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Sample records for hypoxia imaging agents

  1. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  2. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  3. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Suzanne E.; Voller, Thomas F.; Welch, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia imaging has applications in functional recovery in ischemic events such as stroke and myocardial ischemia, but especially in tumors in which hypoxia can be predictive of treatment response and overall prognosis. Recently there has been development of imaging agents utilizing positron emission tomography for non-invasive imaging of hypoxia. Many of these PET agents have come to the forefront of hypoxia imaging. Halogenated PET nitroimidazole imaging agents labeled with 18F (t1/2 = 110 m) and 124I (t1/2 = 110 m) have been under investigation for the last 25 years, with radiometal agents (64Cu-ATSM) being developed more recently. This review focuses on these positron emission tomography imaging agents for hypoxia. PMID:20046923

  4. Preparation and Biodistribution of Technetium-99m-Labeled Bis- Misonidazole (MISO) as an Imaging Agent for Tumour Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Fan, Di; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumour hypoxia is an important aspect in determining the course of tumour therapy. In this study, we developed a novel imaging agent, (99m)Tc-ethylenedicysteine-bis-misonidazole ((99m)Tc-EC-MISO), for diagnosing tumour hypoxia. We used 2-nitroimidazole as a reactant to synthesize the amino derivative of misonidazole (MISO) in the first step and then conjugated the di-amino derivative of MISO to the chelating agent ethylenedicysteine (EC) for labelling (99m)Tc in the second step. (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4-) was reduced by tin chloride (SnCl2) for radiolabeling. The radiochemical purity was up to 94%. Tissue biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were conducted on subcutaneous gliomal tumour-bearing mice. The tumour-to-muscle ratio in the (99m)Tc-EC-MISO group increased with time, up to 4.6 at 4 h after injection. SPECT/CT imaging confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with (99m)Tc-EC-MISO at 2 h. By introducing a second 2-nitroimidazole redox centre, an apparent hypoxic accumulation of this novel (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agent in the tumour was observed.

  5. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  6. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH.

  7. Hypoxia-sensitive NMR contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, H.M.; Chen, K.; Pals, M.; Sentjurc, M.; Morse, P.D. 2d.

    1986-02-01

    The rate of reduction of nitroxides is shown to be more rapid in hypoxic cells. The rate of reduction and the effect of hypoxia on the reduction rate vary for different nitroxides. These findings indicate that it may be feasible to develop in vivo NMR contrast agents that selectively will indicate areas of hypoxia and thereby aid in the detection of disease processes such as neoplasia, ischemia, and inflammation.

  8. Induction of marrow hypoxia by radioprotective agents

    SciTech Connect

    Allalunis-Turner, M.J.; Walden, T.L.; Sawich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Many compounds that possess sulfhydryl groups have been shown to protect bone marrow from radiation injury. The most effective thiol radioprotective agent is ethiofos (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothoic acid or WR-2721). The ability of thiol and non-thiol radioprotectors to induce hypoxia was determined using binding of ({sup 3}H)misonidazole by bone marrow cells as a measure of hypoxia. When administered at maximally radioprotective doses, four drugs (WR-2721, cysteamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2) significantly increased the amount of ({sup 3}H)misonidazole bound by marrow cells, while no significant increase in binding was observed with three other agents (endotoxin, AET, superoxide dimutase). Doses of WR-2721 previously shown to provide suboptimal radioprotection did not significantly increase {sup 3}H-misonidazole binding. These results suggest that the physiological effects of some radioprotectors, that is, their ability to induce marrow hypoxia, may contribute to their efficacy in vivo.

  9. Induction of marrow hypoxia by radioprotective agents

    SciTech Connect

    Allalunis-Turner, M.J.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Sawich, C.

    1989-06-01

    The ability of thiol and non-thiol radioprotectors to induce hypoxia was determined using the binding of (/sup 3/H)misonidazole by bone marrow cells as a measure of hypoxia. When administered at maximally radioprotective doses, four drugs (WR-2721, cysteamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2) significantly increased the amount of (/sup 3/H)misonidazole bound by marrow cells, while no significant increase in binding was observed with three other agents (endotoxin, AET, superoxide dimutase). Doses of WR-2721 previously shown to provide suboptimal radioprotection did not significantly increase /sup 3/H-misonidazole binding. These results suggest that the physiological effects of some radioprotectors, that is, their ability to induce marrow hypoxia, may contribute to their efficacy in vivo.

  10. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  11. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed.

  12. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  13. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  14. The development of (99m)Tc-analog of Cu-DTS as an agent for imaging hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, K; Tsukamoto, T; Saito, M; Nakayama, M; Fujibayashi, Y; Saji, H

    2000-05-01

    Works on dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) derivatives radiolabeled with divalent Cu (Cu-62, Cu-64) indicate its potentiality as an ischemic tissue detecting agent. Development of analogous derivatives labeled with the more accessible technetium-99m (Tc) is most desirable. Various synthesized DTS derivatives are radiolabeled with a novel approach, using a macromolecular Sn(II)-complex under an anaerobic condition at pH 3.4-4.5 and stabilization by ascorbate solution at pH 6.7-7.0. Characterization of Tc-DTS derivatives done by various analytical methods (TLC, HPLC, EP, PC) and by in vivo studies in normal mice and in rats myocardial LAD (left anterior descent coronary artery) occlusion model. Among tested DTS, only Tc-ATSE, Tc-ATSM and Tc-ATSM(2) showed distinctive characteristics, with the latter presenting high myocardium uptake in regions of ischemia in LAD rat myocardium model. Potentiality of the Cu-DTS mimetic agent, Tc-ATSM(2) as an ischemia-damaged myocardium agent is discussed.

  15. Induction of Marrow Hypoxia by Radioprotective Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    administered at maximally radioprotective doses. four drugs (WR.2721, cysteamine , 5-hydroxytryptamine, and 16.16-dimethyl prostaglndin Ez) uignificantly...2721, DiPGE2, cysteamine (Cys), or 5-HT induces significant hypoxia in mouse bone marrow. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mice. Six- to twelve-week-old BALB/c...Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: Implications for hypcr- thermic sensitization and radiation protection. Radiat. Res

  16. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  17. Multimodality imaging of hypoxia in preclinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Cui, Weina; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Gulaka, Praveen K.; Hao, Guiyang; Thorpe, Philip; Hahn, Eric W.; Peschke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has long been recognized to influence solid tumor response to therapy. Increasingly, hypoxia has also been implicated in tumor aggressiveness, including growth, development and metastatic potential. Thus, there is a fundamental, as well as a clinical interest, in assessing in situ tumor hypoxia. This review will examine diverse approaches focusing on the pre-clinical setting, particularly, in rodents. The strategies are inevitably a compromise in terms of sensitivity, precision, temporal and spatial resolution, as well as cost, feasibility, ease and robustness of implementation. We will review capabilities of multiple modalities and examine what makes them particularly suitable for investigating specific aspects of tumor pathophysiology. Current approaches range from nuclear imaging to magnetic resonance and optical, with varying degrees of invasiveness and ability to examine spatial heterogeneity, as well as dynamic response to interventions. Ideally, measurements would be non-invasive, exploiting endogenous reporters to reveal quantitatively local oxygen tension dynamics. A primary focus of this review is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based techniques, such as 19F MRI oximetry, which reveals not only hypoxia in vivo, but more significantly, spatial distribution of pO2 quantitatively, with a precision relevant to radiobiology. It should be noted that pre-clinical methods may have very different criteria for acceptance, as compared with potential investigations for prognostic radiology or predictive biomarkers suitable for use in patients. PMID:20639813

  18. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    PubMed

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factors as neuroprotective agent in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Ben Sundra; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar

    2017-03-01

    Beta amyloid (Aβ)-42 peptide and phosphorylated tau protein have been demonstrated as the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A gradual decline of oxygen and glucose supply to the brain during aging or hypoxia was manifested as a contributing factor to hypometabolism. The brain regions susceptible to hypometabolism are the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and cognition-associated neocortical regions like parietal, temporal and frontal cortex. In AD patients, the brain regions with hypometabolism can trigger overexpression of amyloid precursor protein and decrease the clearance of Aβ. Aβ and hypoxia can evoke inflammation, oxidative stress and finally neuronal cell death. Among the transcription factors involved in the compensatory mechanism, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) has a major role in the cellular adaptation by inducing the expression of several proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Therefore, maintaining the HIF-1α level by inhibiting the prolyl 4-hydroxylase was effective to attenuate the nerve damage during hypoxia and postpone the incidence of AD. Agents such as iron chelators, and heavy metals like cobalt and nickel were demonstrated to be effective in maintaining the HIF-1α level in the nerve. This review article discusses the possible role of HIF-1α as a neuroprotector in AD and the future perspectives. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Aguirre, Andres; Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Claffey, Kevin P.; Zhu, Quing

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

  1. [(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A-nitroimidazole: a promising agent for PET detection of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunkou; Hao, Guiyang; Ramezani, Saleh; Saha, Debabrata; Zhao, Dawen; Sun, Xiankai; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate a new (68) Ga-based imaging agent for detecting tumor hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET). The new hypoxia targeting agent reported here, [(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A-nitroimidazole ([(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A-NI), was constructed by linking a nitroimidazole moiety with the macrocyclic ligand component of ProHance®, HP-DO3A. The hypoxia targeting capability of this agent was evaluated in A549 lung cancer cells in vitro and in SCID mice bearing subcutaneous A549 tumor xenografts. The cellular uptake assays showed that significantly more [(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A-NI accumulates in hypoxic tumor cells at 30, 60 and 120 min than in the same cells exposed to 21% O2 . The agent also accumulated in hypoxic tumors in vivo to give a tumor/muscle ratio (T/M) of 5.0 ± 1.2 (n = 3) as measured by PET at 2 h post-injection (p.i.). This was further confirmed by ex vivo biodistribution data. In addition, [(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A-NI displayed very favorable pharmacokinetic properties, as it was cleared largely through the kidneys with little to no accumulation in liver, heart or lung (%ID/g < 0.5%) at 2 h p.i. The specificity of the agent for hypoxic tissues was further validated in a comparative study with a control compound, [(68) Ga]-HP-DO3A, which lacks the nitroimidazole moiety, and by PET imaging of tumor-bearing mice breathing air versus 100% O2 . Given the commercial availability of cGMP (68) Ge/(68) Ga generators and the ease of (68) Ga labeling, the new agent could potentially be widely applied for imaging tumor hypoxia prior to radiation therapy.

  2. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of (18)F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  3. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  4. Clinically Approved Nanoparticle Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Ghanouni, Pejman; Campbell, Jos L.; Mittra, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a new class of imaging agent used for both anatomic and molecular imaging. Nanoparticle-based imaging exploits the signal intensity, stability, and biodistribution behavior of submicron-diameter molecular imaging agents. This review focuses on nanoparticles used in human medical imaging, with an emphasis on radionuclide imaging and MRI. Newer nanoparticle platforms are also discussed in relation to theranostic and multimodal uses. PMID:27738007

  5. Imaging hypoxia using 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a multivariate in vivo hemodynamic model of tissue oxygenation (MiHMO2) based on 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: Low oxygen levels, or hypoxia, deprives cancer cells of oxygen and confers resistance to irradiation, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and oxygen-dependent therapies (phototherapy) leading to treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival. For example, clinical studies of patients with breast carcinomas, cervical cancer, and head and neck carcinomas (HNC) are more likely to suffer local reoccurrence and metastasis if their tumors are hypoxic. A novel method to non invasively measure tumor hypoxia, identify its type, and monitor its heterogeneity is devised by measuring tumor hemodynamics, MiHMO2. Material and Methods: Simulations are performed to compare tumor pO2 levels and hypoxia based on physiology - perfusion, fractional plasma volume, fractional cellular volume - and its hemoglobin status - oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration - based on in vivo measurements of breast, prostate, and ovarian tumors. Simulations of MiHMO2 are performed to assess the influence of scanner resolutions and different mathematic models of oxygen delivery. Results: Sensitivity of pO2 and hypoxic fraction to photoacoustic scanner resolution and dependencies on model complexity will be presented using hemodynamic parameters for different tumors. Conclusions: Photoacoustic CT spectroscopy provides a unique ability to monitor hemodynamic and cellular physiology in tissue, which can be used to longitudinally monitor tumor oxygenation and its response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of cancer mediated by tumor hypoxia and HIF1α/OATPs signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Shi, Changhong; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Dou, Xiaoliang; Sahu, Divya; Li, Wei; Harada, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ruoxiang; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2014-09-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents are promising tools for noninvasive cancer imaging. Here, we explored the mechanistic properties of a specific group of NIR heptamethine carbocyanines including MHI-148 dye we identified and synthesized, and demonstrated these dyes to achieve cancer-specific imaging and targeting via a hypoxia-mediated mechanism. We found that cancer cells and tumor xenografts exhibited hypoxia-dependent MHI-148 dye uptake in vitro and in vivo, which was directly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Microarray analysis and dye uptake assay further revealed a group of hypoxia-inducible organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) responsible for dye uptake, and the correlation between OATPs and HIF1α was manifested in progressive clinical cancer specimens. Finally, we demonstrated increased uptake of MHI-148 dye in situ in perfused clinical tumor samples with activated HIF1α/OATPs signaling. Our results establish these NIRF dyes as potential tumor hypoxia-dependent cancer-targeting agents and provide a mechanistic rationale for continued development of NIRF imaging agents for improved cancer detection, prognosis and therapy.

  7. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of cancer mediated by tumor hypoxia and HIF1α/OATPs signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Shi, Changhong; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Dou, Xiaoliang; Sahu, Divya; Li, Wei; Harada, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ruoxiang; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents are promising tools for noninvasive cancer imaging. Here, we explored the mechanistic properties of a specific group of NIR heptamethine carbocyanines including MHI-148 dye we identified and synthesized, and demonstrated these dyes to achieve cancer-specific imaging and targeting via a hypoxia-mediated mechanism. We found that cancer cells and tumor xenografts exhibited hypoxia-dependent MHI-148 dye uptake in vitro and in vivo, which was directly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Microarray analysis and dye uptake assay further revealed a group of hypoxia-inducible organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) responsible for dye uptake, and the correlation between OATPs and HIF1α was manifested in progressive clinical cancer specimens. Finally, we demonstrated increased uptake of MHI-148 dye in situ in perfused clinical tumor samples with activated HIF1α/OATPs signaling. Our results establish these NIRF dyes as potential tumor hypoxia-dependent cancer-targeting agents and provide a mechanistic rationale for continued development of NIRF imaging agents for improved cancer detection, prognosis and therapy. PMID:24957295

  8. In vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging of tumor hypoxia in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Morgounova, Ekaterina; Jiang, Chunlan; Choi, Jeunghwan; Bischof, John; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Tumor hypoxia is an important factor in assessment of both cancer progression and cancer treatment efficacy. This has driven a substantial effort toward development of imaging modalities that can directly measure oxygen distribution and therefore hypoxia in tissue. Although several approaches to measure hypoxia exist, direct measurement of tissue oxygen through an imaging approach is still an unmet need. To address this, we present a new approach based on in vivo application of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) to map the distribution of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in tissue. This method utilizes methylene blue, a dye widely used in clinical applications, as an oxygen-sensitive imaging agent. PALI measurement of oxygen relies upon pO2-dependent excitation lifetime of the dye. A multimodal imaging system was designed and built to achieve ultrasound (US), photoacoustic, and PALI imaging within the same system. Nude mice bearing LNCaP xenograft hindlimb tumors were used as the target tissue. Hypoxic regions were identified within the tumor in a combined US/PALI image. Finally, the statistical distributions of pO2 in tumor, normal, and control tissues were compared with measurements by a needle-mounted oxygen probe. A statistically significant drop in mean pO2 was consistently detected by both methods in tumors. PMID:23877772

  9. Development of (68)Ga-labeled multivalent nitroimidazole derivatives for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Seelam, Sudhakara Reddy; Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Yun-Sang; Hong, Mi Kyung; Kim, Young Joo; Banka, Vinay Kumar; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabeled nitroimidazole (NI) derivatives have been extensively studied for imaging hypoxia. To increase the hypoxic tissue uptake, we developed (68)Ga-labeled agents based on mono-, bis-, and trisnitroimidazole conjugates with the chelating agent 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-tris[methyl(2-carboxyethyl)phosphinic acid] (TRAP). All the three agents showed high radiolabeling yields (>96%) and were found to be stable up to 4h in prepared medium at room temperature and in human serum at 37°C. The trivalent agent showed a significant increase in hypoxic to normoxic uptake ratio (p <0.005) according to the in vitro cell uptake experiments. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of hypoxia in xenografted CT26 tumor tissue. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.17±0.04, (68)Ga-4: 0.33±0.04, (68)Ga-5: 0.45±0.09, and (68)Ga-6: 0.47±0.05% ID/g) showed the highest uptake by tumor cells according to the biodistribution studies in CT-26 xenografted mice. All the nitroimidazole derivatives showed significantly higher uptake by tumor cells than the control agent (p <0.05) at 1h post-injection. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.10±0.06; (68)Ga-4: 0.20±0.06; (68)Ga-5: 0.33±0.08; (68)Ga-6: 0.59±0.09) also showed the highest standard uptake value for tumor cells at 1h post-injection in animal PET studies using CT-26 xenografted mice. In conclusion, we successfully synthesized multivalent (68)Ga-labeled NI derivatives for imaging hypoxia. Among them, the trivalent agent showed the highest tumor uptake in biodistribution and animal PET studies.

  10. [Hypoxia and memory. Specific features of nootropic agents effects and their use].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic adaptation are powerful factors of controlling memory and behavior processes. Acute hypoxia exerts a differential impact on different deficits of mnestic and cognitive functions. Instrumental reflexes of active and passive avoidance, negative learning, behavior with a change in the stereotype of learning are more greatly damaged. Memory with spatial and visual differentiation and their rearrangement change to a lesser extent and conditional reflexes are not deranged. In this contract, altitude hypoxic adaptation enhances information fixation and increases the degree and duration of retention of temporary relations. Nootropic agents with an antihypoxic action exert a marked effect on hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders and the magnitude of this effect depends on the ration of proper nootropic to antihypoxic components in the spectrum of the drugs' pharmacological activity. The agents that combine a prevailing antiamnestic effect and a marked and moderate antihypoxic action (mexidole, nooglutil, pyracetam, beglymin, etc.) are most effective in eliminating different hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders, nootropic drugs that have a pronounced antiamnestic activity (centrophenoxine, etc.) and no antihypoxic component also restore the main types of mnestic disorders after hypoxia, but to a lesser extent.

  11. A simplified synthesis of the hypoxia imaging agent 2-(2-Nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-[18F]pentafluoropropyl)-acetamide ([18F]EF5)

    PubMed Central

    Chitneni, Satish K.; Bida, Gerald T.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction [18F]EF5 is a validated marker for PET imaging of tumor hypoxia. It is prepared by reacting a trifluoroallyl precursor with carrier-added [18F]F2 gas in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solvent. We report here an improved radiosynthesis and purification of [18F]EF5 by utilizing an electroformed nickel (Ni) target for [18F] F2 production, and Oasis® HLB cartridges for on-line solid phase extraction of [18F]EF5 prior to HPLC purification. Methods [18F]F2 was produced by deuteron bombardment of neon plus F2 in an Ni target, and bubbled through the radiolabelling precursor solution. Purification was achieved by extracting the contents of the crude reaction mixture onto Oasis HLB cartridges, and subsequently eluted onto a semi-preparative HPLC column for further separation. Purified [18F]EF5 was evaluated in small animal PET studies using HCT116 tumor xenografts in nude mice. Results The electroformed Ni target enabled recovery of >75% of the radioactivity from the cyclotron target, resulting in 16.2±2.2 GBq (438±58 mCi) of [18F]F2 available for the synthesis. Use of Oasis cartridges yielded a less complex mixture for purification. On average, 1140±200 MBq (30.8±5.4 mCi) of [18F]EF5 were collected at EOS. Small animal PET imaging studies showed specific retention of [18F]EF5 in tumors, with tumor-to-muscle ratios of 2.7±0.3 at about 160 min after injection. Conclusion A simple procedure has been developed for the routine synthesis of [18F]EF5 in amounts and purity required for clinical studies. This new method avoids the need for TFA evaporation and also enables facile automation of the synthesis using commercially available radiosynthesis modules. PMID:22727821

  12. Hypoxia imaging predicts success of hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-F; Lee, C-H; Chiu, N-T; Hsia, C-C; Shen, L-H; Shiau, A-L

    2012-04-01

    Tc-99m-HL91 is a hypoxia imaging biomarker. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of Tc-99m-HL91 imaging for hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells transduced with the hypoxia-inducible promoter-driven CD gene (LL2/CD) or luciferase gene (LL2/Luc) serving as the control. When tumor volumes reached 100 mm(3), pretreatment images were acquired after injection of Tc-99m-HL91. The mice were divided into low and high hypoxic groups based on the tumor-to-non-tumor ratio of Tc-99m-HL91. They were injected daily with 5-FC (500 mg kg(-1)) or the vehicle for 1 week. When tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3), autoradiography and histological examinations were performed. Treatment with 5-FC delayed tumor growth and enhanced the survival of mice bearing high hypoxic LL2/CD tumors. The therapeutic effect of hypoxia-induced CD/5-FC gene therapy was more pronounced in high hypoxic tumors than in low hypoxic tumors. This study provides the first evidence that Tc-99m-HL91 can serve as an imaging biomarker for predicting the treatment responses of hypoxia-regulated CD/5-FC gene therapy in animal tumor models. Our results suggest that hypoxia imaging using Tc-99m-HL91 has the predictive value for the success of hypoxia-directed treatment regimens.

  13. SU-E-I-84: MRI Relaxation Properties of a Pre-Clinical Hypoxia-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Wilson, G; Chavez, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A possible hypoxia-sensitive MRI agent, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), has been tried to image oxygen level in proton-based MRI (Kodibagkar et al, NMR Biomed, 2008). The induced changes of T1 (or R1) value by the HMDSO as the oxygenation level changes are the principle that the hypoxia agent is based on: the R1 increases as the oxygen level increases. However, as reported previously, the range of R1 values (0.1–0.3 s-1, corresponding to 3–10 s of T1) is not in the range where a regular MRI technique can easily detect the change. In order for this agent to be widely applied in an MRI environment, more relaxation properties of this agent, including T1 in the rotating frame (T1rho) and T2, need to be explored. Here, the relaxation properties of this agent are explored. Methods: A phantom was made with HMDSO, water and mineral oil, each of which was prepared with oxygen and nitrogen, and was imaged in a 3T MRI system. The T1 properties were explored by the inversion recovery (TR=3000ms, TE=65ms) while varying the inversion time (TI), and also by the fast-field-echo (TR=2 ms, TE=2.8ms) while varying the flip angle (FA). T1rho was explored with a 5-pulse spin-locking technique (TR=5000ms, TE=10ms, spin-lock field=500Hz) while varying the spin-lock duration. T2 was explored with multi-shot TSE (TR=2500ms) while varying TE. Results: With the variable FA and TI, the signals of HMDSO with oxygen and nitrogen change in a similar way and do not respond well by the change of oxygen level, which confirms the large T1 value of HMDSO. The T1rho and T2, however, have a better sensitivity. Conclusion: For the possible pre-clinical hypoxia MRI agent (HMDSO), the detection of T1 (or R1) changes may be more challenging than the detection of other relaxation properties, particularly T2, as the oxygen level changes.

  14. Hypoxia imaging using Positron Emission Tomography in non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Wiegman, Erwin M; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-12-01

    Tumour hypoxia is an important contributor to radioresistance. Thus, increasing the radiation dose to hypoxic areas may result in improved locoregional tumour control. However, this strategy requires accurate detection of the hypoxic sub-volume using PET imaging. Secondly, hypoxia imaging may also provide prognostic information and may be of help to monitor treatment response. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was carried out on the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image Tumour hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More specifically, the purpose of this review was (1) to summarize the different hypoxia tracers used, (2) to investigate whether Tumour hypoxia can be detected in NSCLC and finally (3) whether the presence of hypoxia can be used to predict outcome.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Imam; Evans, Stephanie M.; Craft, Jason R.; Capozzi, Megan E.; McCollum, Gary W.; Yang, Rong; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:27491345

  16. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology

    PubMed Central

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging. PMID:22933906

  17. Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    eyes and image choroidal vessels/capillaries using CARS intravital microscopy Subtask 3: Measure oxy-hemoglobin levels in PBI test and control eyes...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0537 TITLE: Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mobile, Multimodal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  18. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  19. Effect of Hypobaric Hypoxia on Cognitive Functions and Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MUTHURAJU, Sangu; PATI, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000–5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals in Tumor Hypoxia Imaging: A Review Focused on Medicinal Chemistry Aspects.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Pablo; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description in 1955, tumor hypoxia has become a central issue in cancer treatment. Since then, it is essential to diagnose accurately the tumor oxygenation degree in order to establish the appropriate treatment. In this regard, a wide diversity of radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo imaging has been developed. Special conditions of the hypoxic microenvironment are low O2 partial pressure, enhanced levels of reductases, and genetic-adaptation-expression biomolecules involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism- and glucose-uptake, local invasion, and metastatic spread. The development of radiolabeled hypoxia markers has been based on reductase substrates, like bioreductive ligands, or on entities capable of recognizing overexpressed proteins under hypoxia conditions, i.e. HIF-1α and carbonic anhydrase IX, among others. In this review these hypoxia markers are analyzed focusing on their medicinal chemistry characteristics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Prem C.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

  2. Metabolic preconditioning of mammalian cells: mimetic agents for hypoxia lack fidelity in promoting phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Induction of HIF-1α by oxygen limitation promotes increased phosphorylation and catalytic depression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and an enhanced glycolytic poise in cells. Cobalt chloride and desferrioxamine are widely used as mimics for hypoxia because they increase the levels of HIF-1α. We evaluated the ability of these agents to elicit selected physiological responses to hypoxia as a means to metabolically precondition mammalian cells, but without the detrimental effects of hypoxia. We show that, while CoCl(2) does increase HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner, it unexpectedly and strikingly decreases PDH phosphorylation at E1α sites 1, 2, and 3 (Ser(293), Ser(300), and Ser(232), respectively) in HepG2 cells. This same effect is also observed for site 1 in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and J774 macrophages. CoCl(2) unexpectedly decreases the mRNA expression for PDH kinase-2 in HepG2 cells, which likely explains the dephosphorylation of PDH observed. And nor does desferrioxamine promote the expected increase in PDH phosphorylation. Dimethyloxaloylglycine (a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor) performs better in this regard, but failed to promote the stronger effects seen with hypoxia. Consequently, CoCl(2) and desferrioxamine are unreliable mimics of hypoxia for physiological events downstream of HIF-1α stabilization. Our study demonstrates that mimetic chemicals must be chosen with caution and evaluated thoroughly if bona fide cellular outcomes are to be promoted with fidelity.

  3. Histological Image Processing Features Induce a Quantitative Characterization of Chronic Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors signifies resistance to therapy. Despite a wealth of tumor histology data, including anti-pimonidazole staining, no current methods use these data to induce a quantitative characterization of chronic tumor hypoxia in time and space. We use image-processing algorithms to develop a set of candidate image features that can formulate just such a quantitative description of xenographed colorectal chronic tumor hypoxia. Two features in particular give low-variance measures of chronic hypoxia near a vessel: intensity sampling that extends radially away from approximated blood vessel centroids, and multithresholding to segment tumor tissue into normal, hypoxic, and necrotic regions. From these features we derive a spatiotemporal logical expression whose truth value depends on its predicate clauses that are grounded in this histological evidence. As an alternative to the spatiotemporal logical formulation, we also propose a way to formulate a linear regression function that uses all of the image features to learn what chronic hypoxia looks like, and then gives a quantitative similarity score once it is trained on a set of histology images. PMID:27093539

  4. Histological Image Processing Features Induce a Quantitative Characterization of Chronic Tumor Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors signifies resistance to therapy. Despite a wealth of tumor histology data, including anti-pimonidazole staining, no current methods use these data to induce a quantitative characterization of chronic tumor hypoxia in time and space. We use image-processing algorithms to develop a set of candidate image features that can formulate just such a quantitative description of xenographed colorectal chronic tumor hypoxia. Two features in particular give low-variance measures of chronic hypoxia near a vessel: intensity sampling that extends radially away from approximated blood vessel centroids, and multithresholding to segment tumor tissue into normal, hypoxic, and necrotic regions. From these features we derive a spatiotemporal logical expression whose truth value depends on its predicate clauses that are grounded in this histological evidence. As an alternative to the spatiotemporal logical formulation, we also propose a way to formulate a linear regression function that uses all of the image features to learn what chronic hypoxia looks like, and then gives a quantitative similarity score once it is trained on a set of histology images.

  5. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  6. Identification of hypoxia-regulated proteins using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging combined with quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas; Schmich, Fabian; Sinclair, John; Mršnik, Martina; Schoof, Erwin M; Barker, Holly E; Linding, Rune; Jørgensen, Claus; Erler, Janine T

    2014-05-02

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed.

  7. In Vivo Hypoxia PET Imaging Quantifies the Severity of Arthritic Joint Inflammation in Line with Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Generation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Kerstin; Kuehn, Anna; Mahling, Moritz; Guenthoer, Philipp; Hector, Andreas; Schwenck, Johannes; Hartl, Dominik; Laufer, Stefan; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Reischl, Gerald; Röcken, Martin; Pichler, Bernd J; Kneilling, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Hypoxia is essential for the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is associated with the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS), because of the enhanced infiltration of immune cells. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring hypoxia noninvasively in vivo in arthritic ankles with PET/MRI using the hypoxia tracers (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) and (18)F-fluoroazomycinarabinoside ((18)F-FAZA). Additionally, we quantified the temporal dynamics of hypoxia and ROS stress using L-012, an ROS-sensitive chemiluminescence optical imaging probe, and analyzed the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Methods: Mice underwent noninvasive in vivo PET/MRI to measure hypoxia or optical imaging to analyze ROS expression. Additionally, we performed ex vivo pimonidazole-/HIF-1α immunohistochemistry and HIF-1α/2α Western blot/messenger RNA analysis of inflamed and healthy ankles to confirm our in vivo results. Results: Mice diseased from experimental RA exhibited a 3-fold enhancement in hypoxia tracer uptake, even in the early disease stages, and a 45-fold elevation in ROS expression in inflamed ankles compared with the ankles of healthy controls. We further found strong correlations of our noninvasive in vivo hypoxia PET data with pimonidazole and expression of HIF-1α in arthritic ankles. The strongest hypoxia tracer uptake was observed as soon as day 3, whereas the most pronounced ROS stress was evident on day 6 after the onset of experimental RA, indicating that tissue hypoxia can precede ROS stress in RA. Conclusion: Collectively, for the first time to our knowledge, we have demonstrated that the noninvasive measurement of hypoxia in inflammation using (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FMISO PET imaging represents a promising new tool for uncovering and monitoring rheumatic inflammation in vivo. Further, because hypoxic inflamed tissues are associated with the overexpression of HIFs, specific inhibition

  8. Targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Caruthers, Shelton D; Winter, Patrick M; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2006-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine is emerging as physicians attempt to diagnose disease in asymptomatic individuals and treat pathology early in its natural history. A novel tool in an emerging armamentarium, molecular imaging will allow noninvasive characterization and segmentation of patients for delivering custom-tailored therapy. Nanoparticulate agents, such as superparamagnetic agents, liposomes, perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsions, and dendrimers, are being intensively researched as formulation platforms for various targeted clinical applications. As exemplified by perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, these new agents, in combination with the rapid innovations in imaging hardware and software, will allow the emergence of new medical diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms.

  9. Iodine-124-labeled iodo-azomycin-galactoside imaging of tumor hypoxia in mice with serial microPET scanning.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Chapman, J Donald; Schneider, Richard; Cai, Shangde; Larson, Steven; Wen, Bixiu; Chen, Yuchun; Finn, Ronald; Ruan, Shutian; Gerweck, Leo; Humm, John; Ling, Clifton

    2004-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, present in many human cancers, can lead to resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and is an independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome. It is therefore important to identify and localize tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. In the current study, serial microPET imaging was used to evaluate iodine-124-labeled iodo-azomycin-galactoside ((124)I-IAZG) (4.2-day physical half-life) as a hypoxia imaging agent in 17 MCa breast tumors and six FSaII fibrosarcomas implanted in mice. For comparison, another promising hypoxic-cell PET radiotracer, fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-misonidazole ((18)F-FMISO), was also imaged in the same tumor-bearing animals. Twelve animals were also imaged with (18)F-labeled fluoro-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). In addition, histological examination was performed, and direct measurement of tumor oxygenation status carried out with the Oxylite probe system. Two size groups were used, relatively well-oxygenated tumors in the range of 80-180 mg were designated as small, and those >300 mg and highly hypoxic, as large. Based on the data from 11 MCa and six FSaII tumors, both (124)I-IAZG and (18)F-FMISO images showed high tracer uptake in the large tumors. In (18)F-FMISO images at 1, 3-4, and 6-8 h post-injection (p.i.), there was considerable whole-body background activity. In contrast, (124)I-IAZG imaging was optimal when performed at 24-48 h p.i., when the whole-body background had dissipated considerably. As a result, the (124)I-IAZG images at 24-48 h p.i. had higher tumor to whole-body activity contrast than the (18)F-FMISO images at 3-6 h p.i. Region-of-interest analysis was performed as a function of time p.i. and indicated a tumor uptake of 5-10% (of total-body activity) for FMISO at 3-6 h p.i., and of ~17% for IAZG at 48 h p.i. This was corroborated by biodistribution data in that the tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N, normal tissues of blood, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney

  10. Real-Time Monitoring of Placental Oxygenation during Maternal Hypoxia and Hyperoxygenation Using Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arthuis, Chloé J.; Novell, Anthony; Raes, Florian; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain; Bouakaz, Ayache; Perrotin, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This preclinical study aimed to evaluate placental oxygenation in pregnant rats by real-time photoacoustic (PA) imaging on different days of gestation and to specify variations in placental oxygen saturation under conditions of maternal hypoxia and hyperoxygenation. Material and methods Placentas of fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats were examined on days 14, 17, and 20 of pregnancy with a PA imaging system coupled to high-resolution ultrasound imaging. Pregnant rats were successively exposed to hyperoxygenated and hypoxic conditions by changing the oxygen concentration in inhaled gas. Tissue oxygen saturation was quantitatively analyzed by real-time PA imaging in the skin and 3 regions of the placenta. All procedures were performed in accordance with applicable ethical guidelines and approved by the animal care committee. Results Maternal hypoxia was associated with significantly greater decrease in blood oxygen saturation (ΔO2 Saturation) in the skin (70.74% ±7.65) than in the mesometrial triangle (32.66% ±5.75) or other placental areas (labyrinth: 18.58% ± 6.61; basal zone: 13.13% ±5.72) on different days of pregnancy (P<0.001). ΔO2 Saturation did not differ significantly between the labyrinth, the basal zone, and the decidua. After the period of hypoxia, maternal hyperoxygenation led to a significant rise in oxygen saturation, which returned to its initial values in the different placental regions (P<0.001). Conclusions PA imaging enables the variation of blood oxygen saturation to be monitored in the placenta during maternal hypoxia or hyperoxygenation. This first preclinical study suggests that the placenta plays an important role in protecting the fetus against maternal hypoxia. PMID:28081216

  11. Tissue and imaging biomarkers for hypoxia predict poor outcome in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Anna; Fasmer, Kristine E.; Mauland, Karen K.; Ytre-Hauge, Sigmund; Hoivik, Erling A.; Husby, Jenny A.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Trovik, Jone; Halle, Mari K.; Woie, Kathrine; Bjørge, Line; Bjørnerud, Atle; Salvesen, Helga B.; Henrica M. J., Werner

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is frequent in solid tumors and linked to aggressive phenotypes and therapy resistance. We explored expression patterns of the proposed hypoxia marker HIF-1α in endometrial cancer (EC) and investigate whether preoperative functional imaging parameters are associated with tumor hypoxia. Expression of HIF-1α was explored both in the epithelial and the stromal tumor component. We found that low epithelial HIF-1α and high stromal HIF-1α expression were significantly associated with reduced disease specific survival in EC. Only stromal HIF-1α had independent prognostic value in Cox regression analysis. High stromal HIF-1α protein expression was rare in the premalignant lesions of complex atypical hyperplasia but increased significantly to invasive cancer. High stromal HIF-1α expression was correlated with overexpression of important genes downstream from HIF-1α, i.e. VEGFA and SLC2A1 (GLUT1). Detecting hypoxic tumors with preoperative functional imaging might have therapeutic benefits. We found that high stromal HIF-1α expression associated with high total lesion glycolysis (TLG) at PET/CT. High expression of a gene signature linked to hypoxia also correlated with low tumor blood flow at DCE-MRI and increased metabolism measured by FDG-PET. PI3K pathway inhibitors were identified as potential therapeutic compounds in patients with lesions overexpressing this gene signature. In conclusion, we show that high stromal HIF-1α expression predicts reduced survival in EC and is associated with increased tumor metabolism at FDG-PET/CT. Importantly; we demonstrate a correlation between tissue and imaging biomarkers reflecting hypoxia, and also possible treatment targets for selected patients. PMID:27634881

  12. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  13. Folate-receptor-targeted radionuclide imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Mathias, Carla J; Green, Mark A

    2004-04-29

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including delivery of radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. This review surveys the growing literature on tumor imaging with radionuclide agents targeted to the folate receptor. Successful folate-receptor targeting has been reported, both in vitro and in vivo, using a variety of radionuclides that are suitable for clinical diagnostic imaging (67Ga, 111In, 99mTc, 66Ga, and 64Cu). While none of these agents has, to date, been demonstrated to have clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool, existing data indicates that it is feasible to noninvasively assess (at least qualitatively) tissue folate receptor levels by external radionuclide imaging.

  14. Heterobivalent Imaging Agents Targeting Prostate Cancer Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    has been implicated as a salient player in the pathobiology of cancers of epithelial origin, e.g. prostate, cervix , ovarian, colon and...ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0481 Heterobivalent Imaging Agents Targeting Prostate Cancer Training Aaron LeBeau University of California, San...Francisco San Francisco, CA 94103 Annual Summary 31 MAY 2010 - 1JUN 201101-06-2011 To determine the utility of imaging MT-SP1 in cancer , xenografts of

  15. Diacetoxyscirpenol as a new anticancer agent to target hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Chun, Yang-Sook; Leutou, Alain Simplice; Son, Byeng Wha; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1, which promotes the progression of malignancy by stimulating angiogenesis and by augmenting the ability of tumors to survive. Thus, HIF-1 is one of the most compelling targets for treating cancers. The aim of this study was to find a small molecule that inhibits HIF-1 under hypoxia in cancer cells. 7,280 compounds in a chemical library were tested in a cancer cell line expressing luciferase HIF-dependently. Through three rounds of screening, we finally picked up a compound that originates from a marine bacterium parasitizing red alga. The antibiotic potently inhibited HIF-1 expression and its transcriptional activity in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia. Through two-step fractionation, diacetoxyscirpenol was purified and identified as a HIF-inhibiting ingredient. Mechanistically, diacetoxyscirpenol inhibits the synthesis of HIF-1α protein and also interferes with the dimerization of HIF-1α and ARNT. It attenuates HIF-mediated gene expression in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia, and by doing so reduces tumorigenic and angiogenic potentials of cancer cells. More importantly, diacetoxyscirpenol retarded tumor growth in mice, and reduced HIF-1α expression and vascular formation in the tumors. Overall, diacetoxyscirpenol is considered a potential drug deregulating the HIF-1 signaling pathway, and it could be beneficially employed for treating malignant tumors with hypoxic microenvironment. PMID:27613833

  16. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, Donald M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Beierwaltes, William H.; Wu, Jiann-long

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla.

  17. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, D.M.; Brown, L.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Wu, J.L.

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla. No Drawings

  18. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  19. Principal component analysis enhances SNR for dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging of cycling hypoxia in vivo.

    PubMed

    Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. These effects may be more deleterious in regions undergoing cycling hypoxia. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has provided a noninvasive, quantitative imaging modality to investigate static pO2 in vivo. However, to image changing hypoxia, EPRI images with better temporal resolution may be required. The tradeoff between temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) results in lower SNR for EPRI images with imaging time short enough to resolve cycling hypoxia. Principal component analysis allows for accelerated image acquisition with acceptable SNR by filtering noise in projection data, from which pO2 images are reconstructed. Principal component analysis is used as a denoising technique by including only low-order components to approximate the EPRI projection data. Simulated and experimental studies show that principal component analysis filtering increases SNR, particularly for small numbers of sub-volumes with changing pO2 , enabling an order of magnitude increase in temporal resolution with minimal deterioration in spatial resolution or image quality. The SNR necessary for dynamic EPRI studies with temporal resolution required to investigate cycling hypoxia and its physiological implications is enabled by principal component analysis filtering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.; Filip, Sanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET) have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour. PMID:25214887

  1. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Aptamer-PEG-modified Fe3O4@Mn as a novel T1- and T2- dual-model MRI contrast agent targeting hypoxia-induced cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haitao; Zhang, Lirong; Liu, Yanfang; Zhou, Yuepeng; Wang, Kang; Xie, Xiaodong; Song, Lian; Wang, Dongqing; Han, Chunlei; Chen, Qiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced cancer stem cells have been known to be involved in tumour metastasis, resistance to chemo/radio therapy and tumour recurrence. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a widely used imaging tool for cancers in clinics and research. To develop T1-positive and T2-negative dual mode MRI agents for more comprehensive and accurate diagnostic information under hypoxic conditions, a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α based aptamer and Mn(II)-modified nanoparticles D-Fe3O4@PMn were synthesized and characterized. In vitro and in vivo studies show that D-Fe3O4@PMn NPs are biocompatible and less cytotoxic and can produce significant contrast enhancement in T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. Furthermore, the D-Fe3O4@PMn NPs enable targeted dual-contrast T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging of cancer cells expressing high levels of HIF-1α and cancer stem cell-related proteins under hypoxic condition. In conclusion, NPs with HIF-1α and Mn(II) are promising diagnostic agents for dual-mode T1 and T2 imaging by targeting cancer stem cells as they are non-toxic and biocompatible. PMID:27976736

  3. Monomolecular multimodal fluorescence-radioisotope imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongren; Liang, Kexian; Bloch, Sharon; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of diseases by different imaging methods can provide complementary information about the functional status of diseased tissues or organs. To overcome the current difficulties in coregistering images from different imaging modalities with a high degree of accuracy, we prepared near-infrared (NIR) monomolecular multimodal imaging agents (MOMIAs) consisting of a heptamethine carbocyanine and 111In-DOTA chelate that served as antennae for optical and scintigraphic imaging, respectively. Their spectral properties clearly show that coordination of indium to MOMIA increased the fluorescence intensity of the compounds. The MOMIAs are exceptionally stable in biological media and serum up to 24 h at 37 degrees C. Biodistribution of the compounds in mice obtained by fluorescence photon and gamma-counts demonstrated a similar distribution trend of the molecular probe in different tissues, suggesting that the detected fluorescence and gamma-emissions emanated from the same source (MOMIA). At 24 h postinjection, the MOMIAs were excreted by the renal and hepatobiliary systems and the blood level of a representative MOMIA was very low, thereby reducing background noise caused by circulating molecular probes. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of preparing single molecules with the capacity to emit discernible and diagnostic fluorescent and gamma-radiations for optical and nuclear imaging of living organisms.

  4. Optical Imaging with Dynamic Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Isample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. In this article we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast, a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: i) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and ii) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  5. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  6. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  7. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  8. Hypoxia and DNA-damaging agent bleomycin both increase the cellular level of the protein 4E-BP.

    PubMed

    Le Bouffant, Ronan; Cormier, Patrick; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Bellé, Robert

    2006-09-01

    The 4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) regulate the cap-dependent eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). The level of 4E-BP protein is regulated during early development of sea urchin embryos. Fertilization leads to the rapid disappearance of the protein that reappears later in development. We show that two important cellular stresses, hypoxia and bleomycin prolonged checkpoint mobilization provoked the overexpression of the protein 4E-BP in developing sea urchin embryos. Hypoxia resulted after 1 h in a reversible gradual increase in the protein 4E-BP level. At 20 h, the protein 4E-BP had reached the level existing in the unfertilized eggs. Bleomycin used as a DNA-damaging agent for checkpoint activation, provoked cell cycle inhibition and after prolonged exposure (20 h), induced the expression of the protein 4E-BP. The effect of bleomycin on 4E-BP protein overexpression was dose-dependent between 0.4 and 1.2 mM. The role of the overexpression of the protein 4E-BP is discussed in relation with cellular stress responses.

  9. Magnetoliposomes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J; Vande Velde, Greetje; Ketkar-Atre, Ashwini; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Among the wide variety in iron oxide nanoparticles which are routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, magnetoliposomes (MLs) take up a special place. In the present work, the two main types (large and small MLs) are defined and their specific features are commented. For both types of MLs, the flexibility of the lipid coating allows for efficient functionalization, enabling bimodal imaging (e.g., MRI and fluorescence) or the use of MLs as theranostics. These features are especially true for large MLs, where several magnetite cores are encapsulated within a single large liposome, which were found to be highly efficient theranostic agents. By carefully fine-tuning the number of magnetite cores and attaching Gd(3+) -complexes onto the liposomal surface, the large MLs can be efficiently optimized for dynamic MRI. A special type of MLs, biogenic MLs, can also be efficiently used in this regard, with potential applications in cancer treatment and imaging. Small MLs, where the lipid bilayer is immediately attached onto a solid magnetite core, give a very high r2 /r1 ratio. The flexibility of the lipid bilayer allows the incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid conjugates to increase blood circulation times and be used as bone marrow contrast agents. Cationic lipids can also be incorporated, leading to high cell uptake and associated strong contrast generation in MRI of implanted cells. Unique for these small MLs is the high resistance the particles exhibit against intracellular degradation compared with dextran- or citrate-coated particles. Additionally, intracellular clustering of the iron oxide cores enhances negative contrast generation and enables longer tracking of labeled cells in time. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  11. A new model of retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration induced by a chemical hypoxia-mimicking agent, cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Kumada, Masako; Kunisada, Takahiro; Oyama, Takeru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kozawa, Osamu; Mori, Hideki

    2006-09-13

    Retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration was induced by cobalt chloride, a chemical hypoxia-mimicking agent in rodents. Time course and dose-response of photoreceptor cell degeneration in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of cobalt chloride were examined by conventional histological analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragments (TUNEL) method with the use of paraffin-embedded sections. The dose-response of photoreceptor cell degeneration in rat retina was also examined. Photoreceptor cells progressively degenerated with time and under dose-response relationship. The suitable dose of cobalt chloride for the selective photoreceptor cell degeneration in mice is 10-12 nmol intravitreal injection at the volume of 2 microl. The retinal morphology of the mice 2 weeks after the 10-12 nmol intravitreal injection was similar to that of retinal degeneration in the mutant rd mouse. Retinal damage of total retinal layers was induced by an excessive dose of cobalt chloride. The progression of retinal damage after cobalt chloride injection, measured morphologically, was completed at 1 week. However, nuclear DNA fragmentation, mainly detected at outer nuclear layer by TUNEL, peaked at 48 h after 12 nmol cobalt chloride injection. Thus, the selective photoreceptor cell degeneration induced by cobalt chloride follows DNA fragmentation at outer nuclear layer. The photoreceptor cell degeneration is established optionally by cobalt chloride without use of the retinal degeneration mutant animals. Thus, we have described the development of a new model of retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration induced by a chemical hypoxia-mimicking agent.

  12. Multifunctional Phosphorescent Conjugated Polymer Dots for Hypoxia Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Liang, Hua; Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Tianshe; Yang, Lijuan; Lv, Wen; Yu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) plays a key role in many physiological processes, and becomes a toxicant to kill cells when excited to 1O2. Intracellular O2 levels, or the degree of hypoxia, are always viewed as an indicator of cancers. Due to the highly efficient cancer therapy ability and low side effect, photodynamic therapy (PDT) becomes one of the most promising treatments for cancers. Herein, an early‐stage diagnosis and therapy system is reported based on the phosphorescent conjugated polymer dots (Pdots) containing Pt(II) porphyrin as an oxygen‐responsive phosphorescent group and 1O2 photosensitizer. Intracellular hypoxia detection has been investigated. Results show that cells treated with Pdots display longer lifetimes under hypoxic conditions, and time‐resolved luminescence images exhibit a higher signal‐to‐noise ratio after gating off the short‐lived background fluorescence. Quantification of O2 is realized by the ratiometric emission intensity of phosphorescence/fluorescence and the lifetime of phosphorescence. Additionally, the PDT efficiency of Pdots is estimated by flow cytometry, MTT cell viability assay, and in situ imaging of PDT induced cell death. Interestingly, Pdots exhibit a high PDT efficiency and would be promising in clinical applications. PMID:27722081

  13. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  14. Changes in BOLD and ADC weighted imaging in acute hypoxia during sea-level and altitude adapted states.

    PubMed

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, Henrik B W; Born, Alfred P; Knudsen, Gitte M; Paulson, Olaf B

    2005-12-01

    Acute normobaric hypoxia as well as longstanding hypobaric hypoxia induce pronounced physiological changes and may eventually lead to impairment of cerebral function. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the cerebral activation response as well as to explore possible structural changes as measured by diffusion weighted imaging. Eleven healthy sea-level residents were studied after 5 weeks of adaptation to high altitude conditions at Chacaltaya, Bolivia (5260 m). The subjects were studied immediately after return to sea-level in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and the examinations repeated 6 months later after re-adaptation to sea-level conditions. The BOLD response, measured at 1.5 T, was severely reduced during acute hypoxia both in the altitude and sea-level adapted states (50% reduction during an average S(a)O(2) of 75%). On average, the BOLD response magnitude was 23% lower in altitude than sea-level adaptation in the normoxic condition, but in the hypoxic condition, no significant differences were found. A small but statistically significant decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was seen in some brain regions during acute hypoxia, whereas ADC was slightly elevated in high altitude as compared to sea-level adaptation. It is concluded that hypoxia significantly diminishes the BOLD response, and the mechanisms underlying this finding are discussed. Furthermore, altitude adaptation may influence both the magnitude of the activation-related response, as well as micro-structural features.

  15. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  16. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  17. “BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging identifies cortical hypoxia in severe renovascular disease”

    PubMed Central

    Gloviczki, Monika L; Glockner, James F; Crane, John A; McKusick, Michael A; Misra, Sanjay; Grande, Joseph P; Lerman, Lilach O; Textor, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has a range of manifestations depending upon the severity of vascular occlusion. The aim of this study was to examine whether exceeding the limits of adaptation to reduced blood flow ultimately leads to tissue hypoxia as determined by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. We compared three groups of hypertensive patients (24 with essential hypertension [EH]), 13 with “moderate” (Doppler velocities 200-384 cm/sec) and 17 with “severe” atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis ([ARAS]; velocities above 384 cm/sec and loss of functional renal tissue). Cortical and medullary blood flows and volumes were determined by multi-detector CT. Post-stenotic kidney size and blood flow were reduced with ARAS, and tissue perfusion fell in the most severe lesions. Tissue deoxyhemoglobin, as reflected by R2* values, was higher in medulla as compared to cortex for all groups and did not differ between subjects with renal artery lesions and EH. By contrast, cortical R2* levels were elevated for severe ARAS (21.6 ±9.4 /sec) as compared with either EH (17.8±2.3 /sec, p<.01) or moderate ARAS (15.7± 2.1 /sec, p<.01). Changes in medullary R2* after furosemide administration tended to be blunted in severe ARAS as compared to unaffected (contralateral) kidneys. These results demonstrate that severe vascular occlusion overwhelms the capacity of the kidney to adapt to reduced blood flow, manifest as overt cortical hypoxia as measured by BOLD MRI. The level of cortical hypoxia is out of proportion to medulla and may provide a marker to identify irreversible parenchymal injury. PMID:22042812

  18. The cost of developing imaging agents for routine clinical use.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Adrian D

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the financial cost of developing new imaging agents for clinical use and to discuss the effects of these costs on the future clinical imaging agent environment. Publicly available financial data from the annual reports of major companies developing and selling imaging agents were examined and the data used to develop cost estimates. These estimates were compared with the in-depth data and analyses available for the development costs of therapeutic drugs. The cost of developing a drug for diagnostic imaging to commercialization is in the 100 dollars to 200 million dollars range, whereas a blockbuster imaging drug has current sales of 200 dollars to 400 million dollars. Most of these blockbuster imaging agents have been on the market for some time. The majority provide morphologic images with general indications in a slowly changing section of the market. Future agents will most likely address smaller markets and be in the rapidly developing molecular imaging field. The costs are high and are a significant brake on the development of imaging agents for commercialization. If new imaging agents are to realize their commercial potential, ways must be found to make the financials more attractive. The prices per dose are currently low so they must either be greatly increased for new imaging agents, with a corresponding increase in the value of the information they provide, or the use of imaging agents must be widened and/or their development made less costly in time and money. Without addressing these issues, the commercialization of new imaging agents will continue to be slow and may get slower. This will impact the progress of imaging agents toward use as validated biomarkers.

  19. Assessment of Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma Xenografts by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A.M.; Gulliksrud, Kristine M.Sc.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cervical cancer and highly hypoxic primary tumors show increased frequency of locoregional treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival rates. The potential usefulness of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing tumor hypoxia noninvasively was investigated in the present preclinical study. Methods and Materials: CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts transplanted intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) in BALB/c nu/nu mice were subjected to DCE-MRI and measurement of fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumor images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the extracellular volume fraction of the imaged tissue) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data. Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells was measured by using the paired survival curve method. Results: Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells differed significantly among the four tumor groups. The mean values {+-} SE were determined to be 44% {+-} 7% (i.m. CK-160), 77% {+-} 10% (s.c. CK-160), 23% {+-} 5% (i.m. TS-415), and 52% {+-} 6% (s.c. TS-415). The four tumor groups differed significantly also in K{sup trans}, and there was an unambiguous inverse relationship between K{sup trans} and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. On the other hand, significant differences among the groups in v{sub e} could not be detected. Conclusions: The study supports the clinical development of DCE-MRI as a method for assessing the extent of hypoxia in carcinoma of the cervix.

  20. The accumulation mechanism of the hypoxia imaging probe "FMISO" by imaging mass spectrometry: possible involvement of low-molecular metabolites.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yukari; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shingo; Numata, Yoshito; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-11-19

    (18)F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been widely used as a hypoxia imaging probe for diagnostic positron emission tomography (PET). FMISO is believed to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules after reduction of its nitro group. However, its detailed accumulation mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the chemical forms of FMISO and their distributions in tumours using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), which visualises spatial distribution of chemical compositions based on molecular masses in tissue sections. Our radiochemical analysis revealed that most of the radioactivity in tumours existed as low-molecular-weight compounds with unknown chemical formulas, unlike observations made with conventional views, suggesting that the radioactivity distribution primarily reflected that of these unknown substances. The IMS analysis indicated that FMISO and its reductive metabolites were nonspecifically distributed in the tumour in patterns not corresponding to the radioactivity distribution. Our IMS search found an unknown low-molecular-weight metabolite whose distribution pattern corresponded to that of both the radioactivity and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. This metabolite was identified as the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO. We showed that the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO is involved in FMISO accumulation in hypoxic tumour tissues, in addition to the conventional mechanism of FMISO covalent binding to macromolecules.

  1. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a “double-agent” approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as “secret agents” in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging. PMID:27747191

  2. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  3. Hypoxia-activated cytotoxic agent tirapazamine enhances hepatic artery ligation-induced killing of liver tumor in HBx transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chen, Kai-Wei; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Su, Tung-Hung; Jao, Ping; Ni, Lin-Chun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2016-10-18

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the main treatment for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification because of its exclusive arterial blood supply. Although TACE achieves substantial necrosis of the tumor, complete tumor necrosis is uncommon, and the residual tumor generally rapidly recurs. We combined tirapazamine (TPZ), a hypoxia-activated cytotoxic agent, with hepatic artery ligation (HAL), which recapitulates transarterial embolization in mouse models, to enhance the efficacy of TACE. The effectiveness of this combination treatment was examined in HCC that spontaneously developed in hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) transgenic mice. We proved that the tumor blood flow in this model was exclusively supplied by the hepatic artery, in contrast to conventional orthotopic HCC xenografts that receive both arterial and venous blood supplies. At levels below the threshold oxygen levels created by HAL, TPZ was activated and killed the hypoxic cells, but spared the normoxic cells. This combination treatment clearly limited the toxicity of TPZ to HCC, which caused the rapid and near-complete necrosis of HCC. In conclusion, the combination of TPZ and HAL showed a synergistic tumor killing activity that was specific for HCC in HBx transgenic mice. This preclinical study forms the basis for the ongoing clinical program for the TPZ-TACE regimen in HCC treatment.

  4. A New Pharmacological Agent (AKB-4924) Stabilizes Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) and Increases Skin Innate Defenses Against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Cheryl Y.M.; Hollands, Andrew; Tran, Dan N.; Olson, Joshua; Dahesh, Samira; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Corle, Courtney; Jeung, Seung Nam; Kotsakis, Anna; Shalwitz, Robert A.; Johnson, Randall S.; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is a major regulator of energy homeostasis and cellular adaptation to low oxygen stress. HIF-1 is also activated in response to bacterial pathogens and supports the innate immune response of both phagocytes and keratinocytes. In this work, we show that a new pharmacological compound AKB-4924 (Akebia Therapeutics) increases HIF-1α levels and enhances the antibacterial activity of phagocytes and keratinocytes against both methicillin-sensitive and -resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. AKB-4924 is also effective in stimulating the killing capacity of keratinocytes against the important opportunistic skin pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinitobacter baumanii. The effect of AKB-4924 is mediated through the activity of host cells, as the compound exerts no direct antimicrobial activity. Administered locally as a single agent, AKB-4924 limits S. aureus proliferation and lesion formation in a mouse skin abscess model. This approach to pharmacologically boost the innate immune response via HIF-1 stabilization may serve as a useful adjunctive treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:22371073

  5. CT and MR Imaging Diagnosis and Staging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Part II. Extracellular Agents, Hepatobiliary Agents, and Ancillary Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Jeong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging play critical roles in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The second article of this two-part review discusses basic concepts of diagnosis and staging, reviews the diagnostic performance of CT and MR imaging with extracellular contrast agents and of MR imaging with hepatobiliary contrast agents, and examines in depth the major and ancillary imaging features used in the diagnosis and characterization of HCC. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25247563

  6. Radiolabelled spiroperidol: Possible pituitary adenoma imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.; Marshall, J.C.; Lloyd, R.V.; Sherman, P.S.; Wieland, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas are the most common type of pituitary tumors. Detection currently depends on physical symptoms, elevated serum prolactin levels and CT scans. An imaging agent which specifically localized in prolactinomas based on some functional characteristic of the tumor would be of considerable clinical value not only for early detection but also for monitoring of therapy. Tritiated spiroperidol (/sup 3/H-Sp) was selected for evaluation based on 1) the presence of D-2 receptors in normal anterior pituitary and adenoma tissue and 2) the high affinity of spiroperidol for D-2 receptors. Recent data have established that implantation of diethylstilbestrol (DES) in Fischer F344 rats induced prolactin-secreting tumors in the pituitary. /sup 3/HSp was evaluated in pituitary tissue of both control and DES-treated rats. /sup 3/HSp concentration in normal female anterior pituitary tissue was found to be about 0.27% kg dose/g from 5 min to 4hrs. This value was about 10 times levels in cortex, cerebellum and striatum. In DES-treated rats the % kg dose/g values remained approximately the same. A 5-fold increase in serum prolactin was associated with a 6-fold increase in both pituitary weight and % dose/organ. The data suggests that although total pituitary weight has increased due to tumor growth (reflected in increased values for % dose/organ), the relative number of receptors per g of tissue has remained constant. This result is in agreement with observations of others on D-2 receptor concentration in prolactinomas.

  7. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  8. Intelligent design of nano-scale molecular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-12-12

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on-off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  9. Imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and septin 9 interaction by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Golan, Maya; Mabjeesh, Nicola J

    2017-05-09

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a major mediator of the hypoxic response involved in tumor progression. We had earlier described the interaction between septin 9 isoform 1 (SEPT9_i1) protein and the oxygen-regulated subunit, HIF-1α. SEPT9_i1 is a member of the conserved family of GTP-binding cytoskeleton septins. SEPT9_i1 stabilizes HIF-1α and facilitates its cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation. We utilized split yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) methodology to monitor the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 in live cells. N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) split YFP chimeras with HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 on both their amino and carboxyl termini were generated. HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 chimeras were expressed in cancer cells and screened for functional complementation. SEPT9_i1-YN and YC-HIF-1α formed a long-lived highly stable complex upon interaction. The BiFC signal was increased in the presence of hypoxia-mimicking agents. In contrast, YC-ΔHLH-HIF-1α chimera, which lacked the helix-loop-helix domain that is essential for the interaction with SEPT9_i1 as well as the expression of SEPT9_i1 252-379 amino acids fragment required for the interaction with HIF-1α, significantly reduced the BiFC signal. The signal was also reduced when cells were treated with 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, an HSP90 inhibitor that inhibits HIF-1α. It was increased with fourchlorfenuron, a small molecule that increases the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1. These results reconfirmed the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 that was imaged in live cells. This BiFC system represents a novel approach for studying the real-time interaction between these two proteins and will allow high-throughput drug screening to identity compounds that disrupt this interaction.

  10. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Marcus T.M.; Raspe, Marcel; ten Hove, Jan Bart; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W.B.

    2015-01-01

    Optical (molecular) imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents. PMID:25985157

  11. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Raspe, Marcel; ten Hove, Jan Bart; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2015-05-12

    Optical (molecular) imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy)3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy)3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents.

  12. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI–FI agents. PMID:24220641

  13. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-11-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI-FI agents.

  14. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis).

  15. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): Evolution and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W. C.; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H.; Menkens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov) to students, researchers and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as a CSV file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, preclinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at: micad@nlm.nih.gov PMID:21989943

  16. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): evolution and progress.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W C; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H; Menkens, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov ) to students, researchers, and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1,000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4,250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as a comma separated values file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, pre-clinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities, and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments, or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at micad@nlm.nih.gov.

  17. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenli; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Nehmeh, Sadek A.; Narayanan, Manoj; Paulus, Timo; Bal, Matthieu; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Lee, Nancy Y.; Humm, John L.

    2009-05-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions—normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic—embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  18. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for MR Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical imaging modality effective for anatomical and functional imaging of diseased soft tissues, including solid tumors. MRI contrast agents have been routinely used for detecting tumor at an early stage. Gadolinium based contrast agents are the most commonly used contrast agents in clinical MRI. There have been significant efforts to design and develop novel Gd(III) contrast agents with high relaxivity, low toxicity and specific tumor binding. The relaxivity of the Gd(III) contrast agents can be increased by proper chemical modification. The toxicity of Gd(III) contrast agents can be reduced by increasing the agents’ thermodynamic and kinetic stability, as well as optimizing their pharmacokinetic properties. The increasing knowledge in the field of cancer genomics and biology provides an opportunity for designing tumor-specific contrast agents. Various new Gd(III) chelates have been designed and evaluated in animal models for more effective cancer MRI. This review outlines the design and development, physicochemical properties, and in vivo properties of several classes of Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents for tumor imaging. PMID:23047730

  19. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  20. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed. PMID:25530615

  1. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  2. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  3. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  4. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  5. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  6. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  7. [Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: development and problems].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-kai

    2002-09-01

    In spite of the inherent versatility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers and clinicians from both home and aboard have made great achievements in developing safe and effective contrast agents. Many new agents are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. It is of clinical importance that the agents should expand the diagnostic utility of MRI, improve the detection of tiny lesions and help evaluate specific tissue or organ functions. This article aims to examine current status of contrast agents for MRI and the problems waiting for solutions.

  8. Noninvasive Imaging of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Gene Therapy for Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ian Y.; Gheysens, Olivier; Li, Zongjin; Rasooly, Julia A.; Wang, Qian; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Willmann, Juergen K.; Wang, David S.; Contag, Christopher H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of myocardial ischemia. Both preclinical and clinical evaluations of this therapy are underway and can benefit from a vector strategy that allows noninvasive assessment of HIF-1α expression as an objective measure of gene delivery. We have developed a novel bidirectional plasmid vector (pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc), which employs the cardiac troponin T (cTnT) promoter in conjunction with a two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system to drive the linked expression of a recombinant HIF-1α gene (HIF-1α-VP2) and the firefly luciferase gene (fluc). The firefly luciferase (FLuc) activity serves as a surrogate for HIF-1α-VP2 expression, and can be noninvasively assessed in mice using bioluminescence imaging after vector delivery. Transfection of cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes with pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc led to a strong correlation between FLuc and HIF-1α-dependent vascular endothelial growth factor expression (r2=0.88). Intramyocardial delivery of pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc into infarcted mouse myocardium led to persistent HIF-1α-VP2 expression for 4 weeks, even though it improved neither CD31+ microvessel density nor echocardiographically determined left ventricular systolic function. These results lend support to recent findings of suboptimal efficacy associated with plasmid-mediated HIF-1α therapy. The imaging techniques developed herein should be useful for further optimizing HIF-1α-VP2 therapy in preclinical models of myocardial ischemia. PMID:23937265

  9. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  10. Efficient Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Nitroreductase Detection and Hypoxia Imaging in Tumor Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hong-Wen; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Li, Jin; Liang, Li-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumor progression, and the development of efficient methods for monitoring hypoxic degree in living systems is of great biomedical importance. In the solid tumors, the nitroreductase level is directly corresponded with the hypoxic status. Many one-photon excited fluorescent probes have been developed for hypoxia imaging in tumor cells via the detection of nitroreductase level. However, two-photon excited probes are more suitable for bioimaging. In this work, a two-photon probe 1 for nitroreductase detection and hypoxic status monitoring in living tumor cells and tissues was reported for the first time. The detection is based on the fact that the nitro-group of probe 1 could be selectively reduced to an amino-group by nitroreductase in the presence of reduced NADH, following by a 1,6-rearrangement-elimination to release the fluorophore, resulting in the enhancement of fluorescence. The probe exhibited both one-photon and two-photon excited remarkable fluorescence enhancement (∼70-fold) for nitroreductase, which afforded a high sensitivity for nitroreductase, with a detection limit of 20 ng/mL observed. Moreover, the applications of the probe for fluorescent bioimaging of hypoxia in living cells and two-photon bioimaging in tissues were carried out, with tissue-imaging depths of 70-160 μm observed, which demonstrates its practical application in complex biosystems.

  11. MALDI-Mass Spectrometric Imaging Revealing Hypoxia-Driven Lipids and Proteins in a Breast Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Lu; Chughtai, Kamila; Purvine, Samuel O.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Raman, Venu; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Glunde, Kristine

    2015-05-20

    Hypoxic areas are a common feature of rapidly growing malignant tumors and their metastases, and are typically spatially heterogeneous. Hypoxia has a strong impact on tumor cell biology and contributes to tumor progression in multiple ways. To date, only a few molecular key players in tumor hypoxia, such as for example hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been discovered. The distribution of biomolecules is frequently heterogeneous in the tumor volume, and may be driven by hypoxia and HIF-1α. Understanding the spatially heterogeneous hypoxic response of tumors is critical. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) provides a unique way of imaging biomolecular distributions in tissue sections with high spectral and spatial resolution. In this paper, breast tumor xenografts grown from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato cells, with a red fluorescent tdTomato protein construct under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE)-containing promoter driven by HIF-1α, were used to detect the spatial distribution of hypoxic regions. We elucidated the 3D spatial relationship between hypoxic regions and the localization of small molecules, metabolites, lipids, and proteins by using principal component analysis – linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on 3D rendered MSI volume data from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato breast tumor xenografts. In this study we identified hypoxia-regulated proteins active in several distinct pathways such as glucose metabolism, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, protein folding, translation/ribosome, splicesome, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, hemoglobin chaperone, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, aurora B signaling/apoptotic execution phase, the RAS signaling pathway, the FAS signaling pathway/caspase cascade in apoptosis and telomere stress induced senescence. In parallel we also identified co-localization of hypoxic regions and various lipid species such as PC(16:0/18:1), PC(16:0/18:2), PC(18:0/18:1), PC

  12. MALDI-Mass Spectrometric Imaging Revealing Hypoxia-Driven Lipids and Proteins in a Breast Tumor Model

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Lu; Chughtai, Kamila; Purvine, Samuel O.; ...

    2015-05-20

    Hypoxic areas are a common feature of rapidly growing malignant tumors and their metastases, and are typically spatially heterogeneous. Hypoxia has a strong impact on tumor cell biology and contributes to tumor progression in multiple ways. To date, only a few molecular key players in tumor hypoxia, such as for example hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been discovered. The distribution of biomolecules is frequently heterogeneous in the tumor volume, and may be driven by hypoxia and HIF-1α. Understanding the spatially heterogeneous hypoxic response of tumors is critical. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) provides a unique way of imaging biomolecular distributions in tissuemore » sections with high spectral and spatial resolution. In this paper, breast tumor xenografts grown from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato cells, with a red fluorescent tdTomato protein construct under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE)-containing promoter driven by HIF-1α, were used to detect the spatial distribution of hypoxic regions. We elucidated the 3D spatial relationship between hypoxic regions and the localization of small molecules, metabolites, lipids, and proteins by using principal component analysis – linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on 3D rendered MSI volume data from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato breast tumor xenografts. In this study we identified hypoxia-regulated proteins active in several distinct pathways such as glucose metabolism, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, protein folding, translation/ribosome, splicesome, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, hemoglobin chaperone, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, aurora B signaling/apoptotic execution phase, the RAS signaling pathway, the FAS signaling pathway/caspase cascade in apoptosis and telomere stress induced senescence. In parallel we also identified co-localization of hypoxic regions and various lipid species such as PC(16:0/18:1), PC(16:0/18:2), PC(18

  13. MALDI-mass spectrometric imaging revealing hypoxia-driven lipids and proteins in a breast tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiang; Chughtai, Kamila; Purvine, Samuel O.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Raman, Venu; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2015-06-16

    Hypoxic areas are a common feature of rapidly growing malignant tumors and their metastases, and are typically spatially heterogeneous. Hypoxia has a strong impact on tumor cell biology and contributes to tumor progression in multiple ways. To date, only a few molecular key players in tumor hypoxia, such as for example hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been discovered. The distribution of biomolecules is frequently heterogeneous in the tumor volume, and may be driven by hypoxia and HIF-1α. Understanding the spatially heterogeneous hypoxic response of tumors is critical. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) provides a unique way of imaging biomolecular distributions in tissue sections with high spectral and spatial resolution. In this paper, breast tumor xenografts grown from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato cells, with a red fluorescent tdTomato protein construct under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE)-containing promoter driven by HIF-1α, were used to detect the spatial distribution of hypoxic regions. We elucidated the 3D spatial relationship between hypoxic regions and the localization of small molecules, metabolites, lipids, and proteins by using principal component analysis – linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on 3D rendered MSI volume data from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato breast tumor xenografts. In this study we identified hypoxia-regulated proteins active in several distinct pathways such as glucose metabolism, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, protein folding, translation/ribosome, splicesome, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, hemoglobin chaperone, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, aurora B signaling/apoptotic execution phase, the RAS signaling pathway, the FAS signaling pathway/caspase cascade in apoptosis and telomere stress induced senescence. In parallel we also identified co-localization of hypoxic regions and various lipid species such as PC(16:0/18:1), PC(16:0/18:2), PC(18:0/18:1), PC

  14. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-21

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents.

  15. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  16. Phase II study of the oxygen saturation curve left shifting agent BW12C in combination with the hypoxia activated drug mitomycin C in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Levitt, N C; O'Byrne, K; Braybrooke, J P; Talbot, D C; Ganesan, T S; Thompson, C H; Rajagopalan, B; Littlewood, T J; Dixon, R M; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    BW12C (5-[2-formyl-3-hydroxypenoxyl] pentanoic acid) stabilizes oxyhaemoglobin, causing a reversible left-shift of the oxygen saturation curve (OSC) and tissue hypoxia. The activity of mitomycin C (MMC) is enhanced by hypoxia. In this phase II study, 17 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) received BW12C and MMC. BW12C was given as a bolus loading dose of 45 mg kg−1over 1 h, followed by a maintenance infusion of 4 mg kg−1h−1for 5 h. MMC 6 mg m−2was administered over 15 min immediately after the BW12C bolus. The 15 evaluable patients had progressive disease after a median of 2 (range 1–4) cycles of chemotherapy. Haemoglobin electrophoresis 3 and 5 h after the BW12C bolus dose showed a fast moving band consistent with the BW12C-oxyhaemoglobin complex, accounting for approximately 50% of total haemoglobin. The predominant toxicities – nausea/vomiting and vein pain – were mild and did not exceed CTC grade 2. Liver31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of patients with hepatic metastases showed no changes consistent with tissue hypoxia. The principle of combining a hypoxically activated drug with an agent that increases tissue hypoxia is clinically feasible, producing an effect equivalent to reducing tumour oxygen delivery by at least 50%. However, BW12C in combination with MMC for 5-FU-resistant colorectal cancer is not an effective regimen. This could be related to drug resistance rather than a failure to enhance cytotoxicity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839290

  17. The Influence of Hypoxia and pH on Bioluminescence Imaging of Luciferase-Transfected Tumor Cells and Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ashraf A.; Jameson, Mark J.; Broaddus, William C.; Lin, Peck Sun; Dever, Seth M.; Golding, Sarah E.; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Valerie, Kristoffer; Chung, Theodore D.

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a relatively new noninvasive technology used for quantitative assessment of tumor growth and therapeutic effect in living animal models. BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells following administration of the substrate luciferin in the presence of oxygen and ATP. In the present study, the effects of hypoxia, hypoperfusion, and pH on BLI signal (BLS) intensity were evaluated in vitro using cultured cells and in vivo using a xenograft model in nude mice. The intensity of the BLS was significantly reduced in the presence of acute and chronic hypoxia. Changes in cell density, viability, and pH also affected BLS. Although BLI is a convenient non-invasive tool for tumor assessment, these factors should be considered when interpreting BLS intensity, especially in solid tumors that could be hypoxic due to rapid growth, inadequate blood supply, and/or treatment. PMID:23936647

  18. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    SciTech Connect

    Jans, H-S; Stypinski, D; Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S; Wiebe, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  20. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia Using HYPOX-4-Dependent Fluorescence in a Mouse Model of Laser-Induced Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO)

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Imam; Jayagopal, Ashwath; McCollum, Gary W.; Yang, Rong; Penn, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the utility of a novel in vivo molecular imaging probe, HYPOX-4, to detect and image retinal hypoxia in real time, in a mouse model of retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods Retinal vein occlusion was achieved in adult mice by photodynamic retinal vein thrombosis (PRVT). One or two major retinal vein(s) was/were occluded in close proximity to the optic nerve head (ONH). In vivo imaging of retinal hypoxia was performed using, HYPOX-4, an imaging probe developed by our laboratory. Pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining was performed and used as a standard ex vivo method for the detection of retinal hypoxia in this mouse RVO model. The retinal vasculature was imaged using fluorescein angiography (FA) and isolectin B4 staining. Retinal thickness was assessed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) analysis. Results By application of the standard ex vivo pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining technique, retinal hypoxia was observed within 2 hours post-PRVT. The observed hypoxic retinal areas depended on whether one or two retinal vein(s) was/were occluded. Similar areas of hypoxia were imaged in vivo using HYPOX-4. Using OCT, retinal edema was observed immediately post-PRVT induction, resolving 8 days later. Nominal preretinal neovascularization was observed at 10 to 14 days post-RVO. Conclusions HYPOX-4 is an efficient probe capable of imaging retinal hypoxia in vivo, in RVO mice. Future studies will focus on its use in correlating retinal hypoxia to the onset and progression of ischemic vasculopathies. PMID:28750413

  1. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  2. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  3. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  4. Silicon Nanoparticles as Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Johnson, Alexander C.; Barton, Robert A.; Lee, Menyoung; Ogier, Alexander C.; Vo, Chinh; Anahtar, Melis N.; Ren, Yin; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Cory, David G.; Hill, Alison L.; Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei provides high image contrast with little or no background signal. To date, in-vivo applications of pre-hyperpolarized materials have been limited by relatively short nuclear spin relaxation times. Here, we investigate silicon nanoparticles as a new type of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent. Nuclear spin relaxation times for a variety of Si nanoparticles are found to be remarkably long, ranging from many minutes to hours at room temperature, allowing hyperpolarized nanoparticles to be transported, administered, and imaged on practical time scales. Additionally, we demonstrate that Si nanoparticles can be surface functionalized using techniques common to other biologically targeted nanoparticle systems. These results suggest that Si nanoparticles can be used as a targetable, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent with a large range of potential applications. PMID:19950973

  5. Recent Advances in Higher-Order, Multimodal, Biomedical Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chitgupi, Upendra; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-09-16

    Advances in biomedical imaging have spurred the development of integrated multimodal scanners, usually capable of two simultaneous imaging modes. The long-term vision of higher-order multimodality is to improve diagnostics or guidance through the analysis of complementary, data-rich, co-registered images. Synergies achieved through combined modalities could enable researchers to better track diverse physiological and structural events, analyze biodistribution and treatment efficacy, and compare established and emerging modalities. Higher-order multimodal approaches stand to benefit from molecular imaging probes and, in recent years, contrast agents that have hypermodal characteristics have increasingly been reported in preclinical studies. Given the chemical requirements for contrast agents representing various modalities to be integrated into a single entity, the higher-order multimodal agents reported so far tend to be of nanoparticulate form. To date, the majority of reported nanoparticles have included components that are active for magnetic resonance. Herein, recent progress in higher-order multimodal imaging agents is reviewed, spanning a range of material and structural classes, and demonstrating utility in three (or more) imaging modalities.

  6. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  7. Blood pool contrast agents for venous magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Irai S.; Li, Weier; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the venous system plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of clinically significant disorders. There have been great advances in venous imaging techniques, culminating in the use of magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Although MRV has distinct advantages in anatomic and quantitative cross sectional imaging without ionizing radiation, there are well-known challenges in acquisition timing and contrast administration in patients with renal impairment. The latest advancement involves the addition of new contrast media agents, which have emerged as valuable alternatives in these difficult scenarios. In this review, we will focus on a group of specific contrast agents called blood pool agents and discuss their salient features and clinical applications. PMID:28123972

  8. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) have attracted enormous attention due to their wide applications, including for magnetic separation, for magnetic hyperthermia, and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This review article introduces the methods of synthesizing MIONs, and their application as MRI contrast agents. Currently, many methods have been reported for the synthesis of MIONs. Herein, we only focus on the liquid-based synthesis methods including aqueous phase methods and organic phase methods. In addition, the MIONs larger than 10 nm can be used as negative contrast agents and the recently emerged extremely small MIONs (ES-MIONs) smaller than 5 nm are potential positive contrast agents. In this review, we focus on the ES-MIONs because ES-MIONs avoid the disadvantages of MION-based T2- and gadolinium chelate-based T1-weighted contrast agents.

  9. Quantitative [18F]-FMISO- PET imaging shows reduction of hypoxia following trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorace, Anna G.; Syed, Anum K.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Quarles, C. Chad; Sanchez, Violeta; Kang, Hakmook; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of [18F]-FMISO-PET imaging as a metric for evaluating early response to trastuzumab therapy with histological validation in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Procedures Mice with BT474, HER2+ tumors, were imaged with [18F]-FMISO-PET during trastuzumab therapy. Pimonidazole staining was used to confirm hypoxia from imaging. Results [18F]-FMISO-PET indicated significant decreases in hypoxia beginning on day 3 (P < 0.01) prior to changes in tumor size. These results were confirmed with pimonidazole staining on day 7 (P < 0.01); additionally, there was a significant positive linear correlation between histology and PET imaging (r2=0.85). Conclusions [18F]-FMISO-PET is a clinically relevant modality which provides the opportunity to 1) predict response to HER2+ therapy before changes in tumor size, and 2) identify decreases hypoxia which has the potential to guide subsequent therapy. PMID:27506906

  10. Radioiodinated agents for imaging multidrug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Augustine, Ann M; Nearman, Jessica; McGarry, Jonathon; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic agents enabling characterization of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors can aid in the selection of chemotherapy regimens. We report here synthesis and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals based on the second-generation MDR-reversing drug MS-209. 5-[3-{4-(2-Phenyl-2-(4'-[(125)I]iodo-phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl}-2-hydroxypropoxy]quino-line (17) was prepared from the 4'-tributylstannyl precursor (16) in >95% radiochemical yield. (16) was synthesized in a six-step process with the overall yield of 25%. In vitro studies were conducted in MES-SA (drug-sensitive) and MES-SA/Dx5 (MDR) human uterine sarcoma cell lines. In vivo studies were performed in athymic mice bearing MES-SA and MES-SA/Dx5 xenografts. The uptake of (17) is higher in MES-SA than MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The uptake and efflux of (17) depend on temperature and concentration, and indicate active transport mechanism(s). Incubation of drug sensitive MES-SA cells with verapamil or (15), a nonradioactive analog of (17), alters the cellular retention of radioactivity only marginally. However, MES-SA/Dx5 cells retain approximately 12% more of (17) when incubated with 10 muM verapamil. The addition of (15) or high concentrations of (17) also increase the uptake of (17) in MES-SA/Dx5 up to 200%, depending on the concentration and temperature. The dependence of (17) uptake on the MDR status is also evident in the ex vivo binding studies. In vivo tests in mice xenografted simultaneously with both tumor cell lines indicate distinct pharmacokinetics for each tumor. The absorption half-life in MES-SA/Dx5 xenograft is approximately 10x shorter and the mean residence time approximately 50% shorter compared to MES-SA xenograft in the same mouse. Radioiodinated derivatives of MS-209 appear to be good indicators of multidrug resistance.

  11. The role of necrosis, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia in 18F-FMISO PET image contrast: a computational modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike

    2016-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a promising technique for imaging tumour hypoxia, and a potential target for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the relationship between FMISO uptake and oxygen partial pressure ({{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} ) is yet to be quantified fully. Tissue oxygenation varies over distances much smaller than clinical PET resolution (<100 μm versus  ˜4 mm), and cyclic variations in tumour perfusion have been observed on timescales shorter than typical FMISO PET studies (˜20 min versus a few hours). Furthermore, tracer uptake may be decreased in voxels containing some degree of necrosis. This work develops a computational model of FMISO uptake in millimetre-scale tumour regions. Coupled partial differential equations govern the evolution of oxygen and FMISO distributions, and a dynamic vascular source map represents temporal variations in perfusion. Local FMISO binding capacity is modulated by the necrotic fraction. Outputs include spatiotemporal maps of {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} and tracer accumulation, enabling calculation of tissue-to-blood ratios (TBRs) and time-activity curves (TACs) as a function of mean tissue oxygenation. The model is characterised using experimental data, finding half-maximal FMISO binding at local {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} of 1.4 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3-2.6 mmHg) and half-maximal necrosis at 1.2 mmHg (0.1-4.9 mmHg). Simulations predict a non-linear non-monotonic relationship between FMISO activity (4 hr post-injection) and mean tissue {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} : tracer uptake rises sharply from negligible levels in avascular tissue, peaking at  ˜5 mmHg and declining towards blood activity in well-oxygenated conditions. Greater temporal variation in perfusion increases peak TBRs (range 2.20-5.27) as a result of smaller predicted necrotic fraction, rather than fundamental differences in FMISO accumulation under acute hypoxia. Identical late FMISO uptake can occur in regions with differing

  12. The role of necrosis, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia in (18)F-FMISO PET image contrast: a computational modelling study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Daniel R; Partridge, Mike

    2016-12-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a promising technique for imaging tumour hypoxia, and a potential target for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the relationship between FMISO uptake and oxygen partial pressure ([Formula: see text]) is yet to be quantified fully. Tissue oxygenation varies over distances much smaller than clinical PET resolution (<100 μm versus  ∼4 mm), and cyclic variations in tumour perfusion have been observed on timescales shorter than typical FMISO PET studies (∼20 min versus a few hours). Furthermore, tracer uptake may be decreased in voxels containing some degree of necrosis. This work develops a computational model of FMISO uptake in millimetre-scale tumour regions. Coupled partial differential equations govern the evolution of oxygen and FMISO distributions, and a dynamic vascular source map represents temporal variations in perfusion. Local FMISO binding capacity is modulated by the necrotic fraction. Outputs include spatiotemporal maps of [Formula: see text] and tracer accumulation, enabling calculation of tissue-to-blood ratios (TBRs) and time-activity curves (TACs) as a function of mean tissue oxygenation. The model is characterised using experimental data, finding half-maximal FMISO binding at local [Formula: see text] of 1.4 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3-2.6 mmHg) and half-maximal necrosis at 1.2 mmHg (0.1-4.9 mmHg). Simulations predict a non-linear non-monotonic relationship between FMISO activity (4 hr post-injection) and mean tissue [Formula: see text] : tracer uptake rises sharply from negligible levels in avascular tissue, peaking at  ∼5 mmHg and declining towards blood activity in well-oxygenated conditions. Greater temporal variation in perfusion increases peak TBRs (range 2.20-5.27) as a result of smaller predicted necrotic fraction, rather than fundamental differences in FMISO accumulation under acute hypoxia. Identical late FMISO uptake can occur in regions with

  13. Robustness of quantitative hypoxia PET image analysis for predicting local tumor control.

    PubMed

    Mönnich, David; Welz, Stefan; Thorwarth, Daniela; Pfannenberg, Christina; Reischl, Gerald; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Nikolaou, Konstantin; la Fougère, Christian; Zips, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    in multicenter trials requires careful standardization and harmonization of all steps from patient preparation to image analysis. Our results indicate that TBRmax should deviate less than 10% from reference conditions (absolute value in this dataset ± 0.2). This conclusion likely applies to all low contrast nitroimidazole hypoxia PET tracers.

  14. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  15. Chemical agent detection and quantification with imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Augustin I.

    1999-10-01

    Passive standoff detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents is currently achieved by remote sensing infrared spectrometry in the 8 - 12 micrometer atmospheric window with the aid of automatic spectral analysis algorithms. Introducing an imaging capability would allow for rapid wide-area reconnaissance and mapping of vapor clouds, as well as reduce false alarms by exploiting the added spatial information. This paper contains an overview of the CW agent standoff detection problem and the challenges associated with developing imaging LWIR hyperspectral sensors for the detection and quantification of vapor clouds, as well as a discussion of spectral processing techniques which can be used to exploit the added data dimensionality.

  16. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun, Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L

    2009-10-01

    To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO). Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe (124)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((124)I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe (18)F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with (124)I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and (18)F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Correlation coefficients between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of this model for the

  17. Dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids as imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Du; Wen, Shihui; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This review reports the recent advances in dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids as contrast agents for biomedical imaging applications. The versatile dendrimer scaffolds with 3-dimensional spherical shape, highly branched internal cavity, tunable surface conjugation chemistry, and excellent biocompatibility and nonimmunogenicity afford their uses as templates to create multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids for mono- or multi- mode molecular imaging applications. In particular, multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles with different surface modifications have been used for fluorescence imaging, targeted tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging, enhanced blood pool CT imaging, dual mode CT/MR imaging, and tumor theranostics (combined CT imaging and chemotherapy) will be introduced and discussed in detail. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Peptide-based imaging agents for cancer detection☆

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Li, Yesen; Liu, Ting; Li, Zijing; Zhang, Xianzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Selective receptor-targeting peptide based agents have attracted considerable attention in molecular imaging of tumor cells that overexpress corresponding peptide receptors due to their unique properties such as rapid clearance from circulation as well as high affinities and specificities for their targets. The rapid growth of chemistry modification techniques has enabled the design and development of various peptide-based imaging agents with enhanced metabolic stability, favorable pharmacokinetics, improved binding affinity and selectivity, better imaging ability as well as biosafety. Among them, many radiolabeled peptides have already been translated into the clinic with impressive diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. This review summarizes the current status in the development of peptide-based imaging agents with an emphasis on the consideration of probe design including the identification of suitable peptides, the chemical modification of probes and the criteria for clinical translation. Specific examples in clinical trials have been provided as well with respect to their diagnostic capability compared with other FDA approved imaging agents. PMID:27327937

  19. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a New Nitroimidazole-99mTc-Complex for Imaging of Hypoxia in Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Guan, Yanxing; Liu, Shaozheng; Chen, Qingjie; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was specifically designed to develop a new 99mTc compound with 3-amino-4-[2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol)-ethylamino]-4-oxo-butyrate (5-ntm-asp) and to verify whether this compound is feasible to be a radiopharmaceutical for hypoxic tumors. Material/Methods Metronidazole derivative 5-ntm-asp was synthesized and then radio-labeled by Na [99mTcO4], forming 99mTc-5-ntm-asp. Another two complexes of 99mTc-2- and 99mTc-5-nitroimidazole-iminodiacetic acid (99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA) were also synthesized based on previous studies. Physicochemical properties (stability, lipophilicity, protein binding) of the compounds were compared, and we also assessed the accumulation status of the compounds within A549 cells under both hypoxic and aerobic conditions. Distribution of the complex was also studied in vivo using BALB/c nude mice that were injected with A549 cells. Results Compared with 99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp was more stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and human plasma (P<0.05). Besides that, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp offered lower lipophilicity and protein-binding rate than the two complexes (P<0.05). During assessment of hypoxic uptake status and high hypoxic/aerobic ratio in mice injected with A549 cells, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp exhibited a more favorable profile than 9mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, including uptake ratio of tumor/blood and uptake ratio of tumor/muscle. Conclusions With overall consideration of physicochemical properties and biological uptake behavior, it is feasible to use 99mTc-5-ntm-asp as an imaging agent for tumor hypoxia. PMID:27752036

  20. Imaging considerations for a technetium-99m myocardial perfusion agent

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Lister-James, J.; Campbell, S.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with /sup 201/Tl chloride suffers from a number of physical, geometric, and dosimetric constraints that could be diminished if an agent labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were available. The cationic complex /sup 99m/Tc hexakis-(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) ((/sup 99m/Tc)TBI) has been shown to concentrate in the myocardial tissue of both animals and humans, with preliminary clinical studies demonstrating a number of technical attributes not possible with /sup 201/Tl. Technetium-99m-TBI is a promising myocardial imaging agent that may permit high quality planar, gated, and tomographic imaging of both myocardial ischemia and infarction with reduced imaging times and improved resolution.

  1. Hypoxia Imaging Endoscopy Equipped with Laser Light Source from Preclinical Live Animal Study to First-In-Human Subject Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Yano, Tomonori; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Nomura, Shogo; Sato, Akihiro; Kojima, Motohiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    A goal in next-generation endoscopy is to develop functional imaging techniques to open up new opportunities for cancer diagnosis. Although spatial and temporal information on hypoxia is crucial for understanding cancer physiology and expected to be useful for cancer diagnosis, existing techniques using fluorescent indicators have limitations due to low spatial resolution and invasive administration. To overcome these problems, we developed an imaging technology based on hemoglobin oxygen saturation in both the tumor and surrounding mucosa using a laser endoscope system, and conducted the first human subject research for patients with aero-digestive tract cancer. The oxygen saturation map overlapped the images of cancerous lesions and indicated highly heterogeneous features of oxygen supply in the tumor. The hypoxic region of the tumor surface was found in both early cancer and cancer precursors. This technology illustrates a novel aspect of cancer biology as a potential biomarker and can be widely utilized in cancer diagnosis. PMID:24915532

  2. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  3. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  4. Contrast agents in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuling; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a noninvasive method to assess angiogenesis, which is widely used in clinical applications including diagnosis, monitoring therapy response and prognosis estimation in cancer patients. Contrast agents play a crucial role in DCE-MRI and should be carefully selected in order to improve accuracy in DCE-MRI examination. Over the past decades, there was much progress in the development of optimal contrast agents in DCE-MRI. In this review, we describe the recent research advances in this field and discuss properties of contrast agents, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we discuss the research perspectives for improving this promising imaging method. PMID:28415647

  5. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spatiotemporal tracking of oligonucleotides in vitro and even a few cases in vivo. Major concerns remain to be addressed including cytotoxicity, particularly of quantum dots; effective dosage of nanoparticles for optimal theranostic effect; development of real-time in vivo imaging; and further improvement of gene therapy efficacy. PMID:23606894

  6. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds.

  7. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  8. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. PMID:25580914

  10. Recent advances in the development of amyloid imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Furumoto, Shozo; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2007-01-01

    Excessive amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the brain is one of the most crucial events in the early pathological stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, Abeta deposits have enough potential to become a useful biomarker for not only an early diagnosis of AD, but also for the assessment of the clinical efficacy of anti-Abeta therapies, if they can be measured non-invasively and reliably in living patients. As a potent candidate technique to measure this biomarker, PET amyloid imaging using a radioligand for Abeta deposits has received much attention. A large number of Abeta ligands have been synthesized and evaluated as candidates for amyloid imaging agents. These can be classified into six categories of derivatives: Congo-red, Thioflavine T, stilbene, vinylbenzoxazole, DDNP, and miscellaneous. Many of these derivatives exhibit high binding affinities to Abeta fibrils (below 20 nM) and some of them also show excellent brain pharmacokinetic profiles. The concept of amyloid imaging is currently being tested in human PET studies using optimized amyloid imaging agents. Despite the small number of subjects, these studies have demonstrated sufficiently promising results. This review article provides an overview of recent advances in the development of amyloid imaging agents, and includes: a summary of the fundamental basis and clinical significance of amyloid imaging; lists of binding affinity data for 135 compounds classified into 12 molecular frameworks; a comprehensive discussion of the in vitro and in vivo features of representative Abeta ligands; and a discussion of the current state of clinical evaluation of these amyloid imaging agents (PIB, SB-13, BF-227, and FDDNP).

  11. Synthesis of ent-BE-43547A1 reveals a potent hypoxia-selective anticancer agent and uncovers the biosynthetic origin of the APD-CLD natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Nikolaj L.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Keiding, Ulrik B.; Weibel, Esben T.; Christiansen, Bjørn; Vosegaard, Thomas; Bjerring, Morten; Jensen, Frank; Johannsen, Mogens; Tørring, Thomas; Poulsen, Thomas B.

    2017-03-01

    Tumour hypoxia is speculated to be a key driver of therapeutic resistance and metastatic dissemination. Consequently, the discovery of new potent agents that selectively target the hypoxic cell population may reveal new and untapped antitumour mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the BE-43547 subclass of the APD-CLD (amidopentadienoate-containing cyclolipodepsipeptides) natural products possesses highly hypoxia-selective growth-inhibitory activity against pancreatic cancer cells. To enable this discovery, we have developed the first synthesis of the BE-43547-macrocyclic scaffold in 16 steps (longest linear sequence), which also allowed access to the full panel of relative stereoisomers and ultimately to the assignment of stereochemical configuration. Discrepancies between the spectroscopic signatures of the synthetic compounds with that originally reported for the BE-43547 members stimulated us to re-isolate the natural product from a BE-43547-producing microorganism during which we elucidated the biosynthetic gene clusters for the BE-43547 family as well as for all other known APD-CLDs. Our studies underline the exciting possibilities for the further development of the anticancer activities of these natural products.

  12. Synthesis of ent-BE-43547A1 reveals a potent hypoxia-selective anticancer agent and uncovers the biosynthetic origin of the APD-CLD natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Nikolaj L.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Keiding, Ulrik B.; Weibel, Esben T.; Christiansen, Bjørn; Vosegaard, Thomas; Bjerring, Morten; Jensen, Frank; Johannsen, Mogens; Tørring, Thomas; Poulsen, Thomas B.

    2016-11-01

    Tumour hypoxia is speculated to be a key driver of therapeutic resistance and metastatic dissemination. Consequently, the discovery of new potent agents that selectively target the hypoxic cell population may reveal new and untapped antitumour mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the BE-43547 subclass of the APD-CLD (amidopentadienoate-containing cyclolipodepsipeptides) natural products possesses highly hypoxia-selective growth-inhibitory activity against pancreatic cancer cells. To enable this discovery, we have developed the first synthesis of the BE-43547-macrocyclic scaffold in 16 steps (longest linear sequence), which also allowed access to the full panel of relative stereoisomers and ultimately to the assignment of stereochemical configuration. Discrepancies between the spectroscopic signatures of the synthetic compounds with that originally reported for the BE-43547 members stimulated us to re-isolate the natural product from a BE-43547-producing microorganism during which we elucidated the biosynthetic gene clusters for the BE-43547 family as well as for all other known APD-CLDs. Our studies underline the exciting possibilities for the further development of the anticancer activities of these natural products.

  13. Molecular-targeted antitumor agents: the Saururus cernuus dineolignans manassantin B and 4-O-demethylmanassantin B are potent inhibitors of hypoxia-activated HIF-1.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Tyler W; Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G

    2004-05-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key regulator of tumor cell adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. Selective HIF-1 inhibitors represent an important new class of potential molecular-targeted antitumor therapeutic agents. Extracts of plants and marine organisms were evaluated using a T47D human breast tumor cell-based reporter assay for HIF-1 inhibitors. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipid extract of Saururus cernuus resulted in the isolation of manassantin B (1) and a new compound, 4-O-demethylmanassantin B (2). The structure of 2 was determined spectroscopically. The absolute configurations of manassantin-type dineolignans have not been previously reported. Therefore, the absolute configurations of the chiral centers in each side chain were deduced from spectroscopic analysis of the Mosher MTPA ester derivatives of 1. Both 1 and 2 are among the most potent small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors discovered, to date, with IC(50) values of 3 and 30 nM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 selectively inhibited hypoxia-activated HIF-1 in contrast to iron chelator-activated HIF-1. Compounds 1 and 2 also inhibited hypoxic induction of the angiogenic factor VEGF. Further study revealed that 1 selectively blocked the induction of HIF-1alpha protein, the oxygen regulated HIF-1 subunit that determines HIF-1 activity.

  14. Blocking heme oxygenase-1 by zinc protoporphyrin reduces tumor hypoxia-mediated VEGF release and inhibits tumor angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Yang, Hao-Jhih; Chang, Chun-Chao; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Jungshan; Ho, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-28

    Hypoxia in tumor niche is one of important factors to start regeneration of blood vessels, leading to increase survival, proliferation, and invasion in cancer cells. Under hypoxia microenvironment, furthermore, steadily increased hypoxia-inducible factor -1α (HIF-1α) is observed, and can increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promote angiogenesis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, is potential to inhibit tumor proliferation and progression. However, the mechanism of ZnPP in inhibition of tumor is not completely clear. We hypothesize that ZnPP may modulate HIF-1α through inhibiting HO-1, and then inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. This study aimed to dissect the mechanism of ZnPP in tumor suppression. We observed the amount of VEGF was increased in the sera of the colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (n = 34, p < 0.05). Furthermore, increased VEGF expression was also measured in colorectal cancer cells, HCT-15, culturing under mimicking hypoxic condition. It suggested that hypoxia induced VEGF production from cancer cells. VEGF production was significantly reduced from HCT-15 cells after exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor KC7F2, suggesting that HIF-1α regulated VEGF production. Moreover, we observed that the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP inhibited the expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF coupled with cell proliferations of HCT-15 cells, suggesting that ZnPP blocked HIF-1α expression, and then inhibited the consequent VEGF production. In the xenograft model, we also observed that the animals exposed to ZnPP displayed much smaller tumor nodules and less degree of angiogenesis with decreased expression of the angiogenesis marker, αvβ3 integrin, compared to that in normal control. This study demonstrated that VEGF level in serum was elevated in the patients with CRC. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, possessed the properties of anti-tumor agent by decreasing HIF-1α levels, blocking VEGF production, impairing tumor

  15. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  16. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  17. Functional Imaging of the Lungs with Gas Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Stanley J.; Nagle, Scott K.; Couch, Marcus J.; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas – and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multi-detector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multi-spectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultra-short echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. Relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis (CF) in both adults and children. PMID:26218920

  18. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children.

  19. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  20. Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) can be used to detect differences in the oxygen content...in the addition of gaseous oxygen to the physical sample are promising next steps. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Primary blast injury, PBI, hypoxia, ischemia... oxygen , eye, retina, photoreceptor, neuron, TRPM7, neurodegeneration, neurotoxicity, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, CARS, mouse 16

  1. Foraminiferal Metabolism Under Hypoxia: Sub-Cellular NanoSIMS Imaging of Intertidal Ammonia tepida Feeding Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeKieffre, C.; Spangenberg, J.; Geslin, E.; Meibom, A.

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxic events particularly affect benthic ecosystems on continental shelves and in coastal areas where renewal of bottom waters slow. Foraminifera living in such environments are among the most tolerant to hypoxia in the meiofauna. Some foraminifera species are able to survive hypoxia, and even anoxia, for weeks to months. Different species must have developed different mechanisms for survival - hypotheses include reduction of the metabolism, symbiosis with bacteria, or denitrification. NanoSIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) imaging is a powerful analytical technique to visualize and quantify the incorporation and transfer of isotopically labeled compounds in organisms with subcellular resolution. We used NanoSIMS imaging, correlated with TEM ultrastructural observations of individual foraminifera, to study the metabolism of intertidal Ammonia tepida, which has shown strongly reduced metabolism under anoxia. Individuals were fed with a 13C-labeled microalgal biofilm and incubated for 4 weeks in oxic and anoxic conditions, respectively. NanoSIMS imaging reveal strongly contrasting cellular-level dynamics of integration and transfer of the ingested biofilm components under the two conditions. In oxic conditions, ingested biofilm components are internalized, metabolized, and used for biosynthesis of different cellular components on a time scale of 24 hours: Lipid droplets are formed, then consumed through respiration. In contrast, upon the onset of anoxia, individual internalized biofilm components remain visible within the cytoplasm after 4 weeks. Lipids of different compositions are initially formed but then not respired. These observations indicate that foraminifera do initially have an active heterotrophic metabolism in the absence of oxygen, but this it is strongly reduced when oxygen is no longer available. Isotopic labeling experiments, NanoSIMS and TEM imaging, and GC-MS will be key to study metabolic mechanisms under anoxic conditions in marine

  2. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  3. Quantitative phase-filtered wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar tumor hypoxia imaging toward early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Soo Sean Choi, Sung; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-10-19

    Overcoming the limitations of conventional linear spectroscopy used in multispectral photoacoustic imaging, wherein a linear relationship is assumed between the absorbed optical energy and the absorption spectra of the chromophore at a specific location, is crucial for obtaining accurate spatially-resolved quantitative functional information by exploiting known chromophore-specific spectral characteristics. This study introduces a non-invasive phase-filtered differential photoacoustic technique, wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar (WM-DPAR) imaging that addresses this issue by eliminating the effect of the unknown wavelength-dependent fluence. It employs two laser wavelengths modulated out-of-phase to significantly suppress background absorption while amplifying the difference between the two photoacoustic signals. This facilitates pre-malignant tumor identification and hypoxia monitoring, as minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation are detectable. The system can be tuned for specific applications such as cancer screening and SO2 quantification by regulating the amplitude ratio and phase shift of the signal. The WM-DPAR imaging of a head and neck carcinoma tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat demonstrates the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo. The PA appearance of the tumor in relation to tumor vascularity is investigated by immunohistochemistry. Phase-filtered WM-DPAR imaging is also illustrated, maximizing quantitative SO2 imaging fidelity of tissues. Oxygenation levels within a tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat using the two-wavelength phase-filtered differential PAR method.

  4. Contrast agents for preclinical targeted X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Zuber, Guy; Vandamme, Thierry

    2014-09-30

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an X-ray based instrument that it is specifically designed for biomedical research at a preclinical stage for live imaging of small animals. This imaging modality is cost-effective, fast, and produces remarkable high-resolution images of X-ray opaque skeleton. Administration of biocompatible X-ray opaque contrast agent allows delineation of the blood vessels, and internal organs and even detection of tumor metastases as small as 300 μm. However, the main limitation of micro-CT lies in the poor efficacy or toxicity of the contrast agents. Moreover, contrast agents for micro-CT have to be stealth nanoparticulate systems, i.e. preventing their rapid renal clearance. The chemical composition and physicochemical properties will condition their uptake and elimination pathways, and therefore all the biological fluids, organs, and tissues trough this elimination route of the nanoparticles will be contrasted. Furthermore, several technologies playing on the nanoparticle properties, aim to influence these biological pathways in order to induce their accumulation onto given targeted sites, organs of tumors. In function of the methodologies carried out, taking benefit or not of the action of immune system, of the natural response of the organism like hepatocyte uptake or enhanced permeation and retention effect, or even accumulation due to ligand/receptor interactions, the technologies are called passive or active targeted imaging. The present review presents the most recent advances in the development of specific contrast agents for targeted X-ray imaging micro-CT, discussing the recent advance of in vivo targeting of nanoparticulate contrast agents, and the influence of the formulations, nature of the nanocarrier, nature and concentration of the X-ray contrasting materials, effect of the surface properties, functionalization and bioconjugation. The pharmacokinetic and versatility of nanometric systems appear particularly advantageous

  5. Silver Nanoplate Contrast Agents for In Vivo Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Souza, Michael; Truby, Ryan; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Green, Christopher; Vreeland, Erika; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoplates are introduced as a new photoacoustic contrast agent that can be easily functionalized for molecular photoacoustic imaging in vivo. Methods are described for synthesis, functionalization, and stabilization of silver nanoplates using biocompatible (“green”) reagents. Directional antibody conjugation to the nanoplate surface is presented along with proof of molecular sensitivity in vitro with pancreatic cancer cells. Cell viability tests show the antibody-conjugated silver nanoplates to be nontoxic at concentrations up to 1 mg/ml. Furthermore, the silver nanoplates' potential for in vivo application as a molecularly sensitive photoacoustic contrast agent is demonstrated using an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Results of these studies suggest that the synthesized silver nanoplates are well suited for a host of biomedical imaging and sensing applications. PMID:22188516

  6. Proflavine derivatives as fluorescent imaging agents of amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Garin, Dominique; Oukhatar, Fatima; Mahon, Andrew B; Try, Andrew C; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Laferla, Frank M; Demeunynck, Martine; Sallanon, Marcelle Moulin; Chierici, Sabine

    2011-04-15

    A series of proflavine derivatives for use to further image Aβ amyloid deposits were synthesized and characterized. Aged 3xTg-AD (23 months old) mice hippocampus sections incubated with these derivatives revealed preferential labeling of amyloid plaques. Furthermore an in vitro binding study showed an inhibitory effect, although moderate, of these compounds on Aβ(40) fibril formation. This study highlights the potential of proflavine as a molecular scaffold for designing new Aβ imaging agents, its native fluorescence allowing in vitro neuropathological staining in AD damaged brain sections.

  7. Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles: Evolution of a Multimodality and Multifunctional Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles offer a biologically inert, highly stable, and nontoxic platform that can be specifically designed to accomplish a range of molecular imaging and drug delivery functions in vivo. The particle surface can be decorated with targeting ligands to direct the agent to a variety of biomarkers that are associated with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and thrombosis. The surface can also carry a high payload of imaging agents, ranging from paramagnetic metals for MRI, radionuclides for nuclear imaging, iodine for CT, and florescent tags for histology, allowing high sensitivity mapping of cellular receptors that may be expressed at very low levels in the body. In addition to these diagnostic imaging applications, the particles can be engineered to carry highly potent drugs and specifically deposit them into cell populations that display biosignatures of a variety of diseases. The highly flexible and robust nature of this combined molecular imaging and drug delivery vehicle has been exploited in a variety of animal models to demonstrate its potential impact on the care and treatment of patients suffering from some of the most debilitating diseases. PMID:25024867

  8. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles: evolution of a multimodality and multifunctional imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles offer a biologically inert, highly stable, and nontoxic platform that can be specifically designed to accomplish a range of molecular imaging and drug delivery functions in vivo. The particle surface can be decorated with targeting ligands to direct the agent to a variety of biomarkers that are associated with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and thrombosis. The surface can also carry a high payload of imaging agents, ranging from paramagnetic metals for MRI, radionuclides for nuclear imaging, iodine for CT, and florescent tags for histology, allowing high sensitivity mapping of cellular receptors that may be expressed at very low levels in the body. In addition to these diagnostic imaging applications, the particles can be engineered to carry highly potent drugs and specifically deposit them into cell populations that display biosignatures of a variety of diseases. The highly flexible and robust nature of this combined molecular imaging and drug delivery vehicle has been exploited in a variety of animal models to demonstrate its potential impact on the care and treatment of patients suffering from some of the most debilitating diseases.

  9. Development of a Multifaceted Ovarian Cancer Imaging Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    method for a recombinant disintegrin vicrostatin (VN), whose structure is based on the snake venom disintegrin contortrostatin (CN), and the use of the...an innovative imaging and diagnostic agent for ovarian cancer (OC). Vicrostatin (VN) is a recombinant protein based on the venom disintegrin...form of the venom derived disintegrin contortrostatin, was compared to a cyclic peptide, cyclo(-RGDfV-), similar to Cilengitide, which is currently in

  10. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  11. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance mechanism...Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. 15

  12. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    goal is to develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance...mechanism. Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...the labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in

  13. Cervical Cancer Regression Measured Using Weekly Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Fractionated Radiotherapy: Radiobiologic Modeling and Correlation With Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Chan, Philip; Haider, Masoom; Cho, Young-Bin; Hill, Richard P.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To measure regression of cancer of the uterine cervix during external beam radiotherapy using magnetic resonance imaging, derive radiobiologic parameters from a mathematical model of tumor regression, and compare these parameters with the pretreatment measurements of tumor hypoxia. Methods and Materials: A total of 27 eligible patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer underwent weekly magnetic resonance imaging scans. The tumor volume was assessed on each of these scans and the rate of regression plotted. A radiobiologic model was formulated to simulate the effect on tumor regression of the surviving proportion of cells after 2 Gy (SP{sub 2}), the cell clearance constant (clearance of irreparably damaged cells from the tumor [T{sub c}]), and accelerated repopulation. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to fit the radiobiologic model to the magnetic resonance imaging-derived tumor volumes and to derive the estimates of SP{sub 2} and T{sub c} for each patient. These were compared to the pretreatment hypoxia measurements. Results: The initial tumor volume was 8-209 cm{sup 3}. The relative reduction in volume during treatment was 0.02-0.79. The simulations using representative values of the independent biologic variables derived from published data showed SP{sub 2} and T{sub c} to strongly influence the shape of the volume-response curves. Nonlinear regression analysis yielded a median SP{sub 2} of 0.71 and median T{sub c} of 10 days. Tumors with a high SP{sub 2} >0.71 were significantly more hypoxic at diagnosis (p = 0.02). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that cervical cancer regresses during external beam radiotherapy, although marked variability is present among patients and is influenced by underlying biologic processes, including cellular sensitivity to radiotherapy and proliferation. Better understanding of the biologic mechanisms might facilitate novel adaptive treatment strategies in future studies.

  14. Contrast agent stability: a continuous B-mode imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-10-01

    The stability of contrast agents in suspensions with various dissolved gas levels has not been reported in the literature. An in vitro investigation has been carried out that studied the combined effect of varying the acoustic pressure along with degassing the suspension environment. In this study, the contrast agents were introduced into suspensions with different oxygen concentration levels, and their relative performance was assessed in terms of decay rate of their backscatter echoes. The partial pressures of oxygen in those solutions ranged between 1.5 and 26 kPa. Two IV and one arterial contrast agents were used: Definity, Quantison, and Myomap. It was found that Quantison and Myomap released free bubbles at high acoustic pressure that also dissolved faster in degassed suspensions. The backscatter decay for Definity did not depend on the air content of the suspensions. The destruction of bubbles was dependent on acoustic pressure. Different backscatter performance was observed by different populations of bubbles of the last two agents. The physical quantity of "overall backscatter" (OB) was defined as the integral of the decay rate over time of the backscatter of the contrast suspensions, and improved significantly the understanding of the behaviour of the agents. A quantitative analysis of the backscatter properties of contrast agents using a continuous imaging approach was difficult to achieve. This is due to the fact that the backscatter in the field of view is representative of a bubble population affected by the ultrasound (US) field, but this bubble population is not representative of the contrast suspension in the whole tank. Single frame insonation is suggested to avoid the effects of decay due to the ultrasonic field, and to measure a tank-representative backscatter. The definition of OB was useful, however, in understanding the behaviour of the agents.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Erin B.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Mummy, David G.; Fain, Sean B.

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP 129Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of 129Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP 129Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP 13C and 15N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-13C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP 13C and 15N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into (1) a brief introduction, (2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, (3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, (4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed review of the literature describing the use of HP agents to study: (5) metabolic pathways in cancer and cardiac

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Erin B; Ludwig, Kai D; Mummy, David G; Fain, Sean B

    2017-07-07

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium ((3)He) and xenon ((129)Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP (129)Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of (129)Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP (129)Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP (13)C and (15)N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-(13)C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP (13)C and (15)N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into (1) a brief introduction, (2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, (3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, (4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed review of the literature describing the use of HP agents to study: (5) metabolic pathways

  17. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of hypoxia in tissue-engineered grafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Barradas, Ana; Fernandes, Hugo; Janssen, Frank; Papenburg, Bernke; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Martens, Anton; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Survival and growth of cellular grafts in tissue engineering (TE) are limited by the rate of oxygen (O(2)) and nutrient diffusion. As such, monitoring the levels of nutrients and O(2) available to the cells is essential to assess the physiology of the cells and to evaluate strategies aiming at improving nutrient availability. In this article, a reporter system containing the luciferase gene driven by a hypoxia responsive promoter was used to monitor cellular hypoxia in a TE context. We report that luciferase activity correlates with the O(2) tension in the cell culture medium. When transgenic cells were seeded onto scaffolds and implanted in immune-deficient mice subcutaneously, luciferase activity was detected. To validate the response to O(2) levels of this reporter system, we cultured transgenic cells on biomaterials in a flow perfusion bioreactor and observed that cells in the bioreactor displayed a drastically lower luciferase activity than conventional static culture, and that higher luciferase activity is observed in the interior of a tissue-engineered construct, illustrating the uneven O(2) distribution in three-dimensional constructs under conventional static culture. We conclude that this reporter system is a versatile tool to investigate cellular O(2) availability in TE both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  19. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  20. A paramagnetic CEST agent for imaging glucose by MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanrong; Trokowski, Robert; Sherry, A Dean

    2003-12-17

    The europium(III) complex of a DOTA-tetraamide ligand (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N' ',N' ''-tetraacetic acids) containing two phenyl boronate pendent arms binds glucose reversibly with an association constant of 383 M-1 at pH 7. Glucose binding results in slowing of water exchange between a single Eu(III)-bound water molecule and bulk water, and this can be imaged by MRI using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging sequence. This metabolite-responsive paramagnetic CEST agent responds to changes in glucose over the physiologically important range (0-20 mM), and thus it offers the possibility of high-sensitivity MR imaging glucose in tissues using bulk water protons as antenna.

  1. In vivo imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor regulation in a subcutaneous and orthotopic GL261 glioma tumor model using a reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Sandra; Seuwen, Aline; Keist, Ruth; Vom Berg, Johannes; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia changes the metabolism of gliomas, leading to a more aggressive phenotype with increased resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. Hypoxia triggers a signaling cascade with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) as a key regulator. We monitored activation of the HIF pathway longitudinally in murine glioma tumors. GL261 cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter driven under the control of a promoter comprising the HIF target gene motive hypoxia response element, were implanted either subcutaneously or orthotopically. In vivo experiments were carried out using bioluminescence imaging. Tumors were subsequently analyzed using immunofluorescence staining for hypoxia, endothelial cells, tumor perfusion, and glucose transporter expression. Transient upregulation of the HIF signaling was observed in both subcutaneous and orthotopic gliomas. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed hypoxic regions in subcutaneous and, to a lesser extent, intracranial tumors. Subcutaneous tumors showed substantial necrosis, which might contribute to the decreased bioluminescence output observed toward the end of the experiment. Orthotopic tumors were less hypoxic than subcutaneous ones and did not develop extensive necrotic areas. Although this may be the result of the overall smaller size of orthotopic tumors, it might also reflect differences in the local environment, such as the better intrinsic vascularization of brain tissue compared to the subcutaneous tissue compartment.

  2. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  3. A novel hypoxia-selective epigenetic agent RRx-001 triggers apoptosis and overcomes drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Das, D Sharma; Ray, A; Das, A; Song, Y; Tian, Z; Oronsky, B; Richardson, P; Scicinski, J; Chauhan, D; Anderson, K C

    2016-11-01

    The hypoxic bone marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and nitric oxide-donating properties. Here, we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001-induced apoptosis is associated with: (i) activation of caspases; (ii) release of ROS and nitrogen species; (iii) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and (iv) decrease in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity, and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM.

  4. The accumulation mechanism of the hypoxia imaging probe “FMISO” by imaging mass spectrometry: possible involvement of low-molecular metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yukari; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shingo; Numata, Yoshito; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been widely used as a hypoxia imaging probe for diagnostic positron emission tomography (PET). FMISO is believed to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules after reduction of its nitro group. However, its detailed accumulation mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the chemical forms of FMISO and their distributions in tumours using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), which visualises spatial distribution of chemical compositions based on molecular masses in tissue sections. Our radiochemical analysis revealed that most of the radioactivity in tumours existed as low-molecular-weight compounds with unknown chemical formulas, unlike observations made with conventional views, suggesting that the radioactivity distribution primarily reflected that of these unknown substances. The IMS analysis indicated that FMISO and its reductive metabolites were nonspecifically distributed in the tumour in patterns not corresponding to the radioactivity distribution. Our IMS search found an unknown low-molecular-weight metabolite whose distribution pattern corresponded to that of both the radioactivity and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. This metabolite was identified as the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO. We showed that the glutathione conjugate of amino-FMISO is involved in FMISO accumulation in hypoxic tumour tissues, in addition to the conventional mechanism of FMISO covalent binding to macromolecules. PMID:26582591

  5. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  6. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  7. [Influence of cholinergic and adrenergic agents of the electric activity of the brain and the heart under hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Akopian, N S; Adamian, N Iu; Karapetian, M A

    2006-01-01

    Injection of adrenergic and cholinergic agents to animals in the normal athmospheric conditions did not tigger drastic changes on the electric activity of the brain and heart. Acutehipoxia demands high adaptability from the body. In such conditions stimulation of reticular formation and hypothalamus produces different changes in the EEG and ECG activity whith injecting adrenergic and cholinergic agents. It was determined that cholinergic influence are effective in the regulation of electrical brain activity while adrenergics are more important for the realization of descending influences of the truncus cerebri vegetative centers and are less active in the modulation of the cerebral cortex activity.

  8. Molecular imaging agents: impact on diagnosis and therapeutics in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Marc E.; Contino, Gianmarco; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging has become a crucial tool in oncology throughout the course of disease detection and management and is an integral part of clinical trials. Anatomic and functional imaging led the way, providing valuable information used in the diagnosis of disease, including data regarding the size and location of the tumor and on physiologic processes such as blood flow and perfusion. As understanding of cancer pathogenesis has advanced through the identification of genetic, biochemical, and cellular alterations in evolving tumors, emphasis has been made on developing methods to detect and serially monitor such alterations. This class of approaches is referred to as molecular imaging. Molecular imaging offers the potential for increasingly sensitive and specific visualization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. These approaches have become established as essential tools for cancer research, early cancer detection and staging and monitoring and predicting response to targeted therapies. Here, we will discuss recent advances in the development of molecular imaging agents and their implementation in basic cancer research as well as in more rationalized approaches to cancer care. PMID:20633310

  9. In Vivo Imaging of GLP-1R with a Targeted Bimodal PET/Fluorescence Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate visualization and quantification of β-cell mass is critical for the improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and insulinoma. Here, we describe the synthesis of a bimodal imaging probe (PET/fluorescence) for imaging GLP-1R expression in the pancreas and in pancreatic islet cell tumors. The conjugation of a bimodal imaging tag containing a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and the copper chelator sarcophagine to the GLP-1R targeting peptide exendin-4 provided the basis for the bimodal imaging probe. Conjugation was performed via a novel sequential one-pot synthetic procedure including 64Cu radiolabeling and copper-catalyzed click-conjugation. The bimodal imaging agent 64Cu-E4-Fl was synthesized in good radiochemical yield and specific activity (RCY = 36%, specific activity: 141 μCi/μg, >98% radiochemical purity). The agent showed good performance in vivo and ex vivo, visualizing small xenografts (<2 mm) with PET and pancreatic β-cell mass by phosphor autoradiography. Using the fluorescent properties of the probe, we were able to detect individual pancreatic islets, confirming specific binding to GLP-1R and surpassing the sensitivity of the radioactive label. The use of bimodal PET/fluorescent imaging probes is promising for preoperative imaging and fluorescence-assisted analysis of patient tissues. We believe that our procedure could become relevant as a protocol for the development of bimodal imaging agents. PMID:24856928

  10. Multi-agent system for line detection on images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpatov, Boris A.; Babayan, Pavel V.; Shubin, Nikita Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Lines are one of the most informative structure elements on any images. For this reason, objects detection and recognition problems are often reduced to edge detection task. One of the most popular approaches to detect lines is based on the Hough transform or Radon transform. However, using both of transforms allows estimating the infinite lines parameters only. It is necessary to use additional approaches to estimate the ends of the detected lines. Moreover, Radon transform does not allow detecting non-straight curve shapes at all. This work is oriented to solve line detection problem using Radon transform and multi-agent approach. The results of the experimental researches that confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach are given. The real full HD image sequences are used. The direction of further improvements is proposed.

  11. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  12. DNA as Sensors and Imaging Agents for Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interests in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields have created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attaching these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detections. These sensors are highly sensitive (with detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of “dipstick tests”, portable fluorometers, computer-readable discs, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state, and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications. PMID:24359450

  13. Can hypoxia-PET map hypoxic cell density heterogeneity accurately in an animal tumor model at a clinically obtainable image contrast?

    PubMed

    Busk, Morten; Horsman, Michael R; Jakobsen, Steen; Hansen, Kim V; Bussink, Johan; van der Kogel, Albert; Overgaard, Jens

    2009-09-01

    PET allows non-invasive mapping of tumor hypoxia, but the combination of low resolution, slow tracer adduct-formation and slow clearance of unbound tracer remains problematic. Using a murine tumor with a hypoxic fraction within the clinical range and a tracer post-injection sampling time that results in clinically obtainable tumor-to-reference tissue activity ratios, we have analyzed to what extent inherent limitations actually compromise the validity of PET-generated hypoxia maps. Mice bearing SCCVII tumors were injected with the PET hypoxia-marker fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA), and the immunologically detectable hypoxia marker, pimonidazole. Tumors and reference tissue (muscle, blood) were harvested 0.5, 2 and 4h after FAZA administration. Tumors were analyzed for global (well counter) and regional (autoradiography) tracer distribution and compared to pimonidazole as visualized using immunofluorescence microscopy. Hypoxic fraction as measured by pimonidazole staining ranged from 0.09 to 0.32. FAZA tumor to reference tissue ratios were close to unity 0.5h post-injection but reached values of 2 and 6 when tracer distribution time was prolonged to 2 and 4h, respectively. A fine-scale pixel-by-pixel comparison of autoradiograms and immunofluorescence images revealed a clear spatial link between FAZA and pimonidazole-adduct signal intensities at 2h and later. Furthermore, when using a pixel size that mimics the resolution in PET, an excellent correlation between pixel FAZA mean intensity and density of hypoxic cells was observed already at 2h post-injection. Despite inherent weaknesses, PET-hypoxia imaging is able to generate quantitative tumor maps that accurately reflect the underlying microscopic reality (i.e., hypoxic cell density) in an animal model with a clinical realistic image contrast.

  14. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  15. Development of Ga-67 Maltolate Complex as an Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Mohammadpour Amini, Mostafa; Majdabadi, Abbas; Rahiminejad, Ali; Bolourinovin, Fatemeh; Pouladi, Mehraban

    2012-01-01

    Due to the antitumor activity of Gallium MAL complex, as well as recent findings on new targeted biomolecules in malignant cells through this complex, the development of radiolabeled gallium complex for future imaging studies was targeted. Ga-67 labeled 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-onate (Ga-67 MAL) was prepared using freshly prepared Ga-67 chloride and 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-onate in a sodium salt form in 25 min at 40° C. The stability of the complex was checked in final formulation and human serum for 24 h followed by the administration in Swiss mice for biodistribution studies. The complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (> 97% ITLC, > 98% HPLC) and specific activity of 13-14 GBq/mmol and was stable in the presence of serum for 48 h. The partition coefficient was calculated for the compound (log p = 0.40). A detailed comparative pharmacokinetic study was performed for Ga-67 cation and Ga-67-MAL. The complex is more rapidly washed out from the circulation through kidneys and liver compared to Ga-67 cation and can be an interesting tumor imaging agent due to the fact that the cold compound is undergoing clinical trials as a safe and potential therapeutic agent for cancer. PMID:24250502

  16. Fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates as cellular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Langdon-Jones, Emily E; Symonds, Nadine O; Yates, Sara E; Hayes, Anthony J; Lloyd, David; Williams, Rebecca; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Pope, Simon J A

    2014-04-07

    A range of biologically compatible, fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates, based upon the rhenium fac-tricarbonyl core, has been synthesized. The fluorescent ligands are based upon a N-functionalized, 4-amino-derived 1,8-naphthalimide core and incorporate a dipicolyl amine binding unit to chelate Re(I); the structural variations accord to the nature of the alkylated imide with ethyl ester glycine (L(1)), 3-propanol (L(2)), diethylene glycol (L(3)), and benzyl alcohol (L(4)) variants. The species are fluorescent in the visible region between 505 and 537 nm through a naphthalimide-localized intramolecular charge transfer, with corresponding fluorescent lifetimes of up to 9.8 ns. The ligands and complexes were investigated for their potential as imaging agents for human osteoarthritic cells and protistan fish parasite Spironucleus vortens using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the specific nature of the naphthalimide structure serves to control the uptake and intracellular localization of these imaging agents. Significant differences were noted between the free ligands and complexes, with the Re(I) complex of L(2) showing hydrogenosomal localization in S. vortens.

  17. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  18. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  19. A Convenient Approach To Synthesize o-Carborane-Functionalized Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes for Endocellular Hypoxia Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Tong, Xiao; Yan, Hong; Lu, Changsheng; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-21

    The structure-property relationship of carborane-modified iridium(III) complexes was investigated. Firstly, an efficient approach for the synthesis of o-carborane-containing pyridine ligands a-f in high yields was developed by utilizing stable and cheap B10 H10 (Et4 N)2 as the starting material. By using these ligands, iridium(III) complexes I-VII were efficiently prepared. In combination with DFT calculations, the photophysical and electrochemical properties of these complexes were studied. The hydrophilic nido-o-carborane-based iridium(III) complex VII showed the highest phosphorescence efficiency (abs. ϕP =0.48) among known water-soluble homoleptic cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes and long emission lifetime (τ=1.24 μs) in aqueous solution. Both of them are sensitive to O2 , and thus endocellular hypoxia imaging of complex VII was realized by time-resolved luminescence imaging (TRLI). This is the first example of applying TRLI in endocellular oxygen detection with a water-soluble nido-carborane functionalized iridium(III) complex.

  20. Ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging and neuropathological correlation in a murine model of hypoxia-ischemia-induced thrombotic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shereen, Ahmed; Nemkul, Niza; Yang, Dianer; Adhami, Faisal; Dunn, R Scott; Hazen, Missy L; Nakafuku, Masato; Ning, Gang; Lindquist, Diana M; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2011-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful method to visualize white matter, but its use in patients with acute stroke remains limited because of the lack of corresponding histologic information. In this study, we addressed this issue using a hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-induced thrombotic model of stroke in adult mice. At 6, 15, and 24  hours after injury, animals were divided into three groups for (1) in vivo T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, followed by histochemistry, (2) ex vivo DTI and electron microscopy, and (3) additional biochemical or immunochemical assays. The temporal changes of diffusion anisotropy and histopathology were compared in the fimbria, internal capsule, and external capsule. We found that HI caused a rapid reduction of axial and radial diffusivities in all three axonal bundles. A large decrease in fractional anisotropy, but not in axial diffusivity per se, was associated with structural breakdown of axons. Furthermore, the decrease in radial diffusivity correlated with swelling of myelin sheaths and compression of the axoplasma. The gray matter of the hippocampus also exhibited a high level of diffusion anisotropy, and its reduction signified dendritic degeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that cross-evaluation of multiple DTI parameters may provide a fuller picture of axonal and dendritic injury in acute ischemic stroke.

  1. Detection of microregional hypoxia in mouse cerebral cortex by two-photon imaging of endogenous NADH fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Sun, Anita; Salahura, Gheorghe; Silva, Jharon N; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kasischke, Karl

    2012-02-21

    The brain's ability to function at high levels of metabolic demand depends on continuous oxygen supply through blood flow and tissue oxygen diffusion. Here we present a visualized experimental and methodological protocol to directly visualize microregional tissue hypoxia and to infer perivascular oxygen gradients in the mouse cortex. It is based on the non-linear relationship between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) endogenous fluorescence intensity and oxygen partial pressure in the tissue, where observed tissue NADH fluorescence abruptly increases at tissue oxygen levels below 10 mmHg(1). We use two-photon excitation at 740 nm which allows for concurrent excitation of intrinsic NADH tissue fluorescence and blood plasma contrasted with Texas-Red dextran. The advantages of this method over existing approaches include the following: it takes advantage of an intrinsic tissue signal and can be performed using standard two-photon in vivo imaging equipment; it permits continuous monitoring in the whole field of view with a depth resolution of ~50 μm. We demonstrate that brain tissue areas furthest from cerebral blood vessels correspond to vulnerable watershed areas which are the first to become functionally hypoxic following a decline in vascular oxygen supply. This method allows one to image microregional cortical oxygenation and is therefore useful for examining the role of inadequate or restricted tissue oxygen supply in neurovascular diseases and stroke.

  2. Detection of Microregional Hypoxia in Mouse Cerebral Cortex by Two-photon Imaging of Endogenous NADH Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Sun, Anita; Salahura, Gheorghe; Silva, Jharon N.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kasischke, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The brain's ability to function at high levels of metabolic demand depends on continuous oxygen supply through blood flow and tissue oxygen diffusion. Here we present a visualized experimental and methodological protocol to directly visualize microregional tissue hypoxia and to infer perivascular oxygen gradients in the mouse cortex. It is based on the non-linear relationship between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) endogenous fluorescence intensity and oxygen partial pressure in the tissue, where observed tissue NADH fluorescence abruptly increases at tissue oxygen levels below 10 mmHg1. We use two-photon excitation at 740 nm which allows for concurrent excitation of intrinsic NADH tissue fluorescence and blood plasma contrasted with Texas-Red dextran. The advantages of this method over existing approaches include the following: it takes advantage of an intrinsic tissue signal and can be performed using standard two-photon in vivo imaging equipment; it permits continuous monitoring in the whole field of view with a depth resolution of ~50 μm. We demonstrate that brain tissue areas furthest from cerebral blood vessels correspond to vulnerable watershed areas which are the first to become functionally hypoxic following a decline in vascular oxygen supply. This method allows one to image microregional cortical oxygenation and is therefore useful for examining the role of inadequate or restricted tissue oxygen supply in neurovascular diseases and stroke. PMID:22370971

  3. Role of 3T multiparametric-MRI with BOLD hypoxia imaging for diagnosis and post therapy response evaluation of postoperative recurrent cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Mahanshetty, Umesh; Juvekar, S L; Shrivastava, S K; Desekar, Naresh; Thakur, M H

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of multiparametric-MRI (MPMRI) with hypoxia imaging as a functional marker for characterizing and detecting vaginal vault/local recurrence following primary surgery for cervical cancer. With institutional review board approval and written informed consent 30 women (median age: 45 years) from October 2009 to March 2010 with previous operated carcinoma cervix and suspected clinical vaginal vault/local recurrence were examined with 3.0T-MRI. MRI imaging included conventional and MPMRI sequences [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion weighted (DW), 1H-MR spectroscopy (1HMRS), blood oxygen level dependent hypoxia imaging (BOLD)]. Two radiologists, blinded to pathologic findings, independently assessed the pretherapy MRI findings and then correlated it with histopathology findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and their confidence intervals were calculated. The pre and post therapy conventional and MPMRI parameters were analyzed and correlated with response to therapy. Of the 30 patients, there were 24 recurrent tumors and 6 benign lesions. The accuracy of diagnosing recurrent vault lesions was highest at combined MPMRI and conventional MRI (100%) than at conventional-MRI (70%) or MPMRI (96.7%) alone. Significant correlation was seen between percentage tumor regression and pre-treatment parameters such as negative enhancement integral (NEI) (p = 0.02), the maximum slope (p = 0.04), mADC value (p = 0.001) and amount of hypoxic fraction on the pretherapy MRI (p = 0.01). Conventional-MR with MPMRI significantly increases the diagnostic accuracy for suspected vaginal vault/local recurrence. Post therapy serial MPMRI with hypoxia imaging follow-up objectively documents the response. MPMRI and BOLD hypoxia imaging provide information regarding tumor biology at the molecular, subcellular, cellular and tissue levels and this information may be used as an appropriate and reliable

  4. Shape Effects in Nanoparticle-Based Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Kayla Shani Brook

    At the nanoscale, material properties become highly size and shape dependent. These properties can be manipulated and exploited for a variety of biomedical applications, including sensing, drug delivery, diagnostics, and imaging. In particular, nanoparticles of different materials, sizes and shapes have been developed as high-performance contrast agents for optical, electron, and medical imaging. In this thesis, I focus on gold nanoparticles because they are widely used as contrast agents in multiple types of imaging modalities. Additionally, the surface of gold can be readily functionalized with ligands and the structure of the particles can be manipulated to modulate their performance as imaging agents. The properties of nanoparticles can generate contrast directly. For example, the light scattering properties of gold particles can be visualized in optical microscopy, the high electron density of gold produces contrast in electron microscopy, and the x-ray absorption properties of gold can be detected in medical x-ray and computed tomography imaging. Alternatively, the properties of the nanomaterial can be exploited to modulate the signal produced by other molecules that are bound to the particle surface. The light emission of molecular fluorophores can be quenched or dramatically increased by coupling to the optical field enhancements of gold nanoparticles, and the performance of gadolinium (Gd(III))-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents can be increased by coupling to the rotational motion of nanoparticles. In this dissertation, I focus specifically on how the structure of star-shaped gold particles (nanostars) can be exploited as single-particle optical probes and to dramatically enhance the relaxivity of Gd(III) bound to the surface. Differential interference contrast (DIC) is a type of wide-field diffraction-limited optical microscopy that is commonly used by biologists to image cells without labels. Here, I demonstrate the DIC can be used

  5. Simultaneous Dual-Nuclei Imaging for Motion Corrected Detection and Quantification of 19F Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Grässlin, Ingmar; Mazurkewitz, Peter C.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine MRI offers broad potential for specific detection and quantification of molecularly targeted agents in diagnosis and therapy planning or monitoring. Because non-proton MRI applications lack morphological information, accompanying proton images are needed to elucidate the spatial tissue context. Furthermore, low concentrations typical of targeted molecular imaging agents require long examinations for signal averaging during which physiological motion may lead to blurring, underestimation in signal quantification, and erroneous localization of the agent distribution. Novel methods for truly-simultaneous acquisition of dual-nuclei MR data are presented that offer efficient and precise anatomical localization of fluorine signals using accurate motion correction based on contemporaneous proton signals. The feasibility of simultaneous dual-nuclei MRI motion correction and corresponding dual-resolution reconstruction, providing nuclei-specific spatial resolution to retrospectively optimize the balance between signal-to-noise ratio and resolution, is shown on a clinical 3T MR system. PMID:21394779

  6. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  7. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  8. Toward hypoxia-selective DNA-alkylating agents built by grafting nitrogen mustards onto the bioreductively activated, hypoxia-selective DNA-oxidizing agent 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin M; Parsons, Zachary D; Barnes, Charles L; Gates, Kent S

    2014-08-15

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells.

  9. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  10. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    McCarney, Evan R; Armstrong, Brandon D; Lingwood, Mark D; Han, Songi

    2007-02-06

    Pure water in a highly (1)H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a (1)H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the (1)H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A (1)H signal enhancement of water by a factor of -10 and -100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T(1) relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate.

  11. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  12. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A.; Carroll, M.; Wright, J.W.; Feldman, M.J.; Massucci, J.; Bhayana, J.N.; Gona, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart.

  13. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  14. The potential of hypoxia markers as target for breast molecular imaging – a systematic review and meta-analysis of human marker expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of breast cancer is a promising emerging technology, potentially able to improve clinical care. Valid imaging targets for molecular imaging tracer development are membrane-bound hypoxia-related proteins, expressed when tumor growth outpaces neo-angiogenesis. We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of such hypoxia marker expression rates in human breast cancer to evaluate their potential as clinically relevant molecular imaging targets. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles describing membrane-bound proteins that are related to hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), the key regulator of the hypoxia response. We extracted expression rates of carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), C-X-C chemokine receptor type-4 (CXCR4), or insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in human breast disease, evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We pooled study results using random-effects models and applied meta-regression to identify associations with clinicopathological variables. Results Of 1,705 identified articles, 117 matched our selection criteria, totaling 30,216 immunohistochemistry results. We found substantial between-study variability in expression rates. Invasive cancer showed pooled expression rates of 35% for CAIX (95% confidence interval (CI): 26-46%), 51% for GLUT1 (CI: 40-61%), 46% for CXCR4 (CI: 33-59%), and 46% for IGF1R (CI: 35-70%). Expression rates increased with tumor grade for GLUT1, CAIX, and CXCR4 (all p < 0.001), but decreased for IGF1R (p < 0.001). GLUT1 showed the highest expression rate in grade III cancers with 58% (45-69%). CXCR4 showed the highest expression rate in small T1 tumors with 48% (CI: 28-69%), but associations with size were only significant for CAIX (p < 0.001; positive association) and IGF1R (p = 0.047; negative association). Although based on few studies, CAIX, GLUT1, and CXCR4 showed profound lower expression rates in normal breast tissue and benign

  15. A two-photon fluorescent probe for nitroreductase imaging in living cells, tissues and zebrafish under hypoxia conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Baoping; Hu, Wei; Sun, Jinyu; Chi, Siyu; Lei, Yidi; Zhang, Fang; Zhong, Cheng; Liu, Zhihong

    2017-04-04

    A two-photon fluorescent probe FNTR for nitroreductase was synthesized by using 9,9-dimethyl-2-acetyl-fluoren-7-methylamino (1) as a two-photon fluorophore and a p-nitrobenzyl carbamate group as a recognition domain for nitroreductase (NTR). The probe and the fluorophore were tested under one- and two-photon modes respectively. After reacting with nitroreductase, FNTR had a 130-fold fluorescence enhancement at 563 nm in 10 min and the maximal two-photon action cross-section value was detected as 66 GM at 750 nm. The probe showed a high sensitivity with a detection limit as low as 23.67 ng ml(-1), high selectivity, low cytotoxicity and good photostability. In the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), endogenous NTR was detected in living cells, tissues and zebrafish. Cobalt chloride was used to induce chemical hypoxia to produce NTR, which generated enhanced fluorescence in cells and tumor tissues. Finally, two-photon fluorescence imaging of NTR was achieved in zebrafish at a penetration depth of up to 200 μm.

  16. The diversity of (68)Ga-based imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Development of new radiopharmaceuticals and their availability are crucial factors influencing the expansion of clinical nuclear medicine. The number of new (68)Ga-based imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET) is increasing greatly. (68)Ga has been used for labeling of a broad range of molecules (small organic molecules, peptides, proteins, and oligonucleotides) as well as particles, thus demonstrating its potential to become a PET analog of the legendary generator-produced gamma-emitting (99m)Tc but with added value of higher sensitivity and resolution as well as quantitation and dynamic scanning. Further, the availability of technology for GMP-compliant automated tracer production can facilitate the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals and enable standardized, harmonized multicenter studies to be conducted for regulatory approval. This chapter presents some examples of tracers for targeted, pretargeted, and nontargeted imaging with emphasis on the potential of (68)Ga to facilitate clinically practical PET development and to promote the PET technique worldwide for earlier and better diagnostics, and personalized medicine with the ultimate objective of improved therapeutic outcome.

  17. Harmonic chirp imaging method for ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, Jerome M G; Chin, Chien Ting; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2005-02-01

    Coded excitation is currently used in medical ultrasound to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and penetration depth. We propose a chirp excitation method for contrast agents using the second harmonic component of the response. This method is based on a compression filter that selectively compresses and extracts the second harmonic component from the received echo signal. Simulations have shown a clear increase in response for chirp excitation over pulse excitation with the same peak amplitude. This was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) optical observations of bubble response with a fast framing camera. To evaluate the harmonic compression method, we applied it to simulated bubble echoes, to measured propagation harmonics, and to B-mode scans of a flow phantom and compared it to regular pulse excitation imaging. An increase of approximately 10 dB in SNR was found for chirp excitation. The compression method was found to perform well in terms of resolution. Axial resolution was in all cases within 10% of the axial resolution from pulse excitation. Range side-lobe levels were 30 dB below the main lobe for the simulated bubble echoes and measured propagation harmonics. However, side-lobes were visible in the B-mode contrast images.

  18. Development of a calcium-sensing receptor molecular imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Zhang, Xiaoli; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D.; Tweedle, Michael F.; Phay, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed by parathyroid cells and thyroid C-cells (from which medullary thyroid carcinoma [MTC] is derived). A molecular imaging agent localizing to the CaSR could improve the detection of parathyroids and MTC preoperatively or intraoperatively. We synthesized a novel compound containing a fluorine residue for potential future labeling and demonstrated that the compound inhibited CaSR function in vitro. Methods We synthesized compound M, a derivative of a known calcilytic compound, Calhex-231. Human embryonic kidney cells transfected with green-fluorescent protein-tagged CaSR or control vector were preincubated with compound M before the addition of calcium. Immunoblotting for total mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK: ERK1/2), activated MAPK (phosphorylated ERK1/2), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was performed. Results Synthesis of compound M was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway by compound M was demonstrated in a dose-dependent manner by a decrease in phosphorylated ERK1/2 with no change in total ERK1/2 levels. Compound M inhibited MAPK signaling slightly better than the parent compound. Conclusion We have developed a novel molecule which demonstrates functional inhibition of CaSR and has a favorable structure for labeling. This compound appears to be appropriate for further development as a molecular imaging tool to enhance the surgical treatment of parathyroid disease and MTC. PMID:24238055

  19. (18)F-labelled metomidate analogues as adrenocortical imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Maria; Karimi, Farhad; Lindhe, Orjan; Långström, Bengt

    2009-05-01

    Two- and one-step syntheses of (18)F-labelled analogues of metomidate, such as 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (1), 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (2), 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (3), 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (4) and 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (5) are presented. Analogues 1-5 were prepared by a two-step reaction sequence that started with the synthesis of either 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate or 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate. These were used as (18)F-alkylating agents in the second step, in which they reacted with the ammonium salt of a 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid. One-step-labelling syntheses of 1, 2 and 5 were also explored. Analogues 1-4 were biologically validated by frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution. Metabolite analysis was performed for 2 and 3. The radiochemical yield of the two-step synthesis was in the range of 10-29% and that of the one-step synthesis was 25-37%. Using microwave irradiation in the one-step synthesis of 1 and 2 increased the radiochemical yield to 46+/-3% and 79+/-30%, respectively. Both the frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution results indicated that analogue 2 has a potential as an adrenocortical imaging agent, having the highest degree of specific adrenal binding and best ratio of adrenal to organ uptake among the compounds studied.

  20. Mn Porphyrins as Novel Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N.; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J.; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J.; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP5+) and Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP5+). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. Materials and Methods MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP5+ (n=6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP5+ (n=6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Results Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP5+or MnTnHex-2-PyP5+, with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP5+ administration. Conclusion After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP5+, contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate

  1. Mn porphyrins as novel molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Lascola, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP(5+)) and Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+)). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP(5+)or MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+), with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP(5+) administration. After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP(5+), contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate malignancy using MRI.

  2. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, ), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  3. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  4. Identification of agents that reduce renal hypoxia-reoxygenation injury using cell-based screening: purine nucleosides are alternative energy sources in LLC-PK1 cells during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Szoleczky, Petra; Módis, Katalin; Nagy, Nóra; Dóri Tóth, Zoltán; DeWitt, Douglas; Szabó, Csaba; Gero, Domokos

    2012-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis is a clinical problem that lacks specific therapy and is characterized by high mortality rate. The ischemic renal injury affects the proximal tubule cells causing dysfunction and cell death after severe hypoperfusion. We utilized a cell-based screening approach in a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of tubular injury to search for cytoprotective action using a library of pharmacologically active compounds. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced ATP depletion, suppressed aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, increased the permeability of the monolayer, caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and caspase-dependent cell death. The only compound that proved cytoprotective either applied prior to the hypoxia induction or during the reoxygenation was adenosine. The protective effect of adenosine required the coordinated actions of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, but did not requisite the purine receptors. Adenosine and inosine better preserved the cellular ATP content during ischemia than equimolar amount of glucose, and accelerated the restoration of the cellular ATP pool following the OGD. Our results suggest that radical changes occur in the cellular metabolism to respond to the energy demand during and following hypoxia, which include the use of nucleosides as an essential energy source. Thus purine nucleoside supplementation holds promise in the treatment of acute renal failure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  6. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  7. The hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride induces cell cycle arrest and alters gene expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seunghee; Jeong, Hye-Jung; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; Choi, Yeong Min; An, In-Sook; Koh, Hyea Jung; Lim, Dae Jin; Lee, Su-Jae; An, Sungkwan

    2012-11-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of tumors that occurs across a wide variety of malignancies. Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant disorder of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Although bone marrow hypoxia is crucial for normal hematopoiesis, the effect of hypoxia on multiple myeloma is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-mediated hypoxia decreased cell viability and altered gene expression in U266 human multiple myeloma cells. CoCl2 induced the loss of cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, FACS analysis revealed that the loss of cell viability was related to apoptosis. Using microarray analysis, we identified mRNA expression profile changes in response to CoCl2 treatment in U266 cells. Four hundred and fifty-two mRNAs exhibited >2-fold changes in expression in CoCl2-treated U266 cells compared to their expression in control cells. A follow-up bioinformatics study revealed that a great number of genes with altered expression were involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, transcription and development. In conclusion, these results provide novel evidence that CoCl2-mediated hypoxia affects the expression profiles of genes that are functionally related to apoptosis and angiogenesis in U266 multiple myeloma cells.

  8. In vitro influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence imaging in brain tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Jarvi, Mark; Niedre, Mark; Mocanu, Joseph D.; Moriyama, Yumi; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar; Wilson, Brian C.

    2007-02-01

    Bioluminescence Imaging (BLI) has been employed as an imaging modality to identify and characterize fundamental processes related to cancer development and response at cellular and molecular levels. This technique is based on the reaction of luciferin with oxygen in the presence of luciferase and ATP. A major concern in this technique is that tumors are generally hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, therefore the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could possibly be reduced to limiting levels, and thus leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo procedures. In this report, we present the initial in vitro results of the oxygen dependence of the bioluminescence signal in rat gliosarcoma 9L cells tagged with the luciferase gene (9L luc cells). Bioluminescence photon emission from cells exposed to different oxygen tensions was detected by a sensitive CCD camera upon exposure to luciferin. The results showed that bioluminescence signal decreased at administered pO II levels below about 5%, falling by approximately 50% at 0.2% pO II. Additional experiments showed that changes in BLI was due to the cell inability to maintain normal levels of ATP during the hypoxic period reducing the ATP concentration to limiting levels for BLI.

  9. Liver-specific agents for contrast-enhanced MRI: role in oncological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thian, Yee Liang; Riddell, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver-specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents are increasingly used in evaluation of the liver. They are effective in detection and morphological characterization of lesions, and can be useful for evaluation of biliary tree anatomy and liver function. The typical appearances and imaging pitfalls of various tumours at MR imaging performed with these agents can be understood by the interplay of pharmacokinetics of these contrast agents and transporter expression of the tumour. This review focuses on the applications of these agents in oncological imaging. PMID:24434892

  10. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1-2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane.

  11. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1–2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane. PMID:26924009

  12. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-02-29

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1-2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane.

  13. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs: substituent effects on the properties of nitro seco-1,2,9,9a-tetrahydrocyclopropa[c]benz[e]indol-4-one (nitroCBI) prodrugs of DNA minor groove alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Tercel, Moana; Atwell, Graham J; Yang, Shangjin; Stevenson, Ralph J; Botting, K Jane; Boyd, Maruta; Smith, Eileen; Anderson, Robert F; Denny, William A; Wilson, William R; Pruijn, Frederik B

    2009-11-26

    Nitrochloromethylbenzindolines (nitroCBIs) are a new class of hypoxia-activated prodrugs for antitumor therapy. The recently reported prototypes undergo hypoxia-selective metabolism to form potent DNA minor groove alkylating agents and are selectively toxic to some but not all hypoxic tumor cell lines. Here we report a series of 31 analogues that bear an extra electron-withdrawing substituent that serves to raise the one-electron reduction potential of the nitroCBI. We identify a subset of compounds, those with a basic side chain and sulfonamide or carboxamide substituent, that have consistently high hypoxic selectivity. The best of these, with a 7-sulfonamide substituent, displays hypoxic cytotoxicity ratios of 275 and 330 in Skov3 and HT29 human tumor cell lines, respectively. This compound (28) is efficiently and selectively metabolized to the corresponding aminoCBI, is selectively cytotoxic under hypoxia in all 11 cell lines examined, and demonstrates activity against hypoxic tumor cells in a human tumor xenograft in vivo.

  14. Simultaneous near-IR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral oxygenation and brain water during hypoxia-ischemia in two-week-old rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, R. A.; Tuor, U. I.; Foniok, T.; Bascaramurty, S.; Ringland, K.; McKenzie, E.; Qiao, M.; Tomanek, B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2001-10-01

    Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy can potentially probe several parameters related to the onset of stroke and the ensuing tissue damage. One obvious marker of ischemia is cerebral oxygenation, which can be lowered sharply in stroke-affected tissue. Also commonly assessed, though less straightforward to recover, is the redox state of the cytochrome aa3 copper center. Finally, parameters that are in principle available but seldom recovered from in vivo near-IR spectra are changes in water concentration and scattering properties of the tissue. We have evaluated the potential for near-IR spectroscopy to detect relevant changes in cerebral oxygenation, blood volume, water content, and scattering properties in an infant rat stroke model that is well characterized by magnetic resonance imaging methods. The specific aim was to acquire near-IR spectra simultaneously with MR images and to correlate stroke-associated changes detected via these two modalities prior to, during and after a hypoxia-ischemia episode within this stroke model. Presented here are results from the design and testing of a near-IR illumination/detection system that is compatible with an MR imaging system, and the recovery of trends in the near-IR spectra that complement the hypoxic-ischemic changes observed in the MR images. Unexpectedly large intensity changes observed for the in vivo near-IR water absorptions are ascribed to hypoxia-induced variations in effective optical pathlength, suggesting that the water absorptions may prove generally useful as a means to track such changes.

  15. Noninvasive multimodality imaging of the tumor microenvironment: registered dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies of a preclinical tumor model of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cho, HyungJoon; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Carlin, Sean; Lupu, Mihaela E; Wang, Ya; Rizwan, Asif; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L; Zanzonico, Pat B; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-03-01

    In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327-AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA) and dynamic (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-Fmiso) PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between (18)F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, (18)F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995). Magn Reson Med 33, 506-514) derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early (18)F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early (18)F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan) (18)F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between (18)F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  16. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia12

    PubMed Central

    Cho, HyungJoon; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Carlin, Sean; Lupu, Mihaela E; Wang, Ya; Rizwan, Asif; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L; Zanzonico, Pat B; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327-AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA) and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso) PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995). Magn Reson Med 33, 506–514) derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan) 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue. PMID:19242606

  17. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Gonçalves, M Clara; Corvo, M Luísa; Martins, M Bárbara F

    2017-01-01

    Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy). The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r1 and r2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy) as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg), cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings. PMID:28804244

  18. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Brantner, Christine A; Daniels, Mathew P; Nichols, James; McCoy, J Philip; Kato, Gregory J

    2014-06-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient's disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged "sickled" and "normal" erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = -0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = -0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = -0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development.

  19. IDH mutation status is associated with a distinct hypoxia/angiogenesis transcriptome signature which is non-invasively predictable with rCBV imaging in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kickingereder, Philipp; Sahm, Felix; Radbruch, Alexander; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Deimling, Andreas von; Bendszus, Martin; Wiestler, Benedikt

    2015-11-05

    The recent identification of IDH mutations in gliomas and several other cancers suggests that this pathway is involved in oncogenesis; however effector functions are complex and yet incompletely understood. To study the regulatory effects of IDH on hypoxia-inducible-factor 1-alpha (HIF1A), a driving force in hypoxia-initiated angiogenesis, we analyzed mRNA expression profiles of 288 glioma patients and show decreased expression of HIF1A targets on a single-gene and pathway level, strong inhibition of upstream regulators such as HIF1A and downstream biological functions such as angio- and vasculogenesis in IDH mutant tumors. Genotype/imaging phenotype correlation analysis with relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) MRI - a robust and non-invasive estimate of tumor angiogenesis - in 73 treatment-naive patients with low-grade and anaplastic gliomas showed that a one-unit increase in rCBV corresponded to a two-third decrease in the odds for an IDH mutation and correctly predicted IDH mutation status in 88% of patients. Together, these findings (1) show that IDH mutation status is associated with a distinct angiogenesis transcriptome signature which is non-invasively predictable with rCBV imaging and (2) highlight the potential future of radiogenomics (i.e. the correlation between cancer imaging and genomic features) towards a more accurate diagnostic workup of brain tumors.

  20. Multimeric Near IR–MR Contrast Agent for Multimodal In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiple imaging modalities are often required for in vivo imaging applications that require both high probe sensitivity and excellent spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, MR and optical imaging are an attractive combination that can be used to determine both molecular and anatomical information. Herein, we describe the synthesis and in vivo testing of two multimeric NIR–MR contrast agents that contain three Gd(III) chelates and an IR-783 dye moiety. One agent contains a PEG linker and the other a short alkyl linker. These agents label cells with extraordinary efficacy and can be detected in vivo using both imaging modalities. Biodistribution of the PEGylated agent shows observable fluorescence in xenograft MCF7 tumors and renal clearance by MR imaging. PMID:26083313

  1. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  2. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  3. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based “nanobubble” contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:25321797

  4. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size.

  5. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  6. Melanin-Based Contrast Agents for Biomedical Optoacoustic Imaging and Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Optoacoustic imaging emerged in early 1990s as a new biomedical imaging technology that generates images by illuminating tissues with short laser pulses and detecting resulting ultrasound waves. This technique takes advantage of the spectroscopic approach to molecular imaging, and delivers high-resolution images in the depth of tissue. Resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is scalable, so that biomedical systems from cellular organelles to large organs can be visualized and, more importantly, characterized based on their optical absorption coefficient, which is proportional to the concentration of absorbing chromophores. Optoacoustic imaging was shown to be useful in both preclinical research using small animal models and in clinical applications. Applications in the field of molecular imaging offer abundant opportunities for the development of highly specific and effective contrast agents for quantitative optoacoustic imaging. Recent efforts are being made in the direction of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents (such as nanoparticles made of melanin) that are potentially applicable in clinical optoacoustic imaging. In order to increase the efficiency and specificity of contrast agents and probes, they need to be made smart and capable of controlled accumulation in the target cells. This review was written in recognition of the potential breakthroughs in medical optoacoustic imaging that can be enabled by efficient and nontoxic melanin-based optoacoustic contrast agents. PMID:28783106

  7. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y.; Brantner, Christine A.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Nichols, James; McCoy, J. Philip; Kato, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient’s disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged “sickled” and “normal” erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = −0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = −0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = −0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development. PMID:24585634

  8. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  9. Spectral Imaging Technology-Based Evaluation of Radiation Treatment Planning to Remove Contrast Agent Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Yi-Qun, Xu; Wei, Liu; Xin-Ye, Ni

    2016-10-01

    This study employs dual-source computed tomography single-spectrum imaging to evaluate the effects of contrast agent artifact removal and the computational accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning improvement. The phantom, including the contrast agent, was used in all experiments. The amounts of iodine in the contrast agent were 30, 15, 7.5, and 0.75 g/100 mL. Two images with different energy values were scanned and captured using dual-source computed tomography (80 and 140 kV). To obtain a fused image, 2 groups of images were processed using single-energy spectrum imaging technology. The Pinnacle planning system was used to measure the computed tomography values of the contrast agent and the surrounding phantom tissue. The difference between radiotherapy treatment planning based on 80 kV, 140 kV, and energy spectrum image was analyzed. For the image with high iodine concentration, the quality of the energy spectrum-fused image was the highest, followed by that of the 140-kV image. That of the 80-kV image was the worst. The difference in the radiotherapy treatment results among the 3 models was significant. When the concentration of iodine was 30 g/100 mL and the distance from the contrast agent at the dose measurement point was 1 cm, the deviation values (P) were 5.95% and 2.20% when image treatment planning was based on 80 and 140 kV, respectively. When the concentration of iodine was 15 g/100 mL, deviation values (P) were -2.64% and -1.69%. Dual-source computed tomography single-energy spectral imaging technology can remove contrast agent artifacts to improve the calculated dose accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Influence of hypoxia on tracer accumulation in squamous-cell carcinoma: in vitro evaluation for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Minn, H; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1996-11-01

    Hypoxic accumulation of 2-[5,6-3H]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([3H]FDG),L-[methyl-3H] methionine ([3H]MET), and L-[1-3H]leucine ([3H]LEU) was evaluated in two cell lines (UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-20) obtained from patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Both cell lines were exposed to decreasing oxygen atmosphere (20%, 1.5%, or 0% O2) for 6 h, after which they were incubated for a further 1 h with tritiated FDG, MET, or LEU. An anoxic atmosphere resulted in a mean increase of [3H]FDG uptake of 120% and 46% over a baseline 20% oxygen atmosphere for UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-20A, respectively. Both total and acid-precipitable [3H]MET uptake remained unchanged at 0% versus baseline, whereas acid-precipitable [3H]LEU uptake decreased by 46% for UT-SCC-5 and by 34% for UT-SCC-20A at 0% O2. Our findings demonstrate that [3H]FDG accumulation is increased in hypoxic UT-SCC cell lines probably through activation of the metabolic steps associated with the glycolytic pathway. The decrease in acid-precipitable [3H]LEU uptake in hypoxia may indicate a decline in protein synthesis, whereas the unchanged [3H]MET uptake probably reflects the unaffected amino acid transport and slow incorporation of radiolabeled methyl group of MET in tumor proteins and nucleic acids. FDG and LEU, but probably not MET, warrant additional study as hypoxia-avid or hypoxia-reduced tracers for assessment of treatment effects designed to modify hypoxia.

  11. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Hao Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu Baoxi; Sun Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  12. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Vasdev, Neil; Hao, Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu, Bao Xi; Sun, Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  13. Object oriented image analysis based on multi-agent recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib Mahmoudi, Fatemeh; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Reinartz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the capabilities of multi-agent systems are used in order to solve object recognition difficulties in complex urban areas based on the characteristics of WorldView-2 satellite imagery and digital surface model (DSM). The proposed methodology has three main steps: pre-processing of dataset, object based image analysis and multi-agent object recognition. Classified regions obtained from object based image analysis are used as input datasets in the proposed multi-agent system in order to modify/improve results. In the first operational level of the proposed multi-agent system, various kinds of object recognition agents modify initial classified regions based on their spectral, textural and 3D structural knowledge. Then, in the second operational level, 2D structural knowledge and contextual relations are used by agents for reasoning and modification. Evaluation of the capabilities of the proposed object recognition methodology is performed on WorldView-2 imagery over Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) which has been collected in January 2010. According to the obtained results of the object based image analysis process, contextual relations and structural descriptors have high potential to modify general difficulties of object recognition. Using knowledge based reasoning and cooperative capabilities of agents in the proposed multi-agent system in this paper, most of the remaining difficulties are decreased and the accuracy of object based image analysis results is improved for about three percent.

  14. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC POLY(L-GLUTAMIC ACID)-BASED CANCER THERAPEUTIC AND IMAGING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern polymer chemistry has led to the generation of a number of biocompatible synthetic polymers have been increasingly studied as efficient carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Synthetic biocompatible polymers have been used to improve the efficacy of both small-molecular-weight therapeutics and imaging agents. Furthermore, multiple targeted anticancer agents and/or imaging reporters can be attached to a single polymer chain, allowing multifunctional and/or multimodality therapy and molecular imaging. Having both an anticancer drug and an imaging reporter in a single polymer chain allows noninvasive real-time visualization of the pharmacokinetics of polymeric drug delivery systems, which can uncover and explain the complicated mechanisms of in vivo drug delivery and their correlation to pharmacodynamics. This review examines use of the synthetic biocompatible polymer poly(L-glutamic acid) (PG) as an efficient carrier of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. This review will summarize and update our recent research on use of PG as a platform for drug delivery and molecular imaging, including recent clinical findings with respect to PG-paclitaxel (PG-TXL); the combination of PG-TXL with radiotherapy; mechanisms of action of PG-TXL; and noninvasive visualization of in vivo delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and multimodality imaging. PMID:21303613

  15. Molecular Imaging of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α and von Hippel-Lindau Interaction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chan, Denise A.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sutphin, Patrick D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Zundel, Wayne; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. Under hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) regulates activation of genes promoting malignant progression. Under normoxia, HIF-1α is hydroxylated on prolines 402 and 564 and is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated degradation by interacting with the von Hippel-Lindau protein complex (pVHL). We have developed a novel method of studying the interaction between HIF-1α and pVHL using the split firefly luciferase complementation-based bioluminescence system in which HIF-1α and pVHL are fused to amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal fragments of the luciferase, respectively. We demonstrate that hydroxylation-dependent interaction between the HIF-1α and pVHL leads to complementation of the two luciferase fragments, resulting in bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo. Complementation-based bioluminescence is diminished when mutant pVHLs with decreased affinity for binding HIF-1α are used. This method represents a new approach for studying interaction of proteins involved in the regulation of protein degradation. PMID:19123984

  16. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  17. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Abrams, M.J.; Davison, A.

    1984-06-05

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  18. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  19. Advances in CNS Imaging Agents: Focus on PET and SPECT Tracers in Experimental and Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    George, Noble; Gean, Emily G; Nandi, Ayon; Frolov, Boris; Zaidi, Eram; Lee, Ho; Brašić, James R; Wong, Dean F

    2015-04-01

    The physiological functioning of the brain is not well-known in current day medicine and the pathologies of many neuropsychiatric disorders are still not yet fully understood. With our aging population and better life expectancies, it has become imperative to find better biomarkers for disease progression as well as receptor target engagements. In the last decade, these major advances in the field of molecular CNS imaging have been made available with tools such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and neuroreceptor-targeted positron emission tomography (PET). These tools have given researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and clinical physicians a better method of understanding CNS dysfunctions, and the ability to employ improved therapeutic agents. This review is intended to provide an update on brain imaging agents that are currently used in clinical and translational research toward treatment of CNS disorders. The review begins with amyloid and tau imaging, the former of which has at least three [(18)F] agents that have been recently approved and will soon be available for clinical use for specific indications in the USA and elsewhere. Other prevalent PET and SPECT neurotransmitter system agents, including those newly US FDA-approved imaging agents related to the dopaminergic system, are included. A review of both mature and potentially growing PET imaging agents, including those targeting serotonin and opiate receptor systems, is also provided.

  20. Macromolecular Imaging Agents Containing Lanthanides: Can Conceptual Promise Lead to Clinical Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Joshua; Reineke, Jeffrey W.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are increasingly being used to improve the resolution of this noninvasive diagnostic technique. All clinically-approved T1 contrast agents are small molecule chelates of gadolinium [Gd(III)] that affect bound water proton relaxivity. Both the small size and monomeric nature of these agents ultimately limits the image resolution enhancement that can be achieved for both contrast enhancement and pharmacokinetic/biodistribution reasons. The multimeric nature of macromolecules, such as polymers, dendrimers, and noncovalent complexes of small molecule agents with proteins, have been shown to significantly increase the image contrast and resolution due to their large size and ability to incorporate multiple Gd(III) chlelation sites. Also, macromolecular agents are advantageous as they have the ability to be designed to be nontoxic, hydrophilic, easily purified, aggregation-resistant, and have controllable three-dimensional macromolecular structure housing the multiple lanthanide chelation sites. For these reasons, large molecule diagnostics have the ability to significantly increase the relaxivity of water protons within the targeted tissues and thus the image resolution for many diagnostic applications. The FDA approval of a contrast agent that consists of a reversible, non-covalent coupling of a small Gd(III) chelate with serum albumin for blood pool imaging (marketed under the trade names of Vasovist and Ablivar) proved to be one of the first diagnostic agent to capitalize on these benefits from macromolecular association in humans. However, much research and development is necessary to optimize the safety of these unique agents for in vivo use and potential clinical development. To this end, recent work in the field of polymer, dendrimer, and noncovalent complex-based imaging agents are reviewed herein and the future outlook of this field is discussed. PMID:23467737

  1. Kit formulation for preparation and biological evaluation of a novel (99m)Tc-oxo complex with metronidazole xanthate for imaging tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenxiang; Lin, Xiao; Zhang, Junbo; Wang, Xuebin; Jin, Zhonghui; Zhang, Weifang; Zhang, Yanyan

    2016-02-01

    Achieving an ideal (99m)Tc labeled nitroimidazole hypoxia marker is still considered to be of great interest. Metronidazole xanthate (MNXT) ligand was synthesized and radiolabeled with (99m)Tc-glucoheptonate (GH) to form the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex, for the potential use as a novel probe for imaging tumor hypoxia. For labeling, (99m)TcO-MNXT was prepared by ligand-exchange reaction with (99m)Tc-GH. The radiochemical purity of the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex was measured by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The distribution coefficient and stability of the complex was investigated. The structure of the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex was verified by preparation and characterization of the corresponding stable rhenium complex. The cellular uptake of the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex was determined in murine sarcoma S180 cell lines under hypoxic and aerobic conditions. The biodistribution and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image studies of the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex were performed in mice bearing S 180 tumor. The radiochemical purity of the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex was over 90%. It had good in vitro stability and its distribution coefficient indicated that it was a hydrophilic complex. When (99m)Tc and Re complexes were coinjected in HPLC, both radioactivity (for (99m)Tc complex) and UV detectors (for Re complex) showed nearly identical HPLC profiles, suggesting their structures are similar. The tumor cell experiment and the biodistribution in mice bearing S 180 tumor showed that the (99m)TcO-MNXT complex had a good hypoxic selectivity and accumulated in the tumor with high uptake and good retention. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image studies showed that the tumor detection was observable. (99m)TcO-MNXT is prepared from a kit without the need for purification and shows high tumor uptake, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratios, suggesting that it would be a promising candidate for imaging tumor hypoxia

  2. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  3. Dynamic imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes using a bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Mounzer, Rawad; Shkarin, Pavel; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, Todd; Ruddle, Nancy H; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of lymphedema and lymph node metastasis in humans has relied primarily on invasive or radioactive modalities. While noninvasive technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the potential for true three-dimensional imaging of lymphatic structures, invasive modalities, such as optical fluorescence microscopy, provide higher resolution and clearer delineation of both lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels. Thus, contrast agents that image lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by both fluorescence and MRI may further enhance our understanding of the structure and function of the lymphatic system. Recent applications of bimodal (fluorescence and MR) contrast agents in mice have not achieved clear visualization of lymphatic vessels and nodes. Here the authors describe the development of a nanoparticulate contrast agent that is taken up by lymphatic vessels to draining lymph nodes and detected by both modalities. A unique nanoparticulate contrast agent composed of a polyamidoamine dendrimer core conjugated to paramagnetic contrast agents and fluorescent probes was synthesized. Anesthetized mice were injected with the nanoparticulates in the hind footpads and imaged by MR and fluorescence microscopy. High resolution MR and fluorescence images were obtained and compared to traditional techniques for lymphatic visualization using Evans blue dye. Lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels were clearly observed by both MRI and fluorescence microscopy using the bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent. Characteristic tail-lymphatics were also visualized by both modalities. Contrast imaging yielded a higher resolution than the traditional method employing Evans blue dye. MR data correlated with fluorescence and Evans blue dye imaging. A bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent facilitates the visualization of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by both fluorescence microscopy and MRI with strong correlation between the two modalities. This agent may translate to applications

  4. Tumor imaging with novel radiogallium (67/68Ga) labeled agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Antich, P. P.; Constantinescu, A.; Ranney, D. F.; Fernando, J. L.; Xiong, R.; Oz, O.; Parkey, R. W.

    1997-02-01

    Gallium-67 (t1/2: 78 h) has played an important role in tumor imaging. It is produced in a cyclotron and is commercially available for routine clinical use. 68Ga (t1/2: 68 min), a positron emitter, suitable for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, is obtained from a generator with long lived parent 68Ge (t1/2: 288 d). Radiogallium has been used mostly, as gallium citrate in imaging studies. Recently, receptor specific agents labeled with gallium have been developed. These include, agents to image somatostatin and folate receptors. We have shown that a new class of agents based on glycosaminoglycoans (GLYCOS) target a variety of tumors. Gallium labeled deferroxamine (DF) bound to sulfated glycosaminoglycans has the ability to rapidly target and permeate a wide variety of solid animal tumors and also undergo rapid blood clearance almost exclusively by the renal route. We have been able to image (within 5 min to 1 hr), prostate adenocarcinoma (AT-1 tumor) grown in surgically prepared pedicles of Copenhagen male rats and breast tumor in pedicles of Fisher female rats. 67Ga labeled agent was used in single photon imaging mode and 68Ga labeled agent was used in PET mode with a small animal PET imaging device built in our laboratory with plastic scintillating optical fibers.

  5. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  6. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  7. Screening of anti-hypoxia/reoxygenation agents by an in vitro model. Part 1: Natural inhibitors for protein tyrosine kinase activated by hypoxia/reoxygenation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Morita, I; Shao, G; Yao, X S; Murota, S

    2000-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) signaling pathways play important roles in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injuries. Inhibition of PTK activation can protect against I/R- or H/R-induced damages. As one part of our work for seeking bioactive compounds from natural sources against I/R or H/R, in the present study we examined the effects of 54 compounds purified from various traditional Chinese herbs on H/R-induced PTK activation by means of an in vitro H/R model in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The results demonstrated that an increase in PTK activation was induced after 2 h of reoxygenation. Compounds 2 (macrostemososide A), 3 (laxogenin-3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-L-arabinopyra nosyl- (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside), 4 (chinenoside II), 7 (ginsenoside-Rd), 52 (icariin), 53 (icariside), and 54 (icaritin) showed relatively obvious inhibition on this H/R-induced PTK activation. Compounds 5 (beta-sitosterol) and 6 (daucosterine), especially 5, completely blocked such an increased activation of PTK induced by H/R. On the contrary, compound 29 (isocumarine) significantly promoted PTK activation further. Moreover, the effects of these compounds on PTK activation were dose-dependent.

  8. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  9. Hypoxia-Responsive Cobalt Complexes in Tumor Spheroids: Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Edward S; Kaur, Amandeep; Bishop, David P; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Kuchel, Philip W; Grieve, Stuart M; Figtree, Gemma A; Renfrew, Anna K; Bonnitcha, Paul D; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-21

    Dense tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies due to the unique tumor microenvironment characterized by hypoxic regions that promote cellular dormancy. Bioreductive drugs that are activated in response to this hypoxic environment are an attractive strategy for therapy with anticipated lower harmful side effects in normoxic healthy tissue. Cobalt bioreductive pro-drugs that selectively release toxic payloads upon reduction in hypoxic cells have shown great promise as anticancer agents. However, the bioreductive response in the tumor microenvironment must be better understood, as current techniques for monitoring bioreduction to Co(II) such as X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure provide limited information on speciation and require synchrotron radiation sources. Here, we present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an accessible and powerful technique to monitor bioreduction by treating the cobalt complex as an MRI contrast agent and monitoring the change in water signal induced by reduction from diamagnetic Co(III) to paramagnetic Co(II). Cobalt pro-drugs built upon the tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine ligand scaffold with varying charge were investigated for distribution and activity in a 3D tumor spheroid model by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and MRI. In addition, paramagnetic (1)H NMR spectroscopy of spheroids enabled determination of the speciation of activated Co(II)TPAx complexes. This study demonstrates the utility of MRI and associated spectroscopy techniques for understanding bioreductive cobalt pro-drugs in the tumor microenvironment and has broader implications for monitoring paramagnetic metal-based therapies.

  10. Magnetic resonance contrast media sensing in vivo molecular imaging agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Norouzian, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Inanlou, Davoud Nouri; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic imaging is commonly performed by nuclear medicine facilities such as PET or SPECT, etc. The production and biomedical applications of bio-molecular sensing in vivo MRI metabolic contrast agents has recently become of great universal research interest, which follows its great success as a potential cost effective, less radioactive, nuclear medicine alternative. Temperature, redox potential, enzyme activity, free radial/metal ion responsive and/or pH sensitive molecular metabolic MR contrast agents are among the famous instances exemplified, which basically promote MR image contrast enhancement ability to distinguish molecular metabolic/gene expression features. Overall, these MRI contrast agents provide a framework to achieve a greater degree of accuracy from MRI as a low cost, more available facility, non radioactive radiation producing and highly sensitive biomedical tool to propound as a new suggesting opponent for PET nuclear medicine imaging. In the present review, the design, development, examination and future of the above agents will be discussed in detail.

  11. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  12. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent. PMID:23912977

  13. Modifying the size distribution of microbubble contrast agents for high-frequency subharmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Subharmonic imaging is of interest for high frequency (>10 MHz) nonlinear imaging, because it can specifically detect the response of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). However, conventional UCA produce a weak subharmonic response at high frequencies, which limits the sensitivity of subharmonic imaging. We hypothesized that modifying the size distribution of the agent can enhance its high-frequency subharmonic response. The overall goal of this study was to investigate size-manipulated populations of the agent to determine the range of sizes that produce the strongest subharmonic response at high frequencies (in this case, 20 MHz). A secondary goal was to assess whether the number or the volume-weighted size distribution better represents the efficacy of the agent for high-frequency subharmonic imaging. Methods: The authors created six distinct agent size distributions from the native distribution of a commercially available UCA (Targestar-P®). The median (number-weighted) diameter of the native agent was 1.63 μm, while the median diameters of the size-manipulated populations ranged from 1.35 to 2.99 μm. The authors conducted acoustic measurements with native and size-manipulated agent populations to assess their subharmonic response to 20 MHz excitation (pulse duration 1.5 μs, pressure amplitudes 100–398 kPa). Results: The results showed a considerable difference between the subharmonic response of the agent populations that were investigated. The subharmonic response peaked for the agent population with a median diameter of 2.15 μm, which demonstrated a subharmonic signal that was 8 dB higher than the native agent. Comparing the subharmonic response of different UCA populations indicated that microbubbles with diameters between 1.3 and 3 μm are the dominant contributors to the subharmonic response at 20 MHz. Additionally, a better correlation was observed between the subharmonic response of the agent and the number-weighted size-distribution (R2

  14. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  15. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; Harari, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m2 and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [61Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging demonstrates measureable changes

  16. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  17. PSMA-targeted contrast agents for intraoperative imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Lee, Jeong Heon; Kang, Homan; Park, G Kate; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2017-02-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) can serve as a molecular cell surface target for the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging enables highly sensitive, rapid, and non-radioactive imaging of PSMA, though specific targeting still remains a challenge because no optimized contrast agents exist.

  18. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of a targeted nanoglobular dual-modal imaging agent for MR imaging and image-guided surgery of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingqian; Ye, Zhen; Lindner, Daniel; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-06-01

    To synthesize and evaluate a peptide targeted nanoglobular dual modal imaging agent specific to a cancer biomarker in tumor stroma for MRI and fluorescence visualization of prostate tumor in image-guided surgery. A peptide (CGLIIQKNEC, CLT1) targeted generation 2 nanoglobular (polylysine dendrimer with a silsesquioxane core) dual modal imaging agent, CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA-MA)-Cy5, was synthesized by stepwise conjugation of Gd-DOTA-MA, Cy5 and peptide to the dendrimer. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of the targeted dual imaging agent was evaluated on a Bruker 7T animal scanner with male athymic nude mice bearing orthotopic PC3-GFP prostate tumor. Fluorescence tumor imaging of the agent was carried out on a Maestro fluorescence imaging system. The targeted agent CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA-MA)-Cy5 produced greater contrast enhancement in the tumor tissue than the control agent KAREC-G2-(Gd-DOTA-MA)-Cy5 at a dose of 30 μmol-Gd/kg in the MR images of the tumor bearing mice. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA-MA)-Cy5 in the tumor tissue was approximately 2 fold of that of the control agent in the first 15 min post-injection. The targeted agent also resulted in bright fluorescence signals in the tumor tissue. The CLT1 peptide targeted nanoglobular dual-imaging agent CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA-MA)-Cy5 has a potential for MRI and fluorescence visualization of prostate tumor.

  20. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  1. Noninvasive Identification of Renal Hypoxia in Experimental Myocardial Infarctions of Different Sizes by Using BOLD MR Imaging in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Di; Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Ting-Ting; Peng, Xin-Gui; Cai, Yu; Wang, Lin; Bai, Ying-Ying; Ju, Shenghong

    2017-08-04

    Purpose To test the feasibility of using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure alterations in renal oxygenation in a mouse model with experimental myocardial infarctions (MIs) of different sizes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local animal ethics committee. One hundred eighty-nine male C57BL/6 J mice were randomly subjected to MI surgery (with different locations of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion) or sham surgery, defined as the exposure of the heart but no ligation. Mice with MI underwent late gadolinium enhancement imaging 1 day after occlusion to confirm infarct size. Mice were sorted into three groups: those with large MI (n = 48), those with small MI (n = 48), and those with sham operation (n = 36). Renal BOLD MR imaging was performed before and 1, 7, 14, 28, and 60 days after MI, and histologic analysis of renal hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) was performed to evaluate tissue hypoxia and kidney injury in subgroups imaged at each time point. The relationships between the BOLD R2* and HIF-1α expression and between HIF-1α and KIM-1 expression were assessed. Statistical analyses were performed with one-way analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman correlation test. Results A significant elevation in R2* was detected in the MI groups compared with the sham group in the cortex (P < .001 for large MI vs sham group; P = .007 for small MI vs sham group) and medulla (P < .001 for large MI vs sham group; P = .003 for small MI vs sham group) on day 60, and R2* was higher in the large MI group than in the small MI group (P < .001). Renal HIF-1α expression was increased after MI and showed linear correlation with R2* in the cortex (R(2) = 0.56) and medulla (R(2) = 0.63). In addition, an increase in renal KIM-1 was observed in the MI groups compared with the sham group on day 60 (sham group, 53.9 × 10(3) arbitrary units [au]

  2. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Screening of anti-hypoxia/reoxygenation agents by an in vitro method. Part 2: Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation prevented hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in endothelial gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Morita, I; Zhang, L; Shao, G; Yao, X S; Murota, S

    2000-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induced an injury in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) after 2 h of reoxygenation in cultured HUVEC. Free radical scavenger (DMSO) and antioxidant (SOD) did not prevent this GJIC injury at all. Protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin C) partly blocked this injury. However, the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein completely inhibited this GJIC injury. Compounds 1 [laxogenin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinosyl-(1-->6)- beta-D-glucopyranoside], 2 (macrostemososide A), 3 [laxogenin-3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha- L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside], 4 (chinenoside II), 5 (beta-sitosterol), 6 (daucosterine), 7 (ginsenoside-Rd), 29 (isocumarine), 52 (icariin), 53 (icariside), and 54 (icaritin), which showed obvious influence on H/R-induced PTK activation as stated in Part 1 (except 1), were explored for their effects on GJIC. The results showed that compounds 2-7 and 52-57 partly protected H/R-induced GJIC injury. Compounds 5 and 6 (especially 5), which showed the strongest inhibitory effects on PTK activation, completely blocked H/R-provoked GJIC injury. Compound 1, which did not influence PTK activation, failed to prevent this GJIC injury. In contrast, compound 29, which significantly promoted PTK activation, enhanced this H/R-induced GJIC injury further. Western blotting of connexin 43, an important gap junctional protein for modulating GJIC in HUVEC, revealed that interference with the gap junctional protein might be the most direct mechanism for compounds 2, 5, 29, and 53 to affect H/R-injured GJIC.

  4. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  5. Bisphosphonate-Based Contrast Agents for Radiological Imaging of Microcalcifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    treatment of patients with bone metastases [5]. Two such commercially available compounds are pamidronate disodium, available as Aredia® from...reaction has superior yield (>70%) to the 18-21% yield for pamidronate - IRDye-78 (LI-COR) conjugation reported previously [6]. Representative images are

  6. Development of contrast enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lex, L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful new diagnostic tool in medicine. In MRI there is a great need to improve the specific identification of different tissues i.e. to enhance the contrast between them. This review tries to cover most of the approaches known for solving this problem.

  7. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescent guided surgical resection of glioma using targeted molecular imaging agents: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Sonya E.L.; Wright, James; Sloan, Andrew E.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2016-01-01

    The median life expectancy following a diagnosis of glioblastoma (GBM) is 15 months. While chemotherapeutics may someday cure GBM by killing the highly dispersive malignant cells, the most important contribution that clinicians can currently offer to improve survival is by maximizing the extent of resection and providing concurrent chemo-radiation, which has become standard. Strides have been made in this area with the advent and implementation of methods of improved intraoperative tumor visualization. One of these techniques, optical fluorescent imaging with targeted molecular imaging agents, allows the surgeon to view fluorescently labeled tumor tissue during surgery with the use of special microscopy – thereby highlighting where to resect, and indicating when tumor-free margins have been obtained. This advantage is especially important at the difficult to observe margins where tumor cells infiltrate normal tissue. Targeted fluorescent agents also may be valuable for identifying tumor versus non-tumor tissue. In this review, we briefly summarize non-targeted fluorescent tumor imaging agents before discussing several novel targeted fluorescent agents being developed for glioma imaging in the context of fluorescent guided surgery or live molecular navigation. Many of these agents are currently undergoing preclinical testing. As the agents become available, however, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each. PMID:26915698

  9. HER2 Targeted Molecular MR Imaging Using a De Novo Designed Protein Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingjuan; Li, Shunyi; Wei, Lixia; Jiang, Jie; Long, Robert; Mao, Hui; Wei, Ling; Wang, Liya; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively assess disease biomarkers has been hampered by the lack of desired contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability, and optimized pharmacokinetics. We have developed a novel MR imaging probe targeting to HER2, a biomarker for various cancer types and a drug target for anti-cancer therapies. This multimodal HER20targeted MR imaging probe integrates a de novo designed protein contrast agent with a high affinity HER2 affibody and a near IR fluorescent dye. Our probe can differentially monitor tumors with different expression levels of HER2 in both human cell lines and xenograft mice models. In addition to its 100-fold higher dose efficiency compared to clinically approved non-targeting contrast agent DTPA, our developed agent also exhibits advantages in crossing the endothelial boundary, tissue distribution, and tumor tissue retention over reported contrast agents as demonstrated by even distribution of the imaging probe across the entire tumor mass. This contrast agent will provide a powerful tool for quantitative assessment of molecular markers, and improved resolution for diagnosis, prognosis and drug discovery. PMID:21455310

  10. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce T; Robinson, Joshua D; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam.

  11. Towards a framework for agent-based image analysis of remote-sensing data.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Peter; Lettmayer, Paul; Blaschke, Thomas; Belgiu, Mariana; Wegenkittl, Stefan; Graf, Roland; Lampoltshammer, Thomas Josef; Andrejchenko, Vera

    2015-04-03

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) as a paradigm for analysing remotely sensed image data has in many cases led to spatially and thematically improved classification results in comparison to pixel-based approaches. Nevertheless, robust and transferable object-based solutions for automated image analysis capable of analysing sets of images or even large image archives without any human interaction are still rare. A major reason for this lack of robustness and transferability is the high complexity of image contents: Especially in very high resolution (VHR) remote-sensing data with varying imaging conditions or sensor characteristics, the variability of the objects' properties in these varying images is hardly predictable. The work described in this article builds on so-called rule sets. While earlier work has demonstrated that OBIA rule sets bear a high potential of transferability, they need to be adapted manually, or classification results need to be adjusted manually in a post-processing step. In order to automate these adaptation and adjustment procedures, we investigate the coupling, extension and integration of OBIA with the agent-based paradigm, which is exhaustively investigated in software engineering. The aims of such integration are (a) autonomously adapting rule sets and (b) image objects that can adopt and adjust themselves according to different imaging conditions and sensor characteristics. This article focuses on self-adapting image objects and therefore introduces a framework for agent-based image analysis (ABIA).

  12. Towards a framework for agent-based image analysis of remote-sensing data

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Peter; Lettmayer, Paul; Blaschke, Thomas; Belgiu, Mariana; Wegenkittl, Stefan; Graf, Roland; Lampoltshammer, Thomas Josef; Andrejchenko, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) as a paradigm for analysing remotely sensed image data has in many cases led to spatially and thematically improved classification results in comparison to pixel-based approaches. Nevertheless, robust and transferable object-based solutions for automated image analysis capable of analysing sets of images or even large image archives without any human interaction are still rare. A major reason for this lack of robustness and transferability is the high complexity of image contents: Especially in very high resolution (VHR) remote-sensing data with varying imaging conditions or sensor characteristics, the variability of the objects’ properties in these varying images is hardly predictable. The work described in this article builds on so-called rule sets. While earlier work has demonstrated that OBIA rule sets bear a high potential of transferability, they need to be adapted manually, or classification results need to be adjusted manually in a post-processing step. In order to automate these adaptation and adjustment procedures, we investigate the coupling, extension and integration of OBIA with the agent-based paradigm, which is exhaustively investigated in software engineering. The aims of such integration are (a) autonomously adapting rule sets and (b) image objects that can adopt and adjust themselves according to different imaging conditions and sensor characteristics. This article focuses on self-adapting image objects and therefore introduces a framework for agent-based image analysis (ABIA). PMID:27721916

  13. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zehri, Aqib H.; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F.; Mooney, Michael A.; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Preul, Mark C.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery. PMID:24872922

  14. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Zehri, Aqib H; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F; Mooney, Michael A; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Preul, Mark C; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. A COMPREHENSIVE LITERATURE SEARCH WAS PERFORMED UTILIZING PUBMED AND KEY WORDS: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery.

  15. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment.

  16. PSMA-Activated Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    PSMA-14 was observed in the cell extract , consistent with the ability of the highly charged carrier peptide to keep the agent out of cells, figure 2A...LNCaP Cell extract LNCaP 300nM JHD9784 Cell extract LNCaP 1uM JHD9784 pe rc en ta ge PSA-15 (JHD9784) cleavage assay Ph12ADT PhL12ADT JHD9784 0...10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Media, JHD9783 no cells Media + 300nM JHD9783, LNCaP Media + 1uM JHD9783, LNCaP Cell extract LNCaP

  17. Magnetic conjugated polymer nanoparticles as bimodal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Howes, Philip; Green, Mark; Bowers, Alex; Parker, David; Varma, Gopal; Kallumadil, Mathew; Hughes, Mary; Warley, Alice; Brain, Anthony; Botnar, Rene

    2010-07-21

    Hybrid nanoparticles which incorporate multiple functionalities, such as fluorescence and magnetism, can exhibit enhanced efficiency and versatility by performing several tasks in parallel. In this study, magnetic-fluorescent semiconductor polymer nanospheres (MF-SPNs) have been synthesized by encapsulation of hydrophobic conjugated polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in phospholipid micelles. Four fluorescent conjugated polymers were used, yielding aqueous dispersions of nanoparticles which emit across the visible spectrum. The MF-SPNs were shown to be magnetically responsive and simultaneously fluorescent. In MRI studies, they were seen to have a shortening effect on the transverse T(2)* relaxation time, which demonstrates their potential as an MR contrast agent. Finally, successful uptake of the MF-SPNs by SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells was demonstrated, and they were seen to behave as bright and stable fluorescent markers. There was no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth.

  18. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a review of the results of experimental and clinical research on both I-amphetamine derivatives and pH-shift agents. Virtually all relevant working groups from the USA and Europe have contributed to this volume. The pharmacology of amphetamine and the corresponding receptor theories are described in detail, whereas other chapters deal with the labeling as well as the metabolic process of this drug. In addition to this, new amphetamine derivatives are presented together with other essential products which play a significant role in scintigraphy of the brain function. Finally, there are two chapters on instrumentation problems followed by eight contributions on the clinical results of amphetamine scintigraphy in cerebral vascular diseases, epilepsy, migraine and brain tumors.

  19. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  20. 4-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl derivatives of O(6)-benzylguanine as hypoxia-activated prodrug inhibitors of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), which produces resistance to agents targeting the O-6 position of DNA guanine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Liu, Mao-Chin; Luo, Mei-Zhen; Penketh, Philip G; Baumann, Raymond P; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Sartorelli, Alan C

    2011-11-10

    A series of 4-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl prodrug derivatives of O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG), conceived as prodrugs of O(6)-BG, an inhibitor of the resistance protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to undergo bioreductive activation by reductase enzymes under oxygen deficiency. Three agents of this class, 4-nitrobenzyl (6-(benzyloxy)-9H-purin-2-yl)carbamate (1) and its monomethyl (2) and gem-dimethyl analogues (3), were tested for activation by reductase enzyme systems under oxygen deficient conditions. Compound 3, the most water-soluble of these agents, gave the highest yield of O(6)-BG following reduction of the nitro group trigger. Compound 3 was also evaluated for its ability to sensitize 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[(methylamino)carbonyl]hydrazine (laromustine)-resistant DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, which express high levels of AGT, to the cytotoxic effects of this agent under normoxic and oxygen deficient conditions. While 3 had little or no effect on laromustine cytotoxicity under aerobic conditions, significant enhancement occurred under oxygen deficiency, providing evidence for the preferential release of the AGT inhibitor O(6)-BG under hypoxia.

  1. 4-Nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl Derivatives of O6-Benzylguanine as Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug Inhibitors of O6-Alkylguanine-DNA Alkyltransferase (AGT) which Produces Resistance to Agents Targeting the O-6 Position of DNA Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rui; Liu, Mao-Chin; Luo, Mei-Zhen; Penketh, Philip G.; Baumann, Raymond P.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 4-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl prodrug derivatives of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG), conceived as prodrugs of O6-BG, an inhibitor of the resistance protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to undergo bioreductive activation by reductase enzymes under oxygen deficiency. Three agents of this class, 4-nitrobenzyl (6-(benzyloxy)-9H-purin-2-yl)carbamate (1), and its monomethyl (2) and gem-dimethyl analogues (3) were tested for activation by reductase enzyme systems under oxygen deficient conditions. Compound 3, the most water-soluble of these agents, gave the highest yield of O6-BG following reduction of the nitro group trigger. Compound 3 was also evaluated for its ability to sensitize 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[(methylamino)carbonyl]hydrazine (laromustine)-resistant DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, which express high levels of AGT, to the cytotoxic effects of this agent under normoxic and oxygen deficient conditions. While 3 had little or no effect on laromustine cytotoxicity under aerobic conditions, significant enhancement occurred under oxygen deficiency, providing evidence for the preferential release of the AGT inhibitor O6-BG under hypoxia. PMID:21955333

  2. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  3. Correlating Molecular Character of NIR Imaging Agents with Tissue-Specific Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Hyun, Hoon; Tawney, Joseph G.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents are emerging in optical imaging as sensitive, cost-effective, and nonharmful alternatives to current agents that emit harmful ionizing radiation. Developing spectrally distinct NIR fluorophores to visualize sensitive vital tissues to selectively avoid them during surgical resection of diseased tissue is of great significance. Herein, we report the synthetic variation of pentamethine cyanine fluorophores with modifications of physicochemical properties toward prompting tissue-specific uptake into sensitive tissues (i.e., endocrine glands). Tissue-specific targeting and biodistribution studies revealed localization of contrast agents in the adrenal and pituitary glands, pancreas, and lymph nodes with dependence on molecular characteristics. Incorporation of hydrophobic heterocyclic rings, alkyl groups, and halogens allowed a fine-tuning capability to the hydrophobic character and dipole moment for observing perturbation in biological activity in response to minor structural alterations. These NIR contrast agents have potential for clinical translation for intraoperative imaging in the delineation of delicate glands. PMID:25923454

  4. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  5. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  6. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hógáin, Dara Ó.; Davies, Gareth R.; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T1 dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T1 dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T1 contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R1 values using a set of images at each field. The R1 maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR1 in which pixel values depend on the change in R1 of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR1 image compared with a standard T1-weighted image.

  7. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hógáin, Dara O; Davies, Gareth R; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J

    2011-01-07

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T(1) dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T(1) dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T(1) contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R(1) values using a set of images at each field. The R(1) maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR(1) in which pixel values depend on the change in R(1) of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR(1) image compared with a standard T(1)-weighted image.

  8. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-05-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents.

  9. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  10. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM (-1) s(-1)), respectively. The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works.

  11. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents. PMID:26137374

  12. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  13. Utilization of nanoparticles as X-ray contrast agents for diagnostic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    De La Vega, José Carlos; Häfeli, Urs O

    2015-01-01

    Among all the diagnostic imaging modalities, X-ray imaging techniques are the most commonly used owing to their high resolution and low cost. The improvement of these techniques relies heavily on the development of novel X-ray contrast agents, which are molecules that enhance the visibility of internal structures within the body in X-ray imaging. To date, clinically used X-ray contrast agents consist mainly of small iodinated molecules that might cause severe adverse effects (e.g. allergies, cardiovascular diseases and nephrotoxicity) in some patients owing to the large and repeated doses that are required to achieve good contrast. For this reason, there is an increasing interest in the development of alternative X-ray contrast agents utilizing elements with high atomic numbers (e.g. gold, bismuth, ytterbium and tantalum), which are well known for exhibiting high absorption of X-rays. Nanoparticles (NPs) made from these elements have been reported to have better imaging properties, longer blood circulation times and lower toxicity than conventional iodinated X-ray contrast agents. Additionally, the combination of two or more of these elements into a single carrier allows for the development of multimodal and hybrid contrast agents. Herein, the limitations of iodinated X-ray contrast agents are discussed and the parameters that influence the efficacy of X-ray contrast agents are summarized. Several examples of the design and production of both iodinated and iodine-free NP-based X-ray contrast agents are then provided, emphasizing the studies performed to evaluate their X-ray attenuation capabilities and their toxicity in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Mechanisms of ZnII-Activated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Major, Jody L.; Boiteau, Rene M.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of a series of ZnII-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents that modulate the access of water to a paramagnetic GdIII ion to create an increase in relaxivity upon binding of ZnII. In the absence and presence of ZnII, the coordination at the GdIII center is modulated by appended ZnII binding groups. These groups were systematically varied to optimize the change in coordination upon ZnII binding. We observe that at least one appended aminoacetate must be present as a coordinating group to bind GdIII and effectively inhibit access of water. At least two binding groups are required to efficiently bind ZnII, creating an unsaturated complex and allowing access of water. 13C isotopic labeling of the acetate binding groups for NMR spectroscopy provides evidence of a change in the metal coordination of these groups upon the addition of ZnII supporting our proposed mechanism of activation as presented. PMID:18928280

  15. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  16. Ytterbium-based PARACEST agent: feasibility of CEST imaging on a clinical MR scanner.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yukihisa; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nishie, Akihiro; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Kato, Naoki; Yoshise, Satoshi; Keupp, Jochen; Burdinski, Dirk; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of performing chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging using ytterbium-based paramagnetic CEST (PARACEST) agents on a clinical magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. We prepared solutions of 3 different ytterbium-based PARACEST agents at concentrations of 5, 10, 20, and 50 mM at a pH of 7.4 and at a concentration of 50 mM at pHs of 3.0, 5.0, 7.4, and 9.5. We acquired images with a turbo spin echo technique using a quadrature head coil and a clinical 3.0-tesla MR system in accordance with the safety limits of the specific absorption rate (SAR). We acquired CEST images with presaturation offset frequencies from -5,000 Hz (-39.1 ppm) to 5,000 Hz (39.1 ppm) with an interval of 500 Hz (3.9 ppm) for each condition. We repeated each scan 3 times and then calculated the mean and standard deviations of the magnitude of the CEST effect at different concentrations and pH values for each agent. We used one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc test to compare mean values of the magnitude of the CEST effect obtained at different concentrations and pH values. P < 0.05 was considered significant. PARACEST agents showed a strong CEST effect at their specific presaturation offset frequencies. For each agent, the CEST effect showed significant concentration dependency (P < 0.05), increasing with agent concentration, and significant pH dependency (P < 0.05), with strong effect near physiological pH. CEST imaging using ytterbium-based PARACEST agents might be feasible on a clinical MR scanner with further modifications, such as adjustments of the presaturation radiofrequency pulse and imaging protocols.

  17. Development of new brain imaging agents based upon nocaine-modafinil hybrid monoamine transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Musachio, John L; Hong, Jinsoo; Ichise, Masanori; Seneca, Nicholas; Brown, Amira K; Liow, Jeih-San; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B; Pike, Victor W; He, Rong; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2006-06-15

    11C-labeled (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]ethanol ([11C]5) and (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]-1-(piperidin-1-yl)ethanone ([11C]6) were synthesized and evaluated as new imaging agents for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). [11C]5 and [11C]6 display high affinity for the NET in vitro (Ki = 0.94 and 0.68 nM, respectively) and significant selectivity over the dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporters (SERT). Because of their high affinity and favorable transporter selectivities we speculated that these ligands might serve as useful PET agents for imaging NET in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, both of these ligands provided brain images that were more typical of those shown by agents binding to the DAT.

  18. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high “relaxivity per particle” and “relaxivity density”, and biodegradability. PMID:23432004

  19. Nano-sized Contrast Agents to Non-Invasively Detect Renal Inflammation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular imaging methods have been developed that employ nano-sized contrast agents to detect markers of inflammation within tissues. Renal inflammation contributes to disease progression in a wide range of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and a biopsy is currently the only method of definitively diagnosing active renal inflammation. However, the development of new molecular imaging methods that employ contrast agents capable of detecting particular immune cells or protein biomarkers will allow clinicians to evaluate inflammation throughout the kidneys, and to assess a patient's response to immunomodulatory drugs. These imaging tools will improve our ability to validate new therapies and to optimize the treatment of individual patients with existing therapies. This review describes the clinical need for new methods of monitoring renal inflammation, and recent advances in the development of nano-sized contrast agents for detection of inflammatory markers of renal disease. PMID:24206601

  20. Intravenous ultrasound contrast agents versus other imaging methods in pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases - a comparison.

    PubMed

    Piskunowicz, Maciej; Kosiak, Wojciech; Batko, Tomasz; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Szarmach, Arkadiusz

    2013-12-01

    The lack of registration of ultrasound contrast agents for use in patients below the age of 18 is a significant limitation of their usage. Despite this, examinations with the use of contrast agents are conducted in numerous centers, mainly as part of the diagnostic process of vesicoureteral reflux. Examinations after an intravenous administration of contrast agents are conducted rarely. The reason for this is not only the lack of registration, but also the lack of studies on their safety profile in paediatric patients or no guidelines concerning the dosage. It seems that imaging with the use of such agents could help solve certain clinical problems when other diagnostic methods fail. The paper presents selected cases of pediatric patients treated in oncological departments, in whom the examination with the use of ultrasound contrast agents had a considerable influence on the diagnostic and therapeutic process.

  1. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  2. Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles As Molecular-Specific Contrast Agents for Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Targeted metallic nanoparticles have shown potential as a platform for development of molecular-specific contrast agents. Aptamers have recently been demonstrated as ideal candidates for molecular targeting applications. In this study, we investigated the development of aptamer-based gold nanoparticles as contrast agents, using aptamers as targeting agents and gold nanoparticles as imaging agents. We devised a novel conjugation approach using an extended aptamer design where the extension is complementary to an oligonucleotide sequence attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The chemical and optical properties of the aptamer−gold conjugates were characterized using size measurements and oligonucleotide quantitation assays. We demonstrate this conjugation approach to create a contrast agent designed for detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), obtaining reflectance images of PSMA(+) and PSMA(−) cell lines treated with the anti-PSMA aptamer−gold conjugates. This design strategy can easily be modified to incorporate multifunctional agents as part of a multimodal platform for reflectance imaging applications. PMID:18512972

  3. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  4. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  5. Submicron polycaprolactone particles as a carrier for imaging contrast agent for in vitro applications.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Robin, Sophie; Humbert, Philippe; Viennet, Céline; Agusti, Geraldine; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent materials have recently attracted considerable attention due to their unique properties and high performance as imaging agent in biomedical fields. Different imaging agents have been encapsulated in order to restrict its delivery to a specific area. In this study, a fluorescent contrast agent was encapsulated for in vitro application by polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer. The encapsulation was performed using modified double emulsion solvent evaporation technique with sonication. Fluorescent nanoparticles (20 nm) were incorporated in the inner aqueous phase of double emulsion. A number of samples were fabricated using different concentrations of fluorescent contrast agent. The contrast agent-containing submicron particle was characterized by a zetasizer for average particle size, SEM and TEM for morphology observations and fluorescence spectrophotometer for encapsulation efficiency. Moreover, contrast agent distribution in the PCL matrix was determined by confocal microscopy. The incorporation of contrast agent in different concentrations did not affect the physicochemical properties of PCL particles and the average size of encapsulated particles was found to be in the submicron range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporo-Spectral Imaging of Intrinsic Optical Signals during Hypoxia-Induced Spreading Depression-Like Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Mané, Maria; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is characterized by a sustained near-complete depolarization of neurons, a massive depolarization of glia, and a negative deflection of the extracellular DC potential. These electrophysiological signs are accompanied by an intrinsic optical signal (IOS) which arises from changes in light scattering and absorption. Even though the underlying mechanisms are unclear, the IOS serves as non-invasive tool to define the spatiotemporal dynamics of SD in brain slices. Usually the tissue is illuminated by white light, and light reflectance or transmittance is monitored. Using a polychromatic, fast-switchable light source we now performed temporo-spectral recordings of the IOS associated with hypoxia-induced SD-like depolarization (HSD) in rat hippocampal slices kept in an interface recording chamber. Recording full illumination spectra (320–680 nm) yielded distinct reflectance profiles for the different phases of HSD. Early during hypoxia tissue reflectance decreased within almost the entire spectrum due to cell swelling. HSD was accompanied by a reversible reflectance increase being most pronounced at 400 nm and 460 nm. At 440 nm massive porphyrin absorption (Soret band) was detected. Hypotonic solutions, Ca2+-withdrawal and glial poisoning intensified the reflectance increase during HSD, whereas hypertonic solutions dampened it. Replacement of Cl- inverted the reflectance increase. Inducing HSD by cyanide distorted the IOS and reflectance at 340–400 nm increased irreversibly. The pronounced changes at short wavelengths (380 nm, 460 nm) and their cyanide sensitivity suggest that block of mitochondrial metabolism contributes to the IOS during HSD. For stable and reliable IOS recordings during HSD wavelengths of 460–560 nm are recommended. PMID:22952835

  7. Poly(iohexol) nanoparticles as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yap, Felix Y; Yin, Lichen; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Qin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Fan, Timothy M; Gaba, Ron C; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-09-18

    Biocompatible poly(iohexol) nanoparticles, prepared through cross-linking of iohexol and hexamethylene diisocyanate followed by coprecipitation of the resulting cross-linked polymer with mPEG-polylactide, were utilized as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Compared to conventional small-molecule contrast agents, poly(iohexol) nanoparticles exhibited substantially protracted retention within the tumor bed and a 36-fold increase in CT contrast 4 h post injection, which makes it possible to acquire CT images with improved diagnosis accuracy over a broad time frame without multiple administrations.

  8. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuchun; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III-IV lung cancer. A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III-IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer.

  9. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer. Methods A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. Results All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). Conclusion 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer. PMID:27322586

  10. Effects of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA on Plant Growth and Root Imaging in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binmei; Wang, Qi; Ni, Xiaoyu; Dong, Yaling; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have a wide range of applications in medical studies involving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), these agents are seldom used to enhance MRI images of plant root systems. To extend the application of MRI contrast agents to plant research and to develop related techniques to study root systems, we examined the applicability of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the imaging of rice roots. Specifically, we examined the biological effects of various concentrations of Gd-DTPA on rice growth and MRI images. Analysis of electrical conductivity and plant height demonstrated that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA had little impact on rice in the short-term. The results of signal intensity and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis suggested that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA was the appropriate concentration for enhancing MRI signals. In addition, examination of the long-term effects of Gd-DTPA on plant height showed that levels of this compound up to 5 mmol had little impact on rice growth and (to some extent) increased the biomass of rice. PMID:24945975

  11. Effects of the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Gd-DTPA on plant growth and root imaging in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zan; Qian, Junchao; Liu, Binmei; Wang, Qi; Ni, Xiaoyu; Dong, Yaling; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have a wide range of applications in medical studies involving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), these agents are seldom used to enhance MRI images of plant root systems. To extend the application of MRI contrast agents to plant research and to develop related techniques to study root systems, we examined the applicability of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the imaging of rice roots. Specifically, we examined the biological effects of various concentrations of Gd-DTPA on rice growth and MRI images. Analysis of electrical conductivity and plant height demonstrated that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA had little impact on rice in the short-term. The results of signal intensity and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis suggested that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA was the appropriate concentration for enhancing MRI signals. In addition, examination of the long-term effects of Gd-DTPA on plant height showed that levels of this compound up to 5 mmol had little impact on rice growth and (to some extent) increased the biomass of rice.

  12. Sunitinib treatment does not improve blood supply but induces hypoxia in human melanoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiangiogenic agents that disrupt the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway have been demonstrated to normalize tumor vasculature and improve tumor oxygenation in some studies and to induce hypoxia in others. The aim of this preclinical study was to investigate the effect of sunitinib treatment on the morphology and function of tumor vasculature and on tumor oxygenation. Methods A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanoma xenografts grown in dorsal window chambers were used as preclinical tumor models. Morphologic parameters of tumor vascular networks were assessed from high-resolution transillumination images, and tumor blood supply time was assessed from first-pass imaging movies recorded after a bolus of 155 kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran had been administered intravenously. Tumor hypoxia was assessed from immunohistochemical preparations of the imaged tissue by use of pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Results Sunitinib treatment reduced vessel densities, increased vessel segment lengths, did not affect blood supply times, and increased hypoxic area fractions. Conclusion Sunitinib treatment did not improve vascular function but induced hypoxia in A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP tumors. PMID:22947392

  13. Optimization of oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Schneemann, Herbert; Vogt, Florian M; Herborn, Christoph U; Ruhm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jorg F

    2003-07-01

    Effect on small-bowel distention of additives to water as contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was assessed. Oral contrast agents included water and water in combination with mannitol, a bulk fiber laxative, locust bean gum, and a combination of mannitol and locust bean gum. Filling of the small bowel was quantified on coronal images obtained with two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence; bowel diameters were measured. Ingestion of water with locust bean gum and mannitol provided the best distention of the small bowel. MR imaging of the small bowel with oral administration of water can be improved with addition of osmotic and nonosmotic substances that lead to decreased water resorption.

  14. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T 1, spin-lattice relaxation and T 2, spin-spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T 1 and T 2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T 1 and 1/T 2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T 2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T 1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents.

  15. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  16. Multimodality PET/MR imaging agents targeted to activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chuqiao; Ng, Thomas S. C.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2013-01-01

    The recent emergence of multimodality imaging, particularly the combination of PET and MRI, has led to excitement over the prospect of improving detection of disease. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have become a popular platform for the fabrication of PET/MRI probes due to their advantages of high MRI detection sensitivity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In this paper, we report the synthesis of dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles labeled with the positron emitter 64Cu to generate a PET/MRI probe, and modified with small molecular maleic anhydride to increase negative surface charge. The modified nanoparticulate PET/MRI probe (MDIO-64Cu-DOTA) bears repetitive anionic charges on the surface that facilitate recognition by scavenger receptor type A (SR-A), a ligand-receptor found on activated macrophages but not on normal vessel walls. MDIO-64Cu-DOTA has an average iron oxide core size of 7-8 nm, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 62.7 nm, an r1 relaxivity of 16.8 mM−1·s−1, and an r2 relaxivity of 83.9 mM−1·s−1 (37 °C, 1.4 T). Cell studies confirmed that the probe was nontoxic and was specifically taken up by macrophages via SR-A. In comparison with the non-modified analog, the accumulation of maleylated DIO in macrophages was substantially improved. These characteristics demonstrate the promise of MDIO-64Cu-DOTA for identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques (VAP) via the targeting of macrophages. PMID:24166283

  17. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  18. Carbon Dots as Nontoxic and High-Performance Fluorescence Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haifang; Lu, Fushen; Luo, Pengju G.; Cao, Li; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Liu, Jia-Hui; Liu, Yuanfang; Chen, Min; Huang, Yipu; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (small carbon nanoparticles with the surface passivated by oligomeric PEG molecules) were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity and also for their optical imaging performance in reference to that of the commercially supplied CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The results suggested that the carbon dots were biocompatible, and their performance as fluorescence imaging agents was competitive. The implication to the use of carbon dots for in vitro and in vivo applications is discussed. PMID:20357893

  19. Doxycycline treatment in a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia reduces cerebral tissue and white matter injury: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Widerøe, Marius; Havnes, Marianne B; Morken, Tora Sund; Skranes, Jon; Goa, Pål-Erik; Brubakk, Ann-Mari

    2012-07-01

    Doxycycline may potentially be a neuroprotective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury through its anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to examine any long-term neuroprotection by doxycycline treatment on cerebral gray and white matter. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury was induced in 7-day-old rats. Pups were treated with either doxycycline (HI+doxy) or saline (HI+vehicle) by intraperitoneal injection at 1 h after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). At 6 h after HI, MnCl(2) was injected intraperitoneally for later manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI was performed with diffusion-weighted imaging on day 1 and T(1) -weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging at 7, 21 and 42 days after HI. Animals were killed after MRI on day 42 and histological examinations of the brains were performed. There was a tendency towards lower lesion volumes on diffusion maps among HI+doxy than HI+vehicle rats at 1 day after HI. Volumetric MRI showed increasing differences between groups with time after HI, with less cyst formation and less cerebral tissue loss among HI+doxy than HI+vehicle pups. HI+doxy pups had less manganese enhancement on day 7 after HI, indicating reduced inflammation. HI+doxy pups had higher fractional anisotropy on diffusion tensor imaging in major white matter tracts in the injured hemisphere than HI+vehicle pups, indicating less injury to white matter and better myelination. Histological examinations supported the MRI results. Lesion size on early MRI was highly correlated with final injury measures. In conclusion, a single dose of doxycycline reduced long-term cerebral tissue loss and white matter injury after neonatal HI, with an increasing effect of treatment with time after injury.

  20. Technetium-99m Labeled Duramycin: A Novel Molecular Imaging Agent to Detect Apoptosis in Cardiovascular Pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Farhan

    Apoptosis underlines atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction/reperfusion (IR) injury. An imaging agent targeting apoptosis would increase the specificity of non-invasive imaging of apoptosis in these pathologies. Duramycin binds to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on the surface of apoptotic cells and can thus target apoptosis. In this study, technetium-99m labeled duramycin (TcD) was used to image both atherosclerosis and IR injury in rabbits using SPECT/CT. Rabbits were inflicted with atherosclerotic damage, IR injury, or were unmanipulated (control). Also, to assess for detection of therapeutic changes, a cardioprotective agent (minocycline) was used in IR rabbits. TcD, 99mTc-Annexin A5 (positive control), and linear TcD (Duramycin without the binding head to PE) were all imaged using SPECT/CT. Aortic or heart samples were collected with their respective organ samples for gamma counting and histopathology. After correlating the imaging, sample gamma counts, and the histopathology, TcD is a feasible imaging agent for apoptosis in atherosclerotic and IR injury.

  1. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  2. Family of enhanced photoacoustic imaging agents for high-sensitivity and multiplexing studies in living mice.

    PubMed

    de la Zerda, Adam; Bodapati, Sunil; Teed, Robert; May, Salomón Y; Tabakman, Scott M; Liu, Zhuang; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Dai, Hongjie; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-06-26

    Photoacoustic imaging is a unique modality that overcomes to a great extent the resolution and depth limitations of optical imaging while maintaining relatively high contrast. However, since many diseases will not manifest an endogenous photoacoustic contrast, it is essential to develop exogenous photoacoustic contrast agents that can target diseased tissue(s). Here we present a family of novel photoacoustic contrast agents that are based on the binding of small optical dyes to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-dye). We synthesized five different SWNT-dye contrast agents using different optical dyes, creating five "flavors" of SWNT-dye nanoparticles. In particular, SWNTs that were coated with either QSY(21) (SWNT-QSY) or indocyanine green (SWNT-ICG) exhibited over 100-times higher photoacoustic contrast in living animals compared to plain SWNTs, leading to subnanomolar sensitivities. We then conjugated the SWNT-dye conjugates with cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptides to molecularly target the α(v)β(3) integrin, which is associated with tumor angiogenesis. Intravenous administration of these tumor-targeted imaging agents to tumor-bearing mice showed significantly higher photoacoustic signal in the tumor than in mice injected with the untargeted contrast agent. Finally, we were able to spectrally separate the photoacoustic signals of SWNT-QSY and SWNT-ICG in living animals injected subcutaneously with both particles in the same location, opening the possibility for multiplexing in vivo studies.

  3. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M.; Mani, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities. PMID:23539505

  4. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi

    2013-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities.

  5. Microbubbles as x-ray scattering contrast agents using analyzer-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Arfelli, F; Rigon, L; Menk, R H

    2010-03-21

    Conventional contrast agents utilized in diagnostic radiology are based on x-ray absorption properties; alternative physical principles capable of providing a contrast enhancement in radiographs have never been applied. This study exploits the possibility of using a novel type of contrast media based on x-ray scattering. The contrast agents consist of microbubble echo-enhancing agents, usually applied in ultrasound examinations, which are invisible with conventional x-ray absorption techniques. The experiment was carried out at the medical beamline of the synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste, Italy. A flat silicon analyzer crystal typically used for diffraction-enhanced imaging was utilized as a tool for detecting the scattering properties of the contrast agents. In analyzer-based imaging, it is possible to detect the scattering properties of the sample by shifting the analyzer crystal to selected positions of its reflectivity curve. In particular, when the sample consists of a large number of micro-particles an overall effect can be observed. Phantoms containing contrast agents based on microbubbles were imaged at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. High visibility of the details was demonstrated, and a strong contrast enhancement was measured compared to normal x-ray absorption techniques.

  6. Microbubble contrast agents: targeted ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-assisted drug-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2006-03-01

    The use of microbubble contrast agents for general tissue delineation and perfusion enjoys steady interest in ultrasound imaging. Microbubbles as contrast materials require a small dosage and show excellent detection sensitivity. Targeting ligands on the surface of microbubbles permit the selective accumulation of these particles in the areas of interest, which show an up-regulated level of receptor molecules on vascular endothelium. Selective contrast imaging of inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion injury, angiogenesis, and thrombosis has been achieved in animal models. Ultrasound-assisted drug delivery and activation, performed by combining microbubble agent containing drug substances or coadministered with pharmaceutical agents (including plasmid DNA for transfection), has been achieved in multiple model systems in vitro and in vivo. Ultrasound and microbubbles-based targeted acceleration of the thrombolytic enzyme action already have reached clinical trials. Overall, microbubble targeting and ultrasound-assisted microbubble-based drug-delivery systems will offer a step toward the application of targeted personalized diagnostics and therapy.

  7. The influence of bonding agents in improving interactions in composite propellants determined using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Dostanić, J; Husović, T V; Usćumlić, G; Heinemann, R J; Mijin, D

    2008-12-01

    Binder-oxidizer interactions in rocket composite propellants can be improved using adequate bonding agents. In the present work, the effectiveness of different 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates was determined by stereo and metallographic microscopy and using the software package Image-Pro Plus. The chemical analysis of samples was performed by a scanning electron microscope equipped for energy dispersive spectrometry.

  8. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging: Basic research and clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Labelling of amphetamines with /sup 123/I: Receptors for amphetamines; New amphetamine derivatives; Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications; and IM SPECT with the pinhole collimator.

  9. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b...prostate cancer by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In Year 3, we

  10. Synthesis of PSA Inhibitors as SPECT- and PET-Based Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    for their ability to inhibit PSA and chymotrypsin. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer , PSA inhibitors, boronic acids, peptidomimetics, serine protease...prostate cancer . First, all men undergoing androgen ablation, eventually relapse and no longer respond to hormone treatment . Therefore, there is an...Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maya Kostova, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University

  11. Fluorine-19 MRI Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking and Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew S.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 (19F)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging stand to revolutionize imaging-based research and clinical trials in several fields of medical intervention. First, their use in characterizing in vivo cell behavior may help bring cellular therapy closer to clinical acceptance. Second, their use in lung imaging provides novel noninvasive interrogation of the ventilated airspaces without the need for complicated, hard-to-distribute hardware. This article reviews the current state of 19F-based cell tracking and lung imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and describes the link between the methods across these fields and how they may mutually benefit from solutions to mutual problems encountered when imaging 19F-containing compounds, as well as hardware and software advancements. PMID:27042089

  12. Hypoxia and tissue destruction in pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Belton, Moerida; Brilha, Sara; Manavaki, Roido; Mauri, Francesco; Nijran, Kuldip; Hong, Young T; Patel, Neva H; Dembek, Marcin; Tezera, Liku; Green, Justin; Moores, Rachel; Aigbirhio, Franklin; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Fryer, Tim D; Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether lesions in human TB are hypoxic or whether this influences disease pathology. Human TB is characterised by extensive lung destruction driven by host matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly collagenases such as matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). Methods We investigated tissue hypoxia in five patients with PET imaging using the tracer [18F]-fluoromisonidazole ([18F]FMISO) and by immunohistochemistry. We studied the regulation of MMP secretion in primary human cell culture model systems in normoxia, hypoxia, chemical hypoxia and by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibition. Results [18F]FMISO accumulated in regions of TB consolidation and around pulmonary cavities, demonstrating for the first time severe tissue hypoxia in man. Patlak analysis of dynamic PET data showed heterogeneous levels of hypoxia within and between patients. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb)-infected human macrophages, hypoxia (1% pO2) upregulated MMP-1 gene expression 170-fold, driving secretion and caseinolytic activity. Dimethyloxalyl glycine (DMOG), a small molecule inhibitor which stabilises the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, similarly upregulated MMP-1. Hypoxia did not affect mycobacterial replication. Hypoxia increased MMP-1 expression in primary respiratory epithelial cells via intercellular networks regulated by TB. HIF-1α and NF-κB regulated increased MMP-1 activity in hypoxia. Furthermore, M.tb infection drove HIF-1α accumulation even in normoxia. In human TB lung biopsies, epithelioid macrophages and multinucleate giant cells express HIF-1α. HIF-1α blockade, including by targeted siRNA, inhibited TB-driven MMP-1 gene expression and secretion. Conclusions Human TB lesions are severely hypoxic and M.tb drives HIF-1α accumulation, synergistically increasing collagenase activity which will lead to lung destruction and cavitation. PMID:27245780

  13. A high-affinity, high-stability photoacoustic agent for imaging gastrin-releasing peptide receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Levi, Jelena; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the utility of targeted photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in providing molecular information to complement intrinsic functional and anatomical details of the vasculature within prostate lesion. We developed a PAI agent, AA3G-740, that targets gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), found to be highly overexpressed in prostate cancer. The binding specificity of the agent was evaluated in human prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and LNCaP, and antagonist properties determined by cell internalization and intracellular calcium mobilization studies. The imaging sensitivity was assessed for the agent itself and for the PC3 cells labeled with agent. The in vivo stability of the agent was determined in human plasma and in the blood of living mice. The in vivo binding of the agent was evaluated in PC3 prostate tumor models in mice, and was validated ex vivo by optical imaging. AA3G-740 demonstrated strong and specific binding to GRPR. The sensitivity of detection in vitro indicated suitability of the agent to image very small lesions. In mice, the agent was able to bind to GRPR even in poorly vascularized tumors leading to nearly 2-fold difference in photoacoustic signal relative to the control agent. The ability to image both vasculature and molecular profile outside the blood vessels gives molecular PAI a unique advantage over currently used imaging techniques. The imaging method presented here can find application both in diagnosis and in image-guided biopsy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Phthalocyanine photosensitizers as contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Bte Ebrahim; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for contrast agents for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of tumors. Herein, Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) was employed to evaluate phthalocyanines commonly used in photodynamic therapy as photoacoustic contrast agents. We studied the photoacoustic activity of three water-soluble phthalocyanine photosensitizers: phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (PcS4), Zn(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (ZnPcS4) and Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid (AlPcS4) in phantom and in tumor-bearing mice to investigate the biodistribution and fate of the phthalocyanines in the biological tissues. PcS4 was observed to grant good contrast between the different reticuloendothelial organs and accumulate in the tumor within an hour of post-administration. ZnPcS4 and AlPcS4 offered little contrast in photoacoustic signals between the organs. PcS4 is a promising photoacoustic contrast agent and can be exploited as a photodiagnostic agent.

  15. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  16. Imaging specificity of MR-optical imaging agents following the masking of surface charge by poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Wu, Shou-Cheng; Lin, Kun-Liang; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Singh, Gyan; Chen, Ming-Hung; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Liu, Gin-Chung; Lee, Te-Wei; Hu, Shao-Hwa; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2013-05-01

    The coupling of specific antibodies to imaging agents often improves imaging specificity. However, free amine groups designed for the coupling can cause nonspecific binding of the imaging agents. We report here development of a nanocarrier, MnMEIO-silane-NH2-mPEG nanoparticles (NPs), consisting of a manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle core (MnMEIO), a copolymer shell of silane and amine-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (silane-EA-mPEG). The key feature in MnMEIO-silane-NH2-mPEG is the flexible PEG, which masks the non-conjugated reactive amine groups (-NH2 ↔ -NH3(+)) and reduces nonspecific binding of MnMEIO-silane-NH2-mPEG to cells. The amine groups on MnMEIO-silane-NH2-mPEG were conjugated with the fluorescent dye, Cy777 or antibodies [Erbitux (Erb)] to form a MR-optical imaging contrast agent (MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb)-mPEG) for EGFR-expressing tumors. Confocal microscopic and flow cytometric analyses showed that MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb)-mPEG displayed low nonspecific binding. Moreover, TEM images showed that MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb)-mPEG were endocytosed by EGFR-expressing cells. In line with their EGFR expression levels, A431, PC-3, and Colo-205 tumors treated with MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb)-mPEG NPs showed -97.1%, -49.7%, and -2.8% contrast enhancement, respectively, in in vitro T2-weighted MR imaging. In vivo T2-weighted MR imaging and optical images showed that MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb)-mPEG could specifically and effectively target to EGFR-expressing tumors in nude mice; the relative contrast enhancements were 7.94 (at 2 h) and 7.59 (at 24 h) fold higher in A431 tumors as compared to the EGFR-negative Colo-205 tumors. On the contrary, MnMEIO-silane-NH2-(Erb) NPs showed only 1.44 (at 2 h) and 1.52 (at 24 h) fold higher in EGFR-positive tumors as compared to the EGFR-negative tumors. Finally, antibodies can be readily changed to allow imaging of other tumors bearing different antigens. These data indicate that masking surface charges on contrast

  17. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    completion and analysis of our study. Because tumor hypoxia is a strong mechanism of radioresistance, particularly for hypofractionated courses of radiation...of our study. Because tumor hypoxia is a strong mechanism of radioresistance, particularly for hypofractionated courses of radiation as in SABR, if

  18. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    tumor hypoxia is a strong mechanism of radioresistance, particularly for hypofractionated courses of radiation as in SABR, if validated this finding...analysis of our study. Because tumor hypoxia is a strong mechanism of radioresistance, particularly for hypofractionated courses of radiation as in SABR

  19. Perylene-diimide-based nanoparticles as highly efficient photoacoustic agents for deep brain tumor imaging in living mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Ruiping; Yang, Min; Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaowei; Bu, Lihong; Lu, Xiaomei; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Heng; Cheng, Zhen

    2015-02-04

    In order to promote preclinical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, novel photoacoustic contrast agents are highly desired for molecular imaging of diseases, especially for deep tumor imaging. Here, perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diiimide-based near-infrared-absorptive organic nanoparticles are reported as an efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging of deep brain tumors in living mice with enhanced permeability and retention effect.

  20. Perylene-diimide-based nanoparticles as highly efficient photoacoustic agents for deep brain tumor imaging in living mice

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Yang, Zhen; ...

    2014-11-06

    In order to promote preclinical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, novel photoacoustic contrast agents are highly desired for molecular imaging of diseases, especially for deep tumor imaging. In this paper, perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diiimide-based near-infrared-absorptive organic nanoparticles are reported as an efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging of deep brain tumors in living mice with enhanced permeability and retention effect

  1. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  2. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  3. Gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Iwakuma, N.; Sharma, P.; Moudgil, B. M.; Wu, C.; McNeill, J.; Jiang, H.; Grobmyer, S. R.

    2009-09-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a rapidly emerging non-invasive imaging technology that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution. The ability to quantitatively and non-invasively image nanoparticles has important implications for the development of nanoparticles as in vivo cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study, the ability of systemically administered poly(ethylene glycol)-coated (PEGylated) gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with PAT has been evaluated. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticles (20 and 50 nm) have high photoacoustic contrast as compared to mouse tissue ex vivo. Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in mice in vivo following subcutaneous administration using PAT. Following intravenous administration of PEGylated gold nanoparticles to tumor-bearing mice, accumulation of gold nanoparticles in tumors can be effectively imaged with PAT. With gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent, PAT has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as breast cancer, melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.

  4. Fe-based nanoparticulate metallic alloys as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bomatí-Miguel, Oscar; Morales, María P; Tartaj, Pedro; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Bonville, Pierre; Santos, Martín; Zhao, Xinqing; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2005-10-01

    Pharmaceutical grade magnetic colloidal dispersions have been prepared from iron alloys synthesized by laser pyrolysis. The colloids were obtained by simultaneous dispersion and coating of the particles with dextran in a strong alkaline solution. Both powders and dispersions have been analyzed in terms of microstructural characteristics, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The powders consist of uniform spherical nanoparticles (12 nm of diameter) showing a metallic core encapsulated into an iron-oxide shell. On the other hand, the colloidal dispersions consist of magnetic particles-aggregates with hydrodynamic sizes of approximately 75 nm. Magnetic resonance images of rats were taken after the intravenously administration of the Fe colloidal dispersions, and compared with those obtained using a commercial iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. The results showed a contrast improvement of 60% in the liver with respect to the commercial sample, which suggests that this product could be a suitable contrast agent for NMR imaging of liver and spleen.

  5. Hypoxia related growth factors and p53 in preoperative sera from patients with colorectal cancer--evaluation of the prognostic significance of these agents.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Wincewicz, Andrzej; Zalewski, Bogdan; Famulski, Waldemar; Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Koda, Mariusz; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Mysliwiec, Michal; Baltaziak, Marek; Pawlak, Krystyna; Sulkowska, Mariola

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) belong to a group of hypoxia related proteins. IGF-I induces expression of VEGF and decomposes wild type p53 in cancer cell lines. The goal of our study was to evaluate serum IGF-I, VEGF and p53 with respect to overall and disease free survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) patients compared with healthy volunteers. Preoperative blood samples from 125 patients with CRC and 16 healthy volunteers were examined using ELISA for serum IGF-I, p53 and VEGF concentrations. Concentrations of p53 and VEGF were significantly higher in CRC patients than in controls (p<0.0006 and p<0.0001, respectively). IGF-I was not statistically different between both groups. Serum IGF-I showed negative correlation with p53 in CRC patients (p<0.04, r=-0.193). IGF-I and VEGF showed negative correlation in poorly differentiated cancers (G3) (p<0.03, r=-0.339). Patients with VEGF concentrations that were above average for the cancer population survived for a shorter period of time (p=0.065 in evaluation of overall survival and 0.071 in estimation of disease-free survival during a 3-year follow-up) compared with patients with serum VEGF lower than the highest values seen in controls. Comparisons between serum IGF-I and p53 appear to confirm the metabolism of p53 by IGF-I. Serum VEGF showed prognostic significance in our study. Serum concentrations of IGF-I and VEGF did not show positive correlation, as expected due to IGF-I induction of VEGF in malignant colon cell lines.

  6. Experimental studies of the physiologic properties of technetium-99m agents: Myocardial transport of perfusion imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meerdink, D.J.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-10-16

    The physiologic properties of new technetium-99m-labeled myocardial imaging agents (Tc-99m sestamibi, an isonitrile; and Tc-99m teboroxime, a boronic acid adduct of technetium dioxime) are discussed and compared to thallium-201 (Tl-201). Studies with isolated hearts, subcellular fractions and cell cultures indicate that Tc-99m sestamibi, Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 do not share common transport or sequestration mechanisms. Although peak Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial extraction over time is about half that of Tl-201 at equivalent coronary blood flows, the amount of Tc-99m sestamibi that remains in the heart is similar to that of Tl-201 because of its higher retention efficiency. The high retention efficiency for Tc-99m sestamibi also results in minimal redistribution. In contrast, Tc-99m teboroxime myocardial extraction is higher than that of Tl-201, but its retention is less efficient, resulting in relatively rapid washout characteristics which may quickly result in tracer redistribution. During reperfusion after a no-flow period, Tc-99m sestamibi extraction and retention increase, but for Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 these values tend to decrease. All tracers show adequate transport characteristics for perfusion imaging, and differences in transport and retention should lead to the development of new clinical protocols.27 references.

  7. Semimetal Nanomaterials of Antimony as Highly Efficient Agent for Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study we report semimetal naonmaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm2 for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm2 for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, futher development of using other smimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT. PMID:25662491

  8. 3D Multi-Object Segmentation of Cardiac MSCT Imaging by using a Multi-Agent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernandez, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed. PMID:18003382

  9. 3D multi-object segmentation of cardiac MSCT imaging by using a multi-agent approach.

    PubMed

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernández, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed.

  10. Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents for Enhancing Tissue Engineering Characterization and Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Santiesteban, Daniela Y.; Kubelick, Kelsey; Dhada, Kabir S.; Dumani, Diego; Suggs, Laura; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The past three decades have seen numerous advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) therapies. However, despite the successes there is still much to be done before TERM therapies become commonplace in clinic. One of the main obstacles is the lack of knowledge regarding complex tissue engineering processes. Imaging strategies, in conjunction with exogenous contrast agents, can aid in this endeavor by assessing in vivo therapeutic progress. The ability to uncover real-time treatment progress will help shed light on the complex tissue engineering processes and lead to development of improved, adaptive treatments. More importantly, the utilized exogenous contrast agents can double as therapeutic agents. Proper use of these Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents (MIRAs) can help increase TERM therapy successes and allow for clinical translation. While other fields have exploited similar particles for combining diagnostics and therapy, MIRA research is still in its beginning stages with much of the current research being focused on imaging or therapeutic applications, separately. Advancing MIRA research will have numerous impacts on achieving clinical translations of TERM therapies. Therefore, it is our goal to highlight current MIRA progress and suggest future research that can lead to effective TERM treatments. PMID:26692081

  11. Gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in x-ray imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Ross, Ryan D; Tilley, Jennifer Mr; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography enables 3D anatomic imaging at a high spatial resolution, but requires delivery of an x-ray contrast agent to distinguish tissues with similar or low x-ray attenuation. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained recent attention as an x-ray contrast agent due to exhibiting a high x-ray attenuation, nontoxicity and facile synthesis and surface functionalization for colloidal stability and targeted delivery. Potential diagnostic applications include blood pool imaging, passive targeting and active targeting, where actively targeted AuNPs could enable molecular imaging by computed tomography. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge for AuNP x-ray contrast agents within a paradigm of key structure-property-function relationships in order to provide guidance for the design of AuNP contrast agents to meet the necessary functional requirements in a particular application. Functional requirements include delivery to the site of interest (e.g., blood, tumors or microcalcifications), nontoxicity during delivery and clearance, targeting or localization at the site of interest and contrast enhancement for the site of interest compared with surrounding tissues. Design is achieved by strategically controlling structural characteristics (composition, mass concentration, size, shape and surface functionalization) for optimized properties and functional performance. Examples from the literature are used to highlight current design trade-offs that exist between the different functional requirements.

  12. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  13. The diagnostic value of 99TcM-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongkun; Han, Gaohua; Xu, Wansong

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim This study was designated to assess the diagnostic value of 99TcM-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate (99TcM-MNLS) hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods A total of 61 patients with NSCLC were selected for this study. All patients were injected with 99TcM-MNLS within 1 week prior to radiotherapy and they were injected with 99TcM-MNLS again 3 months after radiotherapy. Qualitative analysis along with semiquantitative analysis results were obtained from hypoxia imaging. Meanwhile, the effect of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC was evaluated based on the solid tumor curative effect evaluation standard. Finally, SPSS 19.0 statistical software was implemented for statistical analysis. Results There was no significant difference in age or sex between the NSCLC patient group and benign patient group (P>0.05). 99TcM-MNLS was selectively concentrated in tumor tissues with a clear imaging in 24 hours. Results from both qualitative analysis and semiquantitative analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging in diagnosing NSCLC were 93.8% and 84.6% and 72.9% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, the receiver operating characteristic curve provided evidence that 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging was a powerful diagnostic tool in distinguishing malignant lung cancer from benign lesions. As suggested by 24-hour imaging, the tumor-to-normal ratio of patients in the 99TcM-MNLS high-intake group and low-intake group had a decline of 24.7% and 14.4% after radiotherapy, respectively. The decline in the tumor-to-normal ratio between the two dosage groups was significantly different (P<0.05). Conclusion 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging had reliable values in both diagnosing NSCLC and evaluating therapeutic effects of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC. PMID:27799797

  14. The diagnostic value of (99)Tc(M)-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongkun; Han, Gaohua; Xu, Wansong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designated to assess the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(M)-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate ((99)Tc(M)-MNLS) hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 61 patients with NSCLC were selected for this study. All patients were injected with (99)Tc(M)-MNLS within 1 week prior to radiotherapy and they were injected with (99)Tc(M)-MNLS again 3 months after radiotherapy. Qualitative analysis along with semiquantitative analysis results were obtained from hypoxia imaging. Meanwhile, the effect of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC was evaluated based on the solid tumor curative effect evaluation standard. Finally, SPSS 19.0 statistical software was implemented for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in age or sex between the NSCLC patient group and benign patient group (P>0.05). (99)Tc(M)-MNLS was selectively concentrated in tumor tissues with a clear imaging in 24 hours. Results from both qualitative analysis and semiquantitative analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of (99)Tc(M)-MNLS hypoxia imaging in diagnosing NSCLC were 93.8% and 84.6% and 72.9% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, the receiver operating characteristic curve provided evidence that (99)Tc(M)-MNLS hypoxia imaging was a powerful diagnostic tool in distinguishing malignant lung cancer from benign lesions. As suggested by 24-hour imaging, the tumor-to-normal ratio of patients in the (99)Tc(M)-MNLS high-intake group and low-intake group had a decline of 24.7% and 14.4% after radiotherapy, respectively. The decline in the tumor-to-normal ratio between the two dosage groups was significantly different (P<0.05). (99)Tc(M)-MNLS hypoxia imaging had reliable values in both diagnosing NSCLC and evaluating therapeutic effects of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC.

  15. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  16. Hypoxia, Monitoring, and Mitigation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Document CDRL A001-3 Revision: Original Date: Aug 2015 Page: 1 of 43 Document Title: HAMS II Quarterly Progress Report...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT The Hypoxia Monitoring, Alert and Mitigation System...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Document CDRL A001-3 Revision: Original Date: Aug 2015 Page: 2

  17. Injectable microbubbles as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound imaging: the key role of perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Ernest G; Klein, David H; Mattrey, Robert M; Riess, Jean G

    2003-07-21

    Ultrasonography has, until recently, lacked effective contrast-enhancing agents. Micrometer-sized gas bubbles that resonate at a diagnostic frequency are ideal reflectors for ultrasound. However, simple air bubbles, when injected into the blood stream, disappear within seconds through the combined effects of Laplace pressure, blood pressure, and exposure to ultrasound energy. Use of fluorocarbon vapor, by extending the persistence of microbubbles in vivo from seconds to minutes, propelled contrast ultrasonography into clinical practice. Imaging techniques that selectively suppress tissue, but not microbubble signal, further increase image contrast. Approved products consist of C3F8 or SF6 microbubbles, and N2 microbubbles osmotically stabilized with C6F14. These agents allow the detection and characterization of cardiovascular abnormalities and solid organ lesions, such as tumors. By providing higher quality images, they improve the accuracy and confidence of disease diagnosis, and can play a decisive role in clinical decision making. New objectives include agents that target specific cells for the molecular imaging of disease, and drug and gene delivery, including ultrasound-triggered delivery.

  18. Positron emitting [68Ga]Ga-based imaging agents: chemistry and diversity.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, Irina

    2011-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) field and, in particular utilization of (68)Ga radiometal is getting momentum. The development of new imaging agents for targeted, pre-targeted, non-targeted imaging and their clinical applications is accelerating worldwide. The pharmacopoeia monographs regarding generator produced (68)Ga radionuclide and (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin (SST) analogues are in progress. The number of commercial generators and automated synthesizers for (68)Ga-labeling chemistry is increasing constantly. Development of a molecular imaging agent is a complex process including identification of the biological target, respective lead compound, synthesis of the imaging agent, its chemical characterization, pre-clinical, and clinical evaluation. The introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals and their accessibility are important factors determining the expansion of clinical nuclear medicine for early disease detection and personalized medicine with higher therapeutic efficiency. Further, the availability of the technology for GMP compliant automated tracer production can facilitate the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals due to the ability to conduct standardized and harmonized multi-center studies for regulatory approval. This review reflects on the current status of (68)Ga in PET field with the focus on the achievements in the chemistry as well as diversity and potential of the resulting tracers.

  19. Uptake of perfusion imaging agents by transplanted hearts: an experimental study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A. Jr.; Carroll, M.; Feldman, M.J.; Kung, H.; Wright, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    There is a need for a reliable noninvasive marker of rejection in transplanted hearts. Endomyocardial biopsy is now the universally accepted diagnostic method of choice, but the invasiveness of the procedure and the limited size of the sample obtained makes this method far from ideal. As coronary blood flow may be expected to decrease during acute rejection, there has been interest in thallium-201 chloride (T1), a perfusion marker, as an imaging agent for diagnosing cardiac rejection. Hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)-technetium (Tc-TBI) is a representative of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals proposed as perfusion markers. We have compared the uptake of these imaging agents in a rat model of cardiac transplantation. Uptake of Tc-TBI as well as of T1 was significantly lower in rejecting than in nonrejecting hearts. This change was found in both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Allografts in animals treated with cyclosporine (CyA) showed less severe rejection and higher uptakes of both imaging agents as compared to unmodified rejection. Our results suggest that perfusion imaging with these radionuclides is a potentially useful approach to the problem of detecting allograft rejection.

  20. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Whiteman, Suzanne C.; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; El Haj, Alicia J.; Spiteri, Monica A.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment.

  1. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    DOE PAGES

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; ...

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form anmore » image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.« less

  2. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (<0.2 mm) and (ii) a new low noise amplifier incorporated into the ultrasonic probe and providing the noise equivalent pressure around 2 Pa resulting in increased signal-to-noise ratio and the optical absorption sensitivity of about 0.15 cm-1. We also improved scan time and the image reconstruction times. This prototype has been commercialized for a number of biomedical research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  3. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  4. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging. PMID:26511147

  5. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  6. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  7. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Yin, Xiezhen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy. PMID:23864011

  8. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  9. Hypoxia-imaging with (18)F-Misonidazole and PET: changes of kinetics during radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eschmann, Susanne Martina; Paulsen, Frank; Bedeshem, Claudia; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Hehr, Thomas; Bamberg, Michael; Bares, Roland

    2007-06-01

    PET with (18)F-Misonidazole (FMISO-PET) is a non-invasive method for measuring tumor hypoxia. We analysed changes of FMISO-uptake during radiotherapy and their impact on patient outcome. Fourteen patients with HNC underwent repeated FMISO-PET prior to radiotherapy and after 30Gy. Dynamic and static PET-scans (2+4h p.i.) were acquired. FMISO-uptake was quantified by calculating standard uptake values (SUV) and tumor-muscle-ratios (TMR). Kinetic curve types representing tissue hypoxia were defined. Change of curve type was correlated with patient outcome. The mean SUV 4h p.i. and the TMR decreased significantly during radiotherapy. SUV decreased clearly in 12/14 patients, and increased in 2 patients. TMR decreased in 11 patients, and increased in 3 patients. Prior to radiotherapy, three different shapes of kinetic curve types indicative for the degree of hypoxia could be defined in 12/14 patients: (1) accumulation type (severe hypoxia (n=8)), (2) intermediate type (intermediate degree of hypoxia (n=3)), and (3) wash-out type (low degree of hypoxia (n=1)). Curve type changed towards a lower degree of hypoxia at 30Gy in all but 3 patients. In three patients curve type remained unchanged. The changes in tumor FMISO-uptake during radiotherapy indicate radio-induced reoxygenation.

  10. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with microbubble contrast agent improves characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Shiraki, Katsuya; Nakanishi, Shigeo; Fuke, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Akira; Shimizu, Atsuya; Hamataki, Toshinobu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with the use of the contrast agent Levovist for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and for the evaluation of therapeutic response. METHODS: Phantom experiments were performed to compare the contrast effects of 2nd harmonic imaging and 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was employed to examine 36 patients with HCC (42 nodules) before and after the treatment and to compare against the findings obtained using other diagnostic imaging modalities. RESULTS: In 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography, the tumor vessels of HCCs were clearly identified during the early phase, and late-phase images clearly demonstrated the differences in contrast enhancement between the tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma. Blood flow within the tumor was detected in 36 nodules (85.7%) during the early phase and in all 42 nodules (100%) during the late phase using 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography, in 38 nodules (90.5%) using contrast-enhanced CT, in 34 nodules (81.0%) using digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and in 42 nodules (100%) using US CO2 angiography. Following transcatheter arterial embolization, 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography detected blood flow and contrast enhancement within the tumors that were judged to contain viable tissue in 20 of 42 nodules (47.6%). However, 6 of these 20 cases were not judged in contrast-enhanced CT. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was compared with the US CO2 angiography findings as the gold standard, and the sensitivity and specificity of these images for discerning viable and nonviable HCC after transcatheter arterial embolization were 100% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography permits the vascular structures of HCCs to be identified and blood flow within the tumor to be clearly demonstrated. Furthermore, 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography is potentially useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of transcatheter

  11. Review of Long-Wavelength Optical and NIR Imaging Materials: Contrast Agents, Fluorophores and Multifunctional Nano Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Pansare, Vikram; Hejazi, Shahram; Faenza, William; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of long wavelength and near infra-red (NIR) imaging has dramatically increased due to the desire to perform whole animal and deep tissue imaging. The adoption of NIR imaging is also growing rapidly due to the availability of targeted biological agents for diagnosis and basic medical research that can be imaged in vivo. The wavelength range of 650–1450 nm falls in the region of the spectrum with the lowest absorption in tissue and therefore enables the deepest tissue penetration. This is the wavelength range we focus on with this review. To operate effectively the imaging agents must both be excited and must emit in this long-wavelength window. We review the agents used both for imaging by absorption, scattering, and excitation (such as fluorescence). Imaging agents comprise both aqueous soluble and insoluble species, both organic and inorganic, and unimolecular and supramolecular constructs. The interest in multi-modal imaging, which involves delivery of actives, targeting, and imaging, requires nanocarriers or supramolecular assemblies. Nanoparticles for diagnostics also have advantages in increasing circulation time and increased imaging brightness relative to single molecule imaging agents. This has led to rapid advances in nanocarriers for long-wavelength, NIR imaging. PMID:22919122

  12. In vivo optical molecular imaging and analysis in mice using dorsal window chamber models applied to hypoxia, vasculature and fluorescent reporters

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M; Fontanella, Andrew N; Shan, Siqing; Hanna, Gabi; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Optical techniques for functional imaging in mice have a number of key advantages over other common imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography or computed tomography, including high resolution, low cost and an extensive library of available contrast agents and reporter genes. A major challenge to such work is the limited penetration depth imposed by tissue turbidity. We describe a window chamber technique by which these limitations can be avoided. This facilitates the study of a wide range of processes, with potential endpoints including longitudinal gene expression, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, and tumor growth and invasion. We further describe several quantitative imaging and analysis techniques for characterizing in vivo fluorescence properties and functional endpoints, including vascular morphology and oxygenation. The procedure takes ~2 h to complete, plus up to several weeks for tumor growth and treatment procedures. PMID:21886101

  13. Structure-based drug design for hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitors and its therapeutic potential for the treatment of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent-resistant anemia: raising expectations for exploratory clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Higashijima, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2013-08-01

    Anemia occurs in various chronic diseases and its treatment is dramatically improved after the appearance of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). However, there are several problems regarding the use of ESA including: i) invasiveness, ii) high cost and iii) ESA resistance. Therefore, there is a need to develop small molecule drugs which can improve these problems. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) plays a key role in regulating erythropoietin production. HIF stabilizers, particularly, prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitors, have emerged as small molecule-based anti-anemia medicine. This article discusses the current status of PHD inhibitors and the pros and cons of currently tested methods. Specifically, the article reviews the advantages of structure-based drug design in the development of PHD inhibitors and looks at future perspectives within the field. Despite the fact that structure-based drug design has dramatically improved drug discovery, testing on humans is still one of the most time-consuming parts of drug discovery and one that is not accelerated by structural approaches. Exploratory clinical trials, first-in-man studies have emerged as a new strategy for preclinical and clinical development of drugs. Exploratory clinical trials will not only reduce the time and cost in preclinical trials but also provide important information on candidate drug's pharmacological effects in humans. Exploratory clinical trials may be a potential alternative strategy for the drug discovery in the future.

  14. Hypoxia Imaging With FAZA-PET and Theoretical Considerations With Regard to Dose Painting for Individualization of Radiotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia Souvatzoglou, Michael; Roeper, Barbara; Dobritz, Martin; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Jacob, Vesna; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Reischl, Gerald; Machulla, Hans-Juergen; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Piert, Morand

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of hypoxia positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluoroazomycin-arabinoside (FAZA) in head and neck cancer for radiation treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer were included. Both FAZA-PET and axial CT were performed using mask fixation. The data were coregistered using software based on mutual information. Contours of tumor (primary gross tumor volume, GTV/CT-P) and lymph node metastases (GTV/CT-N) were outlined manually, and FAZA standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated automatically. The hypoxic subvolume (GTV/PET-FAZA) having at least 50% more FAZA uptake than background (mean SUV) neck muscle tissue was contoured automatically within GTV/CT-P (GTV/PET-FAZA-P) and GTV/CT-N (GTV/PET-FAZA-N). Results: The median GTV/PET-FAZA-P was 4.6 mL, representing 10.8% (range, 0.7-52%) of the GTV/CT-P. The GTV/PET-FAZA-P failed to correlate significantly with the GTV/CT-P (p = 0.06). The median GTV/PET-FAZA-N was 4.1 mL, representing 8.3% (range, 2.2-51.3%) of the GTV/CT-N. It was significantly correlated with the GTV/PET-N (p = 0.006). The GTV/PET-FAZA-P was located in a single confluent area in 11 of 18 patients (61%) and was diffusely dispersed in the whole GTV/CT-P in 4 of 18 patients (22%), whereas no hypoxic areas were identified in 3 of 18 patients (17%). The GTV/PET-FAZA-N was outlined as a single confluent region in 7 of 18 patients (39%), in multiple diffuse hypoxic regions in 4 of 18 patients (22%), and was not delineated in 7 of 18 patients (39%). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that FAZA-PET imaging could be used for a hypoxia-directed intensity-modulated radiotherapy approach in head and neck cancer.

  15. Detection of viability of transplanted beta cells labeled with a novel contrast agent - polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Biao; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hai; Xie, Qiuping; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Chuanxin; Wu, Yulian

    2012-01-01

    Islets can be visualized on MRI by labeling with superparamagnetic contrast agent during the transplantation procedure. However, whether the signal intensity reflects the cell number and cellular viability has not been determined. We used a self-synthesized novel superparamagnetic contrast agent -polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO) - to label β-TC-6 cells (a mouse insulinoma cell line) or primary islets with commercial Feridex as a control. The labeling efficiency of two agents was compared by Prussian blue staining, intracellular iron content determination and MR scanning. Cells were exposed to hypoxia, high-glucose or exogenous H₂O₂ stimulation before/after PVP-SPIO labeling. Normal and injured cells were also transplanted into renal subcapsule. A clinically used 3.0 T MR scan was performed in vitro and 24 h post-transplantation to investigate the correlation between cellular viability and signal. Our PVP-SPIO displayed superior biocompatibility and magnetic properties. All of the cells could be labeled at 100 µg/ml iron concentration after 24 h incubation. At 100 µg/ml iron concentration, 1 × 10⁵ β cells labeled with PVP-SPIO could already be visualized in vitro by MRI, less than the detection threshold of Feridex. There existed a linear correlation between the number of labeled cells and R₂ value on the T₂ -weighted images. The signal intensity and the intracellular iron content declined along with the decreased viability of labeled cells. There was also a significant difference in signal intensity between injured and normal labeled cells after transplantation. From these results, we concluded that PVP-SPIO possessed superior cell labeling efficiency, and β cells could be labeled without compromising viability and function. The signal intensity on MRI might be a useful predictor to evaluate the number and the viability of PVP-SPIO-labeled cells.

  16. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS.

  17. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-01-01

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex® IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist®, Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex®, AMAG Pharma; Sinerem®, Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan®, Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist® is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme®) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors. PMID:26715826

  18. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    PubMed Central

    D’Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  19. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors.

  20. Potentiation of carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity by hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the cause of hepatic injury in patients with hypoxaemia, the persistence of liver susceptibility to toxic injury after hypoxia was investigated in rats. Centrilobular necrosis and marked elevation of serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) and serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) activities were induced by carbon tetrachloride (0.1 ml/kg body weight) given in the period between 3 h before and 21 h after exposure to 7% oxygen for 3 h. This observation, that a short period of hypoxia results in a prolonged sensitivity to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury, has not been described previously. The mechanism of the phenomenon is obscure. These observations suggest that the hepatic injury in patients with hypoxaemia may be caused not only by the hypoxia per se or chemicals administered before or during hypoxia, but also by chemicals given within 24 h of hypoxaemia. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3801302

  1. Synthesis of cytocompatible Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashi, Zahra; Divband, Baharak; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Khatamian, Maasoumeh; Farahmand-Zahed, Farzane; Nazarlo, Ali Kiani; Gharehaghaji, Nahideh

    2017-09-01

    In this study, ZSM-5 nano zeolite was used as a support material for iron oxide nanoparticles and the potential ability of the nanocomposite for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was investigated. The nanocomposite was synthesized by hydrothermal method and characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. MRI was carried out by use of a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner. The T2 weighted images were prepared and the r2 relaxivity was calculated. The sizes of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and related nanocomposite were 13-24 nm and 80-150 nm, respectively. Results of MTT assay confirmed that the prepared nanocomposite is cytocompatible. The r2 relaxivity of the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite was 457.1 mM-1 s-1. This study suggests that the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite has potential to use as an MRI T2 contrast agent.

  2. Silica-coated gold nanoplates as stable photoacoustic contrast agents for sentinel lymph node imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Geoffrey P.; Bashyam, Ashvin; Homan, Kimberly A.; Makhija, Suraj; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-11-01

    A biopsy of the first lymph node to which a tumor drains—the sentinel lymph node (SLN)—is commonly performed to identify micrometastases. Image guidance of the SLN biopsy procedure has the potential to improve its accuracy and decrease its morbidity. We have developed a new stable contrast agent for photoacoustic image-guided SLN biopsy: silica-coated gold nanoplates (Si-AuNPs). The Si-AuNPs exhibit high photothermal stability when exposed to pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation. This makes them well suited for in vivo photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, Si-AuNPs are shown to have low cytotoxicity. We tested the Si-AuNPs for SLN mapping in a mouse model where they exhibited a strong, sustained photoacoustic signal. Real-time ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging revealed that the Si-AuNPs quickly drain to the SLN, gradually spreading throughout a large portion of the node.

  3. Gold nanoparticle contrast agents in advanced X-ray imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Jung, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-17

    Recently, there has been significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications, both technically and scientifically, via developments in sources, optics and imaging methodologies. While one community is pursuing extensive applications of available X-ray tools, others are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions and brighter compact sources. For increased image quality and more exquisite investigation on characteristic biological phenomena, contrast agents have been employed extensively in imaging technologies. Heavy metal nanoparticles are excellent absorbers of X-rays and can offer excellent improvements in medical diagnosis and X-ray imaging. In this context, the role of gold (Au) is important for advanced X-ray imaging applications. Au has a long-history in a wide range of medical applications and exhibits characteristic interactions with X-rays. Therefore, Au can offer a particular advantage as a tracer and a contrast enhancer in X-ray imaging technologies by sensing the variation in X-ray attenuation in a given sample volume. This review summarizes basic understanding on X-ray imaging from device set-up to technologies. Then this review covers recent studies in the development of X-ray imaging techniques utilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their relevant applications, including two- and three-dimensional biological imaging, dynamical processes in a living system, single cell-based imaging and quantitative analysis of circulatory systems and so on. In addition to conventional medical applications, various novel research areas have been developed and are expected to be further developed through AuNP-based X-ray imaging technologies.

  4. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  5. Highly stabilized gadolinium chelates functionalized on metal nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Talha S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method for imaging and diagnosing tissue damage, organ function and the vascular system. Magnevist(TM) a complex of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Gd3+ is a clinically approved contrast agent for MRI. A derivative of DTPA was formed by the addition of two cysteine groups (DTPA-L-Cys) through amide linkage. The Gd complex of this ligand bonds with the silver surfaces through the cysteine thiols. GdDTPA-L-Cys was bound to ˜10nm diameter Ag nanoparticles for use as a multifunctional MRI contrast agent. The ligand and complex were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The silver construct was characterized by TEM, TGA and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The per metal complex r1 relaxivity of GdDTPA-L-Cys{Ag} greater than that of Magnavist(TM) with the same molarity for both compounds. The synthesis of a DTPA derivative is described that allows it to bind to silver or gold nanoparticles through a single thiol linkage (DTPASH). The resulting Gd complex, GdDTPASH, was bound to Ag nanoparticles to create a single monolayer on the surface. The construct was further stabilized in buffered solution with the addition of a thiolated PEG chain. The highly stabilized nanoparticle construct delivers a high payload of Gd compelex and is an effective T1 brightening agent. The production of this type of construct opens the way for engineered multimodal MRI contrast agents.

  6. An in vitro study of a microbubble contrast agent using a clinical ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboros, V.; Moran, C. M.; Pye, S. D.; McDicken, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal insonation settings for contrast imaging are yet to be specified, mainly due to the lack of good understanding of the behaviour of the microbubbles. A satisfactory model that explains the behaviour of individual contrast agent scatterers has not yet been reported in the literature. An in vitro system based on a commercial scanner (ATL HDI3000) has been developed to investigate the backscatter of such agents. Suspensions of Definity® were introduced in an anechoic tank. The frequency of transmitted ultrasound varied from 1 to 5 MHz, pulse period from 2 to 10 periods and peak negative acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.7 MPa. The backscatter at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency windows from the agent was normalized in terms of the corresponding components of backscatter from a blood mimicking fluid suspension. The agent provided a dominant resonance effect at 1.6 MHz transmit frequency. Second harmonic normalized backscatter averaged around 9 dB higher than the fundamental. The normalized fundamental backscatter intensity was linear with peak negative pressure. The second harmonic at resonance peaked at 0.5 MPa suggestive of bubble disruption above such pressure. The system proved capable of illustrating the ultrasonic behaviour of Definity® in vitro, and the investigation suggested particular insonation conditions for optimal image enhancement using Definity®.

  7. Polypyrrole coated phase-change contrast agents for sono-photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Matula, Thomas J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Pozzo, Lilo D.

    2017-03-01

    A new light and sound sensitive nanoemulsion contrast agent is presented. The agents feature a low boiling point liquid perfluorocarbon core and a broad light spectrum absorbing polypyrrole (PPy) polymer shell. The PPy coated nanoemulsions can reversibly convert from liquid to gas phase upon cavitation of the liquid perfluorocarbon core. Cavitation can be initiated using a sufficiently high intensity acoustic pulse or from heat generation due to light absorption from a laser pulse. The emulsions can be made between 150 and 350 nm in diameter and PPy has a broad optical absorption covering both the visible spectrum and extending into the near-infrared spectrum (peak absorption 1053 nm). The size, structure, and optical absorption properties of the PPy coated nanoemulsions were characterized and compared to PPy nanoparticles (no liquid core) using dynamic light scattering, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering. The cavitation threshold and signal intensity were measured as a function of both acoustic pressure and laser fluence. Overlapping simultaneous transmission of an acoustic and laser pulse can significantly reduce the activation energy of the contrast agents to levels lower than optical or acoustic activation alone. We also demonstrate that simultaneous light and sound cavitation of the agents can be used in a new sono-photoacoustic imaging method, which enables greater sensitivity than traditional photoacoustic imaging.

  8. Research on image fusion of missile team based on multi-agent cooperative blackboard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Guo; Munan, Li

    The target of cooperative engagement of missile teams is to furthest improve hit rate of target according to communication and cooperation among missiles. In this paper the problems of image fusion between missile teams in complex combat environment was analyzed, after which an muti-agent blackboard cooperative model was presented and a public information platform of missile team is built according to this model. Through these, the fusion of images taken from muti-sensor of missiles can be realized and the hit rate of attacking target will be improved. At last, an simulation experiment were performed, and the feasibility of the method is proved by simulation experiment.

  9. Gd-Si Oxide Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-García, Alejandro; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Bernabeu, Ángela; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Fernández, Eduardo; Botella, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, characterization and application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging of a novel type of magnetic nanoparticle based on Gd-Si oxide, which presents high Gd3+ atom density. For this purpose, we have used a Prussian Blue analogue as the sacrificial template by reacting with soluble silicate, obtaining particles with nanorod morphology and of small size (75 nm). These nanoparticles present good biocompatibility and higher longitudinal and transversal relaxivity values than commercial Gd3+ solutions, which significantly improves the sensitivity of in vivo magnetic resonance images. PMID:28335240

  10. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Williams, D. R.; Schallek, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  11. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Torres, A; Williams, D R; Schallek, J B

    2015-06-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina.

  12. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38-40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  13. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  14. Tracking contrast agents using real-time 2D photoacoustic imaging system for cardiac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo; Ingram, Pier; Witte, Russell S.

    2009-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly developing imaging modality that can detect optical contrast agents with high sensitivity. While detectors in PA imaging have traditionally been single element ultrasound transducers, use of array systems is desirable because they potentially provide high frame rates to capture dynamic events, such as injection and distribution of contrast in clinical applications. We present preliminary data consisting of 40 second sequences of coregistered pulse-echo (PE) and PA images acquired simultaneously in real time using a clinical ultrasonic machine. Using a 7 MHz linear array, the scanner allowed simultaneous acquisition of inphase-quadrature (IQ) data on 64 elements at a rate limited by the illumination source (Q-switched laser at 20 Hz) with spatial resolution determined to be 0.6 mm (axial) and 0.4 mm (lateral). PA images had a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 35 dB without averaging. The sequences captured the injection and distribution of an infrared-absorbing contrast agent into a cadaver rat heart. From these data, a perfusion time constant of 0.23 s-1 was estimated. After further refinement, the system will be tested in live animals. Ultimately, an integrated system in the clinic could facilitate inexpensive molecular screening for coronary artery disease.

  15. Glycans in magnetic resonance imaging: determinants of relaxivity to smart agents, and potential applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Gregori, Maria; So, Po-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry and glycobiology have become a "hot" subject. These extensive, complex structures serve essential roles in cell surface phenomena, but we are only beginning to understand what some of these functions are; any advances in the development of synthetic and/or analytical tools for glycobiology are extremely useful for our understanding of the roles of carbohydrates in biology, and as biomarkers of physiological/pathological states. This review provides an outlook of the potential of carbohydrate chemistry/biology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a major important and prominent technique in diagnostic clinical medicine and biomedical research. During the last 30 years, MRI has developed from an intriguing research project to an essential diagnostic method in the clinic. Although MRI contrast in endogenous tissues provides excellent sensitivity for detecting subtle changes in anatomy and function, MRI still has poor specificity for attributing image contrast to specific biological processes. To overcome this limitation, MRI methods are being developed that induce changes in MR image contrast in response to molecular compositions and functions that serve as early biomarkers of pathologies. Carbohydrates with their intriguing chemistry, not only can provide structures for novel MRI probes for imaging specific biological processes, but can themselves provide novel targets/biomarkers. For example, the glycan structure can simply provide a molecular scaffold for modulating the physicochemical properties of the imaging contrast agent, or can be used for the design of novel MR agents with the ability to disclose relevant physiological or pathological cellular events.

  16. Novel Molecular Imaging Agents to Detect Biomarkers of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    chemistry with HBTU and HOBt as coupling agents. The coupling efficiency of each amino acid residues were checked by Kaiser’s ninhydrin test . The...of each amino acid residues were checked by Kaiser’s ninhydrin test . The starting resin had 1.0mmol/g of OH groups and the scale of peptide synthesis...assess biomarkers of metastatic breast cancer (Months 4-6). This task has been successfully accomplished by testing our peptide-DOTA imaging

  17. Non-invasive detection of apoptosis using magnetic resonance imaging and a targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Beauregard, D A; Loizou, L; Davletov, B; Brindle, K M

    2001-11-01

    The C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which binds to anionic phospholipids in cell membranes, was shown to bind to the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells by both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Conjugation of the protein to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles allowed detection of this binding using magnetic resonance imaging. Detection of apoptotic cells, using this novel contrast agent, was demonstrated both in vitro, with isolated apoptotic tumor cells, and in vivo, in a tumor treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  18. Evaluation of chirp reversal power modulation sequence for contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Novell, A; Sennoga, C A; Escoffre, J M; Chaline, J; Bouakaz, A

    2014-09-07

    Over the last decade, significant research effort has been focused on the use of chirp for contrast agent imaging because chirps are known to significantly increase imaging contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). New imaging schemes, such as chirp reversal (CR), have been developed to improve contrast detection by increasing non-linear microbubble responses. In this study we evaluated the contrast enhancement efficiency of various chirped imaging sequences in combination with well-established imaging schemes such as power modulation (PM) and pulse inversion (PI). The imaging schemes tested were implemented on a fully programmable open scanner and evaluated by ultrasonically scanning (excitation frequency of 2.5 MHz; amplitude of 350 kPa) a tissue-mimicking flow phantom comprising a 4 mm diameter tube through which aqueous dispersions (dilution fraction of 1/2000) of the commercial ultrasound contrast agent, SonoVue(®) were continuously circulated. The recovery of non-linear microbubble responses after chirp compression requires the development and the optimization of a specific filter. A compression filter was therefore designed and used to compress and extract several non-linear components from the received microbubble responses. The results showed that using chirps increased the image CNR by approximately 10 dB, as compared to conventional Gaussian apodized sine burst excitation but degraded the axial resolution by a factor of 1.4, at -3 dB. We demonstrated that the highest CNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CTR) were achievable when CR was combined with PM as compared to other imaging schemes such as PI.

  19. Ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agent binding to both E- and P-selectin in different species.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Thierry; Bussat, Philippe; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Emmel, Patricia; Henrioud, Sylvie; Biolluz, Nathalie; Willmann, Jürgen K; Schneider, Michel; Tranquart, François

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging is increasingly used in preclinical studies to measure the expression of vascular markers during inflammation process. In this context, a new ultrasound contrast agent functionalized with a recombinant P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 analogue (rPSGL-Ig) was developed (MBrPSGL-Ig). This agent was assayed in vitro and in vivo to evaluate its binding performance and potential to image expression of inflammatory markers E- and P-selectin. Performance of this newly developed agent was compared with that of antibody (MBAb) or sialyl Lewis X (MBsLe) containing microbubbles and with control microbubbles (MBC). The targeted ultrasound contrast agents were prepared by coupling biotin-conjugated ligands onto streptavidin-functionalized microbubbles. First, in vitro experiments were performed to measure the adhesion efficiency of these microbubble constructs under static or flow conditions (114 sec), on cell monolayer (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and bEnd.5), or coatings of E- or P-selectin of various animal species, respectively. Second, molecular imaging studies were performed in a rat inflammatory model 24 hours after intramuscular injection of lipopolysaccharide in the hind limb. Finally, immunohistochemistry staining of rat inflamed muscle tissue was performed to assess expression of E- and P-selectin. Microbubbles functionalized with rPSGL-Ig (MBrPSGL-Ig) displayed firm in vitro binding on the coating of both recombinant E- or P-selectin, with an efficiency similar to microbubbles comprising antibody specific for E-selectin (MBE) or P-selectin (MBP). In contrast, lower binding capacity was measured with MBsLe. At the surface of inflamed endothelial cells, MBrPSGL-Ig were able to interact specifically with E- and P-selectin. Binding specificity was demonstrated by performing blocking experiments with target-specific antibodies, resulting in an 80% to 95% decrease in binding. Ten minutes after microbubble injection, echo signal

  20. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80 each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. • Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection provides appropriate scan protocols. • Abdominal CT is feasible using spectral imaging and 300 mgI/kg contrast agent. • 50-keV monochromatic images with 50 % ASIR provide optimal image quality.

  1. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  2. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-basedradiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-09-25

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Ourapproach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosinekinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emittingradioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. Allcompounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolarrange. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versusthe ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay usingan iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinityof the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinitiesranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P;lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compoundshave been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFRoverexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake buthighlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline wasnot metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadthof agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation forfuture research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent.

  3. Peptidyl Molecular Imaging Contrast Agents Using a New Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Pagel, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A versatile method is disclosed for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of molecular imaging contrast agents. A DO3A moiety was derivatized to introduce a CBZ-protected amino group and then coupled to a polymeric support. CBZ cleavage with Et2AlCl/thioanisole was optimized for SPPS. Amino acids were then coupled to the aminoDOTA loaded resin using conventional step-wise Fmoc SPPS to create a product with DOTA coupled to the C-terminus of the peptide. In a second study, the DO3A moiety was coupled to a glycine-loaded polymeric support, and amino acids were then coupled to the amino-DOTA-peptide loaded resin using SPPS, to incorporate DOTA within the peptide sequence. The peptide-(Tm3+-DOTA) amide showed a PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) effect, which demonstrated the utility of this contrast agent for molecular imaging. These results demonstrate the advantages of exploiting SPPS methodologies through the development of unique DOTA derivatives to create peptide-based molecular imaging contrast agents. PMID:17330953

  4. Innovative magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic agents based on paramagnetic Gd(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Aime, Silvio; Dastrù, Walter; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Gianolio, Eliana; Mainero, Valentina

    2002-01-01

    Gd(III) complexes are under intense scrutiny as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They act by enhancing tissutal proton relaxation rates. Much has already been done in order to get an in-depth understanding of the relationships between structure, dynamics, and contrastographic ability of these paramagnetic complexes. Their potential in the assessment of flow, perfusion, and capillary permeability has already been established. The next challenges are in the field of molecular imaging applications, which would allow the attainment of early diagnosis based on the recognition of specific reporters of the onset of the pathological state. To this end, Gd(III) complexes have to be endowed with improved targeting capabilities by conjugating suitable recognition synthons on their surfaces. Small peptides are candidates of choice for the attainment of this goal. Moreover, the intrinsic low sensitivity of the NMR techniques implies the need to deliver large amounts of contrast agents to the target in order to get its visualization in the resulting images. Highly efficient delivery systems have been identified, which bring a great promise for the development of innovative diagnostic agents based on Gd(III) complexes.

  5. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-01

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  6. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  7. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  8. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  9. Catatonia After Cerebral Hypoxia: Do the Usual Treatments Apply?

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Davin K.; Abbott, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurologic deterioration occurring days to weeks after a cerebral hypoxic event accompanied by diffuse white matter demyelination is called delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL). Manifestations of DPHL are diverse, and include dementia, gait disturbance, incontinence, pyramidal tract signs, parkinsonism, chorea, mood and thought disorders, akinetic mutism, and rarely catatonia. Methods The authors report a case of malignant catatonia in a patient diagnosed with DPHL that was refractory to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and review the literature on catatonia in DHPL. Results The patient was a 56 year-old female with schizoaffective disorder who was admitted with catatonia two weeks after hospitalization for drug overdose and respiratory failure. Her catatonic symptoms did not respond to lorazepam, amantadine, methylphenidate, or ten sessions of bilateral ECT at maximum energy. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive periventricular white matter lesions not present on admission scans, and she was diagnosed with DPHL. Discussion No treatment for DPHL has been proven to be widely effective. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments may reduce the rate of development, and symptom improvement has been reported with stimulants and other psychotropic agents. Review of the literature reveals rare success with GABAergic agents for catatonia after cerebral hypoxia, and no cases successfully treated with ECT. There are seven case reports of neurologic decompensation during ECT treatment after a cerebral hypoxic event. Conclusion Caution is advised when considering ECT for catatonia when delayed sequelae of cerebral hypoxia are on the differential diagnosis, as there is a dearth of evidence to support this treatment approach. PMID:25262046

  10. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of cells overexpressing MagA, an endogenous contrast agent for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, Donna E; Lemaire, Claude; McCreary, Cheryl R; McGirr, Rebecca; Dhanvantari, Savita; Thompson, R Terry; Figueredo, Rene; Koropatnick, Jim; Foster, Paula; Prato, Frank S

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may benefit from the ferrimagnetic properties of magnetosomes, membrane-enclosed iron biominerals whose formation in magnetotactic bacteria is encoded by multiple genes. One such gene is MagA, a putative iron transporter. We have examined expression of MagA in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells and characterized their response to iron loading and cellular imaging by MRI. MagA expression augmented both Prussian blue staining and the elemental iron content of N2A cells, without altering cell proliferation, in cultures grown in the presence of iron supplements. Despite evidence for iron incorporation in both MagA and a variant, MagAE137V, only MagA expression produced intracellular contrast detectable by MRI at 11 Tesla. We used this stable expression system to model a new sequence for cellular imaging with MRI, using the difference between gradient and spin echo images to distinguish cells from artifacts in the field of view. Our results show that MagA activity in mammalian cells responds to iron supplementation and functions as a contrast agent that can be deactivated by a single point mutation. We conclude that MagA is a candidate MRI reporter gene that can exploit more fully the superior resolution of MRI in noninvasive medical imaging.

  12. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi

    Macromolecular contrast agents have been shown to be superior to small molecular weight contrast agents for MRI in blood pool imaging, tumor diagnosis and grading. However, none has been approved by the FDA because they circulate in the bloodstream much longer than small molecular weight contrast agents and result in high tissue accumulation of toxic Gd(III) ions. Biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents (BMCA) were invented to alleviate the toxic accumulation. They have a cleavable disulfide bond based backbone that can be degraded in vivo and excreted out of the body via renal filtration. Furthermore, the side chain of the backbone can be modified to achieve various degradation rates. Three BMCA, (Gd-DTPA)-cystamine copolymers (GDCC), Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), and Gd-DTPA cystine diethyl ester copolymers (GDCEP), were evaluated as blood pool contrast agents in a rat model. They have excellent blood pool enhancement, preferred pharmacokinetics, and only minimal long-term tissue retention of toxic Gd(III) ions. GDCC and GDCP, the lead agents with desired degradation rates, with molecular weights of 20 KDa and 70 KDa, were chosen for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to differentiate human prostate tumor models of different malignancy and growth rates. GDCC and GDCP could differentiate these tumor models, providing more accurate estimations of plasma volume, flow leakage rate, and permeability surface area product than a small molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA-BMA when compared to the prototype macromolecular contrast agent albumin-Gd-DTPA. GDCC was favored for its neutral charge side chain and reasonable uptake rate by the tumors. GDCC with a molecular weight of 40 KDa (GDCC-40, above the renal filtration cutoff size) was used to assess the efficacy of two photothermal therapies (interstitial and indocyanine green enhanced). GDCC-40 provided excellent tumor enhancement shortly after its injection. Acute tumor response (4 hr) after therapies

  14. Experimental evaluation of a hyperspectral imager for near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. S.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems have the potential to combine morphological and spectral information to provide detailed and high sensitivity readouts in biological and medical applications. As HSI enables simultaneous detection in several spectral bands, the technology has significant potential for use in real-time multiplexed contrast agent studies. Examples include tumor detection in intraoperative and endoscopic imaging as well as histopathology. A multiplexed readout from multiple disease targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. Here, we evaluate a commercial, compact, near-infrared HSI sensor that has the potential to enable low cost, video rate HSI for multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent studies in biomedical applications. The hyperspectral imager, based on a monolithically integrated Fabry-Perot etalon, has 70 spectral bands between 600-900 nm, making it ideal for this application. Initial calibration of the imager was performed to determine wavelength band response, quantum efficiency and the effect of F-number on the spectral response. A platform for wide-field fluorescence imaging in reflectance using fluorophore specific LED excitation was then developed. The applicability of the imaging platform for simultaneous readout of multiple fluorophore signals was demonstrated using a dilution series of Alexa Fluor 594 and Alexa Fluor 647, showing that nanomolar fluorophore concentrations can be detected. Our results show that the HSI system can clearly resolve the emission spectra of the two fluorophores in mixtures of concentrations across several orders of magnitude, indicating a high dynamic range performance. We therefore conclude that the HSI sensor tested here is suitable for detecting fluorescence in biomedical imaging applications.

  15. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  16. Hypoxia-sensitive bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate]/chitosan nanoparticles and their phosphorescence tumor imaging in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yun; Zhang, Shaojuan; Jia, Menghui; Liu, Yang; Shang, Jin; Guo, Youmin; Xu, Jianhua; Wu, Daocheng

    2013-11-01

    A new hypoxia-sensitive coordination compound, bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate)], hereafter denoted as (btp)2Ir(PBCA), is synthesized and characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/chitosan [(btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS] nanoparticles (NPs) with a core-shell structure are prepared by a two-step fabrication process. The size distributions of these NPs are measured with a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology is observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The functional groups on the surface are confirmed by FTIR. Phosphorescence spectra are obtained and lifetimes are determined with a spectrophotofluorometer and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus, respectively. HeLa and CT26 cell lines are used to examine the cytotoxicity by the MTT assay, as well as to determine the imaging capability of the samples in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. Tumor-bearing mouse models of colon adenocarcinoma are used for tumor imaging in vivo, and the imaging effect is evaluated with a Maestro 2 fluorescence imaging system. Compared with the hypoxia-associated probe bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium(acetylacetonate) (BTP), the phosphorescence lifetime of (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs significantly decreases, but the hypoxia-sensitivity increases after preparation of NPs. Apart from the significantly lower cytotoxicity, (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs also enhance the tumor imaging effect by more than 10 times, maintaining the phosphorescence signal in tumor tissue for over 24 h and significantly decreasing the phosphorescence signal in normal tissue in vivo compared with the BTP probe.A new hypoxia-sensitive coordination compound, bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate)], hereafter denoted as (btp)2Ir(PBCA), is synthesized and characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform

  17. Comparison of [18F]-FMISO, [18F]-FAZA and [18F]-HX4 for PET imaging of hypoxia--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wack, Linda J; Mönnich, David; van Elmpt, Wouter; Zegers, Catharina M L; Troost, Esther G C; Zips, Daniel; Thorwarth, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypoxia tracer properties on positron emission tomography (PET) image quality for three tracers [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), [18F]-fluoroazomycinarabinoside (FAZA) and [18F]-flortanidazole (HX4), using mathematical simulations based on microscopic tumor tissue sections. Oxygen distribution and tracer binding was mathematically simulated on immunohistochemically stained cross-sections of tumor xenografts. Tracer diffusion properties were determined based on available literature. Blood activity and clearance over a four-hour period post-injection (p.i.) were derived from clinical dynamic PET scans of patients suffering from head and neck or bronchial cancer. Simulations were performed both for average patient blood activities and for individual patients, and image contrast between normoxic and hypoxic tissue areas was determined over this four-hour period p.i. On average, HX4 showed a six-fold higher clearance than FMISO and an almost three-fold higher clearance than FAZA based on the clinical PET data. The absolute variation in clearance was significantly higher for HX4 than for FMISO (standard deviations of 5.75 *10-5 s-1 vs. 1.55 *10-5 s-1). The absolute tracer activity in these scans at four hours p.i. was highest for FMISO and lowest for HX4. Simulated contrast at four hours p.i. was highest for HX4 (2.39), while FMISO and FAZA were comparable (1.67 and 1.75, respectively). Variations in contrast of 7-11% were observed for each tracer depending on the vascularization patterns of the chosen tissue. Higher variations in clearance for HX4 resulted in an increased inter-patient variance in simulated contrast at four hours p.i. In line with recent experimental and clinical data, the results suggest that HX4 is a promising new tracer that provides high image contrast four hours p.i., though inter-patient variance can be very high. Nevertheless, the widely used tracer FMISO provides a robust and reproducible signal four hours p.i., but

  18. Characterization and application of porous gold nanoparticles as two-photon luminescence imaging agents: 20-fold brighter than gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Hyun; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Suho; Kim, Se-Hwa; Lee, Tae Geol; Lee, Jae Yong; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2017-10-04

    Two-photon nonlinear microscopy with the aid of plasmonic contrast agents, is an attractive bioimaging technique capable of generating high-resolution images in three dimensions and facilitating targeted imaging with deep tissue penetration. In this work, physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles containing multiple nanopores are used as two-photon contrast agents and are reported to emit a 20-fold brighter two-photon luminescence as compared to typical contrast agents, i.e., gold nanorods. A successful application of our porous gold nanoparticles is experimentally demonstrated by in vitro nonlinear optical imaging of adipocytes at subcellular level. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensitivities for CT imaging of contrast agents in a thorax/myocardium phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryar, Joseph; O'Hare, Neil J.; Dowsett, D. J.

    1990-07-01

    A phantom. having similar dimensions to a heart in the human thorax, has been used to determine the sensitivity of X-ray CT scanning for the imaging of contrast agents within the myocardiuin. A theoretical determination of sensitivity has been made for elements from Z=35 to Z=92 for both monochromatic and polychromatic beams. For the monochromatic beams, calculations were made for single energy studies in which the contrast agent was added after an initial scan and for dual energy studies where differential absorption across a K or L absorption edge is used. Simulated images, in which Poisson noise was added to the projection data, have been generated for various elements in the range Z=35 to 92, with particular attention being paid to iodine, gadolithum, tungsten and gold for monochromatic and polychromatic beams. For monochromatic beams the simulated images are compared with the theoretical predictions. The phantom, imaged in a Somatom-2 scanner (with a 256x256 display) has been used to test the accuracy of the results for a polychromatic beam. Results show that the maximum sensitiyity will occur in the region of Z=64 (gadolinium).

  20. Method and application for imaging breast cancer using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping; Intes, Xavier; Nioka, Shoko; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Chance, Britton

    2002-04-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared Spectral window (NIR) offers new possibilities for medical imaging. And using DOT, Indocyanine green (ICG) is found to be a useful blood pooling contrast agent for optical tumor detection. Here we introduce our efforts on study of breast cancer image reconstruction using ICG as a contrast agent. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we developed an effective method to analyze and process the raw data acquired from a CWS (Continuous Wave Spectroscopy) system. Differential absorption images of breast cancers are reconstructed by using ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) which uses the diffusion equation within the Rytov approximation. The experiment device is a combination of sixteen light sources (tungsten bulb) and sixteen light detectors (silicon photodiodes). These sources and detectors are located on a circular holder where the human breasts are placed, each other at equal distance (11 angle apart). It takes a few seconds to acquire data since one source is on, while all the detectors simultaneously detect the photons. So an image includes 16*16 data points. Results from clinical trial in Japan and China show that there is a high concentration of ICG in the location of a cancer, suggesting high blood volume pooling and the usefulness of ICG detecting optically breast cancers.

  1. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-07

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL(-1) were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  2. A low molecular weight folate receptor targeted contrast agent for magnetic resonance tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kalber, Tammy L; Kamaly, Nazila; So, Po-Wah; Pugh, John A; Bunch, Josephine; McLeod, Cameron W; Jorgensen, Michael R; Miller, Andrew D; Bell, Jimmy D

    2011-08-01

    This study aims to develop a low molecular weight folate receptor (FR) contrast agent for MR tumor imaging. Gadolinium-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (Gd.DOTA) was conjugated to folic acid to create Gd.DOTA.Folate. The efficacy of Gd.DOTA.Folate to bind FR was evaluated in vitro by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tumor enhancement over 14 h, utilizing an overexpressing α-FR cell line (IGROV-1), compared to an α-FR-negative cell line (OVCAR-3). Gd.DOTA.Folate localization ex vivo was verified by laser ablation ICP-MS. ICP-MS confirmed Gd.DOTA.Folate uptake by IGROV-1 cells and competitive binding with free folic acid inhibited binding. IGROV-1 tumors showed an increase in R (1) at 2 h, which increased significantly over 14 h post-Gd.DOTA.Folate with clear enhancement on MR images. This was not observed in controls. These data support the use of FR-targeted small molecular weight MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging in vivo.

  3. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Biocompatible polypyrrole nanoparticles as a novel organic photoacoustic contrast agent for deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Deng, Zijian; Li, Yanyan; Li, Changhui; Wang, Jinrui; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-05-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a hybrid, nonionizing imaging modality because of its satisfactory spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast. Here, we demonstrate the application of a novel organic PAT contrast agent based on polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPy NPs). Monodisperse PPy NPs are ~46 nm in diameter with strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range, which allowed visualization of PPy NP-containing agar gel embedded in chicken breast muscle at a depth of ~4.3 cm. Compared with PAT images based on the intrinsic optical contrast in mice, the PAT images acquired within 1 h after intravenous administration of PPy NPs showed the brain vasculature with greater clarity than hemoglobin in blood. Preliminary results showed no acute toxicity to the vital organs (heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys) in mice following a single imaging dose of PPy NPs. Our results indicate that PPy NPs are promising contrast agents for PAT with good biocompatibility, high spatial resolution and enhanced sensitivity.

  5. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  6. Biodegradable Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles as Efficient Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.; Rieter, William J.; Lau, Honam; Huxford-Phillips, Rachel C.

    2013-01-01

    Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) nanoparticles are crosslinked homopolymers formed by condensation of functionalized trialkoxysilanes, and provide an interesting platform for developing biologically and biomedically relevant nanomaterials. In this work, the design and synthesis of biodegradable PSQ particles with extremely high payloads of paramagnetic Gd(III) centers is explored, for use as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two new bis(trialkoxysilyl) derivatives of Gd(III) diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) containing disulfide linkages are synthesized and used to form biodegradable Gd-PSQ particles by base-catalyzed condensation reactions in reverse microemulsions. The Gd-PSQ particles, PSQ-1 and PSQ-2, carry 53.8 wt% and 49.3 wt% of Gd-DTPA derivatives, respectively. In addition, the surface carboxy groups on the PSQ-2 particles can be modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the anisamide (AA) ligand to enhance biocompatibility and cell uptake, respectively. The Gd-PSQ particles are readily degradable to release the constituent Gd(III) chelates in the presence of endogenous reducing agents such as cysteine and glutathione. The MR relaxivities of the Gd-PSQ particles are determined using a 3T MR scanner, with r1 values ranging from 5.9 to 17.8 mMs−1 on a per-Gd basis. Finally, the high sensitivity of the Gd-PSQ particles as T1-weighted MR contrast agents is demonstrated with in vitro MR imaging of human lung and pancreatic cancer cells. The enhanced efficiency of the anisamide-functionalized PSQ-2 particles as a contrast agent is corroborated by both confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging and ICP-MS analysis of Gd content in vitro. PMID:23613450

  7. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  8. Nucleic Acid-directed Self-assembly of Multifunctional Gold Nanoparticle Imaging Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyan; Liu, Yongjian; Jarreau, Chad; Welch, Michael J.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted much interest as a platform for development of multifunctional imaging and therapeutic agents. Multifunctionalized gold nanoparticles are generally constructed by covalent assembly of a gold core with thiolated ligands. In this study, we have assembled multifunctionalized gold nanoparticles in one step by nucleic acid hybridization of ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide)-derivatized gold nanoparticles with a library of pre-functionalized complementary PNAs (peptide nucleic acids). The PNAs were functionalized by conjugation with DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) for chelating 64Cu for PET imaging, PEG (polyethylene glycol) for conferring stealth properties, and Cy5 for fluorescent imaging. The resulting nanoparticles showed good stability both in vitro and in vivo showing biodistribution behavior in a mouse that would be expected for a PEGylated gold nanoparticle rather than that for the radiolabelled PNA used in its assembly. PMID:24058728

  9. Ultrasound molecular imaging of ovarian cancer with CA-125 targeted nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong; Hernandez, Christopher; Yuan, Hai-Xia; Lilly, Jacob; Kota, Pavan; Zhou, Haoyan; Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A

    2017-06-09

    Ultrasound is frequently utilized in diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Because epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is often characterized by overexpression of cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), ultrasound contrast agents able to target this molecular signature could be a promising complementary strategy. In this work, we demonstrate application of CA-125-targeted echogenic lipid and surfactant-stabilized nanobubbles imaged with standard clinical contrast harmonic ultrasound for imaging of CA-125 positive OVCAR-3 tumors in mice. Surface functionalization of the nanobubbles with a CA-125 antibody achieved rapid significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced tumor accumulation, higher peak ultrasound signal intensity and slower wash out rates in OVCAR-3 tumors compared to CA-125 negative SKOV-3 tumors. Targeted nanobubbles also exhibited increased tumor retention and prolonged echogenicity compared to untargeted nanobubbles. Data suggest that ultrasound molecular imaging using CA-125 antibody-conjugated nanobubbles may contribute to improved diagnosis of EOC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Residualization Rates of Near Infrared Dyes for the Rational Design of Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Liao, Jianshan; Atangcho, Lydia; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is widely used for tracking antibodies and biomolecules in vivo. Clinical and preclinical applications include intraoperative imaging, tracking therapeutics, and fluorescent labeling as a surrogate for subsequent radiolabeling. Despite their extensive use, one of the fundamental properties of NIR dyes, the residualization rate within cells following internalization, has not been systematically studied. This rate is required for the rational design of probes and proper interpretation of in vivo results. Procedures In this brief report, we measure the cellular residualization rate of eight commonly used dyes encompassing three core structures (cyanine, BODIPY, and oxazine/thiazine/carbopyronin). Results We identify residualizing (half-life > 24 hrs) and non-residualizing dyes (half-life < 24 hrs) in both the far red (~650-680 nm) and near infrared (~740-800 nm) regions. Conclusions This data will allow researchers to independently and rationally select the wavelength and residualizing nature of dyes for molecular imaging agent design. PMID:25869081

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd2-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd2-DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pKa, complex constant, and T1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd2-DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd2-DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r1) of 7.613mM(-1)s(-1) (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd2-DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd2-DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd2-DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd2-DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd2-DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (< 1 g) and early stage (≤ stage II) masses to prevent rapid progression to late stages and ultimately death. The second challenge is differentiating malignant from benign tissue to avoid costly and invasive surgeries (19.5 surgeries are required to find 1 cancer even with multiple screenings). First-line diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and serum marker tests (e.g. CA-125) aid in diagnosis but they lack the sensitivity and specificity required to overcome both challenges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a second-line diagnostic aided by gadolinium based contrast agents (CAs), offers higher resolution pictures for classifying indeterminate ovarian masses. But as currently practiced, MRI still lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to alter patient outcomes. In this work we develop a new paradigm for EOC diagnosis that targets the prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  13. Image-guided robotic delivery system for precise placement of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Cleary, K; Freedman, M; Clifford, M; Lindisch, D; Onda, S; Jiang, L

    2001-07-06

    The effectiveness of conventional solid tumor treatment is limited by the systemic toxicity and lack of specificity of chemotherapeutic agents. Present treatment modalities are frequently insufficient to eliminate competent cancer cells without exceeding the limits of toxicity to normal tissue. The coming generation of cancer therapeutics depends on the precise targeting and sustained release of antitumor agents to overcome these limitations. We are developing an image-guided, robotic system for precise intratumoral placement of anticancer drugs and sustained release devices to advance this new treatment paradigm. The robotic system will use intraoperatively obtained computed tomographic (CT) images from a mobile CT scanner for guidance. The concept is to track patient anatomy and localize instruments using currently available optical tracking technology. Tracking will also be used to register patient anatomy with the images. The physician can then use the registered image to select an appropriate tumor target and entry location and to plan the instrument path. This path will then be transmitted to the robot, which orients and drives the instrument to the desired target under physician control. Achievement of the target is confirmed via intraoperative CT. This system will provide instrument guidance that is precise, direct, and controllable. Error due to poor target visualization and hand unsteadiness should be reduced greatly. The basic components of the system (robot, mobile CT, tracking) have been demonstrated in our laboratory, and the integration of the components is in progress. In future work, we plan to fuse preoperative PET imaging with intraoperative CT to allow functional as well as anatomic image guidance.

  14. Significant impact of different oxygen breathing conditions on noninvasive in vivo tumor-hypoxia imaging using [18F]-fluoro-azomycinarabino-furanoside ([18F]FAZA)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background [18F]FAZA is a PET biomarker with great potential for imaging tumor hypoxia. Aim of our study was to compare [18F]FAZA uptake in mice with subcutaneous exogenous CT26 colon carcinomas and endogenous polyoma middle-T (PyV-mT) mammary carcinomas and to analyze the influence of different breathing protocols in CT26 colon carcinomas as well as the reversibility or irreversibility of [18F]FAZA uptake. Methods We injected subcutaneous CT26 colon carcinoma or polyomavirus middle-T (PyV-mT) mammary carcinoma-bearing mice intravenously with18F-FAZA and performed PET scans 1-3 h post injection (p.i.). To analyze the impact of oxygen supply in CT26 carcinomas we used three different breathing protocols: (P0) air; (P1) 100% oxygen 1 h prior injection until 3 h p.i.; (P2) 100% oxygen breathing starting 2 min prior tracer injection until 1 h p.i. and during the PET scans; mice were breathing air between the 2 h and 3 h 10 min static scans. Normalized PET images were analyzed by using defined regions of interest. Finally, some mice were dissected for pimonidazole immunohistochemistry. Results There was no difference in18F-FAZA uptake 1-3 h p.i. between the two carcinoma types (CT26: 1.58 ± 0.45%ID/cc; PyV-mT: 1.47 ± 0.89%ID/cc, 1 h p.i., tumor size < 0.5 cm3). We measured a significant tracer clearance, which was more pronounced in muscle tissue (P0). The [18F]FAZA tumor-to-muscle-ratios in CT26 colon carcinoma-bearing mice 2 h and 3 h, but not 1 h p.i. were significantly higher when the mice breathed air (P0: 3.56 ± 0.55, 3 h) compared to the oxygen breathing protocols (P1: 2.45 ± 0.58; P2: 2.77 ± 0.42, 3 h). Surprisingly, the breathing protocols P1 and P2 showed no significant differences in T/M ratios, thus indicating that the crucial [18F]FAZA uptake phase is during the first hour after [18F]FAZA injection. Importantly, the muscle clearance was not affected by the different oxygen breathing conditions while the tumor clearance was lower when mice were

  15. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  16. Environmentally sensitive paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesus; Calle, Daniel; Lizarbe, Blanca; Negri, Viviana; Ubide, Carmen; Fayos, Rosa; Larrubia, Pilar López; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdan, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Even though alterations in the microenvironmental properties of tissues underlie the development of the most prevalent and morbid pathologies, they are not directly observable in vivo by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. This circumstance has lead to the development of a wide variety of exogenous paramagnetic and diamagnetic MRI and MRS probes able to inform non invasively on microenvironmental variables such as pH, pO(2), ion concentration o even temperature. This review covers the fundamentals of environmental contrast and the current arsenal of endogenous and exogenous MRI and MRS contrast enhancing agents available to visualize it. We begin describing the physicochemical background necessary to understand paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast enhancement with a special reference to novel magnetization transfer and (13)C hyperpolarization strategies. We describe then the main macrocyclic structures used to support the environmentally sensitive paramagnetic sensors, including CEST and PARACEST pH sensitive probes, temperature probes and enzyme activity or gene expression activatable probes. Finally we address the most commonly used diamagnetic contrast agents including imidazolic derivatives to reveal extracellular pH and tissue pO(2) values by MRS. The potential applications of these agents in multimodal and molecular imaging approaches are discussed.

  17. NIR-activated iron oxides as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Pei-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Chia; Li, Meng-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are commonly used contrast agents for theranostic nanomedicines because of their advantages of good biocompatibility, high stability in physiological conditions, low cytotoxicity and excellent safety record in clinical settings for human use. In this study, we developed a NIR-activated iron oxide (NIR-Fe3O4) nanoparticle as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unlike traditional iron oxides, the developed NIR-Fe3O4 owns biocompatibility and optical tunability capable of providing strong optical absorption in the NIR range for PA signal generation. Its intrinsic magnetic property enables the active magnetic tumor targeting. Phantom experiments were performed to confirm the tunability of NIR-Fe3O4's optical absorption in NIR and demonstrate its magnetic targeting capability. The PA signal response of NIR-Fe3O4 as a function of concentration was also investigated. The results showed that the PA signal of NIR-Fe3O4 with OD=1.25 was comparable to that of blood at 715 nm - the wavelength of peak absorption of the used NIR-Fe3O4. Moreover, the PA signal from NIR-Fe3O4 could be further improved by magnetic targeting. Overall, we proved that the potential of the developed NIR-Fe3O4 as a good tumor targeting contrast agent of PA imaging.

  18. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.