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Sample records for hypothermia improves outcome

  1. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  2. Vitamin D improves functional outcomes in neonatal hypoxic ischemic male rats treated with N-acetylcysteine and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Danielle W; Fraser, Jamie L; Rollins, Laura Grace; Bentzley, Jessica; Nie, Xingju; Martin, Renee; Singh, Inderjit; Jenkins, Dorothea

    2017-09-01

    Hypothermia treatment neuroprotects approximately 50% of neonates who present with moderate to severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, is neuroprotective in combination with hypothermia in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) female rats, but less protective in males. Vitamin D is a neurosteroid, which may provide immunomodulation and improve outcomes for both sexes. We investigated the efficacy of this combination of drugs with hypothermia after severe HI, as well as potential mechanisms of vitamin D effects in the transition to chronic inflammation. DOL 7 rats were randomized to sham, or HI and hypothermia treated with either saline (HYPO), NAC (50 mg/kg/d, HNAC), or HNAC plus 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 (0.1 μg/kg/d, HNAC + VitD) daily for 2 weeks. A second set of animals were randomized and treated for 11 days to investigate vitamin D metabolism and inflammatory mediators. Rats treated with HNAC + VitD performed significantly better on tests of strength and use of affected limb, adaptive sensorimotor skills, motor sequence learning, and working memory than either HYPO or HNAC, particularly benefiting male rats. Significantly fewer rats in the HNAC + VitD group had severe hemispheric volume loss. HI injury decreased serum vitamin D at 11 days and induced the enzyme that deactivates vitamin D in the hippocampus, particularly in males. Persistent vitamin D dysregulation was seen in both hippocampi in males, which was not reversed by hypothermia. Vitamin D in combination with hypothermia and NAC supports functional recovery in both sexes of neonatal rats significantly better than hypothermia alone or hypothermia and NAC in this severe HI model. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Systemic hypothermia improves histological and functional outcome after cervical spinal cord contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Lo, Thomas Pang; Cho, Kyoung-Suok; Garg, Maneesh Sen; Lynch, Michael Patrick; Marcillo, Alexander Eduardo; Koivisto, Denise Leigh; Stagg, Monica; Abril, Rosa Marie; Patel, Samik; Dietrich, W Dalton; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2009-06-10

    Hypothermia has been employed during the past 30 years as a therapeutic modality for spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models and in humans. With our newly developed rat cervical model of contusive SCI, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of transient systemic hypothermia (beginning 5 minutes post-injury for 4 hours, 33 degrees C) with gradual rewarming (1 degrees C per hour) for the preservation of tissue and the prevention of injury-induced functional loss. A moderate cervical displacement SCI was performed in female Fischer rats, and behavior was assessed for 8 weeks. Histologically, the application of hypothermia after SCI resulted in significant increases in normal-appearing white matter (31% increase) and gray matter (38% increase) volumes, greater preservation (four-fold) of neurons immediately rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter, and enhanced sparing of axonal connections from retrogradely traced reticulospinal neurons (127% increase) compared with normothermic controls. Functionally, a faster rate of recovery in open field locomotor ability (BBB score, weeks 1-3) and improved forelimb strength, as measured by both weight-supported hanging (43% increase) and grip strength (25% increase), were obtained after hypothermia. The current study demonstrates that mild systemic hypothermia is effective for retarding tissue damage and reducing neurological deficits following a clinically relevant contusive cervical SCI.

  4. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiefeng; Huang, Zeng; Ye, Sen; Wang, Moli; Fang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC) improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32–34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects. PMID:28097144

  5. Remote Postconditioning Alone and Combined with Hypothermia Improved Postresuscitation Cardiac and Neurological Outcomes in Swine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Huang, Zeng; Ye, Sen; Wang, Moli; Fang, Ya; Li, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Previously, we demonstrated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIpostC) improved postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions in rat. Here, we investigated the effects of RIpostC alone and combined with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on cardiac and neurological outcomes after CPR in swine. Methods. Twenty-one pigs were subjected to 10 mins of VF and then 5 mins of CPR. The animals were randomized to receive RIpostC alone, or its combination with TH, or sham control. RIpostC was induced by 4 cycles of limb ischemia followed by reperfusion. TH was implemented by surface cooling to reach a temperature of 32-34°C. Results. During 72 hrs after resuscitation, lower level of cardiac troponin I and greater stroke volume and global ejection fraction were observed in animals that received RIpostC when compared to the control. RIpostC also decreased serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S100B and increased neurologic alertness score after resuscitation. The combination of RIpostC and TH resulted in greater improvement in cardiac and neurological outcomes than RIpostC alone. Conclusion. RIpostC was conducive to improving postresuscitation myocardial and cerebral functions and reducing their organ injuries. Its combination with TH further enhanced its protective effects.

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  7. Hypothermia improves disease manifestations in SMA mice via SMN augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Ting, Chen-Hung; Chien, Yin-Hsio; Lee, Ni-Chong; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in a mouse model of SMA. SMA mice were exposed to ice for 50 s to achieve transient hypothermia (below 25°C) daily beginning on postnatal day 1. Neonatal SMA mice (Smn(-/-)SMN2(+/-)) who received daily transient hypothermia exhibited reduced motor neuron degeneration and muscle atrophy and preserved the architecture of neuromuscular junction when compared with untreated controls at day 8 post-treatment. Daily hypothermia also prolonged the lifespan, increased body weight and improved motor coordination in SMA mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that transient hypothermia led to an increase in SMN transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord and brain. In in vitro studies using an SMN knockdown motor neuron-like cell-line, transient hypothermia increased intracellular SMN protein expression and length of neurites, confirming the direct effect of hypothermia on motor neurons. These data indicate that the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in improving outcome in an SMA mouse model may be mediated, in part, via an upregulation of SMN levels in the motor neurons. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Amplitude-Integrated Electroencephalography Improves the Identification of Infants with Encephalopathy for Therapeutic Hypothermia and Predicts Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 2 Years of Age.

    PubMed

    Skranes, Janne Helen; Løhaugen, Gro; Schumacher, Eva Margrethe; Osredkar, Damjan; Server, Andres; Cowan, Frances Mary; Stiris, Tom; Fugelseth, Drude; Thoresen, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    To examine whether using an amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) severity pattern as an entry criterion for therapeutic hypothermia better selects infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and to assess the time-to-normal trace for aEEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion load as 24-month outcome predictors. Forty-seven infants meeting Norwegian therapeutic hypothermia guidelines were enrolled prospectively. Eight-channel EEG/aEEG was recorded from 6 hours until after rewarming, and read after discharge. Neonatal MRI brain scans were scored for summated (range 0-11) regional lesion load. A poor outcome at 2 years was defined as death or a Bayley Scales of Infant-Toddler Development cognitive or motor composite score of <85 or severe hearing or visual loss. Three severity groups were defined from the initial aEEG; continuous normal voltage (CNV; n = 15), discontinuous normal voltage (DNV; n = 18), and a severe aEEG voltage pattern (SEVP; n = 14). Any seizure occurrence was 7% CNV, 50% DNV, and 100% SEVP. Infants with SEVP with poor vs good outcome had a significantly longer median (IQR) time-to-normal trace: 58 hours (9-79) vs 18 hours (12-19) and higher MRI lesion load: 10 (3-10) vs 2 (1-5). A poor outcome was noted in 3 of 15 infants with CNV, 4 of 18 infants with DNV, and 8 of 14 infants with SEVP. Using multiple stepwise linear regression analyses including only infants with abnormal aEEG (DNV and SEVP), MRI lesion load significantly predicted cognitive and motor scores. For the SEVP group alone, time-to-normal trace was a stronger outcome predictor than MRI score. No variable predicted outcome in infants with CNV. Selection of infants with encephalopathy for therapeutic hypothermia after perinatal asphyxia may be improved by including only infants with an early moderate or severely depressed background aEEG trace. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    Cold weather can affect your body in different ways. You can get frostbite, which is an injury to the ... Anyone who spends much time outdoors in cold weather can get hypothermia. You can also get it ...

  10. Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Turk, Elisabeth E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothermia refers to a situation where there is a drop in body core temperature below 35 degrees C. It is a potentially fatal condition. In forensic medicine and pathology, cases of hypothermia often pose a special challenge to experts because of their complex nature, and the often absent or nonspecific nature of morphological findings. The scene of the incident may raise suspicions of a crime initially, due to phenomena such as terminal burrowing behavior and paradoxical undressing. An element of hypothermia often contributes to the cause of death in drug- and alcohol-related fatalities, in the homeless, in immersion deaths, in accidents and in cases of abuse or neglect, making the condition extremely relevant to forensic medical specialists. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the pathophysiological aspects of hypothermia and to illustrate different aspects relevant to forensic medical casework.

  11. [Hypothermia].

    PubMed

    García Iriarte, Antxon; Sáenz Mendía, Raquel; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    A deep understanding about the causes and situations which predispose a patient to hypothermia can prevent its progression and the emergence of complications which present life-threatening risks and can lead to irreversible organ deterioration. The distinct degrees of hypothermia require a diagnosis and a distinct therapeutic treatment which share common pillars based on: the need to employ general measures which counterarrest the deterioration of those organs caused by heat loss; and the use of internal or external reheating methods which vary due to the degree of hypothermia and the hemodynamic stability of the patient. In moderate or severe cases, a nurse's role, as one who collaborates in patient treatment, requires paying special attention to strict monitoring of vital constants, neurological, metabolic and cardio-respiratory signs, as well as collaborating in various therapeutic procedures. As a nursing diagnosis, hypothermia refers to those situations in which a nurse's professional competence capacitates he/she to carry out actions which resolve that prejudicial situation a patient faces.

  12. Continuous Electroencephalogram in Comatose Postcardiac Arrest Syndrome Patients Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia: Outcome Prediction Study.

    PubMed

    Sadaka, Farid; Doerr, Danielle; Hindia, Jiggar; Lee, K Philip; Logan, William

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic Hypothermia (TH) is the only therapeutic intervention proven to significantly improve survival and neurologic outcome in comatose postcardiac arrest patients and is now considered standard of care. When we discuss prognostication with regard to comatose survivors postcardiac arrest, we should look for tools that are both reliable and accurate and that achieve a false-positive rate (FPR) equal to or very closely approaching zero. We retrospectively reviewed data that were prospectively collected on all cardiac arrest patients admitted to our ICU. Continuous electroencephalogram (cEEG) monitoring was performed as part of our protocol for therapeutic hypothermia in comatose postcardiac arrest patients. The primary outcome measure was the best score on hospital discharge on the 5-point Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC) scores. A total of 58 patients were included in this study. Twenty five (43%) patients had a good neurologic outcome (CPC score of 1-2). Three (5.2%) patients had nonconvulsive status epilepticus, all of whom had poor outcome (CPC = 5). Seventeen (29%) patients had burst suppression (BS); all had poor outcome. Both nonconvuslsive seizures (NCS) and BS had a specificity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%), positive predictive values of 100% (95% CI, 31%-100%), and 100% (95% CI, 77%-100%), respectively. Both NCS and BS had FPRs of zero (95% CI, 0.0-0.69, and 0.0-0.23, respectively). In comatose postcardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, EEG during the maintenance and rewarming phase of hypothermia can contribute to prediction of neurologic outcome. Pending large multicenter prospective studies evaluating the role of cEEG in prognostication, our study adds to the existing evidence that cEEG can play a potential role in prediction of outcome in postcardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Hypothermia and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Polderman, K H

    2008-01-01

    Multi-centred studies in patients who remain comatose after cardiac arrest and also in newborn babies with perinatal asphyxia have clearly demonstrated that mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) can improve neurological outcome after post-anoxic injury. This represents a highly promising development in the field of neurocritical care. This review discusses the place of mild therapeutic hypothermia in the overall therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrest patients. Cooling should not be viewed in isolation but in the context of a 'treatment bundle,' which together can significantly improve outcome after cardiac arrest. Favourable outcomes of 50-60% are now routinely achieved in many centres in patients with witnessed arrest and an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia. These results have been achieved by combining a number of therapeutic strategies, including early and effective resuscitation with greater emphasis on continuing chest compressions throughout various procedures (including resumption of compressions immediately after defibrillation even if rhythm has been restored) as well as prevention of hypoxia and hypotension in all stages following restoration of spontaneous circulation. Regarding the use of hypothermia, early induction and proper management of side-effects are the key elements of successful implementation. Treatment should include the rapid infusion of 1500-3000 mL of cold fluids to induce hypothermia and prevent hypovolaemia and hypotension. Educational activities to increase awareness and acceptance of new therapeutic options and European Resuscitation Council guidelines are urgently required.

  14. No association between intraoperative hypothermia or supplemental protective drug and neurologic outcomes in patients undergoing temporary clipping during cerebral aneurysm surgery: findings from the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial.

    PubMed

    Hindman, Bradley J; Bayman, Emine O; Pfisterer, Wolfgang K; Torner, James C; Todd, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    Although hypothermia and barbiturates improve neurologic outcomes in animal temporary focal ischemia models, the clinical efficacy of these interventions during temporary occlusion of the cerebral vasculature during intracranial aneurysm surgery (temporary clipping) is not established. A post hoc analysis of patients from the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial who underwent temporary clipping was performed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression methods were used to test for associations between hypothermia, supplemental protective drug, and short- (24-h) and long-term (3-month) neurologic outcomes. An odds ratio more than 1 denotes better outcome. Patients undergoing temporary clipping (n = 441) were assigned to intraoperative hypothermia (33.3 degrees +/- 0.8 degrees C, n = 208) or normothermia (36.7 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees C, n = 233), with 178 patients also receiving supplemental protective drug (thiopental or etomidate) during temporary clipping. Three months after surgery, 278 patients (63%) had good outcome (Glasgow Outcome Score = 1). Neither hypothermia (P = 0.847; odds ratio = 1.043, 95% CI = 0.678-1.606) nor supplemental protective drug (P = 0.835; odds ratio = 1.048, 95% CI = 0.674-1.631) were associated with 3-month Glasgow Outcome Score. The effect of supplemental protective drug did not significantly vary with temperature. The effects of hypothermia and protective drug did not significantly vary with temporary clip duration. Similar findings were made for 24-h neurologic status and 3-month Neuropsychological Composite Score. In the Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial, neither systemic hypothermia nor supplemental protective drug affected short- or long-term neurologic outcomes of patients undergoing temporary clipping.

  15. Early clinical prediction of neurological outcome following out of hospital cardiac arrest managed with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddeen, Mohammed Ishaq; Ramadoss, Rajaram; Rajajee, V.; Grzeskowiak, Luke E.; Rajagopalan, Ram E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) may improve neurological outcome in comatose patients following out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The reliability of clinical prediction of neurological outcome following TH remains unclear. In particular, there is very limited data on survival and predictors of neurological outcome following TH for OHCA from resource-constrained settings in general and South Asia in specific. Objective: The objective was to identify factors predicting unfavorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge in comatose survivors of OHCA treated with hypothermia. Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Urban 200-bed hospital in Chennai, India. Methods: Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category score [3–5]) at hospital discharge were evaluated among patients admitted between January 2006 and December 2012 following OHCA treated with TH. Hypothermia was induced with cold intravenous saline bolus, ice packs and cold-water spray with bedside fan. Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome were examined through multivariate exact logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 121 patients were included with 106/121 (87%) experiencing the unfavorable neurological outcome. Independent predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome included: Status myoclonus <24 h (odds ratio [OR] 21.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.89-Infinite), absent brainstem reflexes (OR 50.09, 6.55-Infinite), and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 (OR 99.41, 12.21-Infinite). All 3 variables had 100% specificity and positive predictive value. Conclusion: Status myoclonus within 24 h, absence of brainstem reflexes and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 reliably predict unfavorable neurological outcome in comatose patients with OHCA treated with TH. PMID:26195855

  16. Hypothermia in trauma.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Samuel Edwin

    2013-12-01

    Hypovolaemic shock that results through traumatically inflicted haemorrhage can have disastrous consequences for the victim. Initially the body can compensate for lost circulating volume, but as haemorrhage continues compensatory mechanisms fail and the patient's condition worsens significantly. Hypovolaemia results in the lethal triad, a combination of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, three factors that are interlinked and serve to worsen each other. The lethal triad is a form of vicious cycle, which unless broken will result in death. This report will focus on the role of hypothermia (a third of the lethal triad) in trauma, examining literature to assess how prehospital temperature control can impact on the trauma patient. Spontaneous hypothermia following trauma has severely deleterious consequences for the trauma victim; however, both active warming of patients and clinically induced hypothermia can produce particularly positive results and improve patient outcome. Possible coagulopathic side effects of clinically induced hypothermia may be corrected with topical haemostatic agents, with the benefits of an extended golden hour given by clinically induced hypothermia far outweighing these risks. Active warming of patients, to prevent spontaneous trauma induced hypothermia, is currently the only viable method currently available to improve patient outcome. This method is easy to implement requiring simple protocols and contributes significantly to interrupting the lethal triad. However, the future of trauma care appears to lie with clinically induced therapeutic hypothermia. This new treatment provides optimism that in the future the number of deaths resulting from catastrophic haemorrhaging may be significantly lessened.

  17. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide on outcomes after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hypothermia-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Kotaro; Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Yu, Binglan; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although nitric oxide prevents organ injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion, role of nitric oxide during TH after CPR remains unclear. Here, we examined the impact of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis on the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR. We also examined whether or not inhaled nitric oxide during hypothermia further improves outcomes after CA/CPR in mice treated with TH. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3−/−) were subjected to CA at 37°C and then resuscitated with chest compression. Body temperature was maintained at 37°C (normothermia) or reduced to 33°C (TH) for 24 hours after resuscitation. Mice breathed air or air mixed with nitric oxide at 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 ppm during hypothermia. To evaluate brain injury and cerebral blood flow, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in WT mice after CA/CPR. Results Hypothermia up-regulated the NOS3-dependent signaling in the brain (n=6–7). Deficiency of NOS3 abolished the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR (n=5–6). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 ppm improved survival rate in hypothermia-treated NOS3−/− mice (n=6) after CA/CPR compared to NOS3−/− mice that were treated with hypothermia alone (n=6, P<0.05). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 (n=9) or 60 (n=9) ppm markedly improved survival rates in TH-treated WT mice (n=51) (both P<0.05 vs TH-treated WT mice). Inhaled nitric oxide during TH (n=7) prevented brain injury compared to TH alone (n=7) without affecting cerebral blood flow after CA/CPR (n=6). Conclusions NOS3 is required for the beneficial effects of TH. Inhaled nitric oxide during TH remains beneficial and further improves outcomes after CA/CPR. Nitric oxide breathing exerts protective effects after CA/CPR even when TH is ineffective due to impaired endogenous nitric oxide production

  18. Intravenous hydrogen sulfide does not induce hypothermia or improve survival from hemorrhagic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Stezoski, Jason; Wu, Xianren; Bayir, Hülya; Morhard, Ryan C; Stezoski, S William; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2011-01-01

    Several laboratory studies suggested that induced hypothermia during hemorrhagic shock improves survival. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide (H2S) induced hypothermia and decreased metabolism in mice and rats but not in piglets. We tested the hypothesis that i.v. H2S will induce hypothermia, reduce oxygen consumption (VO2), and improve outcome in prolonged hemorrhagic shock in pigs. We also assessed markers of organ injury (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, and troponin) and level of protein thiols to monitor H2S metabolism. In a prospective randomized study, pigs were subjected to volume-controlled hemorrhagic shock with limited fluid resuscitation to maintain MAP 30 mmHg or greater. The study group received infusion of H2S at 5 mg·kg·h; the control group received vehicle (n = 8 per group). Dose was based on the highest tolerated dose in pilot studies. Full resuscitation was initiated after 3 h. There were no differences in survival at 24 h between groups (2/8 in H2S vs. 3/8 in control group). Heart rate increased similarly during hemorrhagic shock in both groups. Cardiac output was better preserved in the delayed phase of hemorrhagic shock in the control group. Temperature and VO2 were similar in both groups during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Markers of organ injury and protein thiols markedly increased in both groups with no differences between groups. In conclusion, we were not able to demonstrate the hypothermia-inducing effect or a reduction in VO2 from H2S infusion in our model of hemorrhagic shock in pigs. Our data mirror those seen in piglets and provide additional evidence of difficulty in translating the hypothermia effect of H2S to large animals in a clinically relevant postinsult paradigm.

  19. [Physiologic effects of hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Eniko; Jenei, Zsigmond; Horváth, Anikó; Gellér, László; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Király, Akos; Molnár, Levente; Sótonyi, Péter; Merkely, Béla; Zima, Endre

    2011-01-30

    Therapeutic use of hypothermia has come to the frontline in the past decade again in the prevention and in mitigation of neurologic impairment. The application of hypothermia is considered as a successful therapeutic measure not just in neuro- or cardiac surgery, but also in states causing brain injury or damage. According to our present knowledge this is the only proven therapeutic tool, which improves the neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, decreasing the oxygen demand of the brain. Besides influencing the nervous system, hypothermia influences the function of the whole organ system. Beside its beneficial effects, it has many side-effects, which may be harmful to the patient. Before using it for a therapeutic purpose, it is very important to be familiar with the physiology and complications of hypothermia, to know, how to prevent and treat its side-effects. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic and pathophysiologic effects of hypothermia.

  20. Hypothermia improves oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Swertz, Meike; Beck, Christopher; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μ HbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (-36 ± 4% and -27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (-15 ± 5% and -11 ± 5%). The improved μ HbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μ flow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (-51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (-106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μ HbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μ flow.

  1. Epidemiology and outcomes of children with accidental hypothermia: A propensity-matched study.

    PubMed

    Totapally, Abhinav; Leoncio, Michael; Beltramo, Fernando; Meyer, Keith; Raszynski, Andre; Totapally, Balagangadhar R

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the epidemiology and outcomes of hospitalized children with a diagnosis of accidental hypothermia. The 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database, detailing discharge diagnoses in children admitted to US hospitals, was analyzed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes to filter out relevant patients. Children ages 1 month to 17 years were included in the analysis. Demographic and outcome variables in the hypothermia group were compared with the rest of the patients. In a separate analysis, children with hypothermia were matched 1:1 using a correlative propensity score using sex, age, hospital region, income quartiles, race, ventilation status, coagulopathy, drowning, and All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups severity score and their outcomes were compared with controls. The sample data were weighted to get a national estimate. Accidental hypothermia was present in 1,028 cases out of 1,915,435 discharges. Children with hypothermia were more likely to be males (54.7% vs. 50.9%; p < 0.05) and infants (32.6% vs. 17.5%); they were less likely to be teens (30% vs. 37.8%). Children with hypothermia were more likely to be admitted in the Southern region (48.3% vs. 38.4%; p < 0.05) and have a higher mortality rate compared to all other discharges (8.5% vs. 0.3%; p < 0.05) or when compared with the matched controls (8.9% vs. 4.4%). The diagnosis of accidental hypothermia significantly increased mortality in hospitalized children. Interestingly, accidental hypothermia was more common in Southern states compared to the other areas of the United States. Prognostic/epidemiological study, level III.

  2. Outcome After Therapeutic Hypothermia in Term Neonates with Encephalopathy and a Syndromic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Shimotake, Thomas K.; Glass, Hannah C.

    2015-01-01

    The large randomized, controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) excluded neonates with congenital disorders. The objective of this study was to report our experience using hypothermia in neonates with signs of HIE and a syndromic disorder or brain anomaly. Subjects were identified from a database of neonates admitted to the Neuro-Intensive Care Nursery at University of California, San Francisco. Of 169 patients fulfilling criteria for hypothermia, eight (5%) had a syndromic disorder, and were cooled as per guidelines for non-syndromic neonates. Perinatal characteristics of infants with and without syndromic disorder were not significantly different. Overall outcome was poor: 38% had evidence of acute HI injury, 3 subjects died, two survivors had low developmental quotient (DQ 25). The risk versus benefit of therapeutic hypothermia for HIE among neonates with congenital brain malformations or syndromic diagnoses is uncertain. PMID:25762585

  3. Efficacy Outcome Selection in the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest (THAPCA) trials

    PubMed Central

    Holubkov, Richard; Clark, Amy E.; Moler, Frank W.; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Pollack, Murray M.; Dean, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The THAPCA trials will determine if therapeutic hypothermia improves survival with good neurobehavioral outcome, as assessed by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Second Edition (VABS-II), in children resuscitated after cardiac arrest in the in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings. We describe the innovative efficacy outcome selection process during THAPCA protocol development. Design Consensus assessment of potential outcomes and evaluation timepoints. Methods We evaluated practical and technical advantages of several follow-up timepoints and continuous/categorical outcome variants. Simulations estimated power assuming varying hypothermia benefit on mortality and on neurobehavioral function among survivors. Results Twelve months post-arrest was selected as the optimal assessment timepoint for pragmatic and clinical reasons. Change in VABS-II from pre-arrest level, measured as quasi-continuous with death and vegetative status being worst possible levels, yielded optimal statistical power. However, clinicians preferred simpler multicategorical or binary outcomes due to easier interpretability, and favored outcomes based solely on post-arrest status, due to concerns about accurate parental assessment of pre-arrest status and differing clinical impact of a given VABS-II change depending on pre-arrest status. Simulations found only modest power loss from categorizing or dichotomizing quasi-continuous outcomes, due to high expected mortality. The primary outcome selected was survival with 12-month VABS-II no less than two standard deviations below a reference population mean (70 points), necessarily evaluated only among children with pre-arrest VABS-II ≥ 70. Two secondary efficacy outcomes, twelve-month survival and quasi-continuous VABS-II change from pre-arrest level, will be evaluated among all randomized children including those with compromised function pre-arrest. Conclusions Extensive discussion of optimal efficacy assessment timing, and of the

  4. Feasibility and Safety of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Short Term Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Jayashree; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Bhat, Ramesh Y; Anusha, K M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is well known for neuroprotection in asphyxiated neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The authors aimed to study the feasibility and safety of therapeutic hypothermia and short term outcome in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Total 31 neonates with moderate to severe HIE were enrolled in the study. Continuous temperature recording was noted in 31 neonates; 17 neonates were studied prospectively while 14 neonates were studied retrospectively. Rectal temperature was monitored in 31 neonates and maintained between 33 and 34 °C by switching off the warmer and using ice packs. Reusable ice packs were used which were inexpensive. Therapeutic hypothermia was maintained for 72 h and babies were then rewarmed 0.5 °C every hour. Therapeutic hypothermia was feasible and inexpensive. There was no major complication during the study. MRI was done in 17 neonates; 52 % were found to have normal MRI at the end of first week. Among the study neonates (n = 31) 64.5 % were neurologically normal at the time of discharge. To conclude, therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in a low resource setting and is a safe way of neuroprotection. Short term outcome was also favourable in these neonates.

  5. Therapeutic hypothermia at an urban public hospital: Development, implementation, experience and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Renaud M; Bailitz, John M; Sahni, Ashima S; Tulaimat, Aiman

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcome of comatose patients suffering an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) with shockable rhythm and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Evidence supporting its use in other circumstances is weak and the adoption of TH remains limited. Describe the development and implementation of a TH program at an urban public hospital and report outcomes of out-of-hospital and in-hospital SCA and important quality measures. The protocol was developed at 464-bed urban public hospital. We assembled historical and prospective samples of patients suffering an SCA. We measured the neurologic outcome of patients at the time of hospital discharge who underwent TH after SCA. We compared outcomes and important quality measures (duration of arrest, time to cooling, and time to target temperature) to existing literature. We determined reasons for not using TH in patients with in-hospital SCA. We described the development of our TH program and the challenges we faced implementing it. Of 45 patients treated with TH after SCA, 23 (51%) survived to discharge, 14 (31%) with good neurologic outcomes. In comparison to historical controls, TH did not improve outcome of in-hospital SCA. SCA from a shockable rhythm was associated with the best outcome. The time from return of spontaneous circulation to initiation of TH was consistently within 8 h. Despite logistical and financial constraints, we were able to rapidly implement a TH program with quality and outcomes similar to published data. TH did not improve outcomes for patients with an in-hospital SCA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hypothermia Improves Oral and Gastric Mucosal Microvascular Oxygenation during Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μHbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (−36 ± 4% and −27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (−15 ± 5% and −11 ± 5%). The improved μHbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μflow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (−51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (−106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μHbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μflow. PMID:24327826

  7. Intraoperative hypothermia and its clinical outcomes in patients undergoing general anesthesia: National study in China.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jie; Lei, Yongjing; Xu, Shiyuan; Si, Yongyu; Li, Shiyang; Xia, Zhongyuan; Shi, Yisa; Gu, Xiaoping; Yu, Jianshe; Xu, Guohai; Gu, Erwei; Yu, Yonghao; Chen, Yanqing; Jia, Hequn; Wang, Yinglin; Wang, Xiuli; Chai, Xiaoqing; Jin, Xiaoju; Chen, Junping; Xu, Meiying; Xiong, Junyu; Wang, Guonian; Lu, Kaizhi; Yu, Wenli; Lei, Weifu; Qin, Zaisheng; Xiang, Jingguo; Li, Longyun; Xiang, Ziyong; Pan, Shuang; Zhan, Lujing; Qiu, Kai; Yao, Min; Huang, Yuguang

    2017-01-01

    Inadvertent intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature <36°C) is a frequently preventable complication with several adverse consequences. Our study aimed to determine the overall incidence of inadvertent intraoperative hypothermia and its risk factors associated with clinical outcomes in this national survey in China. We conducted a national cross-sectional study with 30 days postoperative follow-up from November 2014 through August 2015. A total of 3132 eligible patients underwent general anesthesia were randomly selected from 28 hospitals in the nationwide of China. The overall incidence of intraoperative hypothermia was as high as 44.3%, in which cumulative incidence rates of hypothermia being 17.8%, 36.2%, 42.5% and 44.1% within 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 4 h respectively following induction of anesthesia. All patients were warmed passively by covering of surgical draping, sheets or cotton blankets, whereas only 14.2% of patients received active warming with space heaters or electric heater or electronic blankets. Compared to normothermic patients, patients with hypothermia is associated with more postoperative ICU admit, longer PACU and more postoperative hospital days, but no difference in surgical site infection (SSI) rates or 30-day mortality. Several factors were shown to be associated with decreased risk of hypothermia. They are active warming (OR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.81), BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.65), higher baseline core temperature (OR = 0.04, 95% CI 0.03-0.06), and higher ambient temperature (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.78-0.88). Risk factors associated with an increased risk of hypothermia included major-plus surgery (OR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.23-1.79), and long anesthesia (>2 h) (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 2.09-3.24). The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in China is high, and the rate of active warming of patients during operation is low. Hypothermia is associated with more postoperative shivering, increased ICU admissions, and longer postoperative hospital

  8. C5a receptor (CD88) inhibition improves hypothermia-induced neuroprotection in an in vitro ischemic model.

    PubMed

    Thundyil, John; Pavlovski, Dale; Hsieh, Yu-Hsuan; Gelderblom, Mathias; Magnus, Tim; Fairlie, David P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-03-01

    The concept of 'salvageble penumbra' has prompted both scientists and physicians to explore various neuroprotective approaches that could be beneficial during stroke therapy. Unfortunately, most of them have proved ineffective in targeting multiple cellular death cascades incited within the ischemic penumbra. Hypothermia has been shown to be capable of addressing this problem to some extent. Although many studies have shown that hypothermia targets several cellular processes, its effects on innate immune receptor-mediated apoptotic death still remain unclear. Moreover, whether inhibiting the signaling of innate immune receptors like complement anaphylatoxin C5a receptor (CD88) plays a role in this hypothermic neuroprotection still need to be deciphered. Using various types of ischemic insults in different neuronal cells, we confirm that hypothermia does indeed attenuate apoptotic neuronal cell death in vitro and this effect can be further enhanced by pharmacologically blocking or knocking out CD88. Thus, our study raises a promising therapeutic possibility of adding CD88 antagonists along with hypothermia to improve stroke outcomes.

  9. The effects of the rate of postresuscitation rewarming following hypothermia on outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoye; Ma, Linhao; Sun, Shijie; Xu, Jeifeng; Zhu, Changqing; Tang, Wanchun

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the optimal rewarming rate following therapeutic hypothermia in a rate model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Both clinical and laboratory studies have demonstrated that mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves myocardial and neurologic outcomes of cardiac arrest. However, the optimal rewarming strategy following therapeutic hypothermia remains to be explored. Prospective randomized controlled experimental study. University-affiliated research institution. Twenty-three healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized: 1) normothermia group (control), 2) rewarming rate at 2°C/hr, 3) rewarming rate at 1°C/hr, and 4) rewarming rate at 0.5°C/hr. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 8 minutes, and defibrillation was attempted after 8 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. For the 2, 1, and 0.5°C/hr groups, rapid cooling was started at the beginning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. On reaching the target cooling temperature of 33°C ± 0.2°C, the temperature was maintained with the aid of a cooling blanket until 4 hours after resuscitation. Rewarming was then initiated at the rate of 2.0, 1.0, or 0.5°C/hr, respectively, until the body temperature reached 37°C ±0.2°C. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and postresuscitation of 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours for the measurements of blood gas and serum biomarkers. Blood temperature significantly decreased in the hypothermic groups from cardiopulmonary resuscitation to postresuscitation 4 hours. Significantly better cardiac output, ejection fraction, myocardial performance index, reduced neurologic deficit scores, and longer duration of survival were observed in the 1 and 0.5°C/hr groups. The increased serum concentration of troponin I, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α was partly attenuated in the 1 and 0.5°C/hr groups when compared with the control and 2°C/hr groups. This study demonstrated that

  10. Mild Hypothermia May Offer Some Improvement to Patients with MODS after CPB Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoqi; Gu, Tianxiang; Xiu, Zongyi; Shi, Enyi; Yu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the effect of mild hypothermia on function of the organs in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. METHODS: The patients were randomly divided into two groups, northermia group (n=71) and hypothermia group (n=89). We immediately began cooling the hypothermia group when test results showed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, meanwhile all patients of two groups were drawn blood to test blood gas, liver and kidney function, blood coagulation function, and evaluated the cardiac function using echocardiography from 12 to 36 hours. We compared the difference of intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation rate and mortality within one month after intensive care unit admission. RESULTS: Among the 160 patients, 36 died, 10 (11.24%) patients were from the hypothermia group and 26 (36.6%) from the northermia group (P <0.05). In northermia group, 45 (63.38%) patients used intra-aortic balloon pump and 4 (5.63%), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; in hypothermia group, 35 (39.32%) patients used intra-aortic balloon pump and 2 (2.25%), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation( P <0.05). The patients' heart rate decreased significantly in the hypothermia group. The heart rate of hypothermia group is significantly slower than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05). But the mean arterial pressure of hypothermia group is significantly higher than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05). In hypothermia group, PO2, SvO2 and lactate were improved significantly compared to pre-cooling (P <0.05), and they were significantly better than the northermia group at the 36th hour (P <0.05%). Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time have no significantly difference between the two groups (P >0.05). But the platelet count has significantly difference between the two groups at the 36th hour (P <0.05). The aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and creatinine were

  11. Outcome after severe accidental hypothermia in the French Alps: A 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Debaty, Guillaume; Moustapha, Ibrahim; Bouzat, Pierre; Maignan, Maxime; Blancher, Marc; Rallo, Amandine; Brun, Julien; Chavanon, Olivier; Danel, Vincent; Carpentier, Françoise; Payen, Jean-François; Briot, Raphaël

    2015-08-01

    To describe the factors associated with outcome after accidental deep hypothermia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients with accidental hypothermia (core temperature <28 °C) admitted to a Level I emergency room over a 10-year period. Forty-eight patients were included with a median temperature of 26 °C (range, 16.3-28 °C) on admission. The etiology of hypothermia was exposure to a cold environment (n = 27), avalanche (n = 13) or immersion in cold water (n = 8). Mean age was 47 ± 22 years, and 58% were males. Thirty-two patients had a cardiac arrest (CA): 15 patients presented unwitnessed cardiac arrest (UCA) and 17 patients presented rescue collapse (RC). Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) was implemented in 21 patients with refractory cardiac arrest and in two patients with hemodynamic instability. Overall mortality was 50%. For cardiac arrest patients, only three out of 15 patients with UCA survived at day 28, whereas eight out of 17 patients with RC survived. The cerebral performance category score was 4 for all the survivors of UCA and 1 [range, 1-2] for survivors of RC. Patients with poor outcome presented more UCA, a lower pH, a higher serum potassium, creatinine, serum sodium or lactate level as well as more severe coagulation disorders. Cardiac arrest related to rescue collapse was associated with favorable outcome. On-scene rescue collapse should prompt prolonged resuscitation and ECLS rewarming in all CA patients with deep hypothermia. Conversely, unwitnessed cardiac arrest was associated with unfavorable outcome and will likely not benefit from ECLS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia and reliability of somatosensory evoked potentials in predicting outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted Laurence

    2012-08-01

    The loss of the N20 component on testing median somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) has been established as the most reliable indicator of unfavorable prognosis in post-cardiopulmonary arrest patients. With the intervention of therapeutic hypothermia in the management of patients who remain comatose following cardiopulmonary arrest that association is now in dispute. Abandoning SSEP as a key prognostic indicator of neurologic outcome would be a serious loss and cannot be justified.

  13. Prevention of unplanned perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Paulikas, Cynthia A

    2008-09-01

    Hypothermia is one of the most common complications experienced by surgical patients. Better postoperative patient outcomes are achieved when normothermia is maintained. Perioperative nurses should understand how to maintain normothermia, the causes of hypothermia, and adverse patient outcomes that result from hypothermia. Nursing interventions to help prevent hypothermia can be implemented during each phase of perioperative care.

  14. A quality improvement project to reduce hypothermia in infants undergoing MRI scanning.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Priti G; Porath, Janelle; Parekh, Uma; Dhar, Padmani; Wang, Ming; Hulse, Michael; Mujsce, Dennis; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    Hypothermia prevention strategies during MRI scanning under general anesthesia in infants may pose a challenge due to the MRI scanner's technical constraints. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results related to increase or decrease in post-scan temperatures in children. We noted occurrences of post-scan hypothermia in anesthetized infants despite the use of routine passive warming techniques. The aims of our quality improvement project were (a) to identify variables associated with post-scan hypothermia in infants and (b) to develop and implement processes to reduce occurrence of hypothermia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants undergoing MRI. One hundred sixty-four infants undergoing MRI scanning were prospectively audited for post-scan body temperatures. A multidisciplinary team identified potential variables associated with post-scan hypothermia and designed preventative strategies: protocol development, risk factor identification, vigilance and use of a vacuum immobilizer. Another audit was performed, specifically focusing on NICU infants. In the initial phase, we found that younger age (P = 0.002), lower weight (P = 0.005), lower pre-scan temperature (P < 0.01), primary anesthetic technique with propofol (P < 0.01), advanced airway devices (P = 0.02) and being in the NICU (P < 0.01) were associated with higher odds for developing post-scan decrease in body temperature. Quality improvement processes decreased the occurrence of hypothermia in NICU infants undergoing MRI scanning from 65% to 18% (95% confidence interval for the difference, 26-70%, P < 0.001). Several variables, including being in the NICU, are associated with a decrease in post-scan temperature in infants undergoing MRI scanning under sedation/general anesthesia. Implementation of strategies to prevent hypothermia in infants may be challenging in the high-risk MRI environment. We were able to minimize this problem in clinical practice by

  15. Delayed combination therapy of local brain hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy on acute stroke outcome in rat

    PubMed Central

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Kahnouei, Mohammadamin Hosseini; Rezazadeh, Hossein; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Mahmoodi, Mohammad Hossein; Moghadam-Ahmadi, Amir; Zarisfi, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy (DC) have been shown to be neuroprotective. This study was designed to evaluate neuroprotective effects of delayed singular or combination of DC and local hypothermia on stroke. Materials and Methods: Cerebral ischemia was induced in 48 Wistar rats assigned to 4 groups: control, decompressive craniectomy (DC), local hypothermia (LH), combination of hypothermia and craniectomy (HC). Infarct size and BBB disruption were measured 48 hr after ischemia insult. Neurological deficits were assessed at 24 and 48 hr after stroke by using sticky tape test, hanging-wire test and Bederson’s scoring system. BBB disruption was measured by Evans blue dye leakage. Results: Although infarct size was significantly reduced in LH, DC and HC groups (P<0.001), combination therapy was more neuroprotective compared to craniectomy alone (P<0.01). BBB disruption was significantly reduced in DC (P< 0.05) and LH and HC (P< 0.01).While sticky tape test (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.001 at 48 hr) and hanging-wire test (P<0.05) showed better behavioral performance only in HC, Bederson test showed improved behavioral functions of both LH (P<0.05 at 24 hr and P<0.01 at 48 hr) and HC animals (P<0.01). Neurological deficits were also decreased in LH (P<0.05) or HC (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.01 at 48 hr) groups compared to the DC group at the same time. Conclusion: Based on our data, although both delayed local hypothermia and craniectomy are protective after stoke, combination therapy of them is more neuroprotective than given alone. PMID:25429337

  16. Hypothermia--it's more than a toy.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Gunther J; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-04-01

    Perioperative hypothermia triples the incidence of adverse myocardial outcomes in high-risk patients; it significantly increases blood loss and augments allogeneic transfusion requirements. Even mild hypothermia increases the incidence of surgical wound infection following colon resection and therefore the duration of hospitalization. Hypothermia adversely affects antibody- and cell-mediated immune defenses, as well as the oxygen availability in the peripheral wound tissues. Mild perioperative hypothermia changes the kinetics and action of various anesthetic and paralyzing agents, increases thermal discomfort, and is associated with delayed postanesthetic recovery. On the other hand however, therapeutic hypothermia may be an interesting approach in various settings. Lowering core temperature to 32-34 degrees C may reduce cell injury by suppressing excitotoxins and oxygen radicals, stabilizing cell membranes, and reducing the number of abnormal electrical depolarizations. Evidence in animals indicates that even mild hypothermia provides substantial protection against cerebral ischemia and myocardial infarction. Mild hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome after cardiac arrest in humans. Randomized trials are in progress to evaluate the potential benefits of mild hypothermia during aneurysm clipping and after stroke or acute myocardial infarction. This article reviews recent publications in the field of accidental as well as therapeutic hypothermia, and tries to assess what evidence is available at the present time.

  17. A recirculating cooling system for improved topical cardiac hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, F L; Fambiatos, A; Pastoriza-Pinol, J; Stirling, G R

    1981-10-01

    A simple system is described that recirculates cooling fluid for topical cardiac hypothermia. This disposable system can produce a flow of 1,500 ml/min at 2 degrees to 4 degrees C. The recirculating cooler produced significantly lower myocardial temperatures than a conventional fluid-discard system in 22 patients having coronary operation. This system has been used as part of the technique of hypothermic cardioplegia in more than 600 patients. During various cardiac procedures, septal temperatures were maintained well below 20 degrees C for 60 minutes or more without the need to reinfuse the cardioplegic solution.

  18. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  19. Serum cortisol concentrations during induced hypothermia for perinatal asphyxia are associated with neurological outcome in human infants.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzo, Rosa T; Giampietri, Matteo; Fiorentini, Erika; Bartalena, Laura; Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Ciampi, Mariella; Boldrini, Antonio; Ghirri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Birth asphyxia is a cause of neonatal death or adverse neurological sequelae. Biomarkers can be useful to clinicians in order to optimize intensive care management and communication of prognosis to parents. During perinatal adverse events, increased cortisol secretion is due to hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. We aimed to investigate if cortisol variations during therapeutic hypothermia are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome. We compared 18 cases (neonates with birth asphyxia) with 18 controls (healthy term newborns) and confirmed increased serum cortisol concentrations following the peri-partum adverse event. Among cases, we stratified patients according to neurological outcome at 18 months (group A - good; group B - adverse) and found that after 24 h of therapeutic hypothermia serum cortisol concentration was significantly lower in group A vs group B (28.7 ng/mL vs 344 ng/mL, *p = 0.01). In group B serum, cortisol concentration decreased more gradually during therapeutic hypothermia. We conclude that monitoring serum cortisol concentration during neonatal therapeutic hypothermia can add information to clinical evaluation of neonates with birth asphyxia; cortisol values after the first 24 h of hypothermia can be a biomarker associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of age.

  20. Patient Outcomes After Palliative Care Consultation Among Patients Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Priya; Brown, Tartania; Khilkin, Michael; Chuang, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of patients who did and did not receive palliative care consultation among those who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and underwent therapeutic hypothermia. We identified patients at a single academic medical center who had undergone therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2009 and 2013. We performed a retrospective chart review for demographic data, hospital and critical care length of stay, and clinical outcomes of care. We reviewed the charts of 62 patients, of which 35 (56%) received a palliative care consultation and 27 (44%) did not. Palliative care consultation occurred an average of 8.3 days after admission. Patients receiving palliative care consultation were more likely to have a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order placed (odds ratio: 2.3, P < .001). The mean length of stay in the hospital was similar for patients seen by palliative care or not (16.7 vs 17.1 days, P = .90). Intensive care length of stay was also similar (11.3 vs 12.6 days, P = .55). Palliative care consultation was underutilized and utilized late in this cohort. Palliative consultation was associated with DNR orders but did not affect measures of utilization such as hospital and intensive care length of stay.

  1. Poor outcome prediction by burst suppression ratio in adults with post-anoxic coma without hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinglin; Su, Yingying; Hussain, Mohammed; Chen, Weibi; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan; Tian, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Burst suppression ratio (BSR) is a quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) parameter. The purpose of our study was to compare the accuracy of BSR when compared to other EEG parameters in predicting poor outcomes in adults who sustained post-anoxic coma while not being subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. EEG was registered and recorded at least once within 7 days of post-anoxic coma onset. Electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 system, using a 16-channel layout. Each EEG expert scored raw EEG using a grading scale adapted from Young and scored amplitude-integrated electroencephalography tracings, in addition to obtaining qEEG parameters defined as BSR with a defined threshold. Glasgow outcome scales of 1 and 2 at 3 months, determined by two blinded neurologists, were defined as poor outcome. Sixty patients with Glasgow coma scale score of 8 or less after anoxic accident were included. The sensitivity (97.1%), specificity (73.3%), positive predictive value (82.5%), and negative prediction value (95.0%) of BSR in predicting poor outcome were higher than other EEG variables. BSR1 and BSR2 were reliable in predicting death (area under the curve > 0.8, P < 0.05), with the respective cutoff points being 39.8% and 61.6%. BSR1 was reliable in predicting poor outcome (area under the curve  =  0.820, P < 0.05) with a cutoff point of 23.9%. BSR1 was also an independent predictor of increased risk of death (odds ratio  =  1.042, 95% confidence intervals: 1.012-1.073, P  =  0.006). BSR may be a better predictor in prognosticating poor outcomes in patients with post-anoxic coma who do not undergo therapeutic hypothermia when compared to other qEEG parameters.

  2. Impact of hypotension and low cerebral perfusion pressure on outcomes in children treated with hypothermia therapy following severe traumatic brain injury: a post hoc analysis of the Hypothermia Pediatric Head Injury Trial.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, James S; Frndova, Helena; Lo, Tsz-Yan M; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Hypotension and low cerebral perfusion pressure are known to be associated with unfavorable outcome in children and adults with traumatic brain injury. Using the database from a previously published, randomized controlled trial of 24 h of hypothermia therapy in children with severe traumatic brain injury, we compared the number of patients with hypotension or low cerebral perfusion pressure between the hypothermia therapy and normothermia groups. We also determined the association between these physiologic insults and unfavorable outcome using regression analysis. There were more patients with episodes of hypotension or low cerebral perfusion pressure in the hypothermia therapy group than in the normothermia group. These physiologic insults were associated with unfavorable outcome in both intervention groups. Hypotension and low cerebral perfusion pressure should be anticipated and prevented in future trials of hypothermia therapy in patients with traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  4. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  5. State of the Art in Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, hypothermia was induced prior to surgery to enable procedures with prolonged ischemia, such as open heart surgery and organ transplant. Within the past decade, the efficacy of hypothermia to treat emergency cases of ongoing ischemia such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest has been studied. Although the exact role of ischemia/reperfusion is unclear clinically, hypothermia holds significant promise for improving outcomes for patients suffering from reperfusion after ischemia. Research has elucidated two distinct windows of opportunity for clinical use of hypothermia. In the early intra-ischemia window, hypothermia modulates abnormal cellular free radical production, poor calcium management, and poor pH management. In the more delayed post-reperfusion window, hypothermia modulates the downstream necrotic, apoptotic, and inflammatory pathways that cause delayed cell death. Improved cooling and monitoring technologies are required to realize the full potential of this therapy. Herein we discuss the current state of clinical practice, clinical trials, recommendations for cooling, and ongoing research on therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20854174

  6. Treatment window for hypothermia in brain injury.

    PubMed

    Markgraf, C G; Clifton, G L; Moody, M R

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic window for hypothermia treatment following experimental brain injury by measuring edema formation and functional outcome. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was produced in anesthetized rats by using cortical impact injury. Edema was measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres by subtracting dry weight from wet weight, and neurological function was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests 24 hours after TBI. In injured rats, it was found that brain water levels were elevated at I hour postinjury, compared with those in sham-injured control animals, and that edema peaked at 24 hours and remained elevated for 4 days. Hypothermia (3 hours at 30 degrees C) induced either immediately after TBI or 60 minutes after TBI significantly reduced early neurological deficits. Delay of treatment by 90 or 120 minutes postinjury did not result in this neurological protection. Immediate administration of hypothermia also significantly decreased the peak magnitude of edema at 24 hours and 48 hours postinjury, compared with that in normothermic injured control animals. When delayed by 90 minutes, hypothermia did not affect the pattern of edema formation. When hypothermia was administered immediately or 60 minutes after TBI, injured rats showed an improvement in functional outcome and a decrease in edema. Delayed hypothermia treatment had no effect on functional outcome or on edema.

  7. Improved homeothermy and hypothermia in African lions during gestation.

    PubMed

    Trethowan, Paul D; Hart, Tom; Loveridge, Andrew J; Haw, Anna; Fuller, Andrea; Macdonald, David W

    2016-11-01

    Mammals use endogenously produced heat to maintain a high and relatively constant core body temperature (Tb). How they regulate their Tb during reproduction might inform us as to what thermal conditions are necessary for optimal development of offspring. However, few studies have measured Tb in free-ranging animals for sufficient periods of time to encounter reproductive events. We measured Tb continuously in six free-ranging adult female African lions (Panthera leo) for approximately 1 year. Lions reduced the 24 h amplitude of Tb by about 25% during gestation and decreased mean 24 h Tb by 1.3 ± 0.1°C over the course of the gestation, reducing incidences of hyperthermia (Tb > 39.5°C). The observation of improved homeothermy during reproduction may support the parental care model (PCM) for the evolution of endothermy, which postulates that endothermy arose in birds and mammals as a consequence of more general selection for parental care. According to the PCM, endothermy arose because it enabled parents to better control incubation temperature, leading to rapid growth and development of offspring and thus to fitness benefits for the parents. Whether the precision of Tb regulation in pregnant lions, and consequently their reproductive success, will be influenced by changing environmental conditions, particularly hotter and drier periods associated with climate change, remains to be determined. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. [Management of hypothermia -- Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre in Krakow].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Tomasz; Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Jarosz, Anna; Sobczyk, Dorota; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sanak, Tomasz; Hymczak, Hubert; Kapelak, Bogusław; Drwiła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Severe accidental hypothermia is a condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the years 2009–2012 the Polish National Statistics Department reported 1836 deaths due to exposure to excessive natural cold. The Severe Accidental Hypothermia Centre (CLHG, Centrum Leczenia Hipotermii Glebokiej) was set up in Krakow in 2013. It is a unit functioning within the structure of the Cardiac Surgery Clinic, established in order to improve the effectiveness of the treatment of patients in the advanced stages of severe hypothermia. Early identification of hypothermia, binding algorithm and coordination leading to extracorporeal rewarming, are the most important elements in the deep hypothermia management.

  9. Body temperature regulation and outcome after cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Benz-Woerner, Jakobea; Delodder, Frederik; Benz, Romedi; Cueni-Villoz, Nadine; Feihl, François; Rossetti, Andrea O; Liaudet, Lucas; Oddo, Mauro

    2012-03-01

    Therapeutic temperature modulation is recommended after cardiac arrest (CA). However, body temperature (BT) regulation has not been extensively studied in this setting. We investigated BT variation in CA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and analyzed its impact on outcome. A prospective cohort of comatose CA patients treated with TH (32-34°C, 24h) at the medical/surgical intensive care unit of the Lausanne University Hospital was studied. Spontaneous BT was recorded on hospital admission. The following variables were measured during and after TH: time to target temperature (TTT=time from hospital admission to induced BT target <34°C), cooling rate (spontaneous BT-induced BT target/TTT) and time of passive rewarming to normothermia. Associations of spontaneous and induced BT with in-hospital mortality were examined. A total of 177 patients (median age 61 years; median time to ROSC 25 min) were studied. Non-survivors (N=90, 51%) had lower spontaneous admission BT than survivors (median 34.5 [interquartile range 33.7-35.9]°C vs. 35.1 [34.4-35.8]°C, p=0.04). Accordingly, time to target temperature was shorter among non-survivors (200 [25-363]min vs. 270 [158-375]min, p=0.03); however, when adjusting for admission BT, cooling rates were comparable between the two outcome groups (0.4 [0.2-0.5]°C/h vs. 0.3 [0.2-0.4]°C/h, p=0.65). Longer duration of passive rewarming (600 [464-744]min vs. 479 [360-600]min, p<0.001) was associated with mortality. Lower spontaneous admission BT and longer time of passive rewarming were associated with in-hospital mortality after CA and TH. Impaired thermoregulation may be an important physiologic determinant of post-resuscitation disease and CA prognosis. When assessing the benefit of early cooling on outcome, future trials should adjust for patient admission temperature and use the cooling rate rather than the time to target temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypothermia for severe traumatic brain injury in adults: Recent lessons from randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Shaefi, Shahzad; Mittel, Aaron M.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Boone, M. Dustin; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide health concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, severe TBI is managed according to recommendations set forth in 2007 by the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF), which were based on relatively low quality clinical trials. These guidelines prescribed the use of hypothermia for the management of TBI. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of hypothermia for TBI have since been conducted. Despite this new literature, there is ongoing controversy surrounding the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. Methods: We searched the PubMed database for all RCTs of hypothermia for TBI since 2007 with the intent to review the methodology outcomes of these trials. Furthermore, we aimed to develop evidence-based, expert opinions based on these recent studies. Results: We identified 8 RCTs of therapeutic hypothermia published since 2007 that focused on changes in neurologic outcomes or mortality in patients with severe TBI. The majority of these trials did not identify improvement with the use of hypothermia, though there were subgroups of patients that may have benefited from hypothermia. Differences in methodology prevented direct comparison between studies. Conclusions: A growing body of literature disfavors the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. In general, empiric hypothermia for severe TBI should be avoided. However, based on the results of recent trials, there may be some patients, such as those in Asian centers or with focal neurologic injury, who may benefit from hypothermia. PMID:28168089

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia after recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Jin Soo; Song, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Hye Seon; Jung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Huimahn Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in experimental stroke models, especially after ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the clinical and radiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke patients after recanalization. A prospective cohort study at 2 stroke centers was performed. We enrolled patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation with an initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥10 who had successful recanalization (≥thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia, 2b). Patients at center A underwent a mild hypothermia (34.5°C) protocol, which included mechanical ventilation, and 48-hour hypothermia and 48-hour rewarming. Patients at center B were treated according to the guidelines without hypothermia. Cerebral edema, hemorrhagic transformation, good outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale, ≤2), mortality, and safety profiles were compared. Potential variables at baseline and during the therapy were analyzed to evaluate for independent predictors of good outcome. The hypothermia group (n=39) had less cerebral edema (P=0.001), hemorrhagic transformation (P=0.016), and better outcome (P=0.017) compared with the normothermia group (n=36). Mortality, hemicraniectomy rate, and medical complications were not statistically different. After adjustment for potential confounders, therapeutic hypothermia (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-8.9; P=0.047) and distal occlusion (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval; 1.3-40.3; P=0.022) were the independent predictors for good outcome. Absence of cerebral edema (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.2; P=0.006) and no medical complications (odds ratio, 9.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-39.9; P=0.003) were also independent predictors for good outcome during the therapy. In patients with ischemic stroke, after successful recanalization, therapeutic hypothermia may reduce risk of cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation, and lead to improved

  12. Perioperative hypothermia in NICU infants: its occurrence and impact on infant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, Deborah; Williams, Lisa; Lloyd, Christina; McCoy, Dena S; Miller Walters, Elizabeth; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Baumgart, Stephen; Sill, Anne; Mueller-Burke, Dawn; Short, Billie Lou

    2014-06-01

    Infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require surgical intervention and maintaining normothermia perioperatively is a major concern. In our preliminary study of 31 normothermic infants undergoing operative procedures in the operating room (OR), 58% (N = 18) returned hypothermic while all 5 undergoing procedures in the NICU remained normothermic (P = .001). To describe perioperative thermal instability (temperatures lower than 36.0°C) and frequency of associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests in infants undergoing operative procedures in the OR and the NICU. This prospective, case-control study included 108 infants admitted to the NICU who were sequentially scheduled for an operative procedure in the OR (50.93%; N = 55) or the NICU (49.07%; N = 53). Existing data from the medical record were collected about temperatures and frequency of adverse cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic events, associated support interventions, and diagnostic tests during the perioperative period. Analyses examined the relative risks and proportional differences in rates of hypothermia between the OR group and the NICU group and associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests between hypothermic and normothermic infants. Hypothermia developed in 40% (N = 43) of infants during the perioperative period. The OR group had a higher rate of perioperative hypothermia (65.45%, N = 36; P < .001) and were 7 times more likely to develop perioperative hypothermia (P = .008) than the NICU group (13.21%, N = 7). Likewise, infants in the OR group were 10 times more likely to develop hypothermia during the intra- and postoperative periods than those in the NICU group (P = .001). The hypothermic group had significantly more respiratory adverse events (P = .025), were 6 times more likely to require thermoregulatory interventions (P < .001), 5 times more likely to require cardiac support interventions (P < .006), and 3

  13. Clinical Practice Variability in Temperature Correction of Arterial Blood Gas Measurements and Outcomes in Hypothermia-Treated Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Terman, Samuel Waller; Nicholas, Katherine S; Hume, Benjamin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for the postcardiac arrest syndrome may be challenging given changes in solubility of arterial blood gases (ABGs) with cooling. Whether ABG measurements should be temperature corrected (TC) remain unknown. We sought to describe practice variability in TC at a single institution and explored the association between TC and neurological outcome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study reviewing electronic health records of all patients treated with MTH after cardiac arrest. We examined whether the percentage of TC ABGs relative to total number of ABGs drawn for each subject during hypothermia was associated with the neurological outcome at hospital discharge and 6-12-month follow-up. The cerebral performance category of 1-2 was defined as a favorable outcome in the logistic regression models. 1223 ABGs were obtained during MTH on 122 subjects over 6 years. TC was never used in 72 subjects (59%; no TC group), made available in 1-74% of ABGs in 17 subjects (14%; intermediate TC group), and made available in ≥75% of ABGs in 33 subjects (27%; mostly TC group). Groups differed in the proportion of subjects with shockable presenting rhythms (47% vs. 47% vs. 76%, p=0.02) and admitting ICU (p=0.005). Favorable 6-month outcomes were more common in the mostly TC than no TC group (48% vs. 25%; OR [95% CI]: 2.9 [1.2-7.1]), but not after adjustment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.33-6.9). There was substantial practice variability in the temperature correction strategy. Availability of temperature-corrected ABGs was not associated with improved neurological outcomes after adjusting for covariates.

  14. White matter tract integrity and developmental outcome in newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Massaro, An N; Evangelou, Iordanis; Fatemi, Ali; Vezina, Gilbert; Mccarter, Robert; Glass, Penny; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether corpus callosum (CC) and corticospinal tract (CST) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures relate to developmental outcome in encephalopathic newborn infants after therapeutic hypothermia. Encephalopathic newborn infants enrolled in a longitudinal study underwent DTI after hypothermia. Parametric maps were generated for fractional anisotropy, mean, radial, and axial diffusivity. CC and CST were segmented by DTI-based tractography. Multiple regression models were used to examine the association of DTI measures with Bayley-II Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) at 15 months and 21 months of age. Fifty-two infants (males n=32, females n=20) underwent DTI at median age of 8 days. Two were excluded because of poor magnetic resonance imaging quality. Outcomes were assessed in 42/50 (84%) children at 15 months and 35/50 (70%) at 21 months. Lower CC and CST fractional anisotropy were associated with lower MDI and PDI respectively, even after controlling for gestational age, birth weight, sex, and socio-economic status. There was also a direct relationship between CC axial diffusivity and MDI, while CST radial diffusivity was inversely related to PDI. In encephalopathic newborn infants, impaired microstructural organization of the CC and CST predicts poorer cognitive and motor performance respectively. Tractography provides a reliable method for early assessment of perinatal brain injury. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  15. Association of serum lactate with outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Novain, Michaël; Cattet, Florian; Plattier, Rémi; Nefzaoui, Mohamed; Hyvernat, Hervé; Raguin, Olivier; Kaidomar, Michel; Kerever, Sébastien; Ichai, Carole

    2017-01-01

    Aims Lactate reflects hypoxic insult in many conditions and is considered as a prognosis factor. But, after cardiac arrest, its interest is still debated. Our study aimed to assess the prognosis value of lactate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective observational study included out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia in four ICUs. Lactate levels were compared at different times during the first 24 hours according to outcome at ICU discharge and to the type of death (multiorgan or neurologic failure). Results Two hundred and seventy-two patients were included, 89 good outcome and 183 poor outcome. In the latter group, 171 patients died, from multiorgan failure in 30% and neurologic failure in 70%. Lactate levels were higher in the poor compared to the good outcome patients at admission (5.4 (3.3–9.4) vs. 2.2 (1.5–3.6) mmol/L; p<0.01), 12 hours (2.5 (1.6–4.7) vs. 1.4 (1.0–2.2) mmol/L; p<0.01) and 24 hours (1.8 (1.1–2.8) vs. 1.3 (0.9–2.1) mmol/L; p<0.01). Patients succumbing from multiorgan failure exhibited higher lactate levels compared to those dying from neurologic failure at admission (7.9 (3.9–12.0) vs. 5.2 (3.3–8.8) mmol/L; p<0.01), H12 (4.9 (2.1–8.9) vs. 2.2 (1.4–3.4) mmol/L; p<0.01) and H24 (3.3 (1.8–5.5) vs. 1.4 (1.1–2.5) mmol/L; p<0.01). Initial lactate levels showed an increasing proportion of poor outcome from the first to fourth quartile. Conclusions After out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia, lactate levels during the first 24 hours seem linked with ICU outcome. Patients dying from multiorgan failure exhibit higher initial lactate concentrations than patients succumbing from neurological failure. PMID:28282398

  16. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  17. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V; Kerr, Candace L; All, Angelo H

    2015-09-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  18. Pancytopenia induced by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Louise; Singer, Sylvia Titi; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2002-11-01

    Hypothermia has been demonstrated to induce pancytopenia in animals, but whether this association exists in humans is unknown. The authors report the case of an 8-year-old girl in whom hypothermia (temperature 33 degrees C-35 degrees C) is the cause of pancytopenia. The patient developed thermoregulatory dysfunction subsequent to surgical resection of a craniopharyngioma. Her recurrent cytopenias could not be explained by any etiology except chronic hypothermia. The pancytopenia improved upon rewarming the patient to a temperature of 36 degrees C. This association between hypothermia and pancytopenia has rarely been reported in humans and may be underdiagnosed especially in cases of transient or milder presentations. The authors recommend careful hematologic monitoring of patients with thermoregulatory dysfunction.

  19. Neurologic Injury Associated with Rewarming from Hypothermia: Is Mild Hypothermia on Bypass Better than Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Bhalala, Utpal S.; Appachi, Elumalai; Mumtaz, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many known risk factors for adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes in children with congenital heart defects (CHD) are not modifiable; however, the temperature and blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), are two risk factors, which may be altered in an attempt to improve long-term neurological outcomes. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, traditionally used for aortic arch repair, has been associated with short-term and long-term neurologic sequelae. Therefore, there is a rising interest in using moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral blood flow on CPB during aortic arch repair. Rewarming from moderate-to-deep hypothermia has been shown to be associated with neuronal injury, neuroinflammation, and loss of cerebrovascular autoregulation. A significantly lesser degree of rewarming is required following mild (33–35°C) hypothermia as compared with moderate (28–32°C), deep (21–27°C), and profound (less than 20°C) hypothermia. Therefore, we believe that mild hypothermia is associated with a lower risk of rewarming-induced neurologic injury. We hypothesize that mild hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion during CPB for neonatal aortic arch repair would be associated with improved neurologic outcome. PMID:27734011

  20. Active Warming Utilizing Combined IV Fluid and Forced-Air Warming Decreases Hypothermia and Improves Maternal Comfort During Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Benjamin; Cho, Yuri; Hilton, Gillian; Ting, Vicki; Carvalho, Brendan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to apply both IV fluid and forced-air warming to decrease perioperative hypothermia in women undergoing cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. The authors hypothesize that combined-modality active warming (AW) would increase maternal temperature on arrival at the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and decrease the incidence of maternal perioperative hypothermia (<36°C) compared with no AW. Forty-six healthy women (n = 23 per group) undergoing scheduled cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia (10-12 mg bupivacaine + 10 μg fentanyl) were enrolled in this double-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Women were randomly assigned to receive either AW (warmed IV fluid and lower body forced-air warmer) or no warming (NW; blankets only). SpotOn Monitoring System was used to measure core temperature intraoperatively and for 1 hour postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was maternal temperature on arrival at the PACU. Secondary outcome measures included incidence of maternal perioperative hypothermia (<36°C), incidence of shivering, thermal comfort scores (0-100 scale), Apgar scores, and umbilical cord blood gas analysis. Demographic, obstetric, and surgical data were similar between study groups. The AW group (35.9°C ± 0.5°C) had a significantly higher temperature on arrival at the PACU compared with the NW group (35.5°C ± 0.5°C, P = 0.006; 95% confidence interval of mean difference, 0.1°C-0.7°C). Fourteen (64%) women in the AW group and 20 (91%) in the NW group were hypothermic during the study period (P = 0.031). Median (interquartile range) thermal comfort scores were 100 (95-100) in the AW group and 90 (70-100) in the NW group (P = 0.008). There were no significant differences in the incidence of intraoperative shivering (22% in the AW and 45% in the NW groups; P = 0.11), Apgar scores, or umbilical vein blood gas values between the study groups. Fluid combined with forced-air warming is effective in decreasing the incidence of

  1. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  2. Impact of presenting rhythm on short- and long-term neurological outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Terman, Samuel W; Hume, Benjamin; Meurer, William J; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare short- and long-term neurological outcomes in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) presenting with non-shockable (nSR) versus shockable (SR) initial rhythms. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting ED and ICU of an academic hospital. Patients One hundred twenty-three consecutive post-OHCA adults (57 nSR, 67 SR) treated with therapeutic hypothermia between 2006 and 2012. Measurements and Main Results Data were collected from electronic health records. Neurological outcomes were dichotomized by Cerebral Performance Category at discharge and 6-12 month follow-up and analyzed via multivariable logistic regressions. Groups were similar, except nSR patients were more likely to have a history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.01), be dialysis-dependent (p = 0.01), and not have bystander CPR (p = 0.05). At discharge, 3/57 (5%) patients with nSR versus 28/66 (42%) with SR had a favorable outcome (unadjusted OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.3; adjusted OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.03-0. 4). At follow-up, 4/55 (7%) versus 29/60 (48%) of patients with nSR and SR respectively had a favorable CPC (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.03-0.3; adjusted OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.09-0.3). Among those surviving hospitalization, neurological outcome was more likely at long-term follow-up than at hospital discharge for both groups (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.7; adjusted 2.9, 1.4-6.2). No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm was seen (p=0.93). Conclusions These data indicate an association between initial nSR and significantly worse short- and long-term outcomes in patients treated with MTH. Among survivors, neurological status significantly improved over time for all patients and SR patients, and tended to improve over time for the small number of nSR patients who survived beyond hospitalization. No significant interaction between changes in neurological status over time and presenting rhythm

  3. Accidental Hypothermia,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-03

    on risk factors.329,538,539,303,93 Safe experimental investigations of hypothermia in hurman volunteers terminate cooling at 350C. This precludes...clinical experiments and surgically induced hypothermia. 423 a195 ,19 3 13 ,202 ,543 ,19 7 ,84 ,175 ,227 ,10 1,443 yward measured his own esophageal...the periphery and core. L9 For example, hypothermic patients experience major afterdrops when frostbitten extremities are thawed prematurely

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia does not diminish the vital and necessary role of SSEP in predicting unfavorable outcome in anoxic-ischemic coma.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted L

    2014-11-01

    Rational medical management of patients who remain comatose following cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) due to anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy depends upon the early identification of those with a hopeless prognosis - regardless of how aggressively they are managed. Conversely, it is mandatory that we recognize those patients with the potential to recover in order to institute aggressive therapeutic measures. The bilateral absence of the N20 Cortical Somatosensory Evoked Potential has been identified as the most reliable predictor of an unfavorable prognosis in normothermic patients. Two randomized trials have determined that mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) delivered immediately after CPR improves neurologic outcomes. TH has now become the standard of care in the management of patients with cardio-pulmonary arrest. Eight studies targeting patients who were comatose following CPR, treated with TH, and using SSEP as an outcome predictor are reviewed. There is only one patient treated with TH who appears to have fully recovered following cardiac arrest who was initially found to have bilateral absent cortical potentials. This opinion paper will address whether the criteria that placed reliance upon SSEP to predict unfavorable outcome in post cardio-pulmonary arrest patients after receiving TH, still apply.

  5. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  6. [Management of severe accidental hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Avellanas, M L; Ricart, A; Botella, J; Mengelle, F; Soteras, I; Veres, T; Vidal, M

    2012-04-01

    Accidental hypothermia is an environmental condition with basic principles of classification and resuscitation that apply to mountain, sea or urban scenarios. Along with coagulopathy and acidosis, hypothermia belongs to the lethal triad of trauma victims requiring critical care. A customized healthcare chain is involved in its management, extending from on site assistance to intensive care, cardiac surgery and/or the extracorporeal circulation protocols. A good classification of the degree of hypothermia preceding admission contributes to improve management and avoids inappropriate referrals between hospitals. The most important issue is to admit hypothermia victims in asystolia or ventricular fibrillation to those hospitals equipped with the medical technology which these special clinical scenarios require. This study attempts to establish the foundations for optimum management of accidental hypothermia from first emergency care on site to treatment in hospital including, resuscitation and rewarming with extracorporeal circulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  9. The biomarkers neuron-specific enolase and S100b measured the day following admission for severe accidental hypothermia have high predictive values for poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Møller, Bjarne; Nørnberg, Bo; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael

    2017-10-07

    The aim of the present study was to assess the ability of the biomarkers neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium-binding protein b (S100b) to predict mortality and poor neurologic outcome after 30days in patients admitted with severe accidental hypothermia. Consecutive patients with severe accidental hypothermia, defined as a core temperature <32°C, were included. Patients were treated with active rewarming and/or extracorporeal life support (ECLS) using extra corporeal circulation (ECC) and/or extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The day following admission blood was analyzed for NSE and S100b. Follow-up was conducted after 30days and poor neurologic outcome was defined as a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 3-5. The predictive value of NSE and S100b was assessed as the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC). A total of 34 patients were admitted with a diagnosis of severe accidental hypothermia and 29 (85%) were resuscitated from cardiac arrest. ECLS was initiated in 27 (79%) of patients. The day following admission three (9%) patients had died and one (3%) patient was awake, and accordingly, NSE and S100b were analyzed in 30 unconscious and/or sedated patients. NSE and S100b achieved AUCs of 0.93 and 0.88, respectively, for prediction of 30day mortality and AUCs of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively, for prediction of poor neurologic outcome. In patients remaining unconscious the day following admission for severe accidental hypothermia, the biomarkers NSE and S100b appear to be solid predictors of mortality and poor neurologic outcome after 30 days. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Handling Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saho, S. Bamba

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on the body's response to hypothermia. Includes activities in which students measure the amount of heat absorbed by a white piece of cloth and a black piece of the same material, use cooperative-learning techniques to design a graphic organizer that explains metabolic responses to cold stress, and study the effect of temperature on…

  11. Handling Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saho, S. Bamba

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on the body's response to hypothermia. Includes activities in which students measure the amount of heat absorbed by a white piece of cloth and a black piece of the same material, use cooperative-learning techniques to design a graphic organizer that explains metabolic responses to cold stress, and study the effect of temperature on…

  12. Synergistic neuroprotective therapies with hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cilio, Maria Roberta; Ferriero, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    summary Neuroprotection is a major health care priority, given the enormous burden of human suffering and financial cost caused by perinatal brain damage. With the advent of hypothermia as therapy for term hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy, there is hope for repair and protection of the brain after a profound neonatal insult. However, it is clear from the published clinical trials and animal studies that hypothermia alone will not provide complete protection or stimulate the repair that is necessary for normal neurodevelopmental outcome. This review critically discusses drugs used to treat seizures after hypoxia–ischemia in the neonate with attention to evidence of possible synergies for therapy. In addition, other agents such as xenon, N-acetylcysteine, erythropoietin, melatonin and cannabinoids are discussed as future potential therapeutic agents that might augment protection from hypothermia. Finally, compounds that might damage the developing brain or counteract the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia are discussed. PMID:20207600

  13. Early-Stage Hyperoxia Is Associated with Favorable Neurological Outcomes and Survival after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the Brain Hypothermia Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Motoki; Oda, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Susumu; Kaneda, Kotaro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Dohi, Kenji; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kobata, Hitoshi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-19

    The effects of hyperoxia on the neurological outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are still controversial. We examined whether the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and hyperoxia were associated with neurological outcomes and survival by conducting post-hoc analyses of the Brain Hypothermia (B-HYPO) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial of mild therapeutic hypothermia for severe TBI. The differences in PaO2 and PaO2/fraction of inspiratory oxygen (P/F) ratio on the 1st day of admission were compared between patients with favorable (n = 64) and unfavorable (n = 65) neurological outcomes and between survivors (n = 90) and deceased patients (n = 39). PaO2 and the P/F ratio were significantly greater in patients with favorable outcomes than in patients with unfavorable neurological outcomes (PaO2: 252 ± 122 vs. 202 ± 87 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.008; P/F ratio: 455 ± 171 vs. 389 ± 155, respectively, p = 0.022) and in survivors than in deceased patients (PaO2: 242 ± 117 vs. 193 ± 75 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.005; P/F ratio: 445 ± 171 vs. 370 ± 141, respectively, p = 0.018). Similar tendencies were observed in subgroup analyses in patients with fever control and therapeutic hypothermia, and in patients with an evacuated mass or other lesions (unevacuated lesions). PaO2 was independently associated with survival (odds ratio 1.008, p = 0.037). These results suggested that early-stage hyperoxia might be associated with favorable neurological outcomes and survival following severe TBI.

  14. Hypothermia therapy after traumatic brain injury in children.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, James S; Ward, Roxanne E; Lacroix, Jacques; Hébert, Paul C; Barnes, Marcia A; Bohn, Desmond J; Dirks, Peter B; Doucette, Steve; Fergusson, Dean; Gottesman, Ronald; Joffe, Ari R; Kirpalani, Haresh M; Meyer, Philippe G; Morris, Kevin P; Moher, David; Singh, Ram N; Skippen, Peter W

    2008-06-05

    Hypothermia therapy improves survival and the neurologic outcome in animal models of traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of hypothermia therapy on the neurologic outcome and mortality among children who have severe traumatic brain injury is unknown. In a multicenter, international trial, we randomly assigned children with severe traumatic brain injury to either hypothermia therapy (32.5 degrees C for 24 hours) initiated within 8 hours after injury or to normothermia (37.0 degrees C). The primary outcome was the proportion of children who had an unfavorable outcome (i.e., severe disability, persistent vegetative state, or death), as assessed on the basis of the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score at 6 months. A total of 225 children were randomly assigned to the hypothermia group or the normothermia group; the mean temperatures achieved in the two groups were 33.1+/-1.2 degrees C and 36.9+/-0.5 degrees C, respectively. At 6 months, 31% of the patients in the hypothermia group, as compared with 22% of the patients in the normothermia group, had an unfavorable outcome (relative risk, 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 2.22; P=0.14). There were 23 deaths (21%) in the hypothermia group and 14 deaths (12%) in the normothermia group (relative risk, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.90 to 2.27; P=0.06). There was more hypotension (P=0.047) and more vasoactive agents were administered (P<0.001) in the hypothermia group during the rewarming period than in the normothermia group. Lengths of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital and other adverse events were similar in the two groups. In children with severe traumatic brain injury, hypothermia therapy that is initiated within 8 hours after injury and continued for 24 hours does not improve the neurologic outcome and may increase mortality. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN77393684 [controlled-trials.com].). Copyright 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  15. Protection in Animal Models of Brain and Spinal Cord Injury with Mild to Moderate Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract For the past 20 years, various laboratories throughout the world have shown that mild to moderate levels of hypothermia lead to neuroprotection and improved functional outcome in various models of brain and spinal cord injury (SCI). Although the potential neuroprotective effects of profound hypothermia during and following central nervous system (CNS) injury have long been recognized, more recent studies have described clinically feasible strategies for protecting the brain and spinal cord using hypothermia following a variety of CNS insults. In some cases, only a one or two degree decrease in brain or core temperature can be effective in protecting the CNS from injury. Alternatively, raising brain temperature only a couple of degrees above normothermia levels worsens outcome in a variety of injury models. Based on these data, resurgence has occurred in the potential use of therapeutic hypothermia in experimental and clinical settings. The study of therapeutic hypothermia is now an international area of investigation with scientists and clinicians from every part of the world contributing to this important, promising therapeutic intervention. This paper reviews the experimental data obtained in animal models of brain and SCI demonstrating the benefits of mild to moderate hypothermia. These studies have provided critical data for the translation of this therapy to the clinical arena. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of mild hypothermia are also summarized. PMID:19245308

  16. Potential long-term benefits of acute hypothermia after spinal cord injury: assessments with somatosensory-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Maybhate, Anil; Hu, Charles; Bazley, Faith A; Yu, Qilu; Thakor, Nitish V; Kerr, Candace L; All, Angelo H

    2012-02-01

    Neuroprotection by hypothermia has been an important research topic over last two decades. In animal models of spinal cord injury, the primary focus has been assessing the effects of hypothermia on behavioral and histologic outcomes. Although a few studies have investigated electrophysiological changes in descending motor pathways with motor-evoked potentials recorded during cooling, we report here hypothermia induced increased electrical conduction in the ascending spinal cord pathways with somatosensory-evoked potentials in injured rats. In our experiments, these effects lasted long after the acute hypothermia and were accompanied by potential long-term improvements in motor movement. Laboratory investigation. University medical school. Twenty-one female Lewis rats. Hypothermia. All animals underwent spinal cord contusion with the NYU-Impactor by a 12.5-mm weight drop at thoracic vertebra T8. A group (n = 10) was randomly assigned for a systemic 2-hr hypothermia episode (32 ± 0.5°C) initiated approximately 2.0 hrs postinjury. Eleven rats were controls with postinjury temperature maintained at 37 ± 0.5°C for 2 hrs. The two groups underwent preinjury, weekly postinjury (up to 4 wks) somatosensory-evoked potential recordings and standard motor behavioral tests (BBB). Three randomly selected rats from each group were euthanized for histologic analysis at postinjury day 3 and day 28. Compared with controls, the hypothermia group showed significantly higher postinjury somatosensory-evoked potential amplitudes with longer latencies. The BBB scores were also higher immediately after injury and 4 wks later in the hypothermia group. Importantly, specific changes in the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan scores in the hypothermia group (not seen in controls) indicated regained functions critical for motor control. Histologic evaluations showed more tissue preservation in the hypothermia group. After spinal cord injury, early systemic hypothermia provided significant

  17. Predicting outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest in therapeutic hypothermia patients: clinical, electrophysiological and imaging prognosticators.

    PubMed

    Maia, Bruno; Roque, Rafael; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Lourenço, Sónia; Bento, Luís; Alcântara, João

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A determinação do prognóstico em sobreviventes comatosos de paragem cárdio-respiratória baseia-se em evidência adquirida sobretudo antes do advento da hipotermia terapêutica. O nosso objectivo é avaliar a capacidade preditiva de dados clínicos, electrofisiológicos e imagiológicos após a hipotermia terapêutica. Materiais e Métodos: Análise retrospectiva e consecutiva de doentes que foram tratados com hipotermia durante os anos de 2010 e 2011. Foram obtidos dados relativamente ao exame neurológico, potenciais evocados somatossensitivos e auditivos, electroencefalograma e ressonância magnética crânio-encefálica, nas primeiras 72 horas após o evento. O outcome definido foi a escala Glasgow Outcome Scale dicotomizada em mau prognóstico (pontuações 1 e 2) e bom prognóstico (pontuações 3, 4 e 5). Resultados: Estudados no total 26 doentes. Reflexos pupilares, corneanos e oculocefálicos abolidos, ausência de respostas N20 nos potenciais evocados somatossensitivos, estado de mal mioclónico e um padrão ‘maligno’ na electroencefalografia relacionaram-se com mau prognóstico, sem falsos-positivos (p = 0,05). Dois doentes classificados com bom outcome demonstraram respostas motoras ausentes ou em extensão nas primeiras 72 horas, originando uma taxa de falsos-positivos de 25% para este parâmetro (p = 0,008). Ambos requereram sedação até às 72 horas. A presença de isquémia na ressonância não teve relação significativa com o outcome. Discussão: A abolição dos reflexos pupilares, corneanos e oculocefálicos, a ausência de respostas N20 nos potenciais evocados, estado de mal mioclónico e um padrão electroencefalográfico ‘maligno’ mantêm-se parâmetros de mau prognóstico válidos em doentes submetidos a hipotermia terapêutica. Conclusão: A necessidade de sedação nestes doentes pode diminuir a capacidade prognóstica das respostas motoras.

  18. Mild intraoperative hypothermia during surgery for intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Todd, Michael M; Hindman, Bradley J; Clarke, William R; Torner, James C

    2005-01-13

    Surgery for intracranial aneurysm often results in postoperative neurologic deficits. We conducted a randomized trial at 30 centers to determine whether intraoperative cooling during open craniotomy would improve the outcome among patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A total of 1001 patients with a preoperative World Federation of Neurological Surgeons score of I, II, or III ("good-grade patients"), who had had a subarachnoid hemorrhage no more than 14 days before planned surgical aneurysm clipping, were randomly assigned to intraoperative hypothermia (target temperature, 33 degrees C, with the use of surface cooling techniques) or normothermia (target temperature, 36.5 degrees C). Patients were followed closely postoperatively and examined approximately 90 days after surgery, at which time a Glasgow Outcome Score was assigned. There were no significant differences between the group assigned to intraoperative hypothermia and the group assigned to normothermia in the duration of stay in the intensive care unit, the total length of hospitalization, the rates of death at follow-up (6 percent in both groups), or the destination at discharge (home or another hospital, among surviving patients). At the final follow-up, 329 of 499 patients in the hypothermia group had a Glasgow Outcome Score of 1 (good outcome), as compared with 314 of 501 patients in the normothermia group (66 percent vs. 63 percent; odds ratio, 1.14; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.48; P=0.32). Postoperative bacteremia was more common in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (5 percent vs. 3 percent, P=0.05). Intraoperative hypothermia did not improve the neurologic outcome after craniotomy among good-grade patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  19. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia post-cardiac arrest: a clinical nurse specialist initiative in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Manasia, Roshan Jan Muhammad; Husain, Shahid Javed; Hooda, Khairunnissa; Imran, Mehrunnissa; Bailey, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess the feasibility of an evidence-based therapeutic hypothermia protocol in adult post-cardiac arrest (CA) patients in a university hospital in Pakistan. Cardiac arrest has a deleterious effect on neurological function, and survival is associated with significant morbidity. The International Liaison Committee of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the American Heart Association recommend the use of mild hypothermia in post-CA victims to mitigate brain injury caused by anoxia. In Pakistan, the survival rate in CA victims is poor. At present, there are no hospitals in the country that use the evidence-based hypothermia intervention in adult post-CA victims. This pilot project of therapeutic hypothermia in adult post-CA patients was implemented in a university hospital in Pakistan by a clinical nurse specialist in collaboration with the cardiopulmonary resuscitation committee and the nursing leadership of the hospital. Various clinical nurse specialist competencies and roles were used to address the 3 spheres of influence: patient, nurses, and system, while executing an evidence-based hypothermia protocol. Process and outcome indicators were monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of hypothermia intervention in this setting. The hypothermia protocol was successfully implemented in 3 adult post-CA patients using cost-effective measures. All 3 patients were extubated within 72 hours after CA, and 2 patients were discharged home with good neurological outcome. Adoption of an evidence-based hypothermia protocol for adult CA patients is feasible in the intensive care setting of a university hospital in Pakistan. The process used in the project can serve as a road map to other hospitals in resource-limited countries such as Pakistan that are motivated to improve post-CA outcomes. This experience reveals that advanced practice nurses can be instrumental in translation of evidence into practice in a healthcare system in

  1. Patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: relatives' experiences.

    PubMed

    Löf, Susanna; Sandström, Agneta; Engström, Asa

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study describing the experiences of relatives when someone they care for survived a cardiac arrest and was treated with therapeutic hypothermia in an intensive care unit. Witnessing a family member suffering a cardiac arrest is a traumatic event for relatives. Relatives constitute an important support for critically ill patients. It is suggested that therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcome for patients who survive cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2009 with eight relatives of patients who had survived cardiac arrest and been treated with therapeutic hypothermia. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in three themes and eight categories. Relatives described the event of the cardiac arrest as frightening. Seeing the patient connected to tubes and equipment induced a feeling of unreality; the patient was experienced as cold, lifeless and hard to recognize. The relatives faced an anxiety-filled future not knowing what the outcome for their relative would be. Relatives supported each other during this the difficult time, and kept hoping that the patient would survive injury. Seeing a patient who has had a cardiac arrest and received therapeutic hypothermia is extremely demanding for relatives, as the patient seems to be lifeless. Relatives need to know what is happening on a continual basis during the patient's entire stay in hospital and even afterwards, and they need to be given opportunities to discuss their own situation and worries.

  2. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  3. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pattern of Brain Injury as a Biomarker of Childhood Outcomes following a Trial of Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A; Laptook, Abbot R; Hintz, Susan R; Barnes, Patrick D; Das, Abhik; Pappas, Athina; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-11-01

    To examine the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of neonatal brain injury defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network to predict death or IQ at 6-7 years of age following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. Out of 208 participants, 124 had MRI and primary outcome (death or IQ <70) data. The relationship between injury pattern and outcome was assessed. Death or IQ <70 occurred in 4 of 50 (8%) of children with pattern 0 (normal MRI), 1 of 6 (17%) with 1A (minimal cerebral lesions), 1 of 4 (25%) with 1B (extensive cerebral lesions), 3 of 8 (38%) with 2A (basal ganglia thalamic, anterior or posterior limb of internal capsule, or watershed infarction), 32 of 49 (65%) with 2B (2A with cerebral lesions), and 7 of 7 (100%) with pattern 3 (hemispheric devastation), P < .001; this association was also seen within hypothermia and control subgroups. IQ was 90 ± 13 among the 46 children with a normal MRI and 69 ± 25 among the 50 children with an abnormal MRI. In childhood, for a normal outcome, a normal neonatal MRI had a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 92%, and a negative predictive value of 59%; for death or IQ <70, the 2B and 3 pattern combined had a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 78%, positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87%. The Neonatal Research Network MRI pattern of neonatal brain injury is a biomarker of neurodevelopmental outcome at 6-7 years of age. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00005772. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Hypothermia: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypothermia is often caused by exposure to cold weather or immersion in a cold body of water. ... Minn. Feb. 25, 2015. Frostbite and hypothermia. National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office. http://www.crh.noaa. ...

  5. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression.

  6. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  7. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  8. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  9. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B [Chicago, IL; Hoek, Terry Vanden [Chicago, IL; Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  10. Neonatal somatosensory evoked potentials persist during hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Ahtola, Eero; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2017-06-01

    Treatment with therapeutic hypothermia has challenged the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography in predicting outcomes after perinatal asphyxia. In this study, we assessed the feasibility and gain of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) during hypothermia. This retrospective study comprised neonates from 35 + 6 to 42 + 2 gestational weeks and treated for asphyxia or hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy at Helsinki University Hospital between 14 February 2007 and 23 December 2009. This period was partly before the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia, which enabled us to include normothermic neonates who would these days receive hypothermia treatment. We analysed SEPs from 47 asphyxiated neonates and compared the results between 23 normothermic and 24 hypothermic neonates. Our data showed that hypothermia led to SEP latencies lengthening by a few milliseconds, but the essential gain for predicting outcomes by SEPs was preserved during hypothermia. Of the 24 hypothermic neonates, bilaterally absent SEPs were associated with poor outcome in 2/2 neonates, normal SEPs were associated with good outcomes in 13/15 neonates and 5/7 neonates with unilaterally absent or grossly delayed SEPs had a poor outcome. Our findings indicated that SEPs were a reliable tool for evaluating the somatosensory system in asphyxiated neonates in both normothermic and hypothermic conditions. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  12. Improving outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Cannon, Jane A; Simpson, Joanne; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare condition with a diverse spectrum of potential outcomes, ranging from frequent complete recovery to fulminant heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of PPCM is not well understood, and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. PPCM is often under-recognised in the clinical setting. Early investigation and diagnosis with subsequent expert management may improve outcomes. The development of registries will allow this condition to be better characterised and may help answer crucial questions regarding its optimal medical and surgical management. This paper reviews the potential approaches to improve outcomes in patients with PPCM.

  13. Guideline Implementation: Preventing Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-03-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of unplanned patient hypothermia" provides guidance for identifying factors associated with intraoperative hypothermia, preventing hypothermia, educating perioperative personnel on this topic, and developing relevant policies and procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which addresses performing a preoperative assessment for factors that may contribute to hypothermia, measuring and monitoring the patient's temperature in all phases of perioperative care, and implementing interventions to prevent hypothermia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  14. Potential Long Term Benefits of Acute Hypothermia after Spinal Cord Injury: Assessments with Somatosensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Maybhate, Anil; Hu, Charles; Bazley, Faith A.; Yu, Qilu; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.; All, Angelo H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neuroprotection by hypothermia has been an important research topic over last two decades. In animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI), the primary focus has been assessing effects of hypothermia on behavioral and histological outcomes. While a few studies have investigated electrophysiological changes in descending motor pathways with motor evoked potentials recorded during cooling, we report here, hypothermia induced increased electrical conduction in the ascending spinal cord pathways with somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in injured rats. In our experiments these effects lasted long after the acute hypothermia and were accompanied with potential long term improvements in motor movement. Design Laboratory Investigation. Setting University Medical School. Subjects 21 Female Lewis Rats. Interventions Hypothermia. Measurements and Main Results All animals underwent spinal cord contusion, with the NYU-Impactor, by a 12.5mm weight drop at thoracic vertebra T8. A group (n=10) was randomly assigned for a systemic 2hr. hypothermia episode (32±0.5°C) initiated ~2.0hrs post-injury. 11 rats were controls with post-injury temperature maintained at 37±0.5°C for 2hrs. The two groups underwent pre-injury, weekly post-injury (up to 4wks) SSEP recordings and standard motor behavioral tests (BBB). Three randomly selected rats from each group were euthanized for histological analysis at post-injury Day 3 and Day 28. Compared to controls, the hypothermia group showed significantly higher SSEP amplitudes post-injury; with longer latencies. The BBB scores were also higher immediately after injury and 4 weeks later in the hypothermia group. Importantly, specific changes in the BBB scores in hypothermia group (not seen in controls) indicated regained functions critical for motor control. Histological evaluations showed more tissue preservation in hypothermia group. Conclusions Post-SCI, early systemic hypothermia provided significant neuroprotection weeks after

  15. Effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to initial ECG rhythm and witnessed status: A nationwide observational interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sae Won; Shin, Sang Do; Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Eui Jung; Ahn, Ki Ok

    2016-03-01

    The use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with shockable rhythms is recommended and widely used. However, it is unclear whether TH is associated with better outcomes in non-shockable rhythms. This is a retrospective observational study using a national OHCA cohort database composed of emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital data. We included adult EMS-treated OHCA patients of presumed cardiac etiology who were admitted to the hospital during Jan. 2008 to Dec. 2013. Patients without hospital outcome data were excluded. The primary outcome was good neurological outcome at discharge; secondary outcome was survival to discharge. The primary exposure was TH. We compared outcomes between TH and non-TH groups using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for individual and Utstein factors. Interactions of initial ECG rhythm and witnessed status on the effect of TH on outcomes were tested. There were 11,256 patients in the final analysis. TH was performed in 1703 patients (15.1%). Neurological outcome was better in TH (23.5%) than non-TH (15.0%) (Adjusted OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.48). The effect of TH on the odds for good neurological outcome was highest in the witnessed PEA group (Adjusted OR=3.91, 95% CI 1.87-8.14). Survival to discharge was significantly higher in the TH group (55.1%) than non-TH (35.9%) (Adjusted OR=1.76, 95% CI 1.56-2.00). In a nationwide observational study, TH is associated with better neurological outcome and higher survival to discharge. The effect of TH is greatest in witnessed OHCA patients with PEA as the initial ECG rhythm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic hypothermia translates from ancient history in to practice

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Alistair J.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Robertson, Nicola J.; Barks, John D.; Thoresen, Marianne; Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The possibility that hypothermia may be able to prevent or lessen asphyxial brain injury is a “dream revisited”. In this review, a historical perspective is provided from the first reported use of therapeutic hypothermia for brain injuries in antiquity, to the present day. The first uncontrolled trials of cooling for resuscitation were reported more than 50 years ago. The seminal insight that led to the modern revival of studies of neuroprotection was that after profound asphyxia, many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short “latent” phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a “secondary” deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Studies designed around this conceptual framework showed that mild hypothermia initiated as early as possible before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, is associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. There is now compelling evidence from randomized controlled trials that mild induced hypothermia significantly improves intact survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes to mid-childhood. PMID:27673420

  17. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridar, Alireza; Bershad, Eric M.; Emiru, Tenbit; Iaizzo, Paul A.; Suarez, Jose I.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is considered to improve survival with favorable neurological outcome in the case of global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. The efficacy of hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), however, is not well studied. Induction of TH typically requires a multimodal approach, including the use of both pharmacological agents and physical techniques. To date, clinical outcomes for patients with either AIS or TBI who received TH have yielded conflicting results; thus, no adequate therapeutic consensus has been reached. Nevertheless, it seems that by determining optimal TH parameters and also appropriate applications, cooling therapy still has the potential to become a valuable neuroprotective intervention. Among the various methods for hypothermia induction, intravascular cooling (IVC) may have the most promise in the awake patient in terms of clinical outcomes. Currently, the IVC method has the capability of more rapid target temperature attainment and more precise control of temperature. However, this technique requires expertise in endovascular surgery that can preclude its application in the field and/or in most emergency settings. It is very likely that combining neuroprotective strategies will yield better outcomes than utilizing a single approach. PMID:22207862

  18. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0-32.3)min and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10min, 11-20min, 21-30min, >30min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20min, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime >20min. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A.; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. Methods This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. Results 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0–32.3) minutes and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10 min, 11-20 min, 21-30 min, > 30 min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20 minutes, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Conclusions Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime > 20 minutes. PMID:24746783

  20. Temperature control during therapeutic hypothermia for newborn encephalopathy using different Blanketrol devices.

    PubMed

    Laptook, Abbot R; Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C ± 1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C ± 1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8% ± 0.1% vs. 95.8% ± 0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia.

  1. MicroRNA-155 potentiates the inflammatory response in hypothermia by suppressing IL-10 production.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Adrian T; Hellmann, Jason; Roberts, Henry; Druen, Devin; Gardner, Sarah A; Sarojini, Harshini; Galandiuk, Susan; Chien, Sufan; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew; Polk, Hiram C

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is commonly used to improve neurological outcomes in patients after cardiac arrest. However, therapeutic hypothermia increases sepsis risk and unintentional hypothermia in surgical patients increases infectious complications. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms by which hypothermia dysregulates innate immunity are incompletely understood. We found that exposure of human monocytes to cold (32°C) potentiated LPS-induced production of TNF and IL-6, while blunting IL-10 production. This dysregulation was associated with increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), which potentiates Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by negatively regulating Ship1 and Socs1. Indeed, Ship1 and Socs1 were suppressed at 32°C and miR-155 antagomirs increased Ship1 and Socs1 and reversed the alterations in cytokine production in cold-exposed monocytes. In contrast, miR-155 mimics phenocopied the effects of cold exposure, reducing Ship1 and Socs1 and altering TNF and IL-10 production. In a murine model of LPS-induced peritonitis, cold exposure potentiated hypothermia and decreased survival (10 vs. 50%; P < 0.05), effects that were associated with increased miR-155, suppression of Ship1 and Socs1, and alterations in TNF and IL-10. Importantly, miR-155-deficiency reduced hypothermia and improved survival (78 vs. 32%, P < 0.05), which was associated with increased Ship1, Socs1, and IL-10. These results establish a causal role of miR-155 in the dysregulation of the inflammatory response to hypothermia.

  2. Therapeutic benefits of mild hypothermia in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Shen; Lin, Shi-Rong; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Good neurological outcome after cardiac arrest (CA) is hard to achieve for clinicians. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that therapeutic mild hypothermia is beneficial. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of therapeutic mild hypothermia in patients successfully resuscitated from CA using a meta-analysis. We searched the MEDLINE (1966 to April 2012), OVID (1980 to April 2012), EMBASE (1980 to April 2012), Chinese bio-medical literature & retrieval system (CBM) (1978 to April 2012), Chinese medical current contents (CMCC) (1995 to April 2012), and Chinese medical academic conference (CMAC) (1994 to April 2012). Studies were included if 1) the study design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT); 2) the study population included patients successfully resuscitated from CA, and received either standard post-resuscitation care with normothermia or mild hypothermia; 3) the study provided data on good neurologic outcome and survival to hospital discharge. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to pool the effect. The study included four RCTs with a total of 417 patients successfully resuscitated from CA. Compared to standard post-resuscitation care with normothermia, patients in the hypothermia group were more likely to have good neurologic outcome (RR=1.43, 95% CI 1.14-1.80, P=0.002) and were more likely to survive to hospital discharge (RR=1.32, 95% CI 1.08-1.63, P=0.008). There was no significant difference in adverse events between the normothermia and hypothermia groups (P>0.05), nor heterogeneity and publication bias. Therapeutic mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcome and survival in patients successfully resuscitated from CA.

  3. Effects of Methylprednisolone on Neuroprotective Effects of Delay Hypothermia on Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Akhtarshomar, Sadegh; Saied, Alireza; Gholamhoseinian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of delayed hypothermia on spinal cord injuries in rats. In addition, the effect of methylprednisolone on therapeutic window of hypothermia was evaluated. Overview of Literature Several studies have demonstrated that early hypothermia is the most effective neuroprotective modality. However, delayed hypothermia seems to be more practical for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. A combination of hypothermia and other neuroprotective methods, such as using methylprednisolone, may help extend the therapeutic window of hypothermia. Methods One hundred and twenty male rats were categorized into six groups. The rats in five groups were subjected to spinal cord injury using the weight drop method, followed by treatment, consisting of early hypothermia, late hypothermia, late hypothermia plus methylprednisolone, or methylprednisolone only. Biochemical tests including catalase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide level were evaluated in the injured spinal cord. Behavioral functions of the hind limb were evaluated by Basso-Battle-Bresnaham locomotor rating scale and tail-flick tests. Results Functional and biochemical evaluation showed both early and late hypothermia had significant neuroprotective effects. The treated groups did not differ significantly from one another in the behavioral tests. Hypothermia had better biochemical results compared to methylprednisolone. Also, methylprednisolone was shown to extend the therapeutic window of delayed hypothermia. Conclusions Hypothermia showed a significant neuroprotective effect, which can be improved with further studies optimizing the duration of hypothermia and the rewarming period. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of the delayed hypothermia can be extended by methylprednisolone. PMID:25705328

  4. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy.

  5. Disease management improves ESRD outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, J J

    2006-02-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence based guidelines and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total health-care costs including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out-of-pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present, current data suggests that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in ESRD.

  6. Hypothermia for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sharon R; Evans, David Jw; Butler, Andrew R; Schofield-Robinson, Oliver J; Alderson, Phil

    2017-09-21

    Hypothermia has been used in the treatment of brain injury for many years. Encouraging results from small trials and laboratory studies led to renewed interest in the area and some larger trials. To determine the effect of mild hypothermia for traumatic brain injury (TBI) on mortality, long-term functional outcomes and complications. We ran and incorporated studies from database searches to 21 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase Classic+Embase (OvidSP), PubMed, ISI Web of science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S & CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. We also re-ran these searches pre-publication in June 2017; the result from this search is presented in 'Studies awaiting classification'. We included randomised controlled trials of participants with closed TBI requiring hospitalisation who were treated with hypothermia to a maximum of 35 ºC for at least 12 consecutive hours. Treatment with hypothermia was compared to maintenance with normothermia (36.5 to 38 ºC). Two review authors assessed data on mortality, unfavourable outcomes according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale, and pneumonia. We included 37 eligible trials with a total of 3110 randomised participants; nine of these were new studies since the last update (2009) and five studies had been previously excluded but were re-assessed and included during the 2017 update. We identified two ongoing studies from searches of clinical trials registers and database searches and two studies await classification.Studies included both adults and children with TBI. Most studies commenced treatment immediately on admission to hospital or after craniotomies and all treatment was maintained for at least 24 hours. Thirty-three studies reported data for mortality, 31 studies reported data for unfavourable outcomes (death, vegetative state or severe disability

  7. Systemic hypothermia in acute cervical spinal cord injury: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dididze, M; Green, B A; Dietrich, W Dalton; Vanni, S; Wang, M Y; Levi, A D

    2013-05-01

    Systemic hypothermia remains a promising neuroprotective strategy. There has been recent interest in its use in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). In this article, we describe our extended single center experience using intravascular hypothermia for the treatment of cervical SCI. Thirty-five acute cervical SCI patients received modest (33 °C) intravascular hypothermia for 48 h. Neurological outcome was assessed by the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury scale (ISNCSCI) developed by the American Spinal Injury Association. Local and systemic complications were recorded. All patients were complete ISNCSCI A on admission, but four converted to ISNCSCI B in <24 h post injury. Hypothermia was delivered in 5.76 (±0.45) hours from injury if we exclude four cases with delayed admission (>18 h). Fifteen of total 35 patients (43%) improved at least one ISNCSCI grade at latest follow up 10.07 (±1.03) months. Even excluding those patients who converted from ISNCSCI A within 24 h, 35.5% (11 out of 31) improved at least one ISNCSCI grade. Both retrospective (n=14) and prospective (n=21) groups revealed similar number of respiratory complications. The overall risk of any thromboembolic complication was 14.2%. The results are promising in terms of safety and improvement in neurological outcome. To date, the study represents the largest study cohort of cervical SCI patients treated by modest hypothermia. A multi-center, randomized study is needed to determine if systemic hypothermia should be a part of SCI patients' treatment for whom few options exist.

  8. Hypothermia for Neuroprotection in Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Legriel, Stephane; Lemiale, Virginie; Schenck, Maleka; Chelly, Jonathan; Laurent, Virginie; Daviaud, Fabrice; Srairi, Mohamed; Hamdi, Aicha; Geri, Guillaume; Rossignol, Thomas; Hilly-Ginoux, Julia; Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Louart, Benjamin; Malissin, Isabelle; Mongardon, Nicolas; Planquette, Benjamin; Thirion, Marina; Merceron, Sybille; Canet, Emmanuel; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Azoulay, Elie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-22

    Background Convulsive status epilepticus often results in permanent neurologic impairment. We evaluated the effect of induced hypothermia on neurologic outcomes in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. Methods In a multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 270 critically ill patients with convulsive status epilepticus who were receiving mechanical ventilation to hypothermia (32 to 34°C for 24 hours) in addition to standard care or to standard care alone; 268 patients were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a good functional outcome at 90 days, defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of 5 (range, 1 to 5, with 1 representing death and 5 representing no or minimal neurologic deficit). The main secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days, progression to electroencephalographically (EEG) confirmed status epilepticus, refractory status epilepticus on day 1, "super-refractory" status epilepticus (resistant to general anesthesia), and functional sequelae on day 90. Results A GOS score of 5 occurred in 67 of 138 patients (49%) in the hypothermia group and in 56 of 130 (43%) in the control group (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.99; P=0.43). The rate of progression to EEG-confirmed status epilepticus on the first day was lower in the hypothermia group than in the control group (11% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.79; P=0.009), but there were no significant differences between groups in the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were more frequent in the hypothermia group than in the control group. Conclusions In this trial, induced hypothermia added to standard care was not associated with significantly better 90-day outcomes than standard care alone in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. (Funded by the French Ministry of Health; HYBERNATUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01359332 .).

  9. Prevention of perioperative hypothermia in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, V Leroy; Watson, Marla E

    2006-01-01

    While inadvertent perioperative hypothermia has received serious attention in many surgical specialties, few discussions of hypothermia have been published in the plastic surgery literature. This article reviews the physiology of thermoregulation, describes how both general and regional anesthesia alter the normal thermoregulatory mechanisms, indicates risk factors particularly associated with hypothermia, and discusses the most effective current methods for maintaining normothermia. Hypothermia is typically defined as a core body temperature of outcomes are reportedly better when a temperature of >/=36.5 degrees C is maintained. Unless preventive measures are instituted, inadvertent hypothermia occurs in 50% to 90% of surgical patients, even those undergoing relatively short procedures lasting one to one-and-a-half hours. During either general or regional anesthesia, a patient's natural behavioral and autonomic responses to cold are unavailable or impaired, and the combination of general and neuraxial anesthesia produces the highest risk for inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Unless hypothermia is prevented, the restoration of normothermia can take more than 4 hours once anesthesia is stopped. Consequences of hypothermia are serious and affect surgical outcomes in plastic surgery patients. Potential complications include morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders and blood loss, increased incidence of surgical wound infection, postoperative shivering, longer hospital stays, and increased costs associated with surgery. Measures for preventing hypothermia are emphasized in this article, especially those proven most effective in prospective and controlled clinical studies. Perhaps the most important step in maintaining normothermia is to prewarm patients in the preoperative area with forced-air heating systems. Intraoperative warming with forced-air and fluid warming are also essential. Other strategies

  10. The dual role of the neuroinflammatory response after ischemic stroke: modulatory effects of hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key element in the ischemic cascade after cerebral ischemia that results in cell damage and death in the subacute phase. However, anti-inflammatory drugs do not improve outcome in clinical settings suggesting that the neuroinflammatory response after an ischemic stroke is not entirely detrimental. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. Because of its inhibitory influence on several pathways of the ischemic cascade, hypothermia has been introduced as a promising neuroprotective strategy. This review also discusses the influence of hypothermia on the neuroinflammatory response. We conclude that hypothermia exerts both stimulating and inhibiting effects on different aspects of neuroinflammation and hypothesize that these effects are key to neuroprotection. PMID:21040547

  11. Mild therapeutic hypothermia shortens intensive care unit stay of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to historical controls

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Christian; Steffen, Ingo; Schefold, Joerg C; Krueger, Anne; Oppert, Michael; Jörres, Achim; Hasper, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Persistent coma is a common finding after cardiac arrest and has profound ethical and economic implications. Evidence suggests that therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome in these patients. In this analysis, we investigate whether therapeutic hypothermia influences the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and ventilator time in patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods A prospective observational study with historical controls was conducted at our medical ICU. Fifty-two consecutive patients (median age 62.6 years, 43 males, 34 ventricular fibrillation) submitted to therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were included. They were compared with a historical cohort (n = 74, median age 63.8 years, 53 males, 43 ventricular fibrillation) treated in the era prior to hypothermia treatment. All patients received the same standard of care. Neurological outcome was assessed using the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC) score. Univariate analyses and multiple regression models were used. Results In survivors, therapeutic hypothermia and baseline disease severity (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II] score) were both found to significantly influence ICU stay and ventilator time (all P < 0.01). ICU stay was shorter in survivors receiving therapeutic hypothermia (median 14 days [interquartile range (IQR) 8 to 26] versus 21 days [IQR 15 to 30] in the control group; P = 0.017). ICU length of stay and time on ventilator were prolonged in patients with CPC 3 or 4 compared with patients with CPC 1 or 2 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.034, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed improved probability for 1-year survival in the hypothermia group compared with the controls (log-rank test P = 0.013). Conclusion Therapeutic hypothermia was found to significantly shorten ICU stay and time of mechanical ventilation in survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Moreover, profound

  12. [Neuroprotection with hypothermia in the newborn with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Standard guidelines for its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Valverde, E; Tenorio, V; Vento, M; Cabañas, F

    2011-11-01

    Standardisation of hypothermia as a treatment for perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is supported by current scientific evidence. The following document was prepared by the authors on request of the Spanish Society of Neonatology and is intended to be a guide for the proper implementation of this therapy. We discuss the difficulties that may arise when moving from the strict framework of clinical trials to clinical daily care: early recognition of clinical encephalopathy, inclusion and exclusion criteria, hypothermia during transport, type of hypothermia (selective head or systemic cooling) and side effects of therapy. The availability of hypothermia therapy has changed the prognosis of children with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and our choices of therapeutic support. In this sense, it is especially important to be aware of the changes in the predictive value of the neurological examination and the electroencephalographic recording in cooled infants. In order to improve neuroprotection with hypothermia we need earlier recognition of to recognise earlier the infants that may benefit from cooling. Biomarkers of brain injury could help us in the selection of these patients. Every single infant treated with hypothermia must be included in a follow up program in order to assess neurodevelopmental outcome.

  13. Thermodynamic aspects of therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Vanlandingham, Sean C; Kurz, Michael C; Wang, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an important treatment for post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Despite its widespread practice, only limited data describe the thermodynamic aspects of heat transfer during TH. This paper reviews the principles of human body heat balance and provides a conceptual model for characterizing heat exchange during TH. The model may provide a framework for computer simulation for improving training in or clinical methods of TH.

  14. Effect of Hypothermia and Targeted Temperature Management on Drug Disposition and Response Following Cardiac Arrest: A Comprehensive Review of Preclinical and Clinical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kacey B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Empey, Philip E

    2016-12-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) has been shown to reduce mortality and improve neurological outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) patients and in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). TTM has also been associated with adverse drug events in the critically ill patient due to its effect on drug pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs). We aim to evaluate the current literature on the effect of TTM on drug PKs and PDs following CA. MEDLINE/PubMed databases were searched for publications, which include the MeSH terms hypothermia, drug metabolism, drug transport, P450, critical care, cardiac arrest, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics between July 2006 and October 2015. Twenty-three studies were included in this review. The studies demonstrate that hypothermia impacts PK parameters and increases concentrations of cytochrome-P450-metabolized drugs in the cooling and rewarming phase. Furthermore, the current data demonstrate a combined effect of CA and hypothermia on drug PK. Importantly, these effects can last greater than 4-5 days post-treatment. Limited evidence suggests hypothermia-mediated changes in the Phase II metabolism and the Phase III transport of drugs. Hypothermia also has been shown to potentially decrease the effect of specific drugs at the receptor level. Therapeutic hypothermia, as commonly deployed/applied during TTM, alters PK, and elevates concentrations of several commonly used medications. Hypothermia-mediated effects are an important factor when dosing and monitoring patients undergoing TTM treatment.

  15. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  16. Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, P M

    2015-12-01

    This review examines the recent evidence of an impact of regional anaesthesia on important clinical outcomes. Evidence was obtained from a variety of studies, with increasing numbers of analyses of large databases being prominent. The benefits and limitations of these approaches are considered in order to provide a context for interpretation of the data they generate. There should be little argument that correctly performed and appropriately used regional anaesthetic techniques can provide the most effective postoperative analgesia for the duration of the block, but the majority of studies suggest that this does not translate into improved longer-term surgical outcomes. The evidence for reduced incidence of major complications when regional anaesthesia is compared with, or added to, general anaesthesia is mixed. There appears to be a small effect in reducing blood loss during major joint arthroplasty. Some, but not all, studies demonstrate a reduced incidence of respiratory and infective complications with regional anaesthesia, but the effect on cardiovascular complications is variable. There are even some data consistent with a hypothesis that general anaesthesia may be protective against postoperative cognitive dysfunction. In conclusion, there is probably no generally applicable benefit in long-term outcomes with regional anaesthesia. More likely is an interaction between patient factors, the surgical procedure, and the relative capability of the anaesthetist to manage different types of anaesthesia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In an era of rapid STEMI reperfusion with Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention is there a role for adjunct therapeutic hypothermia? A structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Saunderson, Christopher E D; Chowdhary, Amrit; Brogan, Richard A; Batin, Phillip D; Gale, Christopher P

    2016-11-15

    Mild hypothermia has been shown to improve neurological outcome and reduce mortality following out of hospital cardiac arrest. In animal models the application of hypothermia with induced coronary occlusion has demonstrated a reduction in infarct size. Consequently, hypothermia has been proposed as a treatment, in addition to Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PPCI) for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, there is incomplete understanding of the mechanism and magnitude of the protective effect of hypothermia on the myocardium, and limited outcome data. We undertook a structured literature review of therapeutic hypothermia as adjuvant to PPCI for acute STEMI. We examined the feasibility, safety, impact on infarct size and the resultant effect on major adverse cardiac events and mortality. There were 13 studies between 1946 and 2016. With the exception of one study, therapeutic hypothermia for STEMI was reported to be feasible and safe, and its only demonstrable benefit was a modest reduction in post-infarct heart failure events. Evidence to date, however, is from small clinical trials and in an era of low early mortality following PPCI for STEMI, demonstrating a mortality benefit will be challenging. Post-myocardial infarction left ventricular dysfunction is a more frequent, alternative clinical outcome and therefore any intervention that mitigates this warrants further investigation.

  18. Reducing the risk of unplanned perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan; Dixon, Jacqueline; Leary, Donna

    2010-11-01

    Maintaining normothermia is important for patient safety, positive surgical outcomes, and increased patient satisfaction. Causes of unplanned hypothermia in the OR include cold room temperatures, the effects of anesthesia, cold IV and irrigation fluids, skin and wound exposure, and patient risk factors. Nurses at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Media, Pennsylvania, performed a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of using warm blankets, warm irrigation fluids, or forced-air warming on perioperative patients to maintain their core temperature during the perioperative experience. Results of the project showed that 75% of patients who received forced-air warming perioperatively had temperatures that reached or were maintained at 36° C (96.8° F) or higher within 15 minutes after leaving the OR.

  19. Elimination of Admission Hypothermia in Preterm Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants by Standardization of Delivery Room Management

    PubMed Central

    Manani, Madhu; Jegatheesan, Priya; DeSandre, Glenn; Song, Dongli; Showalter, Lynn; Govindaswami, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Context: Temperature instability is a serious but potentially preventable morbidity in preterm infants. Admission temperatures below 36°C are associated with increased mortality and late onset sepsis. Objective: The goal of our quality-improvement effort was to increase preterm infants’ admission temperatures to above 36°C by preventing heat loss in the immediate postnatal period. Design: This quality-improvement initiative used the rapid-cycle Plan-Do-Study-Act approach. Preterm infants born at less than 33 weeks’ gestation with very low birth weight less than 1500 g who were born at a Regional Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in San Jose, CA, were enrolled. Our intervention involved standardizing the management of thermoregulation from predelivery through admission to the NICU. Data on admission temperature were collected prospectively. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was hypothermia, defined as temperature below 36°C on admission to the NICU. Results: The hypothermia rate was reduced from 44% in early 2006 to 0% by 2009. There was a slight increase to 6% in 2010. Subsequently, with further real-time feedback, we were able to sustain 0% hypothermia through 2011. Our hypothermia rate remained substantially lower than state and national hypothermia benchmarks that have shown moderate improvement over the same period. Conclusion: We reduced hypothermia in very low-birth-weight infants using a standardized protocol, multidisciplinary team approach, and continuous feedback. Sustaining improvement is a challenge that requires real-time progress evaluation of outcomes and ongoing staff education. PMID:24355884

  20. Effects of perioperative hypothermia and warming in surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil; Wong, Peng Foo; Melling, Andrew Christian; Leaper, David John

    2005-09-01

    Perioperative hypothermia is common and adversely affects clinical outcomes due to its effect on a range of homeostatic functions. Many of these adverse consequences are preventable by the use of warming techniques. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant published articles on perioperative hypothermia and warming. The databases searched include MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005), EMBASE (1974 to February 2005), CINAHL, the Cochrane library and the health technology assessment database. Reference lists of key articles were also searched. The primary beneficial effects of warming are mediated through increased blood flow and oxygen tension at tissue level. Reduction in wound infection, blood loss and perioperative pain with warming is promising. However, more evidence from good-quality prospective randomised controlled trials is needed to evaluate the role of warming in improving overall morbidity, mortality and hospital stay as well as to clarify its role as an adjunct to resuscitation and during the pre-hospital transport phase of critically ill patients. Awareness of the risks of perioperative hypothermia is the key to prevention. Achieving normothermia throughout the patient's journey is a worthwhile goal in surgical patients.

  1. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R.; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  2. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult.

  3. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  4. Outcomes of a hospital-wide plan to improve care of comatose survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rittenberger, Jon. C.; Guyette, Francis X.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; DeVita, Michael A.; Alvarez, Rene J.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves outcomes in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Few hospitals have protocol-driven plans that include TH. We implemented a series of process interventions designed to increase TH use and improve outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) or in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). Methods and Results Linked interventions including a TH order sheet, verbal and written feedback to individual providers, an educational program, TH “kit” and on-call consultants to assist with patient care and hypothermia induction were implemented between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007 in a large, university-affiliated, tertiary care center. We then completed a retrospective review of all patients treated for cardiac arrest during the study period. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared analyses, or Fisher’s exact test were used as appropriate. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. 135 OHCA patients and 106 IHCA patients were eligible for post-arrest care. TH use increased each year in the OHCA group (from 6% to 65% to 76%; p<0.001) and IHCA group (from 0% to 36% to 53%; p=.02). A good outcome was achieved in 21% and 8% of comatose patients with OHCA and IHCA, respectively. Patients with OHCA and ventricular dysrhythmia were more likely to have a good outcome with TH treatment than without it (good outcome in 57% vs. 8%; p=.005). Conclusion Implementing a series of aggressive interventions increased appropriate TH use and was associated with improved outcomes in our facility. PMID:18951113

  5. The role of hypothermia in post-cardiac arrest patients with return of spontaneous circulation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Walters, James H; Morley, Peter T; Nolan, Jerry P

    2011-05-01

    To update a comprehensive systematic review of the use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest that was undertaken initially as part of the 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science. The specific question addressed was: 'in post-cardiac arrest patients with a return of spontaneous circulation, does the induction of mild hypothermia improve morbidity or mortality when compared with usual care?' Pubmed was searched using ("heart arrest" or "cardiopulmonary resuscitation") AND "hypothermia, induced" using 'Clinical Queries' search strategy; EmBASE was searched using (heart arrest) OR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) AND hypothermia; The Cochrane database of systematic reviews; ECC EndNote Library for "hypothermia" in abstract OR title. Excluded were animal studies, reviews and editorials, surveys of implementation, analytical models, reports of single cases, pre-arrest or during arrest cooling and group where the intervention was not hypothermia alone. 77 studies met the criteria for further review. Of these, four were meta-analyses (LOE 1); seven were randomised controlled trials (LOE 1), although six of these were from the same set of patients; nine were non-randomised, concurrent controls (LOE 2); 15 were trials with retrospective controls (LOE 3); 40 had no controls (LOE 4); and one was extrapolated from a non-cardiac arrest group (LOE 5). There is evidence supporting the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia to improve neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose following the return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest; however, much of the evidence is from low-level, observational studies. Of seven randomised controlled trials, six use data from the same patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. History of accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Guly, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Death from exposure to cold has been recognised for thousands of years but hypothermia as a clinical condition was not generally recognised until the mid-20th century and then only in extreme conditions such as immersion in cold water or snow. In the UK, hypothermia in less extreme conditions was not generally recognised until the 1960s. Recognition of hypothermia required the temperature to be measured and this did not become a clinical tool until the late 1800s and it was not used routinely until the early 1900s. Although John Hunter and James Curry did some physiological experiments in the 1700s, detailed physiological experiments were not done until the early 20th century and the use of therapeutic hypothermia for malignancy and in anaesthesia in the 1930s and 1940s provided more impetus for investigating the physiology of hypothermia in humans and familiarising the medical profession with measuring core temperatures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immediate Short-Duration Hypothermia Provides Long-Term Protection in an in Vivo Model of Traumatic Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Marek; Matthews, Brian T.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Meaney, David F.; Shofer, Frances S.; Neumar, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized trial did not demonstrate improved outcomes in severe traumatic brain injured patients treated with mild hypothermia (Clifton, et al., 2001). However, the mean time to target temperature was over 8 hours and patient inclusion was based on Glasgow Coma Scale score so brain pathology was likely diverse. There remains significant interest in the benefits of hypothermia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and, in particular, traumatic axonal injury (TAI), which is believed to significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality of TBI patients. The long-term beneficial effect of mild hypothermia on TAI has not been established. To address this issue, we developed an in vivo rat optic nerve stretch model of TAI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral optic nerve stretch at 6, 7 or 8 mm piston displacement. The increased number of axonal swellings and bulbs immunopositive for non-phosphorylated neurofilament (SMI-32) seen four days after injury was statistically significant after 8 mm displacement. Ultrastructural analysis 2 weeks after 8 mm displacement revealed a 45.0% decrease (p<0.0001) in myelinated axonal density in the optic nerve core. There was loss of axons regardless of axon size. Immediate post-injury hypothermia (32°C) for 3 hours reduced axonal degeneration in the core (p=0.027). There was no differential protection based on axon size. These results support further clinical investigation of temporally optimized therapeutic hypothermia after traumatic brain injury. PMID:18977220

  8. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):56-63.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Intraoperative Hypothermia During Surgical Fixation of Hip Fractures.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Jildeh, Toufic R; Shaw, Jonathan; Guthrie, Trent; Silverton, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Hip fractures are common orthopedic injuries and are associated with significant morbidity/mortality. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended by national guidelines to minimize additional morbidity/mortality, but limited evidence exists regarding hypothermia's effect on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in patients with operatively treated hip fractures and evaluate its effect on complications and outcomes. Retrospective chart review was performed on clinical records from 1541 consecutive patients who sustained a hip fracture and underwent operative fixation at the authors' institution between January 2005 and October 2013. A total of 1525 patients were included for analysis, excluding those with injuries requiring additional surgical intervention. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling evaluated associations with hypothermia and effect on complications/outcomes. The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in operatively treated hip fractures was 17.0%. Hypothermia was associated with an increase in the rate of deep surgical-site infection (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-9.14; P=.022). Lower body mass index and increasing age demonstrated increased association with hypothermia (P=.004 and P=.005, respectively). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first and largest study analyzing the effect of intraoperative hypothermia in orthopedic patients. In patients with hip fractures, the study's findings confirm evidence found in other surgical specialties that hypothermia may be associated with an increased risk of deep surgical-site infection and that lower body mass index and increasing age are risk factors

  10. Hypothermia for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Mann, Cody; Sohn, Hong Moon; Hilibrand, Alan S; Phillips, Frank M; Wang, Jeffrey C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Interest in systemic and local hypothermia extends back over many decades, and both have been investigated as potential neuroprotective interventions in a number of clinical settings, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, cardiac arrest, and both intracranial and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. The recent use of systemic hypothermia in an injured National Football League football player has focused a great deal of attention on the potential use of hypothermia in acute spinal cord injury. To provide spinal clinicians with an overview of the biological rationale for using hypothermia, the past studies and current clinical applications of hypothermia, and the basic science studies and clinical reports of the use of hypothermia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury. A review of the English literature on hypothermia was performed, starting with the original clinical description of the use of systemic hypothermia in 1940. Pertinent basic science and clinical articles were identified using PubMed and the bibliographies of the articles. Each article was reviewed to provide a concise description of hypothermia's biological rationale, current clinical applications, complications, and experience as a neuroprotective intervention in spinal cord injury. Hypothermia has a multitude of physiologic effects. From a neuroprotective standpoint, hypothermia slows basic enzymatic activity, reduces the cell's energy requirements, and thus maintains Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) concentrations. As such, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be neuroprotective in patients after cardiac arrest, although its benefit in other clinical settings such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, and intracranial aneurysm surgery has not been demonstrated. Animal studies of local and systemic hypothermia in traumatic spinal cord injury models have produced mixed results. Local hypothermia was actively studied in the 1970s in human acute traumatic spinal cord injury, but no case series of

  11. Mild perioperative hypothermia and the risk of wound infection.

    PubMed

    Flores-Maldonado, A; Medina-Escobedo, C E; Ríos-Rodríguez, H M; Fernández-Domínguez, R

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial destruction caused by free radicals, which are synthesized by neutrophils in the presence of oxygen, depends on adequate tissue perfusion. Mild perioperative hypothermia causes vasoconstriction, reducing nutrient and oxygen supply to wounds and increasing frequency of surgical wound infection. However, the causal role of hypothermia in surgical wound infection is the subject of controversy. The present work proposes the hypothesis that mild perioperative hypothermia is associated with infection of the surgical wound. A prospective cohort of 290 surgical patients was studied in a second-level hospital; 261 (90%) of the patients concluded the follow-up. The relationship of hypothermia and of other confounding factors, such as diabetes mellitus, antibiotic treatment, and wound drains with infection outcome was evaluated. One physician, blinded to patient hypothermia, gathered the data. Surgical wound infection was defined as the surgeon's diagnosis with positive culture. Twenty subjects (7.6%) showed infection of surgical wound; 18 (11.5%) of 156 hypothermics and two (2%) 105 normothermics (p = 0.004). Hypothermia proved to be a significant independent risk of infection with relative risk of 6.3 (p = 0.01). Mild perioperative hypothermia is associated with infection of the surgical wound and its prevention is therefore justified.

  12. In vitro arrhythmia generation by mild hypothermia: a pitchfork bifurcation type process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binbin; Jacquir, Sabir; Laurent, Gabriel; Binczak, Stéphane; Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein

    2015-03-01

    The neurological damage after cardiac arrest presents a huge challenge for hospital discharge. Therapeutic hypothermia (34 °C - 32 °C) has shown its benefits in reducing cerebral oxygen demand and improving neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. However, it can have many adverse effects, among them cardiac arrhythmia generation which represents an important part (up to 34%, according different clinical studies). A monolayer cardiac culture is prepared with cardiomyocytes from a newborn rat, directly on a multi-electrode array, which allows the acquisition of the extracellular potential of the culture. The temperature range is 37 °C - 30 °C-37 °C, representing the cooling and rewarming process of therapeutic hypothermia. Experiments showed that at 35 °C, the acquired signals are characterized by period-doubling phenomenon, compared with signals at other temperatures. Spiral waves, commonly considered to be a sign of cardiac arrhythmia, are observed in the reconstructed activation map. With an approach from nonlinear dynamics, phase space reconstruction, it is shown that at 35 °C, the trajectories of these signals formed a spatial bifurcation, even trifurcation. Another transit point is found between 30 °C-33 °C, which agreed with other clinical studies that induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest should not fall below 32 °C. The process of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest can be represented by a pitchfork bifurcation type process, which could explain the different ratios of arrhythmia among the adverse effects after this therapy. This nonlinear dynamic suggests that a variable speed of cooling/rewarming, especially when passing 35 °C, would help to decrease the ratio of post-hypothermia arrhythmia and then improve the hospital output.

  13. Hypothermia for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children-A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beca, John; McSharry, Brent; Erickson, Simon; Yung, Michael; Schibler, Andreas; Slater, Anthony; Wilkins, Barry; Singhal, Ash; Williams, Gary; Sherring, Claire; Butt, Warwick

    2015-07-01

    To perform a pilot study to assess the feasibility of performing a phase III trial of therapeutic hypothermia started early and continued for at least 72 hours in children with severe traumatic brain injury. Multicenter prospective randomized controlled phase II trial. All eight of the PICUs in Australia and New Zealand and one in Canada. Children 1-15 years old with severe traumatic brain injury and who could be randomized within 6 hours of injury. The control group had strict normothermia to a temperature of 36-37°C for 72 hours. The intervention group had therapeutic hypothermia to a temperature of 32-33°C for 72 hours followed by slow rewarming at a rate compatible with maintaining intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure. Of 764 children admitted to PICU with traumatic brain injury, 92 (12%) were eligible and 55 (7.2%) were recruited. There were five major protocol violations (9%): three related to recruitment and consent processes and two to incorrect temperature management. Rewarming took a median of 21.5 hours (16-35 hr) and was performed without compromise in the cerebral perfusion pressure. There was no increase in any complications, including infections, bleeding, and arrhythmias. There was no difference in outcomes 12 months after injury; in the therapeutic hypothermia group, four (17%) had a bad outcome (pediatric cerebral performance category, 4-6) and three (13%) died, whereas in the normothermia group, three (12%) had a bad outcome and one (4%) died. Early therapeutic hypothermia in children with severe traumatic brain injury does not improve outcome and should not be used outside a clinical trial. Recruitment rates were lower and outcomes were better than expected. Conventional randomized controlled trials in children with severe traumatic brain injury are unlikely to be feasible. A large international trials group and alternative approaches to trial design will be required to further inform practice.

  14. Hypothermia following antipsychotic drug use

    PubMed Central

    Wegewijs, Michelle A.; Loonen, Anton J. M.; Beers, Erna

    2007-01-01

    Objective Hypothermia is an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of antipsychotic drug (APD) use. Risk factors for hypothermia in ADP users are unknown. We studied which risk factors for hypothermia can be identified based on case reports. Method Case reports of hypothermia in APD-users found in PUBMED or EMBASE were searched for risk factors. The WHO international database for Adverse Drug Reactions was searched for reports of hypothermia and APD use. Results The literature search resulted in 32 articles containing 43 case reports. In the WHO database, 480 reports were registered of patients developing hypothermia during the use of APDs which almost equals the number of reports for hyperthermia associated with APD use (n = 524). Hypothermia risk seems to be increased in the first days following start or dose increase of APs. APs with strong 5-HT2 antagonism seem to be more involved in hypothermia; 55% of hypothermia reports are for atypical antipsychotics. Schizophrenia was the most prevalent diagnosis in the case reports. Conclusion Especially in admitted patients who are not able to control their own environment or physical status, frequent measurements of body temperature (with a thermometer that can measure low body temperatures) must be performed in order to detect developing hypothermia. PMID:17401555

  15. Melatonin improves outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing brain inflammation and oxidative damage and multiple organ dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Hsu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2013-01-01

    We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure), brain (or hypothalamic) inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress), multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction.

  16. Hypothermia for Intracranial Hypertension after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J D; Sinclair, H Louise; Rodriguez, Aryelly; Harris, Bridget A; Battison, Claire G; Rhodes, Jonathan K J; Murray, Gordon D

    2015-12-17

    In patients with traumatic brain injury, hypothermia can reduce intracranial hypertension. The benefit of hypothermia on functional outcome is unclear. We randomly assigned adults with an intracranial pressure of more than 20 mm Hg despite stage 1 treatments (including mechanical ventilation and sedation management) to standard care (control group) or hypothermia (32 to 35°C) plus standard care. In the control group, stage 2 treatments (e.g., osmotherapy) were added as needed to control intracranial pressure. In the hypothermia group, stage 2 treatments were added only if hypothermia failed to control intracranial pressure. In both groups, stage 3 treatments (barbiturates and decompressive craniectomy) were used if all stage 2 treatments failed to control intracranial pressure. The primary outcome was the score on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E; range, 1 to 8, with lower scores indicating a worse functional outcome) at 6 months. The treatment effect was estimated with ordinal logistic regression adjusted for prespecified prognostic factors and expressed as a common odds ratio (with an odds ratio <1.0 favoring hypothermia). We enrolled 387 patients at 47 centers in 18 countries from November 2009 through October 2014, at which time recruitment was suspended owing to safety concerns. Stage 3 treatments were required to control intracranial pressure in 54% of the patients in the control group and in 44% of the patients in the hypothermia group. The adjusted common odds ratio for the GOS-E score was 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.30; P=0.04), indicating a worse outcome in the hypothermia group than in the control group. A favorable outcome (GOS-E score of 5 to 8, indicating moderate disability or good recovery) occurred in 26% of the patients in the hypothermia group and in 37% of the patients in the control group (P=0.03). In patients with an intracranial pressure of more than 20 mm Hg after traumatic brain injury, therapeutic hypothermia plus

  17. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia via TRPV1 channel agonism provides neuroprotection following ischemic stroke when initiated 90 min after reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Balasubramanian, Adithya; Marrelli, Sean P

    2014-01-15

    Traditional methods of therapeutic hypothermia show promise for neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), however, with limitations. We examined effectiveness and specificity of pharmacological hypothermia (PH) by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonism in the treatment of focal cerebral I/R. Core temperature (T(core)) was measured after subcutaneous infusion of TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) in conscious C57BL/6 WT and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. Acute measurements of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion were measured before and after DHC treatment. Focal cerebral I/R (1 h ischemia + 24 h reperfusion) was induced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Hypothermia (>8 h) was initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion by DHC infusion (osmotic pump). Neurofunction (behavioral testing) and infarct volume (TTC staining) were measured at 24 h. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) produced a stable drop in T(core) (33°C) in naive and I/R mouse models but not in TRPV1 KO mice. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) had no measurable effect on HR and cerebral perfusion but produced a slight transient drop in MAP (<6 mmHg). In stroke mice, DHC infusion produced hypothermia, decreased infarct volume by 87%, and improved neurofunctional score. The hypothermic and neuroprotective effects of DHC were absent in TRPV1 KO mice or mice maintained normothermic with heat support. PH via TRPV1 agonist appears to be a well-tolerated and effective method for promoting mild hypothermia in the conscious mouse. Furthermore, TRPV1 agonism produces effective hypothermia in I/R mice and significantly improves outcome when initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion.

  18. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  19. Program Characteristics that Predict Improved Learner Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Margaret Becker; Mellard, Daryl

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies adult education program characteristics that predict improved learner outcomes through statistical analyses of data across four years in a single state. Data indicate that, collectively, several predictors contribute to our understanding of learner outcomes, including (a) learner entry level, (b) size of community, (c) staff qualifications, and (d) learner exposure to high quality services. A surprising finding was the lack of robust outcome predictors that maintain consistency from one year to another. PMID:22348153

  20. Patient-centered outcomes research to improve asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anise, Ayodola; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is funding 8 comparative effectiveness research projects to improve patient-centered outcomes for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with uncontrolled asthma. These projects aim to compare multilevel interventions with known efficacy at the community, home, and health system levels to enhance patient and clinician uptake of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines and improve outcomes. The National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines provide clinicians with a range of acceptable approaches for the diagnosis and management of asthma and define general practices that meet the needs of most patients. Yet disparities in asthma care and outcomes remain pervasive for African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute AsthmaNet consortium has identified several top research priorities for pediatric and adult populations, including a recommendation to examine tailored approaches based on race/ethnicity. In addition, the guidelines emphasize the need for studies that focus on multicomponent interventions recognizing that single interventions are generally ineffective. This article will describe the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded asthma projects and how they are individually and collectively addressing evidence gaps in asthma care by focusing on multicomponent and tailored approaches for improving outcomes and reducing disparities for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Endovascular therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke: ICTuS 2/3 protocol.

    PubMed

    Lyden, Patrick D; Hemmen, Thomas M; Grotta, James; Rapp, Karen; Raman, Rema

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury. Although supported by preclinical evidence, therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke remains under study. In the Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS) trial, awake stroke patients were successfully cooled using an endovascular cooling catheter and a novel antishivering regimen. In the ICTuS-L study, the combination of endovascular hypothermia and thrombolysis proved feasible; while hypothermia was associated with no increased risk of bleeding complications, there was an increased association with pneumonia. Despite efforts to expedite, cooling began on average six-hours after stroke onset. We designed a novel Phase 2/3 trial to further test the safety of combined thrombolysis and endovascular hypothermia and to determine if the combination shows superiority compared with thrombolysis alone. ICTuS 2 (n = 400) will assess four hypotheses, and if milestones are met, ICTuS 3 (n = 1200) will begin as a seamless continuation for a total sample of 1600 patients. The ICTuS 2 milestones include (1) target temperature reached within six-hours of symptom onset; (2) no increased risk of pneumonia; (3) no increase in signs/symptoms of fluid overload due to chilled saline infusions; and (4) sufficient recruitment to complete the trial on time. The ICTuS 2/3 protocol contains novel features - based on the previous ICTuS and ICTuS-L trials - designed to achieve these milestones. Innovations include scrupulous pneumonia surveillance, intravenous chilled saline immediately after randomization to induce rapid cooling, and a requirement for catheter placement within two-hours of thrombolysis. An Investigational Device Exemption has been obtained and an initial group of sites initiated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduces polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation following spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chatzipanteli, K; Yanagawa, Y; Marcillo, A E; Kraydieh, S; Yezierski, R P; Dietrich, W D

    2000-04-01

    The present study addresses the effects of moderate posttraumatic hypothermia (32 degrees C) on the temporal and regional profile of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) accumulation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that posttraumatic hypothermia would reduce the degree of inflammation by reducing PMNL infiltration. Rats underwent moderate spinal cord injury at T10 using the NYU impactor device. In the first study, the temporal profile of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (a marker of neutrophil accumulation) under normothermic (37 degrees C) conditions was determined. The animals were allowed to survive for 3 or 24 h, or 3 or 7 days after SCI. Spinal cords were dissected into five segments rostral and caudal to the injury site. Additional animals were studied for the immunocytochemical visualization of MPO. In the second study, rats were sacrificed at 24 h after a monitoring period of normothermia (36.5 degrees C/3 h) or hypothermia (32.4 degrees C/3 h) with their controls. In the time course studies, MPO enzymatic activity was significantly increased at 3 and 24 h within the traumatized T10 segment compared to controls. MPO activity was also increased at 3 h within the rostral T8 and T9 segments and caudal T11 and T12 segments compared to controls. At 24 h after trauma, MPO activity remained elevated within both the rostral and caudal segments compared to control. By 3 days, the levels of MPO activity were reduced compared to the 24-h values but remained significantly different from control. Neutrophils that exhibited MPO immunoreactivity were seen at 6 and 24 h, with a higher number at 3 days. PMNLs were located within the white and gray matter of the lesion and both rostral and caudal to the injury site. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduced MPO activity at 24 h in the injured spinal cord segment, compared to normothermic values. The results of this study indicate that a potential mechanism by which hypothermia improves outcome following SCI is

  3. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  4. Nurses' knowledge of inadvertent hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Josephine; Walsh, Ella; Burton, Aileen; Murphy, Sheila; O'gorman, Fionuala; McPolin, Gráinne

    2009-04-01

    Inadvertent hypothermia can have significant consequences in the perioperative setting. Knowing how to recognize and manage inadvertent hypothermia is an important aspect of perioperative nursing. A quantitative, descriptive study was conducted at an annual perioperative nursing conference to evaluate nurses' knowledge regarding the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Significant variations in responses regarding definitions of hypothermia and normothermia were noted. In addition, nurses identified a plethora of factors that prevent them from maintaining normothermia in their patients. These factors mandate a need for educational interventions and the adoption of practice guidelines in the clinical area.

  5. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  6. Prolonged and profound therapeutic hypothermia for the treatment of "brain death" after a suicidal intoxication. Challenging conventional wisdoms.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Varon, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been reported to improve the neurologic outcome of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The use of therapeutic hypothermia in patients who have had an acute ischemic-hypoxic brain injury after a suicidal intoxication has not been previously reported. We present the case of a young woman who presented comatose to our emergency department after attempting suicide by ingesting diazepam and a bottle of antifreeze (ethylene-glycol). Despite aggressive supportive care, the patient progressed to what appeared to be clinical brain death. At this point, the patient was managed with therapeutic hypothermia for 36 hours. The patient awoke within 48 hours of rewarming and made a complete and full neurologic recovery. In conclusion, this case has important implications in the management of patients who have had an acute ischemichypoxic brain injury. Inappropriately labeling such patients as "brain dead" will result in the failure to institute therapeutic hypothermia and other advanced neuroprotective interventions in patients who could be salvaged with a good neurologic outcome.

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia and the Risk of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wang, An-Yi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current guidelines recommend a period of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for comatose patients after cardiac arrest to improve clinical outcomes. However, in-vitro studies have reported platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy, results that might discourage clinicians from applying TH in clinical practice. We aimed to quantify the risks of hemorrhage observed in clinical studies. Medline and Embase were searched from inception to October 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients undergoing TH with controls were selected, irrespective of the indications for TH. There were no restrictions for language, population, or publication year. Data on study characteristics, which included patients, details of intervention, and outcome measures, were extracted. Forty-three trials that included 7528 patients were identified from 2692 potentially relevant references. Any hemorrhage was designated as the primary outcome and was reported in 28 studies. The pooled results showed no significant increase in hemorrhage risk associated with TH (risk difference [RD] 0.005; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.001–0.011; I2, 0%). Among secondary outcomes, patients undergoing TH were found to have increased risk of thrombocytopenia (RD 0.109; 95% CI 0.038–0.179; I2 57.3%) and transfusion requirements (RD 0.021; 95% CI 0.003–0.040; I2 0%). The meta-regression analysis indicated that prolonged duration of cooling may be associated with increased risk of hemorrhage. TH was not associated with increased risk of hemorrhage despite the increased risk of thrombocytopenia and transfusion requirements. Clinicians should cautiously assess each patient's risk-benefit profile before applying TH. PMID:26632746

  8. A multidisciplinary approach for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sierchio, Grace P

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment has been impacted tremendously by higher patient acuity, cost-cutting measures, an increase in litigation, and increased expectations by an educated generation of healthcare consumers. This has led to the need to continually measure, assess, and improve quality. These activities must consider not only patient clinical outcomes, but also customer service ratings and financial outcomes. Quality improvement requires a collaborative approach to succeed, and the need to build a cohesive and effective multidisciplinary team is critical for positive outcomes. Strategies to build a culture of teamwork include incorporating total quality management principles into every level of the organization, seeking participation from every discipline and level of the organization, and recognizing employees for their efforts. Infusion nurses have an excellent opportunity to contribute their expertise to any multidisciplinary team that impacts the outcomes of infusion patients. In addition, team-building and quality improvement may prove to be excellent career moves for infusion nurses looking to further specialize their practice.

  9. Nursing informatics, outcomes, and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2003-08-01

    Nursing informatics actively supports nursing by providing standard language systems, databases, decision support, readily accessible research results, and technology assessments. Through normalized datasets spanning an entire enterprise or other large demographic, nursing informatics tools support improvement of healthcare by answering questions about patient outcomes and quality improvement on an enterprise scale, and by providing documentation for business process definition, business process engineering, and strategic planning. Nursing informatics tools provide a way for advanced practice nurses to examine their practice and the effect of their actions on patient outcomes. Analysis of patient outcomes may lead to initiatives for quality improvement. Supported by nursing informatics tools, successful advance practice nurses leverage their quality improvement initiatives against the enterprise strategic plan to gain leadership support and resources.

  10. Improving the outcomes in oncological colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Jeroen LA; Reisinger, Kostan W; Derikx, Joep PM; Boerma, Djamila; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    During the last several decades, colorectal cancer surgery has experienced some major perioperative improvements. Preoperative risk-assessment of nutrition, frailty, and sarcopenia followed by interventions for patient optimization or an adapted surgical strategy, contributed to improved postoperative outcomes. Enhanced recovery programs or fast-track surgery also resulted in reduced length of hospital stay and overall complications without affecting patient safety. After an initially indecisive start due to uncertainty about oncological safety, the most significant improvement in intraoperative care was the introduction of laparoscopy. Laparoscopic surgery for colon and rectal cancer is associated with better short-term outcomes, whereas long-term outcomes regarding survival and recurrence rates are comparable. Nevertheless, long-term results in rectal surgery remain to be seen. Early recognition of anastomotic leakage remains a challenge, though multiple improvements have allowed better management of this complication. PMID:25253944

  11. Use of a nursing checklist to facilitate implementation of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Avery, Kathleen Ryan; O'Brien, Molly; Pierce, Carol Daddio; Gazarian, Priscilla K

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become a widely accepted intervention that is improving neurological outcomes following return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest. This intervention is highly complex but infrequently used, and prompt implementation of the many steps involved, especially achieving the target body temperature, can be difficult. A checklist was introduced to guide nurses in implementing the therapeutic hypothermia protocol during the different phases of the intervention (initiation, maintenance, rewarming, and normothermia) in an intensive care unit. An interprofessional committee began by developing the protocol, a template for an order set, and a shivering algorithm. At first, implementation of the protocol was inconsistent, and a lack of clarity and urgency in managing patients during the different phases of the protocol was apparent. The nursing checklist has provided all of the intensive care nurses with an easy-to-follow reference to facilitate compliance with the required steps in the protocol for therapeutic hypothermia. Observations of practice and feedback from nursing staff in all units confirm the utility of the checklist. Use of the checklist has helped reduce the time from admission to the unit to reaching the target temperature and the time from admission to continuous electroencephalographic monitoring in the cardiac intensive care unit. Evaluation of patients' outcomes as related to compliance with the protocol interventions is ongoing.

  12. The effectiveness of low-dose desmopressin in improving hypothermia-induced impairment of primary haemostasis under influence of aspirin - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Pui Yee; Cheung, Chi Wai; Lee, Yvonne; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Ng, Kwok Fu Jacobus

    2015-05-28

    Mild hypothermia (34-35 °C) increases perioperative blood loss. Our previous studies showed that desmopressin could have in vitro beneficial effects on hypothermia-induced primary haemostasis impairment. In this study, we investigate the in vitro effects of desmopressin on hypothermia-induced primary haemostasis impairment under the influence of aspirin in healthy volunteers. Sixty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to taking aspirin 100 mg or placebo for three days. On the sixth day blood samples were taken before and after the injection of desmopressin (1.5 microgram or 5 microgram) or normal saline subcutaneously. Measurements including Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100®) closure times, plasma von Willebrand Factor antigen, haemoglobin and platelet levels were made at 32 °C and 37 °C respectively. Collagen/epinephrine closure time (EPICT) was significantly prolonged by 21.13 % (95 %CI 2.34-39.74 %, p = 0.021) in aspirin group at 37 °C. While hypothermia alone prolonged both collagen/adenosine diphosphate (ADPCT) and EPICT by 17.63 % (95 %CI 13.5-20.85 %, p < 0.001) and 8.0 % (95 %CI 6.38-10.04 %, p = 0.024) respectively, addition of aspirin only further prolonged EPICT by 19.9 % (95 %CI 3.32-36.49 %, p = 0.013). In aspirin group, desmopressin 1.5 microgram and 5 microgram significantly reduced ADPCT to below baseline levels at 37 °C (p = 0.025 and <0.001 respectively), whereas reduction in EPICT was seen with desmopressin 5 microgram (p =0.008). The effect was less pronounced at 32 °C, with a significant reduction in EPICT obtained with a dosage of 5 microgram only (p = 0.011). It was shown that aspirin could further potentiate the hypothermia-induced closure time prolongations. Low dose desmopressin (1.5 microgram) reduced PFA-100® closure times towards baseline. A higher dosage (5 microgram) further reduced the closure times below baseline. Therefore low dose desmopressin (1.5 microgram) might have the potential to

  13. Diving and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hayes, P

    1991-01-01

    Hypothermia is not and should not be a prevalent feature of diving, yet many divers become extremely cold and uncomfortable during their work. It is not difficult to provide adequate insulation to protect the torso but if movement and dexterity are to be maintained, the extremities will inevitably suffer. Free swimming divers are limited by duration in cold (5 degrees C), shallow (10 m) water. Six hours is a typical maximum before both core cooling and extremity pain or dysfunction pose a threat. Habituation to cold may be observed in some divers. Surface supplied or bell supported divers, relying on supplementary hot water, need between 500 and 3500 Watts to preserve comfort over the range 10 to 300 m depth. Deep diving, using oxyhelium gas mixtures, can result in high respiratory convective losses in excess of 300 Watts. Heat exchangers are used to prevent damage to the tract. There have been a number of cases where hypothermia has been implicated in the cause of death in diving accidents, but generally the reason is not lack of physiological knowledge but equipment failure and inadequate contingency. Recent developments in diver protection have focused on electrically heated hand wear to preserve performance and prevent the risk of non freezing injury in a relatively inactive diver.

  14. Disaggregated data to improve child health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The District Health Information System was developed in South Africa to collect aggregated routine data from public health facilities. In Amajuba District, KwaZulu-Natal, ward-based data collection has been initiated to facilitate improved responsiveness to community health needs and improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction. Aim To assess the application of the municipal ward-based health data in the decision-making process to improve child health outcomes. Setting The study was conducted in 25 primary health care service sites in Amajuba. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods’ approach was used. The study population comprised operational managers, professional nurses, ward-based outreach team leaders and supervisors. Quantitative data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were collected using focus group discussions and analysed using thematic analysis. Results Of the 131 respondents, 83 (67.5%) provided targeted child interventions to a certain or a large extent to improve child health outcomes, but only 74 (57.4%) respondents reported using municipal ward-based health data to a certain or large extent in order to inform their decisions. This discrepancy indicates poor utilisation of local health information for decision-making. Conclusion The study showed that municipal ward-based health data are not fully utilised for making informed decisions to improve child health outcomes. It is imperative to inculcate a culture of evidence-informed decisions that leads to provision of targeted interventions in order to mitigate the challenge of scarcity of resources and to improve child health outcomes. PMID:28155323

  15. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  16. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  17. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Catwalk Gait analysis showed significant improvement in the paclitaxel group on a variety of parameters compared to the saline group. MRI analysis revealed that paclitaxel treatment resulted in significantly reduced edema volume at site-of-injury (11.92 ± 3.0 and 8.86 ± 2.2 mm3 for saline vs. paclitaxel respectively, as determined by T2-weighted analysis; p ≤ 0.05), and significantly increased myelin tissue preservation (9.45 ± 0.4 vs. 8.95 ± 0.3, p ≤ 0.05). Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment resulted in improvement of neurological outcome and MR imaging biomarkers of injury. These results could have a significant impact on therapeutic developments to treat traumatic brain injury. PMID:26086366

  18. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  19. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2009-07-01

    Aesthetic facial reconstruction is a challenging art. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction requires a thorough understanding of the basic principles of the functional and aesthetic requirements for facial reconstruction. From there, further refinement and attention to detail can be provided. This paper discusses basic principles of aesthetic facial reconstruction.

  20. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Body Temperature on Outcome After Adult Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Madden, Lori Kennedy; DeVon, Holli A

    2015-08-01

    This systematic review describes effects of body temperature alterations defined as fever, controlled normothermia, and spontaneous or induced hypothermia on outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adults. A search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Library database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science in July 2013 with no back date restriction except for induced hypothermia (2009). Of 1366 titles identified, 712 were reviewed. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials in hypothermia since 2009 (last Cochrane review) or cohort studies of temperature in TBI, measure core and/or brain temperature, neurologic outcome reporting, primarily adult patients, and English language publications. Exclusion criteria were as follows: most patients with non-TBI diagnosis, primarily pediatric patients, case reports, or laboratory/animal studies. Most studies found that fever avoidance resulted in positive outcomes including decreased length of stay in the intensive care unit; mortality; and incidence of hypertension, elevated intracranial pressure, and tachycardia. Hypothermia on admission correlated with poor outcomes. Controlled normothermia improved surrogate outcomes. Prophylactic induced hypothermia is not supported by the available evidence from randomized controlled trial. Setting a goal of normothermia, avoiding fever, and aggressively treating fever may be most important after TBI. Further research is needed to characterize the magnitude and duration of temperature alteration after TBI, determine if temperature alteration influences or predicts neurologic outcome, determine if rate of temperature change influences or predicts neurologic outcome, and compare controlled normothermia versus standard practice or hypothermia.

  1. Will interventions targeting conscientiousness improve aging outcomes?

    PubMed

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-05-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it may be possible to design therapeutic interventions that increase conscientiousness, there may be more effective and efficient ways to improve population health. We ask for evidence that a focus on conscientiousness improves behavior change efforts that target specific health-related behaviors or large-scale environmental modification.

  2. Accidental hypothermia in severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Fanny; Mrozek, Ségolène; Geeraerts, Thomas; Fourcade, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Hypothermia, along with acidosis and coagulopathy, is part of the lethal triad that worsen the prognosis of severe trauma patients. While accidental hypothermia is easy to identify by a simple measurement, it is no less pernicious if it is not detected or treated in the initial phase of patient care. It is a multifactorial process and is a factor of mortality in severe trauma cases. The consequences of hypothermia are many: it modifies myocardial contractions and may induce arrhythmias; it contributes to trauma-induced coagulopathy; from an immunological point of view, it diminishes inflammatory response and increases the chance of pneumonia in the patient; it inhibits the elimination of anaesthetic drugs and can complicate the calculation of dosing requirements; and it leads to an over-estimation of coagulation factor activities. This review will detail the pathophysiological consequences of hypothermia, as well as the most recent principle recommendations in dealing with it.

  3. The geography of hypothermia in the United States: An analysis of mortality, morbidity, thresholds, and messaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Jeremy M.

    is known concerning heat and cold mortality. A lack of health outcome or health information to develop website information/wind chill alerts was noted. Overall, it was determined that hypothermia is a good metric for assessing cold weather-related vulnerability and that implementing health outcome-based information will help limit the hazards associated with this public health problem.

  4. Perioperative Hypothermia: Incidence and Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    1990 Thesis/" Perioperative Hypothermia: Incidence and Prevention CRodney L. Fisher AFIT Student at: Columbia University AFIT/CI/CIA 90-120 AFT/I/I...Civilian Institution Programs DTIC CTELECTE 0 36 UNCLASSIFIFD 4 PERIOPERATIVE HYPOTHERMIA: INCIDENCE AND PREVENTION By Rodney L. Fisher, CAPT., USAF...Availability Codes Avall and/or Dit Special ABSTRACT Perioperative thermal regulation is discussed. A retrospective audit was conducted to identify the

  5. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union. Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. Methods/design This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35°C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010. Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. Discussion The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It

  6. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35 °C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial).

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J D; Sinclair, Helen Louise; Battison, Claire G; Polderman, Kees H; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mascia, Luciana; Harris, Bridget A; Murray, Gordon D; Stocchetti, Nino; Menon, David K; Shakur, Haleema; De Backer, Daniel

    2011-01-12

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union.Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1 °C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35 °C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010.Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It represents a new and fundamental step for

  7. Improving outcomes of acute myocarditis in children.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral myocarditis may impair prognosis in children of all ages. Its true incidence is underestimated because of heterogeneity of presentation and outcome. Patients may either recover or progress to chronic cardiomyopathy or death. Improving short-term and long-term prognosis is challenging but can probably be achieved by new diagnostic techniques and novel targeted therapies. The objectives of this review are: (1) to detail the current state of knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms of acute myocarditis; (2) to provide an update on diagnostic tools such as magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy; and (3) to present new insights in therapeutic strategies, targeted therapies and management of fulminant cases. Options for improving outcomes in acute myocarditis in the pediatric population are discussed.

  8. Multimodel quantitative analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials after cardiac arrest with graded hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Leanne Moon Young; Choudhary, Rishabh; Xiaofeng Jia

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the most prominent causes of morbidity and mortality in adults. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a recommended treatment to improve survival and functional outcome following CA, however, it is unclear what degree of TH is most beneficial. It has been suggested that TH of 33°C provides no survival or outcome benefits over TH of 36°C. Additionally, there is a lack of verified objective quantitative prognostic tools for comatose CA patients under TH. In this study, we calculated three quantitative markers of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) to examine their potential to track recovery in the early period following CA under graded TH. A total of 16 rats were randomly divided among 4 temperature groups (n=4/group): normothermia (N0, 36.5-37.5°C), hypothermia 1 (H1, 30-32°C), hypothermia 2 (H2, 32-34°C) and hypothermia 3 (H3, 34-36°C). All rats underwent a 15min baseline SSEP recording followed by 9min asphyxial-CA, resulting in severe cerebral injury, and immediate temperature management following resuscitation for 6 hours. SSEP recordings were maintained in 15 min intervals from 30min-4hrs after resuscitation. The N10 amplitude, N10 latency and quantitative SSEP phase space area (qSSEP-PSA) were calculated for the early recovery period and normalized to their respective baselines. Functional recovery was determined by the neurological deficit scale (NDS). N10 amplitude was significantly larger in H1, H2 and H3 compared to N0. N10 latency was significantly longer in H1 than all temperature groups and all hypothermia groups had significantly longer latencies than N0. qSSEP-PSA had significantly better recovery in H1 and H2 than N0. Animals with good outcome (72hr NDS>50) had better recovery of all markers. N10 amplitude was significantly correlated with N10 latency and qSSEP-PSA. The results importantly demonstrate that quantified SSEPs have the potential to objectively track recovery following CA with graded TH.

  9. Intraoperative mild hypothermia for postoperative neurological deficits in people with intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Li, Luying Ryan; You, Chao; Chaudhary, Bhuwan

    2016-03-22

    subarachnoid haemorrhage. Seventy-six of 577 participants (13.1%) who received hypothermia and 93 of 581 participants (16.0%) who did not receive hypothermia were dead or dependent (RR 0.82; 95% CI 0.62 to 1.09; RD -0.03; 95% CI -0.07 to 0.01, moderate-quality evidence) after three months.Reported unfavourable outcomes did not differ between participants with or without hypothermia. The quality of evidence for these outcomes remains unclear because the outcomes were reported in a variety of ways. No decompressive craniectomy or corticectomy was reported. Thirty-six of 577 (6.2%) participants with hypothermia and 40 of 581 (6.9%) participants without hypothermia had infarction. Thirty-four of 577 (6%) participants with hypothermia and 32 of the 581 (5.5%) participants without hypothermia had clinical vasospasm (temporary deficits).Duration of hospital stay was not reported. Only one study with 112 participants reported discharge destinations: 43 of 55 (78.2%) participants with hypothermia and 39 of 57 (68.4%) participants in the control group were discharged home. The remaining participants were discharged to other facilities.Thirty-nine of 577 (6.8%) participants with hypothermia and 39 of 581 (6.7%) participants without hypothermia had infections. Six of 577 (1%) participants with hypothermia and 6 of 581 (1%) participants without hypothermia had cardiac arrhythmia. It remains possible that intraoperative mild hypothermia could prevent death or dependency in activities of daily living in people with good grade aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. However, the confidence intervals around this estimate include the possibility of both benefit and harm. There was insufficient information to draw any conclusions about the effects of intraoperative mild hypothermia in people with poor grade aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage or without subarachnoid haemorrhage. We did not identify any reliable evidence to support the routine use of intraoperative mild hypothermia. A high

  10. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  11. Environmental hypothermia in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock is safe.

    PubMed

    Iyegha, Uroghupatei P; Greenberg, Joseph J; Mulier, Kristine E; Chipman, Jeffrey; George, Mark; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated survival benefit to induced hypothermia in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhagic shock simulating an associated delay to definitive care. In the current study, we wished to evaluate the effects of environmental hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock with the addition of polytrauma. Sixteen pigs were randomized to normothermic (39°C, n = 7) or hypothermic (34°C, n = 9) groups. The model included instrumentation, chest injury (captive bolt device), hemorrhage to systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ∼50 mmHg, and crush liver injury. Animals received limited fluid resuscitation for a 1-h period with goal SBP of greater than 80 mmHg and ice packs or warming blankets to achieve goal temperatures, followed by full resuscitation with goal SBP of greater than 90 mmHg, adequate urine output, and hemoglobin by protocol for 20 h. Survivors were observed for an additional 24 h with end points including mortality, markers of organ injury, and neurologic function. There were no differences in survival between the groups (mortality = 1/9, hypothermia group vs. 2/7, normothermia group, P = 0.39). Markers of organ injury were elevated in the hypothermia group at 24 h after injury but were identical between groups at the end of the experimental protocol (48 h after injury). There were no noted differences in neurologic function between the two groups. Environmental hypothermia in a model of polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock was not associated with worse outcomes.

  12. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  13. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Tegels, Juul J W; De Maat, Michiel F G; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Hoofwijk, Anton G M; Stoot, Jan H M B

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain.

  14. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tegels, Juul JW; De Maat, Michiel FG; Hulsewé, Karel WE; Hoofwijk, Anton GM; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain. PMID:25320507

  15. Xenon neuroprotection in experimental stroke: interactions with hypothermia and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Siyuan P; Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L; Lascola, Christopher D; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Jung, Jin Yong; Maze, Mervyn; Franks, Nicholas P; Pearlstein, Robert D; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S

    2012-12-01

    Xenon has been proven to be neuroprotective in experimental brain injury. The authors hypothesized that xenon would improve outcome from focal cerebral ischemia with a delayed treatment onset and prolonged recovery interval. Rats were subjected to 70 min temporary focal ischemia. Ninety minutes later, rats were treated with 0, 15, 30, or 45% Xe for 20 h or 0 or 30% Xe for 8, 20, or 44 h. Outcome was measured after 7 days. In another experiment, after ischemia, rats were maintained at 37.5° or 36.0°C for 20 h with or without 30% Xe. Outcome was assessed 28 days later. Finally, mice were subjected to intracerebral hemorrhage with or without 30% Xe for 20 h. Brain water content, hematoma volume, rotarod function, and microglial activation were measured. Cerebral infarct sizes (mean±SD) for 0, 15, 30, and 45% Xe were 212±27, 176±55, 160±32, and 198±54 mm, respectively (P=0.023). Neurologic scores (median±interquartile range) followed a similar pattern (P=0.002). Infarct size did not vary with treatment duration, but neurologic score improved (P=0.002) at all xenon exposure durations (8, 20, and 44 h). Postischemic treatment with either 30% Xe or subtherapeutic hypothermia (36°C) had no effect on 28-day outcome. Combination of these interventions provided long-term benefit. Xenon improved intracerebral hemorrhage outcome measures. Xenon improved focal ischemic outcome at 7, but not 28 days postischemia. Xenon combined with subtherapeutic hypothermia produced sustained recovery benefit. Xenon improved intracerebral hemorrhage outcome. Xenon may have potential for clinical stroke therapy under carefully defined conditions.

  16. Improving mental health outcomes: achieving equity through quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Poots, Alan J.; Green, Stuart A.; Honeybourne, Emmi; Green, John; Woodcock, Thomas; Barnes, Ruth; Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate equity of patient outcomes in a psychological therapy service, following increased access achieved by a quality improvement (QI) initiative. Design Retrospective service evaluation of health outcomes; data analysed by ANOVA, chi-squared and Statistical Process Control. Setting A psychological therapy service in Westminster, London, UK. Participants People living in the Borough of Westminster, London, attending the service (from either healthcare professional or self-referral) between February 2009 and May 2012. Intervention(s) Social marketing interventions were used to increase referrals, including the promotion of the service through local media and through existing social networks. Main Outcome Measure(s) (i) Severity of depression on entry using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ9). (ii) Changes to severity of depression following treatment (ΔPHQ9). (iii) Changes in attainment of a meaningful improvement in condition assessed by a key performance indicator. Results Patients from areas of high deprivation entered the service with more severe depression (M = 15.47, SD = 6.75), compared with patients from areas of low (M = 13.20, SD = 6.75) and medium (M = 14.44, SD = 6.64) deprivation. Patients in low, medium and high deprivation areas attained similar changes in depression score (ΔPHQ9: M = −6.60, SD = 6.41). Similar proportions of patients achieved the key performance indicator across initiative phase and deprivation categories. Conclusions QI methods improved access to mental health services; this paper finds no evidence for differences in clinical outcomes in patients, regardless of level of deprivation, interpreted as no evidence of inequity in the service with respect to this outcome. PMID:24521701

  17. Improving cost and outcome of coronary surgery.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, W S; Craver, J M; Jones, E L; Gott, J P; Deaton, C; Culler, S D; Guyton, R A

    1998-11-10

    There has been increasing interest in improving the outcome of coronary surgery while also seeking to minimize cost. It was the purpose of the present study to determine changes in the outcome and cost of CABG between 1988 and 1996. The outcome and costs for 12,266 patients undergoing CABG were evaluated. Clinical data were gathered from the Emory Cardiovascular Database, and financial data were obtained from the UB92 formulation of the hospital bill. Charges were reduced to cost through the use of departmental cost-to-charge ratios. Costs were inflated to 1996 costs by using the medical care inflation rate. The patients became sicker, especially with increased incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and prior myocardial infarctions and a decrease in ejection fraction over the study period. Mortality rates tended to decrease from 4.7% to 2.7% (P = 0.07). After accounting for increasing indexes of severity of disease over the period, there was a significant decrease in death (OR, 0.90/y; P = 0.0001). Q-wave myocardial infarction rate fell from 4.1% to 1.3% (P < 0.0001). Mean hospital cost decreased from $22,689 to $15,987. Length of stay after surgery decreased from 9.2 to 5.9 days. After accounting for other variables, cost decreased by $1118 per year, and annual length of stay decreased by 0.55 day. The outcome of CABG continues to improve with declines in mortality rate and Q-wave myocardial infarction. This was accomplished while decreasing costs and length of stay. Whether these favorable trends will continue remains to be seen.

  18. Systemic barriers to improving vascular access outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J; Ferrell, Lori M; Perry, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is the most frequent cause of hospitalization for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Our system of vascular access care and industry standards developed for historic reasons have resulted in a haphazard approach to access management. The Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative has provided a road map for improving vascular access management. However, despite widespread acceptance, these recommendations are not routinely followed. This is largely the result of inertia coupled with systemic barriers to improving access outcomes. These barriers include lack of funded pre-ESRD care and preoperative imaging, lack of reimbursement for access monitoring, unavailable surgical and interventional suites, erosion of the real value of the composite rate, bundling of additional new services without rate adjustment, poor accountability of surgeons and hospitals, and a reimbursement system that rewards procedures and, in particular, graft and catheter placement. Currently, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is reevaluating the composite rate and its included bundle of services. To provide the best access care with the fewest complications while insuring multidisciplinary involvement and accountability, a realistic appraisal and realignment of incentives must be developed to insure improvement of access care in the United States.

  19. Optimal nutrition for improved twin pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Goodnight, William; Newman, Roger

    2009-11-01

    Twin pregnancies contribute a disproportionate degree to perinatal morbidity, partly because of increased risks of low birth weight and prematurity. Although the cause of the morbidity is multifactorial, attention to twin-specific maternal nutrition may be beneficial in achieving optimal fetal growth and birth weight. Achievement of body mass index (BMI)-specific weight gain goals, micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation specific to the physiology of twin gestations, and carbohydrate-controlled diets are recommended for optimal twin growth and pregnancy outcomes. The daily recommended caloric intake for normal-BMI women with twins is 40-45 kcal/kg each day, and iron, folate, calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplementation is recommended beyond a usual prenatal vitamin. Daily supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid and vitamin D should also be considered. Multiple gestation-specific prenatal care settings with a focus on nutritional interventions improve birth weight and length of gestation and should be considered for the care of women carrying multiples. Antepartum lactation consultation can also improve the rate of postpartum breastfeeding in twin pregnancies. Twin gestation-specific nutritional interventions seem effective in improving the outcome of these pregnancies and should be emphasized in the antepartum care of multiple gestations. This review examines the available evidence and offers recommendations for twin pregnancy-specific nutritional interventions.

  20. Focal Cerebral Arteriopathy: Do Steroids Improve Outcome?

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Maja; Bigi, Sandra; Stojanovski, Belinda; Gajera, Jay; Regényi, Maria; El-Koussy, Marwan; Mackay, Mark T

    2017-09-01

    Focal cerebral arteriopathy accounts for up to 35% of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in children and is the most important predictor of stroke recurrence. The study objective was to compare outcomes for children with focal cerebral arteriopathy treated with combined corticosteroid antithrombotic treatment (CAT) to those receiving antithrombotic treatment (AT) alone. This multicenter retrospective Swiss/Australian cohort study analyzed consecutive children, aged 1 month to 18 years, presenting with first AIS because of a focal cerebral arteriopathy from 2000 to 2014. Children with CAT were compared with those treated with AT. Primary outcome was the presence of neurological deficits at 6 months post-AIS as measured by the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure. Secondary outcomes included resolution of stenosis and stroke recurrence. Analysis of covariance was used to adjust for potential confounders (baseline pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and concomitant acyclovir use). A total of 73 children (51% males) were identified, 21 (29%) of whom received CAT. Mean (SD) age at stroke for the entire group was 7.9 years (4.7). Median (interquartile range) pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Scale was 3 (2.0-8.0) in the CAT group and 5 (3.0-9.0) in the AT group (P=0.098). Median (interquartile range) Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure 6 months post-AIS was 0.5 (0-1.5) in the CAT group compared with 1.0 (0.5-2.0) in the AT group (P=0.035), the finding was sustained after adjusting for potential confounders. Complete resolution of stenosis at last MRI was noted in 17 (81%) in the CAT group compared with 24 (59%) in the AT group (P=0.197). Stroke recurrence occurred in 1 patient in each group. Corticosteroid treatment may provide additional benefit over AT for improved neurological outcome in childhood AIS because of focal cerebral arteriopathy. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further investigate these differences and understand mechanisms by

  1. Hypothermia for pediatric refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Guilliams, Kristin; Rosen, Max; Buttram, Sandra; Zempel, John; Pineda, Jose; Miller, Barbara; Shoykhet, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a life-threatening emergency, demonstrating, by definition, significant pharmacoresistance. We describe five cases of pediatric RSE treated with mild hypothermia. Retrospective chart review was performed of records of children who received hypothermia for RSE at two tertiary-care pediatric hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Five children with RSE received mild hypothermia (32-35°C). Hypothermia reduced seizure burden during and after treatment in all cases. Prior to initiation of hypothermia, four children (80%) received pentobarbital infusions to treat RSE, but relapsed after pentobarbital discontinuation. No child relapsed after treatment with hypothermia. One child died after redirection of care. Remaining four children were discharged. This is the largest pediatric case series reporting treatment of RSE with mild hypothermia. Hypothermia decreased seizure burden during and after pediatric RSE and may prevent RSE relapse. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Hypothermia for pediatric refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Kristin; Rosen, Max; Buttram, Sandra; Zempel, John; Pineda, Jose; Miller, Barbara; Shoykhet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a life-threatening emergency, demonstrating, by definition, significant pharmacoresistance. We describe five cases of pediatric RSE treated with mild hypothermia. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed of records of children who received hypothermia for RSE at two tertiary-care pediatric hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Key Findings Five children with RSE received mild hypothermia (32–35°C). Hypothermia reduced seizure burden during and after treatment in all cases. Prior to initiation of hypothermia, four children (80%) received pentobarbital infusions to treat RSE, but relapsed after pentobarbital discontinuation. No child relapsed after treatment with hypothermia. One child died after redirection of care. Remaining four children were discharged. Significance This is the largest pediatric case series reporting treatment of RSE with mild hypothermia. Hypothermia decreased seizure burden during and after pediatric RSE and may prevent RSE relapse. PMID:23906244

  3. Improving mental health outcomes: achieving equity through quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Poots, Alan J; Green, Stuart A; Honeybourne, Emmi; Green, John; Woodcock, Thomas; Barnes, Ruth; Bell, Derek

    2014-04-01

    To investigate equity of patient outcomes in a psychological therapy service, following increased access achieved by a quality improvement (QI) initiative. Retrospective service evaluation of health outcomes; data analysed by ANOVA, chi-squared and Statistical Process Control. A psychological therapy service in Westminster, London, UK. People living in the Borough of Westminster, London, attending the service (from either healthcare professional or self-referral) between February 2009 and May 2012. s) Social marketing interventions were used to increase referrals, including the promotion of the service through local media and through existing social networks. s) (i) Severity of depression on entry using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ9). (ii) Changes to severity of depression following treatment (ΔPHQ9). (iii) Changes in attainment of a meaningful improvement in condition assessed by a key performance indicator. Patients from areas of high deprivation entered the service with more severe depression (M = 15.47, SD = 6.75), compared with patients from areas of low (M = 13.20, SD = 6.75) and medium (M = 14.44, SD = 6.64) deprivation. Patients in low, medium and high deprivation areas attained similar changes in depression score (ΔPHQ9: M = -6.60, SD = 6.41). Similar proportions of patients achieved the key performance indicator across initiative phase and deprivation categories. QI methods improved access to mental health services; this paper finds no evidence for differences in clinical outcomes in patients, regardless of level of deprivation, interpreted as no evidence of inequity in the service with respect to this outcome.

  4. Inadvertent Perianesthetic Hypothermia in Small Animal Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia is one of the most common complications in anesthesia of dogs and cats. Hypothermia during anesthesia can lead to altered pharmacokinetics of anesthetic and analgesic drugs, dysfunction of organ systems, increased patient susceptibility to infection, reduced wound healing, altered coagulation, hypotension, and delayed recovery. An understanding of the pathophysiology, complications, and techniques to minimize hypothermia during anesthesia can help veterinarians optimize care of patients. This article provides an overview of inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia.

  5. [Prevention of perioperative hypothermia : Implementation of the S3 guideline].

    PubMed

    Horn, E-P; Klar, E; Höcker, J; Bräuer, A; Bein, B; Wulf, H; Torossian, A

    2017-01-09

    To improve perioperative quality and patient safety, the German S3 guideline should be consistently implemented to avoid perioperative hypothermia. Perioperative normothermia is a quality indicator and should be achieved by anesthesiologists and surgeons. To detect hypothermia early during the perioperative process, measuring body temperature should be started 1-2 h preoperatively. Patients should be actively warmed for 20-30 min before starting anesthesia. Prewarming is most effective and should be included in the preoperative process. Patients should be informed about the risks of perioperative hypothermia and members of the perioperative team should be educated. A standard operating procedure (SOP) to avoid hypothermia should be introduced in every operative unit. The incidence of postoperative hypothermia should be evaluated in operative patients every 3-6 months. The goals should be to measure body temperature in >80% of patients undergoing surgery and for >70% to exhibit a core temperature >36 °C at the end of surgery.

  6. Improving asthma outcomes in large populations.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Michael; Zeiger, Robert S

    2011-08-01

    This article summarizes our experience using administrative, survey, and telephone information to define asthma severity, impairment, risk, and quality of care in our large Kaiser Permanente population. Our data suggest that the 2-year Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set definition of persistent asthma is a good surrogate for survey-defined persistent asthma, and thus it would be reasonable to direct asthma population management and quality-of-care assessments at patients with Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set-defined persistent asthma for 2 years in a row. For population management, the numbers of short-acting β-agonist (SABA) canisters dispensed and validated tools on mail or telephone surveys have been used to assess asthma impairment. Algorithms based on pharmacy data (SABA canister and oral corticosteroid dispensings and prior emergency hospital care) have been used to assess the risk domain of asthma control. The asthma medication ratio (controllers divided by controllers plus SABAs) has been shown to be related to improved outcomes and is recommended as an asthma quality-of-care marker. It is hoped that outreach to patients and providers based on these indicators will improve asthma outcomes in patients cared for in individual practices, as well as in large health plans.

  7. Field Management of Accidental Hypothermia during Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Case history number 97: Core rewarming by peritoneal irrigation in accidental hypothermia with cacdiac arrest. Anesth Analg 1966; 56:574-577. 85. Lint-n...Intractable ventricular fibrillation associated with profound accidental hypothermia - Successful treatment with ;irtial cardiopulmonary bypass . N Engl...5 B. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HYPOTHERMIC DIVER ................ 6 C. FIELD TREATMENT OF HYPOTHERMIA. A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 9 D

  8. Neuroprotective effects of deep hypothermia in refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Niquet, Jerome; Gezalian, Michael; Baldwin, Roger; Wasterlain, Claude G

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacoresistance develops quickly during repetitive seizures, and refractory status epilepticus (RSE) remains a therapeutic challenge. The outcome of RSE is poor, with high mortality and morbidity. New treatments are needed. Deep hypothermia (20°C) is used clinically during reconstructive cardiac surgery and neurosurgery, and has proved safe and effective in those indications. We tested the hypothesis that deep hypothermia reduces RSE and its long-term consequences. We used a model of SE induced by lithium and pilocarpine and refractory to midazolam. Several EEG measures were recorded in both hypothermic (n = 17) and normothermic (n = 20) animals. Neuronal injury (by Fluoro-Jade B), cell-mediated inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (by immunohistochemistry) were studied 48 h following SE onset. Normothermic rats in RSE seized for 4.1 ± 1.1 h, and at 48 h they displayed extensive neuronal injury in many brain regions, including hippocampus, dentate gyrus, amygdala, entorhinal and pyriform cortices, thalamus, caudate/putamen, and the frontoparietal neocortex. Deep hypothermia (20°C) of 30 min duration terminated RSE within 12 min of initiation of hypothermia, reduced EEG power and seizure activity upon rewarming, and eliminated SE-induced neuronal injury in most animals. Normothermic rats showed widespread breakdown of the BBB, and extensive macrophage infiltration in areas of neuronal injury, which were completely absent in animals treated with hypothermia. These results suggest that deep hypothermia may open a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of RSE and for the prevention of its long-term consequences.

  9. Improving outcomes for underserved adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Britto, Maria T; Vockell, Anna-Liisa B; Munafo, Jennifer Knopf; Schoettker, Pamela J; Wimberg, Janet A; Pruett, Raymond; Yi, Michael S; Byczkowski, Terri L

    2014-02-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Treatment adherence by adolescents is often poor, and their outcomes are worse than those of younger patients. We conducted a quality improvement initiative to improve asthma control and outcomes for high-risk adolescents treated in a primary care setting. Interventions were guided by the Chronic Care Model and focused on standardized and evidence-based care, care coordination and active outreach, self-management support, and community connections. Patients with optimally well-controlled asthma increased from ∼10% to 30%. Patients receiving the evidence-based care bundle (condition/severity characterized in chart and, for patients with persistent asthma, an action plan and controller medications at the most recent visit) increased from 38% to at or near 100%. Patients receiving the required self-management bundle (patient self-assessment, stage-of-readiness tool, and personal action plan) increased from 0% to ∼90%. Patients and parents who were confident in their ability to manage their or their adolescent's asthma increased from 70% to ∼85%. Patient satisfaction and the mean proportion of patients with asthma-related emergency department visits or hospitalizations remained stable at desirable levels. Implementing interventions focused on standardized and evidence-based care, self-management support, care coordination and active outreach, linkage to community resources, and enhanced follow-up for patients with chronically not-well-controlled asthma resulted in sustained improvement in asthma control in adolescent patients. Additional interventions are likely needed for patients with chronically poor asthma control.

  10. Hypothermia Presenting in Wernicke Encephalopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Hyun; Oh, Ju Sun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Oh, Jae Ho

    2017-02-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neurologic disorder characterized by clinical symptoms, such as nystagmus, ataxia, and mental confusion. Hypothermia in patients with WE is a rare complication, and its pathogenic mechanism and therapy are yet to be ascertained. Herein, we presented a case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with WE 3 months earlier. We investigated the cause of hypothermia (35.0℃) that occurred after an enema (bowel emptying). Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed mammillary body and hypothalamus atrophy. In the autonomic function test, the sympathetic skin response (SSR) test did not evoke SSR latencies on both hands. In addition, abnormal orthostatic hypotension was observed. Laxative and stool softener medication were administered, and his diet was modified, which led to an improvement in constipation after 2 weeks. Moreover, there was no recurrence of hypothermic episode. This is the first reported case of late-onset hypothermia secondary to WE.

  11. Hypothermia Presenting in Wernicke Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a neurologic disorder characterized by clinical symptoms, such as nystagmus, ataxia, and mental confusion. Hypothermia in patients with WE is a rare complication, and its pathogenic mechanism and therapy are yet to be ascertained. Herein, we presented a case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with WE 3 months earlier. We investigated the cause of hypothermia (35.0℃) that occurred after an enema (bowel emptying). Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed mammillary body and hypothalamus atrophy. In the autonomic function test, the sympathetic skin response (SSR) test did not evoke SSR latencies on both hands. In addition, abnormal orthostatic hypotension was observed. Laxative and stool softener medication were administered, and his diet was modified, which led to an improvement in constipation after 2 weeks. Moreover, there was no recurrence of hypothermic episode. This is the first reported case of late-onset hypothermia secondary to WE. PMID:28289649

  12. Hypothermia-related deaths--Wisconsin, 2014, and United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Meiman, Jon; Anderson, Henry; Tomasallo, Carrie

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia is defined as a core body temperature of <95°F (<35°C) and is caused by environmental exposure, drug intoxication, or metabolic or nervous system dysfunction. Exposure to cold is a leading cause of weather-related mortality and is responsible for approximately twice the number of deaths annually as exposure to heat in the United States. To understand the risk factors for hypothermia-related death and improve prevention efforts, during January 1-April 30, 2014, a period of record low temperatures, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health began active surveillance for hypothermia. Suspected hypothermia-related deaths were reported by coroners or medical examiners and identified in death records. Hypothermia was confirmed as the cause of death by review of death investigation narratives. This report describes three selected cases of hypothermia-related deaths in Wisconsin and summarizes characteristics of all cases that occurred in the state during the period of active surveillance. A summary of hypothermia-related deaths for the United States during 2003-2013 also is presented for comparison and to assess national mortality trends. Hypothermia continues to be an important cause of weather-related death. Key risk factors include drug intoxication, mental illness, and social isolation. State and local health agencies might need to focus outreach on vulnerable populations and target interventions for groups at highest risk for death.

  13. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  14. Mild hypothermia, blood loss and complications in elective spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Guest, James D; Vanni, S; Silbert, L

    2004-01-01

    Spinal surgery carries risks of incidental spinal cord and nerve root injury. Neuroprotection, to minimize the extent of such injuries, is desirable. However, no neuroprotective strategies have been conclusively validated in nonvascular spinal surgery. Mild hypothermia resulting from general anesthesia is a readily achievable potential neuroprotective strategy. Mild hypothermia, however, has been associated with wound infection, increased operative blood loss and other complications. No previous studies have specifically evaluated whether mild hypothermia is associated with an increased risk of these complications in elective spinal surgery. We investigated the association between incidental mild hypothermia, perioperative complications and operative blood loss. This is a retrospective study employing cohort analysis, rank analysis and single and multivariate linear regression. The setting was the Veterans Administration Medical Center, a teaching hospital of the University of Miami. Data on a total of 70 adult veterans aged 23 to 81 years undergoing complex spinal procedures in which passive cooling was employed during surgical decompression. The variables measured were temperature, blood loss, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and duration of anesthesia. The outcome measured was the presence or absence of complications. After 70 patients had been acquired, regression and rank analyses were performed to test for a link between mild hypothermia and blood loss. In addition, two cohorts, patients who experienced complications, and those who did not experience complications in the perioperative period, were compared for several variables including three measures of exposure to hypothermia. Surgical procedures included 60 cervical, 1 occipitocervical, 1 cervicothoracic, 7 thoracic and 1 thoracolumbar procedure. Hypothermia followed induction of anesthesia; esophageal or bladder temperature was monitored. Cooling was passive; warming utilized a forced air blanket

  15. Exercise preconditioning improves traumatic brain injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jordan M; Montgomery, Mitchell H; Gregory, Eugene J; Berman, Nancy E J

    2015-10-05

    To determine whether 6 weeks of exercise performed prior to traumatic brain injury (TBI) could improve post-TBI behavioral outcomes in mice, and if exercise increases neuroprotective molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor-A [VEGF-A], erythropoietin [EPO], and heme oxygenase-1 [HO-1]) in brain regions responsible for movement (sensorimotor cortex) and memory (hippocampus). 120 mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) no exercise+no TBI (NOEX-NOTBI [n=30]), (2) no exercise+TBI (NOEX-TBI [n=30]), (3) exercise+no TBI (EX-NOTBI [n=30]), and (4) exercise+TBI (EX-TBI [n=30]). The gridwalk task and radial arm water maze were used to evaluate sensorimotor and cognitive function, respectively. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were performed to investigate VEGF-A, EPO, and HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in the right cerebral cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus. EX-TBI mice displayed reduced post-TBI sensorimotor and cognitive deficits when compared to NOEX-TBI mice. EX-NOTBI and EX-TBI mice showed elevated VEGF-A and EPO mRNA in the cortex and hippocampus, and increased VEGF-A and EPO staining of sensorimotor cortex neurons 1 day post-TBI and/or post-exercise. EX-TBI mice also exhibited increased VEGF-A staining of hippocampal neurons 1 day post-TBI/post-exercise. NOEX-TBI mice demonstrated increased HO-1 mRNA in the cortex (3 days post-TBI) and hippocampus (3 and 7 days post-TBI), but HO-1 was not increased in mice that exercised. Improved TBI outcomes following exercise preconditioning are associated with increased expression of specific neuroprotective genes and proteins (VEGF-A and EPO, but not HO-1) in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise Preconditioning Improves Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan M.; Montgomery, Mitchell H.; Gregory, Eugene J.; Berman, Nancy E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether 6 weeks of exercise performed prior to traumatic brain injury (TBI) could improve post-TBI behavioral outcomes in mice, and if exercise increases neuroprotective molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor-A [VEGF-A], erythropoietin [EPO], and heme oxygenase-1 [HO-1]) in brain regions responsible for movement (sensorimotor cortex) and memory (hippocampus). Methods 120 mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 1) no exercise + no TBI (NOEX-NOTBI [n=30]), 2) no exercise + TBI (NOEX-TBI [n=30]), 3) exercise + no TBI (EX-NOTBI [n=30]), and 4) exercise + TBI (EX-TBI [n=30]). The gridwalk task and radial arm water maze were used to evaluate sensorimotor and cognitive function, respectively. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were performed to investigate VEGF-A, EPO, and HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in the right cerebral cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus. Results EX-TBI mice displayed reduced post-TBI sensorimotor and cognitive deficits when compared to NOEX-TBI mice. EX-NOTBI and EX-TBI mice showed elevated VEGF-A and EPO mRNA in the cortex and hippocampus, and increased VEGF-A and EPO staining of sensorimotor cortex neurons 1 day post-TBI and/or post-exercise. EX-TBI mice also exhibited increased VEGF-A staining of hippocampal neurons 1 day post-TBI/post-exercise. NOEX-TBI mice demonstrated increased HO-1 mRNA in the cortex (3 days post-TBI) and hippocampus (3 and 7 days post-TBI), but HO-1 was not increased in mice that exercised. Conclusions Improved TBI outcomes following exercise preconditioning are associated with increased expression of specific neuroprotective genes and proteins (VEGF-A and EPO, but not HO-1) in the brain. PMID:26165153

  17. Improving Outcomes Following Penetrating Colon Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Preston R.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Croce, Martin A.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Elizabeth Pritchard, F.; Minard, Gayle; Stewart, Ronald M.

    2002-01-01

    . More destructive injuries were managed in the CP group (27% vs. 19%). Abscess rate was lower in the CP group (27% vs. 37%), as was suture line leak rate (7% vs. 14%). Colon related mortality in the CP group was 5% as compared with 12% in the PS group. Conclusions The clinical pathway for destructive colon wound management has improved outcomes as measured by anastomotic leak rates and colon related mortality. The data demonstrated the need for colostomy in the face of shock and comorbidities. Institution of this pathway results in colostomy for only 7% of all colon wounds. PMID:12035033

  18. A recommended early goal-directed management guideline for the prevention of hypothermia-related transfusion, morbidity, and mortality in severely injured trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Ryan; Callum, Jeannie; Laflamme, Claude; Tien, Homer; Nascimento, Barto; Beckett, Andrew; Alam, Asim

    2016-04-20

    Hypothermia is present in up to two-thirds of patients with severe injury, although it is often disregarded during the initial resuscitation. Studies have revealed that hypothermia is associated with mortality in a large percentage of trauma cases when the patient's temperature is below 32 °C. Risk factors include the severity of injury, wet clothing, low transport unit temperature, use of anesthesia, and prolonged surgery. Fortunately, associated coagulation disorders have been shown to completely resolve with aggressive warming. Selected passive and active warming techniques can be applied in damage control resuscitation. While treatment guidelines exist for acidosis and bleeding, there is no evidence-based approach to managing hypothermia in trauma patients. We synthesized a goal-directed algorithm for warming the severely injured patient that can be directly incorporated into current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. This involves the early use of warming blankets and removal of wet clothing in the prehospital phase followed by aggressive rewarming on arrival at the hospital if the patient's injuries require damage control therapy. Future research in hypothermia management should concentrate on applying this treatment algorithm and should evaluate its influence on patient outcomes. This treatment strategy may help to reduce blood loss and improve morbidity and mortality in this population of patients.

  19. The Role of Posttraumatic Hypothermia in Preventing Dendrite Degeneration and Spine Loss after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan-fang; Zhao, Cheng-cheng; Jiang, Gan; Gu, Xiao; Feng, Jun-feng; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hypothermia prevents cell death and promotes functional outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known regarding the effect of hypothermia on dendrite degeneration and spine loss after severe TBI. In the present study, we used thy1-GFP transgenic mice to investigate the effect of hypothermia on the dendrites and spines in layer V/VI of the ipsilateral cortex after severe TBI. We found that hypothermia (33 °C) dramatically prevented dendrite degeneration and spine loss 1 and 7 days after CCI. The Morris water maze test revealed that hypothermia preserved the learning and memory functions of mice after CCI. Hypothermia significantly increased the expression of the synaptic proteins GluR1 and PSD-95 at 1 and 7 days after CCI in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus compared with that of the normothermia TBI group. Hypothermia also increased cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels. These results suggest that posttraumatic hypothermia is an effective method to prevent dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserve learning and memory function after severe TBI. Increasing cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels might be the mechanism through which hypothermia prevents dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserves learning and memory function. PMID:27833158

  20. [Pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Jakub

    2006-06-01

    The paper is a review of pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia. The advanced methods of rewarming, such as passive and active: external and core used in clinic allow for efficient management ant prophylactics of hypothermia. Thermotherapy with use of infrared ceiling heaters CTS and mobile MTC as well as Infutherm system applying by authors are desirable and even indispensable in contemporary equipment of surgery clinics, cardiovascular surgery clinics and burn centers. The ideal rewarming method should be safe and enable fast, reliable and predictable warming or rewarming. The clinical parameter to determine the efficacy of rewarming is the change of core temperature. There is no doubt that active warming with forced-air warmers (Warm Touch 5700 and Bair Hugger 500) or radiative heaters (IR-A:Hydrosun 500, IR-C radiation: CTC X, MTC) is more effective than use of standard, passive insulation hospital blankets or convectional heaters. Actually the forced-air warmers are counted to be more useful in cardiovascular surgery hypothermia management, because of fast rate core temperature rise and faster rise in mean skin temperature compared to the control group. CTC X and MTC Aragona radiative heaters are useful in burn management being the most effective when the distance of heater from the patient body is less than 80 cm. The observation of 60 consecutive extensive burns leads to conclusion that long-lasting dressings in burn patients when the whole body is not covered and protected, can be performed safely only in conditions excluding heat losses and core temperature drop. While the cold intravenous fluids may significantly contribute to the temperature drop depending on the volume infused, the use of fluids warming systems as well as external heat application is absolutely indicated to improve the heat balance of the patient body.

  1. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  2. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  3. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Renu; Joshi, Disha; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2017-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107), subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group. Results Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9), diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28), and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33). At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6) than baseline (10.7). Conclusion Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c, in diabetes. PMID:28243070

  4. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results.

    PubMed

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-10-01

    groups died within 90 days (nonsignificant). Pneumonia occurred in 14 patients in the hypothermia and in 3 of the normothermia groups (P=0.001). The pneumonia rate did not significantly adversely affect 3 month modified Rankin Scale score (P=0.32). This study demonstrates the feasibility and preliminary safety of combining endovascular hypothermia after stroke with intravenous thrombolysis. Pneumonia was more frequent after hypothermia, but further studies are needed to determine its effect on patient outcome and whether it can be prevented. A definitive efficacy trial is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke.

  5. Motivational tools to improve probationer treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Walters, Scott T.; Sloas, Lincoln B.; Lerch, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivational interviewing (MI) is a promising practice to increase motivation, treatment retention, and reducing recidivism among offender populations. Computer-delivered interventions have grown in popularity as a way to change behaviors associated with drug and alcohol use. Methods/Design Motivational Assistance Program to Initiate Treatment (MAPIT) is a three arm, multisite, randomized controlled trial, which examines the impact of Motivational Interviewing (MI), a Motivational Computer Program (MC), and Supervision as Usual (SAU) on addiction treatment initiation, engagement, and retention. Secondary outcomes include drug/alcohol use, probation progress, recidivism (i.e., criminal behavior) and HIV/AIDS testing and treatment among probationers. Participant characteristics are measured at baseline, 2, and 6 months after assignment. The entire study will include 600 offenders, with each site recruiting 300 offenders (Baltimore City, Maryland and Dallas, Texas). All participants will go through standard intake procedures for probation and participate in probation requirements as usual. After standard intake, participants will be recruited and screened for eligibility. Discussion The results of this clinical trial will fill a gap in knowledge about ways to motivate probationers to participate in addiction treatment and HIV care. This randomized clinical trial is innovative in the way it examines the use of in-person vs. technological approaches to improve probationer success. Trial Registration NCT01891656 PMID:26009023

  6. Motivational tools to improve probationer treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taxman, Faye S; Walters, Scott T; Sloas, Lincoln B; Lerch, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Mayra

    2015-07-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a promising practice to increase motivation, treatment retention, and reducing recidivism among offender populations. Computer-delivered interventions have grown in popularity as a way to change behaviors associated with drug and alcohol use. Motivational Assistance Program to Initiate Treatment (MAPIT) is a three arm, multisite, randomized controlled trial, which examines the impact of Motivational interviewing (MI), a motivational computer program (MC), and supervision as usual (SAU) on addiction treatment initiation, engagement, and retention. Secondary outcomes include drug/alcohol use, probation progress, recidivism (i.e., criminal behavior) and HIV/AIDS testing and treatment among probationers. Participant characteristics are measured at baseline, 2, and 6 months after assignment. The entire study will include 600 offenders, with each site recruiting 300 offenders (Baltimore City, Maryland and Dallas, Texas). All participants will go through standard intake procedures for probation and participate in probation requirements as usual. After standard intake, participants will be recruited and screened for eligibility. The results of this clinical trial will fill a gap in knowledge about ways to motivate probationers to participate in addiction treatment and HIV care. This randomized clinical trial is innovative in the way it examines the use of in-person vs. technological approaches to improve probationer success. NCT01891656. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Improving maternal nutrition for better pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2015-11-01

    Much has been learned during the past several decades about the role of maternal nutrition in the outcome of pregnancy. While the bulk of the data is derived from animal models, human observations are gradually accumulating. There is need to improve maternal nutrition because of the high neonatal mortality rate especially in developing countries. The author used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors into account when interpreting study findings. Nutrition plays a vital role in reducing some of the health risks associated with pregnancy such as risk of fetal and infant mortality, intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight and premature births, decreased birth defects, cretinism, poor brain development and risk of infection. Adequate nutrition is essential for a woman throughout her life cycle to ensure proper development and prepare the reproductive life of the woman. Pregnant women require varied diets and increased nutrient intake to cope with the extra needs during pregnancy. Use of dietary supplements and fortified foods should be encouraged for pregnant women to ensure adequate supply of nutrients for both mother and foetus. The author concludes that nutrition education should be a core component of Mother and Child Health Clinics and every opportunity should be utilised to give nutrition education on appropriate diets for pregnant women.

  8. Improving Pupil Referral Unit Outcomes: Pupil Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Siobhan; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the quality of alternative provision for young people with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and the poor academic and social outcomes many experience. Little research has sought the views of the young people themselves regarding the enablers and barriers to positive outcomes they have encountered. A…

  9. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  10. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  11. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  12. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  13. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  14. Psychoeducation: improving outcomes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Colom, Francesc; Lam, Dominic

    2005-08-01

    A relevant paradigm shift in the treatment of bipolar disorder started a few years ago; crucial findings on the usefulness of psychological interventions clearly support switching from an exclusively pharmacological therapeutic approach to a combined yet hierarchical model in which pharmacotherapy plays a central role, but psychological interventions may help cover the gap that exists between theoretical efficacy and "real world" effectiveness. Hereby we review the efficacy of several adjunctive psychotherapies in the maintenance treatment of bipolar patients. A systematic review of the literature on the issue was performed, using MEDLINE and CURRENT CONTENTS databases. "Bipolar", "Psychotherapy", "Psychoeducation", "Cognitive-behavioral" and "Relapse prevention" were entered as keywords. Psychological treatments specifically designed for relapse prevention in bipolar affective disorder are useful tools in conjunction with mood stabilizers. Most of the psychotherapy studies recently published report positive results on maintenance as an add-on treatment, and efficacy on the treatment of depressive episodes. Interestingly, several groups from all over the world reported similar positive results and reached very similar conclusions; almost every intervention tested contains important psychoeducative elements including both compliance enhancement and early identification of prodromal signs - stressing the importance of life-style regularity - and exploring patients' health beliefs and illness-awareness. The usefulness of psychotherapy for improving treatment adherence and clinical outcome of bipolar patients is nowadays unquestionable, and future treatment guidelines should promote its regular use amongst clinicians. As clinicians, it is our major duty, to offer the best treatment available to our patients and this includes both evidence-based psychoeducation programs and newer pharmacological agents.

  15. Improving alcohol withdrawal outcomes in acute care.

    PubMed

    Melson, Jo; Kane, Michelle; Mooney, Ruth; Mcwilliams, James; Horton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is the nation's third leading cause of preventable deaths. If untreated, 6% of alcohol-dependent patients experience alcohol withdrawal, with up to 10% of those experiencing delirium tremens (DT), when they stop drinking. Without routine screening, patients often experience DT without warning. Reduce the incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT, restraint use, and transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with DT. In October 2009, the alcohol withdrawal team instituted a care management guideline used by all disciplines, which included tools for screening, assessment, and symptom management. Data were obtained from existing datasets for three quarters before and four quarters after implementation. Follow-up data were analyzed and showed a great deal of variability in transfers to the ICU and restraint use. Percentage of patients who developed DT showed a downward trend. Incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT and, in patients with DT, restraint use and transfers to the ICU. Initial data revealed a decrease in percentage of patients with alcohol withdrawal who experienced DT (16.4%-12.9%). In patients with DT, restraint use decreased (60.4%-44.4%) and transfers to the ICU decreased (21.6%-15%). Follow-up data indicated a continued downward trend in patients with DT. Changes were not statistically significant. Restraint use and ICU transfers maintained postimplementation levels initially but returned to preimplementation levels by third quarter 2012. Early identification of patients for potential alcohol withdrawal followed by a standardized treatment protocol using symptom-triggered dosing improved alcohol withdrawal management and outcomes.

  16. Practicability of avoiding hypothermia in resuscitation room phase in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K O; Jensen, J M; Sprengel, K

    2015-05-01

    Hypothermia in severely injured patients is a high demanding situation resulting from an effect of injury severity, surrounding temperature at trauma site and admittance. This article reviews the possible options to combat hypothermia in the resuscitation room with respect to practicability. This review summarizes available passive and active re-warming techniques and trys to offer a practicable chronology to restore normothermia. Resources should be applied depending on the availability of each institution and manifestation of hypothermia, but there is a strong demand for improvements with respect to practicability, convenience and safety for the patient.

  17. Preventing Unplanned Perioperative Hypothermia in Children.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Susan E; Phillips, Amy; Wiggins, Shirley; Struwe, Leeza

    2017-02-01

    Unplanned perioperative hypothermia is a common surgical risk. Unplanned hypothermia is defined as a body temperature below 36° C (96.8° F) during any phase of the perioperative period. Perioperative nurses at a Midwestern tertiary pediatric hospital developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) designed to maintain normothermia for the pediatric surgical population. This CPG outlined standard thermoregulation nursing interventions and required the consistent use of a temporal artery thermometer. A test of this CPG before full implementation established a baseline incidence of unplanned hypothermia at 16.3% (n = 80). The purpose of this study was to measure the rate of perioperative hypothermia in children after implementing the evidence-based CPG. The study results demonstrated that the CPG, guiding research-based nursing practice, consistently prevented unplanned hypothermia. The incidence rate of unplanned perioperative hypothermia after CPG implementation was 1.84% (n = 1,196).

  18. Effects of hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on recovery of neurological function in rats with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONG; ZHANG, JIANJUN

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment of the injured spinal cord is hypothesized to be involved in driving the differentiation and survival of engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs). Hypothermia is known to improve the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord in a number of ways. To investigate the effect of NSC transplantation in combination with hypothermia on the recovery of rat spinal cord injury, 60 Sprague-Dawley female rats were used to establish a spinal cord hemisection model. They were divided randomly into three groups: A, spinal cord injury group; B, NSC transplantation group; and C, NSC transplantation + hypothermia group. At 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-injury, the motor function of all animals was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie and Besnaham locomotor scoring system and the inclined plane test. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were performed. At 8 weeks post-transplantation, horseradish peroxidase nerve tracing and transmission electron microscopy were conducted to observe axonal regeneration. The outcome of hind limb motor function recovery in group C significantly surpassed that in group B at 4 weeks post-injury (P<0.05). Recovery was also observed in group A, but to a lesser degree. For the pathological sections no neural axonal were observed in group A. A few axon-like structures were observed in group B and more in group C. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled neurofibers and bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells were observed in the spinal cords of group C. Fewer of these cells were found in group B and fewer still in group A. The differences among the three groups were significant (P<0.05). Using transmission electron microscopy, newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were observed in the central transverse plane in groups B and C, although these nerve fibers were not evident in group A. In conclusion, NSC transplantation promoted the recovery of hind limb function in rats, and combination treatment with

  19. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  20. Deep accidental hypothermia during the Queensland summer.

    PubMed

    Udy, Andrew A; Ziegenfuss, Marc D; Fraser, John F

    2007-12-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with severe accidental hypothermia associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after a polypharmacy overdose. Deep hypothermia developed while she lay unconscious, with a split-system air-conditioning unit rapidly cooling the confined area of her bedroom. Despite the need for lengthy resuscitative efforts at the scene and in hospital, she went on to a full neurological recovery. The neuroprotective role of accidental hypothermia is reviewed, as are the guidelines for resuscitation in this setting. We conclude that hypothermia must be considered even in unlikely circumstances, such as the Queensland summer, when ambient temperatures are high.

  1. Thermal insulation for preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Alderson, Phil; Campbell, Gillian; Smith, Andrew F; Warttig, Sheryl; Nicholson, Amanda; Lewis, Sharon R

    2014-06-04

    Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia occurs because of interference with normal temperature regulation by anaesthetic drugs and exposure of skin for prolonged periods. A number of different interventions have been proposed to maintain body temperature by reducing heat loss. Thermal insulation, such as extra layers of insulating material or reflective blankets, should reduce heat loss through convection and radiation and potentially help avoid hypothermia. To assess the effects of pre- or intraoperative thermal insulation, or both, in preventing perioperative hypothermia and its complications during surgery in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE, OvidSP (1956 to 4 February 2014), EMBASE, OvidSP (1982 to 4 February 2014), ISI Web of Science (1950 to 4 February 2014), and CINAHL, EBSCOhost (1980 to 4 February 2014), and reference lists of articles. We also searched Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. Randomized controlled trials of thermal insulation compared to standard care or other interventions aiming to maintain normothermia. Two authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias for each included study, with a third author checking details. We contacted some authors to ask for additional details. We only collected adverse events if reported in the trials. We included 22 trials, with 16 trials providing data for some analyses. The trials varied widely in the type of patients and operations, the timing and measurement of temperature, and particularly in the types of co-interventions used. The risk of bias was largely unclear, but with a high risk of performance bias in most studies and a low risk of attrition bias. The largest comparison of extra insulation versus standard care had five trials with 353 patients at the end of surgery and showed a weighted mean difference (WMD) of 0.12 ºC (95% CI -0.07 to 0.31; low quality evidence). Comparing extra insulation

  2. A clinical audit cycle of post-operative hypothermia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rose, N; Kwong, G P S; Pang, D S J

    2016-09-01

    Use of clinical audits to assess and improve perioperative hypothermia management in client-owned dogs. Two clinical audits were performed. In Audit 1 data were collected to determine the incidence and duration of perioperative hypothermia (defined as rectal temperatures <37·0°C). The results from Audit 1 were used to reach consensus on changes to be implemented to improve temperature management, including re-defining hypothermia as rectal temperature <37·5°C. Audit 2 was performed after 1 month with changes in place. Audit 1 revealed a high incidence of post-operative hypothermia (88·0%) and prolonged time periods (7·5 hours) to reach normothermia. Consensus changes were to use a forced air warmer on all dogs and measure rectal temperatures hourly post-operatively until temperature ≥37·5°C. After 1 month with the implemented changes, Audit 2 identified a significant reduction in the time to achieve a rectal temperature of ≥37·5°C, with 75% of dogs achieving this goal by 3·5 hours. The incidence of hypothermia at tracheal extubation remained high in Audit 2 (97·3% with a rectal temperature <37·5°C). Post-operative hypothermia was improved through simple changes in practice, showing that clinical audit is a useful tool for monitoring post-operative hypothermia and improving patient care. Overall management of perioperative hypothermia could be further improved with earlier intervention. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Warming infusion improves perioperative outcomes of elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Lai, Bingjie; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Xinyu; Cui, Yunfeng; Sun, Qianchuang; Liu, Wenhua; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lv, Hui; Han, Hongyu; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This prospective, randomized, and controlled study was performed to determine the benefits of prewarmed infusion in elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement. Methods: Between September 2015 and April 2016, elderly patients who underwent bilateral hips replacement that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. After inclusion, patients were randomized into one of the study groups: in the control group, patients received an infusion of fluid kept at room temperature (22–23°C); in the warming infusion group, patients received an infusion of fluid warmed using an infusion fluid heating apparatus (35°C). Postoperative outcomes, including recovery time, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and postoperative complications rate of patients from both groups, were compared. Results: A total of 64 patients were included in our study (71.2 ± 7.6 years, 53.1% males), with 32 patients in the control group and 32 patients in warming infusion group. No significant difference was found in terms of demographic data and intraoperative blood transfusion rate between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Patients receiving a prewarmed infusion had a significantly shorter time to spontaneous breath, eye opening, consciousness recovery, and extubation than the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, significant differences were found in Steward score and VAS score between 2 groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, warming infusion group also showed an obviously decreased incidence of shivering and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A prewarmed infusion could reduce the incidence of perioperative hypothermia and improve outcomes in the elderly during bilateral hip replacement. PMID:28353593

  4. Does regional anaesthesia really improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Kettner, S C; Willschke, H; Marhofer, P

    2011-12-01

    In recent decades, a number of studies have attempted to determine whether regional anaesthesia offers convincing benefits over general anaesthesia. However, today we interpret meta-analyses more carefully, and it remains unclear whether regional anaesthesia reduces mortality. However, regional anaesthesia offers superior analgesia over opioid-based analgesia, and a significant reduction in postoperative pain is still a worthwhile outcome. Recent developments in technical aspects of regional anaesthesia have the potential to provide significant advantages for many patients in all age groups. Moreover, studies focusing on specific outcomes have shown benefits for regional anaesthesia used for surgery and postoperative analgesia.

  5. Moderate systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Julie A; Burgess, Pamela; Cartie, Richard J; Prasad, Balakrishna M

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been proposed to be beneficial in an array of human pathologies including cardiac arrest, stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, and hemorrhagic shock. Burn depth progression is multifactorial but inflammation plays a large role. Because hypothermia is known to reduce inflammation, we hypothesized that moderate hypothermia will decrease burn depth progression. We used a second-degree 15% total body surface area thermal injury model in rats. Burn depth was assessed by histology of biopsy sections. Moderate hypothermia in the range of 31-33°C was applied for 4h immediately after burn and in a delayed fashion, starting 2h after burn. In order to gain insight into the beneficial effects of hypothermia, we analyzed global gene expression in the burned skin. Immediate hypothermia decreased burn depth progression at 6h post injury, and this protective effect was sustained for at least 24h. Burn depth was 18% lower in rats subjected to immediate hypothermia compared to control rats at both 6 and 24h post injury. Rats in the delayed hypothermia group did not show any significant decrease in burn depth at 6h, but had 23% lower burn depth than controls at 24h. Increased expression of several skin-protective genes such as CCL4, CCL6 and CXCL13 and decreased expression of tissue remodeling genes such as matrix metalloprotease-9 were discovered in the skin biopsy samples of rats subjected to immediate hypothermia. Systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression in a rodent model and up-regulation of skin-protective genes and down-regulation of detrimental tissue remodeling genes by hypothermia may contribute to its beneficial effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Prevention and Management of Neonatal Hypothermia in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Marsh, David R.; Kafwanda, Sarah Ngolofwana; Musso, Austen; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for newborn survival. The World Health Organization recommends maintaining a warm chain and skin-to-skin care for thermoprotection of newborn children. Since little is known about practices related to newborn hypothermia in rural Africa, this study's goal was to characterize relevant practices, attitudes, and beliefs in rural Zambia. Methods and Findings We conducted 14 focus group discussions with mothers and grandmothers and 31 in-depth interviews with community leaders and health officers in Lufwanyama District, a rural area in the Copperbelt Province, Zambia, enrolling a total of 171 participants. We analyzed data using domain analysis. In rural Lufwanyama, community members were aware of the danger of neonatal hypothermia. Caregivers' and health workers' knowledge of thermoprotective practices included birthplace warming, drying and wrapping of the newborn, delayed bathing, and immediate and exclusive breastfeeding. However, this warm chain was not consistently maintained in the first hours postpartum, when newborns are at greatest risk. Skin-to-skin care was not practiced in the study area. Having to assume household and agricultural labor responsibilities in the immediate postnatal period was a challenge for mothers to provide continuous thermal care to their newborns. Conclusions Understanding and addressing community-based practices on hypothermia prevention and management might help improve newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Possible interventions include the implementation of skin-to-skin care in rural areas and the use of appropriate, low-cost newborn warmers to prevent hypothermia and support families in their provision of newborn thermal protection. Training family members to support mothers in the provision of thermoprotection for their newborns could facilitate these practices. PMID:24714630

  7. ATP induces mild hypothermia in rats but has a strikingly detrimental impact on focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijuan; Li, Wenjin; Niu, Guangming; Leak, Rehana K; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating condition lacking effective therapies. A promising approach to attenuate ischemic injury is mild hypothermia. Recent studies show that adenosine nucleotides can induce hypothermia in mice. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) induces mild hypothermia in rats and reduces ischemic brain injury. We found that intraperitoneal injections of ATP decreased core body temperature in a dose-dependent manner; the dose appropriate for mild hypothermia was 2 g/kg. When ATP-induced hypothermia was applied to stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, however, a neuroprotective effect was not observed. Instead, the infarct volume grew even larger in ATP-treated rats. This was accompanied by an increased rate of seizure events, hemorrhagic transformation, and higher mortality. Continuous monitoring of physiologic parameters revealed that ATP reduced heartbeat rate and blood pressure. ATP also increased blood glucose, accompanied by severe acidosis and hypocalcemia. Western blotting showed that ATP decreased levels of both phospho-Akt and total-Akt in the cortex. Our results reveal that, despite inducing hypothermia, ATP is not appropriate for protecting the brain against stroke. Instead, we show for the first time that ATP treatment is associated with exaggerated ischemic outcomes and dangerous systemic side effects.

  8. Intra-cardiopulmonary resuscitation hypothermia with and without volume loading in an ischemic model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, Demetris; Zviman, Menekhem; Castro, Valeria; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Ranjan, Ravi; Wilson, Robert F; Halperin, Henry R

    2009-10-06

    We investigated the effects of intra-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) hypothermia with and without volume loading on return to spontaneous circulation and infarction size in an ischemic model of cardiac arrest. Using a distal left anterior descending artery occlusion model of cardiac arrest followed by resuscitation with a total of 120 minutes of occlusion and 90 minutes of reperfusion, we randomized 46 pigs into 5 groups and used myocardial staining to define area at risk and myocardial necrosis. Group A had no intervention. Immediately after return of spontaneous circulation, group B received surface cooling with cooling blankets and ice. Group C received intra-CPR 680+/-23 mL of 28 degrees C 0.9% normal saline via a central venous catheter. Group D received intra-CPR 673+/-26 mL of 4 degrees C normal saline followed by surface cooling after return of spontaneous circulation. Group E received intra-CPR and hypothermia after return of spontaneous circulation with an endovascular therapeutic hypothermia system placed in the right atrium and set at a target of 32 degrees C. Intra-CPR volume loading with room temperature (group C) or iced saline (group D) significantly (P<0.05) decreased coronary perfusion pressure (group C, 12.8+/-4.78 mm Hg; group D, 14.6+/-9.9 mm Hg) compared with groups A, B, and E (20.6+/-8.2, 20.1+/-7.8, and 21.3+/-12.4 mm Hg). Return of spontaneous circulation was significantly improved in group E (9 of 9) compared with groups A plus B and C (10 of 18 and 1 of 8). The percent infarction to the area at risk was significantly reduced with intra-CPR hypothermia in groups D (24.3+/-4.2%) and E (4+/-3.4%) compared with groups A (72+/-5.1%) and B (67.3+/-4.2%). Intra-CPR hypothermia significantly reduces myocardial infarction size. Elimination of volume loading further improves outcomes.

  9. Is hypothermia in the victim of major trauma protective or harmful? A randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilello, L M; Jurkovich, G J; Stark, M S; Hassantash, S A; O'Keefe, G E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this randomized, prospective clinical trial was to determine whether hypothermia during resuscitation is protective or harmful to critically injured trauma patients. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Hypothermia has both protective and harmful clinical effects. Retrospective studies show higher mortality in patients with hypothermia; however, hypothermia is more common in more severely injured patients, which makes it difficult to determine whether hypothermia contributes to mortality independently of injury severity. There are no randomized, prospective treatment studies to assess hypothermia's impact as an independent variable. METHODS: Fifty-seven hypothermic (T < or = 34.5 C), critically injured patients requiring a pulmonary artery catheter were randomized to a rapid rewarming protocol using continuous arteriovenous rewarming (CAVR) or to a standard rewarming (SR) control group. The primary outcome of interest was first 24-hour blood product and fluid resuscitation requirements. Other comparative analyses included coagulation assays, hemodynamic and oxygen transport measurements, length of stay, and mortality. RESULTS: The two groups were well matched for demographic and injury severity characteristics. CAVR rewarmed significantly faster than did SR (p < 0.01), producing two groups with different amounts of hypothermia exposure. The patients who underwent CAVR required less fluid during resuscitation to the same hemodynamic goals (24,702 mL vs. 32,540 mL, p = 0.05) and were significantly more likely to rewarm (p = 0.002). Only 2 (7%) of 29 patients who underwent CAVR failed to warm to 36 C and both died, whereas 12 (43%) of 28 patients who underwent SR failed to reach 36 C, and all 12 died. Patients who underwent CAVR had significantly less early mortality (p = 0.047). CONCLUSION: Hypothermia increases fluid requirements and independently increases acute mortality after major trauma. PMID:9351712

  10. History and current use of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Alan, David; Vejvoda, Jiri; Honek, Jakub; Veselka, Josef

    2016-01-01

    In spite of many years of development and implementation of pre-hospital advanced life support programmes, the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) used to be very poor. Neurologic injury from cerebral hypoxia is the most common cause of death in patients with OHCA. In the past two decades, post-resuscitation care has developed many new concepts aimed at improving the neurological outcome and survival rate of patients after cardiac arrest. Systematic post-cardiac arrest care after the return of spontaneous circulation, including induced mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in selected patients, is aimed at significantly improving rates of long-term neurologically intact survival. This review summarises the history and current knowledge in the field of mild TH after OHCA. PMID:27695505

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia Protocol in a Community Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kulstad, Christine E.; Holt, Shannon C.; Abrahamsen, Aaron A.; Lovell, Elise O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients resuscitated after out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT). We evaluated the effects of using a TH protocol in a large community hospital emergency department (ED) for all patients with neurological impairment after resuscitated OHCA regardless of presenting rhythm. We hypothesized improved mortality and neurological outcomes without increased complication rates. Methods: Our TH protocol entails cooling to 33°C for 24 hours with an endovascular catheter. We studied patients treated with this protocol from November 2006 to November 2008. All non-pregnant, unresponsive adult patients resuscitated from any initial rhythm were included. Exclusion criteria were initial hypotension or temperature less than 30°C, trauma, primary intracranial event, and coagulopathy. Control patients treated during the 12 months before the institution of our TH protocol met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria. We recorded survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, and rates of bleeding, sepsis, pneumonia, renal failure, and dysrhythmias in the first 72 hours of treatment. Results: Mortality rates were 71.1% (95% CI, 56–86%) for 38 patients treated with TH and 72.3% (95% CI 59–86%) for 47 controls. In the TH group, 8% of patients (95% CI, 0–17%) had a good neurological outcome on discharge, compared to 0 (95% CI 0–8%) in the control group. In 17 patients with VF/VT treated with TH, mortality was 47% (95% CI 21–74%) and 18% (95% CI 0–38%) had good neurological outcome; in 9 control patients with VF/VT, mortality was 67% (95% CI 28–100%), and 0% (95% CI 0–30%) had good neurological outcome. The groups were well-matched with respect to sex and age. Complication rates were similar or favored the TH group. Conclusion: Instituting a TH protocol for OHCA patients with any

  12. Therapeutic Hypothermia: What's Hot about Cold.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Reducing body temperature to 33 °C in patients who have been resuscitated from cardiac arrest but who remain comatose can ameliorate anoxic encephalopathy and improve recovery. Experimental animal studies have suggested that cooling to 33 °C also aids the resuscitative process itself, facilitating the resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The mechanism of cooling benefit is probably the reduction of metabolic demand of most organs, and reduced production of toxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species. External cooling by application of ice or pads through which cold water circulates is effective but requires up to 8 hours to achieve the target temperature of 33 °C. Our goal was to develop a faster method of cooling that could be initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In anesthetized swine, we induced ventricular fibrillation by passing alternating current down an electrode catheter in the right ventricle. We then ventilated the animals' lungs with liquid perfluorocarbons (PFCs), a technique known as total liquid ventilation (TLV). Perfluorocarbons are oxygen-carrying modules; we pre-oxygenated the PFCs by bubbling 100% O(2) through the solution for 2 minutes before use, and pre-cooled the PFCs to -15 °C. The cold oxygenated PFCs reduced pulmonary artery temperature (a surrogate for myocardial temperature) to 33 °C in about 6 minutes. Using this technique we achieved ROSC in 8 of 11 (82%) animals given TLV versus 3 of 11 (27%) control animals receiving conventional CPR without PFCs (P<0.05). We also compared the cold TLV technique with the administration of intravenous iced saline to achieve hypothermia. Both the cold TLV and cold saline techniques produced rapid hypothermia, but we could achieve ROSC in only 2 of 8 (25%) animals given cold saline versus 7 of 8 (88%) given cold TLV. This result is likely due to the rise in right atrial pressure and corresponding reduction in coronary perfusion pressure caused by volume loading with IV saline

  13. Improving learning outcomes: integration of standardized patients & telemedicine technology.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Diane C; Guthrie, John T; Adamo, Graceanne

    2004-01-01

    Innovative use of standardized patients (SPs) in a telemedicine environment can improve learning outcomes and clinical competencies. This randomized, cross-over study examined the relationship of technology-based strategies and the improvement of knowledge outcomes and competencies. Results showed that the innovative use of SPs and telemedicine, compared to a traditional distance learning teaching methodology, significantly improved learning outcomes. In addition, there was a significant increase in performance motivation and an interesting decrease in student satisfaction that may be linked to the pressure of performance-based learning. This article addresses knowledge improvement only.

  14. Interventions for treating inadvertent postoperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Warttig, Sheryl; Alderson, Phil; Campbell, Gillian; Smith, Andrew F

    2014-11-20

    not possible. This may have influenced results, but it is unclear how the results may have been influenced. Active warming was found to reduce the mean time taken to achieve normothermia by about 30 minutes in comparison with use of warmed cotton blankets (mean difference (MD) -32.13 minutes, 95% confidence interval (CI) -42.55 to -21.71; moderate-quality evidence), but no significant difference in shivering was noted. Active warming was found to reduce mean time taken to achieve normothermia by almost an hour and a half in comparison with use of unwarmed cotton blankets (MD -88.86 minutes, 95% CI -123.49 to -54.23; moderate-quality evidence), and people in the active warming group were less likely to shiver than those in the unwarmed cotton blanket group (Relative Risk=0.61 95% CI= 0.42 to 0.86; low quality evidence). There was no effect on mean temperature difference in degrees celsius at 60 minutes (MD=0.18°C, 95% CI=-0.10 to 0.46; moderate quality evidence), and no data were available in relation to major cardiovascular complications. Forced air warming was found to reduce time taken to achieve normothermia by about one hour in comparison to circulating hot water devices (MD=-54.21 minutes 95% CI= -94.95, -13.47). There was no statistically significant difference between thermal insulation and cotton blankets on mean time to achieve normothermia (MD =-0.29 minutes, 95% CI=-25.47 to 24.89; moderate quality evidence) or shivering (Relative Risk=1.36 95% CI= 0.69 to 2.67; moderate quality evidence), and no data were available for mean temperature difference or major cardiovascular complications. Insufficient evidence was available about other comparisons, adverse effects or any other secondary outcomes. Active warming, particularly forced air warming, appears to offer a clinically important reduction in mean time taken to achieve normothermia (normal body temperature between 36°C and 37.5°C) in patients with postoperative hypothermia. However, high

  15. Improving numeracy through values affirmation enhances decision and STEM outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ellen; Shoots-Reinhard, Brittany; Tompkins, Mary Kate; Schley, Dan; Meilleur, Louise; Sinayev, Aleksander; Tusler, Martin; Wagner, Laura; Crocker, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Greater numeracy has been correlated with better health and financial outcomes in past studies, but causal effects in adults are unknown. In a 9-week longitudinal study, undergraduate students, all taking a psychology statistics course, were randomly assigned to a control condition or a values-affirmation manipulation intended to improve numeracy. By the final week in the course, the numeracy intervention (statistics-course enrollment combined with values affirmation) enhanced objective numeracy, subjective numeracy, and two decision-related outcomes (financial literacy and health-related behaviors). It also showed positive indirect-only effects on financial outcomes and a series of STEM-related outcomes (course grades, intentions to take more math-intensive courses, later math-intensive courses taken based on academic transcripts). All decision and STEM-related outcome effects were mediated by the changes in objective and/or subjective numeracy and demonstrated similar and robust enhancements. Improvements to abstract numeric reasoning can improve everyday outcomes.

  16. Neuroprotection with hypothermia and allopurinol in an animal model of hypoxic-ischemic injury: Is it a gender question?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fanjul, Javier; Durán Fernández-Feijóo, Cristina; Lopez-Abad, Míriam; Lopez Ramos, Maria Goretti; Balada Caballé, Rafael; Alcántara-Horillo, Soledad; Camprubí Camprubí, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is one of the most important causes of neonatal brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is the standard treatment for term newborns after perinatal hypoxic ischemic injury (HI). Despite this, TH does not provide complete neuroprotection. Allopurinol seems to be a good neuroprotector in several animal studies, but it has never been tested in combination with hypothermia. Clinical findings show that male infants with (HI) fare more poorly than matched females in cognitive outcomes. However, there are few studies about neuroprotection taking gender into account in the results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential additive neuroprotective effect of allopurinol when administrated in association with TH in a rodent model of moderate HI. Gender differences in neuroprotection were also evaluated. P10 male and female rat pups were subjected to HI (Vannucci model) and randomized into five groups: sham intervention (Control), no treatment (HI), hypothermia (HIH), allopurinol (HIA), and dual therapy (hypothermia and allopurinol) (HIHA). To evaluate a treatment's neuroprotective efficiency, 24 hours after the HI event caspase3 activation was measured. Damaged area and hippocampal volume were also measured 72 hours after the HI event. Negative geotaxis test was performed to evaluate early neurobehavioral reflexes. Learning and spatial memory were assessed via Morris Water Maze (MWM) test at 25 days of life. Damaged area and hippocampal volume were different among treatment groups (p = 0.001). The largest tissue lesion was observed in the HI group, followed by HIA. There were no differences between control, HIH, and HIHA. When learning process was analyzed, no differences were found. Females from the HIA group had similar results to the HIH and HIHA groups. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was increased in both HI and HIA. Despite this, in females cleaved caspase-3 was only differently increased in the HI group. All

  17. Improving STEM Student Learning Outcomes with GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal data collection initiated a decade ago as part of a successful NSF-CCLI grant proposal has resulted in a large - and growing - sample (200+) of students who report on their perceptions of self-improvement in Technology, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning proficiencies upon completion of an introductory (200-level) GIS course at New Jersey City University, a Hispanic-Serving and Minority Institution in Jersey City, NJ. Results from student satisfaction surveys indicate that, not surprisingly, 80% of respondents report improved confidence in Technology Literacy. Critical Thinking proficiency is judged to be significantly improved by 60% of respondents. On the other hand, Quantitative Reasoning proficiency confidence is improved in only 30% of students. This latter finding has prompted the instructor to search for more easily recognizable (to the student) ways of embedding quantitative reasoning into the course, as it is obvious to any GIS professional that there is an enormous amount of quantitative reasoning associated with this technology. A second post-course questionnaire asks students to rate themselves in these STEM proficiency areas using rubrics. Results mirror those from the self-satisfaction surveys. On a 5-point Likkert scale, students tend to see themselves improving about one letter grade on average in each proficiency area. The self-evaluation rubrics are reviewed by the instructor and are judged to be accurate for about 75% of the respondents.

  18. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Daniel E.; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G.; Curtis, Anne B.; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W.; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  19. Improving Learning Outcome Using Six Sigma Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetteh, Godson A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to apply the Six Sigma methodology to identify the attributes of a lecturer that will help improve a student's prior knowledge of a discipline from an initial "x" per cent knowledge to a higher "y" per cent of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The data collection method…

  20. Improving Learning Outcome Using Six Sigma Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetteh, Godson A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to apply the Six Sigma methodology to identify the attributes of a lecturer that will help improve a student's prior knowledge of a discipline from an initial "x" per cent knowledge to a higher "y" per cent of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The data collection method…

  1. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  2. Brain injury following trial of hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Barnes, Patrick D; Hintz, Susan R; Laptook, Abbott R; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M; McDonald, Scott A; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Walsh, Michele C; Tyson, Jon E; Donovan, Edward F; Goldberg, Ronald N; Bara, Rebecca; Das, Abhik; Finer, Neil N; Sanchez, Pablo J; Poindexter, Brenda B; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Carlo, Waldemar A; Stoll, Barbara J; Duara, Shahnaz; Guillet, Ronnie; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of our study was to examine the relationship between brain injury and outcome following neonatal hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Design and patients Neonatal MRI scans were evaluated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) randomised controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia and each infant was categorised based upon the pattern of brain injury on the MRI findings. Brain injury patterns were assessed as a marker of death or disability at 18–22 months of age. Results Scans were obtained on 136 of 208 trial participants (65%); 73 in the hypothermia and 63 in the control group. Normal scans were noted in 38 of 73 infants (52%) in the hypothermia group and 22 of 63 infants (35%) in the control group. Infants in the hypothermia group had fewer areas of infarction (12%) compared to infants in the control group (22%). Fifty-one of the 136 infants died or had moderate or severe disability at 18 months. The brain injury pattern correlated with outcome of death or disability and with disability among survivors. Each point increase in the severity of the pattern of brain injury was independently associated with a twofold increase in the odds of death or disability. Conclusions Fewer areas of infarction and a trend towards more normal scans were noted in brain MRI following whole-body hypothermia. Presence of the NICHD pattern of brain injury is a marker of death or moderate or severe disability at 18–22 months following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:23080477

  3. Higher powered magnification improved endodontic surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levenson, David

    2012-01-01

    Medline, Embase and PubMed databases were searched together with hand-searches of a range of journals (Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery). Clinical studies in several languages (English, French, German, Italian and Spanish) with a minimum follow-up of six months evaluated using clinical and radiographic examination included. Assessment and data abstraction were carried out independently. Weighted pooled success rates and relative risk assessment between TRS and EMS were calculated and a meta-analysis was carried out using a random effects model. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Weighted pooled success rates calculated from extracted raw data showed an 88% positive outcome for CRS (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8455-0.9164) and 94% for EMS (95% CI, 0.8889-0.9816). This difference was statistically significant (P < .0005). Relative risk ratio analysis showed that the probability of success for EMS was 1.07 times that for CRS. Seven studies provided information on the individual tooth type. The probability of success between the groups was statistically significant in favour of EMS for molars, but no significant difference was found for anteriors or premolars. The probability for success for EMS proved to be significantly greater than the probability for success for CRS, providing best available evidence on the influence of high-power magnification rendered by the dental operating microscope or the endoscope.

  4. Improving Outcomes in Patients With Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Armen, Scott B; Freer, Carol V; Showalter, John W; Crook, Tonya; Whitener, Cynthia J; West, Cheri; Terndrup, Thomas E; Grifasi, Marissa; DeFlitch, Christopher J; Hollenbeak, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis mortality may be improved by early recognition and appropriate treatment based on evidence-based guidelines. An intervention was developed that focused on earlier identification of sepsis, early antimicrobial administration, and an educational program that was disseminated throughout all hospital units and services. There were 1331 patients with sepsis during the intervention period and 1401 patients with sepsis during the control period. After controlling for expected mortality, patients in the intervention period had 30% lower odds of dying (odds ratio = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.84). They also had 1.07 fewer days on average in the intensive care unit (95% CI = -1.98 to -0.16), 2.15 fewer hospital days (95% CI = -3.45 to -0.86), and incurred on average $1949 less in hospital costs, although the effect on costs was not statistically significant. Continued incremental improvement and sustainment is anticipated through organizational oversight, continued education, and initiation of an automated electronic sepsis alert function. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Web-based hypothermia information: a critical assessment of Internet resources and a comparison to peer-reviewed literature.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Jeremy M; Sheridan, Scott C

    2015-03-01

    Hypothermia is a medical condition characterized by a drop in core body temperature, and it is a considerable source of winter weather-related vulnerability in mid-/high-latitude areas. Heat vulnerability research, including assessments of internet-based resources, is more thoroughly represented in the peer-reviewed literature than cold-related vulnerability research. This study was undertaken to summarize available web-based hypothermia information, and then determine its scientific validity compared to the peer-reviewed literature. This research takes a similar approach used by Hajat et al. for web-based heat vulnerability research, and utilizes this framework to assess hypothermia information found on the internet. Hypothermia-related search terms were used to obtain websites containing hypothermia information, and PubMed (medical literature search engine) and Google Scholar were used to identify peer-reviewed hypothermia literature. The internet information was aggregated into categories (vulnerable populations, symptoms, prevention), which were then compared to the hypothermia literature to determine the scientific validity of the web-based guidance. The internet information was assigned a Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) grade (developed by the American Academy of Family Practitioners) of A, B, or C based on the peer-reviewed evidence. Overall, 25 different pieces of guidance within the three categories were identified on 49 websites. Guidance concerning hypothermia symptoms most frequently appeared on websites, with six symptoms appearing on 50% or greater of websites. No piece of guidance within the vulnerable population categories appeared on greater than 60% of the websites, and prevention-related guidance was characterized by varied SORT grades. Hypothermia information on the internet was not entirely congruent with the information within the peer-reviewed medical literature. Several suggestions for improving web-based hypothermia resources

  6. [Perioperative hypothermia. Impact on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, A P; Lindenblatt, N; Klar, E

    2007-09-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery associated with several adverse effects including impaired wound healing and more frequently leads to wound infections. Perioperative hypothermia affects the hemostasis and various immune functions and therefore interferes with the initial phases of the wound healing process. Furthermore, perioperative hypothermia contributes to wound complications by inhibition of deposition of collagen and prolongation of postoperative catabolism. Wound complications prolong hospitalization and substantially increase medical costs. Thus, maintaining normothermia perioperatively is essential to reduce the number of wound complications.

  7. Factors at scene and in transfer related to the development of hypothermia in major burns

    PubMed Central

    Steele, J.E.; Atkins, J.L.; Vizcaychipi, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is a paucity of evidence regarding incidence and causes of hypothermia in patients with major burns and its impact on outcomes. This paper identifies contributing factors to hypothermia and its relationship with the severity of physiological scoring systems on admission to a tertiary centre. Patients with burns >20% TBSA admitted between March 2010 and July 2013 comprised this retrospective survey. Data relating to causative factors at time of burn, during transfer, physiological outcome scores (BOBI, SOFA, RTS and APACHE II), length of hospital stay and mortality were collected. SPSS statistical software was used for analysis. The study included 31 patients (medians: age 32 years, burn size 30% TBSA). 13% (n=4) of patients died during hospital admission. 42% (n=13) of patients had a temperature <36.0C on arrival. Temperature on arrival at the burns centre was related to the severity of all physiological scores (p=<0.001). There was no difference between groups in terms of mortality in hospital (p=0.151) or length of hospital stay (p=0.547). Our results show that hypothermia is related to burn severity and patient physiological status. They do not show a relationship between hypothermia and external factors at the time of the burn. This paper prompts further investigation into the prevention of hypothermia in patients with major burns. PMID:28149230

  8. Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Carroll, Mary V.; McNamara, Megan; Klem, Mary Lou; King, Brandy; Rich, Michael O.; Chan, Chun W.; Nayak, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Context Video games represent a multibillion-dollar industry in the U.S. Although video gaming has been associated with many negative health consequences, it may also be useful for therapeutic purposes. The goal of this study was to determine whether video games may be useful in improving health outcomes. Evidence acquisition Literature searches were performed in February 2010 in six databases: the Center on Media and Child Health Database of Research, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reference lists were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Only RCTs that tested the effect of video games on a positive, clinically relevant health consequence were included. Study selection criteria were strictly defined and applied by two researchers working independently. Study background information (e.g., location, funding source), sample data (e.g., number of study participants, demographics), intervention and control details, outcomes data, and quality measures were abstracted independently by two researchers. Evidence synthesis Of 1452 articles retrieved using the current search strategy, 38 met all criteria for inclusion. Eligible studies used video games to provide physical therapy, psychological therapy, improved disease self-management, health education, distraction from discomfort, increased physical activity, and skills training for clinicians. Among the 38 studies, a total of 195 health outcomes were examined. Video games improved 69% of psychological therapy outcomes, 59% of physical therapy outcomes, 50% of physical activity outcomes, 46% of clinician skills outcomes, 42% of health education outcomes, 42% of pain distraction outcomes, and 37% of disease self-management outcomes. Study quality was generally poor; for example, two thirds (66%) of studies had follow-up periods of <12 weeks, and only 11% of studies blinded researchers. Conclusions There is potential promise for video games to improve

  9. Novel method for inducing rapid, controllable therapeutic hypothermia in rats using a perivascular implanted closed-loop cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jessica A; Rajput, Padmesh S; Lyden, Patrick D

    2016-07-15

    Hypothermia is the most potent protective therapy available for cerebral ischemia. In experimental models, cooling the brain even a single degree Celsius alters outcome after global and focal ischemia. Difficulties translating therapeutic hypothermia to patients with stroke or after cardiac arrest include: uncertainty as to the optimal treatment duration; best target-depth temperature; and longest time delay after which therapeutic hypothermia won't benefit. Recent results from human clinical trials suggest that cooling with surface methods provides insufficient cooling speed or control over target temperature. Available animal models incorporate surface cooling methods that are slow, and do not allow for precise control of the target temperature. To address this need, we developed a rapid, simple, inexpensive model for inducing hypothermia using a perivascular implanted closed-loop cooling circuit. The method allows precise control of the target temperature. Using this method, target temperature for therapeutic hypothermia was reached within 13±1.07min (Mean±SE). Once at target, the temperature was maintained within 0.09°C for 4h. This method will allow future experiments to determine under what conditions therapeutic hypothermia is effective, determine the optimal relationship among delay, duration, and depth, and provide the research community with a new model for conducting further research into mechanistic questions underlying the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuous quality improvement: an effective strategy for improvement of program outcomes in a higher education setting.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer Field; Marshall, Bennie L

    2008-01-01

    The nursing department at a historically black university has implemented a continuous quality improvement approach to improve its program outcomes. A quality enhancement plan was designed with three major goals: to increase NCLEX-RN pass rates, to improve student advisement processes, and to increase student satisfaction. The strategies implemented to meet these outcomes are described and evaluated.

  11. Evaluating outcomes of care and targeting quality improvement using Medicare health outcomes survey data.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sonya E

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provides a rich source of outcomes data on the Medicare Advantage (MA) program for the US Department of Health and Human Services, managed care organizations participating in Medicare, quality improvement organizations, and health services researchers working to improve quality of care for Medicare enrollees. Since 1998, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has collected longitudinal functional status information to assess the performance of Medicare managed care organizations. This introduction reviews the goals of the HOS program, how the HOS supports health care reform, and outlines recent HOS studies exploring data applications for monitoring outcomes and implementing quality improvement activities.

  12. Cardiac condition during cooling and rewarming periods of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Demirgan, Serdar; Erkalp, Kerem; Sevdi, M Salih; Aydogmus, Meltem Turkay; Kutbay, Numan; Firincioglu, Aydin; Ozalp, Ali; Alagol, Aysin

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia has been used in cardiac surgery for many years for neuroprotection. Mild hypothermia (MH) [body temperature (BT) kept at 32-35°C] has been shown to reduce both mortality and poor neurological outcome in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study investigated whether patients who were expected to benefit neurologically from therapeutic hypothermia (TH) also had improved cardiac function. The study included 30 patients who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest between September 17, 2012, and September 20, 2013, and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following successful CPR. Patient BTs were cooled to 33°C using intravascular heat change. Basal BT, systolic artery pressure (SAP), diastolic artery pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were measured at 36°C, 35°C, 34°C and 33°C during cooling. BT was held at 33°C for 24 hours prior to rewarming. Rewarming was conducted 0.25°C/h. During rewarming, measurements were repeated at 33°C, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C. A final measurement was performed once patients spontaneously returned to basal BT. We compared cooling and rewarming cardiac measurements at the same BTs. SAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). DAP values during rewarming (basal temperature, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling. MAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). CO and CI values were higher during rewarming than during cooling. GEDI and ELWI did not differ during cooling and rewarming. SVRI values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C, 36°C and basal temperature) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing cardiac

  13. Cardiac condition during cooling and rewarming periods of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been used in cardiac surgery for many years for neuroprotection. Mild hypothermia (MH) [body temperature (BT) kept at 32–35°C] has been shown to reduce both mortality and poor neurological outcome in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study investigated whether patients who were expected to benefit neurologically from therapeutic hypothermia (TH) also had improved cardiac function. Methods The study included 30 patients who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest between September 17, 2012, and September 20, 2013, and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following successful CPR. Patient BTs were cooled to 33°C using intravascular heat change. Basal BT, systolic artery pressure (SAP), diastolic artery pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were measured at 36°C, 35°C, 34°C and 33°C during cooling. BT was held at 33°C for 24 hours prior to rewarming. Rewarming was conducted 0.25°C/h. During rewarming, measurements were repeated at 33°C, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C. A final measurement was performed once patients spontaneously returned to basal BT. We compared cooling and rewarming cardiac measurements at the same BTs. Results SAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). DAP values during rewarming (basal temperature, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling. MAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). CO and CI values were higher during rewarming than during cooling. GEDI and ELWI did not differ during cooling and rewarming. SVRI values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C, 36°C and basal temperature) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). Conclusions To our knowledge

  14. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... not possible, get the person out of the wind and use a blanket to provide insulation from ... protect your body. These include: Mittens (not gloves) Wind-proof, water-resistant, many-layered clothing Two pairs ...

  15. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal cavity (peritoneal cavity). Staying warm in cold weather Before you or your children step out into cold air, remember the advice that follows with the simple acronym COLD — cover, overexertion, layers, dry: Cover. Wear a hat or other protective covering ...

  16. Diverse effects of hypothermia therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury based on the computed tomography classification of the traumatic coma data bank.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Eiichi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Kaneko, Tadashi; Oda, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Susumu; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2015-03-01

    A multicenter randomized controlled trial of patients with severe traumatic brain injury who received therapeutic hypothermia or fever control was performed from 2002 to 2008 in Japan (BHYPO). There was no difference in the therapeutic effect on traumatic brain injury between the two groups. The efficacy of hypothermia treatment and the objective of the treatment were reexamined based on a secondary analysis of the BHYPO trial in 135 patients (88 treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 47 with fever control). This analysis was performed to examine clinical outcomes according to the CT classification of the Traumatic Coma Data Bank on admission. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale and mortality at 6 months after injury. Good recovery and moderate disability were defined as favorable outcomes. Favorable outcomes in young patients (≤50 years old) with evacuated mass lesions significantly increased from 33.3% with fever control to 77.8% with therapeutic hypothermia. Patients with diffuse injury III who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia, however, had significantly higher mortality than patients treated with fever control. It was difficult to control intracranial pressure with hypothermia for patients with diffuse injury III, but hypothermia was effective for young patients with an evacuated mass lesion.

  17. Metformin and improved treatment outcomes in radiation therapy - A review.

    PubMed

    Samsuri, Nur Atiqah Binte; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2017-04-01

    Metformin, a primary treatment for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, is associated with improved outcomes for diabetic cancer patients fuelling further investigation on its mechanisms of action. The radiosensitising properties of metformin are increasingly reported in pre-clinical studies. This review discusses whether metformin should be offered to radiotherapy (RT) cancer patients as a means to improve their treatment outcomes. A database search was conducted for articles published with metformin as the main intervention between 2010 and 2016. Three groups of RT cancer patients were analysed: diabetic patients using metformin, diabetic patients not using metformin and non-diabetic patients not using metformin. Data on survival and recurrence metrics were extracted. Thirteen studies were included. Conflicting evidence exists with regards to the impact of metformin administration on recurrence and survival outcomes following radiotherapy. Three studies reported improved tumour response determined by recurrence rates while five studies did not observe differences or metformin use was not the associated reason. One study revealed inconsistent tumour response results. Metformin was reported as improving survival outcomes in 2 studies and not improving outcomes in 5 studies. 4 studies showed indefinite results. Although metformin may improve tumour response in the non-randomized, retrospective studies analysed, it may not necessarily confer survival benefits. Future prospective and randomised trials are required to translate the positive impact of metformin documented in pre-clinical and retrospective studies into improve management of RT cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  19. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  20. ThermoSpots to Detect Hypothermia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Thomas B.; Kennedy, Neil; Ndoya, Noel; Emond, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is a risk factor for increased mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Yet frequent temperature measurement remains unfeasible in under-resourced units in developing countries. ThermoSpot is a continuous temperature monitoring sticker designed originally for neonates. When applied to skin, its liquid crystals are designed to turn black with hypothermia and remain green with normothermia. Aims To (i) estimate the diagnostic accuracy of ThermoSpots for detecting WHO-defined hypothermia (core temperature <35.5°C or peripheral temperature <35.0°C) in children with SAM and (ii) determine their acceptability amongst mothers. Methods Children with SAM in a malnutrition unit in Malawi were enrolled during March-July 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of ThermoSpots were calculated by comparing the device colour against ‘gold standard’ rectal temperatures taken on admission and follow up peripheral temperatures taken until discharge. Guardians completed a questionnaire to assess acceptability. Results Hypothermia was uncommon amongst the 162 children enrolled. ThermoSpot successfully detected the one rectal temperature and two peripheral temperatures recorded that met the WHO definition of hypothermia. Overall, 3/846 (0.35%) temperature measurements were in the WHO-defined hypothermia range. Interpreting the brown transition colour (between black and green) as hypothermia improved sensitivities. For milder hypothermia definitions, sensitivities declined (<35.4°C, 50.0%; <35.9°C, 39.2%). Specificity was consistently above 94%. From questionnaires, 40/43 (93%) mothers reported they were 90–100% happy with the device overall. Free-text answers revealed themes of “Skin Rashes”, “User-satisfaction” and “Empowerment". Conclusion Although hypothermia was uncommon in this study, ThermoSpots successfully detected these episodes in malnourished children and were acceptable to mothers. Research in settings where

  1. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  2. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  3. Intra-carotid cold magnesium sulfate infusion induces selective cerebral hypothermia and neuroprotection in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wu, Yong-Ming; Ji, Zhong; Ji, Ya-Bin; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Local hypothermia induced by intra-arterial infusion of cold saline reduces brain injury in ischemic stroke. Administration of magnesium sulfate through the internal carotid artery is also known to reduce ischemic brain damage. The neuroprotective effects of combination therapy with local endovascular hypothermia and intra-carotid magnesium sulfate infusion has not been evaluated. The aim of the study was to determine whether infusion of intra-carotid cold magnesium offers neuroprotective efficacy superior to cold saline infusion alone. Sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion and were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated group; stroke control group; local cold magnesium infusion group; local cold saline infusion group; local normothermic magnesium infusion group; and local normothermic saline infusion group. Before reperfusion, ischemic rats received local infusion or no treatment. Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and brain water content were evaluated at 48 h after reperfusion. Selective brain hypothermia (33-34 °C) was successfully induced by intra-carotid cold infusion. Local cold saline infusion and local cold magnesium infusion reduced the infarct volumes by 48 % (p < 0.001) and 65 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared with stroke controls. Brain water content was decreased significantly in animals treated with local cold magnesium infusion. Furthermore, the rats given a local cold magnesium infusion had the best neurological outcome. Local normothermic infusion failed to improve ischemic brain damage. These data suggest that local hypothermia induced by intra-carotid administration of cold magnesium is more effective in reducing acute ischemic damage than infusion of cold saline alone.

  4. Does induction time of mild hypothermia influence the survival duration of septic rats?

    PubMed

    Léon, Karelle; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Ollivier, Hélène; Monbet, Valérie; L'Her, Erwan

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between hypothermia induction time and survival duration following sepsis was studied on 31 male Sprague-Dawley rats (median weight 311 g, range 260-356 g). After anesthesia and when the target temperature was reached (normothermia: 38°C or mild induced hypothermia: 34°C), sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and perforation. Five experimental groups were used. In groups 1 and 2, temperature of septic rats was maintained throughout the experiment at 38°C (seven rats) or 34°C (six rats), respectively. In groups 3, 4, and 5, septic rats (six per group) were maintained at 38°C for 1, 2, and 3 hours, respectively, and then placed in mild hypothermia (34°C). For each group, the survival duration was determined and blood samples were performed at the tail to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plasma concentration. Whatever the experimental group, a decrease in temperature from 38°C to 34°C significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats compared with those maintained at 38°C throughout the experiment. The delay between the onset of sepsis and induction of hypothermia was also crucial. Thus, hypothermia induced after 1 hour of sepsis at 38°C significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats (12 hours 37 minutes±1 hour 4 minutes; group 3) compared with hypothermia induced after 3 hours of sepsis (8 hours 56 minutes±1 h 20 minutes; group 5). Moreover, except for group 5, survival duration improvement of septic rats observed in hypothermia was related to a lower increase of TNF-α plasma concentration compared with septic rats in normothermia. During sepsis, mild induced hypothermia significantly increased the survival duration of septic rats. The earlier hypothermia was applied, the longer the septic rats survived. According to these results, hypothermia may therefore provide the necessary time to apply a proper treatment.

  5. Aneurysms of the basilar artery treated with circulatory arrest, hypothermia, and barbiturate cerebral protection.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, R F; Hadley, M N; Rigamonti, D; Carter, L P; Raudzens, P A; Shedd, S A; Wilkinson, E

    1988-06-01

    Complete circulatory arrest, deep hypothermia, and barbiturate cerebral protection are efficacious adjuncts in the surgical treatment of selected giant intracranial aneurysms. These techniques were utilized in seven patients, one with a large and six with giant basilar artery aneurysms; four had excellent results, one had a good result, one had a fair outcome, and one died. The rationale for the use of complete cardiac arrest with extracorporeal circulation, hypothermia, and barbiturate cerebral protection is outlined. The surgical and anesthetic considerations are reviewed. The perioperative morbidity and long-term results support the use of these techniques in selected patients with complex intracranial vascular lesions.

  6. A simulation model for improving learner and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Titler, Marita G

    2014-09-01

    Simulation has become a necessary and integral part of education for prelicensure and ongoing education of health care practitioners. To guide this process, the Simulation Model for Improving Learner and Health Outcomes (SMILHO) model provides a framework to design the experience from a science of learning approach and links it to learner and health outcomes to add to the knowledge base. Much work has been done in this area, and the SMILHO model will support the future work needed to continue to create effective simulation-based learning experiences and move research from knowledge and skill evaluation to learner and health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving numeracy through values affirmation enhances decision and STEM outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ellen; Tompkins, Mary Kate; Schley, Dan; Meilleur, Louise; Sinayev, Aleksander; Tusler, Martin; Wagner, Laura; Crocker, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Greater numeracy has been correlated with better health and financial outcomes in past studies, but causal effects in adults are unknown. In a 9-week longitudinal study, undergraduate students, all taking a psychology statistics course, were randomly assigned to a control condition or a values-affirmation manipulation intended to improve numeracy. By the final week in the course, the numeracy intervention (statistics-course enrollment combined with values affirmation) enhanced objective numeracy, subjective numeracy, and two decision-related outcomes (financial literacy and health-related behaviors). It also showed positive indirect-only effects on financial outcomes and a series of STEM-related outcomes (course grades, intentions to take more math-intensive courses, later math-intensive courses taken based on academic transcripts). All decision and STEM-related outcome effects were mediated by the changes in objective and/or subjective numeracy and demonstrated similar and robust enhancements. Improvements to abstract numeric reasoning can improve everyday outcomes. PMID:28704410

  8. Improving Care Delivery and Outcomes in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Julia G.; Bingham, Catherine A.; Morgan, Esi M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight efforts in pediatric rheumatology related to optimizing the care provided to patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases and describe various approaches to improve health outcomes. Recent findings Recent studies report low rates of remission, frequent occurrence of comorbidities, disease damage, and decreased health-related quality of life in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Pediatric Rheumatology Care and Outcomes Improvement Network is a quality improvement learning network that has demonstrated improvement in process of care measures through use of a centralized patient registry, and interventions including pre-visit planning, population management, shared decision making, and patient/parent engagement. A pediatric rheumatology patient-powered research network was established to enable patient and caregiver participation in setting research priorities and to facilitate data sharing to answer research questions. Quality measure development and benchmarking is proceeding in multiple pediatric rheumatic diseases. Summary This review summarizes the current efforts to improve care delivery and outcomes in pediatric rheumatic diseases through a learning health system approach that harnesses knowledge from the clinical encounter to serve quality improvement, research and discovery. Incorporating standard approaches to medication treatment plans may reduce variation in care. Including the patient voice to design of research studies brings focus on more patient relevant outcomes. (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1). PMID:26780426

  9. Improving staff performance through clinician application of outcome management.

    PubMed

    Reid, Dennis H; Parsons, Marsha B; Lattimore, L Perry; Towery, Donna L; Reade, Kamara K

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance) to improve, developing and implementing a performance monitoring system, training staff in the targeted performances using performance- and competency-based training, and providing on-the-job supportive and corrective feedback. In Study 1, a senior job coach was assisted in using the outcome management steps to improve prompting procedures of three staff job coaches working with supported workers with autism in a community job. Correct prompting improved for all three job coaches following implementation of the outcome management process by the senior job coach. In Study 2, two teachers in two adult education classrooms were assisted in using the process to improve the degree to which their assistants involved students with severe disabilities in meal-preparation activities. Student participation in the activities increased in both classrooms when the teachers implemented the outcome management steps. In both studies, improved performances maintained for at least a 14-week period. Results are discussed in regard to working with supervisors as representing one step in promoting the adoption of research-based supervisory strategies within human service organizations.

  10. Facilitating communication with patients for improved migraine outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buse, Dawn C; Lipton, Richard B

    2008-06-01

    Effective communication is integral to good medical care. Medical professional groups, regulatory agencies, educators, researchers, and patients recognize its importance. Quality of medical communication is directly related to patient satisfaction, improvement in medication adherence, treatment compliance, other outcomes, decreased risk of malpractice, and increase in health care providers' levels of satisfaction. However, skill level and training remain problematic in this area. Fortunately, research has shown that medical communication skills can be successfully taught and acquired, and that improvement in communication skills improves outcomes. The American Migraine Communication Studies I and II evaluated the current state of health care provider-patient communication in headache care and tested a simple educational intervention. They found problematic issues but demonstrated that these areas could be improved. We review theoretical models of effective communication and discuss strategies for improving communication, including active listening, interviewing strategies, and methods for gathering information about headache-related impairment, mood, and quality of life.

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, F.W.; Silverstein, F.S.; Holubkov, R.; Slomine, B.S.; Christensen, J.R.; Nadkarni, V.M.; Meert, K.L.; Browning, B.; Pemberton, V.L.; Page, K.; Gildea, M.R.; Scholefield, B.R.; Shankaran, S.; Hutchison, J.S.; Berger, J.T.; Ofori-Amanfo, G.; Newth, C.J.L.; Topjian, A.; Bennett, K.S.; Koch, J.D.; Pham, N.; Chanani, N.K.; Pineda, J.A.; Harrison, R.; Dalton, H.J.; Alten, J.; Schleien, C.L.; Goodman, D.M.; Zimmerman, J.J.; Bhalala, U.S.; Schwarz, A.J.; Porter, M.B.; Shah, S.; Fink, E.L.; McQuillen, P.; Wu, T.; Skellett, S.; Thomas, N.J.; Nowak, J.E.; Baines, P.B.; Pappachan, J.; Mathur, M.; Lloyd, E.; van der Jagt, E.W.; Dobyns, E.L.; Meyer, M.T.; Sanders, R.C.; Clark, A.E.; Dean, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. METHODS In a trial conducted at 37 children’s hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. RESULTS The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P = 0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P = 0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P = 0.56). The incidences of blood-product use

  12. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children.

    PubMed

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Gildea, Marianne R; Scholefield, Barnaby R; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Berger, John T; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Newth, Christopher J L; Topjian, Alexis; Bennett, Kimberly S; Koch, Joshua D; Pham, Nga; Chanani, Nikhil K; Pineda, Jose A; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi J; Alten, Jeffrey; Schleien, Charles L; Goodman, Denise M; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Bhalala, Utpal S; Schwarz, Adam J; Porter, Melissa B; Shah, Samir; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Wu, Theodore; Skellett, Sophie; Thomas, Neal J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Baines, Paul B; Pappachan, John; Mathur, Mudit; Lloyd, Eric; van der Jagt, Elise W; Dobyns, Emily L; Meyer, Michael T; Sanders, Ronald C; Clark, Amy E; Dean, J Michael

    2017-01-26

    Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. In a trial conducted at 37 children's hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P=0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P=0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P=0.56). The incidences of blood-product use, infection, and serious adverse

  13. Effect of endovascular hypothermia on acute ischemic edema: morphometric analysis of the ICTuS trial.

    PubMed

    Guluma, Kama Z; Oh, Haeryong; Yu, Sung-Wook; Meyer, Brett C; Rapp, Karen; Lyden, Patrick D

    2008-01-01

    Pilot studies of hypothermia for stroke suggest a potential benefit in humans. We sought to test whether hypothermia decreases post-ischemic edema using CT scans from a pilot trial of endovascular hypothermia for stroke. Eighteen patients with acute ischemic stroke underwent therapeutic hypothermia (target = 33 degrees C) for 12 or 24 h followed by a 12-h controlled re-warm using an endovascular system. CT scans obtained at baseline, 36-48 h (right after cooling and re-warming) and 30 days were digitized, intracranial compartment volumes measured using a validated stereological technique, and the calculated change in CSF volume between the three time-points were used as an estimate of edema formation in each patient. Patients were grouped retrospectively for analysis based on whether they cooled effectively (i.e., to a temperature nadir of less than 34.5 degrees C within 8 h) or not. Eleven patients were cooled partially or not at all, and seven were effectively cooled. Baseline demographics and compartment volumes and densities were similar in both groups. At 36-48 h, the total CSF volume had significantly decreased in the not-cooled group compared to the cooled group (P < 0.05), with no significant difference in mean volume of ischemia between them (73 +/- 73 ml vs. 54 +/- 59 ml, respectively), suggesting an ameliorative effect of hypothermia on acute edema formation. At 30 days, the difference in CSF volumes had resolved, and infarct volumes (73 +/- 71 ml vs. 84 +/- 102 ml, respectively) and functional outcomes were comparable. Endovascular hypothermia decreases acute post-ischemic cerebral edema. A larger trial is warranted to determine if it affects final infarct volume and outcome in stroke.

  14. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  15. Germany's Disease Management Program: Improving Outcomes in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design. PMID:17288080

  16. Germany's disease management program: improving outcomes in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design.

  17. Improved outcome in Sweden after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and possible association with improvements in every link in the chain of survival.

    PubMed

    Strömsöe, Anneli; Svensson, Leif; Axelsson, Åsa B; Claesson, Andreas; Göransson, Katarina E; Nordberg, Per; Herlitz, Johan

    2015-04-07

    To describe out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Sweden from a long-term perspective in terms of changes in outcome and circumstances at resuscitation. All cases of OHCA (n = 59,926) reported to the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register from 1992 to 2011 were included. The number of cases reported (n/100,000 person-years) increased from 27 (1992) to 52 (2011). Crew-witnessed cases, cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to the arrival of the emergency medical service (EMS), and EMS response time increased (P < 0.0001). There was a decrease in the delay from collapse to calling for the EMS in all patients and from collapse to defibrillation among patients found in ventricular fibrillation (P < 0.0001). The proportion of patients found in ventricular fibrillation decreased from 35 to 25% (P < 0.0001). Thirty-day survival increased from 4.8 (1992) to 10.7% (2011) (P < 0.0001), particularly among patients found in a shockable rhythm and patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) at hospital admission. Among patients hospitalized with ROSC in 2008-2011, 41% underwent therapeutic hypothermia and 28% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Among 30-day survivors in 2008-2011, 94% had a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2 at discharge from hospital and the results were even better if patients were found in a shockable rhythm. From a long-term perspective, 30-day survival after OHCA in Sweden more than doubled. The increase in survival was most marked among patients found in a shockable rhythm and those hospitalized with ROSC. There were improvements in all four links in the chain of survival, which might explain the improved outcome. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of mild hypothermia on hemodynamics in cardiac arrest survivors and isolated failing human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Pelster, Theresa; Pax, Anja; Horn, Wiebke; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Unsöld, Bernhard W.; Seidler, Tim; Wagner, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S.

    2010-01-01

    Post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction is a common phenomenon after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and contributes to hemodynamic instability and low survival rates after cardiac arrest. Mild hypothermia for 24 h after ROSC has been shown to significantly improve neurologic recovery and survival rates. In the present study we investigate the influence of therapeutic hypothermia on hemodynamic parameters in resuscitated patients and on contractility in failing human myocardium. We analyzed hemodynamic data from 200 cardiac arrest survivors during the hypothermia period. The initial LVEF was 32.6 ± 1.2% indicating a significantly impaired LV function. During hypothermia induction, the infusion rate of epinephrine could be significantly reduced from 9.1 ± 1.3 μg/min [arrival intensive care unit (ICU) 35.4°C] to 4.6 ± 1.0 μg/min (34°C) and 2.8 ± 0.5 μg/min (33°C). The dobutamine and norepinephrine application rates were not changed significantly. The mean arterial blood pressure remained stable. The mean heart rate significantly decreased from 91.8 ± 1.7 bpm (arrival ICU) to 77.3 ± 1.5 bpm (34°C) and 70.3 ± 1.4 bpm (33°C). In vitro we investigated the effect of hypothermia on isolated ventricular muscle strips from explanted failing human hearts. With decreasing temperature, the contractility increased to a maximum of 168 ± 23% at 27°C (n = 16, P < 0.05). Positive inotropic response to hypothermia was accompanied by moderately increased rapid cooling contractures as a measure of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content, but can be elicited even when the SR Ca2+ release is blocked in the presence of ryanodine. Contraction and relaxation kinetics are prolonged with hypothermia, indicating increased Ca2+ sensitivity as the main mechanism responsible for inotropy. In conclusion, mild hypothermia stabilizes hemodynamics in cardiac arrest survivors which might contribute to improved survival rates in these patients

  19. Efforts to Improve Perinatal Outcomes for Women Enrolled in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Robinson, Lekisha; Cha, Stephen; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha

    2015-08-01

    Improving women's health and perinatal health outcomes is a high priority for Medicaid, the jointly financed federal-state health coverage program. The authorities provided by the Affordable Care Act give Medicaid new resources and opportunities to improve coverage and perinatal care. Given that the Medicaid program currently covers almost half of all births in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in partnership with states and other stakeholders, is using new and existing authorities to improve birth outcomes. Quality measurement, quality-improvement projects, and expanded models of care underscore the major quality approach of the center. As an outgrowth of an expert panel that included membership of several state Medicaid medical directors, Medicaid providers, and consumer representatives, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services launched the Maternal and Infant Health Initiative, which aims to increase postpartum visit rates and the use of effective contraception among women covered by Medicaid. This Initiative provides focus on key opportunities and strategies to improve the rate, measurement, timing, and content of postpartum visits. Additionally, a focus on contraception will serve to improve pregnancy planning and spacing and prevent unintended pregnancy. As the Initiative evolves, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services plans to identify policy, service delivery, and reimbursement policies to advance the Initiative's goals and improve outcomes for women covered by Medicaid.

  20. Management of hypothermia: impact of lecture-based interactive workshops on training of pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Altun, Insaf; Karakoç, Ali

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia and its impact on pediatric nurses' training. This is a pretest-to-posttest quasi-experimental descriptive study. Thirty pediatric nurses attended an interactive lecture-based interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia. Participants had to accept an invitation to the presentation before the training event. They completed the lecture, and a multiple-choice question test before and after the lecture was given. There was a significant improvement in mean test scores after the lecture when compared with those before the lecture (mean [SD], 15.5 [1.3] vs 5.0 [1.7], P < 0.001). The information gained in this study will be valuable as a baseline for further research and help guide improvements in the management of hypothermia with the ultimate goal of enhancing safe and quality patient care.

  1. [Hypothermia due to anti-tuberculosis drugs: first case].

    PubMed

    Oualil, H; Nejjari, S; Bourkadi, J E; Iraqi, G

    2014-10-01

    Hypothermia - an adverse reaction of drug use potentially severe - requires an early diagnosis and an adapted management. We report the first case, to our knowledge of hypothermia due to anti-tuberculosis drugs.

  2. Trauma systems: improving trauma outcomes in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Becher, Robert D; Meredith, J Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s, there has been a tremendous improvement in the outcomes for injured patients in North Carolina; the scope, significance, and virtue of this achievement are remarkable. This commentary reviews how the state has consistently decreased the burden of injury through its integrated, systems-based approach to trauma care.

  3. Improving Staff Performance through Clinician Application of Outcome Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.; Lattimore, L. Perry; Towery, Donna L.; Reade, Kamara K.

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance)…

  4. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a "systems" approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. A one-day "lean" training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, "glitch count" and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. This version of "lean" system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in "lean" projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success.

  5. Automated peritoneal lavage: an extremely rapid and safe way to induce hypothermia in post-resuscitation patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is a worldwide used therapy to improve neurological outcome in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest (CA). Preclinical data suggest that timing and speed of induction are related to reduction of secondary brain damage and improved outcome. Methods Aiming at a rapid induction and stable maintenance phase, MTH induced via continuous peritoneal lavage (PL) using the Velomedix® Inc. automated PL system was evaluated and compared to historical controls in which hypothermia was achieved using cooled saline intravenous infusions and cooled blankets. Results In 16 PL patients, time to reach the core target temperature of 32.5°C was 30 minutes (interquartile range (IQR): 19 to 60), which was significantly faster compare to 150 minutes (IQR: 112 to 240) in controls. The median rate of cooling during the induction phase in the PL group of 4.1°C/h (IQR: 2.2 to 8.2) was significantly faster compared to 0.9°C/h (IQR: 0.5 to 1.3) in controls. During the 24-hour maintenance phase mean core temperature in the PL patients was 32.38 ± 0.18°C (range: 32.03 to 32.69°C) and in control patients 32.46 ± 0.48°C (range: 31.20 to 33.63°C), indicating more steady temperature control in the PL group compared to controls. Furthermore, the coefficient of variation (VC) for temperature during the maintenance phase was lower in the PL group (VC: 0.5%) compared to the control group (VC: 1.5%). In contrast to 23% of the control patients, none of the PL patients showed an overshoot of hypothermia below 31°C during the maintenance phase. Survival and neurological outcome was not different between the two groups. Neither shivering nor complications related to insertion or use of the PL method were observed. Conclusions Using PL in post-CA patients results in a rapidly reached target temperature and a very precise maintenance, unprecedented in clinical studies evaluating MTH techniques. This opens the way to investigate the

  6. Moderate hypothermia during aortic arch surgery is associated with reduced risk of early mortality.

    PubMed

    Tsai, January Y; Pan, Wei; Lemaire, Scott A; Pisklak, Paul; Lee, Vei-Vei; Bracey, Arthur W; Elayda, MacArthur A; Preventza, Ourania; Price, Matt D; Collard, Charles D; Coselli, Joseph S

    2013-09-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) provides cerebral protection during aortic arch surgery. However, the ideal temperature for HCA during ACP remains unknown. Clinical outcomes were compared in patients who underwent moderate (nasopharyngeal temperature, ≥ 20 °C) versus deep (nasopharyngeal temperature, <20 °C) HCA with ACP during aortic arch repair. By using a prospectively maintained clinical database, we analyzed data from 221 consecutive patients who underwent aortic arch replacement with HCA and ACP between December 2006 and May 2009. Seventy-eight patients underwent deep hypothermia (mean lowest temperature, 16.8 °C ± 1.7 °C) and 143 patients underwent moderate hypothermia (mean, 22.9 °C ± 1.4 °C) before systemic circulatory arrest was initiated. Multivariate stepwise logistic and linear regressions were performed to determine whether depth of hypothermia independently predicted postoperative outcomes and blood-product use. Compared with moderate hypothermia, deep hypothermia was associated independently with a greater risk of in-hospital death (7.7% vs 0.7%; odds ratio [OR], 9.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-81.6; P = .005) and 30-day all-cause mortality (9.0% vs 2.1%; OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.2-18.6; P = .02), and with longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (154 ± 62 vs 140 ± 46 min; P = .008). Deep hypothermia also was associated with a higher incidence of stroke, although this association was not statistically significant (7.6% vs 2.8%; P = .073; OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 0.9-12.5). No difference was seen in acute kidney injury, blood product transfusion, or need for surgical re-exploration. Moderate hypothermia with ACP is associated with lower in-hospital and 30-day mortality, shorter cardiopulmonary bypass time, and fewer neurologic sequelae than deep hypothermia in patients who undergo aortic arch surgery with ACP. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby

  7. Improving health care outcomes through geriatric rehabilitation. Conference summary.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K N

    1997-06-01

    The Boston Working Group on Improving Health Care Outcomes Through Geriatric Rehabilitation was structured around four major themes: (1) defining disability or disablement; (2) the patient's experience of the processes and outcomes of care; (3) the role and value of clinical practice guidelines; and (4) the need for casemix and severity or risk adjustment procedures and measures. These discussions produced opening statements of policy or empiric issues and recommendations about the best means of demonstrating the benefits of geriatric rehabilitation and, in particular, how to measure, ensure, and improve the quality of rehabilitation services, especially for the elderly. This article summarizes the reports from the work groups and identifies some common themes. Critical points include: (1) the need to define and describe geriatric rehabilitation better for nonexperts in the health field and for patients and consumers in general; (2) the need for more research to link rehabilitation processes with measurable and clinically important outcomes; (3) the breadth and depth of domains of processes and outcomes of care that ideally could and should be measured; and (4) the need to reach many audiences with a clear message about the importance of geriatric rehabilitation in ensuring high quality of care and good health status and functional outcomes for all elderly patients.

  8. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  9. Sustained improvement in nutritional outcomes at two paediatric cystic fibrosis centres after quality improvement collaboratives.

    PubMed

    Savant, Adrienne P; Britton, LaCrecia J; Petren, Kristofer; McColley, Susanna A; Gutierrez, Hector H

    2014-04-01

    To describe the characteristics of sustained improved nutritional outcomes through the use of quality improvement (QI) methodology. Retrospective analysis of a QI intervention in two institutions, implemented as part of larger national collaboratives. Paediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) programmes in academic centres in Alabama and Illinois. All paediatric patients enrolled in the CF Foundation (CFF) Patient Data Registry were included. Improved and sustained nutrition outcomes occurred through implementation of the CFF practice guidelines for CF nutrition management via care delivery processes, nutritional interventions, team engagement and data display. Mean body mass index (BMI) percentile, percentage of patients less than 50th percentile and percentage less than 10th percentile for all patients aged 2-20 years were tracked through run charts and statistical process control charts. Mann-Whitney U and χ(2) tests were used to determine significance between each centre and national outcomes. Each centre achieved rapid improvement in mean BMI percentile in patients, one centre rising from the 40th percentile in 2001 to the 49th percentile in 2003, the other rising from the 37th percentile in 2003 to the 45th percentile in 2004. These centres have also maintained improved nutritional outcomes, so that they were at the 60th and 55th percentiles, respectively, in 2011. Sustained improvement was accomplished through QI methodology, use of data as a driver for improvement and a change in culture. Participation in collaboratives led to improved nutrition outcomes while a strong culture of QI facilitated sustained improvement.

  10. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes: How they may be used to improve outcomes after Radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Khurram M.; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of managed healthcare, the measuring and reporting of surgical outcomes is a universal mandate. The outcomes should be monitored and reported in a timely manner. Methods for measuring surgical outcomes should be continuous, free of bias and accommodate variations in patient factors. The traditional methods of surgical audits are periodic, resource-intensive and have a potential for bias. These audits are typically annual and therefore there is a long time lag before any effective remedial action could be taken. To reduce this delay the manufacturing industry has long used statistical control-chart monitoring systems, as they offer continuous monitoring and are better suited to monitoring outcomes systematically and promptly. The healthcare industry is now embracing such systematic methods. Radical cystectomy (RC) is one of the most complex surgical procedures. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes after RC can identify areas of improvements on an ongoing basis, which can be used to initiate timely corrective measures. We review the available methods to improve the outcomes. Cumulative summation charts have the potential to be a robust method which can prompt early warnings and thus initiate an analysis of root causes. This early-warning system might help to resolve the issue promptly with no need to wait for the report of annual audits. This system can also be helpful for monitoring learning curves for individuals, both in training or when learning a new technology. PMID:26413333

  11. Improving Outcome for Mental Disorders by Enhancing Memory for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Smith, Rita L.; Gumport, Nicole B.; Hollon, Steven D.; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Hein, Kerrie; Dolsen, Michael R.; Hamen, Kristen; Kanady, Jennifer C.; Thompson, Monique A.; Abrons, Deidre

    2017-01-01

    Summary Patients exhibit poor memory for treatment. A novel Memory Support Intervention, derived from basic science in cognitive psychology and education, is tested with the goal of improving patient memory for treatment and treatment outcome. Adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) were randomized to 14 sessions of cognitive therapy (CT)+Memory Support (n = 25) or CT-as-usual (CTMS; n = 23). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment and 6 months later. Memory support was greater in CT+Memory Support compared to the CT-as-usual. Compared to CT-as-usual, small to medium effect sizes were observed for recall of treatment points at post-treatment. There was no difference between the treatment arms on depression severity (primary outcome). However, the odds of meeting criteria for ‘response’ and ‘remission’ were higher in CT+Memory Support compared with CT-as-usual. CT+Memory Support also showed an advantage on functional impairment. While some decline was observed, the advantage of CT+Memory Support was evident through 6-month follow-up. Patients with less than 16 years of education experience greater benefits from memory support than those with 16 or more years of education. Memory support can be manipulated, may improve patient memory for treatment and may be associated with an improved outcome. PMID:27089159

  12. Purchasing population health: aligning financial incentives to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the concept of population health, including its definition, measurement, and determinants, and to suggest an approach for aligning financial incentives toward this goal. DATA SOURCE, STUDY DESIGN, DATA EXTRACTION. Literature review, policy analysis PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The article presents the argument that a major reason for our slow progress toward health outcome improvement is that there is no operational definition of population health and that financial incentives are not aligned to this goal. Current attempts at process measures as indicators of quality or outcome are not adequate for the task. It is suggested that some measure of health-adjusted life expectancy be adopted for this purpose, and that integrated delivery systems and other agents responsible for nonmedical determinants be rewarded for improvement in this measure. This will require the development of an investment portfolio across the determinants of health based on relative marginal return to health, with horizontal integration strategies across sectoral boundaries. A 20-year three-phase development strategy is proposed, including components of research and acceptance, integrated health system implementation, and cross-sectoral integration. CONCLUSIONS: The U.S. healthcare system is a $1 trillion industry without a definition of its product. Until population outcome measures are developed and rewarded for, we will not solve the twenty-first century challenge of maximizing health outcome improvement for the resources available. Images Figure 1 PMID:9618669

  13. Randomized Trial of Plastic Bags to Prevent Term Neonatal Hypothermia in a Resource-Poor Setting

    PubMed Central

    Belsches, Theodore C.; Tilly, Alyssa E.; Miller, Tonya R.; Kambeyanda, Rohan H.; Leadford, Alicia; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Ramani, Manimaran; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Term infants in resource-poor settings frequently develop hypothermia during the first hours after birth. Plastic bags or wraps are a low-cost intervention for the prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants that may also be effective in term infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that placement of term neonates in plastic bags at birth reduces hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in a resource-poor hospital. METHODS: This parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at University Teaching Hospital, the tertiary referral center in Zambia. Inborn neonates with both a gestational age ≥37 weeks and a birth weight ≥2500 g were randomized 1:1 to either a standard thermoregulation protocol or to a standard thermoregulation protocol with placement of the torso and lower extremities inside a plastic bag within 10 minutes after birth. The primary outcome was hypothermia (<36.5°C axillary temperature) at 1 hour after birth. RESULTS: Neonates randomized to plastic bag (n = 135) or to standard thermoregulation care (n = 136) had similar baseline characteristics (birth weight, gestational age, gender, and baseline temperature). Neonates in the plastic bag group had a lower rate of hypothermia (60% vs 73%, risk ratio 0.76, confidence interval 0.60–0.96, P = .026) and a higher axillary temperature (36.4 ± 0.5°C vs 36.2 ± 0.7°C, P < .001) at 1 hour after birth compared with infants receiving standard care. CONCLUSIONS: Placement in a plastic bag at birth reduced the incidence of hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in term neonates born in a resource-poor setting, but most neonates remained hypothermic. PMID:23979082

  14. Comparison of resistive heating and forced-air warming to prevent inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    John, M; Crook, D; Dasari, K; Eljelani, F; El-Haboby, A; Harper, C M

    2016-02-01

    Forced-air warming is a commonly used warming modality, which has been shown to reduce the incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (<36°C). The reusable resistive heating mattresses offer a potentially cheaper alternative, however, and one of the research recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was to evaluate such devices formally. We conducted a randomized single-blinded study comparing perioperative hypothermia in patients receiving resistive heating or forced-air warming. A total of 160 patients undergoing non-emergency surgery were recruited and randomly allocated to receive either forced-air warming (n=78) or resistive heating (n=82) in the perioperative period. Patient core temperatures were monitored after induction of anaesthesia until the end of surgery and in the recovery room. Our primary outcome measures included the final intraoperative temperature and incidence of hypothermia at the end of surgery. There was a significantly higher rate of hypothermia at the end of surgery in the resistive heating group compared with the forced-air warming group (P=0.017). Final intraoperative temperatures were also significantly lower in the resistive heating group (35.9 compared with 36.1°C, P=0.029). Hypothermia at the end of surgery in both warming groups was common (36% forced air warming, 54% resistive heating). Our results suggest that forced-air warming is more effective than resistive heating in preventing postoperative hypothermia. NCT01056991. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Improving outcomes for ESRD patients: shifting the quality paradigm.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients' lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes-fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the creators of

  16. Shoulder Arthroplasty: Key Steps to Improve Outcomes and Minimize Complications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Diaz, Roberto; Athwal, George S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Sperling, John W

    2016-01-01

    Advances in shoulder replacement surgery have allowed for the successful treatment of various shoulder conditions. As the elderly population increases and the surgical indications for shoulder replacement surgery continue to expand, the number of shoulder replacements performed annually will continue to increase. Accordingly, the number of complications also will be expected to increase. Successful shoulder replacement outcomes require surgeons to have a thorough understanding of the surgical indications, surgical technique, and potential complications of the procedure. By reviewing the key aspects of shoulder replacement surgery and focusing on the surgical technique and common complications for both anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, surgeons can help improve outcomes and minimize complications.

  17. [Improving functional outcome of schizophrenia with cognitive remediation].

    PubMed

    Franck, Nicolas; Demily, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    The functional outcome of schizophrenia is partly conditioned by cognitive disorders associated with this disease. The functional outcome of schizophrenia depends not only on psychotropic medications, but also on non-pharmacological measures and in particular on cognitive remediation. All patients suffering from schizophrenia should benefit from a multidisciplinary functional evaluation including neuropsychological assessment. The restitution of the functional evaluation's results values preserved skills rather than deficits. Cognitive remediation should be considered when cognitive disorders have a functional impact. It reduces the impact of the patient's cognitive disorders and improves the success of his/her concrete projects.

  18. Therapeutic hypothermia in Italian Intensive Care Units after 2010 resuscitation guidelines: still a lot to do.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Nicola; Scarpa, Daniele; Rossi, Sandra; Persona, Paolo; Martano, Luigi; Bianchin, Andrea; Castioni, Carlo Alberto; Ori, Carlo; Iliceto, Sabino; Cacciavillani, Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is one of three interventions that have demonstrated to improve patients' neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the 2010 resuscitation guidelines on TH implementation in various Italian Intensive Care Units (ICU). A structured questionnaire was submitted to Italian ICU. The questionnaire was addressed to determine the procedures of TH in each ICU or, on the contrary, the reason for not employing the therapy. We obtained complete information from 770 of 847 Italian ICU (91%). Out of 405 Units included in the analysis only 223 (55.1%) reported to use TH in comatose patients after return of spontaneous circulation. The trend of TH implementation shows a stable increase, particularly after 2006 but there is no evident acceleration after the strong indication of the 2010 guidelines. There was a rise of about 3.4 times in the number of Italian ICU using TH as compared to the 2007 survey (an increase of 68% per year). One hundred and eighty-two (44.9%) units did not use TH mainly because of lack of equipment, economic issues or the conviction of the difficulty of execution. TH is still under-used in Italy (55.1%) even though the therapy is strongly recommended in the 2010 guidelines. However, the increase in the adoption of hypothermia has been significant in the past 5 years (68%/years) and the awareness of the efficacy is almost consolidated among intensivists, being logistic problems the leading cause for non-adoption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of glucose management during therapeutic hypothermia at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Forni, Allison A; Rocchio, Megan A; Szumita, Paul M; Anger, Kevin E; Avery, Kathleen Ryan; Scirica, Benjamin M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in metabolic function during therapeutic hypothermia (TH) decrease responsiveness to insulin and increase the risk of hyperglycemia. Glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes in selected patients; however, glycemic management strategies during TH are not defined. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the glycemic metrics and IV insulin administration in critically ill patients during the cooling and rewarming phases of TH. Data from 37 patients who received at least 6h of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest between January 2007 and January 2010 were retrospectively evaluated, 14 (37.8%) of whom had diabetes. The mean blood glucose was 9.16±3.22mmol/L and 6.54±2.45mmol/L; p<0.01 during cooling and rewarming, respectively. Twelve (32.4%) patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event, defined as a blood glucose <4mmol/L. Nineteen (51.4%) patients experienced at least one hyperglycemic event, defined as a blood glucose >11.11mmol/L and 15 (40.5%) patients received IV insulin therapy. Patients on IV insulin had a higher incidence of diabetes (9 vs. 5; p<0.05), higher admission blood glucose (13.89±6.13 vs. 11.03±4.65mmol/L; p=0.11), and a higher incidence of hyperglycemia (14 vs. 2; p<0.01) and hypoglycemia (8 vs. 4; p<0.05). Of the patients on IV insulin, mean insulin requirements during cooling and rewarming were 15.2±16.1 and 7±12.5units/h, respectively. TH is commonly associated with hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and the use of IV insulin therapy. Further research is needed to determine optimal glycemic management strategies to prevent hyper- and hypoglycemia in patients during the different phases of TH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Induced mild hypothermia in post-cardiopulmonary bypass vasoplegia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Singh, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Naresh; Pant, Kailash Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The state of vasoplegia in immediate post-cardiopulmonary bypass period is characterized by severe hypotension, supranormal cardiac output, low systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and resistance to vasoconstrictors. We could successfully use induced mild hypothermia to increase SVR, and could avoid very high doses of nor-epinephrine (>0.3 mcg/kg/min) in the background of severe pulmonary hypertension (systolic pulmonary pressure> 90 mmHg). Its effects such as decreased oxygen demand, positive inotropy and better right ventricle performance probably helped to improve oxygenation in presence of pulmonary oedema.

  1. Application of Six Sigma towards improving surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P J; Barreto, S G; Nadkarni, M S

    2008-01-01

    Six Sigma is a 'process excellence' tool targeting continuous improvement achieved by providing a methodology for improving key steps of a process. It is ripe for application into health care since almost all health care processes require a near-zero tolerance for mistakes. The aim of this study is to apply the Six Sigma methodology into a clinical surgical process and to assess the improvement (if any) in the outcomes and patient care. The guiding principles of Six Sigma, namely DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control), were used to analyze the impact of double stapling technique (DST) towards improving sphincter preservation rates for rectal cancer. The analysis using the Six Sigma methodology revealed a Sigma score of 2.10 in relation to successful sphincter preservation. This score demonstrates an improvement over the previous technique (73% over previous 54%). This study represents one of the first clinical applications of Six Sigma in the surgical field. By understanding, accepting, and applying the principles of Six Sigma, we have an opportunity to transfer a very successful management philosophy to facilitate the identification of key steps that can improve outcomes and ultimately patient safety and the quality of surgical care provided.

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia in drowning induced hypoxic brain injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although therapeutic hypothermia for neuroprotection has been in use for over half a century but its use has been controversial in absence of proper guidelines. However for over two decades there has been revived interest in mild therapeutic hypothermia (32 - 34°C) for neuroprotection. Case A 17 year-old female tourist was rescued from sea. She received cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for about 16 minutes. But she had sustained significant neurological insult as a result of hypoxic brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia was added to her regime of neuroprotection in intensive care unit, and her neurological status improved in just 8 hours with full correction of her coma score by day 4. PMID:20062680

  3. Thermal management during anaesthesia and thermoregulation standards for the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Torossian, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is still high, and thus thermoregulatory standards are warranted. This review summarizes current evidence of thermal management during anaesthesia, referring to recognized clinical queries (temperature measurement, definition of hypothermia, risk factors, warming methods, implementation strategies). Body temperature is a vital sign, and 37 degrees C is the mean core temperature of a healthy human. Systematic review shows that for non-invasive temperature monitoring the oral route is the most reliable; infrared ear temperature measurement is inaccurate. Intraoperatively, acceptable semi-invasive temperature monitoring sites are the nasopharynx, oesophagus and urinary bladder. Clinically relevant hypothermia starts at 36 degrees C with regard to major adverse outcomes (increased infectious complications, morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders, prolonged length of hospital stay, and increased costs). Skin surface warming for 20 min immediately before anaesthesia (pre-warming) minimizes initial redistribution hypothermia. Intraoperatively, active warming should be applied when anaesthesia time is > 60 min. Effective methods of active warming are forced-air warming or conductive warming, provided that enough skin surface is available. Infusion fluid warming, increasing the operating room temperature, and warming of irrigation fluids are adjunctive therapies. The patient's body temperature should be above 36 degrees C before induction of anaesthesia, and should be measured continuously throughout surgery. Active warming should be applied intraoperatively. Postoperative patient temperature and outcomes should be evaluated.

  4. Who benefits most from mild therapeutic hypothermia in coronary intervention era? A retrospective and propensity-matched study.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Eisuke; Inoue, Ichiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Ishihara, Masaharu; Shimatani, Yuji; Kurisu, Satoshi; Nakama, Yasuharu; Dai, Kazuoki; Otani, Takayuki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Morimoto, Yoshimasa; Ejiri, Kentaro; Oda, Nozomu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of the time interval from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation (CPA-ROSC) in cardiac arrest patients and the types of patients who will benefit from therapeutic hypothermia. Four hundred witnessed adult comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac etiology were enrolled in the study. The favorable neurological outcome was defined as category 1 or 2 on the five-point Pittsburgh cerebral performance scale at the time of hospital discharge. A matching process based on the propensity score was performed to equalize potential prognostic factors in the hypothermia and normothermia groups, and to formulate a balanced 1:1 matched cohort study. The rate of favorable neurological outcome was higher (P < 0.05) in the hypothermia group (n = 110) than in the normothermia group in patients with CPA-ROSC of 15 to 20 minutes (64% vs. 17%), 20 to 25 minutes (70% vs. 8%), 25 to 30 minutes (50% vs. 7%), 35 to 40 minutes (27% vs. 0%) and 40 to 45 minutes (29% vs. 2%). A similar association was observed in a propensity-matched cohort, but the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference in the rate of favorable neurological outcome between the hypothermia-matched group and the normothermia-matched group. In the patients whose CPA-ROSC was greater than 15 minutes, however, the rate of favorable neurological outcome was higher in the hypothermia-matched group than in the normothermia-matched group (27% vs. 4%, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CPA-ROSC was an independent predictor of favorable neurological outcome (every 1 minute: odds ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.85 to 0.92, P < 0.001). The CPA-ROSC is an independent predictor of neurological outcome. Therapeutic hypothermia is more beneficial in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest with CPA-ROSC greater than 15 minutes.

  5. Patient Web Portals to Improve Diabetes Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Mulvaney, Shelagh A.; Hess, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Patient web portals (PWPs), defined as the integration of electronic medical records and patient health records, have been related to enhanced patient outcomes. A literature review was conducted to characterize the design and evaluation of PWPs to improve health care processes and outcomes in diabetes. A summary of 26 articles revealed the positive impact PWPs have on patient outcomes, patient-provider communication, disease management, and access to and patient satisfaction with health care. Innovative and useful approaches included the evaluation of specific components of the PWPs, assessing the impact of PWPs on mediators of health behaviors, such as patient distress, identification of barriers to use, and patient willingness to pay for access. Future research should focus on relevant processes that mediate patient and provider use, impact on health care utilization, and a patient-centered approach to the design and integration of educational opportunities afforded through PWPs. PMID:20890688

  6. Does pharmacotherapy improve cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mayank; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel L; Agrawal, Harsh; Alpert, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) occurs commonly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) including those treated with hemodialysis (HD), and is associated with poor outcomes in this population. Pharmacologic management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, acute and chronic coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation in the general population is supported by the results of high-quality, randomized, controlled clinical trials. Pharmacotherapy of these disorders in the general population is effective in improving clinical outcomes. In contrast, information concerning the effect of pharmacotherapy on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, and particularly in HD patients, is limited. Available data suggest that, in general, pharmacotherapy of hypertension and dyslipidemia, anti-platelet therapy of CVD, and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation are less effective in HD patients than in the general population or even in patients with early stage of CKD.

  7. Free oscillation rheometry monitoring of haemodilution and hypothermia and correction with fibrinogen and factor XIII concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    starch induced clot instability, but improved coagulation in blood diluted with Ringer’s acetate solution. Fibrinogen improved coagulation irrespective of hypothermia. PMID:23517637

  8. Family interventions to improve diabetes outcomes for adults

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Benitez, Amanda; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a critical aspect of disease management for adults with diabetes. Since family members can play a vital role in a patient’s disease management, involving them in self-care interventions may positively influence patients’ diabetes outcomes. We systematically reviewed family-based interventions for adults with diabetes published from 1994 to 2014 and assessed their impact on patients’ diabetes outcomes and the extent of family involvement. We found 26 studies describing family-based diabetes interventions for adults. Interventions were conducted across a range of patient populations and settings. The degree of family involvement varied across studies. We found evidence for improvement in patients’ self-efficacy, perceived social support, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care across the studies. Owing to the heterogeneity of the study designs, types of interventions, reporting of outcomes, and family involvement, it is difficult to determine how family participation in diabetes interventions may affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Future studies should clearly describe the role of family in the intervention, assess quality and extent of family participation, and compare patient outcomes with and without family involvement. PMID:26250784

  9. Improving patient outcomes to targeted therapies in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Zeynep; Smalley, Keiran S M; Sondak, Vernon K

    2016-06-01

    The arrival of targeted therapies has led to significant improvements in clinical outcomes for patients with BRAFV600 mutated advanced melanoma over the past five years. In several clinical trials, BRAF and MEK inhibitors have shown improvement in progression free and overall survival, along with much higher tumor response rates in comparison to chemotherapy, with the combination of these drugs superior to monotherapy. These agents are also being tested in earlier-stage patients, in addition to alternative dosing regimens and in combinations with other therapeutics. Efforts are also ongoing to expand the success found with targeted therapies to other subtypes of melanoma, including NRAS and c-kit mutated melanomas, uveal melanomas, and BRAF/NRAS wild type melanomas. Expert Commentary: We aim to provide an overview of clinical outcomes with targeted therapies in melanoma patients.

  10. Disease management improves end-stage renal disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Renal disease management organizations have reported achieving significant decreases in mortality and hospitalization in conjunction with cost savings, improved patient satisfaction and quality of life. Disease management organizations strive to fill existing gaps in care delivery through the standardized use of risk assessment, predictive modeling, evidence-based guidelines, and process and outcomes measurement. Patient self-management education and the provision of individual nurse care managers are also key program components. As we more fully measure clinical outcomes and total healthcare costs, including payments from all insurance and government entities, pharmacy costs and out of pocket expenditures, the full implications of disease management can be better defined. The results of this analysis will have a profound influence on United States healthcare policy. At present current data suggest that the promise of disease management, improved care at reduced cost, can and is being realized in end-stage renal disease. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Nurses' Attitudes Toward Clinical Research: Experience of the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Trials.

    PubMed

    Browning, Brittan; Page, Kent E; Kuhn, Renee L; DiLiberto, Mary Ann; Deschenes, Jendar; Taillie, Eileen; Tomanio, Elyse; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W; Meert, Kathleen; Pemberton, Victoria L

    2016-03-01

    To understand factors affecting nurses' attitudes toward the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest trials and association with approach/consent rates. Cross-sectional survey of pediatric/cardiac intensive care nurses' perceptions of the trials. Study was conducted at 16 of 38 self-selected study sites. Pediatric and cardiac intensive care nurses. The primary outcome was the proportion of nurses with positive perceptions, as defined by agree or strongly agree with the statement "I am happy to take care of a Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest patient". Associations between perceptions and study approach/consent rates were also explored. Of 2,241 nurses invited, 1,387 (62%) completed the survey and 77% reported positive perceptions of the trials. Nurses, who felt positively about the scientific question, the study team, and training received, were more likely to have positive perceptions of the trials (p < 0.001). Nurses who had previously cared for a research patient had significantly more positive perceptions of Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest compared with those who had not (79% vs 54%; p < 0.001). Of the 754 nurses who cared for a Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest patient, 82% had positive perceptions, despite 86% reporting it required more work. Sixty-nine percent believed that hypothermia reduces brain injury and mortality; sites had lower consent rates when their nurses believed that hypothermia was beneficial. Institution-specific approach rates were positively correlated with nurses' perceptions of institutional support for the trial (r = 0.54; p = 0.04), ICU support (r = 0.61; p = 0.02), and the importance of conducting the trial in children (r = 0.61; p = 0.01). The majority of nurses had positive perceptions of the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest trials. Institutional, colleague, and study team support and training were contributing factors. Despite

  12. Improving Outcomes for ESRD Patients: Shifting the Quality Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients’ lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes—fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the

  13. Randomized Multilevel Intervention to Improve Outcomes of Residents in Nursing Homes in Need of Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Nahm, Helen E.; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Hicks, Lanis; Mehr, David; Flesner, Marcia; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive multilevel intervention was tested to build organizational capacity to create and sustain improvement in quality of care and subsequently improve resident outcomes in nursing homes in need of improvement. Intervention facilities (n=29) received a two-year multilevel intervention with monthly on-site consultation from expert nurses with graduate education in gerontological nursing. Attention control facilities (n=29) that also needed to improve resident outcomes received monthly information about aging and physical assessment of elders. Design and Methods Randomized clinical trial of nursing homes in need of improving resident outcomes of bladder and bowel incontinence, weight loss, pressure ulcers, and decline in activities of daily living (ADL). It was hypothesized that following the intervention, experimental facilities would have better resident outcomes, higher quality of care, higher staff retention, more organizational attributes of improved working conditions than control facilities, similar staffing and staff mix, and lower total and direct care costs. Results The intervention did improve quality of care (p=0.02); there were improvements in pressure ulcers (p=0.05), weight loss (p=0.05). Staff retention, organizational working conditions, staffing, and staff mix and most costs were not affected by the intervention. Leadership turnover was surprisingly excessive in both intervention and control groups. Implications Some facilities that are in need of improving quality of care and resident outcomes are able to build the organizational capacity to improve while not increasing staffing or costs of care. Improvement requires continuous supportive consultation and leadership willing to involve staff and work together to build the systematic improvements in care delivery needed. PMID:21816681

  14. Hypothermia-induced acute kidney injury in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mun Chul; Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Min A; Lee, Cheon Beom; Sun, In O; Lee, Kwang Young

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia, defined as an unintentional decline in the core body temperature to below 35℃, is a life-threatening condition. Patients with malnutrition and diabetes mellitus as well as those of advanced age are at high risk for accidental hypothermia. Due to the high mortality rates of accidental hypothermia, proper management is critical for the wellbeing of patients. Accidental hypothermia was reported to be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) in over 40% of cases. Although the pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, vasoconstriction and ischemia in the kidney were considered to be the main mechanisms involved. Cases of AKI associated with hypothermia have been reported worldwide, but there have been few reports of hypothermia-induced AKI in Korea. Here, we present a case of hypothermia-induced AKI that was treated successfully with rewarming and supportive care.

  15. Hypothermia secondary to glioblastoma multiforme? Autopsy findings in two cases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matthew; Schwartz, Liliana; Duflou, Johan

    2015-03-01

    Death due to accidental primary hypothermia in cold climates is relatively common, with previous case series reflecting this. In contrast, hypothermia-related death as a result of an underlying medical cause, such as a brain tumor, is rare. The literature clearly illustrates a theoretical causal relationship between brain neoplasms and hypothermia through the infiltration of the hypothalamus; however, the number of reported cases is minimal. Two cases are presented where autopsy confirmed hypothermia as the cause of death with both cases revealing widespread glioblastoma multiforme in the brain. Both decedents were elderly with a number of comorbidities identified during autopsy that could explain death; however, hypothermia was deemed the most likely cause. It is proposed that both decedents died of hypothermia as a result of the tumor's effect on thermoregulation. These cases underline the importance of forensic pathologists to be aware of the relationship between brain tumors and hypothermia and to not dismiss death as being due to other disease processes.

  16. TIAM1 variants improve clinical outcome in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Elena; Yáñez, Yania; Fornés-Ferrer, Victoria; Zugaza, José L; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2017-07-11

    Identification of tumor driver mutations is crucial for improving clinical outcome using a personalized approach to the treatment of cancer. Neuroblastoma is a tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system for which only a few driver alterations have been described including MYCN amplification and ALK mutations. We assessed 106 primary neuroblastoma tumors by next generation sequencing using a customized amplicon-based gene panel. Our results reveal that genetic variants in TIAM1 gene associate with better clinical outcome, suggesting a role for these TIAM1 variants in preventing progression of this disease. The detected variants are located within the different domains of TIAM1 that signal to the upstream regulator RAS and downstream effector molecules MYC and RAC, which are all implicated in neuroblastoma etiology and progression. Clinical outcome was improved in tumors where a TIAM1 variant was present concomitantly with either ALK mutation or MYCN amplification. Given the function of these signaling molecules in cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and neurite outgrowth, our data suggest that the TIAM1-mediated network is essential to neuroblastoma and thus, inhibiting TIAM1 reflects a rational strategy for improving therapy efficacy in neuroblastoma.

  17. TIAM1 variants improve clinical outcome in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanmartín, Elena; Yáñez, Yania; Fornés-Ferrer, Victoria; Zugaza, José L.; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria; de Mora, Jaime Font

    2017-01-01

    Identification of tumor driver mutations is crucial for improving clinical outcome using a personalized approach to the treatment of cancer. Neuroblastoma is a tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system for which only a few driver alterations have been described including MYCN amplification and ALK mutations. We assessed 106 primary neuroblastoma tumors by next generation sequencing using a customized amplicon-based gene panel. Our results reveal that genetic variants in TIAM1 gene associate with better clinical outcome, suggesting a role for these TIAM1 variants in preventing progression of this disease. The detected variants are located within the different domains of TIAM1 that signal to the upstream regulator RAS and downstream effector molecules MYC and RAC, which are all implicated in neuroblastoma etiology and progression. Clinical outcome was improved in tumors where a TIAM1 variant was present concomitantly with either ALK mutation or MYCN amplification. Given the function of these signaling molecules in cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and neurite outgrowth, our data suggest that the TIAM1-mediated network is essential to neuroblastoma and thus, inhibiting TIAM1 reflects a rational strategy for improving therapy efficacy in neuroblastoma. PMID:28423360

  18. Quality improvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: moving forward to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quach, Pauline; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Benchimol, Eric I

    2013-10-14

    In recent years, pediatric health care has embraced the concept of quality improvement to improve patient outcomes. As quality improvement efforts are implemented, network collaboration (where multiple centers and practices implement standardized programs) is a popular option. In a collaborative network, improvement in the conduct of structural, process and outcome quality measures can lead to improvements in overall health, and benchmarks can be used to assess and compare progress. In this review article, we provided an overview of the quality improvement movement and the role of quality indicators in this movement. We reviewed current quality improvement efforts in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as other pediatric chronic illnesses. We discussed the need to standardize the development of quality indicators used in quality improvement networks to assess medical care, and the validation techniques which can be used to ensure that process indicators result in improved outcomes of clinical significance. We aimed to assess current quality improvement efforts in pediatric IBD and other diseases, such as childhood asthma, childhood arthritis, and neonatal health. By doing so, we hope to learn from their successes and failures and to move the field forward for future improvements in the care provided to children with IBD.

  19. Translating drug-induced hibernation to therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Jinka, Tulasi R; Combs, Velva M; Drew, Kelly L

    2015-06-17

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves prognosis after cardiac arrest; however, thermoregulatory responses such as shivering complicate cooling. Hibernators exhibit a profound and safe reversible hypothermia without any cardiovascular side effects by lowering the shivering threshold at low ambient temperatures (Ta). Activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) in the central nervous system (CNS) induces hibernation in hibernating species and a hibernation-like state in rats, principally by attenuating thermogenesis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that targeted activation of the central A1AR combined with a lower Ta would provide a means of managing core body temperature (Tb) below 37 °C for therapeutic purposes. We targeted the A1AR within the CNS by combining systemic delivery of the A1AR agonist (6)N-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) with 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT), a nonspecific adenosine receptor antagonist that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier. Results show that CHA (1 mg/kg) and 8-SPT (25 mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally every 4 h for 20 h at a Ta of 16 °C, induce and maintain the Tb between 29 and 31 °C for 24 h in both naïve rats and rats subjected to asphyxial cardiac arrest for 8 min. Faster and more stable hypothermia was achieved by continuous infusion of CHA delivered subcutaneously via minipumps. Animals subjected to cardiac arrest and cooled by CHA survived better and showed less neuronal cell death than normothermic control animals. Central A1AR activation in combination with a thermal gradient shows promise as a novel and effective pharmacological adjunct for inducing safe and reversible targeted temperature management.

  20. Hypothermia and the Elderly: Perceptions and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Carol E.; Pestle, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 381 older adults participating in Area Agency on Aging meal programs in Florida. Found that only 10 percent were aware of dangers of accidental hypothermia. Many low-income elderly are vulnerable to cold because of poorly insulated homes, inadequate heating, and lack of warm clothing. States need initiatives to increase comfort levels…

  1. Hypothermia and the Elderly: Perceptions and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Carol E.; Pestle, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 381 older adults participating in Area Agency on Aging meal programs in Florida. Found that only 10 percent were aware of dangers of accidental hypothermia. Many low-income elderly are vulnerable to cold because of poorly insulated homes, inadequate heating, and lack of warm clothing. States need initiatives to increase comfort levels…

  2. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Asphyxiated Newborns Undergoing Hypothermia Therapy: Pilot Findings Using a Multiple-Time-Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F; Tian, Fenghua; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamics in newborns might enable us to optimize cerebral perfusion. Our objective was to develop an approach to assess cerebral hemodynamics across multiple time scales during the first 72 hours of life in newborns during hypothermia therapy. Methods Spontaneous oscillations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) were analyzed using a moving window correlation (MWC) method with time scales ranging from 0.15 to 8 hours in this pilot methodology study. Abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome was defined by Bayley III scores and/or cerebral palsy by 24 months of age using receiver operating curve (ROC). Results Multiple-time-scale correlations between MAP and SctO2 oscillations were tested in 10 asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia therapy. Large non induced fluctuations in the blood pressure were observed during cooling in all five infants with abnormal outcomes. Notably, these infants had two distinct patterns of correlation: a positive in-phase correlation at the short time scales (15 min), and/or a negative anti-phase correlations observed at long time scales (4 hrs.). Both the in-phase (AUC 0.6, [95% CI 0.2–0.95]) and anti-phase correlations (AUC 0.75, [95% CI 0.4–0.95]) appeared to be related to an abnormal outcome. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the time scale is an important factor that needs to be standardized in the assessment of neonatal cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:26858217

  3. Registries to measure and improve outcomes after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Zachary D; Nichol, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac arrest registries are used to measure and improve the process and outcome of resuscitation care, and can give insight into risk factors, prognosis, and the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate its impact. This review provides an overview of current out-of-hospital (OHCA) and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) registries, with attention to key recent findings and future directions. Major OHCA registries include the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Cardiac Arrest Epistry and Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival. Registry data from IHCA largely stem from the US and Canada with Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation, and the UK with the National Cardiac Arrest Audit. Each registry has strengths and limitations. Important findings include trends in survival, racial disparities in care, and hospital and community-level variations in performance, as well as estimates of the effectiveness of individual interventions. Utstein definitions facilitate uniform reporting of the process and outcome of care, and are currently being updated. Standardization of registry data is an ongoing challenge. OHCA and IHCA registries are invaluable in advancing our understanding of resuscitation care, as well as variations in international practice. Investigations that compare and contrast outcomes from established and evolving registries will help advance resuscitation science further.

  4. Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: How do we improve surgical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Maria; Mathern, Gary W.; Cross, J. Helen; Bertram, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Surgery has become the standard of care for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy with anterior temporal lobe resection the most common operation performed for adults with hippocampal sclerosis. This procedure leads to significant improvement in the lives of the overwhelming majority of patients. Despite improved techniques in neuroimaging that have facilitated the identification of potential surgical candidates, the short and long term success of epilepsy surgery has not changed substantially in recent decades. The basic surgical goal, removal of the amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampal gyrus, is based on the hypothesis that these structures represent a uniform and contiguous source of seizures in the mesial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome. Recent observations from the histopathology of resected tissue, preoperative neuroimaging and the basic science laboratory suggest that the syndrome is not always a uniform entity. Despite clinical similarity, not all patients become seizure free. Improving surgical outcomes requires a re-examination of why patients fail surgery. This review will examine recent findings from the clinic and laboratory. Historically, we have considered MTLE a single disorder, but it may be time to view it as a group of closely related syndromes with variable type and extent of histopathology. That recognition may lead to identifying the appropriate subgroups that will require different diagnostic and surgical approaches to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:20976764

  5. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  6. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns.

  9. Metformin and ageing: improving ageing outcomes beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Willy Marcos; Palacio, Ana; Tamariz, Leonardo; Florez, Hermes

    2017-08-02

    In a world where the population is ageing, there is growing interest and demand for research evaluating strategies that address the ageing process. After 60 years of successful use of metformin in our pharmaceutical armamentarium, we are learning that, beyond improving glycaemic control, metformin may have additional mechanisms and pathways of action that need further study. Although, metformin's effect on clinical ageing outcomes may still be considered speculative, the findings from studies into cellular and animal models and from observational and pilot human studies support the existence of beneficial effects on ageing. At present, progress for human research, using randomised clinical trials to evaluate metformin's clinical impact, has just started. Here, we present a review on the ageing process and the mechanisms involved, and the role that metformin may have to counter these. We go on to discuss the upcoming large randomised clinical trials that may provide insight on the use of metformin for ageing outcomes beyond glycaemic control.

  10. Does treatment of SDB in children improve cardiovascular outcome?

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-02-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a common disorder in both adults and children and is caused by the obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Unlike adults, most cases of paediatric SDB are due to the presence of enlarged tonsils and adenoids, thus the main treatment option is adenotonsillectomy (T&A). It is well known that obstructive sleep apnoea in adults increases the risk for hypertension, coronary artery disease and stroke, and there is now mounting evidence that SDB also has a significant impact on the cardiovascular system in children with reports of elevated blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction and altered autonomic cardiovascular control. As there is now substantial evidence that elevated blood pressure in childhood is carried on to adulthood it is important to know if treatment of SDB improves cardiovascular outcomes. Studies in adults have shown that treatment of SDB leads to improvements in cardiovascular function, including a reduction in pulmonary artery pressure, systemic blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction. However, studies exploring the outcomes of treatment of SDB in children on the cardiovascular system are limited and varied in their methodology and outcome measures. As a number of cardiovascular disturbances are sequelae of SDB, early detection and management could result in the reduction of elevated blood pressure in children, and consequently a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity in adulthood. The aim of this review is to summarise the findings of studies to date which have investigated the cardiovascular outcomes in children treated for SDB and to make recommendations for future management of this very common disease.

  11. Ablation of Barrett's oesophagus: towards improved outcomes for oesophageal cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayne, George C; Bright, Tim; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I

    2012-09-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is the major risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The management of Barrett's oesophagus entails treating reflux symptoms with acid-suppressing medication or surgery (fundoplication). However, neither form of anti-reflux therapy produces predictable regression, or prevents cancer development. Patients with Barrett's oesophagus usually undergo endoscopic surveillance, which aims to identify dysplastic changes or cancer at its earliest stage, when treatment outcomes should be better. Alternative endoscopic interventions are now available and are suggested for the treatment of early cancer and prevention of progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer. Such treatments could minimize the risks associated with oesophagectomy. The current status of these interventions is reviewed. Various endoscopic interventions have been described, but with long-term outcomes uncertain, they remain somewhat controversial. Radiofrequency ablation of dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus might reduce the risk of cancer progression, although cancer development has been reported after this treatment. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows a 1.5-2 cm diameter piece of oesophageal mucosa to be removed. This provides better pathology for diagnosis and staging, and if the lesion is confined to the mucosa and fully excised, EMR can be curative. The combination of EMR and radiofrequency ablation has been used for multifocal lesions, but long-term outcomes are unknown. The new endoscopic interventions for Barrett's oesophagus and early oesophageal cancer have the potential to improve clinical outcomes, although evidence that confirms superiority over oesphagectomy is limited. Longer-term outcome data and data from larger cohorts are required to confirm the appropriateness of these procedures. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Improved outcomes found after implementing a systematic evaluation and program improvement process for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cass, Anne; Shaw, Tambi; Ehman, Melissa; Young, Jan; Flood, Jennifer; Royce, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    California's state and local tuberculosis (TB) programs collaborated to develop the Tuberculosis Indicators Project (TIP), a program evaluation and improvement process. In TIP, local and state staff review data, identify program gaps, implement plans to improve local TB program performance, and evaluate outcomes. After 10 years of project implementation, indicator performance changes and patient outcomes were measured. Eighty-seven percent of participating programs showed a performance increase in targeted indicators after three years compared with 57% of comparison groups. Statistically significant performance change was more common in the intervention local health departments (LHDs) than in comparison groups. The most notable performance changes were in the contact investigation and case management indicators. These results indicate that this systematic evaluation and program improvement project was associated with improved LHD TB control performance and may be useful to inform improvement projects in other public health programs.

  13. Leveraging Behavioral Economics to Improve Heart Failure Care and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Leslie L; DeVore, Adam D; Granger, Bradi B; Eapen, Zubin J; Ariely, Dan; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2017-08-22

    Behavioral challenges are often present in human illness, so behavioral economics is increasingly being applied in healthcare settings to better understand why patients choose healthy or unhealthy behaviors. The application of behavioral economics to healthcare settings parallels recent shifts in policy and reimbursement structures that hold providers accountable for outcomes that are dependent on patient behaviors. Numerous studies have examined the application of behavioral economics principles to policy making and health behaviors, but there are limited data on applying these concepts to the management of chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF). Given its increasing prevalence and high associated cost of care, HF is a paradigm case for studying novel approaches to improve health care; therefore, if we can better understand why patients with HF make the choices they do, then we may be more poised to help them manage their medications, influence daily behaviors, and encourage healthy decision making. In this article, we will give a brief explanation of the core behavioral economics concepts that apply to patients with HF. We will also examine how to craft these concepts into tools such as financial incentives and social networks that may improve the management of patients with HF. We believe that behavioral economics can help us understand barriers to change, encourage positive behaviors, and offer additional approaches to improving the outcomes of patients with HF. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Do endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with emphysema?

    PubMed

    Barua, Anupama; Vaughan, Paul; Wotton, Robin; Naidu, Babu

    2012-12-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with severe emphysema. Eighty-seven papers were found using the reported search, of which seven represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial demonstrated that endobronchial valve increased forced expiratory volume in one second by 4.3% (95% confidence interval 1.4-7.2) and decreased by 2.5% in the control group (95% confidence interval -5.4 to 0.4) at a 6-month interval. This benefit is more marked in patients who do not have collateral ventilation into the area of lung being isolated as mapped by bronchoscopic physiological mapping (Chartis) or by computed tomography imaging documenting intact fissures. This evidence is reflected in the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial. Patients treated with endobronchial valve with high heterogeneity and complete fissures had greater improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second at 6- and 12-month intervals. We conclude that endobronchial valve placement improves lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in selected patients with emphysematous diseases.

  15. Improving stroke outcome: the benefits of increasing availability of technology.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, R. F.; Langhorne, P.; James, E.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A decision analysis was performed to explore the potential benefits of interventions to improve the outcome of patients admitted to hospital with a stroke, in the context of the technology available in different parts of the world. METHODS: The outcome of death or dependency was used with a six-month end-point. RESULTS: Four settings were identified that would depend on the resources available. The proportion of stroke patients who were dead or dependent at six months was 61.5% with no intervention at all. Setting 4, with the only intervention being the delayed introduction of aspirin, produced a 0.5% absolute improvement in outcome (death or dependency), and the addition of an organized stroke unit (Setting 3) produced the largest incremental improvement, of 2.7%. Extra interventions associated with non-urgent computed tomography and thus the ability to avoid anticoagulation or aspirin for those with a haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 2), and immediate computed tomography scanning to allow the use of thrombolytics in non-haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 1), produced only small incremental benefits of 0.4% in each case. DISCUSSION: To reduce the burden of illness due to stroke, efforts at primary prevention are essential and likely to have a greater impact than even the best interventions after the event. In the absence of good primary prevention, whatever is possible must be done to reduce the sequelae of stroke. This analysis provides a rational basis for beginning the development of clinical guidelines applicable to the economic setting of the patient. PMID:11143194

  16. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  17. Improvement in outcomes of clinical islet transplantation: 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Barton, Franca B; Rickels, Michael R; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Hering, Bernhard J; Wease, Stephen; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Oberholzer, Jose; Odorico, Jon S; Garfinkel, Marc R; Levy, Marlon; Pattou, Francois; Berney, Thierry; Secchi, Antonio; Messinger, Shari; Senior, Peter A; Maffi, Paola; Posselt, Andrew; Stock, Peter G; Kaufman, Dixon B; Luo, Xunrong; Kandeel, Fouad; Cagliero, Enrico; Turgeon, Nicole A; Witkowski, Piotr; Naji, Ali; O'Connell, Philip J; Greenbaum, Carla; Kudva, Yogish C; Brayman, Kenneth L; Aull, Meredith J; Larsen, Christian; Kay, Tom W H; Fernandez, Luis A; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Bellin, Melena; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-07-01

    To describe trends of primary efficacy and safety outcomes of islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes recipients with severe hypoglycemia from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry (CITR) from 1999 to 2010. A total of 677 islet transplant-alone or islet-after-kidney recipients with type 1 diabetes in the CITR were analyzed for five primary efficacy outcomes and overall safety to identify any differences by early (1999-2002), mid (2003-2006), or recent (2007-2010) transplant era based on annual follow-up to 5 years. Insulin independence at 3 years after transplant improved from 27% in the early era (1999-2002, n = 214) to 37% in the mid (2003-2006, n = 255) and to 44% in the most recent era (2007-2010, n = 208; P = 0.006 for years-by-era; P = 0.01 for era alone). C-peptide ≥0.3 ng/mL, indicative of islet graft function, was retained longer in the most recent era (P < 0.001). Reduction of HbA(1c) and resolution of severe hypoglycemia exhibited enduring long-term effects. Fasting blood glucose stabilization also showed improvements in the most recent era. There were also modest reductions in the occurrence of adverse events. The islet reinfusion rate was lower: 48% by 1 year in 2007-2010 vs. 60-65% in 1999-2006 (P < 0.01). Recipients that ever achieved insulin-independence experienced longer duration of islet graft function (P < 0.001). The CITR shows improvement in primary efficacy and safety outcomes of islet transplantation in recipients who received transplants in 2007-2010 compared with those in 1999-2006, with fewer islet infusions and adverse events per recipient.

  18. Effect of a quality improvement strategy on several haemodialysis outcomes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Ramos, Rosa; Betriu, Angels; Paniagua, José; Belart, Montse; Martínez, Tomás

    2008-09-01

    Intermediate outcomes are associated with the survival of long-term haemodialysis patients; however, outcome variability across centres may result in heterogeneous quality of care. The study aim was to evaluate a multifaceted quality improvement activity (QIA) targeting several haemodialysis clinical performance measures. A total (prevalent and incident) of 313 patients from four dialysis units were included. The QIA was based on a multifaceted strategy involving collection of haemodialysis clinical performance measures every 6-8 months, feedback about results, improvement plans and benchmarking, and it was tested in a 3-year prospective interventional study. Two timepoints of clinical performance measures were considered for evaluating the QIA: baseline (February 2003, pre-QIA) and final (February 2006, post-QIA). Centres showed significant improvement in percentage of patients with haemoglobin <11 g/dl, mean haemoglobin; percentage of patients with Kt/v <1.2, mean Kt/v; percentage of patients with phosphorous >5.5 mg/dl, mean phosphorous; percentage of patients with calcium phosphate product >55, mean calcium phosphate product; and percentage of patients with ferritin <200 ng/ml, mean ferritin. No change was observed in percentage of patients with haemoglobin between 11 and 13 g/dl, erythropoietin consumed; percentage of patients with ferritin <100 ng/ml; percentage of patients with ferritin >800 ng/ml; percentage of patients with albumin <3.5 g/dl, mean albumin; or percentage of native arteriovenous fistula. The percentage of patients with haemoglobin >13 g/dl was increased. Quality-improvement strategies can help improve haemodialysis performance for anaemia, dialysis dose and bone metabolism. The importance of assessing patients with high haemoglobin level should be stressed.

  19. Housing improvements for health and associated socio-economic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Hilary; Thomas, Sian; Sellstrom, Eva; Petticrew, Mark

    2013-02-28

    The well established links between poor housing and poor health indicate that housing improvement may be an important mechanism through which public investment can lead to health improvement. Intervention studies which have assessed the health impacts of housing improvements are an important data resource to test assumptions about the potential for health improvement. Evaluations may not detect long term health impacts due to limited follow-up periods. Impacts on socio-economic determinants of health may be a valuable proxy indication of the potential for longer term health impacts. To assess the health and social impacts on residents following improvements to the physical fabric of housing. Twenty seven academic and grey literature bibliographic databases were searched for housing intervention studies from 1887 to July 2012 (ASSIA; Avery Index; CAB Abstracts; The Campbell Library; CINAHL; The Cochrane Library; COPAC; DH-DATA: Health Admin; EMBASE; Geobase; Global Health; IBSS; ICONDA; MEDLINE; MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; NTIS; PAIS; PLANEX; PsycINFO; RIBA; SCIE; Sociological Abstracts; Social Science Citations Index; Science Citations Index expanded; SIGLE; SPECTR). Twelve Scandinavian grey literature and policy databases (Libris; SveMed+; Libris uppsök; DIVA; Artikelsök; NORART; DEFF; AKF; DSI; SBI; Statens Institut for Folkesundhed; Social.dk) and 23 relevant websites were searched. In addition, a request to topic experts was issued for details of relevant studies. Searches were not restricted by language or publication status. Studies which assessed change in any health outcome following housing improvement were included. This included experimental studies and uncontrolled studies. Cross-sectional studies were excluded as correlations are not able to shed light on changes in outcomes. Studies reporting only socio-economic outcomes or indirect measures of health, such as health service use, were excluded. All housing improvements which

  20. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D.; Walker, Matthew P.; Thompson, Monique A.; Smith, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and lead to significant impairment. Progress toward establishing treatments has been good. However, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically-supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? This question arises from five lines of evidence: (a) mental illness is often characterized by memory impairment, (b) memory impairment is modifiable, (c) psychosocial treatments often involve the activation of emotion, (d) emotion can bias memory and (e) memory for psychosocial treatment sessions is poor. Insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory are leveraged to derive strategies for a transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support intervention. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the internet and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise and imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  1. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Goding, George S; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R; Catcheside, Peter G; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Claman, David M; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Barnes, Maree

    2014-02-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce obstructive sleep apnea severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel hypoglossal nerve stimulation system (HGNS; Apnex Medical, St Paul, MN, USA) in treating obstructive sleep apnea at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52.4 ± 9.4 years) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the hypoglossal nerve stimulation system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life [Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)]. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was used on 86 ± 16% of nights for 5.4 ± 1.4 h per night. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.001) from baseline to 12 months in apnea-hypopnea index (45.4 ± 17.5 to 25.3 ± 20.6 events h(-1) ) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire score (14.2 ± 2.0 to 17.0 ± 2.4), as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared with 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal; and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility and efficacy.

  2. Looking beyond historical patient outcomes to improve clinical models.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chih-Chun; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Scirica, Benjamin M; McMillan, Sean; Gurm, Hitinder S; Syed, Zeeshan

    2012-04-25

    Conventional algorithms for modeling clinical events focus on characterizing the differences between patients with varying outcomes in historical data sets used for the model derivation. For many clinical conditions with low prevalence and where small data sets are available, this approach to developing models is challenging due to the limited number of positive (that is, event) examples available for model training. Here, we investigate how the approach of developing clinical models might be improved across three distinct patient populations (patients with acute coronary syndrome enrolled in the DISPERSE2-TIMI33 and MERLIN-TIMI36 trials, patients undergoing inpatient surgery in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program registry, and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium registry). For each of these cases, we supplement an incomplete characterization of patient outcomes in the derivation data set (uncensored view of the data) with an additional characterization of the extent to which patients differ from the statistical support of their clinical characteristics (censored view of the data). Our approach exploits the same training data within the derivation cohort in multiple ways to improve the accuracy of prediction. We position this approach within the context of traditional supervised (2-class) and unsupervised (1-class) learning methods and present a 1.5-class approach for clinical decision-making. We describe a 1.5-class support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm that implements this approach, and report on its performance relative to logistic regression and 2-class SVM classification with cost-sensitive weighting and oversampling. The 1.5-class SVM algorithm improved prediction accuracy relative to other approaches and may have value in predicting clinical events both at the bedside and for risk-adjusted quality of care assessment.

  3. Patient activation and improved outcomes in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Rebecca; Beach, Mary Catherine; Saha, Somnath; Mori, Tomi; Loveless, Mark O; Hibbard, Judith H; Cohn, Jonathan A; Sharp, Victoria L; Korthuis, P Todd

    2013-05-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses several important concepts in chronic care management, including self-efficacy for positive health behaviors. In HIV-infected populations, better self-efficacy for medication management is associated with improved adherence to antiretroviral medications (ARVs), which is critically important for controlling symptoms and slowing disease progression. To determine 1) characteristics associated with patient activation and 2) associations between patient activation and outcomes in HIV-infected patients. Cross-sectional survey. 433 patients receiving care in four HIV clinics. An interviewer conducted face-to-face interviews with patients following their HIV clinic visit. Survey data were supplemented with medical record abstraction to obtain most recent CD4 counts, HIV viral load and antiretroviral medications. Patient activation was measured using the 13-item PAM (possible range 0-100). Outcomes included CD4 cell count > 200 cells/mL(3), HIV-1 RNA < 400 copies/mL (viral suppression), and patient-reported adherence. Overall, patient activation was high (mean PAM = 72.3 [SD 16.5, range 34.7-100]). Activation was lower among those without vs. with a high school degree (68.0 vs. 74.0, p < .001), and greater depression (77.6 lowest, 70.2 middle, 68.1 highest tertile, p < .001). There was no association between patient activation and age, race, gender, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, or social status. In multivariable models, every 5-point increase in PAM was associated with greater odds of CD4 count > 200 cells/mL(3) (aOR 1.10 [95 % CI 1.01, 1.21]), adherence (aOR 1.18 [95 % CI 1.09, 1.29]) and viral suppression (aOR 1.08 [95 % CI 1.00, 1.17]). The association between PAM and viral suppression was mediated through adherence. Higher patient activation was associated with more favorable HIV outcomes. Interventions to improve patient activation should be developed and tested for their ability to

  4. Statins to improve cardiovascular outcomes in treated HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Chris T.; Eckard, Allison Ross; McComsey, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To evaluate evidence that statins reduce cardiovascular risk in patients living with HIV Recent findings Moderate to high dose atorvastatin and rosuvastatin appear to reduce non-calcified coronary plaque volume and slow progression of carotid intima-media thickness in patients with treated HIV infection. Expected lipoprotein changes with statins on the background of modern ART are similar to the general population. In addition to lipids, the statin benefit may be mediated in part by improvements in vascular inflammation and levels of T-cell and monocyte activation. One concern is the potential for rosuvastatin to cause insulin resistance. Decisions to prescribe statins must be done in the context of global risk assessment, but traditional risk calculators such as the Framingham risk score or the ACC/AHA pooled-risk equations underestimate risk in this population. Furthermore, many patients with subclinical disease would not be recommended for statins according to the most recent ACC/AHA guidelines. Summary Statins are likely to improve cardiovascular outcomes for patients with HIV, but results of the first outcome study are not expected until 2020. In the meantime, clinicians should individualize statin prescriptions, and should consider using more potent statins (rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, and pitavastatin) when possible. PMID:26658651

  5. Robotic joint replacement surgery: does technology improve outcomes?

    PubMed

    Hill, Chelsea; El-Bash, Reem; Johnson, Leslie; Coustasse, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease that leads patients to seek total joint replacement (TJR). Component misalignment leads to failure of TJR. Computer navigation enhances the precision of component alignment, but the addition of robotic guidance can boost TJR to a higher level of accuracy. Some 29 English-language peer-reviewed articles from 2002 to 2013 and 1 Web site were reviewed. A conceptual framework was adapted to explain benefits and barriers of adoption of robotic TJR. A total of 10 studies were reviewed with focus on more precise alignment, outcomes, length of stay, and costs. Cost to obtain robotic surgical equipment was found to be about $1 million with maintenance costs approaching $350 000. Robotic techniques compared with conventional orthopedic surgery showed slight variances in favor of robotic procedures. Although hospitals have the potential to reduce costs and improve outcomes with robotic TJR, the expenditure and maintenance have not been proven a clear return on investment. As surgical robotic technology evolves in accuracy and accessibility, joint replacement surgery may benefit from improved precision and decreased health care costs. However, equipment purchase and upkeep costs and surgeon training may impede use to its full potential in orthopedic surgery in the United States.

  6. Improved Outcomes in a Quality Improvement Collaborative for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Peter A.; Kappelman, Michael D.; King, Eileen C.; Pratt, Jesse M.; Boyle, Brendan M.; Duffy, Lynn F.; Grunow, John E.; Kim, Sandra C.; Leibowitz, Ian; Schoen, Bess T.; Colletti, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Unintended variation in the care of patients with Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) may prevent achievement of optimal outcomes. We sought to improve chronic care delivery and outcomes for children with inflammatory bowel disease by using network-based quality improvement methods. METHODS: By using a modified Breakthrough Series collaborative structure, 6 ImproveCareNow Network care centers tested changes in chronic illness care and collected data monthly. We used an interrupted time series design to evaluate the impact of these changes. RESULTS: Data were available for 843 children with CD and 345 with UC. Changes in care delivery were associated with an increase in the proportion of visits with complete disease classification, measurement of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) before initiation of thiopurines, and patients receiving an initial thiopurine dose appropriate to their TPMT status. These were significant in both populations for all process variables (P < .01) except for measurement of TPMT in CD patients (P = .12). There were significant increases in the proportion of CD (55%–68%) and UC (61%–72%) patients with inactive disease. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of CD patients not taking prednisone (86%–90%). Participating centers varied in the success of achieving these changes. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in the outcomes of patients with CD and UC were associated with improvements in the process of chronic illness care. Variation in the success of implementing changes suggests the importance of overcoming organizational factors related to quality improvement success. PMID:22412030

  7. Improved outcomes in a quality improvement collaborative for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Wallace V; Margolis, Peter A; Kappelman, Michael D; King, Eileen C; Pratt, Jesse M; Boyle, Brendan M; Duffy, Lynn F; Grunow, John E; Kim, Sandra C; Leibowitz, Ian; Schoen, Bess T; Colletti, Richard B

    2012-04-01

    Unintended variation in the care of patients with Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) may prevent achievement of optimal outcomes. We sought to improve chronic care delivery and outcomes for children with inflammatory bowel disease by using network-based quality improvement methods. By using a modified Breakthrough Series collaborative structure, 6 ImproveCareNow Network care centers tested changes in chronic illness care and collected data monthly. We used an interrupted time series design to evaluate the impact of these changes. Data were available for 843 children with CD and 345 with UC. Changes in care delivery were associated with an increase in the proportion of visits with complete disease classification, measurement of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) before initiation of thiopurines, and patients receiving an initial thiopurine dose appropriate to their TPMT status. These were significant in both populations for all process variables (P < .01) except for measurement of TPMT in CD patients (P = .12). There were significant increases in the proportion of CD (55%-68%) and UC (61%-72%) patients with inactive disease. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of CD patients not taking prednisone (86%-90%). Participating centers varied in the success of achieving these changes. Improvements in the outcomes of patients with CD and UC were associated with improvements in the process of chronic illness care. Variation in the success of implementing changes suggests the importance of overcoming organizational factors related to quality improvement success.

  8. [Management of peri-operative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia (body temperature under 36°C) is the thermal disorder most frequently found in surgical patients, but should be avoided as a means of reducing morbidity and costs. Temperature should be considered as a vital sign and all staff involved in the care of surgical patients must be aware that it has to be maintained within normal limits. Maintaining body temperature is the result, as in any other system, of the balance between heat production and heat loss. Temperature regulation takes place through a system of positive and negative feedback in the central nervous system, being developed in three phases: thermal afferent, central regulation and efferent response. Prevention is the best way to ensure a normal temperature. The active warming of the patient during surgery is mandatory. Using warm air is the most effective, simple and cheap way to prevent and treat hypothermia.

  9. Chronic hypernatraemia and hypothermia following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Nussey, S. S.; Ang, V. T.; Jenkins, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a 30 year old man who developed chronic adipsic hypernatraemia and hypothermia following a subarachnoid haemorrhage from an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Anterior pituitary function tests were normal. Hypothermia was demonstrated over 4 years with loss of the ability to control heat conservation despite body temperatures as low as 30 degrees C. He failed to experience thirst despite plasma sodium concentrations of up to 187 nmol/l and plasma osmolalities of up to 397 mOsm/kg. The slope of the plasma vasopressin-plasma osmolality curve indicated loss of the osmoreceptor. There was an absent vasopressin response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia but a normal response to apomorphine. The apomorphine-stimulated immunoreactive vasopressin was shown to behave identically to the synthetic peptide on HPLC and was bioactive. PMID:3774677

  10. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  11. Shapiro's syndrome: Defining the clinical spectrum of the spontaneous paroxysmal hypothermia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tambasco, Nicola; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Prontera, Paolo; Nigro, Pasquale; Donti, Emilio; Rossi, Aroldo; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Shapiro Syndrome (SS) is a rare condition of spontaneous periodic hypothermia, corpus callosum agenesis (ACC) and hyperhidrosis which can occur at any age. The variant form refers to the phenotypic SS without ACC. We reported the case of SS variant on a 4-year-old boy who presented from his first year frequent episodes of hypothermia lasting 2-3 h with core rectal temperatures <35 °C. In order to understand the characteristics of this rare syndrome we searched all the cases present in literature. Fifty-two cases of SS were found in literature. Among all clinical signs, paroxysmal hypothermia seems to be the hallmark of both typical and variant SS. ACC is reported only in 40% of cases of SS. Hyperhidrosis, another hallmark of SS, was present in only 42.3% of the cases and mainly in adult onset. The presence of SS in siblings of different genders suggests an autosomal recessive inheritance model, however a gonadic mosaicism responsible for an autosomal de novo mutation cannot be ruled out. From our review of well documented cases of SS, we conclude that only the episodic and spontaneous paroxysmal hypothermia should be considered the defining hallmark of typical and variant SS. This can be important to define the clinical manifestation of SS improving the early diagnosis.

  12. A simple and effective semi-invasive method for inducing local hypothermia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bazley, Faith A; Pashai, Nikta; Kerr, Candace; Thakor, Nitish; All, Angelo H

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia has been shown to be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury. Local hypothermia is advantageous because it avoids inducing systemic side effects of general hypothermia while providing the opportunity for greater temperature reduction at the site of injury, which may contribute to increased neuroprotection. We report a new semi-invasive method for inducing local hypothermia in rats' spinal cords. Our method does not require laminectomy or penetration of the dura and is more effective at cooling the cord than transcutaneous approaches. We show that we were successfully able to cool the spinal cord to 30.2 ± 0.3°C for 2 hours with rectal temperature maintained at 37.3 ± 0.3°C after a spinal cord contusion injury. We also validated our method in control rats that received only a laminectomy. Furthermore, this method was able to reliably cool and rewarm the cord at a steady rate (Δ5.5°C in 30 min, or 0.2°C/min). Future work will include validating long-term functional improvements of injured rats after treatment and to apply local cooling to other spinal cord injury models, such as compression injuries.

  13. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Palomeque, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS), followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24363826

  15. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  16. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-10-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement.

  17. Accidental hypothermia-an update : The content of this review is endorsed by the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MEDCOM).

    PubMed

    Paal, Peter; Gordon, Les; Strapazzon, Giacomo; Brodmann Maeder, Monika; Putzer, Gabriel; Walpoth, Beat; Wanscher, Michael; Brown, Doug; Holzer, Michael; Broessner, Gregor; Brugger, Hermann

    2016-09-15

    This paper provides an up-to-date review of the management and outcome of accidental hypothermia patients with and without cardiac arrest. The authors reviewed the relevant literature in their specialist field. Summaries were merged, discussed and approved to produce this narrative review. The hospital use of minimally-invasive rewarming for non-arrested, otherwise healthy, patients with primary hypothermia and stable vital signs has the potential to substantially decrease morbidity and mortality for these patients. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has revolutionised the management of hypothermic cardiac arrest, with survival rates approaching 100 % in some cases. Hypothermic patients with risk factors for imminent cardiac arrest (temperature <28 °C, ventricular arrhythmia, systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg), and those who have already arrested, should be transferred directly to an ECLS-centre. Cardiac arrest patients should receive continuous cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during transfer. If prolonged transport is required or terrain is difficult, mechanical CPR can be helpful. Delayed or intermittent CPR may be appropriate in hypothermic arrest when continuous CPR is impossible. Modern post-resuscitation care should be implemented following hypothermic arrest. Structured protocols should be in place to optimise pre-hospital triage, transport and treatment as well as in-hospital management, including detailed criteria and protocols for the use of ECLS and post-resuscitation care. Based on new evidence, additional clinical experience and clearer management guidelines and documentation, the treatment of accidental hypothermia has been refined. ECLS has substantially improved survival and is the treatment of choice in the patient with unstable circulation or cardiac arrest.

  18. Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation Improves Obstructive Sleep Apnea: 12 Month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kezirian, Eric J.; Goding, George S.; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J.; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R.; Catcheside, Peter G.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Walsh, Jennifer H.; Maddison, Kathleen J.; Claman, David M.; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y.; Campbell, Matthew C.; Palme, Carsten E.; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R.; Hillman, David R.; Barnes, Maree

    2013-01-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HGNS) activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce OSA severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of a novel HGNS system (HGNS®, Apnex Medical, Inc., St. Paul, MN) in treating OSA at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52·4±9·4 years) with moderate to severe OSA and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the HGNS system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in OSA severity (apnoea-hypopnoea index, AHI, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, FOSQ). HGNS was used on 86±16% of nights for 5·4±1·4 hours per night. There was a significant improvement (p < 0·001) from baseline to 12 months in AHI (45.4±17·5 to 25·3±20·6 events/h) and FOSQ score (14·2±2·0 to 17·0±2·4) as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared to 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. HGNS demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility, and efficacy. PMID:24033656

  19. Changes in hippocampal ultrastructure and vimentin expression in rhesus monkeys following selective deep hypothermia and blood occlusion.

    PubMed

    Li, B C; Fu, X; Niu, X Q; Fan, Y D; Xu, W; Zhao, X X; Pu, J

    2015-01-30

    Previous studies have shown that selective cerebral profound hypothermia combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion can improve resistance to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in monkeys. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of selective cerebral profound hypothermia on the ultrastructure and vimentin expression in monkey hippocampi after severe cerebral ischemia. Eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomly divided into two groups: profound hypothermia (N = 5) and normothermia (N = 3). Monkeys in the profound hypothermia group underwent bilateral carotid artery and jugular vein occlusion for 10 minutes at room temperature. Ringer's solution at 4°C was then perfused through the right internal carotid artery and out of the right jugular vein, maintaining the brain temperature below 18°C. Sixty minutes later, cerebral blood flow was restored. The normothermia group underwent all procedures with the exception that the Ringer's solution was 37°C during perfusion. All animals in the profound hypothermia group were successfully resuscitated. No significant abnormalities of hippocampal morphology or ultrastructure were observed. In contrast, no monkeys were alive after perfusion in the normothermia group and they had abnormal hippocampal morphology and ultrastructure to different extents. Vimentin expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the profound hypothermia group (47.88% ± 1.66) than the normothermia group (79.51% ± 1.00; P < 0.01). We conclude that selective cerebral profound hypothermia following 10-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries was able to downregulate vimentin expression in the hippocampus and protect it from severe cerebral ischemia.

  20. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoñO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  1. Postoperative management of hip fractures: interventions associated with improved outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2012-01-01

    The annual number of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million by 2050. Currently, nearly 50% of hip fracture patients will develop at least one short-term complication including infection, delirium, venous thromboembolism (VTE), pressure ulcers or cardiovascular events. More than half will experience an adverse long-term outcomes including worsened ambulation or functional status, additional fractures and excess mortality. This paper summarizes current evidence for postoperative interventions attempting to improve these outcomes, including pain management, anemia management, delirium prevention strategies, VTE prophylaxis, rehabilitation type, nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids and secondary fracture prevention. Models of care that have been tested in this population including interdisciplinary orthogeriatric services, clinical pathways and hospitalist care are summarized. In general, good quality evidence supports routine use of VTE prophylaxis, and moderate quality evidence supports multifactorial delirium prevention protocols, and a conservative transfusion strategy. Aggressive pain control with higher doses of opiates and/or regional blocks are associated with lower delirium rates. Low-moderate quality evidence supports the use of clinical pathways, and dedicated orthogeriatric consultative services or wards. After hospital discharge, good quality evidence supports the use of bisphosphonates for secondary fracture prevention and mortality reduction. Rehabilitation services are important, but evidence to guide quantity, type or venue is lacking. Additional research is needed to clarify the role of nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids, home care and psychosocial interventions. PMID:24340216

  2. Improving Pediatric Asthma Care and Outcomes Across Multiple Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nkoy, Flory; Fassl, Bernhard; Stone, Bryan; Uchida, Derek A; Johnson, Joseph; Reynolds, Carolyn; Valentine, Karen; Koopmeiners, Karmella; Kim, Eun Hea; Savitz, Lucy; Maloney, Christopher G

    2015-12-01

    Gaps exist in inpatient asthma care. Our aims were to assess the impact of an evidence-based care process model (EB-CPM) 5 years after implementation at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH), a tertiary care facility, and after its dissemination to 7 community hospitals. Participants included asthmatics 2 to 17 years admitted at 8 hospitals between 2003 and 2013. The EB-CPM was implemented at PCH between January 2008 and March 2009, then disseminated to 7 community hospitals between January and June 2011. We measured compliance using a composite score (CS) for 8 quality measures. Outcomes were compared between preimplementation and postimplementation periods. Confounding was addressed through multivariable regression analyses. At PCH, the CS increased and remained at >90% for 5 years after implementation. We observed sustained reductions in asthma readmissions (P = .026) and length of stay (P < .001), a trend toward reduced costs (P = .094), and no change in hospital resource use, ICU transfers, or deaths. The CS also increased at the 7 community hospitals, reaching 80% to 90% and persisting >2 years after dissemination, with a slight but not significant readmission reduction (P = .119), a significant reduction in length of stay (P < .001) and cost (P = .053), a slight increase in hospital resource use (P = .032), and no change in ICU transfers or deaths. Our intervention resulted in sustained, long-term improvement in asthma care and outcomes at the tertiary care hospital and successful dissemination to community hospitals. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Improved facial outcome assessment using a 3D anthropometric mask.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Clement, J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to process three-dimensional facial surfaces to objectively assess outcomes of craniomaxillofacial care is urgently required. Available surface registration techniques depart from conventional facial anthropometrics by not including anatomical relationship in their analysis. Current registrations rely on the manual selection of areas or points that have not moved during surgery, introducing subjectivity. An improved technique is proposed based on the concept of an anthropometric mask (AM) combined with robust superimposition. The AM is the equivalent to landmark definitions, as used in traditional anthropometrics, but described in a spatially dense way using (∼10.000) quasi-landmarks. A robust superimposition is performed to align surface images facilitating accurate measurement of spatial differences between corresponding quasi-landmarks. The assessment describes magnitude and direction of change objectively and can be displayed graphically. The technique was applied to three patients, without any modification and prior knowledge: a 4-year-old boy with Treacher-Collins syndrome in a resting and smiling pose; surgical correction for hemimandibular hypoplasia; and mandibular hypoplasia with staged orthognathic procedures. Comparisons were made with a reported closest-point (CP) strategy. Contrasting outcomes were found where the CP strategy resulted in anatomical implausibility whilst the AM technique was parsimonious to expected differences. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  5. Preoperative evaluation of the gynecologic patient: considerations for improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bruce E; Porter, Joann

    2008-05-01

    The preoperative evaluation serves several purposes for the gynecologist. Patients with previously undiagnosed, or incompletely managed, medical concerns are identified and appropriate treatment initiated. In women with known medical concerns, the surgeon can anticipate problems and plan for appropriate postoperative care. In certain cases, the preoperative evaluation identifies medical conditions that are unstable enough to adversely affect the postoperative outcome, and appropriate referral for medical management can be made. One of the most important aspects of the evaluation is the identification of women at high risk for cardiovascular complications. A stepwise approach is useful to identify those women who may proceed to surgery and those who need further testing. Much of the preoperative evaluation of the woman with pulmonary disease can be done during the history and physical examination without additional testing. Deep venous thrombosis is a significant concern in gynecologic surgery; appropriate identification of the woman at risk is important, with initiation of prophylaxis occurring shortly after the surgery concludes. Many women undergoing gynecologic surgery have diabetes. Careful management of diabetes in the perioperative period has become more germane, with evidence of improved outcomes as tight control is achieved. Much of the preoperative evaluation falls easily into the purview of the gynecologist, with advice presented as to when medical consultation should be considered.

  6. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  7. Improving MILSATCOM (Military Satellite Communication) acquisition outcomes: Lease versus buy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinneen, P. M.; Quinn, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    This study was requested by the Director of Space Systems and Command, Control, and Communications, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff (Research, Development, and Acquisition), Headquarters United States Air Force, to assist in improving the outcomes of military satellite communication (MILSATCOM) programs. In view of rapidly rising costs of military space systems, leasing has been suggested as one way of controlling these costs. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify and analyze the central considerations relevant to determining whether to lease or by MILSATCOM services. The results of this report should be of interest to members of MILSATCOM acquisition community and others concerned with making lease versus buy decisions in the public sector. The work was conducted under the MILSATCOM Acquisition Policy project of the Project Air Force Resource Management Program.

  8. Pregabalin suppresses calcium-mediated proteolysis and improves stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Son, Tae Gen; Mughal, Mohamed R; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    Pregabalin, a Ca(2+) channel α(2)δ-subunit antagonist with analgesic and antiepileptic activity, reduced neuronal loss and improved functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke. Pregabalin administration (5-10mg/kg, i.p.) 30-90 min after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion reduced infarct volume, neuronal death in the ischemic penumbra and neurological deficits at 24h post-stroke. Pregabalin significantly decreased the amount of Ca(2+)/calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis in the cerebral cortex measured at 6h post-stroke. Together with the extensive clinical experience with pregabalin for other neurological indications, our findings suggest the potential for a therapeutic benefit of pregabalin in stroke patients.

  9. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population.

  10. Acupuncture fails to improve treatment outcome in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Worner, T M; Zeller, B; Schwarz, H; Zwas, F; Lyon, D

    1992-06-01

    Fifty-six alcoholics (49 male, 7 female) of lower socioeconomic class attending an outpatient treatment program in Brooklyn, New York were prospectively randomized to one of three treatment group: point-specific acupuncture, sham transdermal stimulation or standard care (control). One third of the subjects reported a history of drug use in addition to alcohol. Results in this small sample showed no significant differences in attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, number of outpatients sessions attended, number of weeks in either the study or in the outpatient program, number of persons completing treatment or in the number of relapses. It is therefore concluded that in this small racially mixed sample of urban outpatient alcoholics, fixed point-specific standardized acupuncture did not improve outcome. We caution against the routine use of this treatment until more randomized controlled trials demonstrate a beneficial effect.

  11. ApolipoproteinE mimetic peptides improve outcome after focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haichen; Anderson, Lauren G; Lascola, Christopher D; James, Michael L; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Bennett, Ellen R; Acheson, Shawn K; Vitek, Michael P; Laskowitz, Daniel T

    2013-03-01

    Growing clinical evidence implicates isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in reducing neuroinflammation and mediating adaptive responses following ischemic and traumatic brain injury. However, the intact apoE holoprotein does not cross the blood-brain barrier and thus has limited therapeutic potential. We have created a small peptide, COG1410 (acetyl-AS-Aib-LRKL-Aib-KRLL-amide), derived from the apoE receptor-binding region. COG1410 retains the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective biological properties of the intact holoprotein and penetrates the blood-brain barrier. In the current study, we utilized a murine model of transient focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion to demonstrate that intravenous (IV) administration of COG1410 reduces infarct volume and radiographic progression of infarct, and improves functional outcome as assessed by rotarod when delivered up to 4h after ischemia onset. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  13. Accelerated corpus callosum development in prematurity predicts improved outcome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; van Bijnen, Loeka; Leemans, Alexander; Pascoe, Leona; Scratch, Shannon E; Cheong, Jeanie; Egan, Gary F; Inder, Terrie E; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    To determine: (1) whether corpus callosum (CC) size and microstructure at 7 years of age or their change from infancy to 7 years differed between very preterm (VP) and full-term (FT) children; (2) perinatal predictors of CC size and microstructure at 7 years; and (3) associations between CC measures at 7 years or trajectories from infancy to 7 years and neurodevelopmental outcomes. One hundred and thirty-six VP (gestational age [GA] <30 weeks and/or birth weight <1,250 g) and 33 FT children had usable magnetic resonance images at 7 years of age, and of these, 76 VP and 16 FT infants had usable data at term equivalent age. The CC was traced and divided into six sub-regions. Fractional anisotropy, mean, axial, radial diffusivity and volume were measured from tractography. Perinatal data were collected, and neurodevelopmental tests administered at 7 years' corrected age. VP children had smaller posterior CC regions, higher diffusivity and lower fractional anisotropy compared with FT 7-year-olds. Reduction in diffusivity over time occurred faster in VP than FT children (P ≤ 0.002). Perinatal brain abnormality and earlier GA were associated with CC abnormalities. Microstructural abnormalities at 7 years or slower development of the CC were associated with motor dysfunction, poorer mathematics and visual perception. This study is the first to demonstrate an accelerated trajectory of CC white matter diffusion following VP birth, associated with improved neurodevelopmental functioning. Findings suggest there is a window of opportunity for neurorestorative intervention to improve outcomes. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3733-3748, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Does administering albumin to postoperative gastroschisis patients improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina A; Silva, Luanna M; Leal, Antonio José G; de Moraes, Augusto César F; Tannuri, Uenis

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Newborns who undergo surgery for gastroschisis correction may present with oliguria, anasarca, prolonged postoperative ileus, and infection. New postoperative therapeutic procedures were tested with the objective of improving postoperative outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred thirty-six newborns participated in one of two phases. Newborns in the first phase received infusions of large volumes of crystalloid solution and integral enteral formula, and newborns in the second phase received crystalloid solutions in smaller volumes, with albumin solution infusion when necessary and the late introduction of a semi-elemental diet. The studied variables were serum sodium and albumin levels, the need for albumin solution expansion, the occurrence of anasarca, the length of time on parenteral nutrition, the length of time before initiating an enteral diet and reaching a full enteral diet, orotracheal intubation time, length of hospitalization, and survival rates. RESULTS: Serum sodium levels were higher in newborns in the second phase. There was a correlation between low serum sodium levels and orotracheal intubation time; additionally, low serum albumin levels correlated with the length of time before the initiation of an oral diet and the time until a full enteral diet was reached. However, the discharge weights of newborns in the second phase were higher than in the first phase. The other studied variables, including survival rates (83.4% and 92.0%, respectively), were similar for both phases. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of an albumin solution to newborns in the early postoperative period following gastroschisis repair increased their low serum sodium levels but did not improve the final outcome. The introduction of a semi-elemental diet promoted an increase in body weight at the time of discharge. PMID:22358234

  15. Disrupting the biofilm matrix improves wound healing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, R

    2015-08-01

    The most unyielding molecular component of biofilm communities is the matrix structure that it can create around the individual microbes that constitute the biofilm. The type of polymeric substances (polymeric sugars, bacterial proteins, bacterial DNA and even co-opted host substances) are dependent on the microbial species present within the biofilm. The extracellular polymeric substances that make up the matrix give the wound biofilm incredible colony defences against host immunity, host healing and wound care treatments. This polymeric slime layer, which is secreted by bacteria, encases the population of microbes, creating a physical barrier that limits the ingress of treatment agents to the bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine if degrading the wound biofilm matrix would improve wound healing outcomes and if so, if there was a synergy between treating agents that disrupted biofilm defenses with Next Science Wound Gel (wound gel) and cidal agents (topical antibiotics). A three-armed randomised controlled trial was designed to determine if standard of care (SOC) was superior to SOC plus wound gel (SOC + gel) and wound gel alone. The wound gel used in this study contains components that directly attack the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance. The gel was applied directly to the wound bed on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday interval, either alone or with SOC topical antibiotics. Using a surrogate endpoint of 50% reduction in wound volume, the results showed that SOC healed at 53%, wound gel healed at 80%, while SOC plus wound gel showed 93% of wounds being successfully treated. By directly targeting the wound biofilm matrix, wound healing outcomes are improved.

  16. Improving neonatal outcome through practical shoulder dystocia training.

    PubMed

    Draycott, Timothy J; Crofts, Joanna F; Ash, Jonathan P; Wilson, Louise V; Yard, Elaine; Sibanda, Thabani; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2008-07-01

    To compare the management of and neonatal injury associated with shoulder dystocia before and after introduction of mandatory shoulder dystocia simulation training. This was a retrospective, observational study comparing the management and neonatal outcome of births complicated by shoulder dystocia before (January 1996 to December 1999) and after (January 2001 to December 2004) the introduction of shoulder dystocia training at Southmead Hospital, Bristol, United Kingdom. The management of shoulder dystocia and associated neonatal injuries were compared pretraining and posttraining through a review of intrapartum and postpartum records of term, cephalic, singleton births in which difficulty with the shoulders was recorded during the two study periods. There were 15,908 and 13,117 eligible births pretraining and posttraining, respectively. The shoulder dystocia rates were similar: pretraining 324 (2.04%) and posttraining 262 (2.00%) (P=.813). After training was introduced, clinical management improved: McRoberts' position, pretraining 95/324 (29.3%) to 229/262 (87.4%) posttraining (P<.001); suprapubic pressure 90/324 (27.8%) to 119/262 (45.4%) (P<.001); internal rotational maneuver 22/324 (6.8%) to 29/262 (11.1%) (P=.020); delivery of posterior arm 24/324 (7.4%) to 52/262 (19.8%) (P<.001); no recognized maneuvers performed 174/324 (50.9%) to 21/262 (8.0%) (P<.001); documented excessive traction 54/324 (16.7%) to 24/262 (9.2%) (P=.010). There was a significant reduction in neonatal injury at birth after shoulder dystocia: 30/324 (9.3%) to 6/262 (2.3%) (relative risk 0.25 [confidence interval 0.11-0.57]). The introduction of shoulder dystocia training for all maternity staff was associated with improved management and neonatal outcomes of births complicated by shoulder dystocia. II.

  17. Research Priorities for Optimal Use of Patient-reported Outcomes in Quality and Outcome Improvement for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Patricia D

    2017-02-01

    The national Functional and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement program routinely collects pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcomes for clinicians to use when making individual patient treatment decisions and monitoring aggregate quality of care and outcomes. When the pre-post gains in pain or function at one site vary from the national norms, the next question is, "how do we improve?" This paper will use the traditional quality management's framework of inputs (patients), processes (clinical care), and outcomes to outline priority research questions to learn how clinicians, hospital managers, and patients can interpret patient-reported outcomes to improve total knee arthroplasty care and outcomes. In summary, research should identify best practices to minimize variation in a patient's health status before surgery, tailor peri-total knee arthroplasty care pathways to match individual patient risks to optimize safe care, and implement patient-reported measures to document optimal outcomes.

  18. Hypometabolism and hypothermia in the rat model of endotoxic shock: independence of circulatory hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Joshua J; Fonseca, Monique T; Flatow, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Kevin; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that development of hypothermia instead of fever in endotoxic shock is consequential to hypoxia. Endotoxic shock was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 μg kg−1 i.v.) in rats at an ambient temperature of 22°C. A β3-adrenergic agonist known to activate metabolic heat production, CL316,243, was employed to evaluate whether thermogenic capacity could be impaired by the fall in oxygen delivery () during endotoxic shock. This possibility was rejected as CL316,243 (0.15 mg kg−1 i.v.) evoked similar rises in oxygen consumption () in the presence and absence of endotoxic shock. Next, to investigate whether a less severe form of circulatory hypoxia could be triggering hypothermia, the circulating volume of LPS-injected rats was expanded using 6% hetastarch with the intention of improving tissue perfusion and alleviating hypoxia. This intervention attenuated not only the fall in arterial pressure induced by LPS, but also the associated falls in and body temperature. These effects, however, occurred independently of hypoxia, as they were not accompanied by any detectable changes in NAD+/NADH ratios. Further experimentation revealed that even the earliest drops in cardiac output and during endotoxic shock did not precede the reduction in that brings about hypothermia. In fact, and fell in such a synchrony that the / ratio remained unaffected. Only when hypothermia was prevented by exposure to a warm environment (30°C) did an imbalance in the / ratio become evident, and such an imbalance was associated with reductions in the renal and hypothalamic NAD+/NADH ratios. In conclusion, hypometabolism and hypothermia in endotoxic shock are not consequential to hypoxia but serve as a pre-emptive strategy to avoid hypoxia in this model. PMID:24951620

  19. Anaesthesiological strategies to improve outcome in liver transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Perilli, V; Aceto, P; Sacco, T; Modesti, C; Ciocchetti, P; Vitale, F; Russo, A; Fasano, G; Dottorelli, A; Sollazzi, L

    2016-07-01

    Graft and patients survival are the main goal of anesthesiological management in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). Even if anesthesiological practice sustained major developments over time, some evidence-based intraoperative strategies have not yet been widely applied. The aim of this review was to summarize intraoperative anesthesiological strategies which could have the potential to improve LT graft and/or recipient survival. Monitoring must be as accurate as possible in order to manage intraoperative hemodynamic changes. The pulmonary artery catheter still represents the more reliable method to monitor cardiac output by using the intermittent bolus thermodilution technique. Minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring devices may be considered only in stable cirrhotic patients. Goal-directed fluid-therapy has not yet defined for LT, but it could have a role in optimizing the long-term sequelae associated with volume depletion or overload. The use of vasopressor may affect LT recipient's outcome, by preventing prolonged hypotension, decreasing blood products transfusion and counteracting hepato-renal syndrome. The use of viscoelastic point of care is also warranted in order to reduce blood products requirements. Decreasing mechanical ventilation time, when it is feasible, may considerably improve survival. Finally, monitoring the depth of anesthesia when integrated into an early extubation protocol might have a positive effect on graft function.

  20. DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of mother’s own milk is the optimal way to feed infants, including very low birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g). Importantly for VLBW infants, who are at elevated risk of neurologic sequelae, mother’s own milk has been shown to enhance neurocognitive development. Unfortunately, the majority of mothers of VLBW infants are unable to provide an adequate supply of milk and thus supplementation with formula or donor milk is necessary. Given the association between mother’s own milk and neurodevelopment, it is important to ascertain whether provision of human donor milk as a supplement may yield superior neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to formula. Our primary hypothesis is that VLBW infants fed pasteurized donor milk compared to preterm formula as a supplement to mother’s own milk for 90 days or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first, will have an improved cognitive outcome as measured at 18 months corrected age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd ed. Secondary hypotheses are that the use of pasteurized donor milk will: (1) reduce a composite of death and serious morbidity; (2) support growth; and (3) improve language and motor development. Exploratory research questions include: Will use of pasteurized donor milk: (1) influence feeding tolerance and nutrient intake (2) have an acceptable cost effectiveness from a comprehensive societal perspective? Methods/Design DoMINO is a multi-centre, intent-to-treat, double blinded, randomized control trial. VLBW infants (n = 363) were randomized within four days of birth to either (1) pasteurized donor milk or (2) preterm formula whenever mother’s own milk was unavailable. Study recruitment began in October 2010 and was completed in December 2012. The 90 day feeding intervention is complete and long-term follow-up is underway. Discussion Preterm birth and its complications are a leading cause long-term morbidity among Canadian children. Strategies to mitigate this

  1. Can States Simultaneously Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Health Outcome Disparities?

    PubMed

    Kindig, David; Lardinois, Nicholas; Chatterjee, Debanjana

    2016-08-25

    Reducing racial health disparities is often stated as a population health goal, but specific targets for such improvement are seldom set. It is often assumed that improving overall health outcomes will be linked to disparity reduction, but this is not necessarily the case. We compared the annual change from 1999 through 2013 in combined-race (black and white) mortality with the annual change in absolute and relative racial mortality disparities for US states. Median annual improvement in combined-race mortality was 1.08% per year. Annual overall mortality rate reductions ranged from 0.24% per year in Oklahoma to 1.83% per year in Maryland. For disparities, the median for the black-white absolute gap was 3.60% per year, and the median for the relative black-to-white ratio was 1.19% per year. There was no significant correlation between the combined-race measure and either the absolute (0.03) or relative disparity measure reductions (-0.17). For mortality in US states over a recent period, improvement in the population mean and disparity reduction do not usually occur together. The disparity reduction rates observed may provide realistic guidance for public and private policy makers in setting goals for reducing population health disparity and creating investment priorities. As a starting point for discussion, the observed national median annual percentage improvement of 1.1 per year combined, 3.6% per year absolute gap reduction, and 1.2% per year relative gap reduction would be modest and reasonable goals.

  2. Social protection: potential for improving HIV outcomes among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca J; Sherr, Lorraine; Mark Orkin, F; Meinck, Franziska; Lim Ah Ken, Patricia; Winder-Rossi, Natalia E; Wolfe, Jason; Vicari, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Advances in biomedical technologies provide potential for adolescent HIV prevention and HIV-positive survival. The UNAIDS 90–90–90 treatment targets provide a new roadmap for ending the HIV epidemic, principally through antiretroviral treatment, HIV testing and viral suppression among people with HIV. However, while imperative, HIV treatment and testing will not be sufficient to address the epidemic among adolescents in Southern and Eastern Africa. In particular, use of condoms and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain haphazard, with evidence that social and structural deprivation is negatively impacting adolescents’ capacity to protect themselves and others. This paper examines the evidence for and potential of interventions addressing these structural deprivations. Discussion New evidence is emerging around social protection interventions, including cash transfers, parenting support and educational support (“cash, care and classroom”). These interventions have the potential to reduce the social and economic drivers of HIV risk, improve utilization of prevention technologies and improve adherence to ART for adolescent populations in the hyper-endemic settings of Southern and Eastern Africa. Studies show that the integration of social and economic interventions has high acceptability and reach and that it holds powerful potential for improved HIV, health and development outcomes. Conclusions Social protection is a largely untapped means of reducing HIV-risk behaviours and increasing uptake of and adherence to biomedical prevention and treatment technologies. There is now sufficient evidence to include social protection programming as a key strategy not only to mitigate the negative impacts of the HIV epidemic among families, but also to contribute to HIV prevention among adolescents and potentially to remove social and economic barriers to accessing treatment. We urge a further research and programming agenda: to actively combine

  3. [Experiences with transparenchymal coral calculi removal under local hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Albert, L; Zacher, W; Meyer, S

    1984-06-01

    Under certain conditions genuine coral calculi are an absolute offication for nephrotomy. In order to achieve complete hygienization of the cavity ischaemia times of more than 25-30 min are often necessary. Controlled surface cooling proved to be very good for improving ischaemia tolerance and reducing post-ischaemic loss of function in 21 necessary nephrotomies out of a total of 651 operations for concrements in the calyx system of the renal pelvis (= 3.2%; = 32.8% of all nephrotomies). A kidney thermometer with a temperature feeler developed by us allows fine control of the hypothermia induced by means of plastic bags filled with ice crystals. The technique of operation together with its advantages and disadvantages are described.

  4. The impact of ambient operating room temperature on neonatal and maternal hypothermia and associated morbidities: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Elaine L; Nelson, David B; Wyckoff, Myra H; Grant, Erica N; Tao, Weike; Sadana, Neeti; Chalak, Lina F; McIntire, Donald D; Leveno, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is common at the time of cesarean delivery and has been associated with a constellation of morbidities in addition to increased neonatal mortality. Additionally, maternal hypothermia is often uncomfortable for the surgical patient and has been associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. Various methods to decrease the rates of neonatal and maternal hypothermia have been examined and found to have varying levels of success. We sought to determine whether an increase in operating room temperature at cesarean delivery results in a decrease in the rate of neonatal hypothermia and associated morbidities. In this single-center randomized trial, operating room temperatures were adjusted weekly according to a cluster randomization schedule to either 20°C (67°F), which was the standard at our institution, or 23°C (73°F), which was the maximum temperature allowable per hospital policy. Neonatal hypothermia was defined as core body temperature <36.5°C (97.7°F) per World Health Organization criteria. The primary study outcome was neonatal hypothermia on arrival to the admitting nursery. Measures of neonatal morbidity potentially associated with hypothermia were examined. From February through July 2015, 791 women who underwent cesarean deliveries were enrolled, resulting in 410 infants in the 20°C standard management group and 399 in the 23°C study group. The rate of neonatal hypothermia on arrival to the admitting nursery was lower in the study group as compared to the standard management group: 35% vs 50%, P < .001. Moderate to severe hypothermia was infrequent when the operating room temperature was 23°C (5%); in contrast such hypothermia occurred in 19% of the standard management group, P < .001. Additionally, neonatal temperature in the operating room immediately following delivery and stabilization was also higher in the study group, 37.1 ± 0.6°C vs 36.9 ± 0.6°C, P < .001. We found no difference in rates of intubation

  5. Recombinant human erythropoietin improves neurological outcomes in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Sun, Huiqing; Xu, Falin; Kang, Wenqing; Gao, Liang; Guo, Jiajia; Zhang, Yanhua; Xia, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of repeated low‐dose human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) in the improvement of neurological outcomes in very preterm infants. Methods A total of 800 infants of ≤32‐week gestational age who had been in an intensive care unit within 72 hours after birth were included in the trial between January 2009 and June 2013. Preterm infants were randomly assigned to receive rhEPO (500IU/kg; n = 366) or placebo (n = 377) intravenously within 72 hours after birth and then once every other day for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was death or moderate to severe neurological disability assessed at 18 months of corrected age. Results Death and moderate/severe neurological disability occurred in 91 of 338 very preterm infants (26.9%) in the placebo group and in 43 of 330 very preterm infants (13.0%) in the rhEPO treatment group (relative risk [RR] = 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.27–0.59, p < 0.001) at 18 months of corrected age. The rate of moderate/severe neurological disability in the rhEPO group (22 of 309, 7.1%) was significantly lower compared to the placebo group (57 of 304, 18.8%; RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.19–0.55, p < 0.001), and no excess adverse events were observed. Interpretation Repeated low‐dose rhEPO treatment reduced the risk of long‐term neurological disability in very preterm infants with no obvious adverse effects. Ann Neurol 2016;80:24–34 PMID:27130143

  6. Academic-community partnerships improve outcomes in pediatric trauma care.

    PubMed

    Kelley-Quon, Lorraine I; Crowley, Melanie A; Applebaum, Harry; Cummings, Katie; Kang, Richard J; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Mangione, Carol M; Shew, Stephen B

    2015-06-01

    To address the specialized needs of injured children, pediatric trauma centers (PTCs) were established at many large, academic hospitals. This study explores clinical outcomes observed for injured children treated at an academic-sponsored community facility. In partnership with an academic medical center in a major metropolitan area, a not-for-profit community hospital became a designated Level II PTC in October 2010. Data for injured children <15 years old treated prior to PTC designation from January 2000 to September 2010 were prospectively collected using the Trauma and Emergency Medicine Information System and compared to data collected after PTC designation from January 2011 to December 2013. Overall, 681 injured children were treated at the community hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. Children treated after PTC designation were less likely to undergo computed tomography (CT) (50.9% vs. 81.3%, p<0.01), even when controlling for age, gender, injury type, injury severity, and year (OR 0.18, 95%CI 0.08-0.37). Specifically, fewer head (45.7% vs. 68.7%, p<0.01) and abdominal CTs (13.2% vs. 26.5%, p<0.01) were performed. Hospital length of stay was significantly shorter (2.8 ± 3.7 days vs. 3.7 ± 5.9 days, p<0.01). Mortality was low overall, but also decreased after PTC designation (0.4% vs. 2.0%, p=0.02). These results indicate that academic-community partnerships in pediatric trauma care are a feasible alternative and may lead to improved outcomes for injured children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protocol guided bleeding management improves cardiac surgery patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pearse, B L; Smith, I; Faulke, D; Wall, D; Fraser, J F; Ryan, E G; Drake, L; Rapchuk, I L; Tesar, P; Ziegenfuss, M; Fung, Y L

    2015-10-01

    Excessive bleeding is a risk associated with cardiac surgery. Treatment invariably requires transfusion of blood products; however, the transfusion itself may contribute to postoperative sequelae. Our objective was to analyse a quality initiative designed to provide an evidenced-based approach to bleeding management. A retrospective analysis compared blood product transfusion and patient outcomes 15 months before and after implementation of a bleeding management protocol. The protocol incorporated point-of-care coagulation testing (POCCT) with ROTEM and Multiplate to diagnose the cause of bleeding and monitor treatment. Use of the protocol led to decreases in the incidence of transfusion of PRBCs (47·3% vs. 32·4%; P < 0·0001), FFP (26·9% vs. 7·3%; P < 0·0001) and platelets (36·1% vs. 13·5%; P < 0·0001). During the intra-operative period, the percentage of patients receiving cryoprecipitate increased (2·7% vs. 5·1%; P = 0·002), as did the number of units transfused (248 vs. 692; P < 0·0001). The proportion of patients who received tranexamic acid increased (13·7% to 68·2%; P < 0·0001). There were reductions in re-exploration for bleeding (5·6% vs. 3·4; P = 0·01), superficial chest wound (3·3% vs. 1·4%; P = 0·002), leg wound infection (4·6% vs. 2·0%; P < 0·0001) and a 12% reduction in mean length of stay from operation to discharge (95%: 9-16%, P < 0·0001). Acquisition cost of blood products decreased by $1 029 118 in the 15-month period with the protocol. The implementation of a bleeding management protocol supported by POCCT in a cardiac surgery programme was associated with significant reductions in the transfusion of allogeneic blood products, improved outcomes and reduced cost. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline "healthy" gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches that

  9. Utero-placental Doppler ultrasound for improving pregnancy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stampalija, Tamara; Gyte, Gillian ML; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2014-01-01

    outcomes. We identified no randomised studies assessing the utero-placental vessels in the first trimester or in women at high risk for hypertensive disorders. Authors’ conclusions Present evidence failed to show any benefit to either the baby or the mother when utero-placental Doppler ultrasound was used in the second trimester of pregnancy in women at low risk for hypertensive disorders. Nevertheless, this evidence cannot be considered conclusive with only two studies included. There were no randomised studies in the first trimester, or in women at high risk. More research is needed to investigate whether the use of utero-placental Doppler ultrasound may improve pregnancy outcome. PMID:20824875

  10. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline “healthy” gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches

  11. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia.

  12. Hypothermia due to Antipsychotic Medication: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zonnenberg, Cherryl; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien M; Ramlal, Dharmindredew; Blom, Jan Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Hypothermia is a rare, but potentially fatal adverse effect of antipsychotic drug (APD) use. Although the opposite condition, hyperthermia, has been researched extensively in the context of the malignant antipsychotic syndrome, little is known about hypothermia due to APDs. This study aimed to review the literature on hypothermia in the context of APD use, and formulate implications for research and clinical care. A systematic search was made in PubMed and Ovid Medline. The literature search yielded 433 articles, including 57 original case descriptions of hypothermia developed during APD use with non-toxic plasma levels. All cases together indicate that the risk of developing hypothermia is highest during the 7 days following initiation, or increase in dosage, of APDs, especially in the presence of additional predisposing factors, such as advanced age, exposure to cold, adjuvant use of benzodiazepines, and (subclinical) hypothyroidism. In addition, data derived from drug-monitoring agencies suggest that the prevalence of APD-related hypothermia is at least 10 times higher than suggested by the literature. We conclude that health-care professionals need to monitor the body temperature of patients starting with (an increased dose of) APDs for a duration of 7-10 days to prevent hypothermia, especially in the presence of multiple risk factors. Moreover, systematic studies are needed to establish the actual prevalence of APD-related hypothermia as well as the relative risk for individual APDs.

  13. Extended Use of Hypothermia in Elderly Patients with Malignant Cerebral Edema as an Alternative to Hemicraniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Han-Yeong; Chang, Jun-Young; Yum, Kyu Sun; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Heon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Bae, Hee-Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Lee, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The use of decompressive hemicraniectomy (DHC) for the treatment of malignant cerebral edema can decrease mortality rates. However, this benefit is not sufficient to justify its use in elderly patients. We investigated the effects of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on safety, feasibility, and functional outcomes in elderly patients with malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarcts. Methods Elderly patients 60 years of age and older with infarcts affecting more than two-thirds of the MCA territory were included. Patients who could not receive DHC were treated with TH. Hypothermia was started within 72 hours of symptom onset and was maintained for a minimum of 72 hours with a target temperature of 33°C. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months following treatment and complications of TH were used as functional outcomes. Results Eleven patients with a median age of 76 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 18 were treated with TH. The median time from symptom onset to initiation of TH was 30.3±23.0 hours and TH was maintained for a median of 76.7±57.1 hours. Shivering (100%) and electrolyte imbalance (82%) were frequent complications. Two patients died (18%). The mean mRS score 3 months following treatment was 4.9±0.8. Conclusions Our results suggest that extended use of hypothermia is safe and feasible for elderly patients with large hemispheric infarctions. Hypothermia may be considered as a therapeutic alternative to DHC in elderly individuals. Further studies are required to validate our findings. PMID:27488978

  14. Directly Observed Therapy and Improved Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Limsomboon, Pranom; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Komsakorn, Sittijate; Moolphate, Saiyud; Chiengsorn, Navarat; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Sombat, Potjaman; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Mock, Philip A.; Varma, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive directly observed therapy (DOT). Randomized controlled trials have not consistently shown that this practice improves TB treatment success rates. In Thailand, one of 22 WHO-designated high burden TB countries, patients may have TB treatment observed by a health care worker (HCW), family member, or no one. We studied whether DOT improved TB treatment outcomes in a prospective, observational cohort. Methods and Findings We prospectively collected epidemiologic data about TB patients treated at public and private facilities in four provinces in Thailand and the national infectious diseases hospital from 2004–2006. Public health staff recorded the type of observed therapy that patients received during the first two months of TB treatment. We limited our analysis to pulmonary TB patients never previously treated for TB and not known to have multidrug-resistant TB. We analyzed the proportion of patients still on treatment at the end of two months and with treatment success at the end of treatment according to DOT type. We used propensity score analysis to control for factors associated with DOT and treatment outcome. Of 8,031 patients eligible for analysis, 24% received HCW DOT, 59% family DOT, and 18% self-administered therapy (SAT). Smear-positive TB was diagnosed in 63%, and 21% were HIV-infected. Of patients either on treatment or that defaulted at two months, 1601/1636 (98%) patients that received HCW DOT remained on treatment at two months compared with 1096/1268 (86%) patients that received SAT (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–6.0) and 3782/3987 (95%) patients that received family DOT (aOR 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.1). Of patients that had treatment success or that defaulted at the end of treatment, 1369/1477 (93%) patients that received HCW DOT completed treatment compared with 744/1074 (69%) patients that received SAT (aOR 3.3; CI, 2.4–4.5) and

  15. [Normothermia and hypothermia from an anaesthesiological viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Pannen, B H J

    2007-09-01

    For a long time the significance of perioperative accidental hypothermia was overlooked. The possible undesirable effects of a relatively small reduction in the body core temperature of 1.5-2.0 degrees C were generally unknown and the treatment options were limited. The unfavourable climatic conditions in the operation room favour heat loss and simultaneously, there is considerable disturbance of temperature regulation through general as well as spinal anaesthesia. In many studies it has now been shown that the resulting decrease in body temperature can have a negative effect on immune function, coagulation, the cardiovascular system and recovery behaviour. Heat loss in the perioperative phase should, therefore, be minimised by effective insulation. Nevertheless, a negative heat balance can often only be avoided by an additional heat treatment of the body surface which ideally should be initiated in the preoperative phase. If large volumes must be infused, an important additional measure is to prewarm these solutions. This is the only way in which the objective, to avoid a fall in body temperature to below 36 degrees C in the perioperative phase and the possible subsequent negative effects on the course of events, can be reached. The incidence of perioperative hypothermia is often underestimated so that in this phase a reduction in body core temperature of more than 2 degrees C will occur in more than 50% of patients if no special measures are undertaken. In addition, the undesirable effects of such a reduction in core temperature were barely known and even only a few years ago there were hardly any possibilities for reliable prevention or effective treatment. Therefore, in this article the causes of perioperative hypothermia will initially be described. In the second section the possible negative consequences of a reduction in body core temperature will be presented and in the last section the resulting consequences for the practice will be discussed.

  16. Hypothermia and physiological control: the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Frappell, P

    1998-02-01

    1. Ventilation (VE) in unanaesthetized hypothermic animals remains tightly coupled to oxygen consumption (VO2) such that VE/VO2 remains constant despite changes in body temperature. 2. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia would suggest that, relative to metabolic rate, the gain of the respiratory system is unaltered in hypothermic animals. 3. Future studies should exercise care to ensure that the method applied in inducing hypothermia does not complicate ventilatory control and that the ability of the species to hibernate is taken into consideration.

  17. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  18. Survival after cardiopulmonary arrest with extreme hyperkalaemia and hypothermia in a patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Stan; Lee, I-Lynn

    2012-12-20

    Potassium levels are regularly used as a prognostic factor to cease resuscitation in significant hypothermia. In this case report, we highlight how survival is still possible with extreme hyperkalaemia in severe hypothermia. We present a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian man who presented with metformin associated lactic acidosis. On presentation he had potassium of 9.1 mmol/l and a temperature of 31.5 °C. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced when he went into asystolic arrest. This presentation would commonly make attempts at resuscitation futile with a 100% death rate. However, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved and survival was possible. We provide evidence that survival is possible in profound hyperkalaemia and hypothermia. Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation with early haemofiltration can be successful.

  19. Survival after cardiopulmonary arrest with extreme hyperkalaemia and hypothermia in a patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Stan; Lee, I-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Potassium levels are regularly used as a prognostic factor to cease resuscitation in significant hypothermia. In this case report, we highlight how survival is still possible with extreme hyperkalaemia in severe hypothermia. We present a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian man who presented with metformin associated lactic acidosis. On presentation he had potassium of 9.1 mmol/l and a temperature of 31.5°C. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced when he went into asystolic arrest. This presentation would commonly make attempts at resuscitation futile with a 100% death rate. However, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved and survival was possible. We provide evidence that survival is possible in profound hyperkalaemia and hypothermia. Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation with early haemofiltration can be successful. PMID:23264158

  20. Certified kitchen managers: do they improve restaurant inspection outcomes?

    PubMed

    Cates, Sheryl C; Muth, Mary K; Karns, Shawn A; Penne, Michael A; Stone, Carmily N; Harrison, Judy E; Radke, Vincent J

    2009-02-01

    Restaurants are associated with a significant number of foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States. Certification of kitchen managers through an accredited training and testing program may help improve food safety practices and thus prevent foodborne illness. In this study, relationships between the results of routine restaurant inspections and the presence of a certified kitchen manager (CKM) were examined. We analyzed data for 4461 restaurants in Iowa that were inspected during 2005 and 2006 (8338 total inspections). Using logistic regression analysis, we modeled the outcome variable (0 = no critical violations [CVs]; 1 = one or more CVs) as a function of presence or absence of a CKM and other explanatory variables. We estimated separate models for seven inspection categories. Restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for personnel (P < 0.01), food source or handling (P < 0.01), facility or equipment requirements (P < 0.05), ware-washing (P < 0.10), and other operations (P < 0.10). However, restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were equally likely to have a CV for temperature or time control and plumbing, water, or sewage as were restaurants without a CKM present. Analyses by type of violation within the temperature and time control category revealed that restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for hot holding (P < 0.05), but the presence of a CKM did not affect other types of temperature and time control violations. Our analyses suggest that the presence of a CKM is protective for most types of CVs, and we identify areas for improving training of CKMs.

  1. Impact of a migraine management program on improving health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Campinha-Bacote, Dexter L; Kendle, Julie B; Jones, Climentene; Callicoat, Deborah; Webert, Allyn; Stoukides, Cheryl A; Kaul, Alan F

    2005-12-01

    The goals of this program were to evaluate the effectiveness of migraine disease management techniques in improving patient satisfaction with migraine care, decreasing the frequency and severity of headaches and migraine-associated disability, increasing the effectiveness of migraine treatment and work productivity, improving physician diagnosis and treatment of migraine, and ultimately determining the program's impact on healthcare resource utilization. A prospective observational study was undertaken. This prospective Migraine Management Program (MMP) used active patient and healthcare physician-based disease management resources, tools, and techniques. Members were identified using administrative and medical claims databases indicating an ICD-9 diagnosis code (346.XX) for migraine during the previous twelve months. All identified patients received the Migraine Therapy Assessment Questionnaire (MTAQ) to assess their level of migraine control for pre/post measurement. Of the 2,134 patients responding to the initial MTAQ, 789 completed both a baseline and follow-up and 1,345 completed only a baseline questionnaire. For those patients completing both, there was a statistically significant reduction in all identified management issues: poor symptom control, high attack frequency, knowledge/behavior barriers, economic burden, and dissatisfaction with treatment. Comparing the former group to those completing only the baseline MTAQ, the latter were significantly more likely to report problems with three migraine management issues; poorer symptom control, greater economic burden, and dissatisfaction with their treatment. The use of appropriate patient and physician educational interventions, such as Aetna's MMP incorporating disease management principles and the MTAQ questionnaire, can have a significant impact on patient-centered outcomes and satisfaction with their migraine treatment.

  2. Improving Pediatric Asthma Outcomes in a Community Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Walls, Theresa A; Hughes, Naomi T; Mullan, Paul C; Chamberlain, James M; Brown, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Asthma triggers >775 000 emergency department (ED) visits for children each year. Approximately 80% of these visits occur in community EDs. We performed this study to measure effects of partnership with a community ED on pediatric asthma care. For this quality improvement initiative, we implemented an evidence-based pediatric asthma guideline in a community ED. We included patients whose clinical impression in the medical decision section of the electronic health record contained the words asthma, bronchospasm, or wheezing. We reviewed charts of included patients 12 months before guideline implementation (August 2012-July 2013) and 19 months after guideline implementation (August 2013-February 2015). Process measures included the proportion of children who had an asthma score recorded, the proportion who received steroids, and time to steroid administration. The outcome measure was the proportion of children who needed transfer for additional care. In total, 724 patients were included, 289 during the baseline period and 435 after guideline implementation. Overall, 64% of patients were assigned an asthma score after guideline implementation. During the baseline period, 60% of patients received steroids during their ED visit, compared with 76% after guideline implementation (odds ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0). After guideline implementation, the mean time to steroids decreased significantly, from 196 to 105 minutes (P < .001). Significantly fewer patients needed transfer after guideline implementation (10% compared with 14% during the baseline period) (odds ratio 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.99). Our study shows that partnership between a pediatric tertiary care center and a community ED is feasible and can improve pediatric asthma care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Colorectal cancer screening: Opportunities to improve uptake, outcomes, and disparities

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Neal; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has become a standard of care in industrialized nations for those 50 to 75 years of age, along with selected high-risk populations. While colorectal cancer screening has been shown to reduce both the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is a complex multi-disciplinary process with a number of important steps that require optimization before tangible improvements in outcomes are possible. For both opportunistic and programmatic colorectal cancer screening, poor participant uptake remains an ongoing concern. Furthermore, current screening modalities (such as the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy) may be used or performed suboptimally, which can lead to missed neoplastic lesions and unnecessary endoscopic evaluations. The latter poses the risk of adverse events, such as perforation and post-polypectomy bleeding, as well as financial impacts to the healthcare system. Moreover, ongoing disparities in colorectal cancer screening persist among marginalized populations, including specific ethnic minorities (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Indigenous groups), immigrants, and those who are economically disenfranchised. Given this context, we aimed to review the current literature on these important areas pertaining to colorectal cancer screening, particularly focusing on the guaiac based fecal occult blood test, the fecal immunochemical test and colonoscopy. PMID:28042387

  4. Improving conservation outcomes with insights from local experts and bureaucracies.

    PubMed

    Haenn, Nora; Schmook, Birgit; Reyes, Yol; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    We describe conservation built on local expertise such that it constitutes a hybrid form of traditional and bureaucratic knowledge. Researchers regularly ask how local knowledge might be applied to programs linked to protected areas. By examining the production of conservation knowledge in southern Mexico, we assert local expertise is already central to conservation. However, bureaucratic norms and social identity differences between lay experts and conservation practitioners prevent the public valuing of traditional knowledge. We make this point by contrasting 2 examples. The first is a master's thesis survey of local experts regarding the biology of the King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) in which data collection took place in communities adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. The second is a workshop sponsored by the same reserve that instructed farmers on how to monitor endangered species, including the King Vulture. In both examples, conservation knowledge would not have existed without traditional knowledge. In both examples, this traditional knowledge is absent from scientific reporting. On the basis of these findings, we suggest conservation outcomes may be improved by recognizing the knowledge contributions local experts already make to conservation programming. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Improving periodontal outcomes: merging clinical and behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Rebecca S; Bray, Kimberly S

    2016-06-01

    New data indicate that periodontal diseases are much more prevalent than previously thought, which means that there are large numbers of patients who will need to be diagnosed and treated for periodontal disease in a general dental practice. Oral hygiene procedures performed by patients between office visits are important for gingival health. No particular type of toothbrush has consistently been shown to have superior plaque-removal ability over another. Although studies on powered brushes have shown evidence for efficacy of biofilm removal and increased patient compliance, they are of short duration, making evaluation of long-term effects difficult to achieve. Interdental cleaning with dental floss can be effective but it is technique-sensitive. Interdental brushes have been shown to be superior to floss in plaque index scores, but not in gingival inflammation reduction. A systematic review of oral irrigation reported a beneficial adjunctive effect on bleeding and gingival indices and pocket depth. Antimicrobials in mouthrinses and toothpastes have shown significant reductions in plaque and gingivitis when used correctly. Even though it is considered essential for patients to utilize biofilm-removal techniques on a frequent basis, studies on adherence show that approximately 30-60% of health information is forgotten within 1 h, and 50% of health recommendations are not followed. Incorporating psychosocial aspects of behavioral change, including well-established counseling strategies, such as motivational interviewing, may elicit improved patient outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  7. Pulsatile reperfusion after cardiac arrest improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Anstadt, M P; Stonnington, M J; Tedder, M; Crain, B J; Brothers, M F; Hilleren, D J; Rahija, R J; Menius, J A; Lowe, J E

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using nonpulsatile flow (NPF) is advocated for refractory cardiac arrest. This study examined cerebral outcome after resuscitation with pulsatile flow (PF) versus NPF. Dogs arrested for 12.5 minute were reperfused with NPF (n = 11) using roller pump CPB or PF (n = 11) using mechanical biventricular cardiac massage. Pump flows were similar between groups; however early arterial pressures were greater during PF versus NPF, *p less than 0.05. Circulatory support was weaned at 60 minutes' reperfusion. Neurologic recovery of survivors (n = 16) was significantly better after PF versus NPF, *p = 0.01. The presence of brain lesions on magnetic resonance images did not significantly differ between groups at 7 days. Brain then were removed and regions examined for ischemic changes. Loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons was more severe after NPF versus PF, +p = 0.009. Ischemic changes were more frequent after NPF in the caudate nucleus (+p = 0.009) and watershed regions of the cerebral cortex (+p = 0.062), compared with PF. These results demonstrate that PF improves cerebral resuscitation when treating cardiac arrest with mechanical circulatory support (* = MANOVA with repeated measures, + = categorical data analysis. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:1953100

  8. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Garnavos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic). These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: “fixed” and “bio”, avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of “semi-reaming” for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best “timing” for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde). Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures. PMID:21559099

  9. Could training executive function improve treatment outcomes for eating disorders?

    PubMed

    Juarascio, Adrienne S; Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Forman, Evan M

    2015-07-01

    Current gold standard treatments for eating disorders (EDs) lack satisfactory efficacy, and traditional psychological treatments do not directly address executive functioning deficits underpinning ED pathology. The goal of this paper is to explore the potential for enhancing ED treatment outcomes by improving executive functioning deficits that have been demonstrated to underlie eating pathology. To achieve our objective, we (1) review existing evidence for executive functioning deficits that underpin EDs and consider the extent to which these deficits could be targeted in neurocognitive training programs, (2) present the evidence for the one ED neurocognitive training program well-studied to date (Cognitive Remediation Therapy), (3) discuss the utility of neurocognitive training programs that have been developed for other psychiatric disorders with similar deficits, and (4) provide suggestions for the future development and research of neurocognitive training programs for EDs. Despite the fact that the body of empirical work on neurocognitive training programs for eating disorders is very small, we conclude that their potential is high given the combined evidence for the role of deficits in executive functioning in EDs, the initial promise of Cognitive Remediation Training, and the success in treating related conditions with neurocognitive training. Based on the evidence to date, it appears that the development and empirical evaluation of neurocognitive training programs for EDs is warranted.

  10. Intravenous nutrients for preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia in adults.

    PubMed

    Warttig, Sheryl; Alderson, Phil; Lewis, Sharon R; Smith, Andrew F

    2016-11-22

    trials were at high or unclear risk of bias owing to inappropriate or unclear randomization methods, and to unclear participant and assessor blinding. This may have influenced results, but it is unclear how results might have been influenced.No trials reported any of our prespecified primary outcomes, which were risk of hypothermia and major cardiovascular events. Therefore, we decided to analyse data related to core body temperature instead as a primary outcome. It was not possible to conduct meta-analysis of data related to amino acid infusion for the 60-minute and 120-minute time points, as we observed significant statistical heterogeneity in the results. Some trials showed that higher temperatures were associated with amino acids, but not all trials reported statistically significant results, and some trials reported the opposite result, where the amino acid group had a lower core temperature than the control group. It was possible to conduct meta-analysis for six studies (n = 249) that provided data relating to the end of surgery. Amino acids led to a statistically significant increase in core temperature in comparison to those receiving control (MD = 0.46°C 95% CI 0.33 to 0.59; I(2) 0.0%; random-effects; moderate quality evidence).Three trials (n = 155) reported shivering as an outcome. Meta-analysis did not show a clear effect, and so it is uncertain whether amino acids reduce the risk of shivering (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.13 to 1.00; I(2) = 93%; random-effects model; very low-quality evidence). Intravenous amino acids may keep participants up to a half-degree C warmer than the control. This difference was statistically significant at the end of surgery, but not at other time points. However, the clinical importance of this finding remains unclear. It is also unclear whether amino acids have any effect on the risk of shivering and if intravenous nutrients confer any other benefits or harms, as high-quality data about these outcomes are lacking.

  11. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  12. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  13. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, Lora M; Macintyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2013-01-31

    /non-exercise/non-active physical therapy interventions or no intervention implemented in individuals with a history of vertebral fracture and evaluating the outcomes of interest. Two review authors independently selected trials and extracted data using a pre-tested data abstraction form. Disagreements were resolved by consensus, or third party adjudication. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate each study. Studies were grouped according to duration of follow-up (i.e., a) four to 12 weeks; b) 16 to 24 weeks; and c) 52 weeks); a study could be represented in more than one group depending on the number of follow-up assessments. For continuous data, we report mean differences (MDs) of the change or percentage change from baseline. Data from two studies were pooled for one outcome using a fixed-effect model. Seven trials (488 participants, four male participants) were included. Substantial variability across the seven trials prevented any meaningful pooling of data for most outcomes. No trials assessed the effect of exercise on incident fractures, adverse events or incident falls. Individual trials reported that exercise could improve pain, performance on the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, back extensor strength, trunk muscle endurance, and quality of life. However, the findings should be interpreted with caution given that there were also reports of no significant difference between exercise and control groups for pain, Timed Up and Go test performance, trunk extensor muscle strength and quality of life. Pooled analyses from two studies revealed a significant between-group difference in favour of exercise for Timed Up and Go performance (MD -1.13 seconds, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.85 to -0.42, P = 0.002). Individual studies also reported no significant between-group differences for posture or bone mineral density. Adherence to exercise varied across studies. The risk of bias across all studies was variable; low risk across most domains in four

  14. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Giangregorio, Lora M; MacIntyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    physical therapy interventions with placebo/non-exercise/non-active physical therapy interventions or no intervention implemented in individuals with a history of vertebral fracture and evaluating the outcomes of interest. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials and extracted data using a pre-tested data abstraction form. Disagreements were resolved by consensus, or third party adjudication. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate each study. Studies were grouped according to duration of follow-up (i.e., a) four to 12 weeks; b) 16 to 24 weeks; and c) 52 weeks); a study could be represented in more than one group depending on the number of follow-up assessments. For continuous data, we report mean differences (MDs) of the change or percentage change from baseline. Data from two studies were pooled for one outcome using a fixed-effect model. Main results Seven trials (488 participants, four male participants) were included. Substantial variability across the seven trials prevented any meaningful pooling of data for most outcomes. No trials assessed the effect of exercise on incident fractures, adverse events or incident falls. Individual trials reported that exercise could improve pain, performance on the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, back extensor strength, trunk muscle endurance, and quality of life. However, the findings should be interpreted with caution given that there were also reports of no significant difference between exercise and control groups for pain, Timed Up and Go test performance, trunk extensor muscle strength and quality of life. Pooled analyses from two studies revealed a significant between-group difference in favour of exercise for Timed Up and Go performance (MD −1.13 seconds, 95% confidence interval (CI) −1.85 to −0.42, P = 0.002). Individual studies also reported no significant between-group differences for posture or bone mineral density. Adherence to

  15. Aortic Center: specialized care improves outcomes and decreases mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Marcela da Cunha; Frota Filho, José Dario; Aguzzoli, Cristiane; Souza, Leonardo Dornelles; Rösler, Álvaro Machado; Lucio, Eraldo Azevedo; Leães, Paulo Ernesto; Pontes, Mauro Ricardo Nunes; Lucchese, Fernando Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare in-hospital outcomes in aortic surgery in our cardiac surgery unit, before and after foundation of our Center for Aortic Surgery (CTA). Methods Prospective cohort with non-concurrent control. Foundation of CTA required specialized training of surgical, anesthetic and intensive care unit teams, routine neurological monitoring, endovascular and hybrid facilities, training of the support personnel, improvement of the registry and adoption of specific protocols. We included 332 patients operated on between: January/2003 to December/2007 (before-CTA, n=157, 47.3%); and January/2008 to December/2010 (CTA, n=175, 52.7%). Baseline clinical and demographic data, operative variables, complications and in-hospital mortality were compared between both groups. Results Mean age was 58±14 years, with 65% male. Group CTA was older, had higher rate of diabetes, lower rates of COPD and HF, more non-urgent surgeries, endovascular procedures, and aneurysms. In the univariate analysis, CTA had lower mortality (9.7 vs. 23.0%, P=0.008), which occurred consistently across different diseases and procedures. Other outcomes which were reduced in CTA included lower rates of reinterventions (5.7 vs 11%, P=0.046), major complications (20.6 vs. 33.1%, P=0.007), stroke (4.6 vs. 10.9%, P=0.045) and sepsis (1.7 vs. 9.6%, P=0.001), as compared to before-CTA. Multivariable analysis adjusted for potential counfounders revealed that CTA was independently associated with mortality reduction (OR=0.23, IC 95% 0.08 – 0.67, P=0.007). CTA independent mortality reduction was consistent in the multivariable analysis stratified by disease (aneurysm, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.03 – 0.98, P=0.048; dissection, OR=0.31, CI 95% 0.09 – 0.99, P=0.049) and by procedure (hybrid, OR=0.07, CI 95% 0.007 – 0.72, P=0.026; Bentall, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.038 – 0.904, P=0.037). Additional multivariable predictors of in-hospital mortality included creatinine (OR=1.7 [1.1-2.6], P=0.008), urgent surgery (OR=5

  16. Utilization of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Induced Hypothermia After Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mir J.; Exline, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas produced as a byproduct of organic waste and many industrial processes. Hydrogen sulfide exposure symptoms may vary from mild (dizziness, headaches, nausea) to severe lactic acidosis via its inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias and death. Treatment is generally supportive. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiac arrest secondary to hydrogen sulfide exposure treated with both hyperbaric oxygen therapy and therapeutic hypothermia with great improvement in neurologic function. PMID:22004989

  17. Morning versus evening induction of labour for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Jannet J H; van der Goes, Birgit Y; Pel, Maria; Mol, Ben Willem J; van der Post, Joris A M

    2013-02-28

    Induction of labour is a common intervention in obstetric practice. Traditionally, in most hospitals induction of labour with medication starts early in the morning, with the start of the working day for the day shift. In human and animal studies spontaneous onset of labour is proven to have a circadian rhythm with a preference for start of labour in the evening. Moreover, when spontaneous labour starts in the evening, the total duration of labour and delivery shortens and fewer obstetric interventions are needed. Based on these observations one might assume that starting induction of labour in the evening, in harmony with the circadian rhythm of natural birth, is more beneficial for both mother and child. To assess whether induction of labour starting in the evening, coinciding with the endogenous circadian rhythm, improves the outcome of labour compared with induction of labour starting in the early morning, organised to coincide with office hours. We contacted the Trials Search Co-ordinator to search the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 February 2012). In addition, we searched MEDLINE (1966 to 16 February 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to 16 February 2012). We included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials. We excluded trials that employed quasi-random methods of treatment allocation. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias. Two review authors independently extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. Where necessary, we contacted study authors for additional information. The search resulted in 2693 articles that we screened on title and abstract for eligibility.Thirteen studies were selected for full text assessment. We included three randomised trials involving 1150 women. Two trials compared the administration of prostaglandins in the morning versus the evening in women with an unfavourable cervix, and one trial compared induction of labour in the morning versus the evening

  18. Quality Improvement under Nursing Home Compare: The Association between Changes in Process and Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Rachel M.; Konetzka, R. Tamara; Kim, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in resident outcomes may be driven by many factors, including changes in nursing home care processes. Understanding what processes, if any, lead to successful improvements in resident outcomes could create a stronger case for the continued use of these outcome measures in nursing home report cards. Objective To test the extent to which improvements in outcomes of care are explained by changes in nursing home processes, a setting where, to our knowledge, this link has not been previously studied. Research Design/Measures We describe facility-level changes in resident processes and outcomes before and after outcomes were publicly reported. We then assess the extent to which the changes in outcomes are associated with changes in nursing home processes of care, using the public release of information on nursing home outcomes as a source of variation in nursing home outcomes to identify the process-outcome relationship. Subjects All 16,623 U.S. nursing homes included in public reporting from 2000 to 2009 in OSCAR and the nursing home Minimum Data Set Results Of the 5 outcome measures examined, only improvements in the percentage of nursing home residents in moderate or severe pain were associated with changes in nursing home processes of care. Furthermore, these changes in the measured process of care explained only a small part of the overall improvement in pain prevalence. Conclusions A large portion of the improvements in nursing home outcomes were not associated with changes in measured processes of care suggesting that processes of care typically measured in nursing homes do little to improve nursing home performance on outcome measures. Developing quality measures that are related improved patient outcomes would likely benefit quality improvement. Understanding the mechanism behind improvements in nursing home outcomes is key to successfully achieving broad quality improvements across nursing homes. PMID:23756645

  19. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Amy E; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Newth, Christopher J L; Bennett, Kimberly S; Berger, John T; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A; Koch, Joshua D; Schleien, Charles L; Dalton, Heidi J; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Thomas, Neal J; van der Jagt, Elise W; Porter, Melissa B; Meyer, Michael T; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S; Bhalala, Utpal S; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A; Sanders, Ronald C; Dean, J Michael

    2015-05-14

    Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children's hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P=0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P=0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P=0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by

  1. Intravenous Thrombolysis plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) – Final results

    PubMed Central

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    of combining endovascular hypothermia after stroke with intravenous thrombolysis. Pneumonia was more frequent after hypothermia, but further studies are needed to determine its effect on patient outcome and whether it can be prevented. A definitive efficacy trial is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke. PMID:20724711

  2. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34–35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5–35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. Methods The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60–90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. Results All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Conclusions Systemic cooling to 34.5–35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653 PMID:27058874

  3. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34-35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5-35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60-90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Systemic cooling to 34.5-35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653.

  4. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  5. Involving nurses in decisions: improving both nurse and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Houser, Janet; ErkenBrack, Lysa; Handberry, Lydia; Ricker, Fran; Stroup, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between nurse involvement in decisions and nurse-patient outcomes. Evidence demonstrates that nurse involvement is associated with satisfaction, but little evidence exists about patient effects. Because of significant resource expenditure, evidence about expected outcomes is needed. Outcomes classified as patient satisfaction, nurse satisfaction, infections, and adverse events were compared between units with high and low levels of involvement from 9 hospitals in Colorado. Involving nurses in outcomes evaluation was associated with better patient outcomes. High involvement units had fewer infections and pressure ulcers. A formal structure was not required to involve nurses in decisions and is related to nurse and patient satisfaction demonstrating a reduction in adverse events.

  6. Can pegylated interferon improve the outcome of polycythemia vera patients?

    PubMed

    Crisà, Elena; Cerrano, Marco; Beggiato, Eloise; Benevolo, Giulia; Lanzarone, Giuseppe; Manzini, Paola Maria; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Riera, Ludovica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2017-01-13

    Pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) was proven by phase II trials to be effective in polycythemia vera (PV); however, it is not clear whether it could improve patient outcome compared to hydroxyurea (HU). Here, we present an observational study on 65 PV patients aged 65 years or younger, who received either peg-IFN (30) or HU (35) according to the physician choice. Median follow-up was 75 months. The two cohorts were comparable for patient and disease characteristics. Eighty-seven percent of the patients treated with peg-INF responded, with a CR rate of 70% as compared to 100 and 49% with HU, respectively. Discontinuation rate was similar in the two groups (20% in peg-IFN vs 17% in HU). JAK2 allele burden was monitored in peg-INF arm only, and a reduction was observed in 88% of the patients. No thrombotic events were observed during peg-IFN treatment compared to three on HU. Disease progression to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia occurred to a patient only in peg-INF, compared to three in HU. Overall, three second malignancies were observed during the study, two in patients who received HU only, and one in a patient largely treated HU who received also peg-IFN for 3 months. Overall survival was significantly better for peg-IFN patients compared to HU, p = 0.027. Our study, albeit limited by small patient and event number and lack of randomization, confirms the efficacy of peg-INF in PV and shows a significant survival advantage for peg-INF-treated patients. Waiting for confirming data from the ongoing phase III trials, our study can support peg-INF as a first-line treatment option for PV, at least for younger patients.

  7. Satisfaction and Improvements in Peritoneal Dialysis Outcomes Associated with Telehealth.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Manya; Sikka, Neal; Cherian, Teena; Lew, Susie Q

    2017-03-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) affects approximately 660,000 persons in the US each year, representing a significant financial burden to the health care system and affected individuals. Telehealth approaches to care offer an important means of reducing costs as well as increasing autonomy for patients. Understanding patient satisfaction with telehealth provides a key towards eventual scalability. Quarterly surveys were conducted to characterize satisfaction with remote biometric monitoring (RBM) for blood pressure, weight, glucose and peritoneal dialysis (PD)-specific educational online videos for ESRD patients using PD. Of 300 participants, 67% participated in the surveys and provided baseline and at least one follow-up assessment. The majority were 45 to 64 years of age (50.5%), Black (64.5%), married or living with significant other (52.0%), and had more than a high school degree (73.0%). RBM was associated with perceived autonomy and confidence in health care activities and decreased negative perceptions of PD care and ESRD. The majority of participants (80.1%) indicated that they were satisfied or completely satisfied with the system. Participants found that the interface increased confidence, reduced frustration, and related perceptions were significantly and positively altered (p<0.05) for each of the separate telehealth components. Educational videos were well utilized with nearly half of the participants (42.5%) reporting that they watched at least one of the videos, and the majority reporting that the videos seen had an overall positive impact on health. Supplementing PD with telehealth has the potential to have a positive impact on patient perceptions of PD care and consequently improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Improved outcome of acute myeloid leukaemia in Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craze, J; Harrison, G; Wheatley, K; Hann, I; Chessells, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of children in the UK with Down's syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
DESIGN—A retrospective study of 59 children with Down's syndrome and AML presenting between 1987 and 1995. Data were obtained from hospital case notes, trial records, and by questionnaire.
RESULTS—The patients were unusually young (median age, 23 months) with a predominance of megakaryoblastic AML. Two of the seven infants who presented with abnormal myelopoesis aged 2 months or younger achieved complete spontaneous remission. Most of the older children with AML (32 of 52) were treated on recognised intensive protocols but 13 received individualised treatment and seven symptomatic treatment alone. Only four received a bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first remission. For the 45 older children who received chemotherapy the overall survival was 55% (median follow up 4.5 years). Patients on individualised protocols had a similar overall survival and toxic death rate but marginally higher relapse rate than those on standard (intensive) protocols. Children with Down's syndrome treated on the national AML 10 trial had a similar overall survival (70% v 59%) at five years to children of comparable age without Down's syndrome: their improved relapse risk (12% v 38%) offset the slight increase in deaths as a result of treatment toxicity (19% v 11%).
CONCLUSION—Neonates with Down's syndrome and abnormal myelopoesis may achieve spontaneous remission, and older children with Down's syndrome and AML can be treated successfully with intensive chemotherapy, without BMT.

 PMID:10373130

  9. Improving vascular access outcomes: attributes of arteriovenous fistula cannulation success

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Lori E.; Wilson, Barbara M.; Oudshoorn, Abe

    2016-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are the preferred access for hemodialysis (HD) yet they are underutilized. Cannulation of the fistula is a procedure requiring significant skill development and refinement and if not done well can have negative consequences for patients. The nurses' approach, attitude and skill with cannulation impacts greatly on the patient experience. Complications from miscannulation or an inability to needle fistulas can result in the increased use of central venous catheters. Some nurses remain in a state of a ‘perpetual novice’ resulting in a viscous cycle of negative patient consequences (bruising, pain), further influencing patients' decisions not to pursue a fistula or abandon cannulation. Method This qualitative study used organizational development theory (appreciative inquiry) and research method to determine what attributes/activities contribute to successful cannulation. This can be applied to interventions to promote change and skill development in staff members who have not advanced their proficiency. Eighteen HD nurses who self-identified with performing successful cannulation participated in audio-recorded interviews. The recordings were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Four common themes, including patient-centered care, teamwork, opportunity and skill and nurse self-awareness, represented successful fistula cannulation. Successful cannulation is more than a learned technique to correctly insert a needle, but rather represents contextual influences and interplay between the practice environment and personal attributes. Conclusions Practice changes based on these results may improve cannulation, decrease complications and result in better outcomes for patients. Efforts to nurture positive patient experiences around cannulation may influence patient decision-making regarding fistula use. PMID:26985384

  10. Size-specific follicle selection improves mouse oocyte reproductive outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuo; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bai, Lu; Nguyen, Catherine T.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsulated in vitro follicle growth (eIVFG) has great potential to provide an additional fertility preservation option for young women and girls with cancer or other reproductive health threatening diseases. Currently, follicles are cultured for a defined period of time and analyzed as a cohort. However, follicle growth is not synchronous, and culturing follicles for insufficient or excessive times can result in compromised gamete quality. Our objective is to determine whether the selection of follicles based on size, rather than absolute culture time, better predict follicle maturity and oocyte quality. Multilayer secondary mouse follicles were isolated and encapsulated in 0.25% alginate. Follicles were cultured individually either for defined time periods or up to specific follicle diameter ranges, at which point several reproductive endpoints were analyzed. The metaphase II (MII) percentage after oocyte maturation on day 6 was the highest (85%) when follicles were cultured for specific days. However, if follicles were cultured to a terminal diameter of 300–350 μm irrespective of absolute time in culture, 93% of the oocytes reached MII. More than 90% of MII oocytes matured from follicles with diameters of 300–350 μm showed normal spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, 85% of oocytes showed 2 pronuclei after in vitro fertilization (IVF), 81% developed into the 2-cell embryo stage, and 38% developed to the blastocyst stage, all significantly higher than the percentages in the other follicle size groups. Our study demonstrates that size-specific follicle selection can be used as a non-invasive marker to identify high quality oocytes and improve reproductive outcomes during eIVFG. PMID:26116002

  11. Effective diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism: Improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism can be life threatening and difficult to diagnose as signs and symptoms are not specific. European guidelines recommend stratification of pulmonary embolism by risk of early mortality. Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism should be assessed for clinical probability of pulmonary embolism using a validated risk score. A low or intermediate clinical probability plus a negative high-sensitivity D-dimer test excludes pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is indicated in patients with a positive multidetector computed tomography or high-probability lung scan. An important part of the management of patients with pulmonary embolism has traditionally been anticoagulant treatment with parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Although effective, this dual-drug approach is associated with limitations. Direct oral anticoagulants that may overcome some of these problems have been tested in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Of these, rivaroxaban and apixaban have demonstrated non-inferiority to standard therapy when given as single-drug approaches for venous thromboembolism treatment, and provided significant reductions in major bleeding rates. Dabigatran and edoxaban were non-inferior to standard therapy when given as part of a dual-drug approach after initial parenteral anticoagulation, and reduced clinically relevant bleeding rates. There may be a benefit to extended anticoagulation with direct oral anticoagulants for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Registry studies will provide more information on the use of these agents in real-world populations. Accurate diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with pulmonary embolism, together with simplified anticoagulation therapy, is likely to improve outcomes.

  12. Proposed guidelines for skin-to-skin treatment of neonatal hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Maura

    2006-01-01

    Hypothermia is not uncommon in full-term, low-risk newborns during the first days of life. Standard care for treating hypothermia often involves the separation of the mother and the newborn while the infant is placed under a warmer and observed in the nursery. Because one important role of the postpartum nurse is to promote mother-infant attachment by encouraging the mother to spend time "getting to know" her infant, this separation can be problematic. This article proposes that skin-to-skin (STS) care, also called kangaroo care, an intervention in which the unclothed, diapered infant is placed on the mother's bare chest, be used to promote thermoregulation instead of using separation and a warmer. STS care has been recognized as a way to facilitate maternal-infant attachment and promote thermoregulation. The literature review here provides an analysis of the available evidence and the author's conclusion that the research supports the use of STS care as an alternative to traditional rewarming. The evidence was graded and organized into an evidence-based practice guideline for the use of STS care in the treatment of mild hypothermia in the low-risk infant. Suggestions for further research and outcomes measurement are included.

  13. Active body surface warming systems for preventing complications caused by inadvertent perioperative hypothermia in adults.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Eva; Urrútia, Gerard; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Pardo-Hernandez, Hector; Campos, Juan Manuel; Paniagua, Pilar; Maestre, Luz; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2016-04-21

    administration of a particular type of ABSW, we found no evidence for the superiority of any system in terms of clinical outcomes, except for extending systemic warming to the preoperative period in participants undergoing major abdominal surgery (one study at low risk of bias).There were limited data on adverse effects (the most relevant being thermal burns). While some trials included a narrative report mentioning that no adverse effects were observed, the majority made no reference to it. Nothing so far suggests that ABSW involves a significant risk to patients. Forced-air warming seems to have a beneficial effect in terms of a lower rate of surgical site infection and complications, at least in those undergoing abdominal surgery, compared to not applying any active warming system. It also has a beneficial effect on major cardiovascular complications in people with substantial cardiovascular disease, although the evidence is limited to one study. It also improves patient's comfort, although we found high heterogeneity among trials. While the effect on blood loss is statistically significant, this difference does not translate to a significant reduction in transfusions. Again, we noted high heterogeneity among trials for this outcome. The clinical relevance of blood loss reduction is therefore questionable. The evidence for other types of ABSW is scant, although there is some evidence of a beneficial effect in the same direction on chills/shivering with electric or resistive-based heating systems. Some evidence suggests that extending systemic warming to the preoperative period could be more beneficial than limiting it only to during surgery. Nothing suggests that ABSW systems pose a significant risk to patients.The difficulty in observing a clinically-relevant beneficial effect with ABSW in outcomes other than temperature may be explained by the fact that many studies applied concomitant procedures that are routinely in place as co-interventions to prevent hypothermia

  14. A simple method to induce focal brain hypothermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darren L; Colbourne, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces cell death and promotes recovery in models of cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and trauma. Clinical studies report significant benefit for treating cardiac arrest and studies are investigating hypothermia for stroke and related conditions. Both local (head) and generalized hypothermia have been used. However, selective brain cooling has fewer side effects than systemic cooling. In this study, we developed a method to induce local (hemispheric) brain hypothermia in rats. The method involves using a small metal coil implanted between the Temporalis muscle and adjacent skull. This coil is then cooled by flushing it with cold water. In our first experiment, we tested whether this method induces focal brain hypothermia in anesthetized rats. Brain temperature was assessed in the ipsilateral cortex and striatum, and contralateral striatum, while body temperature was kept normothermic. Focal, ipsilateral cooling was successfully produced, while the other locations remained normothermic. In the second experiment, we implanted the coil, and brain and body temperature telemetry probes. The coil was connected via overhead swivel to a cold-water source. Brain hypothermia was produced for 24 h, while body temperature remained normothermic. A third experiment measured brain and body temperature along with heart rate and blood pressure. Brain cooling was produced for 24 h without significant alterations in pressure, heart rate or body temperature. In summary, our simple method allows for focal brain hypothermia to be safely induced in anesthetized or conscious rats, and is, therefore, ideally suited to stroke and trauma studies.

  15. Hypothermia fatalities in a temperate climate: Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cathy; Duflou, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Fatal hypothermia is well known to occur in cold climates, with previous case series reflecting this. However, hypothermia can also occur in temperate climates. This case series describes the features and circumstances surrounding hypothermia-related deaths in Sydney, Australia. The files of hypothermia-related deaths were reviewed at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Glebe between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2005 via a search of electronic autopsy records. Twenty-four cases of fatal hypothermia were found. Many of the deaths occurred in winter (46%). The mean age was 76 years (range 56-92), with a female predominance (63%). Risk factors for hypothermia were identified in 58%. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 22 (range 15-33). Nineteen cases (79%) were found indoors. Four decedents were found naked, four were dressed in minimal amounts of clothing, and paradoxical undressing was found in seven cases. Pathological findings included gastric erosions (79%), and patchy reddish brown discoloration over large joints (75%). The majority of cases had significant pre-existing natural disease processes. Out of 18 cases where toxicology was performed, alcohol was detected in four cases, while other psychotropic agents were present in four deaths. No illicit drugs were detected. This study shows that fatal hypothermia, a significant public health problem, is not limited to cold climates. Forensic pathologists in Australia need to be aware of this condition, and not dismiss death as due to natural disease processes.

  16. Risk factors for hypothermia in EMS-treated burn patients.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Matthew D; Rittenberger, Jon C; Patterson, P Daniel; McEntire, Serina J; Corcos, Alain C; Ziembicki, Jenny A; Hostler, David

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia has been associated with increased mortality in burn patients. We sought to characterize the body temperature of burn patients transported directly to a burn center by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and identify the factors independently associated with hypothermia. We utilized prospective data collected by a statewide trauma registry to carry out a nested case-control study of burn patients transported by EMS directly to an accredited burn center between 2000 and 2011. Temperature at hospital admission ≤36.5°C was defined as hypothermia. We utilized registry data abstracted from prehospital care reports and hospital records in building a multivariable regression model to identify the factors associated with hypothermia. Forty-two percent of the sample was hypothermic. Burns of 20-39% total body surface area (TBSA) (OR 1.44; 1.17-1.79) and ≥40% TBSA (OR 2.39; 1.57-3.64) were associated with hypothermia. Hypothermia was also associated with age > 60 (OR 1.50; 1.30-1.74), polytrauma (OR 1.58; 1.19-2.09), prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale <8 (OR 2.01; 1.46-2.78), and extrication (OR 1.49; 1.30-1.71). Hypothermia was also more common in the winter months (OR 1.54; 1.33-1.79) and less prevalent in patients weighing over 90 kg (OR 0.63; 0.46-0.88). A substantial proportion of burn patients demonstrate hypothermia at hospital arrival. Risk factors for hypothermia are readily identifiable by prehospital providers. Maintenance of normothermia should be stressed during prehospital care.

  17. The prognostic value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in term newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia following asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Sijens, Paul E; Wischniowsky, Katharina; Ter Horst, Hendrik J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate brain metabolism assessed shortly after therapeutic hyperthermia by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), with neurodevelopmental outcome. At the age of 6.0±1.8days, brain metabolites of 35 term asphyxiated newborns, treated with therapeutic hypothermia, were quantified by multivoxel proton MRS of a volume cranial to the corpus callosum, containing both gray and white matter. At the age of 30months the Bayley Scale of Infant Development-III was performed. Infants that died had lower gray matter NAA levels than infants that survived (P=0.005). In surviving infants (28 of 35) there was a trend of negative correlation between gray matter choline levels and gross motor outcome (r=-0.45). In the white matter, choline correlated negatively with fine motor skills (r=-0.40), and creatine positively with gross motor skills (r=0.58, P=0.02). There was no relationship between lactate levels and outcome. MRS of asphyxiated neonates treated by therapeutic hypothermia can serve as predictor of outcome. Unlike previously reported associations in untreated asphyxiates, lactate levels had no relationship with outcome, which indicates that one of the working mechanisms of therapeutic hypothermia is reduction of the metabolic rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  19. A new microcontroller supervised thermoelectric renal hypothermia system.

    PubMed

    Işik, Hakan

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, a thermoelectric system controlled by a microcontroller is developed to induce renal hypothermia. Temperature value was managed by 8-byte microcontroller, PIC16F877, and was programmed using microcontroller MPASM package. In order to ensure hypothermia in the kidney 1-4 modules and sensors perceiving temperature of the area can be selected. Temperature values are arranged proportionately for the selected area and the determined temperature values can be monitored from an Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen. The temperature range of the system is between -50 and +50 degrees C. Renal hypothermia system was tried under in vivo conditions on the kidney of a dog.

  20. Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in Cardiac Arrest Caused by Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Frank, Brian; Pontell, Mathew E; Medinilla, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest.

  1. Do hip replacements improve outcomes for hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Burns, R B; Moskowitz, M A; Ash, A; Kane, R L; Finch, M; McCarthy, E P

    1999-03-01

    Hip fracture is a common problem among older Americans. Two types of procedures are available for repairing hip fractures: hip replacement and open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation. The assumption has been that hip replacement produces better functional outcomes. Although that is the common wisdom, outcome studies evaluating hip replacement for treatment of hip fracture are few and have not clearly documented its superiority. To compare outcomes of hip fracture patients who receive hip replacement versus another stabilizing procedure (open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation). Prospective cohort study. We studied 332 patients (age, > 65) who were hospitalized for a femoral neck fracture and discharged alive. We examined 2 treatment groups, hip replacement versus another procedure, on 6 outcomes [Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), walking, living situation (institutionalized or not), perceived health (excellent/good vs. fair/poor), rehospitalization, and mortality] at 3 postdischarge times (6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year). Mean age was 80, 80% were female, 96% White, 28% married, and 71% had a hip replacement. The treatment groups were similar at baseline (3 months before admission as reported at discharge) on ADLs, walking, living situation, and perceived health (all P > 0.24). After adjusting for demographics, clinical characteristics, fracture characteristics, and prior ADLs, walking ability, living situation, and perceived health, patients with a hip replacement did not do better at 6 weeks, 6 months, or 1 year post-discharge on any of the 6 outcome measures (all 18 P > 0.10). A global test of all 6 outcomes finds hip replacement patients doing less well at one year (P = 0.02). Despite the commonly held belief that hip replacement is a superior treatment for hip fracture, we found no suggestion of better outcomes for hip replacement on any of 6 key outcomes.

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: unintentional overcooling is common using ice packs and conventional cooling blankets.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Raina M; Abella, Benjamin S; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Soar, Jasmeet; Ong, Marcus E H; Schmidt, Gregory A; Becker, Lance B; Vanden Hoek, Terry L

    2006-12-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest survivors has been shown to improve neurologically intact survival, optimal methods to ensure controlled induction and maintenance of cooling are not clearly established. Precise temperature control is important to evaluate because unintentional overcooling below the consensus target range of 32-34 degrees C may place the patient at risk for serious complications. We sought to measure the prevalence of overcooling (<32 degrees C) in postarrest survivors receiving primarily noninvasive cooling. Retrospective chart review of postarrest patients. Three large teaching hospitals. Cardiac arrest survivors receiving therapeutic hypothermia. Charts were reviewed if primarily surface cooling was used with a target temperature goal between 32 degrees C and 34 degrees C. Of the 32 cases reviewed, overcooling lasting for >1 hr was identified as follows: 20 of 32 patients (63%) reached temperatures of <32 degrees C, 9 of 32 (28%) reached temperatures of <31 degrees C, and 4 of 32 (13%) reached temperatures of <30 degrees C. Of those with overcooling of <32 degrees C, 6 of 20 (30%) survived to hospital discharge, whereas of those without overcooling, 7 of 12 (58%) survived to hospital discharge (p = not significant). The majority of the cases reviewed demonstrated unintentional overcooling below target temperature. Improved mechanisms for temperature control are required to prevent potentially deleterious complications of more profound hypothermia.

  3. Timely bystander CPR improves outcomes despite longer EMS times.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwan Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Kyung Won; Ahn, Ki Ok; Lee, Eui Jung; Hong, Ki Jeong; Ro, Young Sun

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of bystander CPR on clinical outcomes in patients with increasing response time from collapse to EMS response. A population-based observational study was conducted in patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of presumed cardiac etiology from 2012 to 2014. The time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers was categorized into quartile groups: fastest group (<4min), fast group (4 to <8min), late group (8 to <15min), and latest group (15 to <30min). The primary outcome was hospital discharge and the secondary outcome was survival with good neurological outcome. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the interaction between bystander CPR and the time interval from collapse to CPR by EMS providers. A total of 15,354 OHCAs were analyzed. Bystander CPR was performed in 8591 (56.0%). Survival to hospital discharge occurred in 1632 (10.6%) and favorable neurological outcome in 996 (6.5%). In an interaction model of bystander CPR, compared to the fastest group, adjusted odds ratios (AORs) (95% CIs) for survival to discharge were 0.89 (0.66-1.20) in the fast group, 0.76 (0.57-1.02) in the late group, and 0.52 (0.37-0.73) in the latest group. For favorable neurological outcome, AORs were 1.12 (0.77-1.62) in