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Sample records for hypothermia improves outcome

  1. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  2. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Huang, Zeng; Ye, Sen; Wang, Moli; Fang, Ya; Li, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC) improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32-34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects.

  3. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiefeng; Huang, Zeng; Ye, Sen; Wang, Moli; Fang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC) improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32–34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects. PMID:28097144

  4. Hypothermia improves disease manifestations in SMA mice via SMN augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Ting, Chen-Hung; Chien, Yin-Hsio; Lee, Ni-Chong; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in a mouse model of SMA. SMA mice were exposed to ice for 50 s to achieve transient hypothermia (below 25°C) daily beginning on postnatal day 1. Neonatal SMA mice (Smn(-/-)SMN2(+/-)) who received daily transient hypothermia exhibited reduced motor neuron degeneration and muscle atrophy and preserved the architecture of neuromuscular junction when compared with untreated controls at day 8 post-treatment. Daily hypothermia also prolonged the lifespan, increased body weight and improved motor coordination in SMA mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that transient hypothermia led to an increase in SMN transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord and brain. In in vitro studies using an SMN knockdown motor neuron-like cell-line, transient hypothermia increased intracellular SMN protein expression and length of neurites, confirming the direct effect of hypothermia on motor neurons. These data indicate that the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in improving outcome in an SMA mouse model may be mediated, in part, via an upregulation of SMN levels in the motor neurons.

  5. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    Cold weather can affect your body in different ways. You can get frostbite, which is an injury to the ... Anyone who spends much time outdoors in cold weather can get hypothermia. You can also get it ...

  6. [Hypothermia].

    PubMed

    García Iriarte, Antxon; Sáenz Mendía, Raquel; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    A deep understanding about the causes and situations which predispose a patient to hypothermia can prevent its progression and the emergence of complications which present life-threatening risks and can lead to irreversible organ deterioration. The distinct degrees of hypothermia require a diagnosis and a distinct therapeutic treatment which share common pillars based on: the need to employ general measures which counterarrest the deterioration of those organs caused by heat loss; and the use of internal or external reheating methods which vary due to the degree of hypothermia and the hemodynamic stability of the patient. In moderate or severe cases, a nurse's role, as one who collaborates in patient treatment, requires paying special attention to strict monitoring of vital constants, neurological, metabolic and cardio-respiratory signs, as well as collaborating in various therapeutic procedures. As a nursing diagnosis, hypothermia refers to those situations in which a nurse's professional competence capacitates he/she to carry out actions which resolve that prejudicial situation a patient faces.

  7. Hypothermia and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Polderman, K H

    2008-01-01

    Multi-centred studies in patients who remain comatose after cardiac arrest and also in newborn babies with perinatal asphyxia have clearly demonstrated that mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) can improve neurological outcome after post-anoxic injury. This represents a highly promising development in the field of neurocritical care. This review discusses the place of mild therapeutic hypothermia in the overall therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrest patients. Cooling should not be viewed in isolation but in the context of a 'treatment bundle,' which together can significantly improve outcome after cardiac arrest. Favourable outcomes of 50-60% are now routinely achieved in many centres in patients with witnessed arrest and an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia. These results have been achieved by combining a number of therapeutic strategies, including early and effective resuscitation with greater emphasis on continuing chest compressions throughout various procedures (including resumption of compressions immediately after defibrillation even if rhythm has been restored) as well as prevention of hypoxia and hypotension in all stages following restoration of spontaneous circulation. Regarding the use of hypothermia, early induction and proper management of side-effects are the key elements of successful implementation. Treatment should include the rapid infusion of 1500-3000 mL of cold fluids to induce hypothermia and prevent hypovolaemia and hypotension. Educational activities to increase awareness and acceptance of new therapeutic options and European Resuscitation Council guidelines are urgently required.

  8. Early clinical prediction of neurological outcome following out of hospital cardiac arrest managed with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddeen, Mohammed Ishaq; Ramadoss, Rajaram; Rajajee, V.; Grzeskowiak, Luke E.; Rajagopalan, Ram E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) may improve neurological outcome in comatose patients following out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The reliability of clinical prediction of neurological outcome following TH remains unclear. In particular, there is very limited data on survival and predictors of neurological outcome following TH for OHCA from resource-constrained settings in general and South Asia in specific. Objective: The objective was to identify factors predicting unfavorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge in comatose survivors of OHCA treated with hypothermia. Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Urban 200-bed hospital in Chennai, India. Methods: Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category score [3–5]) at hospital discharge were evaluated among patients admitted between January 2006 and December 2012 following OHCA treated with TH. Hypothermia was induced with cold intravenous saline bolus, ice packs and cold-water spray with bedside fan. Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome were examined through multivariate exact logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 121 patients were included with 106/121 (87%) experiencing the unfavorable neurological outcome. Independent predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome included: Status myoclonus <24 h (odds ratio [OR] 21.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.89-Infinite), absent brainstem reflexes (OR 50.09, 6.55-Infinite), and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 (OR 99.41, 12.21-Infinite). All 3 variables had 100% specificity and positive predictive value. Conclusion: Status myoclonus within 24 h, absence of brainstem reflexes and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 reliably predict unfavorable neurological outcome in comatose patients with OHCA treated with TH. PMID:26195855

  9. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide on outcomes after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hypothermia-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Kotaro; Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Yu, Binglan; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although nitric oxide prevents organ injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion, role of nitric oxide during TH after CPR remains unclear. Here, we examined the impact of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis on the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR. We also examined whether or not inhaled nitric oxide during hypothermia further improves outcomes after CA/CPR in mice treated with TH. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3−/−) were subjected to CA at 37°C and then resuscitated with chest compression. Body temperature was maintained at 37°C (normothermia) or reduced to 33°C (TH) for 24 hours after resuscitation. Mice breathed air or air mixed with nitric oxide at 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 ppm during hypothermia. To evaluate brain injury and cerebral blood flow, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in WT mice after CA/CPR. Results Hypothermia up-regulated the NOS3-dependent signaling in the brain (n=6–7). Deficiency of NOS3 abolished the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR (n=5–6). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 ppm improved survival rate in hypothermia-treated NOS3−/− mice (n=6) after CA/CPR compared to NOS3−/− mice that were treated with hypothermia alone (n=6, P<0.05). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 (n=9) or 60 (n=9) ppm markedly improved survival rates in TH-treated WT mice (n=51) (both P<0.05 vs TH-treated WT mice). Inhaled nitric oxide during TH (n=7) prevented brain injury compared to TH alone (n=7) without affecting cerebral blood flow after CA/CPR (n=6). Conclusions NOS3 is required for the beneficial effects of TH. Inhaled nitric oxide during TH remains beneficial and further improves outcomes after CA/CPR. Nitric oxide breathing exerts protective effects after CA/CPR even when TH is ineffective due to impaired endogenous nitric oxide production

  10. Hypothermia in trauma.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Samuel Edwin

    2013-12-01

    Hypovolaemic shock that results through traumatically inflicted haemorrhage can have disastrous consequences for the victim. Initially the body can compensate for lost circulating volume, but as haemorrhage continues compensatory mechanisms fail and the patient's condition worsens significantly. Hypovolaemia results in the lethal triad, a combination of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, three factors that are interlinked and serve to worsen each other. The lethal triad is a form of vicious cycle, which unless broken will result in death. This report will focus on the role of hypothermia (a third of the lethal triad) in trauma, examining literature to assess how prehospital temperature control can impact on the trauma patient. Spontaneous hypothermia following trauma has severely deleterious consequences for the trauma victim; however, both active warming of patients and clinically induced hypothermia can produce particularly positive results and improve patient outcome. Possible coagulopathic side effects of clinically induced hypothermia may be corrected with topical haemostatic agents, with the benefits of an extended golden hour given by clinically induced hypothermia far outweighing these risks. Active warming of patients, to prevent spontaneous trauma induced hypothermia, is currently the only viable method currently available to improve patient outcome. This method is easy to implement requiring simple protocols and contributes significantly to interrupting the lethal triad. However, the future of trauma care appears to lie with clinically induced therapeutic hypothermia. This new treatment provides optimism that in the future the number of deaths resulting from catastrophic haemorrhaging may be significantly lessened.

  11. Intravenous hydrogen sulfide does not induce hypothermia or improve survival from hemorrhagic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Stezoski, Jason; Wu, Xianren; Bayir, Hülya; Morhard, Ryan C; Stezoski, S William; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2011-01-01

    Several laboratory studies suggested that induced hypothermia during hemorrhagic shock improves survival. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide (H2S) induced hypothermia and decreased metabolism in mice and rats but not in piglets. We tested the hypothesis that i.v. H2S will induce hypothermia, reduce oxygen consumption (VO2), and improve outcome in prolonged hemorrhagic shock in pigs. We also assessed markers of organ injury (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, and troponin) and level of protein thiols to monitor H2S metabolism. In a prospective randomized study, pigs were subjected to volume-controlled hemorrhagic shock with limited fluid resuscitation to maintain MAP 30 mmHg or greater. The study group received infusion of H2S at 5 mg·kg·h; the control group received vehicle (n = 8 per group). Dose was based on the highest tolerated dose in pilot studies. Full resuscitation was initiated after 3 h. There were no differences in survival at 24 h between groups (2/8 in H2S vs. 3/8 in control group). Heart rate increased similarly during hemorrhagic shock in both groups. Cardiac output was better preserved in the delayed phase of hemorrhagic shock in the control group. Temperature and VO2 were similar in both groups during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Markers of organ injury and protein thiols markedly increased in both groups with no differences between groups. In conclusion, we were not able to demonstrate the hypothermia-inducing effect or a reduction in VO2 from H2S infusion in our model of hemorrhagic shock in pigs. Our data mirror those seen in piglets and provide additional evidence of difficulty in translating the hypothermia effect of H2S to large animals in a clinically relevant postinsult paradigm.

  12. [Physiologic effects of hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Eniko; Jenei, Zsigmond; Horváth, Anikó; Gellér, László; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Király, Akos; Molnár, Levente; Sótonyi, Péter; Merkely, Béla; Zima, Endre

    2011-01-30

    Therapeutic use of hypothermia has come to the frontline in the past decade again in the prevention and in mitigation of neurologic impairment. The application of hypothermia is considered as a successful therapeutic measure not just in neuro- or cardiac surgery, but also in states causing brain injury or damage. According to our present knowledge this is the only proven therapeutic tool, which improves the neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, decreasing the oxygen demand of the brain. Besides influencing the nervous system, hypothermia influences the function of the whole organ system. Beside its beneficial effects, it has many side-effects, which may be harmful to the patient. Before using it for a therapeutic purpose, it is very important to be familiar with the physiology and complications of hypothermia, to know, how to prevent and treat its side-effects. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic and pathophysiologic effects of hypothermia.

  13. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates with Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Shimotake, Thomas K.; Glass, Hannah C.

    2015-01-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of HIE and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, eight (5%) had a syndromic disorder, and were cooled as per guidelines for non-syndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute HI injury, 3 subjects died, two survivors had low developmental quotient (DQ 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  14. C5a receptor (CD88) inhibition improves hypothermia-induced neuroprotection in an in vitro ischemic model.

    PubMed

    Thundyil, John; Pavlovski, Dale; Hsieh, Yu-Hsuan; Gelderblom, Mathias; Magnus, Tim; Fairlie, David P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-03-01

    The concept of 'salvageble penumbra' has prompted both scientists and physicians to explore various neuroprotective approaches that could be beneficial during stroke therapy. Unfortunately, most of them have proved ineffective in targeting multiple cellular death cascades incited within the ischemic penumbra. Hypothermia has been shown to be capable of addressing this problem to some extent. Although many studies have shown that hypothermia targets several cellular processes, its effects on innate immune receptor-mediated apoptotic death still remain unclear. Moreover, whether inhibiting the signaling of innate immune receptors like complement anaphylatoxin C5a receptor (CD88) plays a role in this hypothermic neuroprotection still need to be deciphered. Using various types of ischemic insults in different neuronal cells, we confirm that hypothermia does indeed attenuate apoptotic neuronal cell death in vitro and this effect can be further enhanced by pharmacologically blocking or knocking out CD88. Thus, our study raises a promising therapeutic possibility of adding CD88 antagonists along with hypothermia to improve stroke outcomes.

  15. Therapeutic hypothermia and reliability of somatosensory evoked potentials in predicting outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted Laurence

    2012-08-01

    The loss of the N20 component on testing median somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) has been established as the most reliable indicator of unfavorable prognosis in post-cardiopulmonary arrest patients. With the intervention of therapeutic hypothermia in the management of patients who remain comatose following cardiopulmonary arrest that association is now in dispute. Abandoning SSEP as a key prognostic indicator of neurologic outcome would be a serious loss and cannot be justified.

  16. Mild Hypothermia May Offer Some Improvement to Patients with MODS after CPB Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoqi; Gu, Tianxiang; Xiu, Zongyi; Shi, Enyi; Yu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the effect of mild hypothermia on function of the organs in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. METHODS: The patients were randomly divided into two groups, northermia group (n=71) and hypothermia group (n=89). We immediately began cooling the hypothermia group when test results showed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, meanwhile all patients of two groups were drawn blood to test blood gas, liver and kidney function, blood coagulation function, and evaluated the cardiac function using echocardiography from 12 to 36 hours. We compared the difference of intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation rate and mortality within one month after intensive care unit admission. RESULTS: Among the 160 patients, 36 died, 10 (11.24%) patients were from the hypothermia group and 26 (36.6%) from the northermia group (P <0.05). In northermia group, 45 (63.38%) patients used intra-aortic balloon pump and 4 (5.63%), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; in hypothermia group, 35 (39.32%) patients used intra-aortic balloon pump and 2 (2.25%), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation( P <0.05). The patients' heart rate decreased significantly in the hypothermia group. The heart rate of hypothermia group is significantly slower than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05). But the mean arterial pressure of hypothermia group is significantly higher than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05). In hypothermia group, PO2, SvO2 and lactate were improved significantly compared to pre-cooling (P <0.05), and they were significantly better than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05%). Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time have no significantly difference between the two groups (P >0.05). But the platelet count has significantly difference between the two groups at the 36th hour (P <0.05). The aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and creatinine were

  17. Prevention of unplanned perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Paulikas, Cynthia A

    2008-09-01

    Hypothermia is one of the most common complications experienced by surgical patients. Better postoperative patient outcomes are achieved when normothermia is maintained. Perioperative nurses should understand how to maintain normothermia, the causes of hypothermia, and adverse patient outcomes that result from hypothermia. Nursing interventions to help prevent hypothermia can be implemented during each phase of perioperative care.

  18. Delayed combination therapy of local brain hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy on acute stroke outcome in rat

    PubMed Central

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Kahnouei, Mohammadamin Hosseini; Rezazadeh, Hossein; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Mahmoodi, Mohammad Hossein; Moghadam-Ahmadi, Amir; Zarisfi, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy (DC) have been shown to be neuroprotective. This study was designed to evaluate neuroprotective effects of delayed singular or combination of DC and local hypothermia on stroke. Materials and Methods: Cerebral ischemia was induced in 48 Wistar rats assigned to 4 groups: control, decompressive craniectomy (DC), local hypothermia (LH), combination of hypothermia and craniectomy (HC). Infarct size and BBB disruption were measured 48 hr after ischemia insult. Neurological deficits were assessed at 24 and 48 hr after stroke by using sticky tape test, hanging-wire test and Bederson’s scoring system. BBB disruption was measured by Evans blue dye leakage. Results: Although infarct size was significantly reduced in LH, DC and HC groups (P<0.001), combination therapy was more neuroprotective compared to craniectomy alone (P<0.01). BBB disruption was significantly reduced in DC (P< 0.05) and LH and HC (P< 0.01).While sticky tape test (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.001 at 48 hr) and hanging-wire test (P<0.05) showed better behavioral performance only in HC, Bederson test showed improved behavioral functions of both LH (P<0.05 at 24 hr and P<0.01 at 48 hr) and HC animals (P<0.01). Neurological deficits were also decreased in LH (P<0.05) or HC (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.01 at 48 hr) groups compared to the DC group at the same time. Conclusion: Based on our data, although both delayed local hypothermia and craniectomy are protective after stoke, combination therapy of them is more neuroprotective than given alone. PMID:25429337

  19. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  20. A recirculating cooling system for improved topical cardiac hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, F L; Fambiatos, A; Pastoriza-Pinol, J; Stirling, G R

    1981-10-01

    A simple system is described that recirculates cooling fluid for topical cardiac hypothermia. This disposable system can produce a flow of 1,500 ml/min at 2 degrees to 4 degrees C. The recirculating cooler produced significantly lower myocardial temperatures than a conventional fluid-discard system in 22 patients having coronary operation. This system has been used as part of the technique of hypothermic cardioplegia in more than 600 patients. During various cardiac procedures, septal temperatures were maintained well below 20 degrees C for 60 minutes or more without the need to reinfuse the cardioplegic solution.

  1. Serum cortisol concentrations during induced hypothermia for perinatal asphyxia are associated with neurological outcome in human infants.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzo, Rosa T; Giampietri, Matteo; Fiorentini, Erika; Bartalena, Laura; Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Ciampi, Mariella; Boldrini, Antonio; Ghirri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Birth asphyxia is a cause of neonatal death or adverse neurological sequelae. Biomarkers can be useful to clinicians in order to optimize intensive care management and communication of prognosis to parents. During perinatal adverse events, increased cortisol secretion is due to hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. We aimed to investigate if cortisol variations during therapeutic hypothermia are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome. We compared 18 cases (neonates with birth asphyxia) with 18 controls (healthy term newborns) and confirmed increased serum cortisol concentrations following the peri-partum adverse event. Among cases, we stratified patients according to neurological outcome at 18 months (group A - good; group B - adverse) and found that after 24 h of therapeutic hypothermia serum cortisol concentration was significantly lower in group A vs group B (28.7 ng/mL vs 344 ng/mL, *p = 0.01). In group B serum, cortisol concentration decreased more gradually during therapeutic hypothermia. We conclude that monitoring serum cortisol concentration during neonatal therapeutic hypothermia can add information to clinical evaluation of neonates with birth asphyxia; cortisol values after the first 24 h of hypothermia can be a biomarker associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of age.

  2. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  3. State of the Art in Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, hypothermia was induced prior to surgery to enable procedures with prolonged ischemia, such as open heart surgery and organ transplant. Within the past decade, the efficacy of hypothermia to treat emergency cases of ongoing ischemia such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest has been studied. Although the exact role of ischemia/reperfusion is unclear clinically, hypothermia holds significant promise for improving outcomes for patients suffering from reperfusion after ischemia. Research has elucidated two distinct windows of opportunity for clinical use of hypothermia. In the early intra-ischemia window, hypothermia modulates abnormal cellular free radical production, poor calcium management, and poor pH management. In the more delayed post-reperfusion window, hypothermia modulates the downstream necrotic, apoptotic, and inflammatory pathways that cause delayed cell death. Improved cooling and monitoring technologies are required to realize the full potential of this therapy. Herein we discuss the current state of clinical practice, clinical trials, recommendations for cooling, and ongoing research on therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20854174

  4. Clinical Practice Variability in Temperature Correction of Arterial Blood Gas Measurements and Outcomes in Hypothermia-Treated Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Terman, Samuel Waller; Nicholas, Katherine S; Hume, Benjamin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for the postcardiac arrest syndrome may be challenging given changes in solubility of arterial blood gases (ABGs) with cooling. Whether ABG measurements should be temperature corrected (TC) remain unknown. We sought to describe practice variability in TC at a single institution and explored the association between TC and neurological outcome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study reviewing electronic health records of all patients treated with MTH after cardiac arrest. We examined whether the percentage of TC ABGs relative to total number of ABGs drawn for each subject during hypothermia was associated with the neurological outcome at hospital discharge and 6-12-month follow-up. The cerebral performance category of 1-2 was defined as a favorable outcome in the logistic regression models. 1223 ABGs were obtained during MTH on 122 subjects over 6 years. TC was never used in 72 subjects (59%; no TC group), made available in 1-74% of ABGs in 17 subjects (14%; intermediate TC group), and made available in ≥75% of ABGs in 33 subjects (27%; mostly TC group). Groups differed in the proportion of subjects with shockable presenting rhythms (47% vs. 47% vs. 76%, p=0.02) and admitting ICU (p=0.005). Favorable 6-month outcomes were more common in the mostly TC than no TC group (48% vs. 25%; OR [95% CI]: 2.9 [1.2-7.1]), but not after adjustment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.33-6.9). There was substantial practice variability in the temperature correction strategy. Availability of temperature-corrected ABGs was not associated with improved neurological outcomes after adjusting for covariates.

  5. Perioperative hypothermia in NICU infants: its occurrence and impact on infant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, Deborah; Williams, Lisa; Lloyd, Christina; McCoy, Dena S; Miller Walters, Elizabeth; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Baumgart, Stephen; Sill, Anne; Mueller-Burke, Dawn; Short, Billie Lou

    2014-06-01

    Infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require surgical intervention and maintaining normothermia perioperatively is a major concern. In our preliminary study of 31 normothermic infants undergoing operative procedures in the operating room (OR), 58% (N = 18) returned hypothermic while all 5 undergoing procedures in the NICU remained normothermic (P = .001). To describe perioperative thermal instability (temperatures lower than 36.0°C) and frequency of associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests in infants undergoing operative procedures in the OR and the NICU. This prospective, case-control study included 108 infants admitted to the NICU who were sequentially scheduled for an operative procedure in the OR (50.93%; N = 55) or the NICU (49.07%; N = 53). Existing data from the medical record were collected about temperatures and frequency of adverse cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic events, associated support interventions, and diagnostic tests during the perioperative period. Analyses examined the relative risks and proportional differences in rates of hypothermia between the OR group and the NICU group and associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests between hypothermic and normothermic infants. Hypothermia developed in 40% (N = 43) of infants during the perioperative period. The OR group had a higher rate of perioperative hypothermia (65.45%, N = 36; P < .001) and were 7 times more likely to develop perioperative hypothermia (P = .008) than the NICU group (13.21%, N = 7). Likewise, infants in the OR group were 10 times more likely to develop hypothermia during the intra- and postoperative periods than those in the NICU group (P = .001). The hypothermic group had significantly more respiratory adverse events (P = .025), were 6 times more likely to require thermoregulatory interventions (P < .001), 5 times more likely to require cardiac support interventions (P < .006), and 3

  6. [Management of hypothermia -- Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre in Krakow].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Tomasz; Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Jarosz, Anna; Sobczyk, Dorota; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sanak, Tomasz; Hymczak, Hubert; Kapelak, Bogusław; Drwiła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Severe accidental hypothermia is a condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the years 2009–2012 the Polish National Statistics Department reported 1836 deaths due to exposure to excessive natural cold. The Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre (CLHG, Centrum Leczenia Hipotermii Glebokiej) was set up in Krakow in 2013. It is a unit functioning within the structure of the Cardiac Surgery Clinic, established in order to improve the effectiveness of the treatment of patients in the advanced stages of severe hypothermia. Early identification of hypothermia, binding algorithm and coordination leading to extracorporeal rewarming, are the most important elements in the deep hypothermia management.

  7. Hypothermia for severe traumatic brain injury in adults: Recent lessons from randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Shaefi, Shahzad; Mittel, Aaron M.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Boone, M. Dustin; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide health concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, severe TBI is managed according to recommendations set forth in 2007 by the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF), which were based on relatively low quality clinical trials. These guidelines prescribed the use of hypothermia for the management of TBI. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of hypothermia for TBI have since been conducted. Despite this new literature, there is ongoing controversy surrounding the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. Methods: We searched the PubMed database for all RCTs of hypothermia for TBI since 2007 with the intent to review the methodology outcomes of these trials. Furthermore, we aimed to develop evidence-based, expert opinions based on these recent studies. Results: We identified 8 RCTs of therapeutic hypothermia published since 2007 that focused on changes in neurologic outcomes or mortality in patients with severe TBI. The majority of these trials did not identify improvement with the use of hypothermia, though there were subgroups of patients that may have benefited from hypothermia. Differences in methodology prevented direct comparison between studies. Conclusions: A growing body of literature disfavors the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. In general, empiric hypothermia for severe TBI should be avoided. However, based on the results of recent trials, there may be some patients, such as those in Asian centers or with focal neurologic injury, who may benefit from hypothermia. PMID:28168089

  8. Association of serum lactate with outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Novain, Michaël; Cattet, Florian; Plattier, Rémi; Nefzaoui, Mohamed; Hyvernat, Hervé; Raguin, Olivier; Kaidomar, Michel; Kerever, Sébastien; Ichai, Carole

    2017-01-01

    Aims Lactate reflects hypoxic insult in many conditions and is considered as a prognosis factor. But, after cardiac arrest, its interest is still debated. Our study aimed to assess the prognosis value of lactate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective observational study included out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia in four ICUs. Lactate levels were compared at different times during the first 24 hours according to outcome at ICU discharge and to the type of death (multiorgan or neurologic failure). Results Two hundred and seventy-two patients were included, 89 good outcome and 183 poor outcome. In the latter group, 171 patients died, from multiorgan failure in 30% and neurologic failure in 70%. Lactate levels were higher in the poor compared to the good outcome patients at admission (5.4 (3.3–9.4) vs. 2.2 (1.5–3.6) mmol/L; p<0.01), 12 hours (2.5 (1.6–4.7) vs. 1.4 (1.0–2.2) mmol/L; p<0.01) and 24 hours (1.8 (1.1–2.8) vs. 1.3 (0.9–2.1) mmol/L; p<0.01). Patients succumbing from multiorgan failure exhibited higher lactate levels compared to those dying from neurologic failure at admission (7.9 (3.9–12.0) vs. 5.2 (3.3–8.8) mmol/L; p<0.01), H12 (4.9 (2.1–8.9) vs. 2.2 (1.4–3.4) mmol/L; p<0.01) and H24 (3.3 (1.8–5.5) vs. 1.4 (1.1–2.5) mmol/L; p<0.01). Initial lactate levels showed an increasing proportion of poor outcome from the first to fourth quartile. Conclusions After out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia, lactate levels during the first 24 hours seem linked with ICU outcome. Patients dying from multiorgan failure exhibit higher initial lactate concentrations than patients succumbing from neurological failure. PMID:28282398

  9. Impact of presenting rhythm on short- and long-term neurological outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Terman, Samuel W; Hume, Benjamin; Meurer, William J; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare short- and long-term neurological outcomes in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) presenting with non-shockable (nSR) versus shockable (SR) initial rhythms. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting ED and ICU of an academic hospital. Patients One hundred twenty-three consecutive post-OHCA adults (57 nSR, 67 SR) treated with therapeutic hypothermia between 2006 and 2012. Measurements and Main Results Data were collected from electronic health records. Neurological outcomes were dichotomized by Cerebral Performance Category at discharge and 6-12 month follow-up and analyzed via multivariable logistic regressions. Groups were similar, except nSR patients were more likely to have a history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.01), be dialysis-dependent (p = 0.01), and not have bystander CPR (p = 0.05). At discharge, 3/57 (5%) patients with nSR versus 28/66 (42%) with SR had a favorable outcome (unadjusted OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.3; adjusted OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.03-0. 4). At follow-up, 4/55 (7%) versus 29/60 (48%) of patients with nSR and SR respectively had a favorable CPC (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.03-0.3; adjusted OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.09-0.3). Among those surviving hospitalization, neurological outcome was more likely at long-term follow-up than at hospital discharge for both groups (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.7; adjusted 2.9, 1.4-6.2). No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm was seen (p=0.93). Conclusions These data indicate an association between initial nSR and significantly worse short- and long-term outcomes in patients treated with MTH. Among survivors, neurological status significantly improved over time for all patients and SR patients, and tended to improve over time for the small number of nSR patients who survived beyond hospitalization. No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm

  10. Neurologic Injury Associated with Rewarming from Hypothermia: Is Mild Hypothermia on Bypass Better than Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Bhalala, Utpal S.; Appachi, Elumalai; Mumtaz, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many known risk factors for adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes in children with congenital heart defects (CHD) are not modifiable; however, the temperature and blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), are two risk factors, which may be altered in an attempt to improve long-term neurological outcomes. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, traditionally used for aortic arch repair, has been associated with short-term and long-term neurologic sequelae. Therefore, there is a rising interest in using moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral blood flow on CPB during aortic arch repair. Rewarming from moderate-to-deep hypothermia has been shown to be associated with neuronal injury, neuroinflammation, and loss of cerebrovascular autoregulation. A significantly lesser degree of rewarming is required following mild (33–35°C) hypothermia as compared with moderate (28–32°C), deep (21–27°C), and profound (less than 20°C) hypothermia. Therefore, we believe that mild hypothermia is associated with a lower risk of rewarming-induced neurologic injury. We hypothesize that mild hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion during CPB for neonatal aortic arch repair would be associated with improved neurologic outcome. PMID:27734011

  11. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  12. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia does not diminish the vital and necessary role of SSEP in predicting unfavorable outcome in anoxic-ischemic coma.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted L

    2014-11-01

    Rational medical management of patients who remain comatose following cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) due to anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy depends upon the early identification of those with a hopeless prognosis - regardless of how aggressively they are managed. Conversely, it is mandatory that we recognize those patients with the potential to recover in order to institute aggressive therapeutic measures. The bilateral absence of the N20 Cortical Somatosensory Evoked Potential has been identified as the most reliable predictor of an unfavorable prognosis in normothermic patients. Two randomized trials have determined that mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) delivered immediately after CPR improves neurologic outcomes. TH has now become the standard of care in the management of patients with cardio-pulmonary arrest. Eight studies targeting patients who were comatose following CPR, treated with TH, and using SSEP as an outcome predictor are reviewed. There is only one patient treated with TH who appears to have fully recovered following cardiac arrest who was initially found to have bilateral absent cortical potentials. This opinion paper will address whether the criteria that placed reliance upon SSEP to predict unfavorable outcome in post cardio-pulmonary arrest patients after receiving TH, still apply.

  14. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  15. Accidental Hypothermia,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-03

    on risk factors.329,538,539,303,93 Safe experimental investigations of hypothermia in hurman volunteers terminate cooling at 350C. This precludes...clinical experiments and surgically induced hypothermia. 423 a195 ,19 3 13 ,202 ,543 ,19 7 ,84 ,175 ,227 ,10 1,443 yward measured his own esophageal...the periphery and core. L9 For example, hypothermic patients experience major afterdrops when frostbitten extremities are thawed prematurely

  16. Early-Stage Hyperoxia Is Associated with Favorable Neurological Outcomes and Survival after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the Brain Hypothermia Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Motoki; Oda, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Susumu; Kaneda, Kotaro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Dohi, Kenji; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kobata, Hitoshi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-19

    The effects of hyperoxia on the neurological outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are still controversial. We examined whether the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and hyperoxia were associated with neurological outcomes and survival by conducting post-hoc analyses of the Brain Hypothermia (B-HYPO) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial of mild therapeutic hypothermia for severe TBI. The differences in PaO2 and PaO2/fraction of inspiratory oxygen (P/F) ratio on the 1st day of admission were compared between patients with favorable (n = 64) and unfavorable (n = 65) neurological outcomes and between survivors (n = 90) and deceased patients (n = 39). PaO2 and the P/F ratio were significantly greater in patients with favorable outcomes than in patients with unfavorable neurological outcomes (PaO2: 252 ± 122 vs. 202 ± 87 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.008; P/F ratio: 455 ± 171 vs. 389 ± 155, respectively, p = 0.022) and in survivors than in deceased patients (PaO2: 242 ± 117 vs. 193 ± 75 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.005; P/F ratio: 445 ± 171 vs. 370 ± 141, respectively, p = 0.018). Similar tendencies were observed in subgroup analyses in patients with fever control and therapeutic hypothermia, and in patients with an evacuated mass or other lesions (unevacuated lesions). PaO2 was independently associated with survival (odds ratio 1.008, p = 0.037). These results suggested that early-stage hyperoxia might be associated with favorable neurological outcomes and survival following severe TBI.

  17. Handling Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saho, S. Bamba

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on the body's response to hypothermia. Includes activities in which students measure the amount of heat absorbed by a white piece of cloth and a black piece of the same material, use cooperative-learning techniques to design a graphic organizer that explains metabolic responses to cold stress, and study the effect of temperature on…

  18. Predicting outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest in therapeutic hypothermia patients: clinical, electrophysiological and imaging prognosticators.

    PubMed

    Maia, Bruno; Roque, Rafael; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Lourenço, Sónia; Bento, Luís; Alcântara, João

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A determinação do prognóstico em sobreviventes comatosos de paragem cárdio-respiratória baseia-se em evidência adquirida sobretudo antes do advento da hipotermia terapêutica. O nosso objectivo é avaliar a capacidade preditiva de dados clínicos, electrofisiológicos e imagiológicos após a hipotermia terapêutica. Materiais e Métodos: Análise retrospectiva e consecutiva de doentes que foram tratados com hipotermia durante os anos de 2010 e 2011. Foram obtidos dados relativamente ao exame neurológico, potenciais evocados somatossensitivos e auditivos, electroencefalograma e ressonância magnética crânio-encefálica, nas primeiras 72 horas após o evento. O outcome definido foi a escala Glasgow Outcome Scale dicotomizada em mau prognóstico (pontuações 1 e 2) e bom prognóstico (pontuações 3, 4 e 5). Resultados: Estudados no total 26 doentes. Reflexos pupilares, corneanos e oculocefálicos abolidos, ausência de respostas N20 nos potenciais evocados somatossensitivos, estado de mal mioclónico e um padrão ‘maligno’ na electroencefalografia relacionaram-se com mau prognóstico, sem falsos-positivos (p = 0,05). Dois doentes classificados com bom outcome demonstraram respostas motoras ausentes ou em extensão nas primeiras 72 horas, originando uma taxa de falsos-positivos de 25% para este parâmetro (p = 0,008). Ambos requereram sedação até às 72 horas. A presença de isquémia na ressonância não teve relação significativa com o outcome. Discussão: A abolição dos reflexos pupilares, corneanos e oculocefálicos, a ausência de respostas N20 nos potenciais evocados, estado de mal mioclónico e um padrão electroencefalográfico ‘maligno’ mantêm-se parâmetros de mau prognóstico válidos em doentes submetidos a hipotermia terapêutica. Conclusão: A necessidade de sedação nestes doentes pode diminuir a capacidade prognóstica das respostas motoras.

  19. Synergistic neuroprotective therapies with hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cilio, Maria Roberta; Ferriero, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    summary Neuroprotection is a major health care priority, given the enormous burden of human suffering and financial cost caused by perinatal brain damage. With the advent of hypothermia as therapy for term hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy, there is hope for repair and protection of the brain after a profound neonatal insult. However, it is clear from the published clinical trials and animal studies that hypothermia alone will not provide complete protection or stimulate the repair that is necessary for normal neurodevelopmental outcome. This review critically discusses drugs used to treat seizures after hypoxia–ischemia in the neonate with attention to evidence of possible synergies for therapy. In addition, other agents such as xenon, N-acetylcysteine, erythropoietin, melatonin and cannabinoids are discussed as future potential therapeutic agents that might augment protection from hypothermia. Finally, compounds that might damage the developing brain or counteract the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia are discussed. PMID:20207600

  20. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  1. Improving outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Cannon, Jane A; Simpson, Joanne; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare condition with a diverse spectrum of potential outcomes, ranging from frequent complete recovery to fulminant heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of PPCM is not well understood, and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. PPCM is often under-recognised in the clinical setting. Early investigation and diagnosis with subsequent expert management may improve outcomes. The development of registries will allow this condition to be better characterised and may help answer crucial questions regarding its optimal medical and surgical management. This paper reviews the potential approaches to improve outcomes in patients with PPCM.

  2. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  3. Hypothermia: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypothermia is often caused by exposure to cold weather or immersion in a cold body of water. ... Minn. Feb. 25, 2015. Frostbite and hypothermia. National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office. http://www.crh.noaa. ...

  4. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  5. Disease management improves ESRD outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, J J

    2006-02-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence based guidelines and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total health-care costs including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out-of-pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present, current data suggests that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in ESRD.

  6. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  7. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  8. Method for inducing hypothermia

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridar, Alireza; Bershad, Eric M.; Emiru, Tenbit; Iaizzo, Paul A.; Suarez, Jose I.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is considered to improve survival with favorable neurological outcome in the case of global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. The efficacy of hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), however, is not well studied. Induction of TH typically requires a multimodal approach, including the use of both pharmacological agents and physical techniques. To date, clinical outcomes for patients with either AIS or TBI who received TH have yielded conflicting results; thus, no adequate therapeutic consensus has been reached. Nevertheless, it seems that by determining optimal TH parameters and also appropriate applications, cooling therapy still has the potential to become a valuable neuroprotective intervention. Among the various methods for hypothermia induction, intravascular cooling (IVC) may have the most promise in the awake patient in terms of clinical outcomes. Currently, the IVC method has the capability of more rapid target temperature attainment and more precise control of temperature. However, this technique requires expertise in endovascular surgery that can preclude its application in the field and/or in most emergency settings. It is very likely that combining neuroprotective strategies will yield better outcomes than utilizing a single approach. PMID:22207862

  10. Guideline Implementation: Preventing Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-03-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of unplanned patient hypothermia" provides guidance for identifying factors associated with intraoperative hypothermia, preventing hypothermia, educating perioperative personnel on this topic, and developing relevant policies and procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which addresses performing a preoperative assessment for factors that may contribute to hypothermia, measuring and monitoring the patient's temperature in all phases of perioperative care, and implementing interventions to prevent hypothermia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  11. Temperature control during therapeutic hypothermia for newborn encephalopathy using different Blanketrol devices.

    PubMed

    Laptook, Abbot R; Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C ± 1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C ± 1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8% ± 0.1% vs. 95.8% ± 0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia.

  12. MicroRNA-155 potentiates the inflammatory response in hypothermia by suppressing IL-10 production.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Adrian T; Hellmann, Jason; Roberts, Henry; Druen, Devin; Gardner, Sarah A; Sarojini, Harshini; Galandiuk, Susan; Chien, Sufan; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew; Polk, Hiram C

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is commonly used to improve neurological outcomes in patients after cardiac arrest. However, therapeutic hypothermia increases sepsis risk and unintentional hypothermia in surgical patients increases infectious complications. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms by which hypothermia dysregulates innate immunity are incompletely understood. We found that exposure of human monocytes to cold (32°C) potentiated LPS-induced production of TNF and IL-6, while blunting IL-10 production. This dysregulation was associated with increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), which potentiates Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by negatively regulating Ship1 and Socs1. Indeed, Ship1 and Socs1 were suppressed at 32°C and miR-155 antagomirs increased Ship1 and Socs1 and reversed the alterations in cytokine production in cold-exposed monocytes. In contrast, miR-155 mimics phenocopied the effects of cold exposure, reducing Ship1 and Socs1 and altering TNF and IL-10 production. In a murine model of LPS-induced peritonitis, cold exposure potentiated hypothermia and decreased survival (10 vs. 50%; P < 0.05), effects that were associated with increased miR-155, suppression of Ship1 and Socs1, and alterations in TNF and IL-10. Importantly, miR-155-deficiency reduced hypothermia and improved survival (78 vs. 32%, P < 0.05), which was associated with increased Ship1, Socs1, and IL-10. These results establish a causal role of miR-155 in the dysregulation of the inflammatory response to hypothermia.

  13. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy.

  14. Hypothermia for Neuroprotection in Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Legriel, Stephane; Lemiale, Virginie; Schenck, Maleka; Chelly, Jonathan; Laurent, Virginie; Daviaud, Fabrice; Srairi, Mohamed; Hamdi, Aicha; Geri, Guillaume; Rossignol, Thomas; Hilly-Ginoux, Julia; Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Louart, Benjamin; Malissin, Isabelle; Mongardon, Nicolas; Planquette, Benjamin; Thirion, Marina; Merceron, Sybille; Canet, Emmanuel; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Azoulay, Elie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-22

    Background Convulsive status epilepticus often results in permanent neurologic impairment. We evaluated the effect of induced hypothermia on neurologic outcomes in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. Methods In a multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 270 critically ill patients with convulsive status epilepticus who were receiving mechanical ventilation to hypothermia (32 to 34°C for 24 hours) in addition to standard care or to standard care alone; 268 patients were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a good functional outcome at 90 days, defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of 5 (range, 1 to 5, with 1 representing death and 5 representing no or minimal neurologic deficit). The main secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days, progression to electroencephalographically (EEG) confirmed status epilepticus, refractory status epilepticus on day 1, "super-refractory" status epilepticus (resistant to general anesthesia), and functional sequelae on day 90. Results A GOS score of 5 occurred in 67 of 138 patients (49%) in the hypothermia group and in 56 of 130 (43%) in the control group (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.99; P=0.43). The rate of progression to EEG-confirmed status epilepticus on the first day was lower in the hypothermia group than in the control group (11% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.79; P=0.009), but there were no significant differences between groups in the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were more frequent in the hypothermia group than in the control group. Conclusions In this trial, induced hypothermia added to standard care was not associated with significantly better 90-day outcomes than standard care alone in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. (Funded by the French Ministry of Health; HYBERNATUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01359332 .).

  15. Prevention of perioperative hypothermia in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, V Leroy; Watson, Marla E

    2006-01-01

    While inadvertent perioperative hypothermia has received serious attention in many surgical specialties, few discussions of hypothermia have been published in the plastic surgery literature. This article reviews the physiology of thermoregulation, describes how both general and regional anesthesia alter the normal thermoregulatory mechanisms, indicates risk factors particularly associated with hypothermia, and discusses the most effective current methods for maintaining normothermia. Hypothermia is typically defined as a core body temperature of outcomes are reportedly better when a temperature of >/=36.5 degrees C is maintained. Unless preventive measures are instituted, inadvertent hypothermia occurs in 50% to 90% of surgical patients, even those undergoing relatively short procedures lasting one to one-and-a-half hours. During either general or regional anesthesia, a patient's natural behavioral and autonomic responses to cold are unavailable or impaired, and the combination of general and neuraxial anesthesia produces the highest risk for inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Unless hypothermia is prevented, the restoration of normothermia can take more than 4 hours once anesthesia is stopped. Consequences of hypothermia are serious and affect surgical outcomes in plastic surgery patients. Potential complications include morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders and blood loss, increased incidence of surgical wound infection, postoperative shivering, longer hospital stays, and increased costs associated with surgery. Measures for preventing hypothermia are emphasized in this article, especially those proven most effective in prospective and controlled clinical studies. Perhaps the most important step in maintaining normothermia is to prewarm patients in the preoperative area with forced-air heating systems. Intraoperative warming with forced-air and fluid warming are also essential. Other strategies

  16. [Neuroprotection with hypothermia in the newborn with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Standard guidelines for its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Valverde, E; Tenorio, V; Vento, M; Cabañas, F

    2011-11-01

    Standardisation of hypothermia as a treatment for perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is supported by current scientific evidence. The following document was prepared by the authors on request of the Spanish Society of Neonatology and is intended to be a guide for the proper implementation of this therapy. We discuss the difficulties that may arise when moving from the strict framework of clinical trials to clinical daily care: early recognition of clinical encephalopathy, inclusion and exclusion criteria, hypothermia during transport, type of hypothermia (selective head or systemic cooling) and side effects of therapy. The availability of hypothermia therapy has changed the prognosis of children with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and our choices of therapeutic support. In this sense, it is especially important to be aware of the changes in the predictive value of the neurological examination and the electroencephalographic recording in cooled infants. In order to improve neuroprotection with hypothermia we need earlier recognition of to recognise earlier the infants that may benefit from cooling. Biomarkers of brain injury could help us in the selection of these patients. Every single infant treated with hypothermia must be included in a follow up program in order to assess neurodevelopmental outcome.

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  18. In an era of rapid STEMI reperfusion with Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention is there a role for adjunct therapeutic hypothermia? A structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Saunderson, Christopher E D; Chowdhary, Amrit; Brogan, Richard A; Batin, Phillip D; Gale, Christopher P

    2016-11-15

    Mild hypothermia has been shown to improve neurological outcome and reduce mortality following out of hospital cardiac arrest. In animal models the application of hypothermia with induced coronary occlusion has demonstrated a reduction in infarct size. Consequently, hypothermia has been proposed as a treatment, in addition to Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PPCI) for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, there is incomplete understanding of the mechanism and magnitude of the protective effect of hypothermia on the myocardium, and limited outcome data. We undertook a structured literature review of therapeutic hypothermia as adjuvant to PPCI for acute STEMI. We examined the feasibility, safety, impact on infarct size and the resultant effect on major adverse cardiac events and mortality. There were 13 studies between 1946 and 2016. With the exception of one study, therapeutic hypothermia for STEMI was reported to be feasible and safe, and its only demonstrable benefit was a modest reduction in post-infarct heart failure events. Evidence to date, however, is from small clinical trials and in an era of low early mortality following PPCI for STEMI, demonstrating a mortality benefit will be challenging. Post-myocardial infarction left ventricular dysfunction is a more frequent, alternative clinical outcome and therefore any intervention that mitigates this warrants further investigation.

  19. Thermodynamic aspects of therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Vanlandingham, Sean C; Kurz, Michael C; Wang, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an important treatment for post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Despite its widespread practice, only limited data describe the thermodynamic aspects of heat transfer during TH. This paper reviews the principles of human body heat balance and provides a conceptual model for characterizing heat exchange during TH. The model may provide a framework for computer simulation for improving training in or clinical methods of TH.

  20. Reducing the risk of unplanned perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan; Dixon, Jacqueline; Leary, Donna

    2010-11-01

    Maintaining normothermia is important for patient safety, positive surgical outcomes, and increased patient satisfaction. Causes of unplanned hypothermia in the OR include cold room temperatures, the effects of anesthesia, cold IV and irrigation fluids, skin and wound exposure, and patient risk factors. Nurses at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Media, Pennsylvania, performed a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of using warm blankets, warm irrigation fluids, or forced-air warming on perioperative patients to maintain their core temperature during the perioperative experience. Results of the project showed that 75% of patients who received forced-air warming perioperatively had temperatures that reached or were maintained at 36° C (96.8° F) or higher within 15 minutes after leaving the OR.

  1. Effects of perioperative hypothermia and warming in surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil; Wong, Peng Foo; Melling, Andrew Christian; Leaper, David John

    2005-09-01

    Perioperative hypothermia is common and adversely affects clinical outcomes due to its effect on a range of homeostatic functions. Many of these adverse consequences are preventable by the use of warming techniques. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant published articles on perioperative hypothermia and warming. The databases searched include MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005), EMBASE (1974 to February 2005), CINAHL, the Cochrane library and the health technology assessment database. Reference lists of key articles were also searched. The primary beneficial effects of warming are mediated through increased blood flow and oxygen tension at tissue level. Reduction in wound infection, blood loss and perioperative pain with warming is promising. However, more evidence from good-quality prospective randomised controlled trials is needed to evaluate the role of warming in improving overall morbidity, mortality and hospital stay as well as to clarify its role as an adjunct to resuscitation and during the pre-hospital transport phase of critically ill patients. Awareness of the risks of perioperative hypothermia is the key to prevention. Achieving normothermia throughout the patient's journey is a worthwhile goal in surgical patients.

  2. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult.

  3. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R.; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  4. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  5. Patient-centered outcomes research to improve asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anise, Ayodola; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is funding 8 comparative effectiveness research projects to improve patient-centered outcomes for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with uncontrolled asthma. These projects aim to compare multilevel interventions with known efficacy at the community, home, and health system levels to enhance patient and clinician uptake of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines and improve outcomes. The National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines provide clinicians with a range of acceptable approaches for the diagnosis and management of asthma and define general practices that meet the needs of most patients. Yet disparities in asthma care and outcomes remain pervasive for African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute AsthmaNet consortium has identified several top research priorities for pediatric and adult populations, including a recommendation to examine tailored approaches based on race/ethnicity. In addition, the guidelines emphasize the need for studies that focus on multicomponent interventions recognizing that single interventions are generally ineffective. This article will describe the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded asthma projects and how they are individually and collectively addressing evidence gaps in asthma care by focusing on multicomponent and tailored approaches for improving outcomes and reducing disparities for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients.

  6. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  7. A multidisciplinary approach for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sierchio, Grace P

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment has been impacted tremendously by higher patient acuity, cost-cutting measures, an increase in litigation, and increased expectations by an educated generation of healthcare consumers. This has led to the need to continually measure, assess, and improve quality. These activities must consider not only patient clinical outcomes, but also customer service ratings and financial outcomes. Quality improvement requires a collaborative approach to succeed, and the need to build a cohesive and effective multidisciplinary team is critical for positive outcomes. Strategies to build a culture of teamwork include incorporating total quality management principles into every level of the organization, seeking participation from every discipline and level of the organization, and recognizing employees for their efforts. Infusion nurses have an excellent opportunity to contribute their expertise to any multidisciplinary team that impacts the outcomes of infusion patients. In addition, team-building and quality improvement may prove to be excellent career moves for infusion nurses looking to further specialize their practice.

  8. Nursing informatics, outcomes, and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2003-08-01

    Nursing informatics actively supports nursing by providing standard language systems, databases, decision support, readily accessible research results, and technology assessments. Through normalized datasets spanning an entire enterprise or other large demographic, nursing informatics tools support improvement of healthcare by answering questions about patient outcomes and quality improvement on an enterprise scale, and by providing documentation for business process definition, business process engineering, and strategic planning. Nursing informatics tools provide a way for advanced practice nurses to examine their practice and the effect of their actions on patient outcomes. Analysis of patient outcomes may lead to initiatives for quality improvement. Supported by nursing informatics tools, successful advance practice nurses leverage their quality improvement initiatives against the enterprise strategic plan to gain leadership support and resources.

  9. Improving the outcomes in oncological colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Jeroen LA; Reisinger, Kostan W; Derikx, Joep PM; Boerma, Djamila; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    During the last several decades, colorectal cancer surgery has experienced some major perioperative improvements. Preoperative risk-assessment of nutrition, frailty, and sarcopenia followed by interventions for patient optimization or an adapted surgical strategy, contributed to improved postoperative outcomes. Enhanced recovery programs or fast-track surgery also resulted in reduced length of hospital stay and overall complications without affecting patient safety. After an initially indecisive start due to uncertainty about oncological safety, the most significant improvement in intraoperative care was the introduction of laparoscopy. Laparoscopic surgery for colon and rectal cancer is associated with better short-term outcomes, whereas long-term outcomes regarding survival and recurrence rates are comparable. Nevertheless, long-term results in rectal surgery remain to be seen. Early recognition of anastomotic leakage remains a challenge, though multiple improvements have allowed better management of this complication. PMID:25253944

  10. Intraoperative Hypothermia During Surgical Fixation of Hip Fractures.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Jildeh, Toufic R; Shaw, Jonathan; Guthrie, Trent; Silverton, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Hip fractures are common orthopedic injuries and are associated with significant morbidity/mortality. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended by national guidelines to minimize additional morbidity/mortality, but limited evidence exists regarding hypothermia's effect on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in patients with operatively treated hip fractures and evaluate its effect on complications and outcomes. Retrospective chart review was performed on clinical records from 1541 consecutive patients who sustained a hip fracture and underwent operative fixation at the authors' institution between January 2005 and October 2013. A total of 1525 patients were included for analysis, excluding those with injuries requiring additional surgical intervention. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling evaluated associations with hypothermia and effect on complications/outcomes. The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in operatively treated hip fractures was 17.0%. Hypothermia was associated with an increase in the rate of deep surgical-site infection (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-9.14; P=.022). Lower body mass index and increasing age demonstrated increased association with hypothermia (P=.004 and P=.005, respectively). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first and largest study analyzing the effect of intraoperative hypothermia in orthopedic patients. In patients with hip fractures, the study's findings confirm evidence found in other surgical specialties that hypothermia may be associated with an increased risk of deep surgical-site infection and that lower body mass index and increasing age are risk factors

  11. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2016-10-25

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  12. Disaggregated data to improve child health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The District Health Information System was developed in South Africa to collect aggregated routine data from public health facilities. In Amajuba District, KwaZulu-Natal, ward-based data collection has been initiated to facilitate improved responsiveness to community health needs and improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction. Aim To assess the application of the municipal ward-based health data in the decision-making process to improve child health outcomes. Setting The study was conducted in 25 primary health care service sites in Amajuba. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods’ approach was used. The study population comprised operational managers, professional nurses, ward-based outreach team leaders and supervisors. Quantitative data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were collected using focus group discussions and analysed using thematic analysis. Results Of the 131 respondents, 83 (67.5%) provided targeted child interventions to a certain or a large extent to improve child health outcomes, but only 74 (57.4%) respondents reported using municipal ward-based health data to a certain or large extent in order to inform their decisions. This discrepancy indicates poor utilisation of local health information for decision-making. Conclusion The study showed that municipal ward-based health data are not fully utilised for making informed decisions to improve child health outcomes. It is imperative to inculcate a culture of evidence-informed decisions that leads to provision of targeted interventions in order to mitigate the challenge of scarcity of resources and to improve child health outcomes. PMID:28155323

  13. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia via TRPV1 channel agonism provides neuroprotection following ischemic stroke when initiated 90 min after reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Balasubramanian, Adithya; Marrelli, Sean P

    2014-01-15

    Traditional methods of therapeutic hypothermia show promise for neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), however, with limitations. We examined effectiveness and specificity of pharmacological hypothermia (PH) by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonism in the treatment of focal cerebral I/R. Core temperature (T(core)) was measured after subcutaneous infusion of TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) in conscious C57BL/6 WT and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. Acute measurements of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion were measured before and after DHC treatment. Focal cerebral I/R (1 h ischemia + 24 h reperfusion) was induced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Hypothermia (>8 h) was initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion by DHC infusion (osmotic pump). Neurofunction (behavioral testing) and infarct volume (TTC staining) were measured at 24 h. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) produced a stable drop in T(core) (33°C) in naive and I/R mouse models but not in TRPV1 KO mice. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) had no measurable effect on HR and cerebral perfusion but produced a slight transient drop in MAP (<6 mmHg). In stroke mice, DHC infusion produced hypothermia, decreased infarct volume by 87%, and improved neurofunctional score. The hypothermic and neuroprotective effects of DHC were absent in TRPV1 KO mice or mice maintained normothermic with heat support. PH via TRPV1 agonist appears to be a well-tolerated and effective method for promoting mild hypothermia in the conscious mouse. Furthermore, TRPV1 agonism produces effective hypothermia in I/R mice and significantly improves outcome when initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion.

  14. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2009-07-01

    Aesthetic facial reconstruction is a challenging art. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction requires a thorough understanding of the basic principles of the functional and aesthetic requirements for facial reconstruction. From there, further refinement and attention to detail can be provided. This paper discusses basic principles of aesthetic facial reconstruction.

  15. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  16. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Catwalk Gait analysis showed significant improvement in the paclitaxel group on a variety of parameters compared to the saline group. MRI analysis revealed that paclitaxel treatment resulted in significantly reduced edema volume at site-of-injury (11.92 ± 3.0 and 8.86 ± 2.2 mm3 for saline vs. paclitaxel respectively, as determined by T2-weighted analysis; p ≤ 0.05), and significantly increased myelin tissue preservation (9.45 ± 0.4 vs. 8.95 ± 0.3, p ≤ 0.05). Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment resulted in improvement of neurological outcome and MR imaging biomarkers of injury. These results could have a significant impact on therapeutic developments to treat traumatic brain injury. PMID:26086366

  17. Coagulopathy by Hypothermia and Acidosis: Mechanisms of Thrombin Generation and Fibrinogen Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    models in swines are based on concepts and procedures developed previously in other animals, particularly the dog; yet, they are superior to canine...degradation via different mech- anisms. Despite the differential effects, hypothermia and acido - sis lead to a consistent outcome: deficit in...hypothermia and acidoses revisited. J Trauma. 1997;42:857–861; discussion 861–862. 4. Ferrara A, MacArthur JD, Wright HK, Modlin IM, McMillen MA. Hypothermia

  18. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  19. Therapeutic Hypothermia and the Risk of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wang, An-Yi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current guidelines recommend a period of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for comatose patients after cardiac arrest to improve clinical outcomes. However, in-vitro studies have reported platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy, results that might discourage clinicians from applying TH in clinical practice. We aimed to quantify the risks of hemorrhage observed in clinical studies. Medline and Embase were searched from inception to October 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients undergoing TH with controls were selected, irrespective of the indications for TH. There were no restrictions for language, population, or publication year. Data on study characteristics, which included patients, details of intervention, and outcome measures, were extracted. Forty-three trials that included 7528 patients were identified from 2692 potentially relevant references. Any hemorrhage was designated as the primary outcome and was reported in 28 studies. The pooled results showed no significant increase in hemorrhage risk associated with TH (risk difference [RD] 0.005; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.001–0.011; I2, 0%). Among secondary outcomes, patients undergoing TH were found to have increased risk of thrombocytopenia (RD 0.109; 95% CI 0.038–0.179; I2 57.3%) and transfusion requirements (RD 0.021; 95% CI 0.003–0.040; I2 0%). The meta-regression analysis indicated that prolonged duration of cooling may be associated with increased risk of hemorrhage. TH was not associated with increased risk of hemorrhage despite the increased risk of thrombocytopenia and transfusion requirements. Clinicians should cautiously assess each patient's risk-benefit profile before applying TH. PMID:26632746

  20. Will interventions targeting conscientiousness improve aging outcomes?

    PubMed

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-05-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it may be possible to design therapeutic interventions that increase conscientiousness, there may be more effective and efficient ways to improve population health. We ask for evidence that a focus on conscientiousness improves behavior change efforts that target specific health-related behaviors or large-scale environmental modification.

  1. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  2. Nurses' knowledge of inadvertent hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Josephine; Walsh, Ella; Burton, Aileen; Murphy, Sheila; O'gorman, Fionuala; McPolin, Gráinne

    2009-04-01

    Inadvertent hypothermia can have significant consequences in the perioperative setting. Knowing how to recognize and manage inadvertent hypothermia is an important aspect of perioperative nursing. A quantitative, descriptive study was conducted at an annual perioperative nursing conference to evaluate nurses' knowledge regarding the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Significant variations in responses regarding definitions of hypothermia and normothermia were noted. In addition, nurses identified a plethora of factors that prevent them from maintaining normothermia in their patients. These factors mandate a need for educational interventions and the adoption of practice guidelines in the clinical area.

  3. Improving outcomes of acute myocarditis in children.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral myocarditis may impair prognosis in children of all ages. Its true incidence is underestimated because of heterogeneity of presentation and outcome. Patients may either recover or progress to chronic cardiomyopathy or death. Improving short-term and long-term prognosis is challenging but can probably be achieved by new diagnostic techniques and novel targeted therapies. The objectives of this review are: (1) to detail the current state of knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms of acute myocarditis; (2) to provide an update on diagnostic tools such as magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy; and (3) to present new insights in therapeutic strategies, targeted therapies and management of fulminant cases. Options for improving outcomes in acute myocarditis in the pediatric population are discussed.

  4. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  5. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Tegels, Juul J W; De Maat, Michiel F G; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Hoofwijk, Anton G M; Stoot, Jan H M B

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain.

  6. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tegels, Juul JW; De Maat, Michiel FG; Hulsewé, Karel WE; Hoofwijk, Anton GM; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain. PMID:25320507

  7. Use of a nursing checklist to facilitate implementation of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Avery, Kathleen Ryan; O'Brien, Molly; Pierce, Carol Daddio; Gazarian, Priscilla K

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become a widely accepted intervention that is improving neurological outcomes following return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest. This intervention is highly complex but infrequently used, and prompt implementation of the many steps involved, especially achieving the target body temperature, can be difficult. A checklist was introduced to guide nurses in implementing the therapeutic hypothermia protocol during the different phases of the intervention (initiation, maintenance, rewarming, and normothermia) in an intensive care unit. An interprofessional committee began by developing the protocol, a template for an order set, and a shivering algorithm. At first, implementation of the protocol was inconsistent, and a lack of clarity and urgency in managing patients during the different phases of the protocol was apparent. The nursing checklist has provided all of the intensive care nurses with an easy-to-follow reference to facilitate compliance with the required steps in the protocol for therapeutic hypothermia. Observations of practice and feedback from nursing staff in all units confirm the utility of the checklist. Use of the checklist has helped reduce the time from admission to the unit to reaching the target temperature and the time from admission to continuous electroencephalographic monitoring in the cardiac intensive care unit. Evaluation of patients' outcomes as related to compliance with the protocol interventions is ongoing.

  8. Optimal nutrition for improved twin pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Goodnight, William; Newman, Roger

    2009-11-01

    Twin pregnancies contribute a disproportionate degree to perinatal morbidity, partly because of increased risks of low birth weight and prematurity. Although the cause of the morbidity is multifactorial, attention to twin-specific maternal nutrition may be beneficial in achieving optimal fetal growth and birth weight. Achievement of body mass index (BMI)-specific weight gain goals, micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation specific to the physiology of twin gestations, and carbohydrate-controlled diets are recommended for optimal twin growth and pregnancy outcomes. The daily recommended caloric intake for normal-BMI women with twins is 40-45 kcal/kg each day, and iron, folate, calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplementation is recommended beyond a usual prenatal vitamin. Daily supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid and vitamin D should also be considered. Multiple gestation-specific prenatal care settings with a focus on nutritional interventions improve birth weight and length of gestation and should be considered for the care of women carrying multiples. Antepartum lactation consultation can also improve the rate of postpartum breastfeeding in twin pregnancies. Twin gestation-specific nutritional interventions seem effective in improving the outcome of these pregnancies and should be emphasized in the antepartum care of multiple gestations. This review examines the available evidence and offers recommendations for twin pregnancy-specific nutritional interventions.

  9. Systemic barriers to improving vascular access outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J; Ferrell, Lori M; Perry, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is the most frequent cause of hospitalization for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Our system of vascular access care and industry standards developed for historic reasons have resulted in a haphazard approach to access management. The Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative has provided a road map for improving vascular access management. However, despite widespread acceptance, these recommendations are not routinely followed. This is largely the result of inertia coupled with systemic barriers to improving access outcomes. These barriers include lack of funded pre-ESRD care and preoperative imaging, lack of reimbursement for access monitoring, unavailable surgical and interventional suites, erosion of the real value of the composite rate, bundling of additional new services without rate adjustment, poor accountability of surgeons and hospitals, and a reimbursement system that rewards procedures and, in particular, graft and catheter placement. Currently, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is reevaluating the composite rate and its included bundle of services. To provide the best access care with the fewest complications while insuring multidisciplinary involvement and accountability, a realistic appraisal and realignment of incentives must be developed to insure improvement of access care in the United States.

  10. Improving mental health outcomes: achieving equity through quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Poots, Alan J.; Green, Stuart A.; Honeybourne, Emmi; Green, John; Woodcock, Thomas; Barnes, Ruth; Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate equity of patient outcomes in a psychological therapy service, following increased access achieved by a quality improvement (QI) initiative. Design Retrospective service evaluation of health outcomes; data analysed by ANOVA, chi-squared and Statistical Process Control. Setting A psychological therapy service in Westminster, London, UK. Participants People living in the Borough of Westminster, London, attending the service (from either healthcare professional or self-referral) between February 2009 and May 2012. Intervention(s) Social marketing interventions were used to increase referrals, including the promotion of the service through local media and through existing social networks. Main Outcome Measure(s) (i) Severity of depression on entry using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ9). (ii) Changes to severity of depression following treatment (ΔPHQ9). (iii) Changes in attainment of a meaningful improvement in condition assessed by a key performance indicator. Results Patients from areas of high deprivation entered the service with more severe depression (M = 15.47, SD = 6.75), compared with patients from areas of low (M = 13.20, SD = 6.75) and medium (M = 14.44, SD = 6.64) deprivation. Patients in low, medium and high deprivation areas attained similar changes in depression score (ΔPHQ9: M = −6.60, SD = 6.41). Similar proportions of patients achieved the key performance indicator across initiative phase and deprivation categories. Conclusions QI methods improved access to mental health services; this paper finds no evidence for differences in clinical outcomes in patients, regardless of level of deprivation, interpreted as no evidence of inequity in the service with respect to this outcome. PMID:24521701

  11. Improving asthma outcomes in large populations.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Michael; Zeiger, Robert S

    2011-08-01

    This article summarizes our experience using administrative, survey, and telephone information to define asthma severity, impairment, risk, and quality of care in our large Kaiser Permanente population. Our data suggest that the 2-year Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set definition of persistent asthma is a good surrogate for survey-defined persistent asthma, and thus it would be reasonable to direct asthma population management and quality-of-care assessments at patients with Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set-defined persistent asthma for 2 years in a row. For population management, the numbers of short-acting β-agonist (SABA) canisters dispensed and validated tools on mail or telephone surveys have been used to assess asthma impairment. Algorithms based on pharmacy data (SABA canister and oral corticosteroid dispensings and prior emergency hospital care) have been used to assess the risk domain of asthma control. The asthma medication ratio (controllers divided by controllers plus SABAs) has been shown to be related to improved outcomes and is recommended as an asthma quality-of-care marker. It is hoped that outreach to patients and providers based on these indicators will improve asthma outcomes in patients cared for in individual practices, as well as in large health plans.

  12. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  13. The geography of hypothermia in the United States: An analysis of mortality, morbidity, thresholds, and messaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Jeremy M.

    is known concerning heat and cold mortality. A lack of health outcome or health information to develop website information/wind chill alerts was noted. Overall, it was determined that hypothermia is a good metric for assessing cold weather-related vulnerability and that implementing health outcome-based information will help limit the hazards associated with this public health problem.

  14. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union. Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. Methods/design This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35°C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010. Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. Discussion The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It

  15. Multimodel quantitative analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials after cardiac arrest with graded hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Leanne Moon Young; Choudhary, Rishabh; Xiaofeng Jia

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the most prominent causes of morbidity and mortality in adults. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a recommended treatment to improve survival and functional outcome following CA, however, it is unclear what degree of TH is most beneficial. It has been suggested that TH of 33°C provides no survival or outcome benefits over TH of 36°C. Additionally, there is a lack of verified objective quantitative prognostic tools for comatose CA patients under TH. In this study, we calculated three quantitative markers of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) to examine their potential to track recovery in the early period following CA under graded TH. A total of 16 rats were randomly divided among 4 temperature groups (n=4/group): normothermia (N0, 36.5-37.5°C), hypothermia 1 (H1, 30-32°C), hypothermia 2 (H2, 32-34°C) and hypothermia 3 (H3, 34-36°C). All rats underwent a 15min baseline SSEP recording followed by 9min asphyxial-CA, resulting in severe cerebral injury, and immediate temperature management following resuscitation for 6 hours. SSEP recordings were maintained in 15 min intervals from 30min-4hrs after resuscitation. The N10 amplitude, N10 latency and quantitative SSEP phase space area (qSSEP-PSA) were calculated for the early recovery period and normalized to their respective baselines. Functional recovery was determined by the neurological deficit scale (NDS). N10 amplitude was significantly larger in H1, H2 and H3 compared to N0. N10 latency was significantly longer in H1 than all temperature groups and all hypothermia groups had significantly longer latencies than N0. qSSEP-PSA had significantly better recovery in H1 and H2 than N0. Animals with good outcome (72hr NDS>50) had better recovery of all markers. N10 amplitude was significantly correlated with N10 latency and qSSEP-PSA. The results importantly demonstrate that quantified SSEPs have the potential to objectively track recovery following CA with graded TH.

  16. Chronic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F; Hutchinson, M; Bahandeka, S; Moore, R E

    1987-01-01

    Two patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis presented with acute hypothermia and on recovery were found to be chronically hypothermic. Thermoregulatory studies indicated a central, hypothalamic defect which is presumed to be due to a plaque of demyelination. PMID:3612161

  17. Accidental hypothermia in severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Fanny; Mrozek, Ségolène; Geeraerts, Thomas; Fourcade, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Hypothermia, along with acidosis and coagulopathy, is part of the lethal triad that worsen the prognosis of severe trauma patients. While accidental hypothermia is easy to identify by a simple measurement, it is no less pernicious if it is not detected or treated in the initial phase of patient care. It is a multifactorial process and is a factor of mortality in severe trauma cases. The consequences of hypothermia are many: it modifies myocardial contractions and may induce arrhythmias; it contributes to trauma-induced coagulopathy; from an immunological point of view, it diminishes inflammatory response and increases the chance of pneumonia in the patient; it inhibits the elimination of anaesthetic drugs and can complicate the calculation of dosing requirements; and it leads to an over-estimation of coagulation factor activities. This review will detail the pathophysiological consequences of hypothermia, as well as the most recent principle recommendations in dealing with it.

  18. Perioperative Hypothermia: Incidence and Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    1990 Thesis/" Perioperative Hypothermia: Incidence and Prevention CRodney L. Fisher AFIT Student at: Columbia University AFIT/CI/CIA 90-120 AFT/I/I...Civilian Institution Programs DTIC CTELECTE 0 36 UNCLASSIFIFD 4 PERIOPERATIVE HYPOTHERMIA: INCIDENCE AND PREVENTION By Rodney L. Fisher, CAPT., USAF...Availability Codes Avall and/or Dit Special ABSTRACT Perioperative thermal regulation is discussed. A retrospective audit was conducted to identify the

  19. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  20. Environmental hypothermia in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock is safe.

    PubMed

    Iyegha, Uroghupatei P; Greenberg, Joseph J; Mulier, Kristine E; Chipman, Jeffrey; George, Mark; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated survival benefit to induced hypothermia in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhagic shock simulating an associated delay to definitive care. In the current study, we wished to evaluate the effects of environmental hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock with the addition of polytrauma. Sixteen pigs were randomized to normothermic (39°C, n = 7) or hypothermic (34°C, n = 9) groups. The model included instrumentation, chest injury (captive bolt device), hemorrhage to systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ∼50 mmHg, and crush liver injury. Animals received limited fluid resuscitation for a 1-h period with goal SBP of greater than 80 mmHg and ice packs or warming blankets to achieve goal temperatures, followed by full resuscitation with goal SBP of greater than 90 mmHg, adequate urine output, and hemoglobin by protocol for 20 h. Survivors were observed for an additional 24 h with end points including mortality, markers of organ injury, and neurologic function. There were no differences in survival between the groups (mortality = 1/9, hypothermia group vs. 2/7, normothermia group, P = 0.39). Markers of organ injury were elevated in the hypothermia group at 24 h after injury but were identical between groups at the end of the experimental protocol (48 h after injury). There were no noted differences in neurologic function between the two groups. Environmental hypothermia in a model of polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock was not associated with worse outcomes.

  1. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Renu; Joshi, Disha; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2017-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107), subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group. Results Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9), diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28), and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33). At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6) than baseline (10.7). Conclusion Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c, in diabetes. PMID:28243070

  2. Improving maternal nutrition for better pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2015-11-01

    Much has been learned during the past several decades about the role of maternal nutrition in the outcome of pregnancy. While the bulk of the data is derived from animal models, human observations are gradually accumulating. There is need to improve maternal nutrition because of the high neonatal mortality rate especially in developing countries. The author used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors into account when interpreting study findings. Nutrition plays a vital role in reducing some of the health risks associated with pregnancy such as risk of fetal and infant mortality, intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight and premature births, decreased birth defects, cretinism, poor brain development and risk of infection. Adequate nutrition is essential for a woman throughout her life cycle to ensure proper development and prepare the reproductive life of the woman. Pregnant women require varied diets and increased nutrient intake to cope with the extra needs during pregnancy. Use of dietary supplements and fortified foods should be encouraged for pregnant women to ensure adequate supply of nutrients for both mother and foetus. The author concludes that nutrition education should be a core component of Mother and Child Health Clinics and every opportunity should be utilised to give nutrition education on appropriate diets for pregnant women.

  3. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  4. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  5. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  6. Hypothermia for pediatric refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Kristin; Rosen, Max; Buttram, Sandra; Zempel, John; Pineda, Jose; Miller, Barbara; Shoykhet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a life-threatening emergency, demonstrating, by definition, significant pharmacoresistance. We describe five cases of pediatric RSE treated with mild hypothermia. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed of records of children who received hypothermia for RSE at two tertiary-care pediatric hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Key Findings Five children with RSE received mild hypothermia (32–35°C). Hypothermia reduced seizure burden during and after treatment in all cases. Prior to initiation of hypothermia, four children (80%) received pentobarbital infusions to treat RSE, but relapsed after pentobarbital discontinuation. No child relapsed after treatment with hypothermia. One child died after redirection of care. Remaining four children were discharged. Significance This is the largest pediatric case series reporting treatment of RSE with mild hypothermia. Hypothermia decreased seizure burden during and after pediatric RSE and may prevent RSE relapse. PMID:23906244

  7. Inadvertent Perianesthetic Hypothermia in Small Animal Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia is one of the most common complications in anesthesia of dogs and cats. Hypothermia during anesthesia can lead to altered pharmacokinetics of anesthetic and analgesic drugs, dysfunction of organ systems, increased patient susceptibility to infection, reduced wound healing, altered coagulation, hypotension, and delayed recovery. An understanding of the pathophysiology, complications, and techniques to minimize hypothermia during anesthesia can help veterinarians optimize care of patients. This article provides an overview of inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia.

  8. [Prevention of perioperative hypothermia : Implementation of the S3 guideline].

    PubMed

    Horn, E-P; Klar, E; Höcker, J; Bräuer, A; Bein, B; Wulf, H; Torossian, A

    2017-01-09

    To improve perioperative quality and patient safety, the German S3 guideline should be consistently implemented to avoid perioperative hypothermia. Perioperative normothermia is a quality indicator and should be achieved by anesthesiologists and surgeons. To detect hypothermia early during the perioperative process, measuring body temperature should be started 1-2 h preoperatively. Patients should be actively warmed for 20-30 min before starting anesthesia. Prewarming is most effective and should be included in the preoperative process. Patients should be informed about the risks of perioperative hypothermia and members of the perioperative team should be educated. A standard operating procedure (SOP) to avoid hypothermia should be introduced in every operative unit. The incidence of postoperative hypothermia should be evaluated in operative patients every 3-6 months. The goals should be to measure body temperature in >80% of patients undergoing surgery and for >70% to exhibit a core temperature >36 °C at the end of surgery.

  9. Field Management of Accidental Hypothermia during Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Case history number 97: Core rewarming by peritoneal irrigation in accidental hypothermia with cacdiac arrest. Anesth Analg 1966; 56:574-577. 85. Lint-n...Intractable ventricular fibrillation associated with profound accidental hypothermia - Successful treatment with ;irtial cardiopulmonary bypass . N Engl...5 B. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HYPOTHERMIC DIVER ................ 6 C. FIELD TREATMENT OF HYPOTHERMIA. A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 9 D

  10. Hypothermia Presenting in Wernicke Encephalopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Hyun; Oh, Ju Sun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Oh, Jae Ho

    2017-02-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neurologic disorder characterized by clinical symptoms, such as nystagmus, ataxia, and mental confusion. Hypothermia in patients with WE is a rare complication, and its pathogenic mechanism and therapy are yet to be ascertained. Herein, we presented a case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with WE 3 months earlier. We investigated the cause of hypothermia (35.0℃) that occurred after an enema (bowel emptying). Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed mammillary body and hypothalamus atrophy. In the autonomic function test, the sympathetic skin response (SSR) test did not evoke SSR latencies on both hands. In addition, abnormal orthostatic hypotension was observed. Laxative and stool softener medication were administered, and his diet was modified, which led to an improvement in constipation after 2 weeks. Moreover, there was no recurrence of hypothermic episode. This is the first reported case of late-onset hypothermia secondary to WE.

  11. Hypothermia Presenting in Wernicke Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neurologic disorder characterized by clinical symptoms, such as nystagmus, ataxia, and mental confusion. Hypothermia in patients with WE is a rare complication, and its pathogenic mechanism and therapy are yet to be ascertained. Herein, we presented a case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with WE 3 months earlier. We investigated the cause of hypothermia (35.0℃) that occurred after an enema (bowel emptying). Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed mammillary body and hypothalamus atrophy. In the autonomic function test, the sympathetic skin response (SSR) test did not evoke SSR latencies on both hands. In addition, abnormal orthostatic hypotension was observed. Laxative and stool softener medication were administered, and his diet was modified, which led to an improvement in constipation after 2 weeks. Moreover, there was no recurrence of hypothermic episode. This is the first reported case of late-onset hypothermia secondary to WE. PMID:28289649

  12. Hypothermia-related deaths--Wisconsin, 2014, and United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Meiman, Jon; Anderson, Henry; Tomasallo, Carrie

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia is defined as a core body temperature of <95°F (<35°C) and is caused by environmental exposure, drug intoxication, or metabolic or nervous system dysfunction. Exposure to cold is a leading cause of weather-related mortality and is responsible for approximately twice the number of deaths annually as exposure to heat in the United States. To understand the risk factors for hypothermia-related death and improve prevention efforts, during January 1-April 30, 2014, a period of record low temperatures, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health began active surveillance for hypothermia. Suspected hypothermia-related deaths were reported by coroners or medical examiners and identified in death records. Hypothermia was confirmed as the cause of death by review of death investigation narratives. This report describes three selected cases of hypothermia-related deaths in Wisconsin and summarizes characteristics of all cases that occurred in the state during the period of active surveillance. A summary of hypothermia-related deaths for the United States during 2003-2013 also is presented for comparison and to assess national mortality trends. Hypothermia continues to be an important cause of weather-related death. Key risk factors include drug intoxication, mental illness, and social isolation. State and local health agencies might need to focus outreach on vulnerable populations and target interventions for groups at highest risk for death.

  13. A recommended early goal-directed management guideline for the prevention of hypothermia-related transfusion, morbidity, and mortality in severely injured trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Ryan; Callum, Jeannie; Laflamme, Claude; Tien, Homer; Nascimento, Barto; Beckett, Andrew; Alam, Asim

    2016-04-20

    Hypothermia is present in up to two-thirds of patients with severe injury, although it is often disregarded during the initial resuscitation. Studies have revealed that hypothermia is associated with mortality in a large percentage of trauma cases when the patient's temperature is below 32 °C. Risk factors include the severity of injury, wet clothing, low transport unit temperature, use of anesthesia, and prolonged surgery. Fortunately, associated coagulation disorders have been shown to completely resolve with aggressive warming. Selected passive and active warming techniques can be applied in damage control resuscitation. While treatment guidelines exist for acidosis and bleeding, there is no evidence-based approach to managing hypothermia in trauma patients. We synthesized a goal-directed algorithm for warming the severely injured patient that can be directly incorporated into current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. This involves the early use of warming blankets and removal of wet clothing in the prehospital phase followed by aggressive rewarming on arrival at the hospital if the patient's injuries require damage control therapy. Future research in hypothermia management should concentrate on applying this treatment algorithm and should evaluate its influence on patient outcomes. This treatment strategy may help to reduce blood loss and improve morbidity and mortality in this population of patients.

  14. The Role of Posttraumatic Hypothermia in Preventing Dendrite Degeneration and Spine Loss after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan-fang; Zhao, Cheng-cheng; Jiang, Gan; Gu, Xiao; Feng, Jun-feng; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hypothermia prevents cell death and promotes functional outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known regarding the effect of hypothermia on dendrite degeneration and spine loss after severe TBI. In the present study, we used thy1-GFP transgenic mice to investigate the effect of hypothermia on the dendrites and spines in layer V/VI of the ipsilateral cortex after severe TBI. We found that hypothermia (33 °C) dramatically prevented dendrite degeneration and spine loss 1 and 7 days after CCI. The Morris water maze test revealed that hypothermia preserved the learning and memory functions of mice after CCI. Hypothermia significantly increased the expression of the synaptic proteins GluR1 and PSD-95 at 1 and 7 days after CCI in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus compared with that of the normothermia TBI group. Hypothermia also increased cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels. These results suggest that posttraumatic hypothermia is an effective method to prevent dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserve learning and memory function after severe TBI. Increasing cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels might be the mechanism through which hypothermia prevents dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserves learning and memory function. PMID:27833158

  15. Warming infusion improves perioperative outcomes of elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Lai, Bingjie; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Xinyu; Cui, Yunfeng; Sun, Qianchuang; Liu, Wenhua; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lv, Hui; Han, Hongyu; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This prospective, randomized, and controlled study was performed to determine the benefits of prewarmed infusion in elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement. Methods: Between September 2015 and April 2016, elderly patients who underwent bilateral hips replacement that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. After inclusion, patients were randomized into one of the study groups: in the control group, patients received an infusion of fluid kept at room temperature (22–23°C); in the warming infusion group, patients received an infusion of fluid warmed using an infusion fluid heating apparatus (35°C). Postoperative outcomes, including recovery time, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and postoperative complications rate of patients from both groups, were compared. Results: A total of 64 patients were included in our study (71.2 ± 7.6 years, 53.1% males), with 32 patients in the control group and 32 patients in warming infusion group. No significant difference was found in terms of demographic data and intraoperative blood transfusion rate between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Patients receiving a prewarmed infusion had a significantly shorter time to spontaneous breath, eye opening, consciousness recovery, and extubation than the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, significant differences were found in Steward score and VAS score between 2 groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, warming infusion group also showed an obviously decreased incidence of shivering and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A prewarmed infusion could reduce the incidence of perioperative hypothermia and improve outcomes in the elderly during bilateral hip replacement. PMID:28353593

  16. Improving learning outcomes: integration of standardized patients & telemedicine technology.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Diane C; Guthrie, John T; Adamo, Graceanne

    2004-01-01

    Innovative use of standardized patients (SPs) in a telemedicine environment can improve learning outcomes and clinical competencies. This randomized, cross-over study examined the relationship of technology-based strategies and the improvement of knowledge outcomes and competencies. Results showed that the innovative use of SPs and telemedicine, compared to a traditional distance learning teaching methodology, significantly improved learning outcomes. In addition, there was a significant increase in performance motivation and an interesting decrease in student satisfaction that may be linked to the pressure of performance-based learning. This article addresses knowledge improvement only.

  17. [Pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Jakub

    2006-06-01

    The paper is a review of pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia. The advanced methods of rewarming, such as passive and active: external and core used in clinic allow for efficient management ant prophylactics of hypothermia. Thermotherapy with use of infrared ceiling heaters CTS and mobile MTC as well as Infutherm system applying by authors are desirable and even indispensable in contemporary equipment of surgery clinics, cardiovascular surgery clinics and burn centers. The ideal rewarming method should be safe and enable fast, reliable and predictable warming or rewarming. The clinical parameter to determine the efficacy of rewarming is the change of core temperature. There is no doubt that active warming with forced-air warmers (Warm Touch 5700 and Bair Hugger 500) or radiative heaters (IR-A:Hydrosun 500, IR-C radiation: CTC X, MTC) is more effective than use of standard, passive insulation hospital blankets or convectional heaters. Actually the forced-air warmers are counted to be more useful in cardiovascular surgery hypothermia management, because of fast rate core temperature rise and faster rise in mean skin temperature compared to the control group. CTC X and MTC Aragona radiative heaters are useful in burn management being the most effective when the distance of heater from the patient body is less than 80 cm. The observation of 60 consecutive extensive burns leads to conclusion that long-lasting dressings in burn patients when the whole body is not covered and protected, can be performed safely only in conditions excluding heat losses and core temperature drop. While the cold intravenous fluids may significantly contribute to the temperature drop depending on the volume infused, the use of fluids warming systems as well as external heat application is absolutely indicated to improve the heat balance of the patient body.

  18. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  19. Improving STEM Student Learning Outcomes with GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal data collection initiated a decade ago as part of a successful NSF-CCLI grant proposal has resulted in a large - and growing - sample (200+) of students who report on their perceptions of self-improvement in Technology, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning proficiencies upon completion of an introductory (200-level) GIS course at New Jersey City University, a Hispanic-Serving and Minority Institution in Jersey City, NJ. Results from student satisfaction surveys indicate that, not surprisingly, 80% of respondents report improved confidence in Technology Literacy. Critical Thinking proficiency is judged to be significantly improved by 60% of respondents. On the other hand, Quantitative Reasoning proficiency confidence is improved in only 30% of students. This latter finding has prompted the instructor to search for more easily recognizable (to the student) ways of embedding quantitative reasoning into the course, as it is obvious to any GIS professional that there is an enormous amount of quantitative reasoning associated with this technology. A second post-course questionnaire asks students to rate themselves in these STEM proficiency areas using rubrics. Results mirror those from the self-satisfaction surveys. On a 5-point Likkert scale, students tend to see themselves improving about one letter grade on average in each proficiency area. The self-evaluation rubrics are reviewed by the instructor and are judged to be accurate for about 75% of the respondents.

  20. Improving Learning Outcome Using Six Sigma Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetteh, Godson A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to apply the Six Sigma methodology to identify the attributes of a lecturer that will help improve a student's prior knowledge of a discipline from an initial "x" per cent knowledge to a higher "y" per cent of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The data collection method…

  1. Effects of hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on recovery of neurological function in rats with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONG; ZHANG, JIANJUN

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment of the injured spinal cord is hypothesized to be involved in driving the differentiation and survival of engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs). Hypothermia is known to improve the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord in a number of ways. To investigate the effect of NSC transplantation in combination with hypothermia on the recovery of rat spinal cord injury, 60 Sprague-Dawley female rats were used to establish a spinal cord hemisection model. They were divided randomly into three groups: A, spinal cord injury group; B, NSC transplantation group; and C, NSC transplantation + hypothermia group. At 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-injury, the motor function of all animals was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie and Besnaham locomotor scoring system and the inclined plane test. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were performed. At 8 weeks post-transplantation, horseradish peroxidase nerve tracing and transmission electron microscopy were conducted to observe axonal regeneration. The outcome of hind limb motor function recovery in group C significantly surpassed that in group B at 4 weeks post-injury (P<0.05). Recovery was also observed in group A, but to a lesser degree. For the pathological sections no neural axonal were observed in group A. A few axon-like structures were observed in group B and more in group C. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled neurofibers and bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells were observed in the spinal cords of group C. Fewer of these cells were found in group B and fewer still in group A. The differences among the three groups were significant (P<0.05). Using transmission electron microscopy, newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were observed in the central transverse plane in groups B and C, although these nerve fibers were not evident in group A. In conclusion, NSC transplantation promoted the recovery of hind limb function in rats, and combination treatment with

  2. Evaluating outcomes of care and targeting quality improvement using Medicare health outcomes survey data.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sonya E

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provides a rich source of outcomes data on the Medicare Advantage (MA) program for the US Department of Health and Human Services, managed care organizations participating in Medicare, quality improvement organizations, and health services researchers working to improve quality of care for Medicare enrollees. Since 1998, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has collected longitudinal functional status information to assess the performance of Medicare managed care organizations. This introduction reviews the goals of the HOS program, how the HOS supports health care reform, and outlines recent HOS studies exploring data applications for monitoring outcomes and implementing quality improvement activities.

  3. Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Carroll, Mary V.; McNamara, Megan; Klem, Mary Lou; King, Brandy; Rich, Michael O.; Chan, Chun W.; Nayak, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Context Video games represent a multibillion-dollar industry in the U.S. Although video gaming has been associated with many negative health consequences, it may also be useful for therapeutic purposes. The goal of this study was to determine whether video games may be useful in improving health outcomes. Evidence acquisition Literature searches were performed in February 2010 in six databases: the Center on Media and Child Health Database of Research, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reference lists were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Only RCTs that tested the effect of video games on a positive, clinically relevant health consequence were included. Study selection criteria were strictly defined and applied by two researchers working independently. Study background information (e.g., location, funding source), sample data (e.g., number of study participants, demographics), intervention and control details, outcomes data, and quality measures were abstracted independently by two researchers. Evidence synthesis Of 1452 articles retrieved using the current search strategy, 38 met all criteria for inclusion. Eligible studies used video games to provide physical therapy, psychological therapy, improved disease self-management, health education, distraction from discomfort, increased physical activity, and skills training for clinicians. Among the 38 studies, a total of 195 health outcomes were examined. Video games improved 69% of psychological therapy outcomes, 59% of physical therapy outcomes, 50% of physical activity outcomes, 46% of clinician skills outcomes, 42% of health education outcomes, 42% of pain distraction outcomes, and 37% of disease self-management outcomes. Study quality was generally poor; for example, two thirds (66%) of studies had follow-up periods of <12 weeks, and only 11% of studies blinded researchers. Conclusions There is potential promise for video games to improve

  4. Practicability of avoiding hypothermia in resuscitation room phase in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K O; Jensen, J M; Sprengel, K

    2015-05-01

    Hypothermia in severely injured patients is a high demanding situation resulting from an effect of injury severity, surrounding temperature at trauma site and admittance. This article reviews the possible options to combat hypothermia in the resuscitation room with respect to practicability. This review summarizes available passive and active re-warming techniques and trys to offer a practicable chronology to restore normothermia. Resources should be applied depending on the availability of each institution and manifestation of hypothermia, but there is a strong demand for improvements with respect to practicability, convenience and safety for the patient.

  5. Preventing Unplanned Perioperative Hypothermia in Children.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Susan E; Phillips, Amy; Wiggins, Shirley; Struwe, Leeza

    2017-02-01

    Unplanned perioperative hypothermia is a common surgical risk. Unplanned hypothermia is defined as a body temperature below 36° C (96.8° F) during any phase of the perioperative period. Perioperative nurses at a Midwestern tertiary pediatric hospital developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) designed to maintain normothermia for the pediatric surgical population. This CPG outlined standard thermoregulation nursing interventions and required the consistent use of a temporal artery thermometer. A test of this CPG before full implementation established a baseline incidence of unplanned hypothermia at 16.3% (n = 80). The purpose of this study was to measure the rate of perioperative hypothermia in children after implementing the evidence-based CPG. The study results demonstrated that the CPG, guiding research-based nursing practice, consistently prevented unplanned hypothermia. The incidence rate of unplanned perioperative hypothermia after CPG implementation was 1.84% (n = 1,196).

  6. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  7. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  8. Continuous quality improvement: an effective strategy for improvement of program outcomes in a higher education setting.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer Field; Marshall, Bennie L

    2008-01-01

    The nursing department at a historically black university has implemented a continuous quality improvement approach to improve its program outcomes. A quality enhancement plan was designed with three major goals: to increase NCLEX-RN pass rates, to improve student advisement processes, and to increase student satisfaction. The strategies implemented to meet these outcomes are described and evaluated.

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia Protocol in a Community Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kulstad, Christine E.; Holt, Shannon C.; Abrahamsen, Aaron A.; Lovell, Elise O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients resuscitated after out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT). We evaluated the effects of using a TH protocol in a large community hospital emergency department (ED) for all patients with neurological impairment after resuscitated OHCA regardless of presenting rhythm. We hypothesized improved mortality and neurological outcomes without increased complication rates. Methods: Our TH protocol entails cooling to 33°C for 24 hours with an endovascular catheter. We studied patients treated with this protocol from November 2006 to November 2008. All non-pregnant, unresponsive adult patients resuscitated from any initial rhythm were included. Exclusion criteria were initial hypotension or temperature less than 30°C, trauma, primary intracranial event, and coagulopathy. Control patients treated during the 12 months before the institution of our TH protocol met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria. We recorded survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, and rates of bleeding, sepsis, pneumonia, renal failure, and dysrhythmias in the first 72 hours of treatment. Results: Mortality rates were 71.1% (95% CI, 56–86%) for 38 patients treated with TH and 72.3% (95% CI 59–86%) for 47 controls. In the TH group, 8% of patients (95% CI, 0–17%) had a good neurological outcome on discharge, compared to 0 (95% CI 0–8%) in the control group. In 17 patients with VF/VT treated with TH, mortality was 47% (95% CI 21–74%) and 18% (95% CI 0–38%) had good neurological outcome; in 9 control patients with VF/VT, mortality was 67% (95% CI 28–100%), and 0% (95% CI 0–30%) had good neurological outcome. The groups were well-matched with respect to sex and age. Complication rates were similar or favored the TH group. Conclusion: Instituting a TH protocol for OHCA patients with any

  10. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  11. History and current use of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Alan, David; Vejvoda, Jiri; Honek, Jakub; Veselka, Josef

    2016-01-01

    In spite of many years of development and implementation of pre-hospital advanced life support programmes, the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) used to be very poor. Neurologic injury from cerebral hypoxia is the most common cause of death in patients with OHCA. In the past two decades, post-resuscitation care has developed many new concepts aimed at improving the neurological outcome and survival rate of patients after cardiac arrest. Systematic post-cardiac arrest care after the return of spontaneous circulation, including induced mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in selected patients, is aimed at significantly improving rates of long-term neurologically intact survival. This review summarises the history and current knowledge in the field of mild TH after OHCA. PMID:27695505

  12. Prevention and Management of Neonatal Hypothermia in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Marsh, David R.; Kafwanda, Sarah Ngolofwana; Musso, Austen; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for newborn survival. The World Health Organization recommends maintaining a warm chain and skin-to-skin care for thermoprotection of newborn children. Since little is known about practices related to newborn hypothermia in rural Africa, this study's goal was to characterize relevant practices, attitudes, and beliefs in rural Zambia. Methods and Findings We conducted 14 focus group discussions with mothers and grandmothers and 31 in-depth interviews with community leaders and health officers in Lufwanyama District, a rural area in the Copperbelt Province, Zambia, enrolling a total of 171 participants. We analyzed data using domain analysis. In rural Lufwanyama, community members were aware of the danger of neonatal hypothermia. Caregivers' and health workers' knowledge of thermoprotective practices included birthplace warming, drying and wrapping of the newborn, delayed bathing, and immediate and exclusive breastfeeding. However, this warm chain was not consistently maintained in the first hours postpartum, when newborns are at greatest risk. Skin-to-skin care was not practiced in the study area. Having to assume household and agricultural labor responsibilities in the immediate postnatal period was a challenge for mothers to provide continuous thermal care to their newborns. Conclusions Understanding and addressing community-based practices on hypothermia prevention and management might help improve newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Possible interventions include the implementation of skin-to-skin care in rural areas and the use of appropriate, low-cost newborn warmers to prevent hypothermia and support families in their provision of newborn thermal protection. Training family members to support mothers in the provision of thermoprotection for their newborns could facilitate these practices. PMID:24714630

  13. ATP induces mild hypothermia in rats but has a strikingly detrimental impact on focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijuan; Li, Wenjin; Niu, Guangming; Leak, Rehana K; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating condition lacking effective therapies. A promising approach to attenuate ischemic injury is mild hypothermia. Recent studies show that adenosine nucleotides can induce hypothermia in mice. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) induces mild hypothermia in rats and reduces ischemic brain injury. We found that intraperitoneal injections of ATP decreased core body temperature in a dose-dependent manner; the dose appropriate for mild hypothermia was 2 g/kg. When ATP-induced hypothermia was applied to stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, however, a neuroprotective effect was not observed. Instead, the infarct volume grew even larger in ATP-treated rats. This was accompanied by an increased rate of seizure events, hemorrhagic transformation, and higher mortality. Continuous monitoring of physiologic parameters revealed that ATP reduced heartbeat rate and blood pressure. ATP also increased blood glucose, accompanied by severe acidosis and hypocalcemia. Western blotting showed that ATP decreased levels of both phospho-Akt and total-Akt in the cortex. Our results reveal that, despite inducing hypothermia, ATP is not appropriate for protecting the brain against stroke. Instead, we show for the first time that ATP treatment is associated with exaggerated ischemic outcomes and dangerous systemic side effects.

  14. Improving staff performance through clinician application of outcome management.

    PubMed

    Reid, Dennis H; Parsons, Marsha B; Lattimore, L Perry; Towery, Donna L; Reade, Kamara K

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance) to improve, developing and implementing a performance monitoring system, training staff in the targeted performances using performance- and competency-based training, and providing on-the-job supportive and corrective feedback. In Study 1, a senior job coach was assisted in using the outcome management steps to improve prompting procedures of three staff job coaches working with supported workers with autism in a community job. Correct prompting improved for all three job coaches following implementation of the outcome management process by the senior job coach. In Study 2, two teachers in two adult education classrooms were assisted in using the process to improve the degree to which their assistants involved students with severe disabilities in meal-preparation activities. Student participation in the activities increased in both classrooms when the teachers implemented the outcome management steps. In both studies, improved performances maintained for at least a 14-week period. Results are discussed in regard to working with supervisors as representing one step in promoting the adoption of research-based supervisory strategies within human service organizations.

  15. Improving Care Delivery and Outcomes in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Julia G.; Bingham, Catherine A.; Morgan, Esi M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight efforts in pediatric rheumatology related to optimizing the care provided to patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases and describe various approaches to improve health outcomes. Recent findings Recent studies report low rates of remission, frequent occurrence of comorbidities, disease damage, and decreased health-related quality of life in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Pediatric Rheumatology Care and Outcomes Improvement Network is a quality improvement learning network that has demonstrated improvement in process of care measures through use of a centralized patient registry, and interventions including pre-visit planning, population management, shared decision making, and patient/parent engagement. A pediatric rheumatology patient-powered research network was established to enable patient and caregiver participation in setting research priorities and to facilitate data sharing to answer research questions. Quality measure development and benchmarking is proceeding in multiple pediatric rheumatic diseases. Summary This review summarizes the current efforts to improve care delivery and outcomes in pediatric rheumatic diseases through a learning health system approach that harnesses knowledge from the clinical encounter to serve quality improvement, research and discovery. Incorporating standard approaches to medication treatment plans may reduce variation in care. Including the patient voice to design of research studies brings focus on more patient relevant outcomes. (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1). PMID:26780426

  16. Therapeutic Hypothermia: What's Hot about Cold.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Reducing body temperature to 33 °C in patients who have been resuscitated from cardiac arrest but who remain comatose can ameliorate anoxic encephalopathy and improve recovery. Experimental animal studies have suggested that cooling to 33 °C also aids the resuscitative process itself, facilitating the resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The mechanism of cooling benefit is probably the reduction of metabolic demand of most organs, and reduced production of toxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species. External cooling by application of ice or pads through which cold water circulates is effective but requires up to 8 hours to achieve the target temperature of 33 °C. Our goal was to develop a faster method of cooling that could be initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In anesthetized swine, we induced ventricular fibrillation by passing alternating current down an electrode catheter in the right ventricle. We then ventilated the animals' lungs with liquid perfluorocarbons (PFCs), a technique known as total liquid ventilation (TLV). Perfluorocarbons are oxygen-carrying modules; we pre-oxygenated the PFCs by bubbling 100% O(2) through the solution for 2 minutes before use, and pre-cooled the PFCs to -15 °C. The cold oxygenated PFCs reduced pulmonary artery temperature (a surrogate for myocardial temperature) to 33 °C in about 6 minutes. Using this technique we achieved ROSC in 8 of 11 (82%) animals given TLV versus 3 of 11 (27%) control animals receiving conventional CPR without PFCs (P<0.05). We also compared the cold TLV technique with the administration of intravenous iced saline to achieve hypothermia. Both the cold TLV and cold saline techniques produced rapid hypothermia, but we could achieve ROSC in only 2 of 8 (25%) animals given cold saline versus 7 of 8 (88%) given cold TLV. This result is likely due to the rise in right atrial pressure and corresponding reduction in coronary perfusion pressure caused by volume loading with IV saline

  17. Germany's Disease Management Program: Improving Outcomes in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design. PMID:17288080

  18. Germany's disease management program: improving outcomes in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design.

  19. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  20. Brain injury following trial of hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Barnes, Patrick D; Hintz, Susan R; Laptook, Abbott R; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M; McDonald, Scott A; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Walsh, Michele C; Tyson, Jon E; Donovan, Edward F; Goldberg, Ronald N; Bara, Rebecca; Das, Abhik; Finer, Neil N; Sanchez, Pablo J; Poindexter, Brenda B; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Carlo, Waldemar A; Stoll, Barbara J; Duara, Shahnaz; Guillet, Ronnie; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to examine the relationship between brain injury and outcome following neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Design and patients Neonatal MRI scans were evaluated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) randomised controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia and each infant was categorised based upon the pattern of brain injury on the MRI findings. Brain injury patterns were assessed as a marker of death or disability at 18–22 months of age. Results Scans were obtained on 136 of 208 trial participants (65%); 73 in the hypothermia and 63 in the control group. Normal scans were noted in 38 of 73 infants (52%) in the hypothermia group and 22 of 63 infants (35%) in the control group. Infants in the hypothermia group had fewer areas of infarction (12%) compared to infants in the control group (22%). Fifty-one of the 136 infants died or had moderate or severe disability at 18 months. The brain injury pattern correlated with outcome of death or disability and with disability among survivors. Each point increase in the severity of the pattern of brain injury was independently associated with a twofold increase in the odds of death or disability. Conclusions Fewer areas of infarction and a trend towards more normal scans were noted in brain MRI following whole-body hypothermia. Presence of the NICHD pattern of brain injury is a marker of death or moderate or severe disability at 18–22 months following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:23080477

  1. Improving Staff Performance through Clinician Application of Outcome Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.; Lattimore, L. Perry; Towery, Donna L.; Reade, Kamara K.

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance)…

  2. Factors at scene and in transfer related to the development of hypothermia in major burns

    PubMed Central

    Steele, J.E.; Atkins, J.L.; Vizcaychipi, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is a paucity of evidence regarding incidence and causes of hypothermia in patients with major burns and its impact on outcomes. This paper identifies contributing factors to hypothermia and its relationship with the severity of physiological scoring systems on admission to a tertiary centre. Patients with burns >20% TBSA admitted between March 2010 and July 2013 comprised this retrospective survey. Data relating to causative factors at time of burn, during transfer, physiological outcome scores (BOBI, SOFA, RTS and APACHE II), length of hospital stay and mortality were collected. SPSS statistical software was used for analysis. The study included 31 patients (medians: age 32 years, burn size 30% TBSA). 13% (n=4) of patients died during hospital admission. 42% (n=13) of patients had a temperature <36.0C on arrival. Temperature on arrival at the burns centre was related to the severity of all physiological scores (p=<0.001). There was no difference between groups in terms of mortality in hospital (p=0.151) or length of hospital stay (p=0.547). Our results show that hypothermia is related to burn severity and patient physiological status. They do not show a relationship between hypothermia and external factors at the time of the burn. This paper prompts further investigation into the prevention of hypothermia in patients with major burns. PMID:28149230

  3. Improving health care outcomes through geriatric rehabilitation. Conference summary.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K N

    1997-06-01

    The Boston Working Group on Improving Health Care Outcomes Through Geriatric Rehabilitation was structured around four major themes: (1) defining disability or disablement; (2) the patient's experience of the processes and outcomes of care; (3) the role and value of clinical practice guidelines; and (4) the need for casemix and severity or risk adjustment procedures and measures. These discussions produced opening statements of policy or empiric issues and recommendations about the best means of demonstrating the benefits of geriatric rehabilitation and, in particular, how to measure, ensure, and improve the quality of rehabilitation services, especially for the elderly. This article summarizes the reports from the work groups and identifies some common themes. Critical points include: (1) the need to define and describe geriatric rehabilitation better for nonexperts in the health field and for patients and consumers in general; (2) the need for more research to link rehabilitation processes with measurable and clinically important outcomes; (3) the breadth and depth of domains of processes and outcomes of care that ideally could and should be measured; and (4) the need to reach many audiences with a clear message about the importance of geriatric rehabilitation in ensuring high quality of care and good health status and functional outcomes for all elderly patients.

  4. Cardiac condition during cooling and rewarming periods of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been used in cardiac surgery for many years for neuroprotection. Mild hypothermia (MH) [body temperature (BT) kept at 32–35°C] has been shown to reduce both mortality and poor neurological outcome in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study investigated whether patients who were expected to benefit neurologically from therapeutic hypothermia (TH) also had improved cardiac function. Methods The study included 30 patients who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest between September 17, 2012, and September 20, 2013, and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following successful CPR. Patient BTs were cooled to 33°C using intravascular heat change. Basal BT, systolic artery pressure (SAP), diastolic artery pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were measured at 36°C, 35°C, 34°C and 33°C during cooling. BT was held at 33°C for 24 hours prior to rewarming. Rewarming was conducted 0.25°C/h. During rewarming, measurements were repeated at 33°C, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C. A final measurement was performed once patients spontaneously returned to basal BT. We compared cooling and rewarming cardiac measurements at the same BTs. Results SAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). DAP values during rewarming (basal temperature, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling. MAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). CO and CI values were higher during rewarming than during cooling. GEDI and ELWI did not differ during cooling and rewarming. SVRI values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C, 36°C and basal temperature) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). Conclusions To our knowledge

  5. Purchasing population health: aligning financial incentives to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the concept of population health, including its definition, measurement, and determinants, and to suggest an approach for aligning financial incentives toward this goal. DATA SOURCE, STUDY DESIGN, DATA EXTRACTION. Literature review, policy analysis PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The article presents the argument that a major reason for our slow progress toward health outcome improvement is that there is no operational definition of population health and that financial incentives are not aligned to this goal. Current attempts at process measures as indicators of quality or outcome are not adequate for the task. It is suggested that some measure of health-adjusted life expectancy be adopted for this purpose, and that integrated delivery systems and other agents responsible for nonmedical determinants be rewarded for improvement in this measure. This will require the development of an investment portfolio across the determinants of health based on relative marginal return to health, with horizontal integration strategies across sectoral boundaries. A 20-year three-phase development strategy is proposed, including components of research and acceptance, integrated health system implementation, and cross-sectoral integration. CONCLUSIONS: The U.S. healthcare system is a $1 trillion industry without a definition of its product. Until population outcome measures are developed and rewarded for, we will not solve the twenty-first century challenge of maximizing health outcome improvement for the resources available. Images Figure 1 PMID:9618669

  6. [Improving functional outcome of schizophrenia with cognitive remediation].

    PubMed

    Franck, Nicolas; Demily, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    The functional outcome of schizophrenia is partly conditioned by cognitive disorders associated with this disease. The functional outcome of schizophrenia depends not only on psychotropic medications, but also on non-pharmacological measures and in particular on cognitive remediation. All patients suffering from schizophrenia should benefit from a multidisciplinary functional evaluation including neuropsychological assessment. The restitution of the functional evaluation's results values preserved skills rather than deficits. Cognitive remediation should be considered when cognitive disorders have a functional impact. It reduces the impact of the patient's cognitive disorders and improves the success of his/her concrete projects.

  7. Shoulder Arthroplasty: Key Steps to Improve Outcomes and Minimize Complications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Diaz, Roberto; Athwal, George S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Sperling, John W

    2016-01-01

    Advances in shoulder replacement surgery have allowed for the successful treatment of various shoulder conditions. As the elderly population increases and the surgical indications for shoulder replacement surgery continue to expand, the number of shoulder replacements performed annually will continue to increase. Accordingly, the number of complications also will be expected to increase. Successful shoulder replacement outcomes require surgeons to have a thorough understanding of the surgical indications, surgical technique, and potential complications of the procedure. By reviewing the key aspects of shoulder replacement surgery and focusing on the surgical technique and common complications for both anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, surgeons can help improve outcomes and minimize complications.

  8. Improving outcomes for ESRD patients: shifting the quality paradigm.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients' lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes-fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the creators of

  9. [Perioperative hypothermia. Impact on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, A P; Lindenblatt, N; Klar, E

    2007-09-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery associated with several adverse effects including impaired wound healing and more frequently leads to wound infections. Perioperative hypothermia affects the hemostasis and various immune functions and therefore interferes with the initial phases of the wound healing process. Furthermore, perioperative hypothermia contributes to wound complications by inhibition of deposition of collagen and prolongation of postoperative catabolism. Wound complications prolong hospitalization and substantially increase medical costs. Thus, maintaining normothermia perioperatively is essential to reduce the number of wound complications.

  10. Does pharmacotherapy improve cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mayank; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel L; Agrawal, Harsh; Alpert, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) occurs commonly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) including those treated with hemodialysis (HD), and is associated with poor outcomes in this population. Pharmacologic management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, acute and chronic coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation in the general population is supported by the results of high-quality, randomized, controlled clinical trials. Pharmacotherapy of these disorders in the general population is effective in improving clinical outcomes. In contrast, information concerning the effect of pharmacotherapy on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, and particularly in HD patients, is limited. Available data suggest that, in general, pharmacotherapy of hypertension and dyslipidemia, anti-platelet therapy of CVD, and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation are less effective in HD patients than in the general population or even in patients with early stage of CKD.

  11. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal cavity (peritoneal cavity). Staying warm in cold weather Before you or your children step out into cold air, remember the advice that follows with the simple acronym COLD — cover, overexertion, layers, dry: Cover. Wear a hat or other protective covering ...

  12. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... not possible, get the person out of the wind and use a blanket to provide insulation from ... protect your body. These include: Mittens (not gloves) Wind-proof, water-resistant, many-layered clothing Two pairs ...

  13. ThermoSpots to Detect Hypothermia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Thomas B.; Kennedy, Neil; Ndoya, Noel; Emond, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is a risk factor for increased mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Yet frequent temperature measurement remains unfeasible in under-resourced units in developing countries. ThermoSpot is a continuous temperature monitoring sticker designed originally for neonates. When applied to skin, its liquid crystals are designed to turn black with hypothermia and remain green with normothermia. Aims To (i) estimate the diagnostic accuracy of ThermoSpots for detecting WHO-defined hypothermia (core temperature <35.5°C or peripheral temperature <35.0°C) in children with SAM and (ii) determine their acceptability amongst mothers. Methods Children with SAM in a malnutrition unit in Malawi were enrolled during March-July 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of ThermoSpots were calculated by comparing the device colour against ‘gold standard’ rectal temperatures taken on admission and follow up peripheral temperatures taken until discharge. Guardians completed a questionnaire to assess acceptability. Results Hypothermia was uncommon amongst the 162 children enrolled. ThermoSpot successfully detected the one rectal temperature and two peripheral temperatures recorded that met the WHO definition of hypothermia. Overall, 3/846 (0.35%) temperature measurements were in the WHO-defined hypothermia range. Interpreting the brown transition colour (between black and green) as hypothermia improved sensitivities. For milder hypothermia definitions, sensitivities declined (<35.4°C, 50.0%; <35.9°C, 39.2%). Specificity was consistently above 94%. From questionnaires, 40/43 (93%) mothers reported they were 90–100% happy with the device overall. Free-text answers revealed themes of “Skin Rashes”, “User-satisfaction” and “Empowerment". Conclusion Although hypothermia was uncommon in this study, ThermoSpots successfully detected these episodes in malnourished children and were acceptable to mothers. Research in settings where

  14. Intra-carotid cold magnesium sulfate infusion induces selective cerebral hypothermia and neuroprotection in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wu, Yong-Ming; Ji, Zhong; Ji, Ya-Bin; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Local hypothermia induced by intra-arterial infusion of cold saline reduces brain injury in ischemic stroke. Administration of magnesium sulfate through the internal carotid artery is also known to reduce ischemic brain damage. The neuroprotective effects of combination therapy with local endovascular hypothermia and intra-carotid magnesium sulfate infusion has not been evaluated. The aim of the study was to determine whether infusion of intra-carotid cold magnesium offers neuroprotective efficacy superior to cold saline infusion alone. Sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion and were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated group; stroke control group; local cold magnesium infusion group; local cold saline infusion group; local normothermic magnesium infusion group; and local normothermic saline infusion group. Before reperfusion, ischemic rats received local infusion or no treatment. Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and brain water content were evaluated at 48 h after reperfusion. Selective brain hypothermia (33-34 °C) was successfully induced by intra-carotid cold infusion. Local cold saline infusion and local cold magnesium infusion reduced the infarct volumes by 48 % (p < 0.001) and 65 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared with stroke controls. Brain water content was decreased significantly in animals treated with local cold magnesium infusion. Furthermore, the rats given a local cold magnesium infusion had the best neurological outcome. Local normothermic infusion failed to improve ischemic brain damage. These data suggest that local hypothermia induced by intra-carotid administration of cold magnesium is more effective in reducing acute ischemic damage than infusion of cold saline alone.

  15. Does induction time of mild hypothermia influence the survival duration of septic rats?

    PubMed

    Léon, Karelle; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Ollivier, Hélène; Monbet, Valérie; L'Her, Erwan

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between hypothermia induction time and survival duration following sepsis was studied on 31 male Sprague-Dawley rats (median weight 311 g, range 260-356 g). After anesthesia and when the target temperature was reached (normothermia: 38°C or mild induced hypothermia: 34°C), sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and perforation. Five experimental groups were used. In groups 1 and 2, temperature of septic rats was maintained throughout the experiment at 38°C (seven rats) or 34°C (six rats), respectively. In groups 3, 4, and 5, septic rats (six per group) were maintained at 38°C for 1, 2, and 3 hours, respectively, and then placed in mild hypothermia (34°C). For each group, the survival duration was determined and blood samples were performed at the tail to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plasma concentration. Whatever the experimental group, a decrease in temperature from 38°C to 34°C significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats compared with those maintained at 38°C throughout the experiment. The delay between the onset of sepsis and induction of hypothermia was also crucial. Thus, hypothermia induced after 1 hour of sepsis at 38°C significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats (12 hours 37 minutes±1 hour 4 minutes; group 3) compared with hypothermia induced after 3 hours of sepsis (8 hours 56 minutes±1 h 20 minutes; group 5). Moreover, except for group 5, survival duration improvement of septic rats observed in hypothermia was related to a lower increase of TNF-α plasma concentration compared with septic rats in normothermia. During sepsis, mild induced hypothermia significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats. The earlier hypothermia was applied, the longer the septic rats survived. According to these results, hypothermia may therefore provide the necessary time to apply a proper treatment.

  16. Quality improvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: moving forward to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quach, Pauline; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Benchimol, Eric I

    2013-10-14

    In recent years, pediatric health care has embraced the concept of quality improvement to improve patient outcomes. As quality improvement efforts are implemented, network collaboration (where multiple centers and practices implement standardized programs) is a popular option. In a collaborative network, improvement in the conduct of structural, process and outcome quality measures can lead to improvements in overall health, and benchmarks can be used to assess and compare progress. In this review article, we provided an overview of the quality improvement movement and the role of quality indicators in this movement. We reviewed current quality improvement efforts in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as other pediatric chronic illnesses. We discussed the need to standardize the development of quality indicators used in quality improvement networks to assess medical care, and the validation techniques which can be used to ensure that process indicators result in improved outcomes of clinical significance. We aimed to assess current quality improvement efforts in pediatric IBD and other diseases, such as childhood asthma, childhood arthritis, and neonatal health. By doing so, we hope to learn from their successes and failures and to move the field forward for future improvements in the care provided to children with IBD.

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  18. Does treatment of SDB in children improve cardiovascular outcome?

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-02-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a common disorder in both adults and children and is caused by the obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Unlike adults, most cases of paediatric SDB are due to the presence of enlarged tonsils and adenoids, thus the main treatment option is adenotonsillectomy (T&A). It is well known that obstructive sleep apnoea in adults increases the risk for hypertension, coronary artery disease and stroke, and there is now mounting evidence that SDB also has a significant impact on the cardiovascular system in children with reports of elevated blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction and altered autonomic cardiovascular control. As there is now substantial evidence that elevated blood pressure in childhood is carried on to adulthood it is important to know if treatment of SDB improves cardiovascular outcomes. Studies in adults have shown that treatment of SDB leads to improvements in cardiovascular function, including a reduction in pulmonary artery pressure, systemic blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction. However, studies exploring the outcomes of treatment of SDB in children on the cardiovascular system are limited and varied in their methodology and outcome measures. As a number of cardiovascular disturbances are sequelae of SDB, early detection and management could result in the reduction of elevated blood pressure in children, and consequently a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity in adulthood. The aim of this review is to summarise the findings of studies to date which have investigated the cardiovascular outcomes in children treated for SDB and to make recommendations for future management of this very common disease.

  19. Do endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with emphysema?

    PubMed

    Barua, Anupama; Vaughan, Paul; Wotton, Robin; Naidu, Babu

    2012-12-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with severe emphysema. Eighty-seven papers were found using the reported search, of which seven represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial demonstrated that endobronchial valve increased forced expiratory volume in one second by 4.3% (95% confidence interval 1.4-7.2) and decreased by 2.5% in the control group (95% confidence interval -5.4 to 0.4) at a 6-month interval. This benefit is more marked in patients who do not have collateral ventilation into the area of lung being isolated as mapped by bronchoscopic physiological mapping (Chartis) or by computed tomography imaging documenting intact fissures. This evidence is reflected in the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial. Patients treated with endobronchial valve with high heterogeneity and complete fissures had greater improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second at 6- and 12-month intervals. We conclude that endobronchial valve placement improves lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in selected patients with emphysematous diseases.

  20. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  1. Improving stroke outcome: the benefits of increasing availability of technology.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, R. F.; Langhorne, P.; James, E.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A decision analysis was performed to explore the potential benefits of interventions to improve the outcome of patients admitted to hospital with a stroke, in the context of the technology available in different parts of the world. METHODS: The outcome of death or dependency was used with a six-month end-point. RESULTS: Four settings were identified that would depend on the resources available. The proportion of stroke patients who were dead or dependent at six months was 61.5% with no intervention at all. Setting 4, with the only intervention being the delayed introduction of aspirin, produced a 0.5% absolute improvement in outcome (death or dependency), and the addition of an organized stroke unit (Setting 3) produced the largest incremental improvement, of 2.7%. Extra interventions associated with non-urgent computed tomography and thus the ability to avoid anticoagulation or aspirin for those with a haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 2), and immediate computed tomography scanning to allow the use of thrombolytics in non-haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 1), produced only small incremental benefits of 0.4% in each case. DISCUSSION: To reduce the burden of illness due to stroke, efforts at primary prevention are essential and likely to have a greater impact than even the best interventions after the event. In the absence of good primary prevention, whatever is possible must be done to reduce the sequelae of stroke. This analysis provides a rational basis for beginning the development of clinical guidelines applicable to the economic setting of the patient. PMID:11143194

  2. [Hypothermia due to anti-tuberculosis drugs: first case].

    PubMed

    Oualil, H; Nejjari, S; Bourkadi, J E; Iraqi, G

    2014-10-01

    Hypothermia - an adverse reaction of drug use potentially severe - requires an early diagnosis and an adapted management. We report the first case, to our knowledge of hypothermia due to anti-tuberculosis drugs.

  3. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  4. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Goding, George S; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R; Catcheside, Peter G; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Claman, David M; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Barnes, Maree

    2014-02-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce obstructive sleep apnea severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel hypoglossal nerve stimulation system (HGNS; Apnex Medical, St Paul, MN, USA) in treating obstructive sleep apnea at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52.4 ± 9.4 years) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the hypoglossal nerve stimulation system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life [Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)]. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was used on 86 ± 16% of nights for 5.4 ± 1.4 h per night. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.001) from baseline to 12 months in apnea-hypopnea index (45.4 ± 17.5 to 25.3 ± 20.6 events h(-1) ) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire score (14.2 ± 2.0 to 17.0 ± 2.4), as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared with 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal; and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility and efficacy.

  5. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D.; Walker, Matthew P.; Thompson, Monique A.; Smith, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and lead to significant impairment. Progress toward establishing treatments has been good. However, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically-supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? This question arises from five lines of evidence: (a) mental illness is often characterized by memory impairment, (b) memory impairment is modifiable, (c) psychosocial treatments often involve the activation of emotion, (d) emotion can bias memory and (e) memory for psychosocial treatment sessions is poor. Insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory are leveraged to derive strategies for a transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support intervention. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the internet and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise and imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  6. Looking beyond historical patient outcomes to improve clinical models.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chih-Chun; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Scirica, Benjamin M; McMillan, Sean; Gurm, Hitinder S; Syed, Zeeshan

    2012-04-25

    Conventional algorithms for modeling clinical events focus on characterizing the differences between patients with varying outcomes in historical data sets used for the model derivation. For many clinical conditions with low prevalence and where small data sets are available, this approach to developing models is challenging due to the limited number of positive (that is, event) examples available for model training. Here, we investigate how the approach of developing clinical models might be improved across three distinct patient populations (patients with acute coronary syndrome enrolled in the DISPERSE2-TIMI33 and MERLIN-TIMI36 trials, patients undergoing inpatient surgery in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program registry, and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium registry). For each of these cases, we supplement an incomplete characterization of patient outcomes in the derivation data set (uncensored view of the data) with an additional characterization of the extent to which patients differ from the statistical support of their clinical characteristics (censored view of the data). Our approach exploits the same training data within the derivation cohort in multiple ways to improve the accuracy of prediction. We position this approach within the context of traditional supervised (2-class) and unsupervised (1-class) learning methods and present a 1.5-class approach for clinical decision-making. We describe a 1.5-class support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm that implements this approach, and report on its performance relative to logistic regression and 2-class SVM classification with cost-sensitive weighting and oversampling. The 1.5-class SVM algorithm improved prediction accuracy relative to other approaches and may have value in predicting clinical events both at the bedside and for risk-adjusted quality of care assessment.

  7. Randomized Trial of Plastic Bags to Prevent Term Neonatal Hypothermia in a Resource-Poor Setting

    PubMed Central

    Belsches, Theodore C.; Tilly, Alyssa E.; Miller, Tonya R.; Kambeyanda, Rohan H.; Leadford, Alicia; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Ramani, Manimaran; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Term infants in resource-poor settings frequently develop hypothermia during the first hours after birth. Plastic bags or wraps are a low-cost intervention for the prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants that may also be effective in term infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that placement of term neonates in plastic bags at birth reduces hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in a resource-poor hospital. METHODS: This parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at University Teaching Hospital, the tertiary referral center in Zambia. Inborn neonates with both a gestational age ≥37 weeks and a birth weight ≥2500 g were randomized 1:1 to either a standard thermoregulation protocol or to a standard thermoregulation protocol with placement of the torso and lower extremities inside a plastic bag within 10 minutes after birth. The primary outcome was hypothermia (<36.5°C axillary temperature) at 1 hour after birth. RESULTS: Neonates randomized to plastic bag (n = 135) or to standard thermoregulation care (n = 136) had similar baseline characteristics (birth weight, gestational age, gender, and baseline temperature). Neonates in the plastic bag group had a lower rate of hypothermia (60% vs 73%, risk ratio 0.76, confidence interval 0.60–0.96, P = .026) and a higher axillary temperature (36.4 ± 0.5°C vs 36.2 ± 0.7°C, P < .001) at 1 hour after birth compared with infants receiving standard care. CONCLUSIONS: Placement in a plastic bag at birth reduced the incidence of hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in term neonates born in a resource-poor setting, but most neonates remained hypothermic. PMID:23979082

  8. Thermal management during anaesthesia and thermoregulation standards for the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Torossian, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is still high, and thus thermoregulatory standards are warranted. This review summarizes current evidence of thermal management during anaesthesia, referring to recognized clinical queries (temperature measurement, definition of hypothermia, risk factors, warming methods, implementation strategies). Body temperature is a vital sign, and 37 degrees C is the mean core temperature of a healthy human. Systematic review shows that for non-invasive temperature monitoring the oral route is the most reliable; infrared ear temperature measurement is inaccurate. Intraoperatively, acceptable semi-invasive temperature monitoring sites are the nasopharynx, oesophagus and urinary bladder. Clinically relevant hypothermia starts at 36 degrees C with regard to major adverse outcomes (increased infectious complications, morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders, prolonged length of hospital stay, and increased costs). Skin surface warming for 20 min immediately before anaesthesia (pre-warming) minimizes initial redistribution hypothermia. Intraoperatively, active warming should be applied when anaesthesia time is > 60 min. Effective methods of active warming are forced-air warming or conductive warming, provided that enough skin surface is available. Infusion fluid warming, increasing the operating room temperature, and warming of irrigation fluids are adjunctive therapies. The patient's body temperature should be above 36 degrees C before induction of anaesthesia, and should be measured continuously throughout surgery. Active warming should be applied intraoperatively. Postoperative patient temperature and outcomes should be evaluated.

  9. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes: evidence matters.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2013-07-01

    Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before hospital discharge? Nurse leaders must understand the strength of nurses' knowledge base related to self-care principles and important barriers to best practice. Nurses may not be comfortable teaching patients about dry weight, meal planning, heart failure medications, or progressive steps of activity and exercise. Further, clinical nurses may not have time to provide in-depth education to patients before discharge. Equally important, research is needed to learn about factors that enhance patients' adherence to heart failure self-care behaviors, because adherence to recommendations of national, evidence-based, heart failure guidelines improves clinical outcomes. Thus, nurses and patients are on parallel paths related to setting the foundation for improved self-care adherence in advanced heart failure. Through research, we found that nurses were not adequately prepared as heart failure educators and that patients did not believe they were able to control heart failure. In 2 educational intervention studies that aimed to help patients understand that they could control fluid management and follow a strict daily fluid limit, patients had improved clinical outcomes. Thus, misperceptions about heart failure can be overcome with interventions that move beyond communicating "what" self-care behaviors are recommended. Research results reflect that evidence matters! Systems and processes are needed to support nurses' knowledge, comfort, and frequency in delivering self-care education before discharge, increase the accuracy of patients' beliefs about controlling heart failure, and enhance patients' desire to adhere to guideline-recommended heart failure self-care behaviors. This

  10. Induced mild hypothermia in post-cardiopulmonary bypass vasoplegia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Singh, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Naresh; Pant, Kailash Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The state of vasoplegia in immediate post-cardiopulmonary bypass period is characterized by severe hypotension, supranormal cardiac output, low systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and resistance to vasoconstrictors. We could successfully use induced mild hypothermia to increase SVR, and could avoid very high doses of nor-epinephrine (>0.3 mcg/kg/min) in the background of severe pulmonary hypertension (systolic pulmonary pressure> 90 mmHg). Its effects such as decreased oxygen demand, positive inotropy and better right ventricle performance probably helped to improve oxygenation in presence of pulmonary oedema.

  11. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  12. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoñO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  13. Improving MILSATCOM (Military Satellite Communication) acquisition outcomes: Lease versus buy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinneen, P. M.; Quinn, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    This study was requested by the Director of Space Systems and Command, Control, and Communications, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff (Research, Development, and Acquisition), Headquarters United States Air Force, to assist in improving the outcomes of military satellite communication (MILSATCOM) programs. In view of rapidly rising costs of military space systems, leasing has been suggested as one way of controlling these costs. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify and analyze the central considerations relevant to determining whether to lease or by MILSATCOM services. The results of this report should be of interest to members of MILSATCOM acquisition community and others concerned with making lease versus buy decisions in the public sector. The work was conducted under the MILSATCOM Acquisition Policy project of the Project Air Force Resource Management Program.

  14. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population.

  15. Pregabalin suppresses calcium-mediated proteolysis and improves stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Son, Tae Gen; Mughal, Mohamed R; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    Pregabalin, a Ca(2+) channel α(2)δ-subunit antagonist with analgesic and antiepileptic activity, reduced neuronal loss and improved functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke. Pregabalin administration (5-10mg/kg, i.p.) 30-90 min after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion reduced infarct volume, neuronal death in the ischemic penumbra and neurological deficits at 24h post-stroke. Pregabalin significantly decreased the amount of Ca(2+)/calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis in the cerebral cortex measured at 6h post-stroke. Together with the extensive clinical experience with pregabalin for other neurological indications, our findings suggest the potential for a therapeutic benefit of pregabalin in stroke patients.

  16. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  17. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  18. Does administering albumin to postoperative gastroschisis patients improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina A; Silva, Luanna M; Leal, Antonio José G; de Moraes, Augusto César F; Tannuri, Uenis

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Newborns who undergo surgery for gastroschisis correction may present with oliguria, anasarca, prolonged postoperative ileus, and infection. New postoperative therapeutic procedures were tested with the objective of improving postoperative outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred thirty-six newborns participated in one of two phases. Newborns in the first phase received infusions of large volumes of crystalloid solution and integral enteral formula, and newborns in the second phase received crystalloid solutions in smaller volumes, with albumin solution infusion when necessary and the late introduction of a semi-elemental diet. The studied variables were serum sodium and albumin levels, the need for albumin solution expansion, the occurrence of anasarca, the length of time on parenteral nutrition, the length of time before initiating an enteral diet and reaching a full enteral diet, orotracheal intubation time, length of hospitalization, and survival rates. RESULTS: Serum sodium levels were higher in newborns in the second phase. There was a correlation between low serum sodium levels and orotracheal intubation time; additionally, low serum albumin levels correlated with the length of time before the initiation of an oral diet and the time until a full enteral diet was reached. However, the discharge weights of newborns in the second phase were higher than in the first phase. The other studied variables, including survival rates (83.4% and 92.0%, respectively), were similar for both phases. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of an albumin solution to newborns in the early postoperative period following gastroschisis repair increased their low serum sodium levels but did not improve the final outcome. The introduction of a semi-elemental diet promoted an increase in body weight at the time of discharge. PMID:22358234

  19. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Asphyxiated Newborns Undergoing Hypothermia Therapy: Pilot Findings Using a Multiple-Time-Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F; Tian, Fenghua; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamics in newborns might enable us to optimize cerebral perfusion. Our objective was to develop an approach to assess cerebral hemodynamics across multiple time scales during the first 72 hours of life in newborns during hypothermia therapy. Methods Spontaneous oscillations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) were analyzed using a moving window correlation (MWC) method with time scales ranging from 0.15 to 8 hours in this pilot methodology study. Abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome was defined by Bayley III scores and/or cerebral palsy by 24 months of age using receiver operating curve (ROC). Results Multiple-time-scale correlations between MAP and SctO2 oscillations were tested in 10 asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia therapy. Large non induced fluctuations in the blood pressure were observed during cooling in all five infants with abnormal outcomes. Notably, these infants had two distinct patterns of correlation: a positive in-phase correlation at the short time scales (15 min), and/or a negative anti-phase correlations observed at long time scales (4 hrs.). Both the in-phase (AUC 0.6, [95% CI 0.2–0.95]) and anti-phase correlations (AUC 0.75, [95% CI 0.4–0.95]) appeared to be related to an abnormal outcome. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the time scale is an important factor that needs to be standardized in the assessment of neonatal cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:26858217

  20. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-10-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement.

  1. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  2. Hypothermia-induced acute kidney injury in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mun Chul; Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Min A; Lee, Cheon Beom; Sun, In O; Lee, Kwang Young

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia, defined as an unintentional decline in the core body temperature to below 35℃, is a life-threatening condition. Patients with malnutrition and diabetes mellitus as well as those of advanced age are at high risk for accidental hypothermia. Due to the high mortality rates of accidental hypothermia, proper management is critical for the wellbeing of patients. Accidental hypothermia was reported to be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) in over 40% of cases. Although the pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, vasoconstriction and ischemia in the kidney were considered to be the main mechanisms involved. Cases of AKI associated with hypothermia have been reported worldwide, but there have been few reports of hypothermia-induced AKI in Korea. Here, we present a case of hypothermia-induced AKI that was treated successfully with rewarming and supportive care.

  3. Hypothermia secondary to glioblastoma multiforme? Autopsy findings in two cases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matthew; Schwartz, Liliana; Duflou, Johan

    2015-03-01

    Death due to accidental primary hypothermia in cold climates is relatively common, with previous case series reflecting this. In contrast, hypothermia-related death as a result of an underlying medical cause, such as a brain tumor, is rare. The literature clearly illustrates a theoretical causal relationship between brain neoplasms and hypothermia through the infiltration of the hypothalamus; however, the number of reported cases is minimal. Two cases are presented where autopsy confirmed hypothermia as the cause of death with both cases revealing widespread glioblastoma multiforme in the brain. Both decedents were elderly with a number of comorbidities identified during autopsy that could explain death; however, hypothermia was deemed the most likely cause. It is proposed that both decedents died of hypothermia as a result of the tumor's effect on thermoregulation. These cases underline the importance of forensic pathologists to be aware of the relationship between brain tumors and hypothermia and to not dismiss death as being due to other disease processes.

  4. DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of mother’s own milk is the optimal way to feed infants, including very low birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g). Importantly for VLBW infants, who are at elevated risk of neurologic sequelae, mother’s own milk has been shown to enhance neurocognitive development. Unfortunately, the majority of mothers of VLBW infants are unable to provide an adequate supply of milk and thus supplementation with formula or donor milk is necessary. Given the association between mother’s own milk and neurodevelopment, it is important to ascertain whether provision of human donor milk as a supplement may yield superior neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to formula. Our primary hypothesis is that VLBW infants fed pasteurized donor milk compared to preterm formula as a supplement to mother’s own milk for 90 days or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first, will have an improved cognitive outcome as measured at 18 months corrected age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd ed. Secondary hypotheses are that the use of pasteurized donor milk will: (1) reduce a composite of death and serious morbidity; (2) support growth; and (3) improve language and motor development. Exploratory research questions include: Will use of pasteurized donor milk: (1) influence feeding tolerance and nutrient intake (2) have an acceptable cost effectiveness from a comprehensive societal perspective? Methods/Design DoMINO is a multi-centre, intent-to-treat, double blinded, randomized control trial. VLBW infants (n = 363) were randomized within four days of birth to either (1) pasteurized donor milk or (2) preterm formula whenever mother’s own milk was unavailable. Study recruitment began in October 2010 and was completed in December 2012. The 90 day feeding intervention is complete and long-term follow-up is underway. Discussion Preterm birth and its complications are a leading cause long-term morbidity among Canadian children. Strategies to mitigate this

  5. Translating drug-induced hibernation to therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Jinka, Tulasi R; Combs, Velva M; Drew, Kelly L

    2015-06-17

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves prognosis after cardiac arrest; however, thermoregulatory responses such as shivering complicate cooling. Hibernators exhibit a profound and safe reversible hypothermia without any cardiovascular side effects by lowering the shivering threshold at low ambient temperatures (Ta). Activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) in the central nervous system (CNS) induces hibernation in hibernating species and a hibernation-like state in rats, principally by attenuating thermogenesis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that targeted activation of the central A1AR combined with a lower Ta would provide a means of managing core body temperature (Tb) below 37 °C for therapeutic purposes. We targeted the A1AR within the CNS by combining systemic delivery of the A1AR agonist (6)N-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) with 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT), a nonspecific adenosine receptor antagonist that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier. Results show that CHA (1 mg/kg) and 8-SPT (25 mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally every 4 h for 20 h at a Ta of 16 °C, induce and maintain the Tb between 29 and 31 °C for 24 h in both naïve rats and rats subjected to asphyxial cardiac arrest for 8 min. Faster and more stable hypothermia was achieved by continuous infusion of CHA delivered subcutaneously via minipumps. Animals subjected to cardiac arrest and cooled by CHA survived better and showed less neuronal cell death than normothermic control animals. Central A1AR activation in combination with a thermal gradient shows promise as a novel and effective pharmacological adjunct for inducing safe and reversible targeted temperature management.

  6. Hypothermia and the Elderly: Perceptions and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Carol E.; Pestle, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 381 older adults participating in Area Agency on Aging meal programs in Florida. Found that only 10 percent were aware of dangers of accidental hypothermia. Many low-income elderly are vulnerable to cold because of poorly insulated homes, inadequate heating, and lack of warm clothing. States need initiatives to increase comfort levels…

  7. Recombinant human erythropoietin improves neurological outcomes in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Sun, Huiqing; Xu, Falin; Kang, Wenqing; Gao, Liang; Guo, Jiajia; Zhang, Yanhua; Xia, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of repeated low‐dose human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) in the improvement of neurological outcomes in very preterm infants. Methods A total of 800 infants of ≤32‐week gestational age who had been in an intensive care unit within 72 hours after birth were included in the trial between January 2009 and June 2013. Preterm infants were randomly assigned to receive rhEPO (500IU/kg; n = 366) or placebo (n = 377) intravenously within 72 hours after birth and then once every other day for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was death or moderate to severe neurological disability assessed at 18 months of corrected age. Results Death and moderate/severe neurological disability occurred in 91 of 338 very preterm infants (26.9%) in the placebo group and in 43 of 330 very preterm infants (13.0%) in the rhEPO treatment group (relative risk [RR] = 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.27–0.59, p < 0.001) at 18 months of corrected age. The rate of moderate/severe neurological disability in the rhEPO group (22 of 309, 7.1%) was significantly lower compared to the placebo group (57 of 304, 18.8%; RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.19–0.55, p < 0.001), and no excess adverse events were observed. Interpretation Repeated low‐dose rhEPO treatment reduced the risk of long‐term neurological disability in very preterm infants with no obvious adverse effects. Ann Neurol 2016;80:24–34 PMID:27130143

  8. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline “healthy” gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches

  9. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline "healthy" gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches that

  10. Social protection: potential for improving HIV outcomes among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca J; Sherr, Lorraine; Mark Orkin, F; Meinck, Franziska; Lim Ah Ken, Patricia; Winder-Rossi, Natalia E; Wolfe, Jason; Vicari, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Advances in biomedical technologies provide potential for adolescent HIV prevention and HIV-positive survival. The UNAIDS 90–90–90 treatment targets provide a new roadmap for ending the HIV epidemic, principally through antiretroviral treatment, HIV testing and viral suppression among people with HIV. However, while imperative, HIV treatment and testing will not be sufficient to address the epidemic among adolescents in Southern and Eastern Africa. In particular, use of condoms and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain haphazard, with evidence that social and structural deprivation is negatively impacting adolescents’ capacity to protect themselves and others. This paper examines the evidence for and potential of interventions addressing these structural deprivations. Discussion New evidence is emerging around social protection interventions, including cash transfers, parenting support and educational support (“cash, care and classroom”). These interventions have the potential to reduce the social and economic drivers of HIV risk, improve utilization of prevention technologies and improve adherence to ART for adolescent populations in the hyper-endemic settings of Southern and Eastern Africa. Studies show that the integration of social and economic interventions has high acceptability and reach and that it holds powerful potential for improved HIV, health and development outcomes. Conclusions Social protection is a largely untapped means of reducing HIV-risk behaviours and increasing uptake of and adherence to biomedical prevention and treatment technologies. There is now sufficient evidence to include social protection programming as a key strategy not only to mitigate the negative impacts of the HIV epidemic among families, but also to contribute to HIV prevention among adolescents and potentially to remove social and economic barriers to accessing treatment. We urge a further research and programming agenda: to actively combine

  11. Directly Observed Therapy and Improved Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Limsomboon, Pranom; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Komsakorn, Sittijate; Moolphate, Saiyud; Chiengsorn, Navarat; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Sombat, Potjaman; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Mock, Philip A.; Varma, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive directly observed therapy (DOT). Randomized controlled trials have not consistently shown that this practice improves TB treatment success rates. In Thailand, one of 22 WHO-designated high burden TB countries, patients may have TB treatment observed by a health care worker (HCW), family member, or no one. We studied whether DOT improved TB treatment outcomes in a prospective, observational cohort. Methods and Findings We prospectively collected epidemiologic data about TB patients treated at public and private facilities in four provinces in Thailand and the national infectious diseases hospital from 2004–2006. Public health staff recorded the type of observed therapy that patients received during the first two months of TB treatment. We limited our analysis to pulmonary TB patients never previously treated for TB and not known to have multidrug-resistant TB. We analyzed the proportion of patients still on treatment at the end of two months and with treatment success at the end of treatment according to DOT type. We used propensity score analysis to control for factors associated with DOT and treatment outcome. Of 8,031 patients eligible for analysis, 24% received HCW DOT, 59% family DOT, and 18% self-administered therapy (SAT). Smear-positive TB was diagnosed in 63%, and 21% were HIV-infected. Of patients either on treatment or that defaulted at two months, 1601/1636 (98%) patients that received HCW DOT remained on treatment at two months compared with 1096/1268 (86%) patients that received SAT (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–6.0) and 3782/3987 (95%) patients that received family DOT (aOR 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.1). Of patients that had treatment success or that defaulted at the end of treatment, 1369/1477 (93%) patients that received HCW DOT completed treatment compared with 744/1074 (69%) patients that received SAT (aOR 3.3; CI, 2.4–4.5) and

  12. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  13. Pulsatile reperfusion after cardiac arrest improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Anstadt, M P; Stonnington, M J; Tedder, M; Crain, B J; Brothers, M F; Hilleren, D J; Rahija, R J; Menius, J A; Lowe, J E

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using nonpulsatile flow (NPF) is advocated for refractory cardiac arrest. This study examined cerebral outcome after resuscitation with pulsatile flow (PF) versus NPF. Dogs arrested for 12.5 minute were reperfused with NPF (n = 11) using roller pump CPB or PF (n = 11) using mechanical biventricular cardiac massage. Pump flows were similar between groups; however early arterial pressures were greater during PF versus NPF, *p less than 0.05. Circulatory support was weaned at 60 minutes' reperfusion. Neurologic recovery of survivors (n = 16) was significantly better after PF versus NPF, *p = 0.01. The presence of brain lesions on magnetic resonance images did not significantly differ between groups at 7 days. Brain then were removed and regions examined for ischemic changes. Loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons was more severe after NPF versus PF, +p = 0.009. Ischemic changes were more frequent after NPF in the caudate nucleus (+p = 0.009) and watershed regions of the cerebral cortex (+p = 0.062), compared with PF. These results demonstrate that PF improves cerebral resuscitation when treating cardiac arrest with mechanical circulatory support (* = MANOVA with repeated measures, + = categorical data analysis. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:1953100

  14. Improving conservation outcomes with insights from local experts and bureaucracies.

    PubMed

    Haenn, Nora; Schmook, Birgit; Reyes, Yol; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    We describe conservation built on local expertise such that it constitutes a hybrid form of traditional and bureaucratic knowledge. Researchers regularly ask how local knowledge might be applied to programs linked to protected areas. By examining the production of conservation knowledge in southern Mexico, we assert local expertise is already central to conservation. However, bureaucratic norms and social identity differences between lay experts and conservation practitioners prevent the public valuing of traditional knowledge. We make this point by contrasting 2 examples. The first is a master's thesis survey of local experts regarding the biology of the King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) in which data collection took place in communities adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. The second is a workshop sponsored by the same reserve that instructed farmers on how to monitor endangered species, including the King Vulture. In both examples, conservation knowledge would not have existed without traditional knowledge. In both examples, this traditional knowledge is absent from scientific reporting. On the basis of these findings, we suggest conservation outcomes may be improved by recognizing the knowledge contributions local experts already make to conservation programming.

  15. Colorectal cancer screening: Opportunities to improve uptake, outcomes, and disparities

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Neal; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has become a standard of care in industrialized nations for those 50 to 75 years of age, along with selected high-risk populations. While colorectal cancer screening has been shown to reduce both the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is a complex multi-disciplinary process with a number of important steps that require optimization before tangible improvements in outcomes are possible. For both opportunistic and programmatic colorectal cancer screening, poor participant uptake remains an ongoing concern. Furthermore, current screening modalities (such as the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy) may be used or performed suboptimally, which can lead to missed neoplastic lesions and unnecessary endoscopic evaluations. The latter poses the risk of adverse events, such as perforation and post-polypectomy bleeding, as well as financial impacts to the healthcare system. Moreover, ongoing disparities in colorectal cancer screening persist among marginalized populations, including specific ethnic minorities (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Indigenous groups), immigrants, and those who are economically disenfranchised. Given this context, we aimed to review the current literature on these important areas pertaining to colorectal cancer screening, particularly focusing on the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, the fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy. PMID:28042387

  16. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  17. Could training executive function improve treatment outcomes for eating disorders?

    PubMed

    Juarascio, Adrienne S; Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Forman, Evan M

    2015-07-01

    Current gold standard treatments for eating disorders (EDs) lack satisfactory efficacy, and traditional psychological treatments do not directly address executive functioning deficits underpinning ED pathology. The goal of this paper is to explore the potential for enhancing ED treatment outcomes by improving executive functioning deficits that have been demonstrated to underlie eating pathology. To achieve our objective, we (1) review existing evidence for executive functioning deficits that underpin EDs and consider the extent to which these deficits could be targeted in neurocognitive training programs, (2) present the evidence for the one ED neurocognitive training program well-studied to date (Cognitive Remediation Therapy), (3) discuss the utility of neurocognitive training programs that have been developed for other psychiatric disorders with similar deficits, and (4) provide suggestions for the future development and research of neurocognitive training programs for EDs. Despite the fact that the body of empirical work on neurocognitive training programs for eating disorders is very small, we conclude that their potential is high given the combined evidence for the role of deficits in executive functioning in EDs, the initial promise of Cognitive Remediation Training, and the success in treating related conditions with neurocognitive training. Based on the evidence to date, it appears that the development and empirical evaluation of neurocognitive training programs for EDs is warranted.

  18. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Giangregorio, Lora M; MacIntyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    physical therapy interventions with placebo/non-exercise/non-active physical therapy interventions or no intervention implemented in individuals with a history of vertebral fracture and evaluating the outcomes of interest. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials and extracted data using a pre-tested data abstraction form. Disagreements were resolved by consensus, or third party adjudication. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate each study. Studies were grouped according to duration of follow-up (i.e., a) four to 12 weeks; b) 16 to 24 weeks; and c) 52 weeks); a study could be represented in more than one group depending on the number of follow-up assessments. For continuous data, we report mean differences (MDs) of the change or percentage change from baseline. Data from two studies were pooled for one outcome using a fixed-effect model. Main results Seven trials (488 participants, four male participants) were included. Substantial variability across the seven trials prevented any meaningful pooling of data for most outcomes. No trials assessed the effect of exercise on incident fractures, adverse events or incident falls. Individual trials reported that exercise could improve pain, performance on the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, back extensor strength, trunk muscle endurance, and quality of life. However, the findings should be interpreted with caution given that there were also reports of no significant difference between exercise and control groups for pain, Timed Up and Go test performance, trunk extensor muscle strength and quality of life. Pooled analyses from two studies revealed a significant between-group difference in favour of exercise for Timed Up and Go performance (MD −1.13 seconds, 95% confidence interval (CI) −1.85 to −0.42, P = 0.002). Individual studies also reported no significant between-group differences for posture or bone mineral density. Adherence to

  19. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  20. Can pegylated interferon improve the outcome of polycythemia vera patients?

    PubMed

    Crisà, Elena; Cerrano, Marco; Beggiato, Eloise; Benevolo, Giulia; Lanzarone, Giuseppe; Manzini, Paola Maria; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Riera, Ludovica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2017-01-13

    Pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) was proven by phase II trials to be effective in polycythemia vera (PV); however, it is not clear whether it could improve patient outcome compared to hydroxyurea (HU). Here, we present an observational study on 65 PV patients aged 65 years or younger, who received either peg-IFN (30) or HU (35) according to the physician choice. Median follow-up was 75 months. The two cohorts were comparable for patient and disease characteristics. Eighty-seven percent of the patients treated with peg-INF responded, with a CR rate of 70% as compared to 100 and 49% with HU, respectively. Discontinuation rate was similar in the two groups (20% in peg-IFN vs 17% in HU). JAK2 allele burden was monitored in peg-INF arm only, and a reduction was observed in 88% of the patients. No thrombotic events were observed during peg-IFN treatment compared to three on HU. Disease progression to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia occurred to a patient only in peg-INF, compared to three in HU. Overall, three second malignancies were observed during the study, two in patients who received HU only, and one in a patient largely treated HU who received also peg-IFN for 3 months. Overall survival was significantly better for peg-IFN patients compared to HU, p = 0.027. Our study, albeit limited by small patient and event number and lack of randomization, confirms the efficacy of peg-INF in PV and shows a significant survival advantage for peg-INF-treated patients. Waiting for confirming data from the ongoing phase III trials, our study can support peg-INF as a first-line treatment option for PV, at least for younger patients.

  1. Size-specific follicle selection improves mouse oocyte reproductive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuo; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bai, Lu; Nguyen, Catherine T.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsulated in vitro follicle growth (eIVFG) has great potential to provide an additional fertility preservation option for young women and girls with cancer or other reproductive health threatening diseases. Currently, follicles are cultured for a defined period of time and analyzed as a cohort. However, follicle growth is not synchronous, and culturing follicles for insufficient or excessive times can result in compromised gamete quality. Our objective is to determine whether the selection of follicles based on size, rather than absolute culture time, better predict follicle maturity and oocyte quality. Multilayer secondary mouse follicles were isolated and encapsulated in 0.25% alginate. Follicles were cultured individually either for defined time periods or up to specific follicle diameter ranges, at which point several reproductive endpoints were analyzed. The metaphase II (MII) percentage after oocyte maturation on day 6 was the highest (85%) when follicles were cultured for specific days. However, if follicles were cultured to a terminal diameter of 300–350 μm irrespective of absolute time in culture, 93% of the oocytes reached MII. More than 90% of MII oocytes matured from follicles with diameters of 300–350 μm showed normal spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, 85% of oocytes showed 2 pronuclei after in vitro fertilization (IVF), 81% developed into the 2-cell embryo stage, and 38% developed to the blastocyst stage, all significantly higher than the percentages in the other follicle size groups. Our study demonstrates that size-specific follicle selection can be used as a non-invasive marker to identify high quality oocytes and improve reproductive outcomes during eIVFG. PMID:26116002

  2. Improved outcome of acute myeloid leukaemia in Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craze, J; Harrison, G; Wheatley, K; Hann, I; Chessells, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of children in the UK with Down's syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
DESIGN—A retrospective study of 59 children with Down's syndrome and AML presenting between 1987 and 1995. Data were obtained from hospital case notes, trial records, and by questionnaire.
RESULTS—The patients were unusually young (median age, 23 months) with a predominance of megakaryoblastic AML. Two of the seven infants who presented with abnormal myelopoesis aged 2 months or younger achieved complete spontaneous remission. Most of the older children with AML (32 of 52) were treated on recognised intensive protocols but 13 received individualised treatment and seven symptomatic treatment alone. Only four received a bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first remission. For the 45 older children who received chemotherapy the overall survival was 55% (median follow up 4.5 years). Patients on individualised protocols had a similar overall survival and toxic death rate but marginally higher relapse rate than those on standard (intensive) protocols. Children with Down's syndrome treated on the national AML 10 trial had a similar overall survival (70% v 59%) at five years to children of comparable age without Down's syndrome: their improved relapse risk (12% v 38%) offset the slight increase in deaths as a result of treatment toxicity (19% v 11%).
CONCLUSION—Neonates with Down's syndrome and abnormal myelopoesis may achieve spontaneous remission, and older children with Down's syndrome and AML can be treated successfully with intensive chemotherapy, without BMT.

 PMID:10373130

  3. Improving vascular access outcomes: attributes of arteriovenous fistula cannulation success

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Lori E.; Wilson, Barbara M.; Oudshoorn, Abe

    2016-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are the preferred access for hemodialysis (HD) yet they are underutilized. Cannulation of the fistula is a procedure requiring significant skill development and refinement and if not done well can have negative consequences for patients. The nurses' approach, attitude and skill with cannulation impacts greatly on the patient experience. Complications from miscannulation or an inability to needle fistulas can result in the increased use of central venous catheters. Some nurses remain in a state of a ‘perpetual novice’ resulting in a viscous cycle of negative patient consequences (bruising, pain), further influencing patients' decisions not to pursue a fistula or abandon cannulation. Method This qualitative study used organizational development theory (appreciative inquiry) and research method to determine what attributes/activities contribute to successful cannulation. This can be applied to interventions to promote change and skill development in staff members who have not advanced their proficiency. Eighteen HD nurses who self-identified with performing successful cannulation participated in audio-recorded interviews. The recordings were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Four common themes, including patient-centered care, teamwork, opportunity and skill and nurse self-awareness, represented successful fistula cannulation. Successful cannulation is more than a learned technique to correctly insert a needle, but rather represents contextual influences and interplay between the practice environment and personal attributes. Conclusions Practice changes based on these results may improve cannulation, decrease complications and result in better outcomes for patients. Efforts to nurture positive patient experiences around cannulation may influence patient decision-making regarding fistula use. PMID:26985384

  4. [Management of peri-operative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia (body temperature under 36°C) is the thermal disorder most frequently found in surgical patients, but should be avoided as a means of reducing morbidity and costs. Temperature should be considered as a vital sign and all staff involved in the care of surgical patients must be aware that it has to be maintained within normal limits. Maintaining body temperature is the result, as in any other system, of the balance between heat production and heat loss. Temperature regulation takes place through a system of positive and negative feedback in the central nervous system, being developed in three phases: thermal afferent, central regulation and efferent response. Prevention is the best way to ensure a normal temperature. The active warming of the patient during surgery is mandatory. Using warm air is the most effective, simple and cheap way to prevent and treat hypothermia.

  5. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  6. Devices for Emergency Hypothermia and Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    Research (SCRR) shows excellent results. Part of the SCRR work is based on induction of mild-moderate or profound hypothermia (SA) in laboratory animals...and a secondary heat exchanger. The secondary, which is part of a disposable tubing set, must be sterlilzable and heparin bondable. Existing heat...controller output. -T,(S) T,(s) Controller _C(s).T Plant 4 -Ts Gs Scaler PS Gss) - T(S) FIGURE 1. GENERALIZED BLOCK DIAGRAM OF CONTROL SYSTEM The

  7. Shapiro's syndrome: Defining the clinical spectrum of the spontaneous paroxysmal hypothermia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tambasco, Nicola; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Prontera, Paolo; Nigro, Pasquale; Donti, Emilio; Rossi, Aroldo; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Shapiro Syndrome (SS) is a rare condition of spontaneous periodic hypothermia, corpus callosum agenesis (ACC) and hyperhidrosis which can occur at any age. The variant form refers to the phenotypic SS without ACC. We reported the case of SS variant on a 4-year-old boy who presented from his first year frequent episodes of hypothermia lasting 2-3 h with core rectal temperatures <35 °C. In order to understand the characteristics of this rare syndrome we searched all the cases present in literature. Fifty-two cases of SS were found in literature. Among all clinical signs, paroxysmal hypothermia seems to be the hallmark of both typical and variant SS. ACC is reported only in 40% of cases of SS. Hyperhidrosis, another hallmark of SS, was present in only 42.3% of the cases and mainly in adult onset. The presence of SS in siblings of different genders suggests an autosomal recessive inheritance model, however a gonadic mosaicism responsible for an autosomal de novo mutation cannot be ruled out. From our review of well documented cases of SS, we conclude that only the episodic and spontaneous paroxysmal hypothermia should be considered the defining hallmark of typical and variant SS. This can be important to define the clinical manifestation of SS improving the early diagnosis.

  8. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies.

  9. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Palomeque, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS), followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24363826

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Educational Data Mining on Improvements in Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlShammari, Iqbal A.; Aldhafiri, Mohammed D.; Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    A meta-synthesis study was conducted of 60 research studies on educational data mining (EDM) and their impacts on and outcomes for improving learning outcomes. After an overview, an examination of these outcomes is provided (Romero, Ventura, Espejo, & Hervas, 2008; Romero, "et al.", 2011). Then, a review of other EDM-related research…

  11. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  12. Changes in hippocampal ultrastructure and vimentin expression in rhesus monkeys following selective deep hypothermia and blood occlusion.

    PubMed

    Li, B C; Fu, X; Niu, X Q; Fan, Y D; Xu, W; Zhao, X X; Pu, J

    2015-01-30

    Previous studies have shown that selective cerebral profound hypothermia combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion can improve resistance to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in monkeys. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of selective cerebral profound hypothermia on the ultrastructure and vimentin expression in monkey hippocampi after severe cerebral ischemia. Eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomly divided into two groups: profound hypothermia (N = 5) and normothermia (N = 3). Monkeys in the profound hypothermia group underwent bilateral carotid artery and jugular vein occlusion for 10 minutes at room temperature. Ringer's solution at 4°C was then perfused through the right internal carotid artery and out of the right jugular vein, maintaining the brain temperature below 18°C. Sixty minutes later, cerebral blood flow was restored. The normothermia group underwent all procedures with the exception that the Ringer's solution was 37°C during perfusion. All animals in the profound hypothermia group were successfully resuscitated. No significant abnormalities of hippocampal morphology or ultrastructure were observed. In contrast, no monkeys were alive after perfusion in the normothermia group and they had abnormal hippocampal morphology and ultrastructure to different extents. Vimentin expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the profound hypothermia group (47.88% ± 1.66) than the normothermia group (79.51% ± 1.00; P < 0.01). We conclude that selective cerebral profound hypothermia following 10-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries was able to downregulate vimentin expression in the hippocampus and protect it from severe cerebral ischemia.

  13. Improving energy audit process and report outcomes through planning initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprau Coulter, Tabitha L.

    Energy audits and energy models are an important aspect of the retrofit design process, as they provide project teams with an opportunity to evaluate a facilities current building systems' and energy performance. The information collected during an energy audit is typically used to develop an energy model and an energy audit report that are both used to assist in making decisions about the design and implementation of energy conservation measures in a facility. The current lack of energy auditing standards results in a high degree of variability in energy audit outcomes depending on the individual performing the audit. The research presented is based on the conviction that performing an energy audit and producing a value adding energy model for retrofit buildings can benefit from a revised approach. The research was divided into four phases, with the initial three phases consisting of: 1.) process mapping activity - aimed at reducing variability in the energy auditing and energy modeling process. 2.) survey analysis -- To examine the misalignment between how industry members use the top energy modeling tools compared to their intended use as defined by software representatives. 3.) sensitivity analysis -- analysis of the affect key energy modeling inputs are having on energy modeling analysis results. The initial three phases helped define the need for an improved energy audit approach that better aligns data collection with facility owners' needs and priorities. The initial three phases also assisted in the development of a multi-criteria decision support tool that incorporates a House of Quality approach to guide a pre-audit planning activity. For the fourth and final research phase explored the impacts and evaluation methods of a pre-audit planning activity using two comparative energy audits as case studies. In each case, an energy audit professionals was asked to complete an audit using their traditional methods along with an audit which involved them first

  14. High-Leverage Leadership: Improving Outcomes in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongon, Denis; Chapman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation of world trade, international media, technological innovation and social change are creating opportunities and challenges that today's pupils will inherit and build on. A pupil's academic, technical and social capacity will define their success or failure. Therefore, educational outcomes and well-being for young people across…

  15. Inside Quality Reform: Early Results on Using Outcomes for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This article offers evidence on ways in which assessment of student learning outcomes made a difference for some academic institutions in the United States. It offers perspectives on the internal changes that took place, especially within academic programmes. Even after the capacity for assessment was developed, challenges remained in evaluating…

  16. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  17. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    malignancies. However, a subset of localized cancers resist genotoxic treatments, and most advanced cancers treated with such therapies eventually progress...NF-κB, and found the physical interaction between these molecules when cells are exposed to genotoxicity . We anticipate that targeting such a key...PCa medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, microenvironment, DNA damage, genotoxicity , stroma, secretion, therapy resistance, outcome. 16

  18. Hypometabolism and hypothermia in the rat model of endotoxic shock: independence of circulatory hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Joshua J; Fonseca, Monique T; Flatow, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Kevin; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that development of hypothermia instead of fever in endotoxic shock is consequential to hypoxia. Endotoxic shock was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 μg kg−1 i.v.) in rats at an ambient temperature of 22°C. A β3-adrenergic agonist known to activate metabolic heat production, CL316,243, was employed to evaluate whether thermogenic capacity could be impaired by the fall in oxygen delivery () during endotoxic shock. This possibility was rejected as CL316,243 (0.15 mg kg−1 i.v.) evoked similar rises in oxygen consumption () in the presence and absence of endotoxic shock. Next, to investigate whether a less severe form of circulatory hypoxia could be triggering hypothermia, the circulating volume of LPS-injected rats was expanded using 6% hetastarch with the intention of improving tissue perfusion and alleviating hypoxia. This intervention attenuated not only the fall in arterial pressure induced by LPS, but also the associated falls in and body temperature. These effects, however, occurred independently of hypoxia, as they were not accompanied by any detectable changes in NAD+/NADH ratios. Further experimentation revealed that even the earliest drops in cardiac output and during endotoxic shock did not precede the reduction in that brings about hypothermia. In fact, and fell in such a synchrony that the / ratio remained unaffected. Only when hypothermia was prevented by exposure to a warm environment (30°C) did an imbalance in the / ratio become evident, and such an imbalance was associated with reductions in the renal and hypothalamic NAD+/NADH ratios. In conclusion, hypometabolism and hypothermia in endotoxic shock are not consequential to hypoxia but serve as a pre-emptive strategy to avoid hypoxia in this model. PMID:24951620

  19. Teachers Working Together: Improving Learning Outcomes in the Inclusive Classroom--Practical Strategies and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingo, Amy S.; Barton-Arwood, Sally M.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA 2004), aligned with the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), emphasizes improved student academic outcomes. With this focus on academic outcomes and access to the general curriculum, there is increased pressure for accountability in the education of students with disabilities in general…

  20. Improving Education Outcomes in the Slovak Republic. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 578

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2007-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is vital for achieving convergence with GDP per capita levels in Western European countries and for reducing income inequality. While some education outcomes are favourable, such as the low secondary-school drop-out rate, others have room for improvement: education achievement is below the OECD average and strongly…

  1. Extended Use of Hypothermia in Elderly Patients with Malignant Cerebral Edema as an Alternative to Hemicraniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Han-Yeong; Chang, Jun-Young; Yum, Kyu Sun; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Heon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Bae, Hee-Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Lee, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The use of decompressive hemicraniectomy (DHC) for the treatment of malignant cerebral edema can decrease mortality rates. However, this benefit is not sufficient to justify its use in elderly patients. We investigated the effects of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on safety, feasibility, and functional outcomes in elderly patients with malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarcts. Methods Elderly patients 60 years of age and older with infarcts affecting more than two-thirds of the MCA territory were included. Patients who could not receive DHC were treated with TH. Hypothermia was started within 72 hours of symptom onset and was maintained for a minimum of 72 hours with a target temperature of 33°C. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months following treatment and complications of TH were used as functional outcomes. Results Eleven patients with a median age of 76 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 18 were treated with TH. The median time from symptom onset to initiation of TH was 30.3±23.0 hours and TH was maintained for a median of 76.7±57.1 hours. Shivering (100%) and electrolyte imbalance (82%) were frequent complications. Two patients died (18%). The mean mRS score 3 months following treatment was 4.9±0.8. Conclusions Our results suggest that extended use of hypothermia is safe and feasible for elderly patients with large hemispheric infarctions. Hypothermia may be considered as a therapeutic alternative to DHC in elderly individuals. Further studies are required to validate our findings. PMID:27488978

  2. [Experiences with transparenchymal coral calculi removal under local hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Albert, L; Zacher, W; Meyer, S

    1984-06-01

    Under certain conditions genuine coral calculi are an absolute offication for nephrotomy. In order to achieve complete hygienization of the cavity ischaemia times of more than 25-30 min are often necessary. Controlled surface cooling proved to be very good for improving ischaemia tolerance and reducing post-ischaemic loss of function in 21 necessary nephrotomies out of a total of 651 operations for concrements in the calyx system of the renal pelvis (= 3.2%; = 32.8% of all nephrotomies). A kidney thermometer with a temperature feeler developed by us allows fine control of the hypothermia induced by means of plastic bags filled with ice crystals. The technique of operation together with its advantages and disadvantages are described.

  3. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia.

  4. [Normothermia and hypothermia from an anaesthesiological viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Pannen, B H J

    2007-09-01

    For a long time the significance of perioperative accidental hypothermia was overlooked. The possible undesirable effects of a relatively small reduction in the body core temperature of 1.5-2.0 degrees C were generally unknown and the treatment options were limited. The unfavourable climatic conditions in the operation room favour heat loss and simultaneously, there is considerable disturbance of temperature regulation through general as well as spinal anaesthesia. In many studies it has now been shown that the resulting decrease in body temperature can have a negative effect on immune function, coagulation, the cardiovascular system and recovery behaviour. Heat loss in the perioperative phase should, therefore, be minimised by effective insulation. Nevertheless, a negative heat balance can often only be avoided by an additional heat treatment of the body surface which ideally should be initiated in the preoperative phase. If large volumes must be infused, an important additional measure is to prewarm these solutions. This is the only way in which the objective, to avoid a fall in body temperature to below 36 degrees C in the perioperative phase and the possible subsequent negative effects on the course of events, can be reached. The incidence of perioperative hypothermia is often underestimated so that in this phase a reduction in body core temperature of more than 2 degrees C will occur in more than 50% of patients if no special measures are undertaken. In addition, the undesirable effects of such a reduction in core temperature were barely known and even only a few years ago there were hardly any possibilities for reliable prevention or effective treatment. Therefore, in this article the causes of perioperative hypothermia will initially be described. In the second section the possible negative consequences of a reduction in body core temperature will be presented and in the last section the resulting consequences for the practice will be discussed.

  5. Survival after cardiopulmonary arrest with extreme hyperkalaemia and hypothermia in a patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Stan; Lee, I-Lynn

    2012-12-20

    Potassium levels are regularly used as a prognostic factor to cease resuscitation in significant hypothermia. In this case report, we highlight how survival is still possible with extreme hyperkalaemia in severe hypothermia. We present a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian man who presented with metformin associated lactic acidosis. On presentation he had potassium of 9.1 mmol/l and a temperature of 31.5 °C. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced when he went into asystolic arrest. This presentation would commonly make attempts at resuscitation futile with a 100% death rate. However, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved and survival was possible. We provide evidence that survival is possible in profound hyperkalaemia and hypothermia. Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation with early haemofiltration can be successful.

  6. Hypothermia and physiological control: the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Frappell, P

    1998-02-01

    1. Ventilation (VE) in unanaesthetized hypothermic animals remains tightly coupled to oxygen consumption (VO2) such that VE/VO2 remains constant despite changes in body temperature. 2. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia would suggest that, relative to metabolic rate, the gain of the respiratory system is unaltered in hypothermic animals. 3. Future studies should exercise care to ensure that the method applied in inducing hypothermia does not complicate ventilatory control and that the ability of the species to hibernate is taken into consideration.

  7. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  9. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child

    PubMed Central

    González, Irene; Lecube, Albert; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; García-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS). These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy. PMID:28008286

  10. Multicenter Australian trial of islet transplantation: improving accessibility and outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, P J; Holmes-Walker, D J; Goodman, D; Hawthorne, W J; Loudovaris, T; Gunton, J E; Thomas, H E; Grey, S T; Drogemuller, C J; Ward, G M; Torpy, D J; Coates, P T; Kay, T W

    2013-07-01

    Whilst initial rates of insulin independence following islet transplantation are encouraging, long-term function using the Edmonton Protocol remains a concern. The aim of this single-arm, multicenter study was to evaluate an immunosuppressive protocol of initial antithymocyte globulin (ATG), tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) followed by switching to sirolimus and MMF. Islets were cultured for 24 h prior to transplantation. The primary end-point was an HbA1c of <7% and cessation of severe hypoglycemia. Seventeen recipients were followed for ≥ 12 months. Nine islet preparations were transported interstate for transplantation. Similar outcomes were achieved at all three centers. Fourteen of the 17 (82%) recipients achieved the primary end-point. Nine (53%) recipients achieved insulin independence for a median of 26 months (range 7-39 months) and 6 (35%) remain insulin independent. All recipients were C-peptide positive for at least 3 months. All subjects with unstimulated C-peptide >0.2 nmol/L had cessation of severe hypoglycemia. Nine of the 17 recipients tolerated switching from tacrolimus to sirolimus with similar graft outcomes. There was a small but significant reduction in renal function in the first 12 months. The combination of islet culture, ATG, tacrolimus and MMF is a viable alternative for islet transplantation.

  11. Fracture liaison services: improving outcomes for patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Samuel; Khan, Tanvir; Ong, Terence; Sahota, Opinder

    2017-01-01

    Fragility fractures are sentinels of osteoporosis, and as such all patients with low-trauma fractures should be considered for further investigation for osteoporosis and, if confirmed, started on osteoporosis medication. Fracture liaison services (FLSs) with varying models of care are in place to take responsibility for this investigative and treatment process. This review aims to describe outcomes for patients with osteoporotic fragility fractures as part of FLSs. The most intensive service that includes identification, assessment and treatment of patients appears to deliver the best outcomes. This FLS model is associated with reduction in re-fracture risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.18–0.67 over 2–4 years), reduced mortality (HR 0.65 over 2 years), increased assessment of bone mineral density (relative risk [RR] 2–3), increased treatment initiation (RR 1.5–4.25) and adherence to treatment (65%–88% at 1 year) and is cost-effective. In response to this evidence, key organizations and stakeholders have published guidance and framework to ensure that best practice in FLSs is delivered. PMID:28138228

  12. Familial Retinoblastoma: Raised Awareness Improves Early Diagnosis and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Aseel Q.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To study the impact of awareness of retinoblastoma in the affected families on the management and outcome of familial retinoblastoma patients. Methods and Materials. This is a retrospective, clinical case series of 44 patients with familial retinoblastoma. Collected data included patient's demographics, laterality, family history, age at diagnosis, presenting signs, treatment modalities, tumor stage, eye salvage rate, metastasis, and mortality. Results. Out of 200 retinoblastoma patients in our registry, 44 (22%) patients were familial, 18 were probands, and 26 were second, third, or fourth affected family members. There were 76 affected eyes: 31 eyes of probands and 45 eyes of the other affected family members. Among probands, all patients (100%) had at least one eye enucleated: 58% (18 eyes) of the affected eyes were enucleated and 32% (10 eyes) of the affected eyes were radiated. On the other hand, among the nonprobands, only 20% had one eye enucleated, and only 4 eyes (9%) received radiation. The eye salvage rate was significantly higher in the nonprobands than in the probands in this series (p = 0.00206). Patients diagnosed by screening (38%) had excellent visual outcome, and both eyes were salvaged. Conclusion. Awareness of families of the possibility of retinoblastoma and adequate screening led to a significantly higher rate of eye salvage in patients with familial retinoblastoma. PMID:28348883

  13. Control Outcomes and Exposures for Improving Internal Validity of Nonrandomized Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dusetzina, Stacie B; Brookhart, M Alan; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Control outcomes and exposures can improve internal validity of nonrandomized studies by assessing residual bias in effect estimates. Control outcomes are those expected to have no treatment effect or the opposite effect of the primary outcome. Control exposures are treatments expected to have no effect on the primary outcome. We review examples of control outcomes and exposures from prior studies and provide recommendations for conducting and reporting these analyses. Data Sources and Study Design Review in Google Scholar and Medline of research studies employing control outcomes or exposures. We abstracted publication year, control outcome, control exposure, primary outcome, primary exposure, control outcome/exposure effect, proposed source of bias, and causal criteria. Principal Findings There is inconsistent terminology for these concepts, making study identification challenging. Six of 11 studies found null associations between treatments and negative control outcomes/exposures, providing greater confidence that the primary study findings were not biased. Five studies found unexpected associations, suggesting bias in the primary association. Conclusions The rigor of nonrandomized studies can be improved with inclusion of control outcomes and exposures for bias detection. Given ongoing concern about clinical and policy inferences from nonrandomized studies, we recommend adoption of these measurement tools. PMID:25598384

  14. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  15. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  16. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  17. Proposed guidelines for skin-to-skin treatment of neonatal hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Maura

    2006-01-01

    Hypothermia is not uncommon in full-term, low-risk newborns during the first days of life. Standard care for treating hypothermia often involves the separation of the mother and the newborn while the infant is placed under a warmer and observed in the nursery. Because one important role of the postpartum nurse is to promote mother-infant attachment by encouraging the mother to spend time "getting to know" her infant, this separation can be problematic. This article proposes that skin-to-skin (STS) care, also called kangaroo care, an intervention in which the unclothed, diapered infant is placed on the mother's bare chest, be used to promote thermoregulation instead of using separation and a warmer. STS care has been recognized as a way to facilitate maternal-infant attachment and promote thermoregulation. The literature review here provides an analysis of the available evidence and the author's conclusion that the research supports the use of STS care as an alternative to traditional rewarming. The evidence was graded and organized into an evidence-based practice guideline for the use of STS care in the treatment of mild hypothermia in the low-risk infant. Suggestions for further research and outcomes measurement are included.

  18. Utilization of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Induced Hypothermia After Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mir J.; Exline, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas produced as a byproduct of organic waste and many industrial processes. Hydrogen sulfide exposure symptoms may vary from mild (dizziness, headaches, nausea) to severe lactic acidosis via its inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias and death. Treatment is generally supportive. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiac arrest secondary to hydrogen sulfide exposure treated with both hyperbaric oxygen therapy and therapeutic hypothermia with great improvement in neurologic function. PMID:22004989

  19. Toward improved public health outcomes from urban nature.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Danielle F; Lin, Brenda B; Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J; Dean, Julie H; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities.

  20. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Roshan, Bijan; Maski, Manish; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury) inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release) suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation. PMID:21694944

  1. Toward Improved Public Health Outcomes From Urban Nature

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J.; Dean, Julie H.; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  2. Improving financial and patient outcomes: the future of demand management.

    PubMed

    Marosits, M J

    1997-08-01

    Demand management has evolved from early managed care models that sought to curtail rising costs through demand-side utilization controls. The first generation of demand management relied heavily on financial incentives for consumers and physicians to demand fewer and less costly resources. The second generation of demand management complemented financial incentives with clinically focused strategies. Often, these strategies were implemented directly by the payer on through a primary care physician gatekeeper. The current and coming generation of demand management activities emphasizes informed consumer choice and active participation in preventative health care, resource utilization decisions, and customization of healthcare services. This personal health management aligns financial incentives, clinical care protocols, and consumer decision-support systems to balance outcomes and resource consumption.

  3. Sexuality and fertility in men with hypospadias; improved outcome.

    PubMed

    Örtqvist, L; Fossum, M; Andersson, M; Nordenström, A; Frisén, L; Holmdahl, G; Nordenskjöld, A

    2016-12-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate sexual function and fertility in adult men born with hypospadias. Patients born with hypospadias, age-matched controls, and a group of circumcised men completed a questionnaire constructed to reflect their psychosexual situation and fertility. Core gender identity, sexual orientation, and gender role behavior was also assessed. 167 patients [63% distal, 24% mid shaft and 13% proximal, mean age 34 (19-54) years], 169 controls from the general population [mean age 33 (19-48) years] and 47 controls circumcised because of phimosis (mean age 26 [19-44]) participated and completed the questionnaire. There were no differences in having a partner, reported fertility, age at sexarche (mean age 17.8), number of sex partners or sexual interest between the patients and controls. More patients than controls reported anejaculation. Reported glanular sensitivity was lower in hypospadias patients and circumcised controls compared with non-circumcised controls. The odds of being satisfied with their sexual life increased with a higher penile perception score in patients (OR = 1.54, p = 0.01). There was no association with penile length. Sexual orientation, core gender identity and gender role behavior were sex-typical in both patients and controls. Patients with proximal hypospadias had a lower reported fertility, experienced anejaculation more often, and were less satisfied with their sexual life. Men born with hypospadias have a good long-term outcome concerning sexual function and fertility. Men born with proximal hypospadias have a more impaired outcome concerning both sexual function and fertility. As satisfaction with genital appearance is important for sexual life satisfaction, clinical, and psychological follow-up into adulthood is especially important in boys born with proximal hypospadias.

  4. Improvements in the outcome of children with meningococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Paize, Fauzia; Playfor, Stephen D

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a marked reduction in the mortality of children with meningococcal disease in paediatric intensive care units (PICU); the reasons for this improvement are multifactorial. The mortality rates for critically ill children overall have improved and reasons for this are probably increased centralisation of PICU services and that fewer critically ill children are now looked after on adult units. Specific treatment pathways for sepsis have improved with the publication of clinical guidelines for children and initiatives such as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. There is a continuing need to focus on the care delivered to children before reaching PICU and to minimise the morbidity suffered by survivors of this disease. PMID:18001494

  5. Improving Early Grade Reading Outcomes: Aprender a Ler in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Burchfield, Shirley; Hua, Haiyan; Noyes, David; van de Waal, Willem

    2017-03-01

    The Government of Mozambique has long struggled to improve the low reading levels of children in early grades. With funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2012, World Education collaborated with the Ministry of Education and Human Development (MINEDH) to improve reading by developing a research-based reading intervention and testing it in two provinces. This article examines student reading performance from cohorts of second and third graders before and after a 1-year intervention compared to that of a control group and identifies factors required for successful scale-up.

  6. A Measurement Model of Microgenetic Transfer for Improving Instructional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I., Jr.; Yudelson, Michael; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to improve instructional task design often make reference to the mental structures, such as "schemas" (e.g., Gick & Holyoak, 1983) or "identical elements" (Thorndike & Woodworth, 1901), that are common to both the instructional and target tasks. This component based (e.g., Singley & Anderson, 1989) approach…

  7. Providing Outcomes Information to Nursing Homes: Can It Improve Quality of Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether providing outcomes information to 120 nursing homes facilitated improvements in quality over a 12-month period, as compared with 1,171 facilities not receiving this information. The outcomes information provided consisted of a report mailed to administrators that examined six measures of care quality. These…

  8. Does residential mobility improve educational outcomes? Evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of residential mobility on educational outcomes. By considering a large Dutch city with substantial internal residential mobility, we examine how residential mobility influences the decision of students to drop out of school. The paper exploits a rich administrative dataset with extensive information on educational, individual, family, housing and moving characteristics of students. It combines a matching design with a multivariate regression analysis, such that the evaluation draws on a well-comparable control group for the treated students. Accounting for individual, family, educational, neighborhood and housing characteristics, as well as for school and year fixed effects, we observe that residential mobility increases the probability of school dropout in the first few years after moving. The estimated effect changes, however, to a lower risk of early school leaving after an initial period, and then changes again to a higher risk after 6years. This effect remains, regardless the level of education the students attended, or whether the student moves to a better or a worse neighborhood.

  9. Improving Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Class III Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Melissa; Bires, Angela Macci; Waterstram-Rich, Kristen; Cline, Thomas W

    Heart failure (HF) is a serious medical problem in the United States and is placing a financial strain on the health care system. It is the leading cause of mortality and as the overall incidence continues to increase, so does the economic impact on the health care system. Innovative treatment options, in the form of disease management programs and implantable cardiac devices, such as the CorVue capable implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) pacemaker, offer the promise of an enhanced quality of life and reduced mortality. Even with these advances, HF continues to be a challenge. Studies reviewing HF management programs have shown promising results. However, more studies are needed to determine which combination of HF management interventions has the greatest financial impact and yields the best patient outcomes. The objective of the research study was to compare 30-day readmission rates of patients implanted with the CorVue capable ICD pacemaker with patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) with no implanted device. The aim of the research focused on the usefulness of intrathoracic impedance monitoring alerts in guiding empirical treatment of patients with CHF to prevent HF readmissions. Methodology included a retrospective medical chart review, comparing 30-day readmission events among patients with class III CHF who received home health intervention with similar patients implanted with the CorVue ICD.

  10. Active thermoregulation improves outcome of off-pump coronary artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Atluri, Pavan; Grand, Todd J; Hsu, Vivian M; Cheung, Albert

    2005-06-01

    During off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, hypothermia increases vasoconstriction, myocardial afterload, coagulopathy and postoperative bleeding. Traditional thermoregulatory techniques do not maintain core body temperature intraoperatively. The efficacy of a commercially available, computer-controlled, water-circulating, dorsal surface, active warming system for thermoregulatory control was evaluated. All patients who underwent non-emergency off-pump coronary bypass grafting by a single surgeon in a 1-year period were studied: the thermoregulation device was used in 50 cases and unavailable for use in 19. The patients who underwent active thermoregulation demonstrated significantly improved core body temperatures compared to the controls: lowest intraoperative, 35.8 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C vs. 35.0 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C; immediately postoperative, 36.5 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C vs. 35.6 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C; and 1-hour postoperative, 36.6 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C vs. 35.9 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C. Thermoregulated patients had significantly reduced 24-hour chest tube drainage (764 +/- 38 vs. 1227 +/- 183 mL), packed red blood cell transfusions (1.4 +/- 0.2 vs. 3.3 +/- 0.7 units), time to extubation (6.8 +/- 0.5 vs. 11.4 +/- 2.3 hours), intensive care unit stay (1.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3 days), and hospital stay (4.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 5.1 +/- 0.3 days).

  11. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  12. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members.

  13. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  14. Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in Cardiac Arrest Caused by Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Frank, Brian; Pontell, Mathew E; Medinilla, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest.

  15. A new microcontroller supervised thermoelectric renal hypothermia system.

    PubMed

    Işik, Hakan

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, a thermoelectric system controlled by a microcontroller is developed to induce renal hypothermia. Temperature value was managed by 8-byte microcontroller, PIC16F877, and was programmed using microcontroller MPASM package. In order to ensure hypothermia in the kidney 1-4 modules and sensors perceiving temperature of the area can be selected. Temperature values are arranged proportionately for the selected area and the determined temperature values can be monitored from an Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen. The temperature range of the system is between -50 and +50 degrees C. Renal hypothermia system was tried under in vivo conditions on the kidney of a dog.

  16. Improving Work Outcomes for Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a...area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 1 SEP 2010 - 31 AUG 2011Annual01-09-2011 W81XWH-08- 2 -0193 Improving...in Year 1 and 2 resulted in continued recruitment and enrollment into Year 3. In Year 1, our enrollment total was 19 out of the targeted 32

  17. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists. PMID:27099542

  18. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists.

  19. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  20. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aufhauser, David D; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R; Bhatti, Tricia R; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R; Abt, Peter L; Wang, Liqing; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Thomasson, Arwin; Reese, Peter P; Hancock, Wayne W; Levine, Matthew H

    2016-05-02

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α-KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance.

  1. Ethnicity moderates the outcomes of self-enhancement and self-improvement themes in expressive writing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, William; Lau, Anna S; Niles, Andrea N; Coello, Jordan; Lieberman, Matthew D; Ko, Ahra C; Hur, Christopher; Stanton, Annette L

    2015-10-01

    The current study examined whether writing content related to self-enhancing (viz., downward social comparison and situational attributions) and self-improving (viz., upward social comparison and persistence) motivations were differentially related to expressive writing outcomes among 17 Asian American and 17 European American participants. Content analysis of the essays revealed no significant cultural group differences in the likelihood of engaging in self-enhancing versus self-improving reflections on negative personal experiences. However, cultural group differences were apparent in the relation between self-motivation processes and changes in anxiety and depressive symptoms at 3-month follow-up. Among European Americans, writing that reflected downward social comparison predicted positive outcomes, whereas persistence writing themes were related to poorer outcomes. For Asian Americans, writing about persistence was related to positive outcomes, whereas downward social comparison and situational attributions predicted poorer outcomes. Findings provide evidence suggesting culturally distinct mechanisms for the effects of expressive disclosure. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Osteotomy does not improve early outcome after slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Diab, Mohammad; Daluvoy, Sanjay; Snyder, Brian D; Kasser, James R

    2006-03-01

    We performed a retrospective, nonrandomized cohort study of unilateral, chronic, severe, stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis comparing five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation alone with five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation combined with staged flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy to restore proximal femoral alignment. Functional outcome was measured by the Harris hip score, with 20% selected as a goal for improvement in functional outcome after corrective osteotomy. While flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy improved hip range of motion, we found no significant difference in functional outcome between the two groups at early follow-up. This is a level 3 evidence study.

  3. Narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder: improved symptom and interpersonal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vromans, Lynette P; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated depressive symptom and interpersonal relatedness outcomes from eight sessions of manualized narrative therapy for 47 adults with major depressive disorder. Post-therapy, depressive symptom improvement (d=1.36) and proportions of clients achieving reliable improvement (74%), movement to the functional population (61%), and clinically significant improvement (53%) were comparable to benchmark research outcomes. Post-therapy interpersonal relatedness improvement (d=.62) was less substantial than for symptoms. Three-month follow-up found maintenance of symptom, but not interpersonal gains. Benchmarking and clinical significance analyses mitigated repeated measure design limitations, providing empirical evidence to support narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder.

  4. Improving patient care: learning more from bad outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Neil J

    2005-01-01

    Many quality improvement efforts look in detail at episodes in which things have gone awry through error, to learn how to prevent repetition of that or related errors, with a particular focus on adverse drug reactions. Looking in a more global fashion at the various scenarios in which matters go amiss, rather than solely at the negative consequences of administering a therapy in error, allows us to derive more useful evidence about best therapeutic practice. An analytic strategy is presented to accomplish this aim, looking at the respective adverse effects associated with giving or with omitting a therapy, in each case both in situations in which the therapy is indicated and in situations in which it is contraindicated.

  5. Does computer-aided formative assessment improve learning outcomes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-02-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final exam marks, spending time on the CAA component of the course was negatively correlated with final exam performance. Students across the ability spectrum reduced their time commitment to CAA in their second semester, with weaker students achieving lower quiz totals, but with more able students' quiz marks hardly affected. Despite this lower quiz performance, the weaker students still improved their final exam marks in the second semester.

  6. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  7. Improving outcomes for patients receiving transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a cancer with increasing incidence in the veteran population. This type of cancer can be treated with transarterial chemoembolization, an invasive procedure performed by specially trained interventional radiologists. The most common serious complications are liver failure, sepsis secondary to ischemic cholecystitis or liver abscess, gastrointestinal bleeding, and death. However, nursing staff and physicians often have little or no experience in caring for patients in the hospital who have had this procedure. Patient safety can be threatened by this lack of knowledge. Sources of threat to patient safety are described by the Institute of Medicine as falling into 4 categories: management, workforce, work processes, and organizational culture. To promote patient safety, defenses need to be deployed to address each category. In this article, the author provides a case example, describes threats to the patient's safety, and describes a plan to improve the care of all patients undergoing this procedure.

  8. Surgical strategies to improve visual outcomes in corneal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, M S

    2014-01-01

    The recent years have brought about a sea change in the field of corneal transplantation with penetrating keratoplasty being phased to newer lamellar keratoplasty techniques for a variety of corneal pathology. Improved and innovative surgical techniques have allowed selective replacement of diseased host corneal layers with pre-prepared healthy donor corneal lamellae for anterior corneal disorders such as keratoconus and posterior corneal disorders such as Fuch's corneal endothelial dystrophy. The results of lamellar techniques are encouraging, with rapid visual rehabilitation and vastly reduced risk of immune-mediated transplant rejection. The techniques of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty and Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) continue to evolve with advent of femtosecond lasers and newer concepts such as pre-conditioned donor corneas for Microthin DSAEK and Descemet's membrane keratoplasty. This review describes the current developments in lamellar keratoplasty, including the futuristic approach using cell therapy to restore vision in corneal blindness. PMID:24384964

  9. Engaging with blended learning to improve students' learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Rebecca; Shannon, Susan J.

    2013-08-01

    When blended learning is embraced to enhance learning in engineering (architectural), design and architecture, we argue it is a best-practice instructional mode. Blended learning is the seamless amalgamation of carefully selected online modules with face-to-face instruction. This paper evaluates case studies of the introduction of blended learning in these disciplines. It demonstrates that students who do not engage with blended learning are academically disadvantaged. Alignment of the blended mode of delivery and the mode of assessment is next considered. Two case studies of the introduction of blended modes of assessment, for improved student satisfaction with feedback, are evaluated. Finally, the reliance upon non-faculty to provide both blended learning and assessment is evaluated using qualitative research methods to establish the barriers to adoption of what is now considered best educational practice.

  10. Revolutionising Bacteriology to Improve Treatment Outcomes and Antibiotic Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Livermore, David M

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory investigation of bacterial infections generally takes two days: one to grow the bacteria and another to identify them and to test their susceptibility. Meanwhile the patient is treated empirically, based on likely pathogens and local resistance rates. Many patients are over-treated to prevent under-treatment of a few, compromising antibiotic stewardship. Molecular diagnostics have potential to improve this situation by accelerating precise diagnoses and the early refinement of antibiotic therapy. They include: (i) the use of 'biomarkers' to swiftly distinguish patients with bacterial infection, and (ii) molecular bacteriology to identify pathogens and their resistance genes in clinical specimens, without culture. Biomarker interest centres on procalcitonin, which has given good results particularly for pneumonias, though broader biomarker arrays may prove superior in the future. PCRs already are widely used to diagnose a few infections (e.g. tuberculosis) whilst multiplexes are becoming available for bacteraemia, pneumonia and gastrointestinal infection. These detect likely pathogens, but are not comprehensive, particularly for resistance genes; there is also the challenge of linking pathogens and resistance genes when multiple organisms are present in a sample. Next-generation sequencing offers more comprehensive profiling, but obstacles include sensitivity when the bacterial load is low, as in bacteraemia, and the imperfect correlation of genotype and phenotype. In short, rapid molecular bacteriology presents great potential to improve patient treatments and antibiotic stewardship but faces many technical challenges; moreover it runs counter to the current nostrum of defining resistance in pharmacodynamic terms, rather than by the presence of a mechanism, and the policy of centralising bacteriology services. PMID:24265945

  11. Local mild hypothermia therapy as an augmentation strategy for minimally invasive surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Sheng, Ke; Su, Meilan; Yang, Nan; Wan, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies reported that the mild hypothermia therapy (MHT) could significantly improve the clinical outcomes for patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HICH). Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to systematically assess whether the addition of local MHT (LMHT) could significantly improve the efficacy of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in treating HICH. Methods Randomized clinical trials on the combined application of MIS and LMHT (MIS+LMHT) vs MIS alone for treating HICH were searched up to September 2016 in databases. Response rate and mortality rate were the primary outcomes, and the neurologic function and Barthel index were the secondary outcomes. Side effects were also analyzed. Results Totally, 28 studies composed of 2,325 patients were included to compare the efficacy of MIS+LMHT to MIS alone. The therapeutic effects of MIS+LMHT were significantly better than MIS alone. The pooled odds ratio of response rate and mortality rate was 2.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]=2.22–3.24) and 0.43 (95% CI=0.32–0.57), respectively. In addition, the MIS+LMHT led to a significantly better improvement in the neurologic function and activities of daily living. The incidence of pneumonia was similar between the two treatment methods. Conclusion These results indicated that compared to MIS alone, the MIS+LMHT could be more effective for the acute treatment of patients with HICH. This treatment modality should be further explored and optimized. PMID:28096671

  12. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as “lung age” should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  13. Clavanin A Improves Outcome of Complications from Different Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Rodrigues, Elaine A.; Holanda, Hortência H. S.; Novaes, Natasha R. F.; Cunha, Junia P. A.; Rezende, Taia M. B.; Magalhães, Kelly G.; Moreno, Susana E.; Jerônimo, Márcio S.; Bocca, Anamélia L.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in the incidence of multidrug-resistant infections today has led to enormous interest in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as suitable compounds for developing unusual antibiotics. In this study, clavanin A, an antimicrobial peptide previously isolated from the marine tunicate Styela clava, was selected as a purposeful molecule that could be used in controlling infection and further synthesized. Clavanin A was in vitro evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as toward L929 mouse fibroblasts and skin primary cells (SPCs). Moreover, this peptide was challenged here in an in vivo wound and sepsis model, and the immune response was also analyzed. Despite displaying clear in vitro antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, clavanin A showed no cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, and in acute toxicity tests, no adverse reaction was observed at any of the concentrations. Moreover, clavanin A significantly reduced the S. aureus CFU in an experimental wound model. This peptide also reduced the mortality of mice infected with E. coli and S. aureus by 80% compared with that of control animals (treated with phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]): these data suggest that clavanin A prevents the start of sepsis and thereby reduces mortality. These data suggest that clavanin A is an AMP that could improve the development of novel peptide-based strategies for the treatment of wound and sepsis infections. PMID:25547358

  14. Trial protocol OPPTIMUM– Does progesterone prophylaxis for the prevention of preterm labour improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is a global problem, with a prevalence of 8 to 12% depending on location. Several large trials and systematic reviews have shown progestogens to be effective in preventing or delaying preterm birth in selected high risk women with a singleton pregnancy (including those with a short cervix or previous preterm birth). Although an improvement in short term neonatal outcomes has been shown in some trials these have not consistently been confirmed in meta-analyses. Additionally data on longer term outcomes is limited to a single trial where no difference in outcomes was demonstrated at four years of age of the child, despite those in the “progesterone” group having a lower incidence of preterm birth. Methods/Design The OPPTIMUM study is a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial to determine whether progesterone prophylaxis to prevent preterm birth has long term neonatal or infant benefit. Specifically it will study whether, in women with singleton pregnancy and at high risk of preterm labour, prophylactic vaginal natural progesterone, 200 mg daily from 22 – 34 weeks gestation, compared to placebo, improves obstetric outcome by lengthening pregnancy thus reducing the incidence of preterm delivery (before 34 weeks), improves neonatal outcome by reducing a composite of death and major morbidity, and leads to improved childhood cognitive and neurosensory outcomes at two years of age. Recruitment began in 2009 and is scheduled to close in Spring 2013. As of May 2012, over 800 women had been randomized in 60 sites. Discussion OPPTIMUM will provide further evidence on the effectiveness of vaginal progesterone for prevention of preterm birth and improvement of neonatal outcomes in selected groups of women with singleton pregnancy at high risk of preterm birth. Additionally it will determine whether any reduction in the incidence of preterm birth is accompanied by improved childhood outcome. Trial registration ISRCTN14568373 PMID

  15. Accidental Hypothermia among the Elderly: An Educational Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Marc B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the problem of hypothermia and specific factors that put older adults at risk. Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an educationally oriented prevention program. Data suggested the information presented through community education was effective. (Author/JAC)

  16. Mild hypothermia alters midazolam pharmacokinetics in normal healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Zhou, Jiangquan; Tortorici, Michael A; Bies, Robert R; Rittenberger, Jon C; Empey, Philip E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Callaway, Clifton W; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2010-05-01

    The clinical use of therapeutic hypothermia has been rapidly expanding due to evidence of neuroprotection. However, the effect of hypothermia on specific pathways of drug elimination in humans is relatively unknown. To gain insight into the potential effects of hypothermia on drug metabolism and disposition, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of midazolam as a probe for CYP3A4/5 activity during mild hypothermia in human volunteers. A second objective of this work was to determine whether benzodiazepines and magnesium administered intravenously would facilitate the induction of hypothermia. Subjects were enrolled in a randomized crossover study, which included two mild hypothermia groups (4 degrees C saline infusions and 4 degrees C saline + magnesium) and two normothermia groups (37 degrees C saline infusions and 37 degrees C saline + magnesium). The lowest temperatures achieved in the 4 degrees C saline + magnesium and 4 degrees C saline infusions were 35.4 +/- 0.4 and 35.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C, respectively. A significant decrease in the formation clearance of the major metabolite 1'-hydroxymidazolam was observed during the 4 degrees C saline + magnesium compared with that in the 37 degrees C saline group (p < 0.05). Population pharmacokinetic modeling identified a significant relationship between temperature and clearance and intercompartmental clearance for midazolam. This model predicted that midazolam clearance decreases 11.1% for each degree Celsius reduction in core temperature from 36.5 degrees C. Midazolam with magnesium facilitated the induction of hypothermia, but shivering was minimally suppressed. These data provided proof of concept that even mild and short-duration changes in body temperature significantly affect midazolam metabolism. Future studies in patients who receive lower levels and a longer duration of hypothermia are warranted.

  17. Role of Neurotensin in Radiation-Induced Hypothermia in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    variety of behavioral and physiolog- of Neurotensin in Radiation-induced Hypothermia in Rat.A- ical effects, including the stimulation of histamine relmeas...induction of hypothermia, after intracisternal or intraven- was examined. Intracerebroventricular (IafCV) adminis-tration of tricular administration...1S-4 7). ’The purposes of this study ne-urotensin produced dose-dependent hypoihermia. Histamine were to investigate the role of neurotensin in

  18. A novel stroke therapy of pharmacologically induced hypothermia after focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ko-Eun; Hall, Casey L.; Sun, Jin-Mei; Wei, Ling; Mohamad, Osama; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan P.

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence from preclinical and clinical studies has shown that mild to moderate hypothermia is neuroprotective against ischemic stroke. Clinical applications of hypothermia therapy, however, have been hindered by current methods of physical cooling, which is generally inefficient and impractical in clinical situations. In this report, we demonstrate the potential of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) by the novel neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist ABS-201 in a focal ischemic model of adult mice. ABS-201 (1.5–2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduces body and brain temperature by 2–5°C in 15–30 min in a dose-dependent manner without causing shivering or altering physiological parameters. Infarct volumes at 24 h after stroke are reduced by ∼30–40% when PIH therapy is initiated either immediately after stroke induction or after 30–60 min delay. ABS-201 treatment increases bcl-2 expression, decreases caspase-3 activation, and TUNEL-positive cells in the peri-infarct region, and suppresses autophagic cell death compared to stroke controls. The PIH therapy using ABS-201 improves recovery of sensorimotor function as tested 21 d after stroke. These results suggest that PIH induced by neurotensin analogs represented by ABS-201 are promising candidates for treatment of ischemic stroke and possibly for other ischemic or traumatic injuries. Choi, K.-E., Hall, C. L., Sun, J.-M., Wei, L., Mohamad, O., Dix, T. A., Yu, S. P. A novel stroke therapy of pharmacologically induced hypothermia after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. PMID:22459147

  19. [Effect of very early kangaroo care on extrauterine temperature adaptation in newborn infants with hypothermia problems].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Huang, Ching-Yi; Lin, Shiu-Mei; Wu, Shu-Chuan

    2006-08-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality has been associated with neonates admitted with body temperatures below 36 degrees C. We employed an experimental design in a randomized control trial to compare the effectiveness of using early kangaroo care (KC) for extrauterine temperature adaptation against that of using radiant warmers. Trial subjects included 78 consecutive cesarean newborn infants with hypothermia problems. The KC group received skin-to-skin contact with their mothers in the post-operative room, while infants in the control group received routine care under radiant warmers. The mean temperature of the KC group was slightly higher than that of the control group (36.29 degrees C vs. 36.22 degrees C, p = .044). After four hours, 97.43% of KC group infants had reached normal body temperatures, compared with 82.05% in the radiant warmer group. Results demonstrate the positive effects of KC for extrauterine temperature adaptation in hypothermia infants. In the course of evidence-based practice, KC could be incorporated into the standard care regimen in order to improve hypothermia care.

  20. 248: Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta Improves Survival in Lethal Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    DEC 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 248: Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta...Silverstein1, Brian Faley1; 1Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ Learning Objectives: Despite the benefit of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) seen...clinicians in prediction of functional outcomes post TH. 248 RESUSCITATIVE ENDOVASCULAR BALLOON OCCLUSION OF THE AORTA IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN LETHAL

  1. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting.

  2. Improving Academic Outcomes for Disadvantaged Students: Scaling up Individualized Tutorials. Policy Proposal 2016-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ander, Roseanna; Guryan, Jonathan; Ludwig, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Improving the educational outcomes of economically disadvantaged children is a policy priority in the United States, and yet relatively little progress has been made in recent decades. Education reforms that aim to help economically disadvantaged students often focus on improving the quality with which grade-level material is taught, or the…

  3. Using Outcome to Improve a Career Development Course: Closing the Scientist-Practitioner Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Robert J.; Miller, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    The use of outcome data can serve as an important catalyst for improving career interventions. A follow-up to the Reese and Miller study was conducted over a 2-year period to assess whether modifications made to the course using the Reese and Miller data as a baseline resulted in subsequent improvements. Using a prepost group design that compared…

  4. Improving Adult Literacy Outcomes: Lessons from Cognitive Research for Developing Countries. Directions in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abadzi, Helen

    Adult literacy program outcomes have been disappointing. A number of principals and methods from cognitive and neuropsychological research can be used to make literacy instruction more effective, including the following: improving cognitive function; fast reading; reading practice; literacy as a motivator; and improving use of class time.…

  5. Moneyball for Head Start: Using Data, Evidence, and Evaluation to Improve Outcomes for Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Sara; Mitchel, Ashley LiBetti

    2016-01-01

    Head Start is a valuable federal program that improves the lives of our nation's most vulnerable children and their families. Research shows that Head Start programs improve children's learning at school entry and have a positive impact on long-term life outcomes. Research also suggests that Head Start could have a stronger impact on children's…

  6. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  7. [Induced hypothermia/normothermia with general anesthesia prevents neurological damage in children with febrile refractory status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Taku; Fujita, Kyoko; Saji, Yohsuke; Maruyama, Azusa; Nagase, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is defined as persistence of seizure activity despite appropriate medical and antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. Febrile RSE is often caused by presumed encephalitis and has a high morbidity rate. In addition, it is believed that hyperthermia aggravates epileptic brain damage. The efficacy of hypothermia/normothermia (H/N) therapy against brain damage has been proposed, but there have been limited studies reporting on the efficacy of this treatment against febrile RSE. To study the efficacy of induced H/N with general anesthesia therapy in children with febrile RSE, a retrospective review of RSE cases was conducted in 28 children hospitalized in the tertiary pediatric intensive care center of Kobe Children's Hospital, Japan, between October 2002 and August 2009. Clinical outcomes and neurological sequelae using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) score were compared after one month of treatment with either H/N (34 degrees C-36 degrees C) with general anesthesia therapy or with other conventional therapies. Cases were categorized as those with good recovery (PCPC=1) or poor outcome (PCPC=2-6). Twelve children underwent H/N with general anesthesia therapy, while 16 children were treated by conventional therapy using intravenous diazepam and/or midazolam. Treatment with H/N significantly improved outcome compared to conventional therapies (p=0.024; Fisher's exact test). Five of 6 patients with poor outcome had a final diagnosis of acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE). Treatment with H/N therapy may reduce neurological damage in the development of AEFCSE caused by febrile RSE in children.

  8. SBDPs and Tau proteins for diagnosis and hypothermia therapy in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongwei; Li, Zhenguang; Yang, Xia; Liu, Jinfeng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The use of spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) and Tau protein levels for diagnosis and a mild hypothermia therapy for treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) was evaluated. One hundred and fifty infants, with HIE within 12 h after birth, participated in the study. There were 30 newborns with mild symptoms, 60 with moderate symptoms, 60 with severe symptoms, and 30 in a control group. Regular therapy was used for the control and the mild HIE groups, and also for 30 cases in the group with moderate symptoms and for 30 in the group with severe symptoms. For the remaining infants, with moderate and severe symptoms, mild hypothermia therapy was used instead. A sandwich ELISA measured plasma concentrations of SBDPs and Tau proteins, at different time-points. For clinical follow-up, the neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) assay and the Gesell development scale were performed at different time-points. The levels of SBDP and Tau proteins increased with the exacerbation of HIE, and decreased with the prolongation of therapy with statistically significant differences amongst groups. After treatment, the levels of SBDP and Tau proteins in groups with moderate and severe symptoms treated with mild hypothermia therapy were significantly lower than those of the groups treated with regular therapy. NBNA scores and the developmental quotient (DQ) were both worse with the increase in severity of HIE, however, the scores of groups with moderate and severe symptoms treated with mild hypothermia therapy were significantly better than those of groups treated with regular therapy (P<0.05). A gradual improvement of DQ was seen in the process of therapy in each group (P<0.05). According to a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, at a critical plasma concentration of SBDPs of 1.58 ng/ml, the sensitivity and specificity for HIE diagnosis was 84.6 and 87.5%, respectively. The ROC analysis for Tau protein yielded a sensitivity and

  9. Visual working memory in deaf children with diverse communication modes: improvement by differential outcomes.

    PubMed

    López-Crespo, Ginesa; Daza, María Teresa; Méndez-López, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Although visual functions have been proposed to be enhanced in deaf individuals, empirical studies have not yet established clear evidence on this issue. The present study aimed to determine whether deaf children with diverse communication modes had superior visual memory and whether their performance was improved by the use of differential outcomes. Severely or profoundly deaf children who employed spoken Spanish, Spanish Sign Language (SSL), and both spoken Spanish and SSL modes of communication were tested in a delayed matching-to-sample task for visual working memory assessment. Hearing controls were used to compare performance. Participants were tested in two conditions, differential outcome and non-differential outcome conditions. Deaf groups with either oral or SSL modes of communication completed the task with less accuracy than bilingual and control hearing children. In addition, the performances of all groups improved through the use of differential outcomes.

  10. Morphological study of the relation between accidental hypothermia and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Foulis, A K

    1982-01-01

    There is a recognised but poorly understood association between hypothermia and acute pancreatitis. A histological study of the pancreas was made in eight patients with accidental hypothermia who had evidence of pancreatitis at necropsy. From an analysis of the patterns of parenchymal necrosis in the pancreas it was thought that there were at least three possible mechanisms for the relation between hypothermia and pancreatitis. Firstly, that ischaemic pancreatitis may result from the "microcirculatory shock" of hypothermia. Secondly, that both hypothermia and pancreatitis may be secondary to alcohol abuse: and finally, that severe pancreatitis may be the primary disease and that hypothermia results from the patients' social circumstances. Images PMID:7142433

  11. Implementation of Neurocritical Care Is Associated With Improved Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Mypinder S; Gooderham, Peter; Toyota, Brian; Kherzi, Navid; Hu, Vivien; Dhingra, Vinay K; Hameed, Morad S; Chittock, Dean R; Griesdale, Donald E

    2017-03-27

    Background Traditionally, the delivery of dedicated neurocritical care (NCC) occurs in distinct NCC units and is associated with improved outcomes. Institution-specific logistical challenges pose barriers to the development of distinct NCC units; therefore, we developed a consultancy NCC service coupled with the implementation of invasive multimodal neuromonitoring, within a medical-surgical intensive care unit. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of a consultancy NCC program on neurologic outcomes in severe traumatic brain injury patients.

  12. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed.

  13. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  14. Mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroprotective effects of combined therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Feng; Li, Qifeng; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation. In this study, we determined if mild hypothermia (27–28°C) can increase the survival rate of neural stem cells (1.0 × 105/μL) transplanted into neonatal mice with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Long-term effects on neurological functioning of the mice were also examined. After mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation, we observed decreased expression levels of inflammatory factor nuclear factor-kappa B and apoptotic factor caspase-3, reduced cerebral infarct volumes, increased survival rate of transplanted cells, and marked improvements in neurological function. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation are superior to those of monotherapy. Moreover, our findings suggest that the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are achieved by anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25422635

  15. Effects of hypothermia on skeletal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaldırım, Ümit; Akyıldız, Faruk; Bilgiç, Serkan; Koca, Kenan; Poyrazoğlu, Yavuz; Uysal, Ozgür Selim; Turğut, Hasan; Türkkan, Selim; Erşen, Ömer; Topal, Turgut; Ozkan, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hypothermia (H) on skeletal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in rats by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), nitric oxide (NO), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in muscle, and measureing immunohistochemical-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) staining of skeletal muscle. Materials and Methods Eighteen Wistar Albino rats were divided randomly into three groups (sham, IR, hypothermia) (n=6). The sham group had all procedures without the IR period. The lower right extremity of rats in the IR and hypothermia groups was subjected to 2 hours of ischemia and 22 hours of reperfusion by applying a clamp on the common iliac artery and a rubber-band at the level of the lesser trochanter under general anesthesia. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent 4 hours of hypothermia during the first four hours of reperfusion in addition to a 2-hour ischemia and 22-hour reperfusion period. All rats were sacrificed at end of the IR period using a high dose of anesthesia. The tibialis anterior muscles were preserved. Immunohistochemical iNOS staining was performed, and MDA, SOD, GSH-Px, NO, and IL-1β were measured in the muscle. Results The level of MDA, NO, and IL-1β in muscle was increased in the IR group compared with that in the sham group, but these parameters were decreased in the hypothermia group compared with the IR group. The activities of SOD and GSH-Px in muscle were decreased in the IR group; however, these parameters were increased in the hypothermia group. The score and intensity of iNOS staining of skeletal muscle was dens in IR group, mild in hypothermia group, and weak in sham group. Conclusion The present study has shown that hypothermia reduced IR injury in the skeletal muscle by decreasing the levels of MDA, NO, and IL-1β, and increasing the activities of SOD and GSH-Px. In addition, hypothermia attenuated the score and intensity of i

  16. Breast Reconstruction Using Contour Fenestrated AlloDerm: Does Improvement in Design Translate to Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Jordan D.; Alperovich, Michael; Weichman, Katie E.; Wilson, Stelios C.; Hazen, Alexes; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Levine, Jamie P.; Choi, Mihye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices are used in implant-based breast reconstruction. The introduction of contour fenestrated AlloDerm (Life-Cell, Branchburg, N.J.) offers sterile processing, a crescent shape, and prefabricated fenestrations. However, any evidence comparing reconstructive outcomes between this newer generation acellular dermal matrices and earlier versions is lacking. Methods: Patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction from 2010 to 2014 were identified. Reconstructive outcomes were stratified by 4 types of implant coverage: aseptic AlloDerm, sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm, contour fenestrated AlloDerm, or total submuscular coverage. Outcomes were compared with significance set at P < 0.05. Results: A total of 620 patients (1019 reconstructions) underwent immediate, implant-based breast reconstruction; patients with contour fenestrated AlloDerm were more likely to have nipple-sparing mastectomy (P = 0.0001, 0.0004, and 0.0001) and immediate permanent implant reconstructions (P = 0.0001). Those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had lower infection rates requiring oral (P = 0.0016) and intravenous antibiotics (P = 0.0012) compared with aseptic AlloDerm coverage. Compared with sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm had similar infection outcomes but significantly more minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0023). Compared with total submuscular coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had similar infection outcomes but significantly more explantations (P = 0.0001), major (P = 0.0130) and minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0001). Significant independent risk factors for increased infection were also identified. Conclusions: Contour fenestrated AlloDerm reduces infections compared with aseptic AlloDerm, but infection rates are similar to those of sterile, ready-to-use AlloDerm and total submuscular coverage. PMID:26495218

  17. Physiatrists and developmental pediatricians working together to improve outcomes in children with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Mark E; Dicianno, Brad E

    2010-08-01

    Based on the experience of 2 physicians from physiatry and developmental pediatrics, this article proposes a framework for improving care and outcomes for children with spina bifida. The combined skills of physiatrists and developmental pediatricians, along with other disciplines, can form the ideal team to manage the complex issues faced by this population. The developmental pediatrician is best suited for directing care for younger children through the elementary and middle school years, during which time behavioral and educational issues are prominent. As the child assumes more responsibility for self-management in adolescence, the physiatrist is ideally suited to provide major clinical input that improves functional outcomes. The addition of the discipline of physiatry to traditional, developmentally oriented pediatric interdisciplinary teams can add the much needed dimensions of activity and participation, and improve functional outcomes at the adult level by encouraging activities in adolescence that lead to full participation in adulthood.

  18. Can miniature pulpotomy procedure improve treatment outcomes of direct pulp capping?

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp exposure is a common incident during dental treatment. If there are clinical signs of pulp vitality, it is recommended to carry out direct pulp capping (DPC) using appropriate pulp covering agents (PCA). The main objectives are maintenance of pulp vitality/healing along with the formation of a calcified bridge beneath the PCA. Our proposed hypothesis is based on consideration of biologic principles in order to achieve improved treatment outcomes of DPC for cariously exposed pulp using miniature pulpotomy procedure (MPP). MPP will result in improved treatment outcomes of DPC by improved maintenance of a clean surgical pulp wound; removal of infected dentin chips/damaged pulp tissue specially injured odontoblast cells; improved proximity/interaction of PCA to undifferentiated mesenchymal/stem cells; better control of bleeding; and creating an improved seal using PCA.

  19. The RAISE Connection Program for Early Psychosis: Secondary Outcomes and Mediators and Moderators of Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Leslie; Nossel, Ilana; Choi, Jean C.; Nuechterlein, Keith; Wang, Yuanjia; Essock, Susan; Bennett, Melanie; McNamara, Karen; Mendon, Sapna; Dixon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore secondary outcomes of a coordinated specialty care program for persons with early psychosis, including quality of life and recovery, as well as to explore mediators and moderators of improvement in occupational and social functioning and symptoms. Sixty-five individuals across two sites were enrolled and received services for up to two years. Trajectories for individuals’ outcomes, over time were examined using linear and quadratic mixed-effects models with repeated measures. In addition, baseline prognostic factors of participant improvement in social and occupational functioning were explored based on previous literature and expert opinion of the analytic team. Results demonstrate that the program was effective in improving quality of life and recovery, over time. Furthermore, processing speed was identified as a significant moderator of improvement in occupational GAF, and treatment fidelity, engagement, and family involvement were identified as mediators of improvement in social and occupational functioning. PMID:25900546

  20. A quality improvement project to optimize patient outcomes following the maze procedure.

    PubMed

    Henry, Linda L; Ad, Niv; Martin, Lisa; Hunt, Sharon; Crippen, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common of all clinically sustained heart arrhythmias with associated morbidities (shortness of breath, fatigue, and stroke). The maze cardiac surgical procedure is a new treatment option available for patients who have medical refractory AF. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a written postdischarge protocol was necessary to improve outcomes following the maze procedure. Only 3 (27%) patients with AF were actively treated by an arrhythmia protocol for restoration of sinus rhythm. Unnecessary pharmacologic management for AF was found in 44 patients with normal sinus rhythm. A postdischarge protocol was developed that improved outcomes.

  1. Does pre-operative physiotherapy improve outcomes from lower limb joint replacement surgery? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Bennell, Kim L

    2004-01-01

    A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-operative physiotherapy programmes on outcome following lower limb joint replacement surgery. A search of relevant key terms was used to find suitable trials, with five papers meeting the inclusion criteria for the review. The methodological quality of the trials was rated using the PEDro scale. Estimates of the size of treatment effects were calculated for each outcome in each trial, with 95% confidence intervals calculated where sufficient data were provided. Of the three trials pertaining to total knee replacement, only very small mean differences were found between control and intervention groups for all of the outcome measures. Where confidence intervals could be calculated, these showed no clinically important differences between the groups. Two papers (one study) pertaining to total hip replacements found significant improvements in WOMAC scores, hip strength and range of movement, walking distance, cadence, and gait velocity for the intervention group, compared to a control group. Estimates of treatment effect sizes for these outcomes were larger than for the total knee replacement studies, with confidence intervals showing potentially clinically important differences between group means. However, as the intervention group also received an additional intensive post-operative physiotherapy program, these results cannot be attributed solely to the pre-operative program. This systematic review shows that pre-operative physiotherapy programmes are not effective in improving outcome after total knee replacement but their effect on outcome from total hip replacement cannot be adequately determined.

  2. Hypometabolism and hypothermia in the rat model of endotoxic shock: independence of circulatory hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Joshua J; Fonseca, Monique T; Flatow, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Kevin; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2014-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that development of hypothermia instead of fever in endotoxic shock is consequential to hypoxia. Endotoxic shock was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 μg kg(-1) i.v.) in rats at an ambient temperature of 22 °C. A β3-adrenergic agonist known to activate metabolic heat production, CL316,243, was employed to evaluate whether thermogenic capacity could be impaired by the fall in oxygen delivery (ḊO2) during endotoxic shock. This possibility was rejected as CL316,243 (0.15 mg kg(-1) i.v.) evoked similar rises in oxygen consumption (V̇O2) in the presence and absence of endotoxic shock. Next, to investigate whether a less severe form of circulatory hypoxia could be triggering hypothermia, the circulating volume of LPS-injected rats was expanded using 6% hetastarch with the intention of improving tissue perfusion and alleviating hypoxia. This intervention attenuated not only the fall in arterial pressure induced by LPS, but also the associated falls in V̇O2 and body temperature. These effects, however, occurred independently of hypoxia, as they were not accompanied by any detectable changes in NAD(+)/NADH ratios. Further experimentation revealed that even the earliest drops in cardiac output and ḊO2 during endotoxic shock did not precede the reduction in V̇O2 that brings about hypothermia. In fact, ḊO2 and V̇O2 fell in such a synchrony that the ḊO2/V̇O2 ratio remained unaffected. Only when hypothermia was prevented by exposure to a warm environment (30 °C) did an imbalance in the ḊO2/V̇O2 ratio become evident, and such an imbalance was associated with reductions in the renal and hypothalamic NAD(+)/NADH ratios. In conclusion, hypometabolism and hypothermia in endotoxic shock are not consequential to hypoxia but serve as a pre-emptive strategy to avoid hypoxia in this model.

  3. Improving patient outcomes with technology and social media in paediatric diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sze May

    2015-01-01

    The UK has the highest number of children and young people with diagnosed Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Europe, but the lowest numbers attaining good diabetes control (1, 2). Novel strategies and incorporation of digital strategies were identified in the team for development to improve overall patient care and outcomes in our population of children and young people with T1DM. Within a dual-site integrated care organisation, 3 digital initiatives were proposed from 2012-2013 to 1) establish Facebook communications with parents/patients, 2) to implement an electronic diabetes information management system (using Twinkle.Net) and 3) to undertake routine uploading of blood glucose meters and insulin pumps (using DIASEND®) with the aim to improve outcomes in paediatric diabetes care. Key objectives for the three initiatives were aimed to optimise the following outcomes: • Reduce HbA1c levels • Decrease emergency admissions, reduce diabetes-related complications and minimise the length of hospital stays • Improve patient satisfaction and communication • Improve efficiencies with mandatory audit submissions • Empower patients, parents, and the multidisciplicnary team with accurate, real-time information. These digital initiatives showed effective use of technology and social media in achieving significant improvements in all the outcomes within the objectives.

  4. [Subcutaneous fat necrosis and persistent hypercalcaemia in a newborn treated with therapeutic neonatal hypothermia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Martínez de Zabarte Fernández, José M; Laliena Aznar, Sara; Corella Aznar, Elena; Cuadrado Piqueras, Laura; Oliván del Cacho, María J; Pinillos Pisón, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the current standard treatment in newborns with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, changing the outcome of these children. It is considered a safe technique with almost no side effects. A possible adverse side event is subcutaneous fat necrosis, which is an acute self-limiting panniculitis that develops during the first weeks of life. We report a case of a newborn at term suffering hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with a generalized multiform erythematous rash and firm and indurated plaques over the back, buttocks and extremities on his 12th day of life after being treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Histopathological study after skin punchbiopsy confirmed the suspicion of subcutaneous fat necrosis. The infant developed asymptomatic moderate hypercalcaemia within the first month of life, which was treated with intravenous fluids and diuretics. Serum calcium levels decreased and normalized in 3 months, with progressive disappearance of skin lesions.

  5. Parental Leave Policy as a Strategy to Improve Outcomes among Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Jennifer C; Klawetter, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Although gains have been made in premature birth rates among racial and ethnic minority and low socioeconomic status populations, tremendous disparities still exist in both prematurity rates and health outcomes for preterm infants. Parental involvement is known to improve health outcomes for preterm babies. However, a gap in evidence exists around whether parental involvement can help ameliorate the disparities in both short- and long-term out-comes for their preterm children. Families more likely to experience preterm birth are also less likely to have access to paid leave and thus experience significant systemic barriers to involvement, especially when their newborns are hospitalized. This article describes the research gap in this area and explores pathways by which social workers may ameliorate disparities in preterm birth outcomes through practice, policy, and research.

  6. Hypothermia: its possible role in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sealy, W C

    1989-05-01

    The current safety of operations on the heart requiring cardiopulmonary bypass occurred because of a series of step-by-step laboratory and clinical investigations that were compromises between the time needed for heart repair and the brain's requirement for oxygen. The first step, so clearly shown in a paper by Bigelow and associates in 1950, was the reduction of the brain's need for oxygen by surface cooling to 28 degrees to 32 degrees C, limited to this level by cardiac and pulmonary failure at levels lower than this. The six to eight minutes of circulatory arrest permitted time for repair of simple defects. This method was rapidly adopted by many surgeons. As low-flow pump oxygenators became available, blood cooling to 10 degrees to 20 degrees C was introduced. This increased the periods of circulatory arrest to 30 to 60 minutes, and also made still longer periods of bypass with the pump oxygenator possible. Hypothermia to reduce oxygen and metabolic requirements is still an important adjunct to bypass, even with the currently used efficient pump oxygenators. It remains the most important component of myocardial preservation, and has made possible the delay needed for transportation between the harvesting and the transplantation of organs.

  7. Naltrexone-induced hypothermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ary, M; Chesarek, W; Sorensen, S M; Lomax, P

    1976-10-01

    Naltrexone, in relatively high doses, has been reported to cause a fall in body temperature in human ex-heroin addicts who had been abstinent for at least 6 weeks. The underlying mechanism of this hypothermic effect has been investigated in rats. The first consideration was that the temperature change was a reflection of delayed withdrawal but rats implanted with a morphine pellet 45 days earlier showed no significant change in temperature after a dose of naltrexone that caused marked withdrawal hypothermia in dependent rats implanted 3 days previously. A fall in core temperature was only induced in rats after doses of 80 and 160 mg/kg i.p. of naltrexone. Behavioral thermoregulatory studies revealed that the animals correct the falling body temperature by increased exposure to a radiant heat source indicating that the central thermostats had not been significantly affected by the drug. These data suggest that the major component in the hypothermic effect of naltrexone is activation of efferent heat loss pathways or peripheral heat loss mechanisms. Due to current suggestions that opiate receptors might represent the receptors for an endogenous transmitter the results are discussed in relation to this consideration. When compared to the sites and mechanism of action of opiates on thermoregulation the results with naltrexone lend little support to the hypothesis that the fall in temperature is due to displacement of an endogenous substance from central opiate receptors.

  8. Effects of improved patient participation in primary care on health-related outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Ariëtte R J; van Weeghel, Inge; Vogelaar, Maartje; Verheul, William; Pieters, Ron H M; de Wit, Niek J; Bensing, Jozien M

    2013-01-01

    Background. In primary care, many consultations address symptom-based complaints. Recovery from these complaints seldom exceeds placebo effects. Patient participation, because of its supposed effects on trust and patient expectancies, is assumed to benefit patients’ recovery. While the idea is theoretically promising, it is still unclear what the effects of increased patient participation are on patient outcomes. Aim. To review the effects of controlled intervention studies aiming to improve patient participation in face-to-face primary care consultations on patient-oriented and/or disease-oriented outcomes. Methods. This study is a systematic review. A systematic search was undertaken for randomized controlled trials designed to measure the effects of interventions that aimed to improve adult patients’ participation in primary care visits. The CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched. Results. Seven different trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Three of the studies were related to symptom-based complaints. Five studies measured patient-oriented outcomes, the primary outcome of interest for this review. All studies suffered from substantial bias. Studies varied widely in their aims, types of complaints/diseases, strength of the interventions and their outcomes. The effects on patient-oriented outcomes and disease-oriented outcomes were ambiguous. Conclusion. Little research has been performed on health outcomes of interventions aiming to increase patient participation in general practice visits among patients suffering from symptom-based complaints. The results still are non-conclusive. The quality of the trials has been weak, possibly due to the complexity of the concept. This weak quality may explain the lack of conclusive results. Proposals for future research designs are offered. PMID:23629738

  9. Patient-provider partnerships in healthcare: enhancing knowledge translation and improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Montague, Terrence

    2006-01-01

    In the complex health arena, a key proposition is that no person acting alone is as effective as a team to drive best practices and outcomes. Another key factor supporting best outcomes is access to the best information to support best choices. Currently, stakeholders suffer from a paucity of real-world knowledge of actual practices and outcomes that allows care gaps to go undiscovered. A body of evidence indicates that measurement and timely feedback of actual practices can decrease the gaps between usual and best care. This is driven by the stakeholders' desire to be the best they can be, and it is enabled by the measured knowledge of where practices fall short of gold standards. The addition of patient partners to such communities of care offers promise of further acceleration and broader impact of knowledge translation and associated beneficial outcomes. For example, in the Improving Cardiac Outcomes in Nova Scotia (ICONS) community-based heart disease project, there was a marked decrease in rates of re-hospitalization over the five-year course of the project. This improvement was only very weakly, or not at all, related to traditional risk factors, such as the presence of multiple illnesses or older age, or to the use of efficacious medical therapies. However, ICONS provided an extensive and repeated multimedia communication among patients, families and providers of project goals, strategy and general news, as well as repeated measurements of practices and outcomes. One outcome of this shared knowledge may have been the reduced need for re-hospitalization. While exact cause-and-effect relationship remain uncertain, patient-provider integrated health networks appear feasible and offer promise for efficient knowledge creation and its population-effective translation. The model and its implementation may be improved by testing further locally responsive initiatives in innovative partnership clusters and by training more personnel resources in inter

  10. Integrating hospital administrative data to improve health care efficiency and outcomes: "the socrates story".

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes.

  11. Integrating Hospital Administrative Data to Improve Health Care Efficiency and Outcomes: “The Socrates Story”

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

  12. A Post-operative Feeding Protocol to Improve Outcomes for Neonates With Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Jennifer; Fry-Bowers, Eileen

    2017-01-04

    Neonates with critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) are vulnerable to malnutrition during the post-operative period due to hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism. To improve nutritional outcomes during hospitalization, a nurse led post-operative enteral feeding protocol was implemented at a large U.S. children's hospital. During an eight-month implementation period, twenty-one neonates met protocol inclusion criteria. Days for neonates to achieve goal caloric feedings (120kcal/kg/day) were decreased. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed serum albumin levels and serial anthropometric measurements improved significantly throughout hospitalization (p<0.005). Results from this quality improvement project show standardizing nutritional care for neonates with CCHD during the post-operative period is an effective way to improve nutritional outcomes and shorten length of hospital stay.

  13. [Computer-assisted cardiovascular disease management: better implementation of care but no improvement in clinical outcomes].

    PubMed

    de Wit, Niek J

    2012-01-01

    Computer support is considered by many to be a promising strategy for improving healthcare interventions, especially in the management of chronic diseases. So far, however, evidence of the effectiveness of ICT support in healthcare is limited. Recently, computer-supported cardiovascular disease management was compared with usual care during an RCT comprised of 1100 primary care patients. This trial demonstrated that neither the clinical outcome nor the cardiovascular morbidity rate improved, even though management of the risk factors improved over 1 year of follow-up. The pragmatic design of the RCT in daily general practice may have restricted implementing the computer support, and may also have hampered the evaluation of the cardiovascular effects. The results demonstrate that although computer support may help improve the performance of disease management, its impact on disease outcomes is questionable. ICT innovations in healthcare require rigorous investigative evaluation before their implementation in daily practice can be justified.

  14. Free fatty acids as markers of death from hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bańka, Krzysztof; Teresiński, Grzegorz; Buszewicz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities of using morphological markers of fatal hypothermia are limited; therefore, other diagnostic criteria of deaths from hypothermia are being researched. The initiation of protective mechanisms against adverse effects of low temperatures results in activation of hormonal systems and development of characteristic biochemical changes that can be impaired by alcohol intoxication. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of determinations of the profile of free fatty acid concentrations as potential markers of hypothermia-related deaths, particularly in intoxicated victims. The study group consisted of blood samples collected during autopsies of 23 victims of hypothermia. The control group included blood samples collected from 34 victims of sudden, violent deaths at the scene of an incident (hangings and traffic accidents) and 10 victims who died because of post-traumatic subdural hematomas with prolonged agony. The study and control groups were divided into three subgroups according to blood alcohol concentrations: 0.0-0.99; 1.0-2.99 and ≥3.0‰. Statistical analysis in the individual subgroups demonstrated significant increases in concentrations of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids (P<0.05), independent of blood ethanol concentration. Palmitic, stearic and oleic acids can be considered the potential markers of fatal hypothermia, including the cases of intoxicated individuals.

  15. Functional laser speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow under hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minheng; Miao, Peng; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-08-01

    Hypothermia can unintentionally occur in daily life, e.g., in cardiovascular surgery or applied as therapeutics in the neurosciences critical care unit. So far, the temperature-induced spatiotemporal responses of the neural function have not been fully understood. In this study, we investigated the functional change in cerebral blood flow (CBF), accompanied with neuronal activation, by laser speckle imaging (LSI) during hypothermia. Laser speckle images from Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8, male) were acquired under normothermia (37°C) and moderate hypothermia (32°C). For each animal, 10 trials of electrical hindpaw stimulation were delivered under both temperatures. Using registered laser speckle contrast analysis and temporal clustering analysis (TCA), we found a delayed response peak and a prolonged response window under hypothermia. Hypothermia also decreased the activation area and the amplitude of the peak CBF. The combination of LSI and TCA is a high-resolution functional imaging method to investigate the spatiotemporal neurovascular coupling in both normal and pathological brain functions.

  16. Does addressing gender inequalities and empowering women and girls improve health and development programme outcomes?

    PubMed

    Taukobong, Hannah F G; Kincaid, Mary M; Levy, Jessica K; Bloom, Shelah S; Platt, Jennifer L; Henry, Sarah K; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2016-12-01

    This article presents evidence supporting the hypothesis that promoting gender equality and women's and girls' empowerment (GEWE) leads to better health and development outcomes. We reviewed the literature across six sectors-family planning (FP); maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH); nutrition; agriculture; water, sanitation and hygiene; and financial services for the poor-and found 76 studies from low and middle-income countries that met our inclusion criteria. Across these studies, we identified common GEWE variables that emerged repeatedly as significant predictors of sector outcomes. We grouped these variables into 10 thematic categories, which we termed 'gender-related levers'. These levers were then classified by the strength of evidence into Wedges, Foundations and Facilitators. Wedges are gender-related levers that had strong associations with improved outcomes across multiple sectors. They include: 'control over income/assets/resources', 'decision-making power' and 'education'. Elements of these levers overlap, but combined, they encapsulate agency. Increasing female agency promotes equality and broadly improves health and development for women, their families and their communities. The second classification, Foundations, displayed strong, positive associations across FP, MNCH and nutrition. Foundations have a more proximal relationship with sector outcomes and include: 'equitable interpersonal relationships', 'mobility' and 'personal safety'. Finally, the third group of levers, Facilitators, was associated with improved outcomes in two to three sectors and include: 'access to information', 'community groups', 'paid labour' and 'rights'. These levers make it easier for women and girls to achieve their goals and are more traditional elements of development programmes. Overall, gender-related levers were associated with improvements in a variety of health and development outcomes. Furthermore, these associations were cross-sectoral, suggesting that to

  17. Leadership to Improve Mathematics Outcomes in Low SES Schools and School Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Colleen; Davies, Anne; Weaven, Mary; Hooley, Neil; Davidson, Kristy; Loton, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Instructional and transformational leadership is reportedly required to improve the mathematics outcomes of students in low socio-economic status school communities. This study of 43 schools in two networks of schools in rural Victoria explored leadership practices and found evidence to support both these leadership approaches along with…

  18. Improving Outcomes in Mathematics in New Zealand: A Dynamic Approach to the Policy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Joanna; Parsons, Ro

    2011-01-01

    Intervention at scale with the aim of improving student participation, engagement and outcomes in mathematics education is a challenge for educational policy makers and reformers. This article argues that an iterative annual cycle of policy formulation, implementation and evaluation enabled ongoing adjustments to the strategic focus, the…

  19. The LLEN: The Purpose of Local Partnerships in the Provision of Improved Outcomes for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Local Learning and Employment Networks (LLENs) are incorporated organizations and groups whose mission is to facilitate local partnerships for the purpose of improving young people's education and training outcomes in Australia. LLENs are supported by grants from Australia's Department of Education and Training. Of the 31 LLENs currently existing…

  20. Changing Mathematics Teaching Practices and Improving Student Outcomes through Collaborative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kelli

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of a collaborative evaluation process on mathematics instruction and student outcomes in an elementary school serving a low-resource community. Thirty-two elementary teachers participated in a 3-year collaborative evaluation professional development process that contributed to improved mathematics…

  1. Revised Models and Conceptualisation of Successful School Principalship for Improved Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Bill; Silins, Halia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present revised models and a reconceptualisation of successful school principalship for improved student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The study's approach is qualitative and quantitative, culminating in model building and multi-level statistical analyses. Findings: Principals who promote both capacity building…

  2. Successful School Leadership for Improved Student Outcomes: Capacity Building and Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Bill

    2013-01-01

    The research reported in this article builds on work commenced eight years ago with reviewing the literature and models of successful school leadership for improved student outcomes. When the findings of this review were combined with the results from case studies of successful schools it resulted in a preliminary model of successful school…

  3. Promoting Entrepreneurship among Inner-City High School Students: Does It Improve Student Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Joan

    1999-01-01

    Presents findings from an evaluation of an entrepreneurship and community economic-development initiative in three Chicago (Illinois) public high schools. Two schools were quite satisfied with the program's implementation, but it was difficult to document improvements in student outcomes. Discusses difficulties in evaluating this type of project.…

  4. Improved Characters and Student Learning Outcomes through Development of Character Education Based General Physics Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlina; Sabani; Mihardi, Satria

    2015-01-01

    Education Research in Indonesia has begun to lead to the development of character education and is no longer fixated on the outcomes of cognitive learning. This study purposed to produce character education based general physics learning model (CEBGP Learning Model) and with valid, effective and practical peripheral devices to improve character…

  5. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as…

  6. Improving the Transition Outcomes of Low-Income Minority Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina; Dimpfl, Shawn; Portillo-Pena, Nelson; Guzman, Alberto; Schiff, Rachel; Murvay, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the results of a program developed to improve the transition outcomes of low-income minority youth with disabilities. The program relies on case management support to facilitate interagency collaboration. The participants included 164 graduates from special education and 26 youth from an equivalent comparison group. Two case…

  7. Plastic Bags for Prevention of Hypothermia in Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Leadford, Alicia E.; Warren, Jamie B.; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Salas, Ariel A.; Schelonka, Robert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hypothermia contributes to neonatal mortality and morbidity, especially in preterm and low birth weight infants in developing countries. Plastic bags covering the trunk and extremities of very low birth weight infants reduces hypothermia. This technique has not been studied in larger infants or in many resource-limited settings. The objective was to determine if placing preterm and low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth maintains normothermia. METHODS: Infants at 26 to 36 weeks’ gestational age and/or with a birth weight of 1000 to 2500 g born at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized by using a 1:1 allocation and parallel design to standard thermoregulation (blanket or radiant warmer) care or to standard thermoregulation care plus placement inside a plastic bag at birth. The primary outcome measure was axillary temperature in the World Health Organization–defined normal range (36.5–37.5°C) at 1 hour after birth. RESULTS: A total of 104 infants were randomized. At 1 hour after birth, infants randomized to plastic bag (n = 49) were more likely to have a temperature in the normal range as compared with infants in the standard thermoregulation care group (n = 55; 59.2% vs 32.7%; relative risk 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.16–2.81; P = .007). The temperature at 1 hour after birth in the infants randomized to plastic bag was 36.5 ± 0.5°C compared with 36.1 ± 0.6°C in standard care infants (P < .001). Hyperthermia (>38.0°C) did not occur in any infant. CONCLUSIONS: Placement of preterm/low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth compared with standard thermoregulation care reduced hypothermia without resulting in hyperthermia, and is a low-cost, low-technology tool for resource-limited settings. PMID:23733796

  8. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  9. Goal specificity: a proxy measure for improvements in environmental outcomes in collaborative governance.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Jennifer C; Koontz, Tomas M

    2014-12-01

    Collaborative governance critics continually call for evidence to support its prevalent use. As is often the case in environmental policy, environmental outcomes occur at a rate incompatible with political agendas. In addition, a multitude of possibly confounding variables makes it difficult to correlate collaborative governance processes with environmental outcomes. The findings of this study offer empirical evidence that collaborative processes have a measurable, beneficial effect on environmental outcomes. Through the use of a unique paired-waterbody design, our dataset reduced the potential for confounding variables to impact our environmental outcome measurements. The results of a path analysis indicate that the output of setting specific pollutant reduction goals is significantly related to watershed partnerships' level of attainment of their environmental improvement goals. The action of setting specific goals (e.g. percentage of load reductions in pollutant levels) is fostered by sustained participation from partnership members throughout the lifecycle of the collaborative. In addition, this study demonstrates the utility of logic modeling for environmental planning and management, and suggests that the process of setting specific pollutant reduction goals is a useful proxy measure for reporting progress towards improvements in environmental outcomes when long-term environmental data are not available.

  10. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  11. Contingency management improves outcomes in cocaine-dependent outpatients with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Gloria; Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on cocaine outpatient treatment outcomes, and there is even less research in the context of Contingency Management (CM). The purpose of this study was to assess the main and interactive effects of co-occurring depressive symptoms on CM outcomes. Cocaine-dependent individuals (N = 108) were randomized to Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or CRA plus CM in two outpatient community clinical settings. Participants were categorized according to depression symptoms, self-reported by means of the BDI at treatment entry. Outcome measures included treatment retention and documented cocaine abstinence over a 6-month treatment period. Depressive symptoms were more commonly found in females and in unemployed participants, and were associated with more drug-related, social, and psychiatric problems at treatment entry. Individuals with baseline depressive symptoms had poorer treatment outcomes than patients without depressive symptoms. The addition of CM to CRA made the program more effective than with CRA alone, regardless of depressive symptoms. CM was associated with better abstinence treatment outcomes, while the interaction between unemployment and depressive symptoms was associated with negative retention treatment outcomes. This study supports the efficacy of CM for cocaine-dependent outpatients with and without depressive symptoms, and highlights its importance for improving treatment for unemployed and depressed cocaine-dependent individuals.

  12. Hypothermia and hypokalemia in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Osamu; Saito, Takako; Sugase, Taro; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old man with type-1 diabetes who was hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). On admission, he had hypothermia, hypokalemia and combined metabolic and respiratory alkalosis, in addition to hyperglycemia. Hypothermia, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis, with a concurrent respiratory alkalosis, are not commonly seen in DKA. After admission, intravenous infusion of 0.45% saline was administered, which resulted in the development of pure metabolic acidosis. After starting insulin infusion, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became evident and finally resulted in massive rhabdomyolysis. Hyperkalemia accompanying oliguric acute kidney injury (AKI) warranted initiation of hemodialysis (HD) on Day-five. On the 45th hospital day, his urine output started to increase and a total of 22 HD sessions were required. We believe that in this case severe dehydration, hypothermia and hypokalemia might have contributed to the initial symptoms of DKA as well as the prolongation of AKI.

  13. Hypothermia bed system for stroke patients. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, S; Suzuki, E; Suzuki, A; Yasui, N

    1999-06-01

    A new hypothermia bed system was used to induce mild hypothermia (33-35 degrees C) in six patients with stroke due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, or embolic internal carotid artery occlusion. The system bed contained all necessary equipment including a respirator, a cooling unit, physiological monitors, and a storage battery. Surface cooling of the patients was performed using water-circulating blankets, and core temperature was maintained based on bladder temperature and a feedback computer program. During hypothermic therapy, patient transfer and radiological examination including computed tomography and positron emission tomography could be easily and safely performed. Differences between the measured bladder temperature and the target temperature were approximately +/- 0.1 degree C. The proposed hypothermia system bed may be useful for serial radiological examination of patients with stroke.

  14. Nitrous oxide-induced hypothermia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, R.M.; Panek, R.W.; Kouchich, F.J.; Rosenthal, M.A.

    1987-08-10

    Exposure of rats to high levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen reduced body temperature in a concentration-related manner. The hypothermia was partly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. But in rats rendered tolerant to morphine by pellet implantation, exposure to 75% N2O/25% O2 evoked a marked hypothermia similar to that observed in morphine-naive animals. In another experiment, the hypothermic effect of chloral hydrate was also sensitive to antagonism by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. These observations lead the authors to suspect that N2O-induced hypothermia in rats is possibly not mediated by opiate receptors. The thermotropic activity of N2O may result from some non-opioid action of N2O. Its selective antagonism by naloxone (but not naltrexone) may be due to a unique non-opioid analeptic action of naloxone. 32 references, 4 figures.

  15. More Frequent Clinic Visits Are Associated with Improved Outcomes for Children with NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carol; Bandsma, Robert; Ling, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Adult data suggest that frequent monitoring of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may be associated with improved outcomes. The optimal frequency of outpatient visits for the management of pediatric NAFLD remains unknown. Study Design. In this retrospective study, two cohorts of patients with NAFLD, one followed on a yearly basis and one followed on 3-month intervals, were included. Both received similar advice regarding lifestyle changes. Primary outcome was change in BMI z-scores over a year. Secondary outcomes were the change in serum transaminases and markers of metabolic dysregulation. Results. Fifty-six patients were included (28 per group). The majority (71%) were male with a mean (±SD) age of 12.2 (±2.7) years. At baseline, there were no differences in BMI z-scores (2.8 versus 2.9; p = 0.72) and ALT levels (101 versus 100 U/L; p = 0.95) between the groups (yearly versus three-month, resp.). Twelve months later, those followed on a 3-month basis demonstrated a significant decrease in BMI (net BMI z-score change = −0.06; p = 0.37), accompanied by a significant improvement in serum ALT (−25 U/L; p < 0.01) and AST (−13 U/L; p = 0.03) levels. There were no differences in fasting lipid profiles. Conclusion. Frequent clinic visits are associated with improved outcomes in pediatric NAFLD. PMID:28058253

  16. Improving outcomes using German Inpatient Quality Indicators in conjunction with peer review procedures.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Thomas; Völzke, Tatjana; Nimptsch, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Some hospital comparisons seem to generate confusion because different methods of outcome comparisons lead to different results in hospital rankings. This article questions the concept of overall comparisons of hospitals, which are multiproduct enterprises and may have specialties that provide good results in some areas despite having worse outcomes in others. Therefore, the authors argue for a disease specific view of outcome measurement. The concept of the German Inpatient Quality Indicators is explained. These indicators cover volume, mortality, and other information by a disease specific approach, which includes information for potential patients as well as specific feedback to the physicians responsible for the respective specialty. This article focuses on the feedback to the hospitals and explains how these indicators can be used for improvement in conjunction with a peer review process. The indicators provide information to the hospitals regarding their relative position because German reference values are available for all indicators. Thus, the indicators can serve as a trigger instrument for identifying possible quality problems. Based on these indications, peer review can be used to analyze the treatment processes and to eventually verify weaknesses and define actions for improvement. The first studies indicate that the use of this approach within hospital quality management can largely improve hospital outcomes in hospitals with subpar results compared to the German average.

  17. Improving the estimation of flavonoid intake for study of health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Jacques, Paul F.; McCullough, Marjorie L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprecision in estimating intakes of non-nutrient bioactive compounds such as flavonoids is a challenge in epidemiologic studies of health outcomes. The sources of this imprecision, using flavonoids as an example, include the variability of bioactive compounds in foods due to differences in growing conditions and processing, the challenges in laboratory quantification of flavonoids in foods, the incompleteness of flavonoid food composition tables, and the lack of adequate dietary assessment instruments. Steps to improve databases of bioactive compounds and to increase the accuracy and precision of the estimation of bioactive compound intakes in studies of health benefits and outcomes are suggested. PMID:26084477

  18. Programme Learning Outcomes Assessment and Continuous Quality Improvement in Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing, UTHM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taib, H.; Salleh, S. M.; Zain, B. A. Md; Azlan, M. A.; Mahzan, S.; Hafeez, Z. A.; Ong, P.; Ahmad, S.; N. A Rahman, M.; Nasir, N. F.; Azham Azmi, M.; Rahman, H. A.; Ngali, Z.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the assessment and continuous quality improvement of Programme Learning Outcomes (PLOs) in the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing. PLO is known as an elementary requirement in Outcome Based Education (OBE) system. All PLOs have been mapped with graduate attributes by EAC Manual 2012. Conceptual process for establishing and reviewing PLOs has been explained in the Plan-Check-Do-Act cycle. PLO assessment has been shown in different types which classified as direct and indirect methods. Continuous Quality Improvement has been extracted from a variety of assessment and has been discussed. Seven (7) CQIs are identified using different assessment methods of PLO during years 2013 to 2016 and subsequent improvement actions have been taken by the faculty within three years.

  19. Postmortem computed tomography lung findings in fatal of hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hyodoh, Hideki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Katada, Ryuichi; Hyodoh, Kazusa; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-09-10

    To identify lung findings specific to fatal hypothermia on postmortem computed tomography (CT) imaging. Whole body CT scans were performed followed by full autopsy to investigate causes of death. There were 13 fatal hypothermia cases (group A) and 118 with other causes of death (group B). The chest cavity (CC), dead space including fluid/pneumothorax (DS), aerated lung volume (ALV), percentage aerated lung (%ALV), and tracheal aerated volume (ATV) were measured. Autopsy findings of groups A and B were compared. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to identify factors specific to fatal hypothermia. There were no differences in age, sex, number with emphysema, or time from death to CT examination between the 2 groups. CC, DS, ALV, %ALV, and ATV were 2601.0±247.4 (mL), 281.1±136.5 (mL), 1564.5±281.1 (mL), 62.1±6.2(%), and 21.8±2.7 (mL) in group A and 2339.2±67.7 (mL), 241.1±38.0 (mL), 739.9±67.0 (mL), 31.4±2.3(%), and 15.9±0.8 (mL) in group B, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups A and B in ALV, %ALV and ATV. The multiple comparison procedure revealed that ALV and %ALV differed significantly between fatal hypothermia and other causes of death (p<0.05). Using ROC evaluation, %ALV had the largest area under the curve (0.819). This study demonstrates that the %ALV is greater in fatal hypothermia cases than in those with other causes of death on postmortem CT chest imaging. Based on CT, hypothermia is very likely to be the cause of death if the %ALV is >70%.

  20. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity. PMID:28228717

  1. Mild Hypothermia Attenuates the Anesthetic Isoflurane-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Dong, Yuanlin; Chen, Dan; Xie, Zhongcong; Zhang, Yiying

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity. However, the methods to attenuate these effects remain largely to be determined. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to assess whether mild hypothermia could protect the isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by assessing the effects of mild hypothermia on the isoflurane-induced changes in ATP levels. H4 human neuroglioma cells were treated with 2% isoflurane for 3 or 6 h with and without mild hypothermia (35°C). We assessed the cell viability by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. We determined DNA damage by measuring levels of phosphorylation of the histone protein H2A variant X at Ser139 (γH2A.X), the marker of DNA damage. We also measured ATP levels in the cells. Here we showed that the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 6 h induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in the cells. Moreover, the treatment with 2% isoflurane for 3 h decreased ATP levels without inducing cytotoxicity. Mild hypothermia attenuated the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity, DNA damage, and ATP reduction in the cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels occurred before the isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Isoflurane may induce DNA damage and cause cytotoxicity through reducing ATP levels. Mild hypothermia would ameliorate isoflurane-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity by attenuating the isoflurane-induced reduction in ATP levels. These pilot studies have established a system and will promote the future investigations of anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  2. Maintaining Perioperative Normothermia: Sustaining an Evidence-Based Practice Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Levin, Rona F; Wright, Fay; Pecoraro, Kathleen; Kopec, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Unintentional perioperative hypothermia has been shown to cause serious patient complications and, thus, to increase health care costs. In 2009, an evidence-based practice improvement project produced a significant decrease in unintentional perioperative hypothermia in colorectal surgical patients through monitoring of OR ambient room temperature. Project leaders engaged all interdisciplinary stakeholders in the original project, which facilitated the sustainability of the intervention method. An important aspect of sustainability is ongoing monitoring and evaluation of a new intervention method. Therefore, continued evaluation of outcomes of the protocol developed in 2009 was scheduled at specific time points after the initial small test of change with colorectal patients. This article focuses on how attention to sustainability factors during implementation of an improvement project led to the sustainability of a protocol for monitoring OR ambient room temperature with all types of surgical patients five years after the initial project.

  3. The Improvement and Completion of Outcome index: A new assessment system for quality of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Kim, Myeng-Ki; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Given the considerable disagreement between the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index and the American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation, we aimed to develop a novel assessment system―the Improvement and Completion of Outcome (ICO) index―to evaluate the outcome of orthodontic treatment. Methods Sixteen criteria from 4 major categories were established to represent the pretreatment malocclusion status, as well as the degree of improvement and level of completion of outcome during/after treatment: dental relationship (arch length discrepancy, irregularity, U1-SN, and IMPA); anteroposterior relationship (overjet, right and left molar position, ANB); vertical relationship (anterior overbite, anterior open-bite, lateral open-bite, SN-MP); and transverse relationship (dental midline discrepancy, chin point deviation, posterior cross-bite, occlusal plane cant). The score for each criterion was defined from 0 or −1 (worst) to 5 (ideal value or normal occlusion) in gradations of 1. The sum of the scores in each category indicates the area and extent of the problems. Improvement and completion percentages were estimated based on the pre- and post-treatment total scores and the maximum total score. If the completion percentage exceeded 80%, treatment outcome was considered successful. Results Two cases, Class I malocclusion and skeletal Class III malocclusion, are presented to represent the assessment procedure using the ICO index. The difference in the level of improvement and completion of treatment outcome can be clearly explained by using 2 percentage values. Conclusions Thus, the ICO index enables the evaluation of the quality of orthodontic treatment objectively and consecutively throughout the entire treatment process. PMID:27478797

  4. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  5. [Prolonged therapeutic hypothermia after pericardial effusion drain surgery].

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Barreiro Canosa, J L; Varela García, O; Fossati Puertas, S; Pereira Tamayo, J Á

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is an effective treatment for neurological protection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and may also be beneficial for in-hospital cardiac arrest. Its use is limited in post-surgical patients due to the risk of specific complications, particularly bleeding. There are significant differences among previous publications regarding the time to reach the target temperature and the duration of therapy, so the optimal strategy is not yet established. We present the case of a patient who suffered a perioperative cardiac arrest related to a pericardial tamponade, and who underwent therapeutic hypothermia for 48h.

  6. Provider and Patient Directed Financial Incentives to Improve Care and Outcomes for Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lorincz, Ilona S.; Lawson, Brittany C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  7. Use of therapeutic hypothermia in cocaine-induced cardiac arrest: further evidence.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Klonoski, Emily; Valentino, Dominic J

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is an important and successful treatment that has been endorsed only in specific clinical settings of cardiac arrest. Inclusion criteria thus far have not embraced drug-induced cardiac arrest, but clinical evidence has been mounting that therapeutic hypothermia may be beneficial in such cases. A 59-year-old man who experienced a cocaine-induced cardiac arrest had a full neurological recovery after use of therapeutic hypothermia. The relevant pathophysiology of cocaine-induced cardiac arrest is reviewed, the mechanism and history of therapeutic hypothermia are discussed, and the clinical evidence recommending the use of therapeutic hypothermia in cocaine-induced cardiac arrest is reinforced.

  8. Imatinib prevents beta cell death in vitro but does not improve islet transplantation outcome

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Lisa A.; Persaud, Shanta J.; Jones, Peter M.; Howell, Simon L.; Welsh, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Improving islet transplantation outcome could not only bring benefits to individual patients but also widen the patient pool to which this life-changing treatment is available. Imatinib has previously been shown to protect beta cells from apoptosis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to investigate whether imatinib could be used to improve islet transplantation outcome. Methods Islets were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and pre-cultured with imatinib prior to exposure to streptozotocin and cytokines in vitro. Cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion were measured. For transplantation experiments, islets were pre-cultured with imatinib for either 72 h or 24 h prior to transplantation into streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. In one experimental series mice were also administered imatinib after islet transplantation. Results Imatinib partially protected islets from beta cell death in vitro. However, pre-culturing islets in imatinib or administering the drug to the mice in the days following islet transplantation did not improve blood glucose concentrations more than control-cultured islets. Conclusion Although imatinib protected against beta cell death from cytokines and streptozotocin in vitro, it did not significantly improve syngeneic islet transplantation outcome. PMID:26953716

  9. Using public policy to improve outcomes for asthmatic children in schools.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Jewlya; Oppenheimer, Sophie; Zimmer, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    School-based services to improve asthma management need to be accompanied by public policies that can help sustain services, scale effective interventions, create greater equity across schools, and improve outcomes for children. Several national organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have recommended specific public policies the adoption of which in school settings can improve asthma outcomes for children. Although many states and school districts have adopted some of these policies, adoption is not universal, and implementation is not always successful, leaving inequities in children's access to asthma services and supports. These issues can be addressed by changing public policy. Policy change is a complex process, but it is one that will benefit from greater involvement by asthma experts, including the researchers who generate the knowledge base on what services, supports, and policies have the best outcomes for children. Asthma experts can participate in the policy process by helping to build awareness of the need for school-based asthma policy, estimating the costs associated with policy options and with inaction, advocating for the selection of specific policies, assisting in implementation (including providing feedback), conducting the research that can evaluate the effectiveness of implementation, and ultimately providing information back into the policy process to allow for improvements to the policies.

  10. Neuroprotective pentapeptide CN-105 improves functional and histological outcomes in a murine model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L.; Liu, Ji; Zhou, Guanen; Venkatraman, Talaignair N.; Lascola, Christopher D.; Acheson, Shawn K.; Dubois, Laura G.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Wang, Haichen

    2016-01-01

    Presently, no pharmacological treatments have been demonstrated to improve long-term functional outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Clinical evidence associates apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype with ICH incidence and outcome. While apoE modifies neuroinflammatory responses through its adaptive role in glial downregulation, intact apoE holoprotein is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, we developed a 5-amino acid peptide – CN-105 – that mimics the polar face of the apoE helical domain involved in receptor interactions. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of CN-105 in a mouse model of ICH. Three doses of CN-105 (0.05 mg/kg) was administered by tail vein injection within 24 hours after ICH induction. Functional assessment showed durable improvement in vestibulomotor performance after CN-105 treatment, as quantified by increased Rotarod latencies on Days 1–5 post-ICH, and long-term improvement in neurocognitive performance, as quantified by reduced Morris water maze latencies on Days 29–32 post-ICH. Further, brain water content was significantly reduced, neuroinflammation was decreased and hippocampal CA3 neuronal survival was increased, although hemorrhage volume was not affected by CN-105. We concluded, therefore, that pentapeptide CN-105 improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in a murine model of ICH, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients with acute ICH. PMID:27713572

  11. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  12. Boston Working Group on Improving Health Care Outcomes Through Geriatric Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    1997-06-01

    Geriatric rehabilitation is a multidisciplinary set of evaluative, diagnostic, and therapeutic interventions whose purpose is to restore functional ability or enhance residual functional capability in elderly people with disabling impairments. The Boston Working Group on Improving Health Care Outcomes Through Geriatric Rehabilitation was convened to begin a dialogue among experts in rehabilitation, quality of care, and health services research to consider ways to measure, improve, and ensure the quality of geriatric rehabilitation services. The conference centered around four major themes: the definition of disability/disablement; the patient's experience of rehabilitative care; the role of clinical practice guidelines; and the need for casemix and severity or risk-adjustment procedures and measures. The plenary speaker discussed potential new directions in each of these areas and reviewed the contribution of these innovations to improved means of outcomes assessment. Each of the four themes was addressed in the form of a paper by an expert in the field. Two reactors with different viewpoints responded to these papers, and small working groups of participants, convened by topic, contributed to discussions later summarized and presented in plenary session by a spokesperson for each group. In one small group, two reporters represented the majority and minority opinions. A summary speaker presented an overview of the conference deliberations and focused on four of the critical points raised by the working groups: (1) the need to define and describe geriatric rehabilitation in lay terms; (2) the need for more research to link process with outcome; (3) the need to balance long-term measurement of process and outcome with short-term analysis that facilitates creative response to accelerating changes in the health care sector; and (4) the need to convince a diverse audience of the role of geriatric rehabilitation in providing high quality care, good health status, and

  13. Interprofessional Curbside Consults to Develop Team Communication and Improve Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, Jennifer; Greenwood, Kristin Curry; Rico, Janet; Nalliah, Romesh; DiVall, Margarita

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To design and implement a series of activities focused on developing interprofessional communication skills and to assess the impact of the activities on students' attitudes and achievement of educational goals. Design. Prior to the first pharmacy practice skills laboratory session, pharmacy students listened to a classroom lecture about team communication and viewed short videos describing the roles, responsibilities, and usual work environments of four types of health care professionals. In each of four subsequent laboratory sessions, students interacted with a different standardized health care professional role-played by a pharmacy faculty member who asked them a medication-related question. Students responded in verbal and written formats. Assessment. Student performance was assessed with a three-part rubric. The impact of the exercise was assessed by conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys and analyzing students' performance on relevant Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. Survey results showed improvement in student attitudes related to team-delivered care. Students' performance on the problem solver and collaborator CAPE outcomes improved, while performance on the educator outcome worsened. Conclusions. The addition of an interprofessional communication activity with standardized health care professionals provided the opportunity for students to develop skills related to team communication. Students felt the activity was valuable and realistic; however, analysis of outcome achievement from the exercise revealed a need for more exposure to team communication skills.

  14. The "not so simple" ankle fracture: avoiding problems and pitfalls to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; Egol, Kenneth A; Gardner, Michael J; Haskell, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ankle fractures are among the most common injuries managed by orthopaedic surgeons. Many ankle fractures are simple, with straightforward management leading to successful outcomes. Some fractures, however, are challenging, and debate arises regarding the best treatment to achieve an optimal outcome. Some patients have medical comorbidities that increase the risk for complications or may require modifications to standard surgical techniques and fixation methods. Several recent investigations have highlighted the pitfalls in accurately reducing syndesmotic injuries. Controversy remains regarding the number and diameter of screws, the duration of weight-bearing limitations, and the need or timing of screw removal. Open reduction may allow more accurate reduction than standard closed methods. Direct fixation of associated posterior malleolus fractures may provide improved syndesmotic stability. Posterior malleolus fractures vary in size and can be classified based on the orientation of the fracture line. As the size of the posterior malleolus fracture fragment increases, the load pattern in the ankle is altered. Direct or indirect reduction and surgical fixation may be required to prevent posterior talar subluxation and restore articular congruency. The supination-adduction fracture pattern is also important to recognize. Articular depression of the medial tibial plafond may require reduction and bone grafting. Optimal fixation requires directing screws parallel to the ankle joint or using a buttress plate. Identifying ankle fractures that may present additional treatment challenges is essential to achieving a successful outcome. A careful review of radiographs and CT scans, a thorough patient assessment, and detailed preoperative planning are needed to improve patient outcomes.

  15. Interprofessional Curbside Consults to Develop Team Communication and Improve Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Kristin Curry; Rico, Janet; Nalliah, Romesh; DiVall, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To design and implement a series of activities focused on developing interprofessional communication skills and to assess the impact of the activities on students’ attitudes and achievement of educational goals. Design. Prior to the first pharmacy practice skills laboratory session, pharmacy students listened to a classroom lecture about team communication and viewed short videos describing the roles, responsibilities, and usual work environments of four types of health care professionals. In each of four subsequent laboratory sessions, students interacted with a different standardized health care professional role-played by a pharmacy faculty member who asked them a medication-related question. Students responded in verbal and written formats. Assessment. Student performance was assessed with a three-part rubric. The impact of the exercise was assessed by conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys and analyzing students’ performance on relevant Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. Survey results showed improvement in student attitudes related to team-delivered care. Students’ performance on the problem solver and collaborator CAPE outcomes improved, while performance on the educator outcome worsened. Conclusions. The addition of an interprofessional communication activity with standardized health care professionals provided the opportunity for students to develop skills related to team communication. Students felt the activity was valuable and realistic; however, analysis of outcome achievement from the exercise revealed a need for more exposure to team communication skills. PMID:28289305

  16. Improving outcomes for high-risk ALL: translating new discoveries into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Loh, Mignon L; Mullighan, Charles G

    2011-06-01

    High-risk (HR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains one of the greatest challenges in pediatric oncology. Relapsed ALL is a leading cause of death in young people, and further improvements in outcome will required the development of therapeutic approaches directed against rational therapeutic targets, as escalation of the intensity of existing therapies is limited by toxicity. This review summarizes advances in the biology and treatment of HR and relapsed ALL presented at a symposium at the 2010 American Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. Analysis of large patient cohorts has identified several factors associated with HR of relapse including older age, T-lineage disease, and persisting minimal residual disease (MRD) early in therapy. As the results of salvage therapy remain poor, new treatment approaches are needed. BCR-ABL1-positive (Ph+) ALL has historically had a very poor outcome, but recent studies have demonstrated the impressive improvements in treatment outcome with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). High-resolution genomic profiling of genetic alterations and gene expression has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL, and has identified several alterations associated with poor outcome, including mutations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF1 (IKAROS), activating mutations of Janus kinases, and rearrangement of the lymphoid cytokine receptor gene CRLF2. These data indicated that the genetic basis of HR-ALL is multifactorial, and have also provided a new potential therapeutic option directed at JAK inhibition.

  17. Basal ganglia perfusion using dynamic color Doppler sonography in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy receiving therapeutic hypothermia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cassia, Guilherme; Morneault, Linda; Saint-Martin, Christine; Sant’Anna, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the cerebral perfusion of the basal ganglia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) receiving hypothermia using dynamic color Doppler sonography (CDS) and investigate for any correlation between these measurements and survival. Methods Head ultrasound (HUS) was performed with a 9S4 MHz sector transducer in HIE infants submitted to hypothermia as part of their routine care. Measurements of cerebral perfusion intensity (CPI) with an 11LW4 MHz linear array transducer were performed to obtain static images and DICOM color Doppler videos of the blood flow in the basal ganglia area. Clinical and radiological data were evaluated retrospectively. The video images were analyzed by two radiologists using dedicated software, which allows automatic quantification of color Doppler data from a region of interest (ROI) by dynamically assessing color pixels and flow velocity during the heart cycle. CPI is expressed in cm/sec and is calculated by multiplying the mean velocity of all pixels divided by the area of the ROI. Three videos of 3 seconds each were obtained of the ROI, in the coronal plane, and used to calculate the CPI. Data are presented as mean ± SEM or median (quartiles). Results A total of 28 infants were included in this study: 16 male, 12 female. HUS was performed within the first 48 hours of therapeutic hypothermia treatment. CPI values were significantly higher in the seven non-survivors when compared to survivors (0.226±0.221 vs. 0.111±0.082 cm/sec; P=0.02). Conclusions Increased perfusion intensity of the basal ganglia area within the first 48 of therapeutic hypothermia treatment was associated with poor outcome in neonates with HIE. PMID:27942470

  18. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  19. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Bryan M.; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  20. Obstetrical APS: is there a place for hydroxychloroquine to improve the pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsene; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Masseau, Agathe; Tincani, Angela; De Caroli, Sara; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Ruffatti, Amelia; Ambrozic, Ales; Botta, Angela; Le Guern, Véronique; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth; Nicaise-Roland, Pascale; Carbonne, Bruno; Carbillon, Lionel; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The use of the conventional APS treatment (the combination of low-dose aspirin and LMWH) dramatically improved the obstetrical prognosis in primary obstetrical APS (OAPS). The persistence of adverse pregnancy outcome raises the need to find other drugs to improve obstetrical outcome. Hydroxychloroquine is widely used in patients with various autoimmune diseases, particularly SLE. Antimalarials have many anti-inflammatory, anti-aggregant and immune-regulatory properties: they inhibit phospholipase activity, stabilize lysosomal membranes, block the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and, in addition, impair complement-dependent antigen-antibody reactions. There is ample evidence of protective effects of hydroxychloroquine in OAPS similar to the situation in SLE arising from in vitro studies of pathophysiological working mechanism of hydroxychloroquine. However, the clinical data on the use of hydroxychloroquine in primary APS are lacking and prospective studies are necessary.

  1. Great Expectations: The Implementation of Integrated Care and Its Contribution to Improved Outcomes for People with Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are great expectations regarding the potential contribution of integrated care interventions to improved outcomes, but so far the evidence is mixed. In this dissertation, we focussed on why, when and how some integrated care interventions contribute to improved outcomes, while others do not. To this purpose, we developed the COMIC Model for studying the Context, Outcomes and Mechanisms of Integrated Care interventions. Evaluations that make use of the COMIC Model take into account the context in which an intervention is implemented and can thereby provide insights into why an intervention does (not) work and how the intervention and/or the context can be changed to achieve improved outcomes.

  2. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Improves Outcomes After Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minamishima, Shizuka; Kida, Kotaro; Tokuda, Kentaro; Wang, Huifang; Sips, Patrick Y.; Kosugi, Shizuko; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Brouckaert, Peter; Liu, Philip K.; Liu, Christina H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Breathing nitric oxide (NO) reduces ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in animal models and in patients. The objective of this study was to learn whether inhaled NO improves outcomes after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods and Results Adult male mice were subjected to potassium-induced CA for 7.5 min whereupon CPR was performed with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. One hour after CPR, mice were extubated and breathed air alone or air supplemented with 40 parts per million (ppm) NO for 23h. Mice that were subjected to CA/CPR and breathed air exhibited a poor 10-day survival rate (4/13), depressed neurological and left ventricular (LV) function, and increased caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction in the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain regions with marked water diffusion abnormality 24h after CA/CPR in mice that breathed air. Breathing air supplemented with NO for 23h starting 1h after CPR attenuated neurological and LV dysfunction 4 days after CA/CPR and markedly improved 10-day survival rate (11/13, P=0.003 vs Air). The protective effects of inhaled NO on the outcome after CA/CPR were associated with reduced water diffusion abnormality, caspase-3 activation, and cytokine induction in the brain and increased serum NOx levels. Deficiency of the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a primary target of NO, abrogated the ability of inhaled NO to improve outcomes after CA/CPR. Conclusions These results suggest that NO inhalation after CA and successful CPR improves outcome via sGC-dependent mechanisms. PMID:21931083

  3. Does supplementation of in-vitro culture medium with melatonin improve IVF outcome in PCOS?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Park, Eun A; Kim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Won Yun; Cho, Jung Hyun; Lee, Woo Sik; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, You Shin; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid (FF) contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcomes of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Melatonin concentrations in the culture media of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and the clinical outcomes after using IVM media with or without melatonin were analysed. In the culture media of GC or COC, melatonin concentrations gradually increased. When human chorionic gonadotrophin priming protocols were used, implantation rates in the melatonin-supplemented group were higher than those of the non-supplemented control group (P<0.05). Pregnancy rates were also higher, although not significantly. The findings suggest that the addition of melatonin to IVM media may improve the cytoplasmic maturation of human immature oocytes and subsequent clinical outcomes. It is speculated that follicular melatonin may be released from luteinizing GC during late folliculogenesis and that melatonin supplementation may be used to improve the clinical outcomes of IVM IVF-embryo transfer. Melatonin is primarily produced by the pineal gland and regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. Interestingly, human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. However, in contrast to animal studies, the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation in the human system has not yet been investigated. So, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcome of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for PCOS patients. The melatonin concentrations in culture medium of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and

  4. Public–private partnerships improve health outcomes in individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, James E; Tolea, Magdalena I; George, Nika; Wingbermuehle, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In a collaborative effort between the Missouri Department of Health, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA), Alzheimer Association, and academic researchers, we tested whether early dementia detection and comprehensive care consultations would improve health outcomes in care receivers (CRs) and their family caregivers (FCGs), therefore addressing an important public health concern. Participants and methods A total of 244 community-dwelling older adults screened for early-stage dementia by the AAA field staff were referred to the Alzheimer Association and participated in Project Learn MORE (Missouri Outreach and Referral Expanded) (PLM) – a 2-year, nonrandomized multisite intervention consisting of comprehensive care consultations to improve coping skills. PLM participants were compared against 96 controls receiving the Alzheimer Association’s “usual services” between January 2011 and December 2012. We examined CR and FCG outcomes, including burden, care confidence, and mood, as effects of PLM, on delaying transitions in level of care. Results CRs showed improved knowledge (P=0.002) and reduced depression (P=0.007), while FCGs demonstrated improved knowledge (P=0.003) and ability to identify sources of support for the CR (P=0.032) and for themselves (P=0.043). However, FCGs were more burdened after PLM (P=0.02), due to increased awareness of Alzheimer’s disease. PLM delayed transitions in care (odds ratio [OR] 3.32, 95% confidence level [CI]: 1.25–8.83) with the number needed to treat =6.82. Conclusion PLM was successful in improving detection of incident cases of dementia in the community and in connecting patients and their families with needed services. Our findings support the use of state agencies and community service partners to detect dementia. Early implementation of psychosocial interventions could have significant impact in improving patient- and family-centered outcomes, potentially providing a cost-efficient alternative to pharmacotherapy

  5. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (P<0.05). Moreover, rosuvastatin treatment significantly ameliorated brain injury after ROSC, which was characterized by the increase of neurological function scores, and reduction of brain edema in cortex and hippocampus (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of cardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC.

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center Network: Improving Care and Outcomes in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Sandeep; Melendres-Groves, Lana; Pawar, Leena; Cajigas, Hector R

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a chronic, progressive, life-threatening disease that requires expert multidisciplinary care. To facilitate this level of care, the Pulmonary Hypertension Association established across the United States a network of pulmonary hypertension care centers (PHCCs) with special expertise in PH, particularly pulmonary arterial hypertension, to raise the overall quality of care and outcomes for patients with this life-threatening disease. Since the inception of PHCCs in September 2014, to date 35 centers have been accredited in the United States. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. PHCCs also offer additional opportunities for improvements in PH care. The patient registry offered through the PHCCs is an organized system by which data are collected to evaluate the outcomes of patients with PH. This registry helps in detecting variations in outcomes across centers, thus identifying opportunities for improvement. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan, training, and tools throughout the PHCC network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care center staff and individuals with PH and their families are the cornerstone of the PHCCs. The Pulmonary Vascular Network of the American College of Chest Physicians believes this to be a positive step that will improve the quality of care delivered in the United States to patients with PH.

  7. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  8. Intracoronary hypothermia for acute myocardial infarction in the isolated beating pig heart

    PubMed Central

    Otterspoor, Luuk C; van Nunen, Lokien X; Rosalina, Tilaï T; Veer, Marcel van’t; Tuijl, Sjoerd Van; Stijnen, Marco; Rutten, Marcel CM; van de Vosse, Frans N; Pijls, Nico HJ

    2017-01-01

    Hypothermia may attenuate reperfusion injury and thereby improve acute myocardial infarction therapy. Systemic cooling trials failed to reduce infarct size, perhaps because the target temperature was not reached fast enough. The use of selective intracoronary hypothermia combined with intracoronary temperature monitoring allows for titrating to target temperature and optimizing the cooling rate. We aimed to the test the feasibility of intracoronary cooling for controlled, selective myocardial hypothermia in an isolated beating pig heart. In five porcine hearts the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was occluded by an over-the-wire balloon (OTWB). After occlusion, saline at 22°C was infused through the OTWB lumen for 5 minutes into the infarct area at a rate of 30 ml/min. Thereafter the balloon was deflated but infusion continued with saline at 4°C for 5 minutes. Distal coronary temperature was continuously monitored by a pressure/temperature guidewire. Myocardial temperature at several locations in the infarct and control areas was recorded using needle thermistors. In the occlusion phase, coronary temperature decreased by 11.4°C (range 9.4-12.5°C). Myocardial temperature throughout the infarct area decreased by 5.1°C (range 1.8-8.1°C) within three minutes. During the reperfusion phase, coronary temperature decreased by 6.2°C (range 4.1-10.3°C) and myocardial temperature decreased by 4.5°C (range 1.5-7.4°C). Myocardial temperature outside the infarct area was not affected. In the isolated beating pig heart with acute occlusion of the LAD, we were able to rapidly “induce, maintain, and control” a stable intracoronary and myocardial target temperature of at least 4°C below body temperature without side effects and using standard PCI equipment, justifying further studies of this technique in humans. PMID:28337283

  9. The Social Epidemiology of Accidental Hypothermia among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rango, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Describes the 1970-1979 incidence of exposure-related hypothermia deaths in the United States. Showed nonwhite men at highest and white women at lowest risk at all ages. Age-related impairment in theromoregulation, functional disability, poverty, and social isolation were found to increase elderly individual's susceptibility to this environmental…

  10. Severe Hypothermia Causing Ventricular Arrhythmia in Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Munta, Kartik; Santosh, Paiullah; Surath, Manimala Rao

    2017-02-01

    Organophosphorus poisoning cases are routinely treated across all Intensive Care Units adjoining the rural areas where agriculture is the main source of income. We present a unique case of severe hypothermia seen in a case of organophosphorus poisoning, which led to electrocardiogram disturbances and life-threatening arrhythmias.

  11. Severe Hypothermia Causing Ventricular Arrhythmia in Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Munta, Kartik; Santosh, Paiullah; Surath, Manimala Rao

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphorus poisoning cases are routinely treated across all Intensive Care Units adjoining the rural areas where agriculture is the main source of income. We present a unique case of severe hypothermia seen in a case of organophosphorus poisoning, which led to electrocardiogram disturbances and life-threatening arrhythmias. PMID:28250607

  12. Chronic hypothermia and water intoxication associated with a neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, E. L.; Sisodiya, S.; Sarkar, D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a 71 year old man with a neurodegenerative condition who developed chronic inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and hypothermia resulting in recurrent episodes of impaired consciousness. This combination of abnormalities is attributable to hypothalamic disease and has not to our knowledge been previously reported with clearly documented antidiuretic hormone excess. Images Figure 1 PMID:8121871

  13. Back pain outcomes in primary care following a practice improvement intervention:- a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the UK's costliest and least understood health problems, whose prevalence still seems to be increasing. Educational interventions for general practitioners on back pain appear to have had little impact on practice, but these did not include quality improvement learning, involve patients in the learning, record costs or document practice activities as well as patient outcomes. Methods We assessed the outcome of providing information about quality improvement techniques and evidence-based practice for back pain using the Clinical Value Compass. This included clinical outcomes (Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire), functional outcomes, costs of care and patient satisfaction. We provided workshops which used an action learning approach and collected before and after data on routine practice activity from practice electronic databases. In parallel, we studied outcomes in a separate cohort of patients with acute and sub-acute non-specific back pain recruited from the same practices over the same time period. Patient data were analysed as a prospective, split-cohort study with assessments at baseline and eight weeks following the first consultation. Results Data for 1014 patients were recorded in the practice database study, and 101 patients in the prospective cohort study. We found that practice activities, costs and patient outcomes changed little after the intervention. However, the intervention was associated with a small, but statistically significant reduction in disability in female patients. Additionally, baseline disability, downheartedness, self-rated health and leg pain had small but statistically significant effects (p < 0.05) on follow-up disability scores in some subgroups. Conclusions GP education for back pain that both includes health improvement methodologies and involves patients may yield additional benefits for some patients without large changes in patterns of practice activity. The effects in this study were

  14. Towards Better Test Utilization – Strategies to Improve Physician Ordering and Their Impact on Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is the single highest volume medical activity in healthcare and demand for laboratory testing is increasing disproportionately to medical activity. It has been estimated that $6.8 billion of medical care in the US involves unnecessary testing and procedures that do not improve patient care and may even harm the patient. Physicians face many challenges in accurately, efficiently and safely ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests. In order to improve patient outcomes, laboratory tests must be appropriately ordered, properly conducted, reported in a timely manner, correctly interpreted and affect a decision for future diagnosis and treatment of the patient. PMID:27683478

  15. Towards Better Test Utilization - Strategies to Improve Physician Ordering and Their Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Danielle B

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is the single highest volume medical activity in healthcare and demand for laboratory testing is increasing disproportionately to medical activity. It has been estimated that $6.8 billion of medical care in the US involves unnecessary testing and procedures that do not improve patient care and may even harm the patient. Physicians face many challenges in accurately, efficiently and safely ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests. In order to improve patient outcomes, laboratory tests must be appropriately ordered, properly conducted, reported in a timely manner, correctly interpreted and affect a decision for future diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  16. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L.; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. Results: A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  17. Change of Patient Selection Strategy and Improved Surgical Outcome in MRI-negative Neocortical Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Chun-Kee; Shin, Jung-won; Moon, Jangsup; Kang, Bong Su; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Jung, Ki-Young; Cho, Yong Won; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is crucial to make selection strategy to identify surgical candidates among medically refractory MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients. In our previous study, we suggested two or more concordance between noninvasive studies (EEG, ictal scalp EEG, interictal FDG-PET, and SPECT) as a new patient selection strategy for MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients before and after the implementation of a new selection strategy. Methods From 1995 to 2011, we included 153 consecutive MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients who received focal resection and had a follow-up period of at least 2 years. These patients were divided into two groups according to their date of surgery (before and after July 2002). The old group consisted of 89 patients and the new one consisted of 53 patients. Clinical characteristics, presurgical evaluations, and pathology were reviewed. Results The new patient selection strategy led to a significant increase in the concordance between two or more modalities. The improvement in surgical outcome after 2002 was significant (seizure-free outcome, 47.2% vs. 75.5%; p = 0.001). Concordance between two or more presurgical evaluations and localizing PET were related to a seizure-free outcome in a multivariate analysis. Conclusions After a change in surgical strategy to select patients with two or more concordance between noninvasive studies, the seizure-free outcome improved up to 75.5%. MRI-negative neocortical epilepsy patients with two or more concordance between noninvasive studies seem to be good candidates for epilepsy surgery. PMID:28101477

  18. Neonatal diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency leads to significantly improved survival outcome: the case for newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lucinda; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Allwood, Zoe; Slatter, Mary; Cant, Andrew; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul; Gennery, Andrew R; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2011-03-17

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) carries a poor prognosis without definitive treatment by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The outcome for transplantation varies and is dependent on donor status and the condition of the child at the time of transplantation. Diagnosis at birth may allow for better protection of SCID babies from infection and improve transplantation outcome. In this comparative study conducted at the 2 designated SCID transplantation centers in the United Kingdom, we show that SCID babies diagnosed at birth because of a positive family history have a significantly improved outcome compared with the first presenting family member. The overall improved survival of more than 90% is related to a reduced rate of infection and significantly improved transplantation outcome irrespective of donor choice, conditioning regimen used, and underlying genetic diagnosis. Neonatal screening for SCID would significantly improve the outcome in this otherwise potentially devastating condition.

  19. Defining and Assessing Quality Improvement Outcomes: A Framework for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Saira; Thomas, Craig; Young, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe an evidence-based framework to define and assess the impact of quality improvement (QI) in public health. Developed to address programmatic and research-identified needs for articulating the value of public health QI in aggregate, this framework proposes a standardized set of measures to monitor and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public health programs and operations. We reviewed the scientific literature and analyzed QI initiatives implemented through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Public Health Improvement Initiative to inform the selection of 5 efficiency and 8 effectiveness measures. This framework provides a model for identifying the types of improvement outcomes targeted by public health QI efforts and a means to understand QI’s impact on the practice of public health. PMID:25689185

  20. Pravastatin improves pregnancy outcomes in obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome refractory to antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lefkou, Eleftheria; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Vosnakis, Christos; Rousso, David

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Administration of conventional antithrombotic treatment (low-dose aspirin plus low–molecular weight heparin [LDA+LMWH]) for obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) does not prevent life-threatening placenta insufficiency–associated complications such as preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in 20% of patients. Statins have been linked to improved pregnancy outcomes in mouse models of PE and APS, possibly due to their protective effects on endothelium. Here, we investigated the use of pravastatin in LDA+LMWH-refractory APS in patients at an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS. We studied 21 pregnant women with APS who developed PE and/or IUGR during treatment with LDA+LMWH. A control group of 10 patients received only LDA+LMWH. Eleven patients received pravastatin (20 mg/d) in addition to LDA+LMWH at the onset of PE and/or IUGR. Uteroplacental blood hemodynamics, progression of PE features (hypertension and proteinuria), and fetal/neonatal outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS. In the control group, all deliveries occurred preterm and only 6 of 11 neonates survived. Of the 6 surviving neonates, 3 showed abnormal development. Patients who received both pravastatin and LDA+LMWH exhibited increased placental blood flow and improvements in PE features. These beneficial effects were observed as early as 10 days after pravastatin treatment onset. Pravastatin treatment combined with LDA+LMWH was also associated with live births that occurred close to full term in all patients. CONCLUSION. The present study suggests that pravastatin may improve pregnancy outcomes in women with refractory obstetric APS when taken at the onset of PE or IUGR until the end of pregnancy. PMID:27454295

  1. Is diabetes management in primary care improving clinical outcomes? A study in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Al-Monjed, M F

    2015-06-09

    There has been little research into the effectiveness of primary-care diabetes clinics in the Middle East. This study in Qatar compared patient outcomes at a primary-care facility with a dedicated diabetes clinic and one without. Using a cross-sectional method, data on demographics, diabetes status and 6 clinical outcomes of diabetes care were collected from the records of patients who visited the clinics during 2012. Diabetes management in both facilities improved clinical outcomes over the 1-year observation period. The mean total cholesterol of patients attending the special clinic (n = 102) decreased significantly from 4.66 to 4.27 mmol/dL and LDL cholesterol from 3.42 to 3.22 mmol/dL. The LDL cholesterol of patients receiving standard care (n = 108) reduced significantly from 3.41 to 3.22 mmol/dL and HDL cholesterol increased from 0.83 to 0.87 mmol/dL. Inter-provider comparisons indicated that the outcomes in the facility with a diabetes clinic were not superior to those in the facility with standard care.

  2. Outcomes research in nutrition and chronic kidney disease: perspectives, issues in practice, and processes for improvement.

    PubMed

    Byham-Gray, Laura D

    2005-01-01

    Despite greater access to health care and advances in medicine and technology, the morbidity and mortality among patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unacceptably high. Discrepancies in patient care outcomes exist between the United States and other industrialized countries and are partly explained by variances reported in clinical practice. Outcomes research (OR) has been the primary methodology used to more fully explore the root causes for the practice variation and to uncover which indicators have the greatest impact. Research has established the relationships between early diagnosis and treatment, cardiovascular disease, quality of life, and malnutrition with morbidity and mortality rates among patients with kidney disease. Although nutrition parameters are predictive of mortality, they are complex to understand and even more difficult to improve, largely because of the effects of the inflammatory process and the lack of a direct measure that defines nutritional status. Future OR projects must focus on specific nutrition-related outcomes and the effectiveness of intervention, as these outcomes can establish clinical guidelines, lead to changes in practice, and create more controlled clinical trials that continue to search for answers to questions on the impact of nutrition and others.

  3. Improved cycle outcomes after laparoscopic ovarian diathermy in hyper-responder patients with previous ART failure.

    PubMed

    Pabuccu, Recai; Pabuccu, Emre Goksan; Gursoy, Asli Yarci; Caglar, Gamze Sinem; Yilmaz, Muserref Banu; Ozdegirmenci, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Excessive response to ovarian stimulation is common among hyper-responder patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Cycle cancellations and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) are all detrimental consequences observed within this cohort and several approaches have been proposed to enhance outcomes. The current study is designed to evaluate whether laparoscopic ovarian diathermy (LOD) improves ART outcomes and pregnancy rates by reducing Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) levels in a group of patients who had a history of recurrent ART failure and high response. A total of 40 hyper-responder patients with history of previous ART failure were included. Group I consisted of 22 patients that underwent LOD prior to ART. Group II consisted of 18 patients that underwent only ART. Cycle outcomes of groups were compared. Following LOD, significant reduction in AMH levels were detected in group I (4.75 ng/mL to 2.25 ng/mL). Clinical pregnancies were similar among groups (40% versus 27.8% p = 0.65). There was no cycle cancellation in Group I, whereas there were three cycle cancellations observed due to OHSS in Group II. Our results indicate that LOD might offer enhanced fertility outcomes and may reduce the likelihood of cycle cancellations in hyper-responders with previous ART failures.

  4. MEASURING AND IMPROVING RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS LUNG DISEASE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES TO THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, J. Kirk; Conway, Steven; Konstan, Michael W.; Marshall, Bruce; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Saiman, Lisa; Accurso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease with significant morbidity. Despite overall improvements in survival, patients with CF experience frequent pulmonary exacerbations and declining lung function, which often accelerates during adolescence. New treatments target steps in the pathogenesis of lung disease, such as the basic defect in CF (CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator [CFTR]), pulmonary infections, inflammation, and mucociliary clearance. These treatments offer hope but also present challenges to patients, clinicians, and researchers. Comprehensive assessment of efficacy is critical to identify potentially beneficial treatments. Lung function and pulmonary exacerbation are the most commonly used outcome measures in CF clinical research. Other outcome measures under investigation include measures of CFTR function; biomarkers of infection, inflammation, lung injury and repair; and patient-reported outcomes. Molecular diagnostics may help elucidate the complex CF airway microbiome. As new treatments are developed for patients with CF, efforts should be made to balance treatment burden with quality of life. This review highlights emerging treatments, obstacles to optimizing outcomes, and key future directions for research. PMID:19833563

  5. Improving Work Outcomes of Dysthymia (Persistent Depressive Disorder) in an Employed Population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David A.; Lerner, Debra; Visco, Zachary L.; Greenhill, Annabel; Chang, Hong; Cymerman, Elina; Azocar, Francisca; Rogers, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a work-focused intervention (WFI) on the work outcomes of employed adults with dysthymia. Method This subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial compares an initial sample of 167 employees (age ≥ 45 years), screened for dysthymia using the PC-SAD without current major depressive disorder randomized to WFI (n=85) or usual care (UC) (n=82). Study sites included 19 employers and five additional organizations. Telephone-based WFI counseling (eight, twice monthly 50-minute sessions) provided work coaching and modification, care coordination and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Adjusted mixed effects models compared the WFI versus UC group pre-intervention to four-month post-intervention change in at-work limitations measured by the Work Limitations Questionnaire. Secondary outcome analysis compared the change in self-reported absences and depression symptom severity (PHQ-9 scores). Results Work productivity loss scores improved 43.0% in the WFI group vs. 4.8% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Absence days declined by 58.3% in WFI vs. 0.0% in UC (difference in change P = .09). Mean PHQ-9 depression symptom severity declined 44.2% in WFI vs. 5.3% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Conclusion At four months, the WFI was more effective than UC on two of the three outcomes. It could be an important mental and functional health improvement resource for the employed dysthymic population. PMID:25892151

  6. Behavioral treatment of social phobia in youth: does parent education training improve the outcome?

    PubMed

    Öst, Lars-Göran; Cederlund, Rio; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Social phobia is one of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, and it runs a fairly chronic course if left untreated. The goals of the present study were to evaluate if a parent education course would improve the outcome for children with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and if comorbidity at the start of treatment would impair the outcome of the social phobia. A total of 55 children, 8-14 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) Child is treated, 2) Child is treated and parent participates in the course, or 3) A wait-list for 12 weeks. The treatment consisted of individual exposure and group social skills training based on the Beidel, Turner, and Morris (2000) SET-C. Children and parents were assessed pre-, post-, and at one year follow-up with independent assessor ratings and self-report measures. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two active treatments and both were better than the wait-list. The treatment effects were maintained or furthered at the follow-up. Comorbidity did not lead to worse outcome of social phobia. Comorbid disorders improved significantly from pre-to post-treatment and from post-to follow-up assessment without being targeted in therapy.

  7. Study protocol - A systematic review and meta-analysis of hypothermia in experimental traumatic brain injury: Why have promising animal studies not been replicated in pragmatic clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Hirst, Theodore C; Watzlawick, Ralf; Rhodes, Jonathan K; Macleod, Malcolm R; Andrews, Peter J D

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and permanent disability. Systemic hypothermia, a treatment used in TBI for many decades, has recently been found to be associated with neutral or unfavourable clinical outcomes despite apparently promising preclinical research. Systematic review and meta-analysis is a tool to summarize literature and observe trends in experimental design and quality that underpin its general conclusions. Here we aim to use these techniques to describe the use of hypothermia in animal TBI models, collating data relating to outcome and both study design and quality. From here we intend to observe correlations between features and attempt to explain any discrepancies found between animal and clinical data. This protocol describes the relevant methodology in detail.

  8. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sandra C; Haynes, Emma; Woods, John A; Bessarab, Dawn C; Dimer, Lynette A; Wood, Marianne M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Hamilton, Sandra J; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. Methods: The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Results: Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Conclusion: Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their Aboriginal patients

  9. Moderate hypothermia within 6 h of birth plus inhaled xenon versus moderate hypothermia alone after birth asphyxia (TOBY-Xe): a proof-of-concept, open-label, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Denis; Robertson, Nicola J; Bainbridge, Alan; Cady, Ernest; Charles-Edwards, Geoffrey; Deierl, Aniko; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Franks, Nicholas P; Griffiths, James; Hajnal, Joseph; Juszczak, Edmund; Kapetanakis, Basil; Linsell, Louise; Maze, Mervyn; Omar, Omar; Strohm, Brenda; Tusor, Nora; Edwards, A David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Moderate cooling after birth asphyxia is associated with substantial reductions in death and disability, but additional therapies might provide further benefit. We assessed whether the addition of xenon gas, a promising novel therapy, after the initiation of hypothermia for birth asphyxia would result in further improvement. Methods Total Body hypothermia plus Xenon (TOBY-Xe) was a proof-of-concept, randomised, open-label, parallel-group trial done at four intensive-care neonatal units in the UK. Eligible infants were 36–43 weeks of gestational age, had signs of moderate to severe encephalopathy and moderately or severely abnormal background activity for at least 30 min or seizures as shown by amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), and had one of the following: Apgar score of 5 or less 10 min after birth, continued need for resuscitation 10 min after birth, or acidosis within 1 h of birth. Participants were allocated in a 1:1 ratio by use of a secure web-based computer-generated randomisation sequence within 12 h of birth to cooling to a rectal temperature of 33·5°C for 72 h (standard treatment) or to cooling in combination with 30% inhaled xenon for 24 h started immediately after randomisation. The primary outcomes were reduction in lactate to N-acetyl aspartate ratio in the thalamus and in preserved fractional anisotropy in the posterior limb of the internal capsule, measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI, respectively, within 15 days of birth. The investigator assessing these outcomes was masked to allocation. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00934700, and with ISRCTN, as ISRCTN08886155. Findings The study was done from Jan 31, 2012, to Sept 30, 2014. We enrolled 92 infants, 46 of whom were randomly assigned to cooling only and 46 to xenon plus cooling. 37 infants in the cooling only group and 41 in the cooling plus xenon group underwent magnetic resonance assessments

  10. Does Computer Assisted Navigation Improve Functional Outcomes and Implant Survivability after Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy D; Clatworthy, Mark G; Frampton, Chris M; Young, Simon W

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether computer assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) improves functional outcomes and implant survivability using data from a large national database. We analysed 9054 primary TKA procedures performed between 2006 and 2012 from the New Zealand National Joint Registry. Functional outcomes were assessed using Oxford Knee Questionnaires at six months and five years. On multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in mean Oxford Knee Scores between the navigated and non-navigated groups at six months (39.0 vs 38.1, P=0.54) or five years (42.2 vs 42.0, P=0.76). At current follow-up, there was no difference in revision rates between navigated and non-navigated TKA (0.46 vs 0.43 revisions 100 component years, P=0.8).

  11. Improving outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of the interprofessional approach.

    PubMed

    Amalakuhan, Bravein; Adams, Sandra G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with significant morbidity, places substantial time and cost burden on the health care system, and is now the third leading cause of death in the US. Many interventions are available to appropriately manage patients with COPD; however, fully implementing these strategies to help improve outcomes may be difficult. Collaboration between an interprofessional team of health care professionals (which includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, dietitians, pharmacists, and many others) and COPD patients and caregivers is necessary to optimally manage these patients and to truly impact outcomes in this devastating disease. Prescribing evidence-based non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies is an important start, but a true team-based approach is critical to successfully implement comprehensive care in patients with COPD. The goal of this review is to employ a case-based approach to provide practical information regarding the roles of the interprofessional team in implementing strategies to optimally manage COPD patients.

  12. Customized Care: An intervention to Improve Communication and health outcomes in multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wittink, Marsha N.; Yilmaz, Sule; Walsh, Patrick; Chapman, Ben; Duberstein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many primary care patients with multimorbidity (two or more chronic conditions) and depression or anxiety have day-to-day challenges that affect health outcomes, such as having financial or housing concerns, or dealing with social or emotional stressors. Yet, primary care providers (PCPs) are often unaware of patients' daily challenges coping with chronic disease. We developed Customized Care, an intervention, to address the barriers to effective communication about patient's day-to-day challenges. Methods In this report we describe the rationale and design of a randomized clinical pilot study to examine the effect of Customized Care on patient-PCP communication and patient health outcomes, including depression, anxiety and functional outcomes. Customized Care comprises two components: (1) a computer-based discussion prioritization tool (DPT) designed to empower patients to communicate their health related priorities; and (2) a customized question prompt list (QPL) tailored to these priorities. Primary care clinic patients and PCPs participated in the study, which consisted of in-person patient assessments, audio recording and transcription of the patient-PCP office visit, and follow-up patient assessments by phone. Results We describe study participant demographics and development of a coding manual to assess communication within the office visit. Participants were recruited from an urban primary care clinic. Sixty patients and 12 PCPs were enrolled over six months. Conclusions With better communication about everyday challenges, patients and PCPs can have more informed discussions about health care options that positively influence patient outcomes. We expect that Customized Care will improve patient-PCP communication about day-to-day challenges, which can lead to better health outcomes. PMID:28191546

  13. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT.

  14. Peripheral Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Synergy to Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Hirsch, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) and its adverse health outcomes than individuals in the general population who have normal renal function. Classic atherosclerosis risk factors care (e.g., age, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia) are common in CKD patients, but CKD also imposes additional unique risk factors that promote arterial disease (e.g., chronic inflammation, hypoalbuminemia and a pro-calcific state). Current nephrology clinical practice is adversely impacted by PAD diagnostic challenges, the complexities of managing two serious comorbid diseases, delayed vascular specialist referral, and slow PAD treatment initiation in CKD patients. Persons with CKD are less likely to be provided recommended ‘optimal’ PAD care. The knowledge that both limb and mortality outcomes are significantly worse in CKD patients, especially those on dialysis, is not a biologic fact, but can serve as a care delivery call to action. Nephrologists can facilitate positive change. This manuscript proposes that patients with PAD and CKD be strategically co-managed by care teams that encompass the skills to create and use evidence-based care pathways. This proposed collaborative multidisciplinary approach will include vascular medicine specialists, nephrologists, wound specialists and mid-level providers. Just as clinical care quality metrics have served as the base for ESRD and acute MI quality improvement, it is time that such quality outcomes metrics be initiated for the large PAD-CKD population. This new system will identify and resolve key gaps in the current care model so that clinical outcomes improve within a cost-effective care frame for this vulnerable population. PMID:25443571

  15. Money matters: exploiting the data from outcomes research for quality improvement initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Bizzini, Mario; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Mannion, Anne F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in studies that have sought to identify predictors of treatment outcome and to examine the efficacy of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to the scientific advancement associated with these studies per se, the hospitals and clinics where the studies are conducted may gain indirect financial benefit from participating in such projects as a result of the prestige derived from corporate social responsibility, a reputational lever used to reward such institutions. It is known that there is a positive association between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, in addition to this, the research findings and the research staff can constitute resources from which the provider can reap a more direct benefit, by means of their contribution to quality control and improvement. Poor quality is costly. Patient satisfaction increases the chances that the patient will be a promoter of the provider to friends and colleagues. As such, involvement of the research staff in the improvement of the quality of care can ultimately result in economic revenue for the provider. The most advanced methodologies for continuous quality improvement (e.g., six-sigma) are data-driven and use statistical tools similar to those utilized in the traditional research setting. Given that these methods rely on the application of the scientific process to quality improvement, researchers have the adequate skills and mind-set to embrace them and thereby contribute effectively to the quality team. The aim of this article is to demonstrate by means of real-life examples how to utilize the findings of outcome studies for quality management in a manner similar to that used in the business community. It also aims to stimulate research groups to better understand that, by adopting a different perspective, their studies can be an additional resource for the healthcare provider. The change in perspective should stimulate

  16. Improving chronic care delivery and outcomes: the impact of the cystic fibrosis Care Center Network.

    PubMed

    Mogayzel, Peter J; Dunitz, Jordan; Marrow, Laura C; Hazle, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem, life-shortening genetic disease that requires complex care. To facilitate this expert, multidisciplinary care, the CF Foundation established a Care Center Network and accredited the first care centres in 1961. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. Although the Care Center Network has been invaluable in achieving substantial gains in survival and quality of life, additional opportunities for improvements in CF care exist. In 1999, analysis of data from the CF Foundation's Patient Registry detected variation in care practices and outcomes across centres, identifying opportunities for improvement. In 2002, the CF Foundation launched a comprehensive quality improvement (QI) initiative to enhance care by assembling national experts to develop a strategic plan to disseminate QI training and processes throughout the Care Center Network. The QI strategies included developing leadership (nationally and within each care centre), identifying best CF care practices, and incorporating people with CF and their families into improvement efforts. The goal was to improve the care for every person with CF in the USA. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan and disseminate QI training and tools throughout the Care Center Network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care centre staff and individuals with CF and their families became a cornerstone of QI efforts. Today it is clear that the application of QI principles within the CF Care Center Network has improved adherence to clinical guidelines and achievement of important health outcomes.

  17. A systematic review of economic evaluations of CHW interventions aimed at improving child health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nkonki, L; Tugendhaft, A; Hofman, K

    2017-02-28

    Evidence of the cost-effectiveness of community health worker interventions is pertinent for decision-makers and programme planners who are turning to community services in order to strengthen health systems in the context of the momentum generated by strategies to support universal health care, the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goal agenda.We conducted a systematic review of published economic evaluation studies of community health worker interventions aimed at improving child health outcomes. Four public health and economic evaluation databases were searched for studies that met the inclusion criteria: National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Cochrane, Paediatric Economic Evaluation Database (PEED), and PubMed. The search strategy was tailored to each database.The 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria were conducted in either high income countries (HIC), low- income countries (LIC) and/or middle-income countries (MIC). The economic evaluations covered a wide range of interventions. Studies were grouped together by intended outcome or objective of each study. The data varied in quality. We found evidence of cost-effectiveness of community health worker (CHW) interventions in reducing malaria and asthma, decreasing mortality of neonates and children, improving maternal health, increasing exclusive breastfeeding and improving malnutrition, and positively impacting physical health and psychomotor development amongst children.Studies measured varied outcomes, due to the heterogeneous nature of studies included; a meta-analysis was not conducted. Outcomes included disease- or condition -specific outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and generic measures (e.g. disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)). Nonetheless, all 19 interventions were found to be either cost-effective or highly cost-effective at a threshold specific to their respective countries.There is a growing body of economic evaluation literature on cost-effectiveness of CHW

  18. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice.

  19. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient's health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD.

  20. Does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina pectoris?

    PubMed

    Holland, Luke C; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Taggart, David P

    2016-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with angina pectoris refractory to medical therapy, does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes? A total of 528 papers were identified using the search protocol described, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. There were 5 case series and 1 prospective cohort study. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. All 5 of the case series demonstrated an improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance or quality of life in patients undergoing surgical sympathectomy. An early case series investigating an open approach had a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the 4 other series used a minimally invasive technique and had low morbidity and zero perioperative mortality rates. The cohort study compared surgical sympathectomy with transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) and concluded TMR to be superior. However, this study looked only at unilateral sympathectomy, whereas all 5 case series focused on bilateral surgery. We conclude that the best currently available evidence does suggest that patients report an improvement in their symptoms and quality of life following surgical sympathectomy, but the low level of this evidence does not allow for a statistically proved recommendation.

  1. Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Chopp, Michael; Cui, Yisheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ruilan; Zhang, Li; Lu, Mei; Szalad, Alexandra; Doppler, Edith; Hitzl, Monika; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2010-11-15

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation mimicking the action of neurotrophic factors and has beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The present study investigated the effect of Cerebrolysin on neurogenesis in a rat model of embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Treatment with Cerebrolysin at doses of 2.5 and 5 ml/kg significantly increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive (BrdU(+)) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells and doublecortin (DCX) immunoreactivity (migrating neuroblasts) in the ipsilateral SVZ and striatal ischemic boundary 28 days after stroke when the treatment was initiated 24 hr after stroke. The treatment also reduced TUNEL(+) cells by ∼50% in the ischemic boundary. However, treatment with Cerebrolysin at a dose of 2.5 ml/kg initiated at 24 and 48 hr did not significantly reduce infarct volume but substantially improved neurological outcomes measured by an array of behavioral tests 21 and 28 days after stroke. Incubation of SVZ neural progenitor cells from ischemic rats with Cerebrolysin dose dependently augmented BrdU(+) cells and increased the number of Tuj1(+) cells (a marker of immature neurons). Blockage of the PI3K/Akt pathway abolished Cerebrolysin-increased BrdU(+) cells. Moreover, Cerebrolysin treatment promoted neural progenitor cell migration. Collectively, these data indicate that Cerebrolysin treatment when initiated 24 and 48 hr after stroke enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome and that Cerebrolysin-augmented proliferation, differentiation, and migration of adult SVZ neural progenitor cells contribute to Cerebrolysin-induced neurogenesis, which may be related to improvement of neurological outcome. The PI3K/Akt pathway mediates Cerebrolysin-induced progenitor cell proliferation.

  2. Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunling; Chopp, Michael; Cui, Yisheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ruilan; Zhang, Li; Lu, Mei; Szalad, Alexandra; Doppler, Edith; Hitzl, Monika; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation mimicking the action of neurotrophic factors and has beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The present study investigated the effect of Cerebrolysin on neurogenesis in a rat model of embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Treatment with Cerebrolysin at doses of 2.5 and 5 ml/kg significantly increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine positive (BrdU+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells and doublecortin (DCX) immunoreactivity (migrating neuroblasts) in the ipsilateral SVZ and striatal ischemic boundary 28 days after stroke when the treatment was initiated 24h after stroke. The treatment also reduced TUNEL+ cells by ~50% in the ischemic boundary. However, treatment with Cerebrolysin at a dose of 2.5 ml/kg initiated at 24 and 48h did not significantly reduce infarct volume, but substantially improved neurological outcomes measured by an array of behavioral tests 21 and 28 days after stroke. Incubation of SVZ neural progenitor cells from ischemic rats with Cerebrolysin dose dependently augmented BrdU+ cells and increased the number of Tuj1+ cells (a marker of immature neurons). Blockage of the PI3K/Akt pathway abolished Cerebrolysin-increased BrdU+ cells. Moreover, Cerebrolysin treatment promoted neural progenitor cell migration. Collectively, these data indicate that Cerebrolysin treatment when initiated 24 and 48h after stroke enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome and that Cerebrolysin-augmented proliferation, differentiation, and migration of adult SVZ neural progenitor cells contribute to Cerebrolysin-induced neurogenesis, which may be related to improvement of neurological outcome. The PI3K/Akt pathway mediates Cerebrolysin-induced progenitor cell proliferation. PMID:20857512

  3. Primary health care contribution to improve health outcomes in Bogota-Colombia: a longitudinal ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colombia has a highly segmented and fragmented national health system that contributes to inequitable health outcomes. In 2004 the district government of Bogota initiated a Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy to improve health care access and population health status. This study aims to analyse the contribution of the PHC strategy to the improvement of health outcomes controlling for socioeconomic variables. Methods A longitudinal ecological analysis using data from secondary sources was carried out. The analysis used data from 2003 and 2007 (one year before and 3 years after the PHC implementation). A Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) of coverage intensity was constructed. According to the PHCI, localities were classified into two groups: high and low coverage. A multivariate analysis using a Poisson regression model for each year separately and a Panel Poisson regression model to assess changes between the groups over the years was developed. Dependent variables were infant mortality rate, under-5 mortality rate, infant mortality rate due to acute diarrheal disease and pneumonia, prevalence of acute malnutrition, vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT) and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding. The independent variable was the PHCI. Control variables were sewerage coverage, health system insurance coverage and quality of life index. Results The high PHCI localities as compared with the low PHCI localities showed significant risk reductions of under-5 mortality (13.8%) and infant mortality due to pneumonia (37.5%) between 2003 and 2007. The probability of being vaccinated for DPT also showed a significant increase of 4.9%. The risk of infant mortality and of acute malnutrition in children under-5 years was lesser in the high coverage group than in the low one; however relative changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Despite the adverse contextual conditions and the limitations imposed by the Colombian health

  4. The use of mobile apps to improve nutrition outcomes: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Kristen N; Huang, Wen-Hao; Andrade, Juan E; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen M

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine if the use of nutrition apps resulted in improved outcomes, including knowledge and behavior, among healthy adults. Using app(s), cellular phone, iPads, mobile phone, mobile telephone, smart phone, mobile and mHealth as search terms with diet, food and nutrition as qualifiers we searched PubMed, CINAHL (January 2008-October 2013) and Web of Science (January 2008-January 2014). Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials, non-controlled trials, and cohort studies published in English that used apps to increase nutrition knowledge or improve behavior related to nutrition. Studies that were descriptive, did not include apps, focused on app development, app satisfaction app feasibility, text messaging, or digital photography were excluded. We evaluated article quality using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Manual. Data was extracted for knowledge, behavior and weight change. Our initial search identified 12,010 titles from PubMed, 260 from CINAHL and 4762 from Web of Science; of these, only four articles met all search criteria. Positive quality ratings were given to three articles; only one reported knowledge outcomes (non-significant). All four articles evaluated weight loss and suggested an advantage to using nutrition apps. Behavioral changes in reviewed studies included increased adherence to diet monitoring (p < 0.001) and decreased effort to continue diet without app (p = 0.024). Few studies, however, have explored the use of nutrition apps as supportive educational interventions. Most apps focus on weight loss with inconsistent outcomes. We conclude that using apps for education needs additional research which includes behavior theory within the app and improved study design.

  5. Improving Medication Adherence and Health Outcomes in Older Adults: An Evidence-Based Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Murray, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor medication adherence is a major public health problem in older adults often resulting in negative health outcomes. Objective The objective of this review was to provide an updated summary of evidence from randomized controlled studies to determine whether interventions aimed at improving medication adherence also improve the health outcomes of older adults residing in community-based settings. Methods Articles that assessed medication adherence interventions and related health outcomes in elderly individuals were identified through searches of MEDLINE (1970–June 2016), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (through to June 2016), and Google Scholar. Across the 12 included studies, interventions were grouped into three main categories: behavioral/educational (n = 3), pharmacist-led (n = 7), and reminder/simplification (n = 2). Results Among the behavioral/educational intervention studies, two showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, whereas one found no changes in adherence or health outcomes. Among the pharmacist-led studies, three showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, while three reported no changes in adherence or health outcomes. One found an improvement in adherence but not health outcomes. Among the reminder/simplification studies, both studies reported improvements in adherence without a significant impact on related health outcomes. Conclusion This evidence-based review of medication adherence interventions in older adults revealed promising strategies in the larger context of a largely mixed body of literature. Future patient-centered and multidisciplinary interventions should be developed and tested using evidence-based principles to improve medication adherence and health outcomes in older adults. PMID:28074410

  6. Effect of wet-cold weather transportation conditions on thermoregulation and the development of accidental hypothermia in pullets under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Minka, Ndazo S; Ayo, Joseph O

    2016-03-01

    The present study examines onboard thermal microclimatic conditions and thermoregulation of pullets exposed to accidental hypothermia during wet-cold weather transportation conditions, and the effect of rewarming on colonic temperature (CT) of the birds immediately after transportation. A total of 2200 pullets were transportation for 5 h in two separate vehicles during the nighttime. The last 3 h of the transportation period was characterized by heavy rainfall. During the precipitation period, each vehicle was covered one fourth way from the top-roof with a tarpaulin. The onboard thermal conditions inside the vehicles during transportation, which comprised ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded, while humidity ratio and specific enthalpy were calculated. The CT of the birds was recorded before and after transportation. During transportation, onboard thermal heterogeneity was observed inside the vehicles with higher (p < 0.05) values in the front and center, and lower values recorded at the air inlets at the sides and rear planes. The CT values recorded in birds at the front and center planes were between 42.2 and 42.5 °C, indicative of mild hypothermia; while lower CT values between 28 and 38 °C were recorded at the sides and rear planes, indicative of mild to severe hypothermia. Several hours of gradual rewarming returned the CT to normal range. The result, for the first time, demonstrated the occurrence of accidental hypothermia in transported pullets under tropical conditions and a successful rewarming outcome. In conclusion, transportation of pullets during wet weather at onboard temperature of 18-20 °C induced hypothermia on birds located at the air inlets, which recovered fully after several hours of gradual rewarming.

  7. Effect of wet-cold weather transportation conditions on thermoregulation and the development of accidental hypothermia in pullets under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minka, Ndazo S.; Ayo, Joseph O.

    2016-03-01

    The present study examines onboard thermal microclimatic conditions and thermoregulation of pullets exposed to accidental hypothermia during wet-cold weather transportation conditions, and the effect of rewarming on colonic temperature (CT) of the birds immediately after transportation. A total of 2200 pullets were transportation for 5 h in two separate vehicles during the nighttime. The last 3 h of the transportation period was characterized by heavy rainfall. During the precipitation period, each vehicle was covered one fourth way from the top-roof with a tarpaulin. The onboard thermal conditions inside the vehicles during transportation, which comprised ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded, while humidity ratio and specific enthalpy were calculated. The CT of the birds was recorded before and after transportation. During transportation, onboard thermal heterogeneity was observed inside the vehicles with higher ( p < 0.05) values in the front and center, and lower values recorded at the air inlets at the sides and rear planes. The CT values recorded in birds at the front and center planes were between 42.2 and 42.5 °C, indicative of mild hypothermia; while lower CT values between 28 and 38 °C were recorded at the sides and rear planes, indicative of mild to severe hypothermia. Several hours of gradual rewarming returned the CT to normal range. The result, for the first time, demonstrated the occurrence of accidental hypothermia in transported pullets under tropical conditions and a successful rewarming outcome. In conclusion, transportation of pullets during wet weather at onboard temperature of 18-20 °C induced hypothermia on birds located at the air inlets, which recovered fully after several hours of gradual rewarming.

  8. Improving environmental quality in an operating room: clinical outcomes and economic implications.

    PubMed

    Sartini, M; Spagnolo, A M; Panatto, D; Perdelli, F; Cristina, M L

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted in a hospital in Liguria (northern Italy) on two groups of patients with the same disease severity who were undergoing the same type of surgery (primary hemiarthroplasty). Our aim was to assessing the results of a quality-improvement scheme implemented in the operating room. The quality-improvement protocol involved analyzing a set of parameters concerning the operating team's behavior and environmental conditions that could be attributed to the operating team itself A program of training and sanitary education was carried to rectify any improper behavior of the operating staff Two hundred and six hip-joint replacement operations (primary hip hemiarthroplasty--ICD9-CM 81.51) all conducted in the same operating room were studied: 103 patients, i.e. operations performed before the quality-improvement scheme and 103 patients, i.e. operations performed after the quality improvement scheme; all were comparable in terms of type of surgery and severity. The scheme resulted in an improvement in both behavioral and environmental parameters and an 80% reduction in the level of microbial air contamination (p < 0.001). Patient outcomes improved in terms of average postoperative hospitalization time, the occurrence and duration of fever (> 37.5 degrees C) and microbiological contamination of surgical wounds. From an economic point of view, facility efficiency increased by 28.57%, average hospitalization time decreased (p < 0.001) and a theoretical increase of Euro 1,441,373.58 a year in revenues was achieved.

  9. Defense Acquisitions: Joint Action Needed by DOD and Congress to Improve Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-27

    Needed by DOD and Congress to Improve Outcomes Why GAO Did This Study DOD’s acquisition of major weapon systems has been on GAO’s high risk list...problems today that it did over 20 years ago. This testimony discusses (1) the performance of the current acquisition system; (2) the role of a sound...on the same kinds of problems today that we did over 20 years ago. Today, I will discuss (1) the performance of the current acquisition system; (2

  10. The changing healthcare landscape: physicians embrace disease management and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Selecky, Christobel; Peck, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The troubled economy and a new administration in Washington have reinvigorated the debate over the merits of disease management programs and the savings they bring to healthcare. At the forefront of the discussion are physicians who are discovering disease management's innovative approach to treating the chronically ill. Across the country, physicians are responding to evidence-based programs designed to improve patient outcomes that, at the same time, assist them in reaching pay-for-performance goals. New research shows that when disease management professionals provide physicians with credible information, course corrections are made more than 85% of the time.

  11. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  12. Does achieving the best practice tariff improve outcomes in hip fracture patients? An observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, B; Nightingale, J; Moran, CG; Moppett, IK

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine if the introduction of the best practice tariff (BPT) has improved survival of the elderly hip fracture population, or if achieving BPT results in improved survival for an individual. Setting A single university-affiliated teaching hospital. Participants 2541 patients aged over 60 admitted with a neck of femur fracture between 2008 and 2010 and from 2012 to 2014 were included, to create two cohorts of patients, before and after the introduction of BPT. The post-BPT cohort was divided into two groups, those who achieved the criteria and those who did not. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes of interest were differences in mortality across cohorts. Secondary analysis was performed to identify associations between individual BPT criteria and mortality. Results The introduction of BPT did not significantly alter overall 30-mortality in the hip fracture population (8.3% pre-BPT vs 10.0% post-BPT; p=0.128). Neither was there a significant reduction in length of stay (15 days (IQR 9–21) pre-BPT vs 14 days (IQR 11–22); p=0.236). However, the introduction of BPT was associated with a reduction in the time from admission to theatre (median 44 hours pre-BPT (IQR 24–44) vs 23 hours post-BPT (IQR 17–30); p<0.005). 30-day mortality in those who achieved BPT was significantly lower (6.0% vs 21.0% in those who did not achieve-BPT; p<0.005). There was a survival benefit at 1 year for those who achieved BPT (28.6% vs 42.0% did not achieve-BPT; p<0.005). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that of the BPT criteria, AMT monitoring and expedited surgery were the only BPT criteria that significantly influenced survival. Conclusions The introduction of the BPT has not led to a demonstrable improvement in outcomes at organisational level, though other factors may have confounded any benefits. However, patients where BPT criteria are met appear to have improved outcomes. PMID:28167748

  13. Does teaching non-technical skills to medical students improve those skills and simulated patient outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Herbstreit, Frank; Kehren, Clemens; Chittamadathil, Jilson; Wolfertz, Sandra; Dirkmann, Daniel; Kluge, Annette; Peters, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a tailor-made, non-technical skills seminar on medical student’s behaviour, attitudes, and performance during simulated patient treatment. Methods Seventy-seven students were randomized to either a non-technical skills seminar (NTS group, n=43) or a medical seminar (control group, n=34). The human patient simulation was used as an evaluation tool. Before the seminars, all students performed the same simulated emergency scenario to provide baseline measurements. After the seminars, all students were exposed to a second scenario, and behavioural markers for evaluating their non-technical skills were rated. Furthermore, teamwork-relevant attitudes were measured before and after the scenarios, and perceived stress was measured following each simulation. All simulations were also evaluated for various medical endpoints. Results Non-technical skills concerning situation awareness (p<.01, r=0.5) and teamwork (p<.01, r=0.45) improved from simulation I to II in the NTS group. Decision making improved in both groups (NTS: p<.01, r=0.39; control: p<.01, r=0.46). The attitude ‘handling errors’ improved significantly in the NTS group (p<.05, r=0.34). Perceived stress decreased from simulation I to II in both groups. Medical endpoints and patients´ outcome did not differ significantly between the groups in simulation II. Conclusions This study highlights the effectiveness of a single brief seminar on non-technical skills to improve student’s non-technical skills. In a next step, to improve student’s handling of emergencies and patient outcomes, non-technical skills seminars should be accompanied by exercises and more broadly embedded in the medical school curriculum. PMID:28355594

  14. Improved outcomes of renal transplantation from cardiac death donors: a 30-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Tojimbara, T; Fuchinoue, S; Iwadoh, K; Koyama, I; Sannomiya, A; Kato, Y; Nanmoku, K; Kai, K; Nakajima, I; Toma, H; Teraoka, S

    2007-03-01

    Outcomes of renal transplantation from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors over 30 years were analyzed. Between 1975 and 2004, 256 renal transplantations from DCD donors were performed. The recipients were divided into four groups according to a time period as follows: 1975-1979 (Group 1; n = 18), 1980-1989 (Group 2; n = 81), 1990-1999 (Group 3; n = 84) and 2000-2004 (Group 4; n = 73). Of the 256 transplanted kidneys from DCD donors, 38 (15%) functioned immediately after transplantation. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) was 72%. Warm ischemic time and total ischemic time were 7.4 +/- 9.4 min and 11.9 +/- 5.6 h, respectively. The overall graft survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were 80%, 72% and 53%, respectively. Graft survival rates in each group have continually improved over time (5-year graft survival; 23% vs. 64% vs. 74% vs. 91%, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in graft survival rates between the groups of patients who survived with a functioning graft for more than 1 year. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed acute rejection and donor age to be independently associated with graft outcome. DCD donors are a valuable source of kidneys for transplantation with promising long-term outcomes.

  15. Tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes improve clinical outcome of therapy-resistant neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Boldrini, Renata; Citti, Arianna; Romania, Paolo; D'Alicandro, Valerio; De Ioris, Maretta; Castellano, Aurora; Furlanello, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma grows within an intricate network of different cell types including epithelial, stromal and immune cells. The presence of tumor-infiltrating T cells is considered an important prognostic indicator in many cancers, but the role of these cells in neuroblastoma remains to be elucidated. Herein, we examined the relationship between the type, density and organization of infiltrating T cells and clinical outcome within a large collection of neuroblastoma samples by quantitative analysis of immunohistochemical staining. We found that infiltrating T cells have a prognostic value greater than, and independent of, the criteria currently used to stage neuroblastoma. A variable in situ structural organization and different concurrent infiltration of T-cell subsets were detected in tumors with various outcomes. Low-risk neuroblastomas were characterized by a higher number of proliferating T cells and a more structured T-cell organization, which was gradually lost in tumors with poor prognosis. We defined an immunoscore based on the presence of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T cells that associates with favorable clinical outcome in MYCN-amplified tumors, improving patient survival when combined with the v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma derived homolog (MYCN) status. These findings support the hypothesis that infiltrating T cells influence the behavior of neuroblastoma and might be of clinical importance for the treatment of patients. PMID:26405592

  16. Hemodialysis vascular access training and practices are key to improved access outcomes.

    PubMed

    Goodkin, David A; Pisoni, Ronald L; Locatelli, Francesco; Port, Friedrich K; Saran, Rajiv

    2010-12-01

    Recognizing that autologous arteriovenous fistula use was associated with improved outcomes in hemodialysis patients, the 1997 Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (DOQI) vascular access practice guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation stressed fistulas as the optimal means of dialysis vascular access. In the United States, this emphasis has continued with the Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative. Much of the data supporting fistulas for dialysis access are derived from longitudinal cohorts, including the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), dialysis provider databases, and other sources. This article reviews major findings from these data sources, focusing on specific practices and characteristics associated with greater arteriovenous fistula use in dialysis facilities worldwide. Important and often overlooked characteristics that are discussed in detail include specific preferences of dialysis staff regarding access type and the emphasis placed on fistula primacy and the number of fistulas created during surgical training. For example, in the DOPPS, the risk of initial fistula failure was 34% lower when fistulas were placed by surgeons who had created at least 25 fistulas during training (P = 0.002). It is imperative that dialysis clinicians advocate actively for specific dialysis access types on behalf of individual patients. Vascular surgery teaching programs must supervise adequate numbers of fistula procedures for every trainee.

  17. An Integrated Review of Interventions to Improve Psychological Outcomes In Caregivers of Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Strömberg, Anna; Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Review To examine interventions aimed at improving psychological outcomes (e.g., caregiver burden, quality of life, anxiety, depression, perceived control, stress mastery, caregiver confidence and preparedness, and caregiver mastery) in family caregivers of patients with heart failure (HF). Recent Findings Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. The most common intervention involved psychoeducation facilitated by a nurse (6/8) and supplemented with a combination of follow-up face-to-face sessions (2/6), home visits (2/6), telephone calls (3/6), and telemonitoring (3/6). Two studies used a support group intervention of 4–6 sessions. Half of the interventions reported a significant effect on one or more primary outcomes, including caregiver burden (n=4), depressive symptoms (n=1), stress mastery (n=1), caregiver confidence and preparedness (n=1), and caregiver mastery (n=1). Summary Compared to dementia and cancer family caregiving, few interventions have been evaluated in caregivers of patients with HF. Of the existing interventions identified in this review, considerable variability was observed in aims, intervention content, delivery methods, duration, intensity, methodological rigor, outcomes, and effects. Given this current state of the science, direct comparison of HF caregiver interventions and recommendations for clinical practice are premature. Thus, research priority is strongly warranted for intervention development and testing to enhance HF caregiver support and education. PMID:26716392

  18. Impact of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions on Improving Health Outcomes among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This review was done to explore the impact of water treatment, hygiene, and sanitary interventions on improving child health outcomes such as absenteeism, infections, knowledge, attitudes, and practices and adoption of point-of-use water treatment. Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases PubMed and Google scholar for studies published between 2009 and 2012 and focusing on the effects of access to safe water, hand washing facilities, and hygiene education among school-age children. Studies included were those that documented the provision of water and sanitation in schools for children less than 18 years of age, interventions which assessed WASH practices, and English-language, full-text peer reviewed papers. Results. Fifteen studies were included in the final analysis. 73% (n = 11) of the studies were conducted in developing countries and were rural based (53%, n = 8). The child's age, gender, grade level, socioeconomic index, access to hygiene and sanitary facilities, and prior knowledge of hygiene practices were significantly associated with the outcomes. Nutrition practices which are key factors associated with the outcomes were rarely assessed. Conclusion. Further research is required to assess the long-term impact of such interventions in different settings. PMID:24454415

  19. Connecting the Disconnected: Improving Education and Employment Outcomes among Disadvantaged Youth. Discussion Paper No. 1412-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Peter B.; Holzer, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly review recent trends in employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth, focusing specifically on those who have become "disconnected" from school and the labor market, and why these trends have occurred. We then review a range of policy prescriptions that might improve those outcomes. These policies include: 1)…

  20. Improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) and treatment outcomes: epistemological assumptions and controversies.

    PubMed

    Williams, C H J

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is recommended as a primary treatment choice in England, for anxiety and depression, by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). It has been argued that CBT has enjoyed political and cultural dominance and this has arguably led to maintained government investment in England for the cognitive and behavioural treatment of mental health problems. The government programme 'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) aims to improve the availability of CBT. The criticism of the NICE evidence-based guidelines supporting the IAPT programme, has been the dominance of the gold standard randomized controlled trial methodology, with a focus on numerical outcome data, rather than a focus on a recovery narrative. RCT-based research is influenced by a philosophical paradigm called positivism. The IAPT culture is arguably influenced by one research paradigm and such an influence can skew services only towards numerical outcome data as the only truth of 'recovery'. An interpretative paradigm could assist in shaping service-based cultures, alter how services are evaluated and improve the richness of CBT research. This paper explores the theory of knowledge (epistemology) that underpins the evidence-based perspective of CBT and how this influences service delivery. The paper argues that the inclusion of service user narrative (qualitative data) can assist the evaluation of CBT from the user's perspective and can understand the context in which people live and how they access services. A qualitative perspective is discussed as a research strategy, capturing the lived experience of under-represented groups, such as sexual, gender and ethnic minorities. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has enjoyed political and cultural dominance within mental healthcare, with renewed government investment in England for the'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) programme. The criticism of the evidence-based guidelines

  1. Targeting the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase Pathway in Gastric Cancer: Can Omics Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phu; Nguyen, Cham

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway signaling is an established oncogenic signal transduction pathway implicated in multiple malignancies. Therapeutic targeting of PI3K pathway components has improved outcomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, kidney cancer, breast cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors. Gastric cancers harbor some of the highest rates of oncogenic alterations in PI3K but attempts to translate this genomic observation have met with limited clinical success and novel approaches are needed. In the following review we discuss PI3K signaling, previous preclinical and clinical investigations in gastric cancer, and discuss future strategies aimed at overcoming resistance and improving efficacy. Identification and refinement of molecular tumor subtypes, development of predictive biomarkers along, and rational drug combination strategies are key to capitalizing on the therapeutic potential of PI3K pathway directed therapies in gastric cancers. PMID:27915478

  2. Genomically Driven Precision Medicine to Improve Outcomes in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krupal; Mymryk, Joe S.; Barrett, John W.; Nichols, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is an endocrine malignancy with an incidence rate that has been increasing steadily over the past 30 years. While well-differentiated subtypes have a favorable prognosis when treated with surgical resection and radioiodine, undifferentiated subtypes, such as anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), are far more aggressive and have a poor prognosis. Conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation, chemotherapy, and radioiodine) have been utilized for treatment of ATC, yet these treatments have not significantly improved the overall mortality rate. As cancer is a genetic disease, genetic alterations such as mutations, fusions, activation of oncogenes, and silencing of tumor suppressors contribute to its aggressiveness. With the use of next-generation sequencing and the Cancer Genome Atlas, mutation-directed therapy is recognized as the upcoming standard of care. In this review, we highlight the known genetic landscape of ATC and the need for a comprehensive genetic characterization of this disease in order to identify additional therapeutic targets to improve patient outcomes. PMID:25276134

  3. Characterization of Death in Neonatal Encephalopathy in the Hypothermia Era.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Boss, Renee D; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Foster-Barber, Audrey; Barkovich, A James; Glass, Hannah C

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the circumstances of death in encephalopathic neonates treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Patients who died after or during treatment with therapeutic hypothermia between 2007-2014 were identified. Patient circumstance of death was characterized using an established paradigm. Thirty-one of 229 patients died (14%) at a median of 3 days of life. Most who died were severely encephalopathic on examination (90%) and had severely abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) findings (87%). All those who had magnetic resonance images (n = 13) had evidence of moderate-severe brain injury; 6 had near-total brain injury. Cooling was discontinued prematurely in 61% of patients. Most patients (90%) were physiologically stable at the time of death; 81% died following elective extubation for quality of life considerations. Three patients (10%) died following withholding or removal of artificial hydration and nutrition. Characterization of death in additional cohorts is needed to identify differences in decision making practices over time and between centers.

  4. Helium-cold induced hypothermia in the white rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Jacobs, M.

    1973-01-01

    Hypothermia was induced in white rats by exposing them to low ambient temperatures (about 0 C) and a gaseous atmosphere of 80% helium and 20% oxygen (helox). Biological survival, in which revival from hypothermia to normothermia is achieved, and clinical survival, in which one or more functional attributes are monitored in the hypothermic animal until it dies, are examined. The helium-cold method appears to produce a hypothermic state in the rat quite similar to that resulting from such techniques as ice water immersion or hypercapnia + hypoxia. There is a direct relationship between body weight and percent survival. Despite the fact that they require a longer period to become hypothermic, the heavier animals are better able to survive.

  5. Does a Quality Improvement Intervention for Anxiety Result in Differential Outcomes for Lower Income Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Chavira, Denise A.; Craske, Michelle G.; Gollineli, Daniela; Han, Xiaotong; Rose, Raphael D.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effects of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care on lower income participants relative to those with higher incomes. The authors hypothesized that lower income patients might show less improvement or improve at a lower rate given that they experience greater economic stress over the treatment course. Alternatively, lower income patients could improve at a higher rate because the intervention facilitates access to evidence-based treatment, which typically is less available to persons with lower incomes. Method The authors compared baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with lower (n=287) and higher (n=717) income using t-tests and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables respectively. For the longitudinal analysis of intervention effects by income group, the authors jointly modeled the outcomes at the four assessment times by study site; income; time; intervention; time and intervention; income and time; income and intervention; and time, intervention and income. Results Although lower-income participants were more ill and disabled at baseline than those in the higher income group, the two income groups were very similar in their clinical response. The lower income participants experienced a comparable degree of clinical improvement, despite receiving fewer treatment sessions, less relapse prevention, and less continuous care. Conclusions These findings contribute to the ongoing discussion as to whether or not, and to what extent, quality improvement interventions work equally well across income groups or require tailoring for specific vulnerable populations. PMID:23377641

  6. Preoperative sport improves the outcome of lumbar disc surgery: a prospective monocentric cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Lener, Sara; Hartmann, Sebastian; Wildauer, Matthias; Löscher, Wolfgang N; Neururer, Sabrina; Thomé, Claudius

    2017-01-13

    A lumbar disc herniation resulting in surgery may be an incisive event in a patient's everyday life. The patient's recovery after sequestrectomy may be influenced by several factors. There is evidence that regular physical activity can lower pain perception and improve the outcome after surgery. For this purpose, we hypothesized that patients performing regular sports prior to lumbar disc surgery might have less pain perception and disability thereafter. Fifty-two participants with a single lumbar disc herniation confirmed on MRI treated by a lumbar sequestrectomy were included in the trial. They were categorized into two groups based on their self-reported level of physical activity prior to surgery: group NS, no regular physical activity and group S, with regular physical activity. Further evaluation included a detailed medical history, a physical examination, and various questionnaires: Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Beck-Depression-Inventory (BDI), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Core Outcome Measure Index (COMI), and the EuroQoL-5Dimension (EQ- 5D). Surgery had an excellent overall improvement of pain and disability (p < 0.005). The ODI, COMI, and EQ-5D differed 6 months after intervention (p < 0.05) favoring the sports group. Leg and back pain on VAS was also significantly less in group B than in group A, 12 months after surgery (p < 0.05). Preoperative regular physical activity is an important influencing factor for the overall satisfaction and disability after lumbar disc surgery. The importance of sports may have been underestimated for surgical outcomes.

  7. Improvement of debate competence: an outcome of an introductory course for medical humanities

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Academic debate is an effective method to enhance the competences of critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills and cooperation skills. The present study examined the improvement of debate competence which is an outcome of debate-based flipped learning. Methods: A questionnaire was administrated to second-year premedical school students at Yeungnam University. In total 45 students participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was composed of 60 items of eight subfactors on debate competence. To investigate the homogeneous of low and high achievement groups, 18 items on empathy and 75 items on critical thinking scales were used. To compare the pretest with posttest scores, data was analyzed using paired sample t-test. Results: There were no significant differences between low and high achievement groups by average grade at the beginning of the semester. There was a significant improvement in high achievers on the logical argumentation (p<0.001), proficiency in inquiry (p<0.01), active participation (p<0.001), ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.001), observance of debate rules (p<0.05), and acceptability (p<0.05). Even in low achievers, active participation (p<0.05) and ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.01) were significantly improved. Conclusion: Results showed that students could improve their debate competence by the debate-based flipped learning. A prospective and comparative study on the communication and teamwork competences needs to be conducted in the future. It is suggested that in-depth discussion for the curriculum design and teaching will be needed in terms of the effectiveness and the outcomes of the medical humanities. PMID:26838572

  8. Behavioral Interventions to Improve Asthma Outcomes for Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mosnaim, Giselle S.; Pappalardo, Andrea A.; Resnick, Scott E.; Codispoti, Christopher D.; Bandi, Sindhura; Nackers, Lisa; Malik, Rabia N.; Vijayaraghavan, Vimala; Lynch, Elizabeth B.; Powell, Lynda H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Factors at multiple ecological levels, including the child, family, home, medical care, and community, impact adolescent asthma outcomes. Objective This systematic review characterizes behavioral interventions at the child, family, home, medical system, and community level to improve asthma management among adolescents. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, SCOPUS, OVID, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and reference review databases was conducted from January 1, 2000 through August 10, 2014. Articles were included if the title or abstract included asthma AND intervention AND (Education OR self-management OR behavioral OR technology OR trigger reduction); and the mean/median age of participants was between eleven and sixteen years. We compared populations, intervention characteristics, study designs, outcomes, settings, and intervention levels across studies to evaluate behavioral interventions to improve asthma management for adolescents. Results Of 1230 articles identified and reviewed, 24 articles (21 unique studies) met inclusion criteria. Promising approaches to improving adherence to daily controller medications include: objective monitoring of inhaled corticosteroid adherence with allergist/immunologist feedback on medication taking behavior and school nurse directly observed therapy. Efficacy at increasing asthma self-management skills was demonstrated using group interactive learning in the school setting. This systematic review is not a meta-analysis, thus limiting its quantitative assessment of studies. Publication bias may also limit our findings. Conclusions Novel strategies to objectively increase controller medication adherence for adolescents include allergist/immunologist feedback and school nurse directly observed therapy. Schools, the most common setting across studies in this review, provide the opportunity for group interactive learning to improve asthma knowledge and self-management skills. PMID:26563672

  9. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  10. Preoperative optimization of cardiovascular hemodynamics improves outcome in peripheral vascular surgery. A prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    Berlauk, J F; Abrams, J H; Gilmour, I J; O'Connor, S R; Knighton, D R; Cerra, F B

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that optimizing hemodynamics using pulmonary artery (PA) catheter (preoperative 'tune-up') would improve outcome in patients undergoing limb-salvage arterial surgery was tested. Eighty-nine patients were randomized to preoperative tune-up either in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) (group 1) or the preinduction room (group 2) or to control (group 3). The tune-up consisted of fluid loading, afterload reduction, and/or inotropic support to achieve predetermined endpoints. Patients with a PA catheter had significantly fewer adverse intraoperative events (p less than 0.05), less postoperative cardiac morbidity (p less than 0.05), and less early graft thrombosis (p less than 0.05) than the control group. The overall study mortality rate was 3.4%, with a mortality rate of 9.5% in the control group and 1.5% in the PA catheter groups. There were no differences in ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, or total hospital costs, although the percentage of cost from complications was higher in group 3 (p greater than 0.05). In this group of patients, preoperative cardiac assessment and optimization is associated with improved outcome. PMID:1929610

  11. Can developing countries achieve adequate improvements in child health outcomes without engaging the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    Bustreo, Flavia; Harding, April; Axelsson, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The private sector exerts a significant and critical influence on child health outcomes in developing countries, including the health of poor children. This article reviews the available evidence on private sector utilization and quality of care. It provides a framework for analysing the private sector's influence on child health outcomes. This influence goes beyond service provision by private providers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Pharmacies, drug sellers, private suppliers, and food producers also have an impact on the health of children. Many governments are experimenting with strategies to engage the private sector to improve child health. The article analyses some of the most promising strategies, and suggests that a number of constraints make it hard for policy-makers to emulate these approaches. Few experiences are clearly described, monitored, and evaluated. The article suggests that improving the impact of child health programmes in developing countries requires a more systematic analysis of how to engage the private sector most effectively. The starting point should include the evaluation of the presence and potential of the private sector, including actors such as professional associations, producer organizations, community groups, and patients' organizations. PMID:14997241

  12. PEGylated liposomal vancomycin: a glimmer of hope for improving treatment outcomes in MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pumerantz, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays a significant role in the pandemic of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and is a major cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia carries a high morbidity and mortality rate especially in elderly diabetics with chronic kidney disease. S. aureus is highly virulent and successful respiratory pathogen. Vancomycin and linezolid are the only two antimicrobial agents FDA-approved to treat MRSA pneumonia. Standard vancomycin dosing is associated with high clinical failure rates and higher dosages are associated with increased nephrotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations are major contributors to poor outcomes with vancomycin. New agents are needed to improve treatment outcomes with MRSA pneumonia. Recently released antimicrobials with in vitro activity are not FDA-approved for treating MRSA pneumonia. Other novel agents are being investigated though none are in late-stage development. Pharmaceutical industry perception of low returns on investment, a Sisyphean regulatory environment, and obstacles to patentability have contributed to declining interest in both the development of novel antibiotics and the improvement of existing generic formulations. Despite decades of investigation into liposomal encapsulation as a drug delivery system that would increase efficacy and decrease toxicity, only liposomal amphotericin B and doxorubicin are commercially available. In this article, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a novel PEGylated liposomal vancomycin formulation along with passive targeting and the enhanced permeability and retention effect of liposomal drug delivery; the pathogenesis of MRSA pneumonia; and recent patents of novel anti-MRSA agents, including inhalational liposomal vancomycin, are reviewed.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  14. Introduction to the STS National Database Series: Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cam; Fann, James I; Paone, Gaetano; Sanchez, Juan A; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is the foundation for most of the Society's quality, research, and patient safety activities. Beginning in January 2016 and repeating each year, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery will publish a monthly Database series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. Six articles will be directly derived from the STS National Database and will be published every other month: three articles on outcomes and quality (one each from the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database, and the STS General Thoracic Surgery Database), and three articles on research (one from each of these three specialty databases). These six articles will alternate with five additional articles on topics related to patient safety. The final article, to be published in December, will provide a summary of the prior 11 manuscripts. This series will allow STS and its Workforces on National Databases, Research Development, and Patient Safety to convey timely information aimed at improving the quality and safety of cardiothoracic surgery.

  15. A multidisciplinary team care approach improves outcomes in high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Liu, Yen-Lin; Lu, Meng-Yao; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Yang, Yung-Li; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Lu, Ching-Chu; Liu, Chia-Ju; Peng, Steven Shinn-Forng; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Lee, Hsinyu; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Min-Chuan; Liao, Yung-Feng; Lee, Ya-Ling; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2017-01-17

    We assessed the impact of a multidisciplinary team care program on treatment outcomes in neuroblastoma patients. Newly diagnosed neuroblastoma patients received treatment under the Taiwan Pediatric Oncology Group (TPOG) N2002 protocol at the National Taiwan University Hospital beginning in 2002. A multidisciplinary team care approach that included nurse-led case management for patients treated under this protocol began in January 2010. Fifty-eight neuroblastoma patients, including 29 treated between 2002 and 2009 (Group 1) and 29 treated between 2010 and 2014 (Group 2), were enrolled in the study. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates for all 58 patients were 59% and 54.7%, respectively. Group 2 patients, who were treated after implementation of the multidisciplinary team care program, had better 3-year EFS (P = 0.046), but not OS (P = 0.16), rates than Group 1 patients. In a multivariate analysis, implementation of the multidisciplinary team approach was the only significant independent prognostic factor for neuroblastoma patients. In further subgroup analyses, the multidisciplinary team approach improved EFS, but not OS, in patients with stage 4 disease, those in the high-risk group, and those with non-MYCN amplified tumors. These data indicate a multidisciplinary team care approach improved survival outcomes in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. However, further investigation will be required to evaluate the long-term effects of this approach over longer follow-up periods.

  16. Integrating Surgery Into Treatment Paradigms for Organ Preservation: Tailoring Treatment to Biology Improves Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gregory T.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was introduced into treatment paradigms for curable head and neck cancer in the early 1970s in an effort to reduce the magnitude of mutilating surgery and to provide a rationale for adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in patients who responded to initial chemotherapy. The large number of trials that followed failed to demonstrate improved survival when neoadjuvant chemotherapy was added to conventional surgery or radiation. Importantly, a consistent observation in these neoadjuvant trials was the significant association of clinical tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and favorable prognosis. Results: The findings led to development of a new treatment paradigm that was based on the hypothesis that the biology of an individual cancer is more predictive of response to specific therapy and overall outcome than is anatomic tumor site or extent, and on the corollary that matching treatment modality to biology will improve overall survival rates. Conclusions: This report identifies key findings that are important in the design and analysis of organ preservation trials and biologic markers predictive of response and outcomes. Ongoing studies incorporating biomarkers such as p53, Bcl-xL, HPV, EGFR, COX-2, and tumor promoter gene methylation are underway and will identify new targets for molecular manipulation, response monitoring, and tumor imaging that could allow real-time changes in how we integrate the various components of multi-modal therapy.

  17. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julia; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Hure, Alexis; Smith, Roger; Collins, Clare E

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2) and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM )is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36)) were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health. PMID:25723973

  18. Does fiscal decentralization improve health outcomes? Evidence from infant mortality in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Marina; Ferrante, Livio

    2016-09-01

    Despite financial and decision-making responsibilities having been increasingly devolved to lower levels of government worldwide, the potential impact of these reforms remains largely controversial. This paper investigates the hypothesis that a shift towards a higher degree of fiscal autonomy of sub-national governments could improve health outcomes, as measured by infant mortality rates. Italy is used as a case study since responsibilities for healthcare have been decentralized to regions, though the central government still retains a key role in ensuring all citizens uniform access to health services throughout the country. A linear fixed-effects regression model with robust standard errors is employed for a panel of 20 regions over the period 1996-2012 (340 observations in the full sample). Decentralization is proxied by two different indicators, capturing the degree of decision-making autonomy in the allocation of tax revenues and the extent to which regions rely on fiscal transfers from the central government. The results show that a higher proportion of tax revenues raised and/or controlled locally as well as a lower transfer dependency from the central government are consistently associated with lower infant mortality rates, ceteris paribus. The marginal benefit from fiscal decentralization, however, is not constant but depends on the level of regional wealth, favouring poorest regions. In terms of policy implications, this study outlines how the effectiveness of decentralization in improving health outcomes is contingent on the characteristics of the context in which the process takes place.

  19. Strategies to improve outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma receiving a liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Misas, Marta; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; De la Mata, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the only therapeutic option which allows to treat both, the hepatocellular carcinoma and the underlying liver disease. Indeed, liver transplantation is considered the standard of care for a subset of patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, tumour recurrence rates are as high as 20%, and once the recurrence is established the therapeutic options are scarce and with little impact on prognosis. Strategies to minimize tumour recurrence and thus to improve outcome may be classified into 3 groups: (1) An adequate selection of candidates for liver transplantation by using the Milan criteria; (2) An optimized management within waiting list including prioritization of patients at high risk of tumour progression, and the implementation of bridging therapies, particularly when the expected length within the waiting list is longer than 6 mo; and (3) Tailored immunosuppression comprising reduced exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, particularly early after liver transplantation, and the addition of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. In the present manuscript the available scientific evidence supporting these strategies is comprehensively reviewed, and future directions are provided for novel research approaches, which may contribute to the final target: to cure more patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and with an improved long term outcome. PMID:25866602

  20. Study on Control of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    The brain hypothermia treatment is an attractive therapy for the neurologist because of its neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients. The present paper deals with the possibility of controlling the brain and other viscera in different temperatures from the viewpoint of system control. It is theoretically attempted to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment to cool only the head but to warm the body by using the simple apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and warming blanket. For this purpose, a biothermal system concerning the temperature difference between the brain and the other thoracico-abdominal viscus is synthesized from the biothermal model of hypothermic patient. The output controllability and the asymptotic stability of the system are examined on the basis of its structure. Then, the maximum temperature difference to be realized is shown dependent on the temperature range of the apparatus and also on the maximum gain determined from the coefficient matrices A, B and C of the biothermal system. Its theoretical analysis shows the realization of difference of about 2.5°C, if there is absolutely no constraint of the temperatures of the cooling cap, muffler and blanket. It is, however, physically unavailable. Those are shown by simulation example of the optimal brain temperature regulation using a standard adult database. It is thus concluded that the surface cooling and warming apparatus do no make it possible to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment, because the brain temperature cannot be cooled lower than those of other viscera in an appropriate temperature environment. This study shows that the ever-proposed good method of clinical treatment is in principle impossible in the actual brain hypothermia treatment.

  1. Accidental hypothermia and death from cold in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masatoshi; Tokudome, Shogo

    1991-12-01

    Hypothermia is considered a sericus problem in big cities. In order to clarify factors contributing to urban hypothermia and death from cold which will continue to be an issue in cities in the future, we analyzed autopsy reports recorded in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 1974 to 1983. In a total of 18346 autopsy reports 157 deaths had been diagnosed as due to exposure to cold. Of these cases, the greatest number were males in their forties and fifties, and most of these were inebriated and/or homeless. Eighty-four perent of urban hypothermia cases occurred when the outdoor temperature was below 5°C, and 50% of deaths from cold occurred when the outdoor temperature was between 0° and 5°C. There were no incidences of death from cold when the minimum outdoor temperature had remained above 16°C. Seventy-four percent of deaths from cold occurred during the winter months of December, January and February, and most of the remaining deaths occurred in March and November. There were no deaths from cold from June to August. More than half of all deaths from cold occurred from 3.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m., with the peak occurring at 5.00 a.m. A blood alcohol concentration of over 2.5 mg/ml had often been found in those in their forties and fifties who had died from hypothermia, and autopsy had often revealed disorders of the liver, digestive system, and circulatory system. Chronic lesions of the liver, probably due to alcoholism, were found in many cases; few cases showed no evidence of alcoholism and these were significantly different from the former group.

  2. A new microcontroller-based human brain hypothermia system.

    PubMed

    Kapidere, Metin; Ahiska, Raşit; Güler, Inan

    2005-10-01

    Many studies show that artificial hypothermia of brain in conditions of anesthesia with the rectal temperature lowered down to 33 degrees C produces pronounced prophylactic effect protecting the brain from anoxia. Out of the methods employed now in clinical practice for reducing the oxygen consumption by the cerebral tissue, the most efficacious is craniocerebral hypothermia (CCH). It is finding even more extensive application in cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, neurorenimatology and many other fields of medical practice. In this study, a microcontroller-based designed human brain hypothermia system (HBHS) is designed and constructed. The system is intended for cooling and heating the brain. HBHS consists of a thermoelectric hypothermic helmet, a control and a power unit. Helmet temperature is controlled by 8-bit PIC16F877 microcontroller which is programmed using MPLAB editor. Temperature is converted to 10-bit digital and is controlled automatically by the preset values which have been already entered in the microcontroller. Calibration is controlled and the working range is tested. Temperature of helmet is controlled between -5 and +46 degrees C by microcontroller, with the accuracy of +/-0.5 degrees C.

  3. Improving PTSD Outcomes in OIF/OEF Returnees: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Hydrocortisone Augmentation of Prolonged Exposure Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0072 TITLE: Improving PTSD Outcomes in OIF/OEF Returnees: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Hydrocortisone...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improving PTSD Outcomes in OIF/OEF Returnees: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Hydrocortisone Augmentation of Prolonged... clinical trial of Prolonged Exposure (PE) with glucocorticoid augmentation (with 30 mg Cortef) or placebo. (0 to 4 months)  Train new study personnel in

  4. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  5. Design of the standardizing care to improve outcomes in pediatric end stage renal disease collaborative.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Miller, Marlene R; Stuart, Jayne; Lawlor, John; Richardson, Troy; Martz, Karen; Rosenberg, Carol; Newland, Jason; McAfee, Nancy; Begin, Brandy; Warady, Bradley A

    2014-09-01

    The Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (SCOPE) Collaborative is a North American multi-center quality transformation effort whose primary aim is to minimize exit-site infection and peritonitis rates among pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. The project, developed by the quality improvement faculty and staff at the Children's Hospital Association's Quality Transformation Network (QTN) and content experts in pediatric nephrology and pediatric infectious diseases, is modeled after the QTN's highly successful Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Hematology-Oncology central line-associated blood-stream infection (CLABSI) Collaboratives. Like the Association's other QTN efforts, the SCOPE Collaborative is part of a broader effort to assist pediatric nephrology teams in learning about and using quality improvement methods to develop and implement evidence-based practices. In addition, the design of this project allows for targeted research that builds on high-quality, ongoing data collection. Finally, the project, while focused on reducing peritoneal dialysis catheter-associated infections, will also serve as a model for future pediatric nephrology projects that could further improve the quality of care provided to children with end stage renal disease.

  6. Neuroglobin Overexpression Improves Sensorimotor Outcomes in a Mouse Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan M.; Kelley, Brian; Gregory, Eugene J.; Berman, Nancy E.J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant need for novel treatments that will improve traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcomes. One potential neuroprotective mechanism is to increase oxygen binding proteins such as neuroglobin. Neuroglobin has a high affinity for oxygen, is an effective free radical scavenger, and is neuroprotective within the brain following hypoxia and ischemia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether neuroglobin overexpression improves sensorimotor outcomes following TBI in transgenic neuroglobin overexpressing (NGB) mice. Additional study aims were to determine if and when an endogenous neuroglobin response occurred following TBI in wild-type (WT) mice, and in what brain regions and cell types the response occurred. Controlled cortical impact (CCI) was performed in adult (5 month) C57/BL6 WT mice, and NGB mice constitutively overexpressing neuroglobin via the chicken beta actin promoter coupled with the cytomegalovirus distal enhancer. The gridwalk task was used for sensorimotor testing of both WT and NGB mice, prior to injury, and at 2, 3, and 7 days post-TBI. NGB mice displayed significant reductions in the average number of foot faults per minute walking at 2, 3, and 7 days post-TBI when compared to WT mice at each time point. Neuroglobin mRNA expression was assessed in the injured cortex of WT mice prior to injury, and at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days post-TBI using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Neuroglobin mRNA was significantly increased at 7 days post-TBI. Immunostaining showed neuroglobin primarily localized to neurons and glial cells in the injured cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus of WT mice, while neuroglobin was present in all brain regions of NGB mice at 7 days post-TBI. These results showed that overexpression of neuroglobin reduced sensorimotor deficits following TBI, and that an endogenous increase in neuroglobin expression occurs during the subacute period. Increasing neuroglobin expression through novel therapeutic

  7. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Stacy; Conner, Emma; Miller, Melodi; Messina, Nena

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user’s family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can improve the outcomes of these children long after the intervention has ended. PMID:25670915

  8. Information Technology-Based Interventions to Improve Drug-Drug Interaction Outcomes: A Systematic Review on Features and Effects.

    PubMed

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Medlock, Stephanie; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to identify features and effects of information technology (IT)-based interventions on outcomes related to drug-drug interactions (DDI outcomes). A literature search was conducted in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for published English-language studies. Studies were included if a main outcome was related to DDIs, the intervention involved an IT-based system, and the study design was experimental or observational with controls. Study characteristics, including features and effects of IT-based interventions, were extracted. Nineteen studies comprising five randomized controlled trials (RCT), five non-randomized controlled trials (NRCT) and nine observational studies with controls (OWC) were included. Sixty-four percent of prescriber-directed interventions, and all non-prescriber interventions, were effective. Each of the following characteristics corresponded to groups of studies of which a majority were effective: automatic provision of recommendations within the providers' workflow, intervention at the time of decision-making, integration into other systems, and requiring the reason for not following the recommendations. Only two studies measured clinical outcomes: an RCT that showed no significant improvement and an OWC that showed improvement, but did not statistically assess the effect. Most studies that measured surrogate outcomes (e.g. potential DDIs) and other outcomes (e.g. adherence to alerts) showed improvements. IT-based interventions improve surrogate clinical outcomes and adherence to DDI alerts. However, there is lack of robust evidence about their effectiveness on clinical outcomes. It is recommended that researchers consider the identified features of effective interventions in the design of interventions and evaluate the effectiveness on DDI outcomes, particularly clinical outcomes.

  9. A multi-centre phase IIa clinical study of predictive testing for preeclampsia: improved pregnancy outcomes via early detection (IMPROvED)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 5% of first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequentially clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or preventative strategies. IMPROvED Consortium members have pioneered a personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, involving mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The key objective is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia. Methods/Design We report the design of a multicentre, phase IIa clinical study aiming to recruit 5000 low risk primiparous women to assess and refine innovative prototype tests based on emerging metabolomic and proteomic technologies. Participation involves maternal phlebotomy at 15 and 20 weeks’ gestation, with optional testing and biobanking at 11 and 34 weeks. Blood samples will be analysed using two innovative, proprietary prototype platforms; one metabolomic based and one proteomic based, both of which outperform current biomarker based screening tests at comparable gestations. Analytical and clinical data will be collated and analysed via the Copenhagen Trials Unit. Discussion The IMPROvED study is expected to refine proteomic and metabolomic panels, combined with clinical parameters, and evaluate clinical applicability as an early pregnancy predictive test for pre-eclampsia. If ‘at risk’ patients can be identified, this will allow stratified care with personalised fetal and maternal surveillance, early diagnosis, timely intervention, and significant health economic savings. The IMPROvED biobank will be accessible to the European scientific community for high quality research into the cause and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcome. Trial registration Trial registration number NCT01891240 The IMPROvED project is funded by the seventh framework

  10. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  11. Perioperative outcomes for pediatric neurosurgical procedures: analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Benjamin J; Vissoci, Joao Ricardo N; Egger, Joseph R; Smith, Emily R; Grant, Gerald A; Haglund, Michael M; Rice, Henry E

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Existing studies have shown a high overall rate of adverse events (AEs) following pediatric neurosurgical procedures. However, little is known regarding the morbidity of specific procedures or the association with risk factors to help guide quality improvement (QI) initiatives. The goal of this study was to describe the 30-day mortality and AE rates for pediatric neurosurgical procedures by using the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatrics (NSQIP-Peds) database platform. METHODS Data on 9996 pediatric neurosurgical patients were acquired from the 2012-2014 NSQIP-Peds participant user file. Neurosurgical cases were analyzed by the NSQIP-Peds targeted procedure categories, including craniotomy/craniectomy, defect repair, laminectomy, shunts, and implants. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality, with secondary outcomes including individual AEs, composite morbidity (all AEs excluding mortality and unplanned reoperation), surgical-site infection, and unplanned reoperation. Univariate analysis was performed between individual AEs and patient characteristics using Fischer's exact test. Associations between individual AEs and continuous variables (duration from admission to operation, work relative value unit, and operation time) were examined using the Student t-test. Patient characteristics and continuous variables associated with any AE by univariate analysis were used to develop category-specific multivariable models through backward stepwise logistic regression. RESULTS The authors analyzed 3383 craniotomy/craniectomy, 242 defect repair, 1811 laminectomy, and 4560 shunt and implant cases and found a composite overall morbidity of 30.2%, 38.8%, 10.2%, and 10.7%, respectively. Unplanned reoperation rates were highest for defect repair (29.8%). The mortality rate ranged from 0.1% to 1.2%. Preoperative ventilator dependence was a significant predictor of any AE for all procedure groups, whereas

  12. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  13. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus Fails to Improve Outcomes Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Sherrefa R; Iniaghe, Loretta O; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most fatal stroke subtype, with no effective therapies. Hematoma expansion and inflammation play major roles in the pathophysiology of ICH, contributing to primary and secondary brain injury, respectively. Fucoidan, a polysaccharide from the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus, has been reported to activate a platelet receptor that may function in limiting bleeding, and to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fucoidan on hemorrhaging and neurological outcomes after ICH. Male CD-1 mice were subjected to experimental ICH by infusion of bacterial collagenase. Animals were randomly divided into the following groups: sham, ICH + vehicle, ICH + 25 mg/kg fucoidan, ICH + 75 mg/kg fucoidan, and ICH + 100 mg/kg fucoidan. Brain water content, neurobehavioral outcomes, and hemoglobin content were evaluated at 24 h post ICH. Our findings show that fucoidan failed to attenuate the ICH-induced increase in BWC. The neurological deficits that result from ICH also did not differ in the treatment groups at all three doses. Finally, we found that fucoidan had no effect on the hemoglobin content after ICH. We postulate that fucoidan treatment did not improve the measured outcomes after ICH because we used crude fucoidan, which has a high molecular weight, in our study. High-molecular-weight fucoidans are reported to have less therapeutic potential than low molecular weight fucoidans. They have been shown to exhibit anti-coagulant and pro-apoptotic properties, which seem to outweigh their anti-inflammatory and potential procoagulant abilities. We propose that using a low-molecular-weight fucoidan, or fractionating the crude polysaccharide, may be effective in treating ICH. Future studies are needed to confirm this.

  14. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients.

  15. Improving child health promotion practices in multiple sectors – outcomes of the Swedish Salut Programme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To improve health in the population, public health interventions must be successfully implemented within organisations, requiring behaviour change in health service providers as well as in the target population group. Such behavioural change is seldom easily achieved. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of a child health promotion programme (The Salut Programme) on professionals’ self-reported health promotion practices, and to investigate perceived facilitators and barriers for programme implementation. Methods A before-and-after design was used to measure programme outcomes, and qualitative data on implementation facilitators and barriers were collected on two occasions during the implementation process. The sample included professionals in antenatal care, child health care, dental services and open pre-schools (n=144 pre-implementation) in 13 out of 15 municipalities in a Swedish county. Response rates ranged between 81% and 96% at the four measurement points. Results Self-reported health promotion practices and collaboration were improved in all sectors at follow up. Significant changes included: 1) an increase in the extent to which midwives in antenatal care raised issues related to men’s violence against women, 2) an increase in the extent to which several lifestyle topics were raised with parents/clients in child health care and dental services, 3) an increased use of motivational interviewing (MI) and separate ‘fathers visits’ in child health care 4) improvements in the supply of healthy snacks and beverages in open pre-schools and 5) increased collaboration between sectors. Main facilitators for programme implementation included cross-sectoral collaboration and sector-specific work manuals/questionnaires for use as support in everyday practice. Main barriers included high workload, and shortage of time and staff. Conclusion This multisectoral programme for health promotion, based on sector-specific intervention

  16. Building a community-academic partnership to improve health outcomes in an underserved community.

    PubMed

    McCann, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    East Garfield Park, IL, is an impoverished community with 59.7% of residents falling below twice the poverty level and 42.6% of its children in poverty. In 2001, the leading causes of hospitalizations were heart disease (10.3%), diabetes (2%), and asthma (3.9%), all of which occur at frequencies 33% greater than the Chicago average. Finally, a review of the health care facilities in the community suggests that there is a need for accessible primary health care services in the area. The purpose of this project was to improve health outcomes in an impoverished, underserved community with documented health care needs and lack of adequate health care services by creating a community-academic partnership to provide on-site, interdisciplinary, health care services within an established and trusted community-based social service agency, Marillac House. The short-term objectives for this project included creating a community-academic partnership between Marillac House and Colleges of Nursing, Medicine, and Health Sciences; providing comprehensive health care services; and developing an innovative clinical education model for interdisciplinary care across specialties. Long-term objectives included providing preventative services; evidenced-based management of acute and chronic illness; evaluating client's health outcomes; and creating a sustainability plan for the long-term success of the health center.

  17. Effect of goal-directed therapy on outcome after esophageal surgery: A quality improvement study

    PubMed Central

    Veelo, Denise P.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; Ouwehand, Kirsten S.; Geerts, Bart F.; Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; van Dieren, Susan; Preckel, Benedikt; Binnekade, Jan M.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Goal-directed therapy (GDT) can reduce postoperative complications in high-risk surgery patients. It is uncertain whether GDT has the same benefits in patients undergoing esophageal surgery. Goal of this Quality Improvement study was to evaluate the effects of a stroke volume guided GDT on post-operative outcome. Methods and findings We compared the postoperative outcome of patients undergoing esophagectomy before (99 patients) and after (100 patients) implementation of GDT. There was no difference in the proportion of patients with a complication (56% vs. 54%, p = 0.82), hospital stay and mortality. The incidence of prolonged ICU stay (>48 hours) was reduced (28% vs. 12, p = .005) in patients treated with GDT. Secondary analysis of complication rate showed a decrease in pneumonia (29 vs. 15%, p = .02), mediastinal abscesses (12 vs. 3%, p = .02), and gastric tube necrosis (5% vs. 0%, p = .03) in patients treated with GDT. Patients in the GDT group received significantly less fluids but received more colloids. Conclusions The implementation of GDT during esophagectomy was not associated with reductions in overall morbidity, mortality and hospital length of stay. However, we observed a decrease in pneumonia, mediastinal abscesses, gastric tube necrosis, and ICU length of stay. PMID:28253353

  18. Improving clinical outcomes for naltrexone as a management of problem alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Gary K

    2013-11-01

    Despite being a relatively effective and safe treatment, the clinical management of alcohol abuse/dependence by oral naltrexone can be compromised due to the patient's non-compliance with daily use of this medication. Over the past decade an increasing body of research has suggested that the use of sustained release depot naltrexone preparations can overcome this issue and deliver improved clinical outcomes. However, at the same time, research findings from diverse areas of pharmacogenetics, neurobiology and behavioural psychology have also been converging to identify variables including genetic markers, patient psychosocial characteristics and drug use history differences, or clusters of these variables that play a major role in mediating the response of alcohol abuse/dependent persons to treatment by naltrexone. While this article does not attempt to review all available data pertaining to an individual alcohol dependent patient's response to treatment by naltrexone, it does identify relevant research areas and highlights the importance of data arising from them. The characterization of clinical markers, to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from naltrexone and to tailor a more individual naltrexone treatment, will ultimately provide significant benefit to both patients and clinicians by optimizing treatment outcome.

  19. Improving the Outcome for Children With Cancer: Development of Targeted New Agents

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for children with cancer has improved significantly over the past 60 years, with greater than 80% of patients today becoming 5-year survivors. Despite this progress, cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease in children in the United States, and significant short-term and long-term treatment toxicities continue to impact the majority of children with cancer. The development of targeted new agents offers the prospect of potentially more effective and less toxic treatment for children. More than a decade since imatinib mesylate was introduced into the treatment of children with Philadelphia chromosomepositive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, transforming its outcome, a range of targeted agents has undergone study in pediatric cancer patients. Early lessons learned from these studies include a better understanding of the adverse event profile of these drugs in children, the challenge of developing pediatric-specific formulations, and the continued reliance on successful development for adult cancer indications on pediatric drug development. The collaborative research infrastructure for children with cancer in the United States is well positioned to advance novel treatments into clinical investigations for a spectrum of rare and ultra-rare childhood cancers. A greater investment of resources in target discovery and validation can help drive much needed development of new, more effective treatments for children with cancer. PMID:25754421

  20. A neighborhood-centered clinical project: improving diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes in Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Sara A

    2015-03-01

    Neighborhood-centered disease prevention programs have become a growing means of introducing baccalaureate nursing students to health care systems. This article reports diabetes and cardiovascular clinical outcomes and health behavior changes made following a 2-year baccalaureate community/public health clinical project and partnership with an urban Hispanic neighborhood. This pilot study used a pretest-posttest design without comparators. The healthy lifestyle consisted of health coaching, physical activity, and lifestyle modification. Thirty-eight women completed the 12-week program. Results revealed significant reductions in diabetes and cardiovascular total risk scores, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, and physical activity (α = 0.05). Students gained learning opportunities in research and public health competencies, while providing clinical practice, research, and scholarship opportunities for nurse educators. Insights from these programs can help faculty, students, and communities identify new approaches that are consistent with the National Prevention Strategy and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to improve diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes among Hispanic women.

  1. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Reuben N.; Mellins, Claude A.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J.; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.; Remien, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on ART for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5–6 weeks after baseline), clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10% improvement for Masivukeni participants and a decrease of 8% for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches. PMID:25566763

  2. [To improve the surgical outcome of chronic constipation: from bed to the bench].

    PubMed

    Tong, Weidong; Wang, Li

    2016-12-25

    The prevalence of chronic constipation is about 16% in adults, and increases with age, especially after 60 years old. Usually, surgical intervention is recommended to patients with long standing intractable constipation, who have undergone various conservative therapies. Lots of surgical procedures have been reported for different kinds of constipation, including slow transit, outlet obstruction, etc. For slow transit constipation, total or subtotal colectomy is commonly used. Merely for the internal rectal prolapse, at least 10 procedures are commonly adopted in clinic. However, no single procedure has been reached a consensus, not to mention the operative indication, principle of procedure selection and outcome assessment. Objectively, the surgical result of chronic constipation is far from perfect. Especially for outlet obstructive constipation, the satisfactory rate is only about 70%. How to enhance the surgical therapeutic effects should be expected on clinical and translation research. Fortunately, sacral neuromodulation therapy and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in managing refractory constipation have brought expected outcomes in recent years. Relationship between microbiota of the colonic mucosa and symptoms, and the sensory nerve regulatory mechanism have attracted much attention. We believe that more translational medicine results can be helpful in the future to improve the comprehensive efficacy of constipation.

  3. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Reuben N; Mellins, Claude A; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J; Remien, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni-is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5-6 weeks after baseline), -clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10 % improvement for-participants and a decrease of 8 % for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches.

  4. Using checklists in a gross anatomy laboratory improves learning outcomes and dissection quality.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Ryan Engebretson; Nikolaus, O Brant; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Checklists have been widely used in the aviation industry ever since aircraft operations became more complex than any single pilot could reasonably remember. More recently, checklists have found their way into medicine, where cognitive function can be compromised by stress and fatigue. The use of checklists in medical education has rarely been reported, especially in the basic sciences. We explored whether the use of a checklist in the gross anatomy laboratory would improve learning outcomes, dissection quality, and students' satisfaction in the first-year Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School. During the second half of a seven-week anatomy course, dissection teams were each day given a hardcopy checklist of the structures to be identified during that day's dissection. The first half of the course was considered the control, as students did not receive any checklists to utilize during dissection. The measured outcomes were scored on four practice practical examinations and four dissection quality assessments, two each from the first half (control) and second half of the course. A student satisfaction survey was distributed at the end of the course. Examination and dissection scores were analyzed for correlations between practice practical examination score and checklist use. Our data suggest that a daily hardcopy list of anatomical structures for active use in the gross anatomy laboratory increases practice practical examination scores and dissection quality. Students recommend the use of these checklists in future anatomy courses.

  5. Can exergaming contribute to improving physical activity levels and health outcomes in children?

    PubMed

    Daley, Amanda J

    2009-08-01

    Physical inactivity among children is a serious public health problem. It has been suggested that high levels of screen time are contributory factors that encourage sedentary lifestyles in young people. As physical inactivity and obesity levels continue to rise in young people, it has been proposed that new-generation active computer- and video-console games (otherwise known as "exergaming") may offer the opportunity to contribute to young people's energy expenditure during their free time. Although studies have produced some encouraging results regarding the energy costs involved in playing active video-console games, the energy costs of playing the authentic versions of activity-based video games are substantially larger, highlighting that active gaming is no substitute for real sports and activities. A small number of exergaming activities engage children in moderate-intensity activity, but most do not. Only 3 very small trials have considered the effects of exergaming on physical activity levels and/or other health outcomes in children. Evidence from these trials has been mixed; positive trends for improvements in some health outcomes in the intervention groups were noted in 2 trials. No adequately powered randomized, controlled trial has been published to date, and no trial has assessed the long-term impact of exergaming on children's health. We now need high-quality randomized, controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of exergaming, as well as its clinical relevance; until such studies take place, we should remain cautious about its ability to positively affect children's health.

  6. Plasma C-Reactive Protein Levels Are Associated With Improved Outcome in ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Khan, Uzma A.; Januzzi, James L.; Gong, Michelle N.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Christiani, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been studied as a marker of systemic inflammation and outcome in a number of diseases, but little is known about its characteristics in ARDS. We sought to examine plasma levels of CRP in patients with ARDS and their relationship to outcome and measures of illness severity. Methods: We measured CRP levels in 177 patients within 48 h of disease onset and tested the association of protein level with 60-day mortality, 28-day daily organ dysfunction scores, and number of ventilator-free days. Results: We found that CRP levels were significantly lower in nonsurvivors when compared with survivors (p = 0.02). Mortality rate decreased with increasing CRP decile (p = 0.02). An increasing CRP level was associated with a significantly higher probability of survival at 60 days (p = 0.005). This difference persisted after adjustment for age and severity of illness in a multivariable model (p = 0.009). Multivariable models were also used to show that patients in the group with higher CRP levels had significantly lower organ dysfunction scores (p = 0.001) and more ventilator-free days (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Increasing plasma levels of CRP within 48 h of ARDS onset are associated with improved survival, lower organ failure scores, and fewer days of mechanical ventilation. These data appear to be contrary to the established view that CRP is solely a marker of systemic inflammation. PMID:19411291

  7. Facilitation of amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice by GABA agonists and CCK-8.

    PubMed

    Boschi, G; Launay, N; Rips, R

    1991-04-01

    1. Amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice is facilitated by dopaminergic stimulation and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic inhibition. The present study was designed to investigate: (a) the involvement of other neuronal systems, such as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the opioid and the cholecystokinin (CCK-8) systems; (b) the possible contribution of hydroxylated metabolites of amphetamine to the hypothermia; (c) the capacity of dopamine itself to induce hypothermia and its mechanisms, in order to clarify the resistance of amphetamine-induced hypothermia to certain neuroleptics. 2. Pretreatment with the GABA antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin, did not inhibit amphetamine-induced hypothermia. The GABAB agonist, baclofen (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) potentiated this hypothermia, whereas the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not. gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) (40 mg kg-1, i.p.) and the neuropeptide CCK-8 (0.04 mg kg-1, i.p.) also induced potentiation. The opioid antagonist, naloxone, was without effect. 3. Dopamine itself (3, 9, 16 and 27 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced less hypothermia than the same doses of amphetamine. Sulpiride did not block dopamine-induced hypothermia, but pimozide (4 mg kg-1, i.p.), cis(z)flupentixol (0.25 mg kg-1, i.p.) and haloperidol (5 micrograms, i.c.v.) did. The direct dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, did not alter the hypothermia. Neither the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor blocker, cyproheptadine, nor the inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), modified dopamine-induced hypothermia. Fluoxetine, an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, had no effect, whereas quipazine (6 mg kg-1, i.p.), a 5-HT agonist, totally prevented the hypothermia. Hypothermia was unaffected by pretreatment with CCK-8. 4. These data indicate that the hypothermia induced by amphetamine involves not only dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic systems which are functionally antagonistic, but is also facilitated by direct or indirect GABA and CCK-8 receptor stimulation

  8. Intrathecal Opioid-Induced Hypothermia Following Subarachnoid Block With Morphine Injection for Elective Cesarean Delivery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Van Havel, Teresa; Gadwood, John; Biegner, M Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Opioids have been administered intrathecally with subarachnoid block for postoperative pain relief in parturients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. This case report presents the uncommon occurrence of intrathecal opioid-induced hypothermia in the latent phase of recovery following elective cesarean delivery. There are few case reports on the occurrence of latent-phase postanesthesia care hypothermia in patients receiving subarachnoid block with morphine sulfate injection (Duramorph). Hypothermia can occur postoperatively for many reasons and can be life-threatening. In this case, hypothermia developed and progressed throughout the postoperative period. The causes of hypothermia were evaluated and treated without success initially. Thyroid dysfunction and alternative differential diagnoses were ruled out. Further assessment determined that the morphine injection might have been a contributing factor. Naloxone at 40-μg increments was administered intravenously and corrected the hypothermia. Awareness of hypothermia postoperatively with associated morphine administration through subarachnoid block must be ruled out in cases of progressing hypothermia.

  9. Inflammatory effects of hypothermia and inhaled H2S during resuscitated, hyperdynamic murine septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Florian; Wagner, Katja; Weber, Sandra; Stahl, Bettina; Knöferl, Markus W; Huber-Lang, Markus; Seitz, Daniel H; Asfar, Pierre; Calzia, Enrico; Senftleben, Uwe; Gebhard, Florian; Georgieff, Michael; Radermacher, Peter; Hysa, Vladislava

    2011-04-01

    Inhaling hydrogen sulfide (H2S) reduced energy expenditure resulting in hypothermia. Because the inflammatory effects of either hypothermia alone or H2S per se still are a matter of debate, we tested the hypothesis whether inhaled H2S amplifies the hypothermia-related modulation of the inflammatory response. Fifteen hours after cecal ligation and puncture or sham laparotomy, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated normothermic and hypothermic mice (core temperature kept at 38°C and 27°C, respectively) received either 100 ppm H2S or vehicle. In the sham-operated animals, inhaled H2S and hypothermia alone comparably reduced the plasma chemokine and IL-6 levels, but combining hypothermia and inhaled H2S had no additional effect. The lung tissue cytokine and chemokine patterns revealed a similar response. During sepsis, inhaled H2S reduced the blood cytokine concentrations only, without effects on the plasma chemokine or the lung tissue levels. Again, inhaled H2S had no major additional effect during hypothermia. With or without sepsis, inhaled H2S and hypothermia alone comparably reduced the lung tissue heme oxygenase 1 expression, whereas inhaled H2S had no additional effect during hypothermia. Lung tissue nuclear transcription factor κB activation was reduced by combining H2S with hypothermia in the sham-operated animals, whereas it was increased by inhaled H2S during sepsis. Hypothermia amplified this response. Hence, during anesthesia and mechanical ventilation, inhaled H2S exerted anti-inflammatory effects, which were, however, not amplified by adding deliberate hypothermia. Sepsis attenuated these anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled H2S, which were at least in part independent of the nuclear transcription factor κB pathway.

  10. Improved outcome to two years of very low-birthweight infants: fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Kitchen, W H; Rickards, A L; Ryan, M M; Ford, G W; Lissenden, J V; Boyle, L W

    1986-10-01

    In 1966-70, the survival rate for very low-birthweight (VLBW) children born in a tertiary perinatal centre was 37.1 per cent but by 1980-82 it had increased to 68.3 per cent. The latter cohort had a significantly reduced prevalence of strabismus, myopia and a head circumference under the 10th percentile, but a significantly increased prevalence of cerebral palsy compared with the 1966-70 VLBW children. Survivors born in 1980-82 had a significantly increased mean Mental Development Index (MDI) on the Bayley Scales compared with the sub-group of survivors born in 1968-70 but there was also a significant improvement in mean MDI over time for a group of normal-birthweight children. No improvement of MDI scores of VLBW survivors in the 1980-82 cohort could be attributed solely to perinatal care. The two-year-old VLBW children in the 1980-82 cohort had similar rates of sensorineural impairments, disabilities and mean MDI to those who would have survived with the care available in 1966-70. It is concluded that survival of VLBW infants has improved in recent times but that neurodevelopmental outcome still lags behind that of normal-birthweight peers.

  11. Vitamin D improves inflammatory bowel disease outcomes: Basic science and clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Krista M; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kroeker, Karen I

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is commonly diagnosed among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are at risk of low bone density and increased fractures due to low vitamin D levels, long standing disease, and frequent steroid exposures; as a result, it is well established that vitamin D supplementation in this population is important. There is increasing support for the role of vitamin D in strengthening the innate immune system by acting as an immunomodulator and reducing inflammation in experimental and human IBD. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)D3, acts on T cells to promote T helper (Th)2/regulatory T responses over Th1/Th17 responses; suppresses dendritic cell inflammatory activity; induces antibacterial activity; and regulates cytokine production in favor of an anti-inflammatory response. Murine and human IBD studies support a therapeutic role of vitamin D in IBD. Risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in this population include decreased sunlight exposure, disease duration, smoking, and genetics. Vitamin D normalization is associated with reduced risk of relapse, reduced risk of IBD-related surgeries, and improvement in quality of life. Vitamin D is an inexpensive supplement which has been shown to improve IBD outcomes. However, further research is required to determine optimal serum vitamin D levels which will achieve beneficial immune effects, and stronger evidence is needed to support the role of vitamin D in inducing disease response and remission, as well as maintaining this improvement in patients’ disease states. PMID:24803805

  12. The scientific learning approach using multimedia-based maze game to improve learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Hafitriani, Sarah; Prabawa, Harsa Wara

    2016-02-01

    The objective of curriculum 2013 is to improve the quality of education in Indonesia, which leads to improving the quality of learning. The scientific approach and supported empowerment media is one approach as massaged of curriculum 2013. This research aims to design a labyrinth game based multimedia and apply in the scientific learning approach. This study was conducted in one of the Vocational School in Subjects of Computer Network on 2 (two) classes of experimental and control. The method used Mix Method Research (MMR) which combines qualitative in multimedia design, and quantitative in the study of learning impact. The results of a survey showed that the general of vocational students like of network topology material (68%), like multimedia (74%), and in particular, like interactive multimedia games and flash (84%). Multimediabased maze game developed good eligibility based on media and material aspects of each value 840% and 82%. Student learning outcomes as a result of using a scientific approach to learning with a multimediabased labyrinth game increase with an average of gain index about (58%) and higher than conventional multimedia with index average gain of 0.41 (41%). Based on these results the scientific approach to learning by using multimediabased labyrinth game can improve the quality of learning and increase understanding of students. Multimedia of learning based labyrinth game, which developed, got a positive response from the students with a good qualification level (75%).

  13. Improving outcomes for operable pancreatic cancer: is access to safer surgery the problem?

    PubMed

    Chang, David K; Merrett, Neil D; Biankin, Andrew V

    2008-07-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of pancreatic cancer in the last two decades, there is a persisting nihilistic attitude among clinicians. An alarmingly high rate of under-utilization of surgical management for operable pancreatic cancer was recently reported in the USA, where more than half of patients with stage 1 operable disease and no other contraindications were not offered surgery as therapy, denying this group of patients a 20% chance of long-term survival. These data indicate that a nihilistic attitude among clinicians may be a significant and reversible cause of the persisting high mortality of patients with pancreatic cancer. This article examines the modern management of pancreatic cancer, in particular, the advances in surgical care that have reduced the mortality of pancreatectomy to almost that of colonic resection, and outlines a strategy for improving outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer now and in the future.

  14. Precision and improving outcomes in acute kidney injury: Personalizing the approach.

    PubMed

    Forni, Lui G; Chawla, Lakhmir; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    It is now well over a decade since attempts at harmonization of acute renal failure into a definable entity termed acute kidney injury. This has led to several landmark studies outlining the epidemiology of acute kidney injury, particularly in the critically ill, as well as providing insights into the long-term effects of the syndrome. Despite the introduction of consensus definitions and improvement in recognition, this has not been translated into outcome benefits as yet. The introduction of novel biomarkers associated with renal damage was primarily aimed at aiding early recognition of acute kidney injury. We argue that, in the future, using biomarkers may not only alert to acute kidney injury but may direct therapy in a personalized fashion rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.

  15. Does physical therapy and rehabilitation improve outcomes for diabetic foot ulcers?

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Yasemin; Ertugrul, Bulent M; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Bayraktar, Kevser

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of diabetes mellitus is ulceration of the foot. Among persons with diabetes, 12%-25% will present to a healthcare institution for a foot disorder during their lifespan. Despite currently available medical and surgical treatments, these are still the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and of lower extremity amputations. Thus, many adjunctive and complementary treatments have been developed in an attempt to improve outcomes. We herein review the available literature on the effectiveness of several treatments, including superficial and deep heaters, electro-therapy procedures, prophylactic methods, exercise and shoe modifications, on diabetic foot wounds. Overall, although physical therapy modalities seem to be useful in the treatment of diabetic foot wounds, further randomized clinical studies are required. PMID:25992328

  16. Progesterone Reduces Secondary Damage, Preserves White Matter, and Improves Locomotor Outcome after Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; González, Susana; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Lima, Analía; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; De Nicola, Alejandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory and promyelinating agent after spinal cord injury