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Sample records for hypoxia imaging agents

  1. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  2. A Functional CT Contrast Agent for In Vivo Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongyuan; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Chusen; Gu, Xiaoli; Jia, Ti; Zhang, Amin; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Lan; Luo, Xianfu; Zhao, Xuesong; Jia, Nengqin; Miao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, which has been well established as a key feature of the tumor microenvironment, significantly influences tumor behavior and treatment response. Therefore, imaging for tumor hypoxia in vivo is warranted. Although some imaging modalities for detecting tumor hypoxia have been developed, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and optical imaging, these technologies still have their own specific limitations. As computed tomography (CT) is one of the most useful imaging tools in terms of availability, efficiency, and convenience, the feasibility of using a hypoxia-sensitive nanoprobe (Au@BSA-NHA) for CT imaging of tumor hypoxia is investigated, with emphasis on identifying different levels of hypoxia in two xenografts. The nanoprobe is composed of Au nanoparticles and nitroimidazole moiety which can be electively reduced by nitroreductase under hypoxic condition. In vitro, Au@BSA-NHA attain the higher cellular uptake under hypoxic condition. Attractively, after in vivo administration, Au@BSA-NHA can not only monitor the tumor hypoxic environment with CT enhancement but also detect the hypoxic status by the degree of enhancement in two xenograft tumors with different hypoxic levels. The results demonstrate that Au@BSA-NHA may potentially be used as a sensitive CT imaging agent for detecting tumor hypoxia. PMID:27345304

  3. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  4. Imaging hypoxia in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Mendichovszky, I; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia plays a central role in tumour development, angiogenesis, growth and resistance to treatment. Owing to constant developments in medical imaging technology, significant advances have been made towards in vitro and in vivo imaging of hypoxia in a variety of tumours, including gliomas of the central nervous system. The aim of this article is to review the literature on imaging approaches currently available for measuring hypoxia in human gliomas and provide an insight into recent advances and future directions in this field. After a brief overview of hypoxia and its importance in gliomas, several methods of measuring hypoxia will be presented. These range from invasive monitoring by Eppendorf polarographic O2 microelectrodes, positron electron tomography (PET) tracers based on 2-nitroimidazole compounds [18F-labelled fluoro-misonidazole (18F-MISO) or 1-(2-[(18)F]fluoro-1-[hydroxymethyl]ethoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole (FRP-170)], 64Cu-ATSM Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) or 99mTc- and 68Ga-labelled metronidazole (MN) agents to advanced MRI methods, such as blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, oxygen-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:22433825

  5. Hypoxia-directed and activated theranostic agent: Imaging and treatment of solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Eun-Joong; Han, Jiyou; Lee, Hyunseung; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Hyun Min; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, a distinguished feature of various solid tumors, has been considered as a key marker for tumor progression. Inadequate vasculature and high interstitial pressures result in relatively poor drug delivery to these tumors. Herein, we developed an antitumor theranostic agent, 4, which is activated in hypoxic conditions and can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. Compound 4, bearing biotin, a tumor-targeting unit, and SN38, an anticancer drug, proved to be an effective theranostic agent for solid tumors. SN38 plays a dual role: as an anticancer drug for therapy and as a fluorophore for diagnosis, thus avoids an extra fluorophore and limits cytotoxicity. Compound 4, activated in the hypoxic environment, showed high therapeutic activity in A549 and HeLa cells and spheroids. In vivo imaging of solid tumors confirmed the tumor-specific localization, deep tissue penetration and activation of compound 4, as well as the production of a strong anticancer effect through the inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model validating it as a promising strategy for the treatment of solid tumors.

  6. Preparation and Biodistribution of Technetium-99m-Labeled Bis- Misonidazole (MISO) as an Imaging Agent for Tumour Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Fan, Di; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumour hypoxia is an important aspect in determining the course of tumour therapy. In this study, we developed a novel imaging agent, (99m)Tc-ethylenedicysteine-bis-misonidazole ((99m)Tc-EC-MISO), for diagnosing tumour hypoxia. We used 2-nitroimidazole as a reactant to synthesize the amino derivative of misonidazole (MISO) in the first step and then conjugated the di-amino derivative of MISO to the chelating agent ethylenedicysteine (EC) for labelling (99m)Tc in the second step. (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4-) was reduced by tin chloride (SnCl2) for radiolabeling. The radiochemical purity was up to 94%. Tissue biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were conducted on subcutaneous gliomal tumour-bearing mice. The tumour-to-muscle ratio in the (99m)Tc-EC-MISO group increased with time, up to 4.6 at 4 h after injection. SPECT/CT imaging confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with (99m)Tc-EC-MISO at 2 h. By introducing a second 2-nitroimidazole redox centre, an apparent hypoxic accumulation of this novel (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agent in the tumour was observed.

  7. Nitroimidazole conjugates of bis(thiosemicarbazonato)64Cu(II) - Potential combination agents for the PET imaging of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonnitcha, Paul D; Bayly, Simon R; Theobald, Mark B M; Betts, Helen M; Lewis, Jason S; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Combination agents comprising two different pharmacophores with the same biological target have the potential to show additive or synergistic activity. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) complexes (e.g. (64)Cu-ATSM) and nitroimidazoles (e.g. (18)F-MISO) are classes of tracer used for the delineation of tumor hypoxia by positron emission tomography (PET). Three nitroimidazole-bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) conjugates were produced in order to investigate their potential as combination hypoxia imaging agents. Two were derived from the known bifunctional bis(thiosemicarbazone) H(2)ATSM/A and the third from the new precursor diacetyl-2-(4-N-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone)-3-(4-N-ethylamino-3-thiosemicarbazone) - H(2)ATSM/en. Oxygen-dependent uptake studies were performed using the (64)Cu radiolabelled complexes in EMT6 carcinoma cells. All the complexes displayed appreciable hypoxia selectivity, with the nitroimidazole conjugates displaying greater selectivity than a simple propyl derivative used as a control. Participation of the nitroimidazole group in the trapping mechanism is indicated by the increased hypoxic uptake of the 2- vs. the 4-substituted (64)Cu-ATSM/A derivatives. The 2-nitroimidazole derivative of (64)Cu-ATSM/en demonstrated superior hypoxia selectivity to (64)Cu-ATSM over the range of oxygen concentrations tested. Biodistribution of the radiolabelled 2-nitroimidazole conjugates was carried out in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice. The complexes showed significantly different uptake trends in comparison to each other and previously studied Cu-ATSM derivatives. Uptake of the Cu-ATSM/en conjugate in non-target organs was considerably lower than for derivatives based on Cu-ATSM/A.

  8. Imaging hypoxia in tumors.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, J R

    2001-10-01

    For many years, it has been known that hypoxia affects the response to radiotherapy in human cancers. Hypoxic regions can develop as a tumor grows beyond the ability of its blood supply to deliver oxygen to the full extent of the tumor, exacerbated by vascular spasm or compression caused by increased interstitial fluid pressure. However, hypoxia is heterogeneous, and tumors that appear identical by clinical and radiographic criteria can vary greatly in their extent of hypoxia. Several invasive procedures to measure hypoxia in tumors have been developed and are predictive of response to therapy, but none of these is in routine clinical use because of technical complexity, inconvenience, and inability to obtain repeated measures. Noninvasive imaging with a hypoxia-directed radiopharmaceutical could be of great clinical utility. Most such radiopharmaceuticals under development use 2-nitroimidazole as the targeting moiety. 2-Nitroimidazole, which is selectively reduced and bound in hypoxic tissues, has been labeled with F-18, Cu-64/67, I-123, and Tc-99m. Of these, F-18-fluoromisonidazole and I-123-iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) have been most widely studied clinically. Non-nitro-containing bioreductive complexes, such as the Cu-60/62/64 thiosemicarbazone ATSM and Tc-99m butylene amineoxime (BnAO or HL91), have also been evaluated. In particular, 1-123-IAZA and Cu-60-ATSM have shown correlation with response to radiotherapy in preliminary clinical studies. However, more preclinical studies comparing imaging with validated invasive methods and clinical studies with outcome measures are required. Nuclear medicine is poised to play an important role in optimizing the therapy of patients with hypoxic tumors.

  9. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  10. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  11. Molecular probes for imaging of hypoxia in the retina.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie M; Kim, Kwangho; Moore, Chauca E; Uddin, Md Imam; Capozzi, Megan E; Craft, Jason R; Sulikowski, Gary A; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-11-19

    Hypoxia has been associated with retinal diseases which lead the causes of irreversible vision loss, including diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, technologies for imaging hypoxia in the retina are needed for early disease detection, monitoring of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic responses in the patient. Toward this goal, we developed two hypoxia-sensitive imaging agents based on nitroimidazoles which are capable of accumulating in hypoxic cells in vivo. 2-nitroimidazole or Pimonidazole was conjugated to fluorescent dyes to yield the imaging agents HYPOX-1 and HYPOX-2. Imaging agents were characterized in cell culture and animal models of retinal vascular diseases which exhibit hypoxia. Both HYPOX-1 and -2 were capable of detecting hypoxia in cell culture models with >10:1 signal-to-noise ratios without acute toxicity. Furthermore, intraocular administration of contrast agents in mouse models of retinal hypoxia enabled ex vivo detection of hypoxic tissue. These imaging agents are a promising step toward translation of hypoxia-sensitive molecular imaging agents in preclinical animal models and patients.

  12. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  13. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  14. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed.

  15. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  16. F18 Fluoromisonidazole for Imaging Tumor Hypoxia: Imaging the Microenvironment for Personalized Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, JG; Krohn, KA

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia in solid tumors is one of the seminal mechanisms for developing aggressive trait and treatment resistsance in solid tumors. This evolutionarily conserved biological mechanism along with de-repression of cellular functions in cancer, although resulting in many challenges, provide us with opportunities to use these adversities to our advantage. Our ability to use molecular imaging to characterize therapeutic targets such as hypoxia and apply this information for therapeutic interventions is growing rapidly. Evaluation of hypoxia and its biological ramifications to effectively plan appropriate therapy that can overcome the cure-limiting effects of hypoxia provides an objective means for treatment selection and planning. FMISO PET imaging of tumor hypoxia continues to be the lead radiopharmaceutical for the evaluation, prognostication and quantification of hypoxia, one of the key elements of the tumor microenvironment. FMISO is less confounded by blood flow and, although the images have less contrast than FDG PET, its uptake after 2 hours is an accurate reflection of inadequate regional Po2 at the time of radiopharmaceutical administration. By virtue of extensive clinical utilization, FMISO remains the lead candidate for imaging and quantifying hypoxia. The past decade has seen significant technological advances in investigating hypoxia imaging in radiation treatment planning and in providing us with the ability to individualize radiation delivery and target volume coverage. The presence of widespread hypoxia in the tumor can be effectively targeted with a systemic hypoxic cell cytotoxin or other agents that are more effective with diminished PO2, either alone or in combination. Molecular imaging in general and hypoxia imaging in particular will likely become an important in vivo imaging biomarker of the future, complementing the traditional direct tissue sampling methods by providing a snap shot of a primary tumor and metastatic disease and in following

  17. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  18. Imaging tumor hypoxia by magnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia results from the negative balance between the oxygen demands of the tissue and the capacity of the neovasculature to deliver sufficient oxygen. The resulting oxygen deficit has important consequences with regard to the aggressiveness and malignancy of tumors, as well as their resistance to therapy, endowing the imaging of hypoxia with vital repercussions in tumor prognosis and therapy design. The molecular and cellular events underlying hypoxia are mediated mainly through hypoxia-inducible factor, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects over a variety of cellular processes, including oncologic transformation, invasion and metastasis. However, few methodologies have been able to monitor noninvasively the oxygen tensions in vivo. MRI and MRS are often used for this purpose. Most MRI approaches are based on the effects of the local oxygen tension on: (i) the relaxation times of (19)F or (1)H indicators, such as perfluorocarbons or their (1)H analogs; (ii) the hemodynamics and magnetic susceptibility effects of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin; and (iii) the effects of paramagnetic oxygen on the relaxation times of tissue water. (19)F MRS approaches monitor tumor hypoxia through the selective accumulation of reduced nitroimidazole derivatives in hypoxic zones, whereas electron spin resonance methods determine the oxygen level through its influence on the linewidths of appropriate paramagnetic probes in vivo. Finally, Overhauser-enhanced MRI combines the sensitivity of EPR methodology with the resolution of MRI, providing a window into the future use of hyperpolarized oxygen probes.

  19. Multimodality imaging of hypoxia in preclinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Cui, Weina; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Gulaka, Praveen K.; Hao, Guiyang; Thorpe, Philip; Hahn, Eric W.; Peschke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has long been recognized to influence solid tumor response to therapy. Increasingly, hypoxia has also been implicated in tumor aggressiveness, including growth, development and metastatic potential. Thus, there is a fundamental, as well as a clinical interest, in assessing in situ tumor hypoxia. This review will examine diverse approaches focusing on the pre-clinical setting, particularly, in rodents. The strategies are inevitably a compromise in terms of sensitivity, precision, temporal and spatial resolution, as well as cost, feasibility, ease and robustness of implementation. We will review capabilities of multiple modalities and examine what makes them particularly suitable for investigating specific aspects of tumor pathophysiology. Current approaches range from nuclear imaging to magnetic resonance and optical, with varying degrees of invasiveness and ability to examine spatial heterogeneity, as well as dynamic response to interventions. Ideally, measurements would be non-invasive, exploiting endogenous reporters to reveal quantitatively local oxygen tension dynamics. A primary focus of this review is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based techniques, such as 19F MRI oximetry, which reveals not only hypoxia in vivo, but more significantly, spatial distribution of pO2 quantitatively, with a precision relevant to radiobiology. It should be noted that pre-clinical methods may have very different criteria for acceptance, as compared with potential investigations for prognostic radiology or predictive biomarkers suitable for use in patients. PMID:20639813

  20. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent∕phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique. PMID:21198195

  1. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  2. Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Aguirre, Andres; Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Claffey, Kevin P.; Zhu, Quing

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

  3. Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides: hypoxia-selective therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Diab-Assef, Mona; Haddadin, Makhluf J; Yared, Pierre; Assaad, Chafika; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala U

    2002-04-01

    A problem that confronts clinicians in the treatment of cancer is the resistance of hypoxic tumors to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Thus, the development of new drugs that are toxic to hypoxic cells found in solid tumors is an important objective for effective anticancer chemotherapy. We recently showed that the heterocyclic aromatic N-oxides, quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides (QdNOs), are cytotoxic to tumor cells cultured under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated the hypoxia-selective toxicity of four diversely substituted QdNOs and determined their effect on the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1alpha in the human colon cancer cell line T-84. The various QdNOs were found to possess a 50- to 100-fold greater cytotoxicity to T-84 cells cultured under hypoxia compared with oxia. Interestingly, the hypoxia cytotoxicity ratio (HCR), the ratio of equitoxic concentrations of the drug under aerobic/anoxic conditions, was highly structure related and depended on the nature of the substituents on the QdNO heterocycle. The most cytotoxic 2-benzoyl-3-phenyl-6,7-dichloro derivative of QdNO (DCQ) was potent at a dose of 1 microM with an HCR of 100 and significantly reduced the levels of HIF-1alpha transcript and protein. The 2-benzoyl-3-phenyl derivative (BPQ) had a hypoxia potency of 20 microM and an HCR of 40. By contrast, the 2-aceto-3-methyl and the 2,3-tetramethylene (TMQ) derivatives of QdNO were much less cytotoxic under hypoxia (HCRs of 8.5 and 6.5, respectively) and reduced the expression of HIF-1alpha mRNA to a much lesser extent. Because the nonchlorinated analogue BPQ did not demonstrate behavior similar to that of DCQ, we hypothesize that the C-6, C-7-chlorine of DCQ might play a significant role in the selective hypoxic cytotoxicity of the drug.

  4. Imaging hypoxia using 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a multivariate in vivo hemodynamic model of tissue oxygenation (MiHMO2) based on 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: Low oxygen levels, or hypoxia, deprives cancer cells of oxygen and confers resistance to irradiation, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and oxygen-dependent therapies (phototherapy) leading to treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival. For example, clinical studies of patients with breast carcinomas, cervical cancer, and head and neck carcinomas (HNC) are more likely to suffer local reoccurrence and metastasis if their tumors are hypoxic. A novel method to non invasively measure tumor hypoxia, identify its type, and monitor its heterogeneity is devised by measuring tumor hemodynamics, MiHMO2. Material and Methods: Simulations are performed to compare tumor pO2 levels and hypoxia based on physiology - perfusion, fractional plasma volume, fractional cellular volume - and its hemoglobin status - oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration - based on in vivo measurements of breast, prostate, and ovarian tumors. Simulations of MiHMO2 are performed to assess the influence of scanner resolutions and different mathematic models of oxygen delivery. Results: Sensitivity of pO2 and hypoxic fraction to photoacoustic scanner resolution and dependencies on model complexity will be presented using hemodynamic parameters for different tumors. Conclusions: Photoacoustic CT spectroscopy provides a unique ability to monitor hemodynamic and cellular physiology in tissue, which can be used to longitudinally monitor tumor oxygenation and its response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  5. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of cancer mediated by tumor hypoxia and HIF1α/OATPs signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Shi, Changhong; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Dou, Xiaoliang; Sahu, Divya; Li, Wei; Harada, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ruoxiang; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2014-09-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents are promising tools for noninvasive cancer imaging. Here, we explored the mechanistic properties of a specific group of NIR heptamethine carbocyanines including MHI-148 dye we identified and synthesized, and demonstrated these dyes to achieve cancer-specific imaging and targeting via a hypoxia-mediated mechanism. We found that cancer cells and tumor xenografts exhibited hypoxia-dependent MHI-148 dye uptake in vitro and in vivo, which was directly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Microarray analysis and dye uptake assay further revealed a group of hypoxia-inducible organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) responsible for dye uptake, and the correlation between OATPs and HIF1α was manifested in progressive clinical cancer specimens. Finally, we demonstrated increased uptake of MHI-148 dye in situ in perfused clinical tumor samples with activated HIF1α/OATPs signaling. Our results establish these NIRF dyes as potential tumor hypoxia-dependent cancer-targeting agents and provide a mechanistic rationale for continued development of NIRF imaging agents for improved cancer detection, prognosis and therapy.

  6. Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia: Existing Problems and Their Potential Model-Based Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kuangyu; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of tissue hypoxia generates contrast in hypoxic areas by applying hypoxia-specific tracers in organisms. In cancer tissue, the injected tracer needs to be transported over relatively long distances and accumulates slowly in hypoxic regions. Thus, the signal-to-background ratio of hypoxia imaging is very small and a non-specific accumulation may suppress the real hypoxia-specific signals. In addition, the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment makes the assessment of the tissue oxygenation status more challenging. In this study, the diffusion potential of oxygen and of a hypoxia tracer for 4 different hypoxia subtypes: ischemic acute hypoxia, hypoxemic acute hypoxia, diffusion-limited chronic hypoxia and anemic chronic hypoxia are theoretically assessed. In particular, a reaction-diffusion equation is introduced to quantitatively analyze the interstitial diffusion of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO. Imaging analysis strategies are explored based on reaction-diffusion simulations. For hypoxia imaging of low signal-to-background ratio, pharmacokinetic modelling has advantages to extract underlying specific binding signals from non-specific background signals and to improve the assessment of tumor oxygenation. Different pharmacokinetic models are evaluated for the analysis of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO and optimal analysis model were identified accordingly. The improvements by model-based methods for the estimation of tumor oxygenation are in agreement with experimental data. The computational modelling offers a tool to explore molecular imaging of hypoxia and pharmacokinetic modelling is encouraged to be employed in the corresponding data analysis. PMID:27526129

  7. [Hypoxia and memory. Specific features of nootropic agents effects and their use].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic adaptation are powerful factors of controlling memory and behavior processes. Acute hypoxia exerts a differential impact on different deficits of mnestic and cognitive functions. Instrumental reflexes of active and passive avoidance, negative learning, behavior with a change in the stereotype of learning are more greatly damaged. Memory with spatial and visual differentiation and their rearrangement change to a lesser extent and conditional reflexes are not deranged. In this contract, altitude hypoxic adaptation enhances information fixation and increases the degree and duration of retention of temporary relations. Nootropic agents with an antihypoxic action exert a marked effect on hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders and the magnitude of this effect depends on the ration of proper nootropic to antihypoxic components in the spectrum of the drugs' pharmacological activity. The agents that combine a prevailing antiamnestic effect and a marked and moderate antihypoxic action (mexidole, nooglutil, pyracetam, beglymin, etc.) are most effective in eliminating different hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders, nootropic drugs that have a pronounced antiamnestic activity (centrophenoxine, etc.) and no antihypoxic component also restore the main types of mnestic disorders after hypoxia, but to a lesser extent.

  8. SU-E-I-84: MRI Relaxation Properties of a Pre-Clinical Hypoxia-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Wilson, G; Chavez, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A possible hypoxia-sensitive MRI agent, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), has been tried to image oxygen level in proton-based MRI (Kodibagkar et al, NMR Biomed, 2008). The induced changes of T1 (or R1) value by the HMDSO as the oxygenation level changes are the principle that the hypoxia agent is based on: the R1 increases as the oxygen level increases. However, as reported previously, the range of R1 values (0.1–0.3 s-1, corresponding to 3–10 s of T1) is not in the range where a regular MRI technique can easily detect the change. In order for this agent to be widely applied in an MRI environment, more relaxation properties of this agent, including T1 in the rotating frame (T1rho) and T2, need to be explored. Here, the relaxation properties of this agent are explored. Methods: A phantom was made with HMDSO, water and mineral oil, each of which was prepared with oxygen and nitrogen, and was imaged in a 3T MRI system. The T1 properties were explored by the inversion recovery (TR=3000ms, TE=65ms) while varying the inversion time (TI), and also by the fast-field-echo (TR=2 ms, TE=2.8ms) while varying the flip angle (FA). T1rho was explored with a 5-pulse spin-locking technique (TR=5000ms, TE=10ms, spin-lock field=500Hz) while varying the spin-lock duration. T2 was explored with multi-shot TSE (TR=2500ms) while varying TE. Results: With the variable FA and TI, the signals of HMDSO with oxygen and nitrogen change in a similar way and do not respond well by the change of oxygen level, which confirms the large T1 value of HMDSO. The T1rho and T2, however, have a better sensitivity. Conclusion: For the possible pre-clinical hypoxia MRI agent (HMDSO), the detection of T1 (or R1) changes may be more challenging than the detection of other relaxation properties, particularly T2, as the oxygen level changes.

  9. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Imam; Evans, Stephanie M.; Craft, Jason R.; Capozzi, Megan E.; McCollum, Gary W.; Yang, Rong; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:27491345

  10. [F-18]-Fluoromisonidazole Quantification of Hypoxia in Human Cancer Patients using Image-derived Blood Surrogate Tissue Reference Regions

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; O’Sullivan, Janet N.; Fink, James R.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Muzi, John P.; Mankoff, David A.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    18F-FMISO is the most widely used PET agent for imaging hypoxia, a condition associated with resistance to tumor therapy. 18F-FMISO equilibrates in normoxic tissues, but is retained under hypoxic conditions because of reduction and binding to macromolecules. A simple tissue-to-blood ratio (TB) is suitable for quantifying hypoxia. A threshold of TB ≥ 1.2 is useful in discriminating the hypoxic volume (HV) of tissue; TBmax is the maximum intensity of the hypoxic region and does not invoke a threshold. Because elimination of blood sampling would simplify clinical use, we tested the validity of using imaging regions as a surrogate for blood sampling. Methods Patients underwent 20 min 18F-FMISO scans during the 90–140 min interval post-injection with venous blood sampling. 223 18F-FMISO patient studies had detectable surrogate blood regions in the field-of-view. Quantitative parameters of hypoxia (TBmax, HV) derived from blood samples were compared to values using surrogate blood regions derived from heart, aorta and/or cerebellum. In a subset of brain cancer patients, parameters from blood samples and from cerebellum were compared for their ability to independently predict outcome. Results Vascular regions of heart showed the highest correlation to measured blood activity (R2 = 0.84). For brain studies, cerebellar activity was similarly correlated to blood samples. In brain cancer patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that image-derived reference regions had nearly identical predictive power as parameters derived from blood, thus obviating the need for venous sampling in these patients. Conclusions Simple static analysis of 18F-FMISO PET captures both the intensity (TBmax) and spatial extent (HV) of tumor hypoxia. An image-derived region to assess blood activity can be used as a surrogate for blood sampling in quantification of hypoxia. PMID:26112020

  11. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  12. Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on cognitive functions and potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Muthuraju, Sangu; Pati, Soumya

    2014-12-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000-5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  13. Contribution of [64Cu]-ATSM PET in molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia compared to classical [18F]-MISO--a selected review.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Rajerison, Holisoa; Guerard, François; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Barbet, Jacques; Michel, Nathalie; Cherel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    During the carcinogenesis process, tumour cells often have a more rapid proliferation potential than cells that participate in blood capillary formation by neoangiogenesis. As a consequence of the poorly organized vasculature of various solid tumours, a limited oxygen delivery is observed. This hypoxic mechanism frequently occurs in solid cancers and can lead to therapeutic resistance. The present selected literature review is focused on the comparison of two positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals agents, which are currently leaders in tumour hypoxia imaging by PET. {18F}-fluoromisonidazole (=FMISO) is most commonly used as an investigational PET agent with an investigational new drug exemption from the FDA, while {64Cu}-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) has been presented as an alternative radiopharmaceutical not yet readily available. The comparison of these two radiopharmaceutical agents is particularly focused on isotope properties, radiopharmaceutical labelling process, pharmacological mechanisms, dosimetry data in patients, and clinical results in terms of image contrast. PET imaging has demonstrated a good efficacy in tumour hypoxia imaging with both FMISO and Cu-ATSM, but FMISO has presented too slow an in vivo accumulation and a weak image contrast of the hypoxia area. Despite a less favourable dosimetry, 64Cu-ATSM appears superior in terms of imaging performance, calling for industrial and clinical development of this innovative radiopharmaceutical.

  14. Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Prem C.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

  15. Histological Image Processing Features Induce a Quantitative Characterization of Chronic Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors signifies resistance to therapy. Despite a wealth of tumor histology data, including anti-pimonidazole staining, no current methods use these data to induce a quantitative characterization of chronic tumor hypoxia in time and space. We use image-processing algorithms to develop a set of candidate image features that can formulate just such a quantitative description of xenographed colorectal chronic tumor hypoxia. Two features in particular give low-variance measures of chronic hypoxia near a vessel: intensity sampling that extends radially away from approximated blood vessel centroids, and multithresholding to segment tumor tissue into normal, hypoxic, and necrotic regions. From these features we derive a spatiotemporal logical expression whose truth value depends on its predicate clauses that are grounded in this histological evidence. As an alternative to the spatiotemporal logical formulation, we also propose a way to formulate a linear regression function that uses all of the image features to learn what chronic hypoxia looks like, and then gives a quantitative similarity score once it is trained on a set of histology images. PMID:27093539

  16. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  17. A Comparison of the Imaging Characteristics and Microregional Distribution of 4 Hypoxia PET Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Sean; Zhang, Hanwen; Reese, Megan; Ramos, Nicholas N.; Chen, Qing; Ricketts, Sally-Ann

    2014-01-01

    We compared the imaging characteristics and hypoxia selectivity of 4 hypoxia PET radiotracers (18F-fluoromisonidazole [18F-FMISO], 18F-flortanidazole [18F-HX4], 18F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside [18F-FAZA], and 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylsemicarbazone) [64Cu-ATSM]) in a single murine xenograft tumor model condition using small-animal PET imaging and combined ex vivo autoradiography and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Methods Nude mice bearing SQ20b xenograft tumors were administered 1 of 4 hypoxia PET tracers and images acquired 80–90 min after injection. Frozen sections from excised tumors were then evaluated for tracer distribution using digital autoradiography and compared with histologic markers of tumor hypoxia (pimonidazole, carbonic anydrase 9 [CA9]) and vascular perfusion (Hoechst 33342). Results The highest tumor uptake was observed with 64Cu-ATSM (maximum standardized uptake values [SUVmax], 1.26 ± 0.13) and the lowest with 18F-FAZA (SUVmax, 0.41 ± 0.24). 18F-FMISO and 18F-HX4 had similar intermediate tumor uptake (SUVmax, 0.76 ± 0.38 and 0.65 ± 0.19, respectively). Digital autoradiographs of hypoxia tracer distribution were compared pixel by pixel with images of immunohistochemistry stains. The fluorinated nitroimidazoles all showed radiotracer uptake increasing with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. 64Cu-ATSM showed the opposite pattern, with highest radiotracer uptake observed in regions with the lowest pimonidazole and CA9 staining. Conclusion The fluorinated nitroimidazoles showed similar tumor distributions when compared with immunohistochemistry markers of hypoxia. Variations in tumor standardized uptake value and normal tissue distribution may determine the most appropriate clinical setting for each tracer. 64Cu-ATSM showed the highest tumor accumulation and little renal clearance. However, the lack of correlation between 64Cu-ATSM distribution and immunohistochemistry hypoxia markers casts some doubt on the hypoxia selectivity of 64Cu

  18. Imaging efficacy of a targeted imaging agent for fluorescence endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, A. J.; Bendiksen, R.; Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Waagene, S.; Hvoslef, A. M.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. A significant unmet clinical need exists in the area of screening for earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We have identified a fluorescence imaging agent targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent is administered intravenously and imaged in a far red imaging channel as an adjunct to white light endoscopy. There is experimental evidence of preclinical proof of mechanism for the agent. In order to assess potential clinical efficacy, imaging was performed with a prototype fluorescence endoscope system designed to produce clinically relevant images. A clinical laparoscope system was modified for fluorescence imaging. The system was optimised for sensitivity. Images were recorded at settings matching those expected with a clinical endoscope implementation (at video frame rate operation). The animal model was comprised of a HCT-15 xenograft tumour expressing the target at concentration levels expected in early stage colorectal cancer. Tumours were grown subcutaneously. The imaging agent was administered intravenously at a dose of 50nmol/kg body weight. The animals were killed 2 hours post administration and prepared for imaging. A 3-4mm diameter, 1.6mm thick slice of viable tumour was placed over the opened colon and imaged with the laparoscope system. A receiver operator characteristic analysis was applied to imaging results. An area under the curve of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 87% [73, 96] and specificity of 100% [93, 100] were obtained.

  19. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  20. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, Donald M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Beierwaltes, William H.; Wu, Jiann-long

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla.

  1. Imaging agent and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Wieland, D.M.; Brown, L.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Wu, J.L.

    1986-04-22

    A new radiopharmaceutical composition for use in nuclear medicine comprises a radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The composition is used as an imaging agent for the heart, adrenal medulla, and tumors of the adrenal medulla and can be used for treatment of tumors of the adrenal medulla. No Drawings

  2. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  3. The hypoxia-mimetic agent CoCl₂ induces chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanglei; Xu, Shuqing; Peng, Lintao; Li, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Yanfang

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia, which is an important factor that mediates tumor progression and poor treatment response, is particularly associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced colorectal cancer chemoresistance remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying hypoxia‑induced chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells. LOVO cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment simulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), which is a chemical inducer of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α). HIF‑1α is a transcription factor that has an important role in tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia, and controls the expression of several genes. Various CoCl2 concentrations are often used to simulate degrees of hypoxia. In the present study, following treatment with CoCl2, an MTT assay was conducted to determine the growth and drug sensitivity of LOVO cells. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and factors associated with chemotherapy resistance, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and multidrug resistant 1 (MDR1), which encodes the major transmembrane efflux transporter P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp). In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis‑related proteins, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑associated agonist of cell death (Bad) were detected by western blotting. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to visually observe Adriamycin (ADR) accumulation and retention, thus analyzing intracellular drug transportation in cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. CoCl2‑simulated hypoxia was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and upregulate the expression levels of HIF‑1α, MDR1/P‑gp and MRP. In addition, proapoptotic members of the Bcl‑2 protein family, Bax and Bad, were downregulated. The anti‑apoptotic member Bcl‑2

  4. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.; Filip, Sanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET) have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour. PMID:25214887

  5. Low field magnetic resonance imaging to visualize chronic and cycling hypoxia in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hironobu; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Choudhuri, Rajani; Saito, Keita; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2010-01-01

    Tumors exhibit fluctuations in blood flow that influence oxygen concentrations and therapeutic resistance. To assist therapeutic planning and improve prognosis, non-invasive dynamic imaging of spatial and temporal variations in oxygen partial pressure (pO2) would be useful. Here we illustrate the use of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) as a novel imaging method to directly monitor fluctuations in oxygen concentrations in mouse models. A common resonator platform for both EPRI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provided pO2 maps with anatomical guidance and microvessel density. Oxygen images acquired every 3 min for a total of 30 min in two different tumor types revealed that fluctuations patterns in pO2 are dependent on tumor size and tumor type. The magnitude of fluctuations in pO2 in SCCVII tumors ranged between 2-18 fold, whereas the fluctuations in HT29 xenografts were of lower magnitude. Alternating breathing cycles with air or carbogen (95 % O2 plus 5 % CO2) distinguished higher and lower sensitivity regions which responded to carbogen, corresponding to cycling hypoxia and chronic hypoxia, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis suggests that the fluctuation in pO2 correlated with pericyte density rather than vascular density in the tumor. This EPRI technique, combined with MRI, may offer a powerful clinical tool to noninvasively detect variable oxygenation in tumors. PMID:20647318

  6. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  7. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  8. Focus on the Controversial Aspects of 64Cu-ATSM in Tumoral Hypoxia Mapping by PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Mathilde; Gouard, Sébastien; Frindel, Mathieu; Vidal, Aurélien; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bourgeois, Mickaël

    2015-01-01

    Mapping tumor hypoxia is a great challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging as the precise functional information of the biological processes is needed for many effective therapeutic strategies. Tumor hypoxia has been widely reported as a poor prognostic indicator and is often associated with tumor aggressiveness, chemo- and radio-resistance. An accurate diagnosis of hypoxia is a challenge and is crucial for providing accurate treatment for patients’ survival benefits. This challenge has led to the emergence of new and novel PET tracers for the functional and metabolic characterization of tumor hypoxia non-invasively. Among these tracers, copper semicarbazone compound [64Cu]-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (=64Cu-ATSM) has been developed as a tracer for hypoxia imaging. This review focuses on 64Cu-ATSM PET imaging and the concept is presented in two sections. The first section describes its in vitro development and pre-clinical testing and particularly its affinity in different cell lines. The second section describes the controversial reports on its specificity for hypoxia imaging. The review concludes that 64Cu-ATSM – more than a hypoxic tracer, exhibits tracer accumulation in tumor, which is linked to the redox potential and reactive oxygen species. The authors concluded that 64Cu-ATSNM is a marker of over-reduced cell state and thus an indirect marker for hypoxia imaging. The affinity of 64Cu-ATSM for over-reduced cells was observed to be a complex phenomenon. And to provide a definitive and convincing mechanism, more in vivo studies are needed to prove the diagnostic utility of 64Cu-ATSM. PMID:26380261

  9. Focus on the Controversial Aspects of (64)Cu-ATSM in Tumoral Hypoxia Mapping by PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Mathilde; Gouard, Sébastien; Frindel, Mathieu; Vidal, Aurélien; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bourgeois, Mickaël

    2015-01-01

    Mapping tumor hypoxia is a great challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging as the precise functional information of the biological processes is needed for many effective therapeutic strategies. Tumor hypoxia has been widely reported as a poor prognostic indicator and is often associated with tumor aggressiveness, chemo- and radio-resistance. An accurate diagnosis of hypoxia is a challenge and is crucial for providing accurate treatment for patients' survival benefits. This challenge has led to the emergence of new and novel PET tracers for the functional and metabolic characterization of tumor hypoxia non-invasively. Among these tracers, copper semicarbazone compound [64Cu]-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) (=64Cu-ATSM) has been developed as a tracer for hypoxia imaging. This review focuses on 64Cu-ATSM PET imaging and the concept is presented in two sections. The first section describes its in vitro development and pre-clinical testing and particularly its affinity in different cell lines. The second section describes the controversial reports on its specificity for hypoxia imaging. The review concludes that 64Cu-ATSM - more than a hypoxic tracer, exhibits tracer accumulation in tumor, which is linked to the redox potential and reactive oxygen species. The authors concluded that 64Cu-ATSNM is a marker of over-reduced cell state and thus an indirect marker for hypoxia imaging. The affinity of 64Cu-ATSM for over-reduced cells was observed to be a complex phenomenon. And to provide a definitive and convincing mechanism, more in vivo studies are needed to prove the diagnostic utility of 64Cu-ATSM. PMID:26380261

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and HIF-stabilizing agents in neonatal care

    PubMed Central

    Park, Angela M.; Sanders, Timothy A.; Maltepe, Emin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Oxygen is essential for multicellular existence. Its reduction to water by the mitochondrial electron transport chain forms the cornerstone of aerobic metabolism. Conditions in which oxygen is limiting for electron transport result in bioenergetic collapse in metazoans. However, compared with postnatal existence, all of mammalian development occurs in a hypoxic environment in utero. Not just an epiphenomenon, this ‘physiological hypoxia’ is required for the activation of a transcriptional response mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcriptional regulators that coordinates the expression of hundreds of genes, many with developmentally critical functions. Oxygen tension, therefore, is a morphogen. Understanding the physiological significance of hypoxia responses during human development and the role of the HIF family of transcriptional regulators will have important consequences for the care of preterm neonates. Defining clinical care guidelines for the proper oxygenation of critically ill neonates that take account of these observations is therefore of paramount importance. The pharmacological stabilization of HIF family members may therefore have clinical utility in premature infants in whom this important morphogen has been inactivated by exposure to supraphysiological oxygen levels. PMID:20599462

  11. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  12. Hypoxia-targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Perche, F; Biswas, S; Wang, T; Zhu, L; Torchilin, V P

    2014-03-24

    Altered vasculature and the resultant chaotic tumor blood flow lead to the appearance in fast-growing tumors of regions with gradients of oxygen tension and acute hypoxia (less than 1.4% oxygen). Due to its roles in tumorigenesis and resistance to therapy, hypoxia represents a problem in cancer therapy. Insufficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the hypoxic regions in solid tumors is recognized as one of the causes of resistance to therapy. This led to the development of hypoxia imaging agents, and the use of hypoxia-activated anticancer prodrugs. Here we show the first example of the hypoxia-induced siRNA uptake and silencing using a nanocarrier consisting of polyethyleneglycol 2000, azobenzene, polyethyleneimine (PEI)(1.8 kDa), and 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) units (the nanocarrier is referred to as PAPD), where azobenzene imparts hypoxia sensitivity and specificity. We report hypoxia-activated green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing in vitro and its downregulation in GFP-expressing tumors after intravenous administration. The proposed nanoformulation represents a novel tumor-environment-responsive modality for cancer targeting and siRNA delivery. PMID:24554550

  13. Multifunctional Phosphorescent Conjugated Polymer Dots for Hypoxia Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Liang, Hua; Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Tianshe; Yang, Lijuan; Lv, Wen; Yu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) plays a key role in many physiological processes, and becomes a toxicant to kill cells when excited to 1O2. Intracellular O2 levels, or the degree of hypoxia, are always viewed as an indicator of cancers. Due to the highly efficient cancer therapy ability and low side effect, photodynamic therapy (PDT) becomes one of the most promising treatments for cancers. Herein, an early‐stage diagnosis and therapy system is reported based on the phosphorescent conjugated polymer dots (Pdots) containing Pt(II) porphyrin as an oxygen‐responsive phosphorescent group and 1O2 photosensitizer. Intracellular hypoxia detection has been investigated. Results show that cells treated with Pdots display longer lifetimes under hypoxic conditions, and time‐resolved luminescence images exhibit a higher signal‐to‐noise ratio after gating off the short‐lived background fluorescence. Quantification of O2 is realized by the ratiometric emission intensity of phosphorescence/fluorescence and the lifetime of phosphorescence. Additionally, the PDT efficiency of Pdots is estimated by flow cytometry, MTT cell viability assay, and in situ imaging of PDT induced cell death. Interestingly, Pdots exhibit a high PDT efficiency and would be promising in clinical applications.

  14. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  15. Hypoxia-resistant profile implies vulnerability of cancer stem cells to physiological agents, which suggests new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Santini, Roberta; Fredducci, David; Vinci, Maria Cristina; D’Amico, Massimo; Rovida, Elisabetta; Stivarou, Theodora; Torre, Eugenio; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Stecca, Barbara; Olivotto, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that peculiar metabolic features of cell adaptation and survival in hypoxia imply growth restriction points that are typical of embryonic stem cells and disappear with differentiation. Here we provide evidence that such restrictions can be exploited as specific antiblastic targets by physiological factors such as pyruvate, tetrahydrofolate, and glutamine. These metabolites act as powerful cytotoxic agents on cancer stem cells (CSCs) when supplied at doses that perturb the biochemical network, sustaining the resumption of aerobic growth after the hypoxic dormant state. Experiments were performed in vivo and in vitro using CSCs obtained from various anaplastic tumors: human melanoma, leukemia, and rat hepatoma cells. Pretreatment of melanoma CSCs with pyruvate significantly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The metabolic network underlying the cytotoxic effect of the physiological factors was thoroughly defined, principally using AH130 hepatoma, a tumor spontaneously reprogrammed to the embryonic stem stage. This network, based on a tight integration of aerobic glycolysis, cellular redox state, and folate metabolism, is centered on the cellular NADP/NADPH ratio that controls the redox pathway of folate utilization in purine synthesis. On the whole, this study indicates that pyruvate, FH4, and glutamine display anticancer activity, because CSCs are committed to survive and maintain their stemness in hypoxia. When CSC need to differentiate and proliferate, they shift from anaerobic to aerobic status, and the few mitochondria available makes them susceptible to the injury of the above physiological factors. This vulnerability might be exploited for novel therapeutic treatments. PMID:24200964

  16. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  17. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  18. Development of 99mTc-N4-NIM for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad S.; Kong, Fan-Lin; Rollo, Alex; Mendez, Richard; Kohanim, Saady; Smith, Daniel Lee; Yang, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The nitro group of 2-nitroimidazole (NIM) enters the tumor cells and is bioreductively activated and fixed in the hypoxia cells. 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (N4) has shown to be a stable chelator for 99mTc. The present study was aimed to develop 99mTc-cyclam-2-nitroimidazole (99mTc-N4-NIM) for tumor hypoxia imaging. N4-NIM precursor was synthesized by reacting N4-oxalate and 1,3-dibromopropane-NIM, yielded 14% (total synthesis). Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM and 99mTc-N4 was obtained in 13762 rat mammary tumor cells and mesothelioma cells in 6-well plates. Tissue distribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM was evaluated in breast-tumor-bearing rats at 0.5–4 hrs. Tumor oxygen tension was measured using an oxygen probe. Planar imaging was performed in the tumor-bearing rat and rabbit models. Radiochemical purity of 99mTc-N4-NIM was >96% by HPLC. Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM was higher than 99mTc-N4 in both cell lines. Biodistribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM showed increased tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle count density ratios as a function of time. Oxygen tension in tumor tissue was 6–10 mmHg compared to 40–50 mmHg in normal muscle tissue. Planar imaging studies confirmed that the tumors could be visualized clearly with 99mTc-N4-NIM in animal models. Efficient synthesis of N4-NIM was achieved. 99mTc-N4-NIM is a novel hypoxic probe and may be useful in evaluating cancer therapy. PMID:22719210

  19. Phosphorescent light-emitting iridium complexes serve as a hypoxia-sensing probe for tumor imaging in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Shaojuan; Negishi, Kazuya; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Hosaka, Masahiro; Tobita, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Iridium complex, a promising organic light-emitting diode material for next generation television and computer displays, emits phosphorescence. Phosphorescence is quenched by oxygen. We used this oxygen-quenching feature for imaging tumor hypoxia. Red light-emitting iridium complex Ir(btp)2(acac) (BTP) presented hypoxia-dependent light emission in culture cell lines, whose intensity was in parallel with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 expression. BTP was further applied to imaging five nude mouse-transplanted tumors. All tumors presented a bright BTP-emitting image as early as 5 min after the injection. The BTP-dependent tumor image peaked at 1 to 2 h after the injection, and was then removed from tumors within 24 h. The minimal BTP image recognition size was at least 2 mm in diameter. By morphological examination and phosphorescence lifetime measurement, BTP is presumed to localize to the tumor cells, not to stay in the tumor microvessels by binding to albumin. The primary problem on suse of luminescent probe for tumor imaging is its weak penetrance to deep tissues from the skin surface. Since BTP is easily modifiable, we made BTP analogues with a longer excitation/emission wavelength to improve the tissue penetrance. One of them, BTPHSA, displayed 560/720 wavelength, and depicted its clear imaging from tumors transplanted over 6-7 mm deep from the skin surface. We suggest that BTP analogues have a vast potential for imaging hypoxic lesions such as tumor tissues.

  20. Rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET imaging of tumour blood flow and hypoxia: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rust, T C; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow and hypoxia are interrelated aspects of physiology that affect cancer treatment and response. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are related PET tracers for blood flow and hypoxia, and the ability to rapidly image both tracers in a single scan would bring several advantages over conventional single-tracer techniques. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, overlapping signals for multiple PET tracers may be recovered utilizing information from kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET was simulated and tested as a function of injection delay, order and relative dose for several copper isotopes, and the results were compared relative to separate single-tracer data. Time-activity curves representing a broad range of tumour blood flow and hypoxia levels were simulated, and parallel dual-tracer compartment modelling was used to recover the signals for each tracer. The main results were tested further using a torso phantom simulation of PET tumour imaging. Using scans as short as 30 minutes, the dual-tracer method provided measures of blood flow and hypoxia similar to single-tracer imaging. The best performance was obtained by injecting PTSM first and using a somewhat higher dose for ATSM. Comparable results for different copper isotopes suggest that tracer kinetics with staggered injections play a more important role than radioactive decay in the signal separation process. Rapid PTSM+ATSM PET has excellent potential for characterizing both tumour blood flow and hypoxia in a single, fast scan, provided that technological hurdles related to algorithm development and routine use can be overcome.

  1. Intelligent design of nano-scale molecular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-12-12

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on-off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  2. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  3. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-11-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI-FI agents.

  4. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis).

  5. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): Evolution and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W. C.; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H.; Menkens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov) to students, researchers and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as a CSV file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, preclinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at: micad@nlm.nih.gov PMID:21989943

  6. Dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids as imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Du; Wen, Shihui; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This review reports the recent advances in dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids as contrast agents for biomedical imaging applications. The versatile dendrimer scaffolds with 3-dimensional spherical shape, highly branched internal cavity, tunable surface conjugation chemistry, and excellent biocompatibility and nonimmunogenicity afford their uses as templates to create multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped metal colloids for mono- or multi- mode molecular imaging applications. In particular, multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles with different surface modifications have been used for fluorescence imaging, targeted tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging, enhanced blood pool CT imaging, dual mode CT/MR imaging, and tumor theranostics (combined CT imaging and chemotherapy) will be introduced and discussed in detail.

  7. Synthesis and radiolabeling of (64)Cu-labeled 2-nitroimidazole derivative (64)Cu-BMS2P2 for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng; Zhu, Hua; Lin, Xinfeng; Chu, Taiwei; Luo, Ruyi; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) probe with hypoxia targeting specificity and a relatively long half-life. The synthesis, (64)Cu-labeling in vitro and in vivo study of the novel 2-nitroimidazole complex (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is presented in this study. The hypoxia targeting capacity of (64)Cu-BMS2P2 in vitro was evaluated and compared with the (64)Cu-BMS181321, and confirmed by PET imaging in vivo and immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) in a tumor mouse model. These results suggest that (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is a promising candidate for PET hypoxia imaging and worthy of further investigations in dynamic hypoxia imaging.

  8. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed. PMID:25530615

  9. Targeted luminescent near-infrared polymer-nanoprobes for in vivo imaging of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Napp, Joanna; Behnke, Thomas; Fischer, Lorenz; Würth, Christian; Wottawa, Marieke; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Alves, Frauke; Resch-Genger, Ute; Schäferling, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) were doped with an oxygen-sensitive near-infrared (NIR)-emissive palladium meso-tetraphenylporphyrin and an inert reference dye which are both excitable at 635 nm. The nanosensors were characterized with special emphasis on fundamental parameters such as absolute photoluminescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime. The PS-NPs were employed for ratiometric dual-wavelength and lifetime-based photoluminescent oxygen sensing. They were efficiently taken up by cultured murine alveolar macrophages, yielding a characteristic and reversible change in ratiometric response with decreasing oxygen concentration. This correlated with the cellular hypoxic status verified by analysis of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) accumulation. In addition, the surface of PS-NPs was functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the monoclonal antibody herceptin, and their binding to HER2/neu-overexpressing tumor cells was confirmed in vitro. First experiments with tumor-bearing mouse revealed a distinctive ratiometric response within the tumor upon hypoxic condition induced by animal sacrifice. These results demonstrate the potential of these referenced NIR nanosensors for in vitro and in vivo imaging that present a new generation of optical probes for oncology.

  10. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  11. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  12. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  13. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  14. Efficient Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Nitroreductase Detection and Hypoxia Imaging in Tumor Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hong-Wen; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Li, Jin; Liang, Li-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumor progression, and the development of efficient methods for monitoring hypoxic degree in living systems is of great biomedical importance. In the solid tumors, the nitroreductase level is directly corresponded with the hypoxic status. Many one-photon excited fluorescent probes have been developed for hypoxia imaging in tumor cells via the detection of nitroreductase level. However, two-photon excited probes are more suitable for bioimaging. In this work, a two-photon probe 1 for nitroreductase detection and hypoxic status monitoring in living tumor cells and tissues was reported for the first time. The detection is based on the fact that the nitro-group of probe 1 could be selectively reduced to an amino-group by nitroreductase in the presence of reduced NADH, following by a 1,6-rearrangement-elimination to release the fluorophore, resulting in the enhancement of fluorescence. The probe exhibited both one-photon and two-photon excited remarkable fluorescence enhancement (∼70-fold) for nitroreductase, which afforded a high sensitivity for nitroreductase, with a detection limit of 20 ng/mL observed. Moreover, the applications of the probe for fluorescent bioimaging of hypoxia in living cells and two-photon bioimaging in tissues were carried out, with tissue-imaging depths of 70-160 μm observed, which demonstrates its practical application in complex biosystems.

  15. MALDI-mass spectrometric imaging revealing hypoxia-driven lipids and proteins in a breast tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiang; Chughtai, Kamila; Purvine, Samuel O.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Raman, Venu; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2015-06-16

    Hypoxic areas are a common feature of rapidly growing malignant tumors and their metastases, and are typically spatially heterogeneous. Hypoxia has a strong impact on tumor cell biology and contributes to tumor progression in multiple ways. To date, only a few molecular key players in tumor hypoxia, such as for example hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been discovered. The distribution of biomolecules is frequently heterogeneous in the tumor volume, and may be driven by hypoxia and HIF-1α. Understanding the spatially heterogeneous hypoxic response of tumors is critical. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) provides a unique way of imaging biomolecular distributions in tissue sections with high spectral and spatial resolution. In this paper, breast tumor xenografts grown from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato cells, with a red fluorescent tdTomato protein construct under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE)-containing promoter driven by HIF-1α, were used to detect the spatial distribution of hypoxic regions. We elucidated the 3D spatial relationship between hypoxic regions and the localization of small molecules, metabolites, lipids, and proteins by using principal component analysis – linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on 3D rendered MSI volume data from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato breast tumor xenografts. In this study we identified hypoxia-regulated proteins active in several distinct pathways such as glucose metabolism, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, protein folding, translation/ribosome, splicesome, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, hemoglobin chaperone, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, aurora B signaling/apoptotic execution phase, the RAS signaling pathway, the FAS signaling pathway/caspase cascade in apoptosis and telomere stress induced senescence. In parallel we also identified co-localization of hypoxic regions and various lipid species such as PC(16:0/18:1), PC(16:0/18:2), PC(18:0/18:1), PC

  16. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  17. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    SciTech Connect

    Jans, H-S; Stypinski, D; Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S; Wiebe, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  19. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity carbon nanotubes as targeted photoacoustic molecular imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Liu, Zhuang; Zavaleta, Cristina; Bodapati, Sunil; Teed, Robert; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Ma, Te-Jen; Oralkan, Omer; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Dai, Hongjie; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2009-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging of living subjects offers high spatial resolution at increased tissue depths compared to purely optical imaging techniques. We have recently shown that intravenously injected single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be used as targeted photoacoustic imaging agents in living mice using RGD peptides to target αvβ3 integrins. We have now developed a new targeted photoacoustic imaging agent based on SWNTs and Indocyanine Green (SWNT-ICG) with absorption peak at 780nm. The photoacoustic signal of the new imaging agent is enhanced by ~20 times as compared to plain SWNTs. The particles are synthesized from SWNT-RGD that noncovalently attach to multiple ICG molecules through pi-pi stacking interactions. Negative control particles had RAD peptide instead of RGD. We measured the serum stability of the particles and verified that the RGD/RAD conjugation did not alter the particle's absorbance spectrum. Finally, through cell uptake studies with U87MG cells we verified that the particles bind selectively to αvβ3 integrin. In conclusion, the extremely high absorption of the SWNT-ICG particles shows great promise for high sensitivity photoacoustic imaging of molecular targets in-vivo. This work lays the foundations for future in-vivo studies that will use the SWNT-ICG particles as imaging agents administered systemically.

  1. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  2. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo. PMID:24938638

  3. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  4. Modified natural nanoparticles as contrast agents for medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel and effective contrast agents is one of the drivers of the ongoing improvement in medical imaging. Many of the new agents reported are nanoparticle-based. There are a variety of natural nanoparticles known, e.g. lipoproteins, viruses or ferritin. Natural nanoparticles have advantages as delivery platforms such as biodegradability. In addition, our understanding of natural nanoparticles is quite advanced, allowing their adaptation as contrast agents. They can be labeled with small molecules or ions such as Gd3+ to act as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, 18F to act as positron emission tomography contrast agents or fluorophores to act as contrast agents for fluorescence techniques. Additionally, inorganic nanoparticles such as iron oxide, gold nanoparticles or quantum dots can be incorporated to add further contrast functionality. Furthermore, these natural nanoparticle contrast agents can be rerouted from their natural targets via the attachment of targeting molecules. In this review, we discuss the various modified natural nanoparticles that have been exploited as contrast agents. PMID:19900496

  5. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  6. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  7. "Keyhole" method for accelerating imaging of contrast agent uptake.

    PubMed

    van Vaals, J J; Brummer, M E; Dixon, W T; Tuithof, H H; Engels, H; Nelson, R C; Gerety, B M; Chezmar, J L; den Boer, J A

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods with good spatial and contrast resolution are often too slow to follow the uptake of contrast agents with the desired temporal resolution. Imaging can be accelerated by skipping the acquisition of data normally taken with strong phase-encoding gradients, restricting acquisition to weak-gradient data only. If the usual procedure of substituting zeroes for the missing data is followed, blurring results. Substituting instead reference data taken before or well after contrast agent injection reduces this problem. Volunteer and patient images obtained by using such reference data show that imaging can be usefully accelerated severalfold. Cortical and medullary regions of interest and whole kidney regions were studied, and both gradient- and spin-echo images are shown. The method is believed to be compatible with other acceleration methods such as half-Fourier reconstruction and reading of more than one line of k space per excitation.

  8. Recent Advances in Higher-order Multimodal Biomedical Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, James; Chitgupi, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    Advances in biomedical imaging have spurred the development of integrated multimodal scanners, usually capable of two simultaneous imaging modes. The long-term vision of higher-order multimodality is to improve diagnostics or guidance through analysis of complementary, data-rich, co-registered images. Synergies achieved through combined modalities could enable researchers to better track diverse physiological and structural events, analyze biodistribution and treatment efficacy, and compare established and emerging modalities. Higher-order multimodal approaches stand to benefit from molecular imaging probes and in recent years, contrast agents that have hypermodal characteristics have increasingly been reported in preclinical studies. Given the chemical requirements for contrast agents representing various modalities to be integrated into a single entity, higher-order multimodal agents reported so far tend to be of nanoparticulate form. To date, the majority of reported nanoparticles have included components that are active for magnetic resonance. Herein, we review recent progress in higher-order multimodal imaging agents, which span a range of material and structural classes, that have demonstrated utility in three (or more) imaging modalities. PMID:26185099

  9. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  10. Contrast agents in diagnostic imaging: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Caschera, Luca; Lazzara, Angelo; Piergallini, Lorenzo; Ricci, Domenico; Tuscano, Bruno; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Specific contrast agents have been developed for x ray examinations (mainly CT), sonography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Most of them are extracellular agents which create different enhancement on basis of different vascularization or on basis of different interstitial network in tissues, but some can be targeted to a particular cell line (e.g. hepatocyte). Microbubbles can be used as carrier for therapeutic drugs which can be released in specific targets under sonographic guidance, decreasing systemic toxicity and increasing therapeutic effect. Radiologists have to choose a particular contrast agent knowing its physical and chemical properties and the possibility of adverse reactions and balancing them with the clinical benefits of a more accurate diagnosis. As for any drug, contrast agents can cause adverse events, which are more frequent with Iodine based CA, but also with Gd based CA and even with sonographic contrast agents hypersensitivity reaction can occur. PMID:27168225

  11. Chemical biology approach for the development of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) inhibitor LW6 as a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ravi; Han, Seunghyeon; Lee, Kyeong

    2015-09-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia has long been considered to be a driving force in tumor progression as well as a negative prognostic factor in human cancers. The discovery of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs), which mediate transcriptional responses to changes in oxygen levels, has renewed enthusiasm for drug discovery and the development of targeted therapies in this field. LW6 represents an important new class of small molecules that inhibit HIF-1; it has been major source for diverse lead compounds including HIF-1α inhibitors. Through a chemical biology approach, LW6-derived chemical probes were successfully utilized for the identification of the direct targeting of a protein in cancer. LW6 provides a valuable platform for the discovery and development of small molecule inhibitors of HIF-1α-dependent tumor progression, metabolic reprogramming, and angiogenesis.

  12. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  13. User-agent cooperation in multiagent IVUS image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Bovenkamp, E G P; Dijkstra, J; Bosch, J G; Reiber, J H C

    2009-01-01

    Automated interpretation of complex images requires elaborate knowledge and model-based image analysis, but often needs interaction with an expert as well. This research describes expert interaction with a multiagent image interpretation system using only a restricted vocabulary of high-level user interactions. The aim is to minimize inter- and intra-observer variability by keeping the total number of interactions as low and simple as possible. The multiagent image interpretation system has elaborate high-level knowledge-based control over low-level image segmentation algorithms. Agents use contextual knowledge to keep the number of interactions low but, when in doubt, present the user with the most likely interpretation of the situation. The user, in turn, can correct, supplement, and/or confirm the results of image-processing agents. This is done at a very high level of abstraction such that no knowledge of the underlying segmentation methods, parameters or agent functioning is needed. High-level interaction thereby replaces more traditional contour correction methods like inserting points and/or (re)drawing contours. This makes it easier for the user to obtain good results, while inter- and intra-observer variability are kept minimal, since the image segmentation itself remains under control of image-processing agents. The system has been applied to intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Experiments show that with an average of 2-3 high-level user interactions per correction, segmentation results substantially improve while the variation is greatly reduced. The achieved level of accuracy and repeatability is equivalent to that of manual drawing by an expert. PMID:19116192

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a New Nitroimidazole-99mTc-Complex for Imaging of Hypoxia in Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Guan, Yanxing; Liu, Shaozheng; Chen, Qingjie; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was specifically designed to develop a new 99mTc compound with 3-amino-4-[2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol)-ethylamino]-4-oxo-butyrate (5-ntm-asp) and to verify whether this compound is feasible to be a radiopharmaceutical for hypoxic tumors. Material/Methods Metronidazole derivative 5-ntm-asp was synthesized and then radio-labeled by Na [99mTcO4], forming 99mTc-5-ntm-asp. Another two complexes of 99mTc-2- and 99mTc-5-nitroimidazole-iminodiacetic acid (99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA) were also synthesized based on previous studies. Physicochemical properties (stability, lipophilicity, protein binding) of the compounds were compared, and we also assessed the accumulation status of the compounds within A549 cells under both hypoxic and aerobic conditions. Distribution of the complex was also studied in vivo using BALB/c nude mice that were injected with A549 cells. Results Compared with 99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp was more stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and human plasma (P<0.05). Besides that, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp offered lower lipophilicity and protein-binding rate than the two complexes (P<0.05). During assessment of hypoxic uptake status and high hypoxic/aerobic ratio in mice injected with A549 cells, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp exhibited a more favorable profile than 9mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, including uptake ratio of tumor/blood and uptake ratio of tumor/muscle. Conclusions With overall consideration of physicochemical properties and biological uptake behavior, it is feasible to use 99mTc-5-ntm-asp as an imaging agent for tumor hypoxia. PMID:27752036

  15. SAR of Cu (II) thiosemicarbazone complexes as hypoxic imaging agents: MM3 analysis and prediction of biologic properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sweta; Tiwari, Anjani K; Ojha, Himanshu; Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Bachcha; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-02-01

    Copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) are very useful for blood flow and hypoxic imaging. The aim of this study was to identify structure-activity relationships (SARs) within a series of analogues with different substitution patterns in the ligands, in order to design improved hypoxia imaging agents and elucidate hypoxia selectivity mechanisms. Genetic algorithms (GAs) were used to develop specific copper metal-ligand force field parameters for the MM3 force-field calculations. These new parameters produced results in good agreement with experiment and previously reported copper metal-ligand parameters. A successful quantitative SAR (QSAR) for predicting the several classes of Cu(II)-chelating ligands was built using a training set of 21 Cu(II) complexes. The QSAR exhibited a correlation between the predicted and experimental test set. The QSAR preformed with great accuracy; r(2) = 0.95 and q(2) = 0.90 utilizing a leave-one-out cross-validation with multiple linear regression analysis to find correlation between different calculated molecular descriptors of these complexes. The final QSAR mathematical models were found as the following: Log P = {3.01698 (+/-0.0590)} - LUMO {0.1248 (+/-0.068)} + MR {0.3219 (+/-0.086)} n = 21 |r| = 0.972 s = 0.188 F = 98.102 The resulting models could act as an efficient strategy for estimating the hypoxic conditions through imaging and provide some insights into the structural features related to the biological activity of these compounds.

  16. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Sensory Materials and Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Demin; Lu, Kuangda; Poon, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of hybrid materials self-assembled from organic bridging ligands and metal ion/cluster connecting points. The combination of a variety of organic linkers, metal ions/clusters, and structural motifs can lead to an infinite array of new materials with interesting properties for many applications. In this Forum article, we discuss the design and applications of MOFs in chemical sensing and biological imaging. The first half of this article focuses on the development of MOFs as chemical sensors by highlighting how unique attributes of MOFs can be utilized to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. We also discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed in order to develop practically useful MOF sensors. The second half of this article focuses on the design and applications of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) as imaging contrast agents. NMOFs possess several interesting attributes, such as high cargo loading capacity, ease of post-modification, tunable size and shape, and intrinsic biodegradability, to make them excellent candidates as imaging contrast agents. We discuss the use of representative NMOFs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and optical imaging (OI). Although still in their infancy, we believe that the compositional tunability and mild synthetic conditions of NMOF imaging agents should greatly facilitate their further development for clinical translation. PMID:24251853

  17. Metal-organic frameworks as sensory materials and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Demin; Lu, Kuangda; Poon, Christopher; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-02-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of hybrid materials self-assembled from organic bridging ligands and metal ion/cluster connecting points. The combination of a variety of organic linkers, metal ions/clusters, and structural motifs can lead to an infinite array of new materials with interesting properties for many applications. In this Forum Article, we discuss the design and applications of MOFs in chemical sensing and biological imaging. The first half of this article focuses on the development of MOFs as chemical sensors by highlighting how unique attributes of MOFs can be utilized to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. We also discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed in order to develop practically useful MOF sensors. The second half of this article focuses on the design and applications of nanoscale MOFs (NMOFs) as imaging contrast agents. NMOFs possess several interesting attributes, such as high cargo loading capacity, ease of postmodification, tunable size and shape, and intrinsic biodegradability, to make them excellent candidates as imaging contrast agents. We discuss the use of representative NMOFs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and optical imaging. Although still in their infancy, we believe that the compositional tunability and mild synthetic conditions of NMOF imaging agents should greatly facilitate their further development for clinical translation.

  18. Hypoxia Imaging Endoscopy Equipped with Laser Light Source from Preclinical Live Animal Study to First-In-Human Subject Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Yano, Tomonori; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Nomura, Shogo; Sato, Akihiro; Kojima, Motohiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    A goal in next-generation endoscopy is to develop functional imaging techniques to open up new opportunities for cancer diagnosis. Although spatial and temporal information on hypoxia is crucial for understanding cancer physiology and expected to be useful for cancer diagnosis, existing techniques using fluorescent indicators have limitations due to low spatial resolution and invasive administration. To overcome these problems, we developed an imaging technology based on hemoglobin oxygen saturation in both the tumor and surrounding mucosa using a laser endoscope system, and conducted the first human subject research for patients with aero-digestive tract cancer. The oxygen saturation map overlapped the images of cancerous lesions and indicated highly heterogeneous features of oxygen supply in the tumor. The hypoxic region of the tumor surface was found in both early cancer and cancer precursors. This technology illustrates a novel aspect of cancer biology as a potential biomarker and can be widely utilized in cancer diagnosis. PMID:24915532

  19. Electric and magnetic properties of contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The endogenous contrast in thermoacoustic imaging is due to the water and ionic content in tissue. This results in poor tissue speci city between high water content tissues. As a result, exogenous contrast agents have been employed to improve tissue speci city and also increase the SNR. An investigation into the sources of contrast produced by several exogenous contrast agents is described. These include three gadolinium based MRI contrast agents, iron oxide particles, single wall carbon nanotubes, saline and sucrose solutions. Both the dielectric and magnetic properties of contrast agents at 3GHz have been measured using microwave resonant cavities. The DC conductivity of the contrast agents were also measured. It is shown that the measured increase in dielectric contrast, relative to water, is due to dipole rotational loss of polar non electrolytes, ionic loss of electrolytes or a combination of both. It is shown that for the same dielectric contrast, electrolytes make better thermoacoustic contrast agents than non-electrolytes, for thermoacoustic imaging.

  20. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  1. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spatiotemporal tracking of oligonucleotides in vitro and even a few cases in vivo. Major concerns remain to be addressed including cytotoxicity, particularly of quantum dots; effective dosage of nanoparticles for optimal theranostic effect; development of real-time in vivo imaging; and further improvement of gene therapy efficacy. PMID:23606894

  2. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  3. Hepatobiliary MR Imaging with Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brown, Jeffrey J.; Merkle, Elmar M.; Nagle, Scott K.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of gadolinium-based “hepatobiliary” contrast agents offers new opportunities for diagnostic MRI and has triggered a great interest for innovative imaging approaches to the liver and bile ducts. In this review article we will discuss the imaging properties of the two gadolinium-based hepatobiliary contrast agents currently available in the USA, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid, as well as important pharmacokinetic differences that affect their diagnostic performance. We will review potential applications, protocol optimization strategies, as well as diagnostic pitfalls. A variety of illustrative case examples will be used to demonstrate the role of these agents in detection and characterization of liver lesions as well as for imaging the biliary system. Changes in MR protocols geared towards optimizing workflow and imaging quality will also be discussed. It is our aim that the information provided in this article will facilitate the optimal utilization of these agents, and will stimulate the reader‘s pursuit of new applications for future benefit. PMID:22334493

  4. New Agents and Techniques for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    The successful management of prostate cancer requires early detection, appropriate risk assessment, and optimum treatment. An unmet goal of prostate cancer imaging is to differentiate indolent from aggressive tumors, as treatment may vary for different grades of the disease. Different modalities have been tested to diagnose, stage, and monitor prostate cancer during therapy. This review briefly describes the key clinical issues in prostate cancer imaging and therapy and summarizes the various new imaging modalities and agents in use and on the horizon. PMID:19690043

  5. De Novo Designed Imaging Agents Based on Lanthanide Peptides Complexes.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A F A

    2016-01-01

    Herein are discussed a selection of lanthanide peptide/protein complexes in view of their potential applications as imaging agents, both in terms of luminescence detection and magnetic resonance imaging. Though this chapter covers a range of different peptides and protein, if focuses specifically on the opportunities afforded by the de novo design of coiled coils, miniature protein scaffolds, and the development on lanthanide-binding sites into these architectures. The requirements for lanthanide coordination and the challenges that need to be addressed when preparing lanthanide peptides with a view to their potential adoption as clinical imaging applications, will be highlighted. PMID:27586349

  6. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Targeted Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents our adaptation of Fryback and Thornbury's hierarchical scheme for modeling the efficacy of diagnostic imaging systems. The original scheme was designed to evaluate new medical imaging systems but is less successful when applied to evaluate new radiopharmaceuticals. The proposed adaptation, which is specifically directed toward evaluating targeted imaging agents, has 6 levels: in vitro characterization, in vivo animal studies, initial human studies, impact on clinical care (change in management), impact on patient outcome, and societal efficacy. These levels, particularly the first four, implicitly define the sequence of studies needed to move an agent from the radiochemistry synthesis laboratory to the clinic. Completion of level 4 (impact on clinical care) should be sufficient for initial approval and reimbursement. We hope that the adapted scheme will help streamline the process and assist in bringing new targeted radiopharmaceuticals to approval over the next few years. PMID:26769867

  7. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  8. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  9. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children.

  10. Science to Practice: Renal Hypoxia and Fat Deposition in Diabetic Neuropathy—New Insights with Functional Renal MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Glen R.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Despite being a valuable tool for evaluation of the kidneys, renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in clinical practice has been limited to depiction of anatomy and provides little diagnostic information about the health and function of the kidney in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetic nephropathy. In this issue, Peng et al (1) have used two MR imaging methods that go beyond depiction of anatomy to show renal function: renal blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) MR imaging, which shows oxygen levels in the kidney, and chemical shift–selective imaging, which shows the relative content of fat in the kidney parenchyma. In a mouse model of diabetes, Peng et al have shown higher fat and lower oxygen levels in kidneys of mice with diabetes than in those of normal controls. These MR imaging methods may help clarify the role of fat deposition and hypoxia in the progression of CKD. As the factors that contribute to the progression of CKD are better understood, ultimately more widespread clinical use for functional renal MR imaging protocols such as renal BOLD and chemical shift–selective imaging may be found to evaluate the severity of CKD and monitor the efficacy of clinical interventions, altering the course of disease progression. PMID:24261489

  11. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  12. Comparisons of EPR imaging and T1-weighted MRI for efficient imaging of nitroxyl contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Narazaki, Michiko; Ikehira, Hiroo; Anzai, Kazunori; Ikota, Nobuo

    2007-07-01

    The resolution and signal to noise ratio of EPR imaging and T(1)-weighted MRI were compared using an identical phantom. Several solutions of nitroxyl contrast agents with different EPR spectral shapes were tested. The feasibility of T(1)-weighted MRI to detect nitroxyl contrast agents was described. T(1)-weighted MRI can detect nitroxyl contrast agents with a complicated EPR spectrum easier and quicker; however, T(1)-weighted MRI has less quantitative ability especially for lipophilic nitroxyl contrast agents, because T(1)-relaxivity, i.e. accessibility to water, is affected by the hydrophilic/hydrophobic micro-environment of a nitroxyl contrast agent. The less quantitative ability of T(1)-weighted MRI may not be a disadvantage of redox imaging, which obtains reduction rate of a nitroxyl contrast. Therefore, T(1)-weighted MRI has a great advantage to check the pharmacokinetics of newly modified and/or designed nitroxyl contrast agents. PMID:17433743

  13. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  14. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  15. Cervical Cancer Regression Measured Using Weekly Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Fractionated Radiotherapy: Radiobiologic Modeling and Correlation With Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Chan, Philip; Haider, Masoom; Cho, Young-Bin; Hill, Richard P.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To measure regression of cancer of the uterine cervix during external beam radiotherapy using magnetic resonance imaging, derive radiobiologic parameters from a mathematical model of tumor regression, and compare these parameters with the pretreatment measurements of tumor hypoxia. Methods and Materials: A total of 27 eligible patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer underwent weekly magnetic resonance imaging scans. The tumor volume was assessed on each of these scans and the rate of regression plotted. A radiobiologic model was formulated to simulate the effect on tumor regression of the surviving proportion of cells after 2 Gy (SP{sub 2}), the cell clearance constant (clearance of irreparably damaged cells from the tumor [T{sub c}]), and accelerated repopulation. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to fit the radiobiologic model to the magnetic resonance imaging-derived tumor volumes and to derive the estimates of SP{sub 2} and T{sub c} for each patient. These were compared to the pretreatment hypoxia measurements. Results: The initial tumor volume was 8-209 cm{sup 3}. The relative reduction in volume during treatment was 0.02-0.79. The simulations using representative values of the independent biologic variables derived from published data showed SP{sub 2} and T{sub c} to strongly influence the shape of the volume-response curves. Nonlinear regression analysis yielded a median SP{sub 2} of 0.71 and median T{sub c} of 10 days. Tumors with a high SP{sub 2} >0.71 were significantly more hypoxic at diagnosis (p = 0.02). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that cervical cancer regresses during external beam radiotherapy, although marked variability is present among patients and is influenced by underlying biologic processes, including cellular sensitivity to radiotherapy and proliferation. Better understanding of the biologic mechanisms might facilitate novel adaptive treatment strategies in future studies.

  16. Diffuse light reflectance signals as potential indicators of loss of viability in brain tissue due to hypoxia: charge-coupled-device-based imaging and fiber-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue is highly vulnerable to ischemia/hypoxia, and real-time monitoring of its viability is important. By fiber-based measurements for rat brain, we previously observed a unique triphasic reflectance change (TRC) after a certain period of time after hypoxia. After TRC, rats could not be rescued, suggesting that TRC can be used as an indicator of loss of brain tissue viability. In this study, we investigated this diffuse-reflectance change due to hypoxia in three parts. First, we developed and validated a theoretical method to quantify changes in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients involved in TRC. Second, we performed charge-coupled-device-based reflectance imaging of the rat brain during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation to examine spatiotemporal characteristics of the reflectance and its correlation with reversibility of brain tissue damage. Third, we made simultaneous imaging and fiber-based measurement of the reflectance for the rat to compare signals obtained by these two modalities. We observed a nontriphasic reflectance change by the imaging, and it was associated with brain tissue viability. We found that TRC measured by the fibers preceded the reflectance-signal change captured by the imaging. This time difference is attributable to the different observation depths in the brain with these two methods.

  17. The mouse spleen white pulp response to continuous hypoxia. A digital image processing analysis.

    PubMed

    Nessi de Aviñón, A C; Bengtsson, M C

    1990-01-01

    Ninety days old male mice of the CFW strain, placed under standard conditions for studies of periodicity, showed a 24 hours variation pattern in the spleen white pulp surface, in cross sections. This pattern was modified by hypoxia during the first 18 hours of continuous treatment. Since this time onwards a new steady state was reached, although the spleen of hypoxic animals was always smaller than in the controls. As the modifications were measured in pixel counts -a magnitude which can be easily transformed into square micrometers- they can be attributed to a real size variation and not to an apparent growth and decay due to environmental vasoactive phenomena.

  18. Graphene-based nanomaterials as molecular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Sung, Chu-Hsun; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) is a noninvasive, real-time visualization of biochemical events at the cellular and molecular level within tissues, living cells, and/or intact objects that can be advantageously applied in the areas of diagnostics, therapeutics, drug discovery, and development in understanding the nanoscale reactions including enzymatic conversions and protein-protein interactions. Consequently, over the years, great advancement has been made in the development of a variety of MI agents such as peptides, aptamers, antibodies, and various nanomaterials (NMs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Recently, graphene, a material popularized by Geim & Novoselov, has ignited considerable research efforts to rationally design and execute a wide range of graphene-based NMs making them an attractive platform for developing highly sensitive MI agents. Owing to their exceptional physicochemical and biological properties combined with desirable surface engineering, graphene-based NMs offer stable and tunable visible emission, small hydrodynamic size, low toxicity, and high biocompatibility and thus have been explored for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications as a promising alternative of traditional imaging agents. This review begins by describing the intrinsic properties of graphene and the key MI modalities. After which, we provide an overview on the recent advances in the design and development as well as physicochemical properties of the different classes of graphene-based NMs (graphene-dye conjugates, graphene-antibody conjugates, graphene-nanoparticle composites, and graphene quantum dots) being used as MI agents for potential applications including theranostics. Finally, the major challenges and future directions in the field will be discussed.

  19. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  20. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  1. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  2. Imaging Hypoxia in Xenografted and Murine Tumors With {sup 18}F-Fluoroazomycin Arabinoside: A Comparative Study Involving MICROPET, Autoradiography, PO{sub 2}-Polarography, and Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Morten Horsman, Michael R.; Jakobsen, Steen; Keiding, Susanne; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Bussink, Johan; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) allows noninvasive assessment of tumor hypoxia; however the combination of low resolution and slow tracer clearance from nonhypoxic tissue is problematic. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo hypoxia selectivity of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]-FAZA), a promising tracer with improved washout kinetics from oxygenated tissue. Methods and Materials: Three squamous cell carcinomas and one fibrosarcoma with widely differing spatial patterns of vascularization, hypoxia, and necrosis were grown in mice and evaluated with PET and complementary methods. Results: Eppendorf electrode measurements consistently demonstrated median PO{sub 2} values <1 mm Hg. In accordance with that, PET revealed that all tumors accumulated [{sup 18}F]-FAZA in excess of reference tissue. Next the two-dimensional spatial distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA (from autoradiography) was compared with fluorescence images of the same tumor sections showing localization of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of co-registered images showed a highly significant co-localization between the two hypoxia markers and an inverse correlation (except for the fibrosarcoma) between the distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA and Hoechst dye. Moreover intratumoral heterogeneity in tracer distribution was clearly visible on autoradiograms, with a [{sup 18}F]-FAZA concentration approximately six times higher in poorly oxygenated areas than in vascular hot spots. Conclusions: The distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA is consistent with hypoxia as the key driving force for tracer tissue retention in a selection of tumors with widely differing physiology.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  4. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  5. Improved molecular imaging contrast agent for detection of human thrombus.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Yu, Xin; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Chen, Junjie; Miller, Brad; Bulte, Jeff W M; Robertson, J David; Gaffney, Patrick J; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2003-08-01

    Molecular imaging of microthrombus within fissures of unstable atherosclerotic plaques requires sensitive detection with a thrombus-specific agent. Effective molecular imaging has been previously demonstrated with fibrin-targeted Gd-DTPA-bis-oleate (BOA) nanoparticles. In this study, the relaxivity of an improved fibrin-targeted paramagnetic formulation, Gd-DTPA-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), was compared with Gd-DTPA-BOA at 0.05-4.7 T. Ion- and particle-based r(1) relaxivities (1.5 T) for Gd-DTPA-PE (33.7 (s*mM)(-1) and 2.48 x 10(6) (s*mM)(-1), respectively) were about twofold higher than for Gd-DTPA-BOA, perhaps due to faster water exchange with surface gadolinium. Gd-DTPA-PE nanoparticles bound to thrombus surfaces via anti-fibrin antibodies (1H10) induced 72% +/- 5% higher change in R(1) values at 1.5 T (deltaR(1) = 0.77 +/- 0.02 1/s) relative to Gd-DTPA-BOA (deltaR(1) = 0.45 +/- 0.02 1/s). These studies demonstrate marked improvement in a fibrin-specific molecular imaging agent that might allow sensitive, early detection of vascular microthrombi, the antecedent to stroke and heart attack.

  6. Development of a novel fluorescent imaging probe for tumor hypoxia by use of a fusion protein with oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2007-02-01

    More malignant tumors contain more hypoxic regions. In hypoxic tumor cells, expression of a series of hypoxiaresponsive genes related to malignant phenotype such as angiogenesis and metastasis are induced. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master transcriptional activator of such genes, and thus imaging of hypoxic tumor cells where HIF-1 is active, is important in cancer therapy. We have been developing PTD-ODD fusion proteins, which contain protein transduction domain (PTD) and the VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-1 alpha subunit (HIF-1α). Thus PTD-ODD fusion proteins can be delivered to any tissue in vivo through PTD function and specifically stabilized in hypoxic cells through ODD function. To investigate if PTD-ODD fusion protein can be applied to construct hypoxia-specific imaging probes, we first constructed a fluorescent probe because optical imaging enable us to evaluate a probe easily, quickly and economically in a small animal. We first construct a model fusion porein PTD-ODD-EGFP-Cy5.5 named POEC, which is PTD-ODD protein fused with EGFP for in vitro imaging and stabilization of fusion protein, and conjugated with a near-infrared dye Cy5.5. This probe is designed to be degraded in normoxic cells through the function of ODD domain and followed by quick clearance of free fluorescent dye. On the other hand, this prove is stabilized in hypoxic tumor cells and thus the dye is stayed in the cells. Between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the difference in the clearance rate of the dye will reveals suited contrast for tumor-hypoxia imaging. The optical imaging probe has not been optimized yet but the results presented here exhibit a potential of PTD-ODD fusion protein as a hypoxia-specific imaging probe.

  7. Molecular imaging agents: impact on diagnosis and therapeutics in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Marc E.; Contino, Gianmarco; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging has become a crucial tool in oncology throughout the course of disease detection and management and is an integral part of clinical trials. Anatomic and functional imaging led the way, providing valuable information used in the diagnosis of disease, including data regarding the size and location of the tumor and on physiologic processes such as blood flow and perfusion. As understanding of cancer pathogenesis has advanced through the identification of genetic, biochemical, and cellular alterations in evolving tumors, emphasis has been made on developing methods to detect and serially monitor such alterations. This class of approaches is referred to as molecular imaging. Molecular imaging offers the potential for increasingly sensitive and specific visualization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. These approaches have become established as essential tools for cancer research, early cancer detection and staging and monitoring and predicting response to targeted therapies. Here, we will discuss recent advances in the development of molecular imaging agents and their implementation in basic cancer research as well as in more rationalized approaches to cancer care. PMID:20633310

  8. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Irene; Ghobril, Jean-Pierre; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-05-07

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput µm-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multi-modal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy and in translational research by imaging immunostained human dysplastic brain tissue.

  9. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Irene; Ghobril, Jean-Pierre; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Mascaro, Anna Letizia Allegra; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput µm-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multi-modal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2′-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy and in translational research by imaging immunostained human dysplastic brain tissue. PMID:25950610

  10. Dinitroazetidines are a novel class of anticancer agents and hypoxia-activated radiation sensitizers developed from highly energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shoucheng; Bednarski, Mark; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Saul, Gordon; Knox, Susan J

    2012-05-15

    In an effort to develop cancer therapies that maximize cytotoxicity, while minimizing unwanted side effects, we studied a series of novel compounds based on the highly energetic heterocyclic scaffold, dinitroazetidine. In this study, we report the preclinical validation of 1-bromoacetyl-3,3-dinitroazetidine (ABDNAZ), a representative lead compound currently in a phase I clinical trial in patients with cancer. In tumor cell culture, ABDNAZ generated reactive free radicals in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, modulating intracellular redox status and triggering apoptosis. When administered to mice as a single agent, ABDNAZ exhibited greater cytotoxicity than cisplatin or tirapazamine under hypoxic conditions. However, compared with cisplatin, ABDNAZ was better tolerated at submaximal doses, yielding significant tumor growth inhibition in the absence of systemic toxicity. Similarly, when combined with radiation, ABDNAZ accentuated antitumor efficacy along with the therapeutic index. Toxicity studies indicated that ABDNAZ was not myelosuppressive and no dose-limiting toxicity was apparent following daily administration for 14 days. Taken together, our findings offer preclinical proof-of-concept for ABDNAZ as a promising new anticancer agent with a favorable toxicity profile, either as a chemotherapeutic agent or a radiosensitizer.

  11. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  12. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  13. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  14. Fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates as cellular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Langdon-Jones, Emily E; Symonds, Nadine O; Yates, Sara E; Hayes, Anthony J; Lloyd, David; Williams, Rebecca; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Pope, Simon J A

    2014-04-01

    A range of biologically compatible, fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates, based upon the rhenium fac-tricarbonyl core, has been synthesized. The fluorescent ligands are based upon a N-functionalized, 4-amino-derived 1,8-naphthalimide core and incorporate a dipicolyl amine binding unit to chelate Re(I); the structural variations accord to the nature of the alkylated imide with ethyl ester glycine (L(1)), 3-propanol (L(2)), diethylene glycol (L(3)), and benzyl alcohol (L(4)) variants. The species are fluorescent in the visible region between 505 and 537 nm through a naphthalimide-localized intramolecular charge transfer, with corresponding fluorescent lifetimes of up to 9.8 ns. The ligands and complexes were investigated for their potential as imaging agents for human osteoarthritic cells and protistan fish parasite Spironucleus vortens using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the specific nature of the naphthalimide structure serves to control the uptake and intracellular localization of these imaging agents. Significant differences were noted between the free ligands and complexes, with the Re(I) complex of L(2) showing hydrogenosomal localization in S. vortens.

  15. Physiological noise in murine solid tumours using T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging: a marker of tumour acute hypoxia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Réginald; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Havaux, Xavier; Macq, Benoit; Gallez, Bernard

    2004-08-01

    T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (T2*-weighted GRE MRI) was used to investigate spontaneous fluctuations in tumour vasculature non-invasively. FSa fibrosarcomas, implanted intramuscularly (i.m.) in the legs of mice, were imaged at 4.7 T, over a 30 min or 1 h sampling period. On a voxel-by-voxel basis, time courses of signal intensity were analysed using a power spectrum density (PSD) analysis to isolate voxels for which signal changes did not originate from Gaussian white noise or linear drift. Under baseline conditions, the tumours exhibited spontaneous signal fluctuations showing spatial and temporal heterogeneity over the tumour. Statistically significant fluctuations occurred at frequencies ranging from 1 cycle/3 min to 1 cycle/h. The fluctuations were independent of the scanner instabilities. Two categories of signal fluctuations were reported: (i) true fluctuations (TFV), i.e., sequential signal increase and decrease, and (ii) profound drop in signal intensity with no apparent signal recovery (SDV). No temporal correlation between tumour and contralateral muscle fluctuations was observed. Furthermore, treatments aimed at decreasing perfusion-limited hypoxia, such as carbogen combined with nicotinamide and flunarizine, decreased the incidence of tumour T2*-weighted GRE fluctuations. We also tracked dynamic changes in T2* using multiple GRE imaging. Fluctuations of T2* were observed; however, fluctuation maps using PSD analysis could not be generated reliably. An echo-time dependency of the signal fluctuations was observed, which is typical to physiological noise. Finally, at the end of T2*-weighted GRE MRI acquisition, a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed to characterize the microenvironment in which tumour signal fluctuations occurred in terms of vessel functionality, vascularity and microvascular permeability. Our data showed that TFV were predominantly located in regions with functional vessels, whereas SDV occurred in regions

  16. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Martinez, Gary V; Cornnell, Heather H; Hart, Charles P; Baker, Amanda F; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials. PMID:27227903

  17. Simultaneous Dual-Nuclei Imaging for Motion Corrected Detection and Quantification of 19F Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Grässlin, Ingmar; Mazurkewitz, Peter C.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine MRI offers broad potential for specific detection and quantification of molecularly targeted agents in diagnosis and therapy planning or monitoring. Because non-proton MRI applications lack morphological information, accompanying proton images are needed to elucidate the spatial tissue context. Furthermore, low concentrations typical of targeted molecular imaging agents require long examinations for signal averaging during which physiological motion may lead to blurring, underestimation in signal quantification, and erroneous localization of the agent distribution. Novel methods for truly-simultaneous acquisition of dual-nuclei MR data are presented that offer efficient and precise anatomical localization of fluorine signals using accurate motion correction based on contemporaneous proton signals. The feasibility of simultaneous dual-nuclei MRI motion correction and corresponding dual-resolution reconstruction, providing nuclei-specific spatial resolution to retrospectively optimize the balance between signal-to-noise ratio and resolution, is shown on a clinical 3T MR system. PMID:21394779

  18. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  19. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  20. Tailored near-infrared contrast agents for image guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Njiojob, Costyl N; Owens, Eric A; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-03-26

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge.

  1. Metallic nanoparticles as optoacoustic contrast agents for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjusteau, Andre; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Lapotko, Dmitri; Liao, Hongwei; Hafner, Jason; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Motamedi, Massoud; Kotov, Nicholas; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2006-02-01

    A contrast agent for optoacoustic imaging and laser therapy of early tumors is being developed based on gold nanocolloids strongly absorbing visible and near-infrared light. The optoacoustic signals obtained from gold nanospheres and gold nanorods solutions are studied. In the case of 100 nm nanospheres as an example, a sharp increase in the total area under the curve of the optoacoustic signal is observed when the laser fluence is increased beyond a threshold value of about 0.1 J/cm2. The change in the optoacoustic signal profile is attributed to the formation of water vapor bubbles around heated nanoparticles, as evidenced via thermoacoustic microscopy experiments. It has been determined that, surprisingly, gold nanoparticles fail to generate detectable nanobubbles upon irradiation at the laser fluence of ~2 mJ/cm2, which heats the nanoparticles up to 374°C, the critical temperature of water. Only when the estimated temperature of the particle reaches about 10,000°C, a marked increase of the optoacoustic pressure amplitude and a changed profile of the optoacoustic signals indicate nanobubble formation. A nanoparticle based contrast agent is the most effective if it can be activate by laser pulses with low fluence attainable in the depth of tissue. With this goal in mind, we develop targeting protocols that form clusters of gold nanocolloid in the target cells in order to lower the bubble formation threshold below the level of optical fluence allowed for safe laser illumination of skin. Experiments and modeling suggest that formation of clusters of nanocolloids may improve the sensitivity of optoacoustic imaging in the detection of early stage tumors.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides as Infection Imaging Agents: Better Than Radiolabeled Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muammad Saeed; Imran, Muhammad Babar; Nadeem, Muhammad Afzal; Shahid, Abubaker

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques offer whole body imaging for localization of number and site of infective foci inspite of limitation of spatial resolution. The innate human immune system contains a large member of important elements including antimicrobial peptides to combat any form of infection. However, development of antibiotics against bacteria progressed rapidly and gained popularity over antimicrobial peptides but even powerful antimicrobials failed to reduce morbidity and mortality due to emergence of mutant strains of bacteria resulting in antimicrobial resistance. Differentiation between infection and inflammation using radiolabeled compounds with nuclear medicine techniques has always been a dilemma which is still to be resolved. Starting from nonspecific tracers to specific radiolabeled tracers, the question is still unanswered. Specific radiolabeled tracers included antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides which bind directly to the bacteria for efficient localization with advanced nuclear medicine equipments. However, there are merits and demerits attributed to each. In the current paper, radiolabeled antibiotics and radiolabeled peptides for infection localization have been discussed starting with the background of primitive nonspecific tracers. Radiolabeled antimicrobial peptides have certain merits compared with labeled antibiotics which make them superior agents for localization of infective focus. PMID:22675369

  3. Novel paramagnetic contrast agents for molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gregory M; Winter, Patrick; Caruthers, Shelton; Schmeider, Anne; Crowder, Kathy; Morawski, Anne; Zhang, Huiying; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2004-12-01

    Molecular biology and genomic sciences are revealing the early biological signatures for many diseases. In response, the Molecular Imaging community is rapidly developing contrast agents to visualize the nascent pathological changes and to concomitantly deliver treatment directly to the site of disease. The evaluation, development and use of these new agents require a complementary understanding of contrast chemistry and imaging techniques. The fundamental issues surrounding magnetic contrast agent development, rational drug delivery, MR molecular imaging, and their interdependence are elucidated.

  4. Targeted contrast agents--an adjunct to whole-body imaging: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Foran, Paul; Bolster, Ferdia; Crosbie, Ian; MacMahon, Peter; O'Kennedy, Richard; Eustace, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    This article reviews the potential use of a combination of whole-body imaging and targeted contrast agents in improving diagnostics, with a particular focus on oncology imaging. It looks at the rationale for nanoparticles and their development as targeted contrast agents. It subsequently describes many of the advances made thus far in developing tissue-specific contrast agents capable of targeting tumors that combined with whole-body imaging may enable superior cancer detection and characterization.

  5. Imaging Hypoxia in Orthotopic Rat Liver Tumors with Iodine 124–labeled Iodoazomycin Galactopyranoside PET1

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Brader, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Chun, Yun Shin; Woo, Yanghee; Singh, Paramjeet; Carlin, Sean; Wen, Bixiu; Ling, C. Clifton; Hricak, Hedvig; Fong, Yuman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate iodine 124 (124I)-labeled iodoazomycin galactopyranoside (IAZGP) positron emission tomography (PET) in the detection of hypoxia in an orthotopic rat liver tumor model by comparing regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake with independent measures of hypoxia and to determine the optimal time after injection to depict hypoxia. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Morris hepatoma tumors were established in the livers of 15 rats. Tumor oxygenation was measured in two rats with a fluorescence fiberoptic oxygen probe. 124I-IAZGP was coadministered with the established hypoxia markers pimonidazole and EF5 in nine rats; 12-hour PET data acquisition was performed 24 hours later. Tumor cryosections were analyzed with immunofluorescence and autoradiography. In the four remaining rats, serial 20- and 60-minute PET data acquisition was peformed up to 48 hours after tracer administration. Results: Oxygen probe measurements showed severe hypoxia (<1 mm Hg) distributed evenly throughout tumor tissue. Analysis of cryosections showed diffuse homogeneous uptake of 124I-IAZGP throughout all tumors. The 124I-IAZGP distribution correlated positively with pimonidazole (r = 0.78) and EF5 (r = 0.76) distribution. Tracer uptake in tumors was detectable with PET after 24 hours in seven of nine rats. In rats that underwent serial PET, tumor-to-liver contrast was sufficient to enable detection of hypoxia between 6 and 48 hours after tracer administration. The optimal ratio between signal intensity and tumor-to-liver contrast occurred 6 hours after tracer administration. Conclusion: Regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake in orthotopic rat liver tumors are consistent with independent measures of hypoxia; visualization of hypoxia with 124I-IAZGP PET is optimal 6 hours after injection. © RSNA, 2008 PMID:18641253

  6. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  7. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, ), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  8. TcO(PnA.O-1-(2-nitroimidazole)) [BMS-181321], a new technetium-containing nitroimidazole complex for imaging hypoxia: synthesis, characterization, and xanthine oxidase-catalyzed reduction.

    PubMed

    Linder, K E; Chan, Y W; Cyr, J E; Malley, M F; Nowotnik, D P; Nunn, A D

    1994-01-01

    vivo, thus satisfying one of the criteria required for this potential hypoxia imaging agent.

  9. Identification of agents that reduce renal hypoxia-reoxygenation injury using cell-based screening: purine nucleosides are alternative energy sources in LLC-PK1 cells during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Szoleczky, Petra; Módis, Katalin; Nagy, Nóra; Dóri Tóth, Zoltán; DeWitt, Douglas; Szabó, Csaba; Gero, Domokos

    2012-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis is a clinical problem that lacks specific therapy and is characterized by high mortality rate. The ischemic renal injury affects the proximal tubule cells causing dysfunction and cell death after severe hypoperfusion. We utilized a cell-based screening approach in a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of tubular injury to search for cytoprotective action using a library of pharmacologically active compounds. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced ATP depletion, suppressed aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, increased the permeability of the monolayer, caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and caspase-dependent cell death. The only compound that proved cytoprotective either applied prior to the hypoxia induction or during the reoxygenation was adenosine. The protective effect of adenosine required the coordinated actions of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, but did not requisite the purine receptors. Adenosine and inosine better preserved the cellular ATP content during ischemia than equimolar amount of glucose, and accelerated the restoration of the cellular ATP pool following the OGD. Our results suggest that radical changes occur in the cellular metabolism to respond to the energy demand during and following hypoxia, which include the use of nucleosides as an essential energy source. Thus purine nucleoside supplementation holds promise in the treatment of acute renal failure.

  10. Automated Detection of Brain Abnormalities in Neonatal Hypoxia Ischemic Injury from MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sun, Yu; Bhanu, Bir; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of three automated brain injury detection methods, namely symmetry-integrated region growing (SIRG), hierarchical region splitting (HRS) and modified watershed segmentation (MWS) in human and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets for the detection of hypoxic ischemic injuries (HII). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, 1.5T) data from neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, as well as T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, 11.7T, 4.7T) at seven different time-points (1, 4, 7, 10, 17, 24 and 31 days post HII) in rat-pup model of hypoxic ischemic injury were used to check the temporal efficacy of our computational approaches. Sensitivity, specificity, similarity were used as performance metrics based on manual (‘gold standard’) injury detection to quantify comparisons. When compared to the manual gold standard, automated injury location results from SIRG performed the best in 62% of the data, while 29% for HRS and 9% for MWS. Injury severity detection revealed that SIRG performed the best in 67% cases while HRS for 33% data. Prior information is required by HRS and MWS, but not by SIRG. However, SIRG is sensitive to parameter-tuning, while HRS and MWS are not. Among these methods, SIRG performs the best in detecting lesion volumes; HRS is the most robust, while MWS lags behind in both respects. PMID:25000294

  11. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  12. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  13. Liver-specific agents for contrast-enhanced MRI: role in oncological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thian, Yee Liang; Riddell, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver-specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents are increasingly used in evaluation of the liver. They are effective in detection and morphological characterization of lesions, and can be useful for evaluation of biliary tree anatomy and liver function. The typical appearances and imaging pitfalls of various tumours at MR imaging performed with these agents can be understood by the interplay of pharmacokinetics of these contrast agents and transporter expression of the tumour. This review focuses on the applications of these agents in oncological imaging. PMID:24434892

  14. A cationic gadolinium contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jonathan D; Lusic, Hrvoje; Wiewiorski, Martin; Farley, Michelle; Snyder, Brian D; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-06-30

    A new cationic gadolinium contrast agent is reported for delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC). The agent partitions into the glycosaminoglycan rich matrix of articular cartilage, based on Donnan equilibrium theory, and its use enables imaging of the human cadaveric metacarpal phalangeal joint.

  15. Molecular imaging of temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signal transduction activity in tumors in living mice.

    PubMed

    Serganova, Inna; Doubrovin, Michael; Vider, Jelena; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Soghomonyan, Suren; Beresten, Tatiana; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Serganov, Alexander; Cai, Shangde; Balatoni, Julius; Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri

    2004-09-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a spatially and temporally heterogeneous phenomenon, which results from several tumor and host tissue-specific processes. To study the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-specific transcriptional activity in tumors, we used repetitive noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity in tumors in living mice. This approach uses a novel retroviral vector bearing a HIF-1-inducible "sensor" reporter gene (HSV1-tk/GFP fusion) and a constitutively expressed "beacon" reporter gene (DsRed2/XPRT). C6 glioma cells transduced with this multireporter system revealed dose-dependent patterns in temporal dynamics of HIF-1 transcriptional activity induced by either CoCl2 or decreased atmospheric oxygen concentration. Multicellular spheroids of C6 reporter cells developed a hypoxic core when >350 microm in diameter. 18F-2'-fluoro-2'deoxy-1beta-D-arabionofuranosyl-5-ethyl-uracil (FEAU) PET revealed spatial heterogeneity of HIF-1 transcriptional activity in reporter xenografts in mice as a function of size or ischemia-reperfusion injury. With increasing tumor diameter (>3 mm), a marked increase in HIF-1 transcriptional activity was observed in the core regions of tumors. Even a moderate ischemia-reperfusion injury in small C6 tumors caused a rapid induction of HIF-1 transcriptional activity, which persisted for a long time because of the inability of C6 tumors to rapidly compensate acute changes in tumor microcirculation.

  16. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1–2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane. PMID:26924009

  17. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1-2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane.

  18. Silane modified upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctions: imaging, therapy and hypoxia detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shihan; Zhang, Xinran; Xu, Hongwei; Dong, Biao; Qu, Xuesong; Chen, Boting; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianxiang; Cheng, Yu; Xu, Sai; Song, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile route to synthesize silane coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs@silane) with an ultrathin layer (the thickness: 1-2 nm), which not only provides good biocompatibility, but also affords hydrophobic interspace to load organic molecules to realize multifunctions. Besides the function of upconversion imaging of UCNPs, cancer therapy and oxygen level detection can also be realized by the addition of chemotherapy drug, PTX, and oxygen sensitive molecules, Platinum (II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP). In bio-experiments, besides the MTT assays, therapy efficacy of UCNPs@PTX@silane can also be detected with the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) by staining methods. UCNPs@PtOEP@silane can afford minimally invasive analysis of dissolved oxygen and then respond sensitively to the variance of intracellular oxygen concentration affected by therapeutic UCNPs@PTX@silane.

  19. Simultaneous near-IR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral oxygenation and brain water during hypoxia-ischemia in two-week-old rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, R. A.; Tuor, U. I.; Foniok, T.; Bascaramurty, S.; Ringland, K.; McKenzie, E.; Qiao, M.; Tomanek, B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2001-10-01

    Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy can potentially probe several parameters related to the onset of stroke and the ensuing tissue damage. One obvious marker of ischemia is cerebral oxygenation, which can be lowered sharply in stroke-affected tissue. Also commonly assessed, though less straightforward to recover, is the redox state of the cytochrome aa3 copper center. Finally, parameters that are in principle available but seldom recovered from in vivo near-IR spectra are changes in water concentration and scattering properties of the tissue. We have evaluated the potential for near-IR spectroscopy to detect relevant changes in cerebral oxygenation, blood volume, water content, and scattering properties in an infant rat stroke model that is well characterized by magnetic resonance imaging methods. The specific aim was to acquire near-IR spectra simultaneously with MR images and to correlate stroke-associated changes detected via these two modalities prior to, during and after a hypoxia-ischemia episode within this stroke model. Presented here are results from the design and testing of a near-IR illumination/detection system that is compatible with an MR imaging system, and the recovery of trends in the near-IR spectra that complement the hypoxic-ischemic changes observed in the MR images. Unexpectedly large intensity changes observed for the in vivo near-IR water absorptions are ascribed to hypoxia-induced variations in effective optical pathlength, suggesting that the water absorptions may prove generally useful as a means to track such changes.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Lee M; Bhargava, Puneet; Essig, Marco; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the basic properties of available gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents, discuss their fundamental differences, and explore common and evolving applications of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast throughout the body excluding the central nervous system. A more specific aim of this article was to explore novel uses of these gadolinium-based contrast agents and applications where a particular agent has been demonstrated to behave differently or be better suited for certain applications than the other contrast agents in this class.

  1. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Brantner, Christine A; Daniels, Mathew P; Nichols, James; McCoy, J Philip; Kato, Gregory J

    2014-06-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient's disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged "sickled" and "normal" erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = -0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = -0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = -0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development. PMID:24585634

  2. Oxygen-Enhanced MRI Accurately Identifies, Quantifies, and Maps Tumor Hypoxia in Preclinical Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Boult, Jessica K R; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2016-02-15

    There is a clinical need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning, and therapy monitoring. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed "Oxy-R fraction") would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here, we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise, and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia noninvasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic.

  3. Multimeric Near IR-MR Contrast Agent for Multimodal In Vivo Imaging.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Victoria S R; Carney, Christiane E; MacRenaris, Keith W; Waters, Emily A; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-07-22

    Multiple imaging modalities are often required for in vivo imaging applications that require both high probe sensitivity and excellent spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, MR and optical imaging are an attractive combination that can be used to determine both molecular and anatomical information. Herein, we describe the synthesis and in vivo testing of two multimeric NIR-MR contrast agents that contain three Gd(III) chelates and an IR-783 dye moiety. One agent contains a PEG linker and the other a short alkyl linker. These agents label cells with extraordinary efficacy and can be detected in vivo using both imaging modalities. Biodistribution of the PEGylated agent shows observable fluorescence in xenograft MCF7 tumors and renal clearance by MR imaging.

  4. Severe systemic reaction to diphosphonate bone imaging agents: skin testing to predict allergic response and a safe alternative agent

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Gabatin, A.; Orzel, J.A.; Maloney, T.R.; Murnane, J.E.; Borchert, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    We describe a severe systemic reaction which occurred in a patient on two occasions after i.v. injection of chemically related diphosphonate bone imaging agents. Skin testing showed reactivity to multiple commercially available diphosphonate compounds but no significant response to pyrophosphates. A subsequent pyrophosphate bone scan resulted in no adverse reaction. Severe systemic reactions to diphosphonates can occur, skin testing may prove useful in evaluating allergic reactions, and pyrophosphates appear to be a safe alternative agent in patients proven or suspected allergic to diphosphonates.

  5. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  6. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  7. Molecular-targeted antitumor agents. 19. Furospongolide from a marine Lendenfeldia sp. sponge inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1 activation in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Rui; Mao, Shui-Chun; Morgan, J Brian; Jekabsons, Mika B; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G

    2008-11-01

    A natural product chemistry-based approach was employed to discover small-molecule inhibitors of the important tumor-selective molecular target hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). Bioassay-guided isolation of an active lipid extract of a Saipan collection of the marine sponge Lendenfeldia sp. afforded the terpene-derived furanolipid furospongolide as the primary inhibitor of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation (IC(50) 2.9 μM, T47D breast tumor cells). The active component of the extract also contained one new cytotoxic scalarane sesterterpene and two previously reported scalaranes. Furospongolide blocked the induction of the downstream HIF-1 target secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and was shown to suppress HIF-1 activation by inhibiting the hypoxic induction of HIF-1α protein. Mechanistic studies indicate that furospongolide inhibits HIF-1 activity primarily by suppressing tumor cell respiration via the blockade of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)-mediated mitochondrial electron transfer.

  8. Classification and basic properties of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Laurent, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive classification of contrast agents currently used or under development for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Agents based on small chelates, macromolecular systems, iron oxides and other nanosystems, as well as responsive, chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and hyperpolarization agents are covered in order to discuss the various possibilities of using MRI as a molecular imaging technique. The classification includes composition, magnetic properties, biodistribution and imaging applications. Chemical compositions of various classes of MRI contrast agents are tabulated, and their magnetic status including diamagnetic, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic are outlined. Classification according to biodistribution covers all types of MRI contrast agents including, among others, extracellular, blood pool, polymeric, particulate, responsive, oral, and organ specific (hepatobiliary, RES, lymph nodes, bone marrow and brain). Various targeting strategies of molecular, macromolecular and particulate carriers are also illustrated.

  9. Imaging flow cytometry for automated detection of hypoxia-induced erythrocyte shape change in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Samsel, Leigh; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Saiyed, Rehan; Fertrin, Kleber Y.; Brantner, Christine A.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Nichols, James; McCoy, J. Philip; Kato, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical and early phase pharmacologic trials in sickle cell disease, the percentage of sickled erythrocytes after deoxygenation, an ex vivo functional sickling assay, has been used as a measure of a patient’s disease outcome. We developed a new sickle imaging flow cytometry assay (SIFCA) and investigated its application. To perform the SIFCA, peripheral blood was diluted, deoxygenated (2% oxygen) for 2 hr, fixed, and analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We developed a software algorithm that correctly classified investigator tagged “sickled” and “normal” erythrocyte morphology with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.1%. The percentage of sickled cells as measured by SIFCA correlated strongly with the percentage of sickle cell anemia blood in experimentally admixed samples (R = 0.98, P ≤ 0.001), negatively with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (R = −0.558, P = 0.027), negatively with pH (R = −0.688, P = 0.026), negatively with pretreatment with the antisickling agent, Aes-103 (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural) (R = −0.766, P = 0.002), and positively with the presence of long intracellular fibers as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (R = 0.799, P = 0.002). This study shows proof of principle that the automated, operator-independent SIFCA is associated with predictable physiologic and clinical parameters and is altered by the putative antisickling agent, Aes-103. SIFCA is a new method that may be useful in sickle cell drug development. PMID:24585634

  10. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  11. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Hao Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu Baoxi; Sun Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  12. Nanoparticle-Based Systems for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Derong; Liu, Fuyao; Ma, Lina; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents play a vital role in diagnosing diseases, demand for new MRI contrast agents, with an enhanced sensitivity and advanced functionalities, is very high. During the past decade, various inorganic nanoparticles have been used as MRI contrast agents due to their unique properties, such as large surface area, easy surface functionalization, excellent contrasting effect, and other size-dependent properties. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of nanoparticle-based T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. The chemical synthesis of the nanoparticle-based contrast agents and their potential applications were discussed and summarized. In addition, the recent development in nanoparticle-based multimodal contrast agents including T1-weighted MRI/computed X-ray tomography (CT) and T1-weighted MRI/optical were also described, since nanoparticles may curtail the shortcomings of single mode contrast agents in diagnostic and clinical settings by synergistically incorporating functionality. PMID:23698781

  13. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Abrams, M.J.; Davison, A.

    1984-06-05

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  14. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  15. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  16. Macromolecular Imaging Agents Containing Lanthanides: Can Conceptual Promise Lead to Clinical Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Joshua; Reineke, Jeffrey W.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are increasingly being used to improve the resolution of this noninvasive diagnostic technique. All clinically-approved T1 contrast agents are small molecule chelates of gadolinium [Gd(III)] that affect bound water proton relaxivity. Both the small size and monomeric nature of these agents ultimately limits the image resolution enhancement that can be achieved for both contrast enhancement and pharmacokinetic/biodistribution reasons. The multimeric nature of macromolecules, such as polymers, dendrimers, and noncovalent complexes of small molecule agents with proteins, have been shown to significantly increase the image contrast and resolution due to their large size and ability to incorporate multiple Gd(III) chlelation sites. Also, macromolecular agents are advantageous as they have the ability to be designed to be nontoxic, hydrophilic, easily purified, aggregation-resistant, and have controllable three-dimensional macromolecular structure housing the multiple lanthanide chelation sites. For these reasons, large molecule diagnostics have the ability to significantly increase the relaxivity of water protons within the targeted tissues and thus the image resolution for many diagnostic applications. The FDA approval of a contrast agent that consists of a reversible, non-covalent coupling of a small Gd(III) chelate with serum albumin for blood pool imaging (marketed under the trade names of Vasovist and Ablivar) proved to be one of the first diagnostic agent to capitalize on these benefits from macromolecular association in humans. However, much research and development is necessary to optimize the safety of these unique agents for in vivo use and potential clinical development. To this end, recent work in the field of polymer, dendrimer, and noncovalent complex-based imaging agents are reviewed herein and the future outlook of this field is discussed. PMID:23467737

  17. Carbon nanomaterials: multi-functional agents for biomedical fluorescence and Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Bartelmess, J; Quinn, S J; Giordani, S

    2015-07-21

    Carbon based nanomaterials have emerged over the last few years as important agents for biomedical fluorescence and Raman imaging applications. These spectroscopic techniques utilize either fluorescently labelled carbon nanomaterials or the intrinsic photophysical properties of the carbon nanomaterial. In this review article we present the utilization and performance of several classes of carbon nanomaterials, namely carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, carbon nanoonions, nanodiamonds and different graphene derivatives, which are currently employed for in vitro as well as in vivo imaging in biology and medicine. A variety of different approaches, imaging agents and techniques are examined and the specific properties of the various carbon based imaging agents are discussed. Some theranostic carbon nanomaterials, which combine diagnostic features (i.e. imaging) with cell specific targeting and therapeutic approaches (i.e. drug delivery or photothermal therapy), are also included in this overview.

  18. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  19. Image-guided synergistic photothermal therapy using photoresponsive imaging agent-loaded graphene-based nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wenjun; Shim, Gayong; Kim, Gunwoo; Lee, Soondong; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kim, Young Bong; Byun, Youngro; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2015-08-10

    We report the image-guided synergistic photothermal antitumor effects of photoresponsive near-infrared (NIR) imaging agent, indocyanine green (ICG), by loading onto hyaluronic acid-anchored, reduced graphene oxide (HArGO) nanosheets. Loading of ICG onto either rGO (ICG/rGO) or HArGO (ICG/HArGO) substantially improved the photostability of photoresponsive ICG upon NIR irradiation. After 1min of irradiation, the NIR absorption peak of ICG almost disappeared whereas the peak of ICG on rGO or HArGO was retained even after 5min of irradiation. Compared with plain rGO, HArGO provided greater cellular delivery of ICG and photothermal tumor cell-killing effects upon laser irradiation in CD44-positive KB cells. The temperature of cell suspensions treated with ICG/HArGO was 2.4-fold higher than that of cells treated with free ICG. Molecular imaging revealed that intravenously administered ICG/HArGO accumulated in KB tumor tissues higher than ICG/rGO or free ICG. Local temperatures in tumor tissues of laser-irradiated KB cell-bearing nude mice were highest in those intravenously administered ICG/HArGO, and were sufficient to trigger thermal-induced complete tumor ablation. Immunohistologically stained tumors also showed the highest percentages of apoptotic cells in the group treated with ICG/HArGO. These results suggest that photoresponsive ICG-loaded HArGO nanosheets could serve as a potential theranostic nano-platform for image-guided and synergistic photothermal antitumor therapy.

  20. Screening of anti-hypoxia/reoxygenation agents by an in vitro model. Part 1: Natural inhibitors for protein tyrosine kinase activated by hypoxia/reoxygenation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Morita, I; Shao, G; Yao, X S; Murota, S

    2000-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) signaling pathways play important roles in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injuries. Inhibition of PTK activation can protect against I/R- or H/R-induced damages. As one part of our work for seeking bioactive compounds from natural sources against I/R or H/R, in the present study we examined the effects of 54 compounds purified from various traditional Chinese herbs on H/R-induced PTK activation by means of an in vitro H/R model in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The results demonstrated that an increase in PTK activation was induced after 2 h of reoxygenation. Compounds 2 (macrostemososide A), 3 (laxogenin-3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-L-arabinopyra nosyl- (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside), 4 (chinenoside II), 7 (ginsenoside-Rd), 52 (icariin), 53 (icariside), and 54 (icaritin) showed relatively obvious inhibition on this H/R-induced PTK activation. Compounds 5 (beta-sitosterol) and 6 (daucosterine), especially 5, completely blocked such an increased activation of PTK induced by H/R. On the contrary, compound 29 (isocumarine) significantly promoted PTK activation further. Moreover, the effects of these compounds on PTK activation were dose-dependent. PMID:10763582

  1. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  2. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  3. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  4. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  5. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent.

  6. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  7. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent. PMID:23912977

  8. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  9. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; Harari, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m2 and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [61Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging demonstrates measureable changes

  10. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  11. Screening of anti-hypoxia/reoxygenation agents by an in vitro method. Part 2: Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation prevented hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in endothelial gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Morita, I; Zhang, L; Shao, G; Yao, X S; Murota, S

    2000-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induced an injury in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) after 2 h of reoxygenation in cultured HUVEC. Free radical scavenger (DMSO) and antioxidant (SOD) did not prevent this GJIC injury at all. Protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin C) partly blocked this injury. However, the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein completely inhibited this GJIC injury. Compounds 1 [laxogenin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinosyl-(1-->6)- beta-D-glucopyranoside], 2 (macrostemososide A), 3 [laxogenin-3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha- L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside], 4 (chinenoside II), 5 (beta-sitosterol), 6 (daucosterine), 7 (ginsenoside-Rd), 29 (isocumarine), 52 (icariin), 53 (icariside), and 54 (icaritin), which showed obvious influence on H/R-induced PTK activation as stated in Part 1 (except 1), were explored for their effects on GJIC. The results showed that compounds 2-7 and 52-57 partly protected H/R-induced GJIC injury. Compounds 5 and 6 (especially 5), which showed the strongest inhibitory effects on PTK activation, completely blocked H/R-provoked GJIC injury. Compound 1, which did not influence PTK activation, failed to prevent this GJIC injury. In contrast, compound 29, which significantly promoted PTK activation, enhanced this H/R-induced GJIC injury further. Western blotting of connexin 43, an important gap junctional protein for modulating GJIC in HUVEC, revealed that interference with the gap junctional protein might be the most direct mechanism for compounds 2, 5, 29, and 53 to affect H/R-injured GJIC. PMID:10763583

  12. Nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for vascular and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular imaging have made magnetic resonance imaging a promising modality for noninvasive visualization and assessment of vascular and cardiac disease processes. This review provides a description of the various nanoparticles exploited for imaging cardiovascular targets. Nanoparticle probes detecting inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis may provide tools for assessing the risk of progressive vascular dysfunction and heart failure. The utility of nanoparticles as multimodal probes and/or theranostic agents has also been investigated. Although clinical application of these nanoparticles is largely unexplored, the potential for enhancing disease diagnosis and treatment is considerable. PMID:20967875

  13. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  14. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  15. Recent progress of imaging agents for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoai; Cai, Huawei; Ge, Ran; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive, neurodegenerative brain disease that is promoted by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein aggregation and proteasome dysfunction in the brain. Compared with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), non-invasive nuclear radiopharmaceuticals have great significance for the early diagnosis of PD due to their high sensitivity and specificity in atypical and preclinical cases. Based on the development of coordination chemistry and chelator design, radionuclides may be delivered to lesions by attaching to PD-related transporters and receptors, such as dopamine, serotonin, and others. In this review, we comprehensively detailed the current achievements in radionuclide imaging in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25977680

  16. Recent Progress of Imaging Agents for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoai; Cai, Huawei; Ge, Ran; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive, neurodegenerative brain disease that is promoted by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein aggregation and proteasome dysfunction in the brain. Compared with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), non-invasive nuclear radiopharmaceuticals have great significance for the early diagnosis of PD due to their high sensitivity and specificity in atypical and preclinical cases. Based on the development of coordination chemistry and chelator design, radionuclides may be delivered to lesions by attaching to PD-related transporters and receptors, such as dopamine, serotonin, and others. In this review, we comprehensively detailed the current achievements in radionuclide imaging in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25977680

  17. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Fluorescent-Guided Surgical Resection of Glioma with Targeted Molecular Imaging Agents: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Craig, Sonya E L; Wright, James; Sloan, Andrew E; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2016-06-01

    The median life expectancy after a diagnosis of glioblastoma is 15 months. Although chemotherapeutics may someday cure glioblastoma by killing the highly dispersive malignant cells, the most important contribution that clinicians can currently offer to improve survival is by maximizing the extent of resection and providing concurrent chemo-radiation, which has become standard. Strides have been made in this area with the advent and implementation of methods of improved intraoperative tumor visualization. One of these techniques, optical fluorescent imaging with targeted molecular imaging agents, allows the surgeon to view fluorescently labeled tumor tissue during surgery with the use of special microscopy, thereby highlighting where to resect and indicating when tumor-free margins have been obtained. This advantage is especially important at the difficult-to-observe margins where tumor cells infiltrate normal tissue. Targeted fluorescent agents also may be valuable for identifying tumor versus nontumor tissue. In this review, we briefly summarize nontargeted fluorescent tumor imaging agents before discussing several novel targeted fluorescent agents being developed for glioma imaging in the context of fluorescent-guided surgery or live molecular navigation. Many of these agents are currently undergoing preclinical testing. As the agents become available, however, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each. PMID:26915698

  19. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging.

  20. Towards a framework for agent-based image analysis of remote-sensing data

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Peter; Lettmayer, Paul; Blaschke, Thomas; Belgiu, Mariana; Wegenkittl, Stefan; Graf, Roland; Lampoltshammer, Thomas Josef; Andrejchenko, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) as a paradigm for analysing remotely sensed image data has in many cases led to spatially and thematically improved classification results in comparison to pixel-based approaches. Nevertheless, robust and transferable object-based solutions for automated image analysis capable of analysing sets of images or even large image archives without any human interaction are still rare. A major reason for this lack of robustness and transferability is the high complexity of image contents: Especially in very high resolution (VHR) remote-sensing data with varying imaging conditions or sensor characteristics, the variability of the objects’ properties in these varying images is hardly predictable. The work described in this article builds on so-called rule sets. While earlier work has demonstrated that OBIA rule sets bear a high potential of transferability, they need to be adapted manually, or classification results need to be adjusted manually in a post-processing step. In order to automate these adaptation and adjustment procedures, we investigate the coupling, extension and integration of OBIA with the agent-based paradigm, which is exhaustively investigated in software engineering. The aims of such integration are (a) autonomously adapting rule sets and (b) image objects that can adopt and adjust themselves according to different imaging conditions and sensor characteristics. This article focuses on self-adapting image objects and therefore introduces a framework for agent-based image analysis (ABIA). PMID:27721916

  1. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zehri, Aqib H.; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F.; Mooney, Michael A.; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Preul, Mark C.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery. PMID:24872922

  2. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  3. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  4. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a review of the results of experimental and clinical research on both I-amphetamine derivatives and pH-shift agents. Virtually all relevant working groups from the USA and Europe have contributed to this volume. The pharmacology of amphetamine and the corresponding receptor theories are described in detail, whereas other chapters deal with the labeling as well as the metabolic process of this drug. In addition to this, new amphetamine derivatives are presented together with other essential products which play a significant role in scintigraphy of the brain function. Finally, there are two chapters on instrumentation problems followed by eight contributions on the clinical results of amphetamine scintigraphy in cerebral vascular diseases, epilepsy, migraine and brain tumors.

  5. Evaluation of Hypoxia with Cu-ATSM

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Suzanne E.; Lewis, Jason S.; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of hypoxia is important in many diseases states in oncology, cardiology and neurology. The radiopharmaceutical, copper labelled diacetyl-bis(N-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM), has been used to assess hypoxia in many studies. In particular, Cu-ATSM has been used in oncologic settings to investigate tumor hypoxia and the role of this parameter in response to therapy and outcome. Other groups have conducted imaging studies assessing the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular disease and neurological disorders. Additionally, several groups have made significant progress into understanding the mechanism by which this compound accumulates in cells. Multiple preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted, shedding light on the important of careful image analysis when using this tracer. This review article focusses on the recent preclinical and clinical studies with this tracer. PMID:25704389

  6. Correlating Molecular Character of NIR Imaging Agents with Tissue-Specific Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Hyun, Hoon; Tawney, Joseph G.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents are emerging in optical imaging as sensitive, cost-effective, and nonharmful alternatives to current agents that emit harmful ionizing radiation. Developing spectrally distinct NIR fluorophores to visualize sensitive vital tissues to selectively avoid them during surgical resection of diseased tissue is of great significance. Herein, we report the synthetic variation of pentamethine cyanine fluorophores with modifications of physicochemical properties toward prompting tissue-specific uptake into sensitive tissues (i.e., endocrine glands). Tissue-specific targeting and biodistribution studies revealed localization of contrast agents in the adrenal and pituitary glands, pancreas, and lymph nodes with dependence on molecular characteristics. Incorporation of hydrophobic heterocyclic rings, alkyl groups, and halogens allowed a fine-tuning capability to the hydrophobic character and dipole moment for observing perturbation in biological activity in response to minor structural alterations. These NIR contrast agents have potential for clinical translation for intraoperative imaging in the delineation of delicate glands. PMID:25923454

  7. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging. PMID:24188576

  9. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  10. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  11. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  12. Design of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography: do large bioconjugates provide an opportunity for in vivo brain imaging?

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Reader, Andrew; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Schirrmacher, Esther; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The development of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography and other in vivo imaging modalities mostly relies on small compounds of low MW as a result of the restricted transport of larger molecules, such as peptides and proteins, across the blood-brain barrier. Besides passive transport, only a few active carrier mechanisms, such as glucose transporters and amino acid transporters, have so far been exploited to mediate the accumulation of imaging probes in the brain. An important question for the future is whether some of the abundant active carrier systems located at the blood-brain barrier can be used to shuttle potential, but non-crossing, imaging agents into the brain. What are the biological and chemical constrictions toward such bioconjugates and is it worthwhile to persue such a delivery strategy?

  13. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high “relaxivity per particle” and “relaxivity density”, and biodegradability. PMID:23432004

  14. Early Diagnosis of Orthopedic Implant Failure Using Macromolecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Dusad, Anand; Zhang, Yijia; Purdue, P. Edward; Fehringer, Edward V.; Garvin, Kevin L.; Goldring, Steven R.; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate diagnostic tools for early detection of wear particle-induced orthopaedic implant loosening. Methods N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer was tagged with an near infrared dye and used to detect the inflammation induced by polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a murine peri-implant osteolysis model. It was established by inserting implant into distal femur and with routine PMMA particles challenging. The osteolysis was evaluated by micro-CT and histological analysis at different time points. Results Significant peri-implant osteolysis was found three-month post PMMA particle challenge by micro-CT and histological analysis. At one-month time point, when there was no significant peri-implant bone loss, HPMA copolymer-near infrared dye conjugate was found to specifically target to the femur with PMMA particles deposition, but not the contralateral control femur with PBS infusion. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the macromolecular diagnostic agent to report particle-induced peri-implant inflammation prior to the development of detectable osteolysis. Recognition of this early pathological event would provide the window of opportunity for prevention of peri-implant osteolysis and subsequent orthopaedic implant failure. PMID:24590878

  15. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  16. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  17. Longitudinal vascular imaging using a novel nano-encapsulated CT and MR contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinzi; Hoisak, Jeremy D.; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-01

    Contrast agents are widely employed in medical imaging for improved visualization of anatomy and disease characterization. In recent years, there is increasing interest in developing novel contrast agents and using their tissue accumulation and clearance patterns to obtain physiological information. The goal of this investigation is to assess the utility of a long circulating dual modality liposomal contrast agent for longitudinal imaging applications in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It was demonstrated that this high molecular weight contrast agent is retained in healthy vasculature (circulation half-life of ~20 hours in mice and ~100 hours in rabbits), but it is able to leak through abnormal tumor vasculature into the tumor interstitium. The rate of its differential tumor uptake was monitored in CT and MR longitudinally over a 48-hour period and a map of the rate of change of contrast enhancement was produced. This contrast agent has shown potential for anatomic and physiological imaging of healthy and abnormal blood vessels in CT and MR. It may become a useful tool for tumor vasculature assessment before, during and after antitumor treatments.

  18. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  19. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  20. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  1. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer. Methods A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. Results All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). Conclusion 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer. PMID:27322586

  2. Current status of nanoparticle-based imaging agents for early diagnosis of cancer and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, Gurusamy; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Park, Jae Hyung; Rhee, Kyehan; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2009-02-01

    Endothelium plays a vital role in various vascular functions, and its dysfunction is a key underlying process closely related to diverse array of diseases such as atherosclerosis and tumor. Therefore, early detection of endothelial dysfunction at the functional or molecular level is of high importance for effective therapy. Recent advances in nanotechnology and our understanding in cellular and molecular biology have provided various biomedical imaging modalities and nanosized multimodal imaging agents. Multimodal nanoparticles that encompass the targeting ligands and magnetic/optical imaging labels enable us to visualize the pathophysiological process of various diseases using multiple imaging techniques. To visualize the specific pathogenic process at the molecular level, the imaging probe needs to be surface-functionalized with specific affinity ligands such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Combining the functional imaging agents along with therapeutic drugs has great potential for effective early detection, accurate diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The current review will highlight the application of various nanoparticle-based imaging agents and their recent developments in diagnosing endothelium dysfunction with a special emphasis on atherosclerosis and cancer.

  3. An Exploratory Study Into the Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Perfusion Computed Tomography for Detection of Intratumoral Hypoxia in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Newbold, Kate Castellano, Isabel; Charles-Edwards, Elizabeth; Mears, Dorothy; Sohaib, Aslam; Leach, Martin; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Clarke, Peter; Fisher, Cyril; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is well established and known to cause radiation resistance and treatment failure in the management of HNC. This study examines the role of parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) as surrogate markers of intratumoral hypoxia, defined by using the exogenous marker of hypoxia pimonidazole and the endogenous marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9). Methods and Materials: Patients with HNC underwent preoperative DCE-MRI, perfusion CT, and pimonidazole infusion. Imaging parameters were correlated with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. The strength of correlations was tested by using a two-tailed Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Twenty-three regions of interest were analyzed from the 7 patients who completed the DCE-MRI studies. A number of statistically significant correlations were seen between DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer between blood plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES], volume of EES, rate constant between EES and blood plasma, time at arrival of contrast inflow, time to peak, average gradient, and time to onset) and areas with a pimonidazole score of 4. In the case of CA9 staining, only a weak correlation was shown with wash-in rate. There were no significant correlations between perfusion CT parameters and pimonidazole staining or CA9 expression. Conclusion: Intratumoral hypoxia in patients with HNC may be predicted by using DCE-MRI; however, perfusion CT requires further investigation.

  4. Contrast-agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of neoplastic lesions of the CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Rosa, Louis; Rajan, Sunder S.; Francisco, John

    1991-06-01

    Even though the intrinsic soft tissue contrast sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords excellent visualization of anatomic detail, certain pathologic processes may be diagnosed earlier with the administration of a contrast-enhancing agent. At present there is one agent, gadopentetate dimeglumine, GdDTPA, that has received FDA approval for use in the MR scanning of the brain and spine in human patients. This paramagnetic chelate distributes throughout the extracellular fluid space as dictated by capillary permeability so that abnormal vascularity and sites of blood-CNS barrier breakdown are highlighted. Primary neoplastic disease, metastases, meningeal extension, residual and recurrent tumor have been found to be better distinguished in MR images acquired after administration of GdDTPA. Routine administration of GdDTPA for cranial imaging has resulted in the discovery of otherwise occult lesions in approximately 3 of patients. Although the clinical utility and high therapeutic safety index of the first approved magnetic resonance contrast agent, GdDTPA, have been well established, other contrast agents, having different physical, chemical and biological properties, may offer improved sensitivity and bio-specificity. Agents currently being evaluated in vivo include: low osmolal paramagnetic chelates, superparamagnetic particles, metalloporphyrins, liposome encapsulated agents, perfluorocarbons, intravascular macromolecular chelate complexes and labeled monoclonal antibodies. Concurrent with advances in the development of new compounds, innovations in scanning hardware, pulse sequence design and image post-processing are helping to extend the efficacy of contrast media. Additional clinical experience will indicate which contrast agents and which MR techniques can best facilitate the early detection of specific neoplastic lesions.

  5. Contrast agents and cardiac MR imaging of myocardial ischemia: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Croisille, Pierre; Revel, Didier; Saeed, Maythem

    2006-09-01

    This review paper presents, in the first part, the different classes of contrast media that are already used or are in development for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. A classification of the different types of contrast media is proposed based on the distribution of the compounds in the body, their type of relaxivity and their potential affinity to particular molecules. In the second part, the different uses of the extracellular type of T1-enhancing contrast agent for myocardial imaging is covered from the detection of stable coronary artery disease to the detection and characterization of chronic infarction. A particular emphasis is placed on the clinical use of gadolinium-chelates, which are the universally used type of MRI contrast agent in the clinical routine. Both approaches, first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (FP-MRI) as well as delayed-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI), are covered in the different situations of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. PMID:16633792

  6. Hybrid gadolinium oxide nanoparticles: multimodal contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Bridot, Jean-Luc; Faure, Anne-Charlotte; Laurent, Sophie; Rivière, Charlotte; Billotey, Claire; Hiba, Bassem; Janier, Marc; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert; Roux, Stéphane; Perriat, Pascal; Tillement, Olivier

    2007-04-25

    Luminescent hybrid nanoparticles with a paramagnetic Gd2O3 core were applied as contrast agents for both in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. These hybrid particles were obtained by encapsulating Gd2O3 cores within a polysiloxane shell which carries organic fluorophores and carboxylated PEG covalently tethered to the inorganic network. Longitudinal proton relaxivities of these particles are higher than the positive contrast agents like Gd-DOTA which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover these particles can be followed up by fluorescence imaging. This study revealed that these particles suited for dual modality imaging freely circulate in the blood vessels without undesirable accumulation in lungs and liver.

  7. A spatially-distributed computational model to quantify behaviour of contrast agents in MR perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, A.N.; Lee, J.; Michler, C.; Chabiniok, R.; Hyde, E.; Nordsletten, D.; Smith, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    Contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging provides an early, non-invasive indication of defects in the coronary circulation. However, the large variation of contrast agent properties, physiological state and imaging protocols means that optimisation of image acquisition is difficult to achieve. This situation motivates the development of a computational framework that, in turn, enables the efficient mapping of this parameter space to provide valuable information for optimisation of perfusion imaging in the clinical context. For this purpose a single-compartment porous medium model of capillary blood flow is developed which is coupled with a scalar transport model, to characterise the behaviour of both blood-pool and freely-diffusive contrast agents characterised by their ability to diffuse through the capillary wall into the extra-cellular space. A parameter space study is performed on the nondimensionalised equations using a 2D model for both healthy and diseased myocardium, examining the sensitivity of system behaviour to Peclet number, Damköhler number (Da), diffusivity ratio and fluid porosity. Assuming a linear MR signal response model, sample concentration time series data are calculated, and the sensitivity of clinically-relevant properties of these signals to the model parameters is quantified. Both upslope and peak values display significant non-monotonic behaviour with regard to the Damköhler number, with these properties showing a high degree of sensitivity in the parameter range relevant to contrast agents currently in use. However, the results suggest that signal upslope is the more robust and discerning metric for perfusion quantification, in particular for correlating with perfusion defect size. Finally, the results were examined in the context of nonlinear signal response, flow quantification via Fermi deconvolution and perfusion reserve index, which demonstrated that there is no single best set of contrast agent parameters

  8. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  9. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  10. Examining multi-component DNA-templated nanostructures as imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading non-invasive tool for disease imaging and diagnosis. Although MRI exhibits high spatial resolution for anatomical features, the contrast resolution is low. Imaging agents serve as an aid to distinguish different types of tissues within images. Gadolinium chelates, which are considered first generation designs, can be toxic to health, while ultra-small, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have low tissue-targeting efficiency and rapid bio-distribution, resulting to an inadequate detection of the MRI signal and enhancement of image contrast. In order to improve the utility of MRI agents, the challenge in composition and structure needs to be addressed. One-dimensional (1D), superparamagnetic nanostructures have been reported to enhance magnetic and in vivo properties and therefore has a potential to improve contrast enhancement in MRI images. In this dissertation, the structure of 1D, multi-component NP chains, scaffolded on DNA, were pre-clinically examined as potential MRI agents. First, research was focused on characterizing and understanding the mechanism of proton relaxation for DNA-templated NP chains using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Proton relaxation and transverse relaxivity were higher in multi-component NP chains compared to disperse NPs, indicating the arrangement of NPs on a 1D structure improved proton relaxation sensitivity. Second, in vitro evaluation for potential issues in toxicity and contrast efficiency in tissue environments using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner was performed. Cell uptake of DNA-templated NP chains was enhanced after encapsulating the nanostructure with layers of polyelectrolytes and targeting ligands. Compared to dispersed NPs, DNA-templated NP chains improved MRI contrast in both the epithelial basement membrane and colon cancer tumors scaffolds. The last part of the project was focused on developing a novel MRI agent that detects changes in DNA methylation

  11. Nano-theranostics and Nitroxyl Radical-labeled Antitumor Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ichio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of functional contrast agents and nanoparticle drug delivery systems (nano-DDS) is opening new pathways to understanding pathophysiology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nitroxyl radical compounds are promising functional contrast agents for redox evaluation. We have developed a novel nitroxyl radical theranostic compound for noninvasive real-time imaging of blood-brain barrier-permeable antitumor drugs. Divalent manganese ions (Mn(2+)) can also be used as an intracellular functional MRI contrast agent. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides a unique opportunity to study neuronal activation and architecture. Extracellular Mn(2+) can enter cells through NMDA receptors for glutamate and/or voltage-gated calcium channels. Thus, Mn(2+) can behave as a functional contrast agent depending on the cellular activity/viability. This paper summarizes the recent progress in MEMRI for neuroimaging and cancer research. Nanocarriers for DDS can contain multiple functional elements, such as therapeutic drugs, MRI contrast agents, fluorescent dyes, and radioisotopes, without significant changes in the particle kinetics/dynamics. Various materials have also been reported as nano-DDS carriers, including micelles, liposomes, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon materials such as fullerenes, with each material providing a different set of characteristics as a nano-DDS carrier. Our recent research into nano-DDS-based contrast agents and the theranostic applications is also outlined. PMID:27477722

  12. Nano-theranostics and Nitroxyl Radical-labeled Antitumor Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ichio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of functional contrast agents and nanoparticle drug delivery systems (nano-DDS) is opening new pathways to understanding pathophysiology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nitroxyl radical compounds are promising functional contrast agents for redox evaluation. We have developed a novel nitroxyl radical theranostic compound for noninvasive real-time imaging of blood-brain barrier-permeable antitumor drugs. Divalent manganese ions (Mn(2+)) can also be used as an intracellular functional MRI contrast agent. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides a unique opportunity to study neuronal activation and architecture. Extracellular Mn(2+) can enter cells through NMDA receptors for glutamate and/or voltage-gated calcium channels. Thus, Mn(2+) can behave as a functional contrast agent depending on the cellular activity/viability. This paper summarizes the recent progress in MEMRI for neuroimaging and cancer research. Nanocarriers for DDS can contain multiple functional elements, such as therapeutic drugs, MRI contrast agents, fluorescent dyes, and radioisotopes, without significant changes in the particle kinetics/dynamics. Various materials have also been reported as nano-DDS carriers, including micelles, liposomes, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon materials such as fullerenes, with each material providing a different set of characteristics as a nano-DDS carrier. Our recent research into nano-DDS-based contrast agents and the theranostic applications is also outlined.

  13. Long-Lasting and Efficient Tumor Imaging Using a High Relaxivity Polysaccharide Nanogel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Lux, Jacques; Nishimura, Tomoki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-09-14

    Clinically approved small-molecule magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are all rapidly cleared from the body and offer weak signal enhancement. To avoid repeated administration of contrast agent and improve signal-to-noise ratios, agents with stronger signal enhancement and better retention in tumors are needed. Therefore, we focused on hydrogels because of their excellent water accessibility and biodegradability. Gadolinium (Gd)-chelating cross-linkers were incorporated into self-assembled pullulan nanogels to both impart magnetic properties and to stabilize this material that has been extensively studied for medical applications. We show that these Gd-chelating pullulan nanogels (Gd-CHPOA) have the highest reported relaxivity for any hydrogel-based particles and accumulate in the 4T1 tumors in mice at high levels 4 h after injection. This combination offers high signal enhancement and lasts up to 7 days to delineate the tumor clearly for longer imaging time scales. Importantly, this long-term accumulation does not cause any damage or toxicity in major organs up to three months after injection. Our work highlights the clinical potential of Gd-CHPOA as a tumor-imaging MRI contrast agent, permitting tumor identification and assessment with a high signal-to-background ratio.

  14. Fluorine-19 MRI Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking and Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew S.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 (19F)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging stand to revolutionize imaging-based research and clinical trials in several fields of medical intervention. First, their use in characterizing in vivo cell behavior may help bring cellular therapy closer to clinical acceptance. Second, their use in lung imaging provides novel noninvasive interrogation of the ventilated airspaces without the need for complicated, hard-to-distribute hardware. This article reviews the current state of 19F-based cell tracking and lung imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and describes the link between the methods across these fields and how they may mutually benefit from solutions to mutual problems encountered when imaging 19F-containing compounds, as well as hardware and software advancements. PMID:27042089

  15. A novel injectable BRET-based in vivo imaging probe for detecting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Suka, Tomoya; Hirota, Keisuke; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a selective protein degradation system that plays a critical role in many essential biological processes by regulating the existence of various cellular proteins. The target proteins of UPS are recognized and tagged with polyubiquitin chains by E3 ubiquitin ligases, which have high substrate-specific activities. Here we present a novel injectable imaging probe POL-N that can detect the UPS-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activity in vivo. Because the luciferase is fused to the E3 ligase-recognition domain of the HIF-1α, POL-N is intact only in the HIFα-overexpressing cells, that is, HIF-active cells, generating signals via an intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between luciferase and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye at the C-terminal end of the probe. Off-target signals of the NIR-BRET were so low that we could achieve highly sensitive and fast detection of intratumoral HIF-activity. Notably, we successfully detected hypoxic liver metastasis, which is extremely difficult to detect by injectable imaging probes due to strong off-target signals, as early as 1 h after systemic injection of POL-N. Our probe design can be widely adapted to UPS-target proteins and may contribute to the exploration of their roles in animal disease models. PMID:27698477

  16. Phthalocyanine photosensitizers as contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Bte Ebrahim; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for contrast agents for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of tumors. Herein, Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) was employed to evaluate phthalocyanines commonly used in photodynamic therapy as photoacoustic contrast agents. We studied the photoacoustic activity of three water-soluble phthalocyanine photosensitizers: phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (PcS4), Zn(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (ZnPcS4) and Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid (AlPcS4) in phantom and in tumor-bearing mice to investigate the biodistribution and fate of the phthalocyanines in the biological tissues. PcS4 was observed to grant good contrast between the different reticuloendothelial organs and accumulate in the tumor within an hour of post-administration. ZnPcS4 and AlPcS4 offered little contrast in photoacoustic signals between the organs. PcS4 is a promising photoacoustic contrast agent and can be exploited as a photodiagnostic agent.

  17. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  18. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  19. Targeted Multifunctional Multimodal Protein-Shell Microspheres as Cancer Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    John, Renu; Nguyen, Freddy T.; Kolbeck, Kenneth J.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In this study, protein-shell microspheres filled with a suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles in oil are demonstrated as multimodal contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT), and ultrasound imaging. The development, characterization, and use of multifunctional multimodal microspheres are described for targeted contrast and therapeutic applications. Procedures A preclinical rat model was used to demonstrate the feasibility of the multimodal multifunctional microspheres as contrast agents in ultrasound, MM-OCT and MRI. Microspheres were functionalized with the RGD peptide ligand, which is targeted to αvβ3 integrin receptors that are over-expressed in tumors and atherosclerotic lesions. Results These microspheres, which contain iron oxide nanoparticles in their cores, can be modulated externally using a magnetic field to create dynamic contrast in MM-OCT. With the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles, these agents also show significant negative T2 contrast in MRI. Using ultrasound B-mode imaging at a frequency of 30 MHz, a marked enhancement of scatter intensity from in vivo rat mammary tumor tissue was observed for these targeted protein microspheres. Conclusions Preliminary results demonstrate multimodal contrast-enhanced imaging of these functionalized microsphere agents with MRI, MM-OCT, ultrasound imaging, and fluorescence microscopy, including in vivo tracking of the dynamics of these microspheres in real-time using a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. These targeted oil-filled protein microspheres with the capacity for high drug-delivery loads offer the potential for local delivery of lipophilic drugs under image guidance. PMID:21298354

  20. Gadolinium contrast agent selection and optimal use for body MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Gupta, Shiva

    2014-07-01

    Proper selection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) for body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases requires understanding the indication for the MRI exam, the key features of the different GBCAs, and the effect that the GBCA has on the selected imaging protocol. The different categories of GBCAs require timing optimization on postcontrast sequences and adjusting imaging parameters to obtain the highest T1 contrast. Gadoxetate disodium has many advantages when evaluating liver lesions, although there are caveats and limitations that need to be understood. Gadobenate dimeglumine, a high-relaxivity GBCA, can be used for indications when stronger T1 relaxivity is needed.

  1. PEGylated Prussian blue nanocubes as a theranostic agent for simultaneous cancer imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Gong, Hua; Zhu, Wenwen; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaoyong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-12-01

    Theranostic agents with both imaging and therapeutic functions have attracted enormous interests in cancer diagnosis and treatment in recent years. In this work, we develop a novel theranostic agent based on Prussian blue nanocubes (PB NCs), a clinically approved agent with strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and intrinsic paramagnetic property, for in vivo bimodal imaging-guided photothermal therapy. After being coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), the obtained PB-PEG NCs are highly stable in various physiological solutions. In vivo T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) bimodal imaging uncover that PB-PEG NCs after intravenous (i.v.) injection show high uptake in the tumor. Utilizing the strong and super stable NIR absorbance of PB, in vivo cancer treatment is then conducted upon i.v. injection of PB-PEG NCs followed by NIR laser irradiation of the tumors, achieving excellent therapeutic efficacy in a mouse tumor model. Comprehensive blood tests and careful histological examinations reveal no apparent toxicity of PB-PEG NCs to mice at our tested dose, which is two-fold of the imaging/therapy dose, within two months. Our work highlights the great promise of Prussian blue with well engineered surface coating as a multifunctional nanoprobe for imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:25239041

  2. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  3. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue. PMID:27526128

  4. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  5. Experimental studies of the physiologic properties of technetium-99m agents: Myocardial transport of perfusion imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meerdink, D.J.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-10-16

    The physiologic properties of new technetium-99m-labeled myocardial imaging agents (Tc-99m sestamibi, an isonitrile; and Tc-99m teboroxime, a boronic acid adduct of technetium dioxime) are discussed and compared to thallium-201 (Tl-201). Studies with isolated hearts, subcellular fractions and cell cultures indicate that Tc-99m sestamibi, Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 do not share common transport or sequestration mechanisms. Although peak Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial extraction over time is about half that of Tl-201 at equivalent coronary blood flows, the amount of Tc-99m sestamibi that remains in the heart is similar to that of Tl-201 because of its higher retention efficiency. The high retention efficiency for Tc-99m sestamibi also results in minimal redistribution. In contrast, Tc-99m teboroxime myocardial extraction is higher than that of Tl-201, but its retention is less efficient, resulting in relatively rapid washout characteristics which may quickly result in tracer redistribution. During reperfusion after a no-flow period, Tc-99m sestamibi extraction and retention increase, but for Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 these values tend to decrease. All tracers show adequate transport characteristics for perfusion imaging, and differences in transport and retention should lead to the development of new clinical protocols.27 references.

  6. 3D Multi-Object Segmentation of Cardiac MSCT Imaging by using a Multi-Agent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernandez, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed. PMID:18003382

  7. The diagnostic value of 99TcM-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongkun; Han, Gaohua; Xu, Wansong

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim This study was designated to assess the diagnostic value of 99TcM-2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl) ethyl dihydrogen phosphate (99TcM-MNLS) hypoxia imaging and its evaluation performance for radiotherapy efficacy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods A total of 61 patients with NSCLC were selected for this study. All patients were injected with 99TcM-MNLS within 1 week prior to radiotherapy and they were injected with 99TcM-MNLS again 3 months after radiotherapy. Qualitative analysis along with semiquantitative analysis results were obtained from hypoxia imaging. Meanwhile, the effect of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC was evaluated based on the solid tumor curative effect evaluation standard. Finally, SPSS 19.0 statistical software was implemented for statistical analysis. Results There was no significant difference in age or sex between the NSCLC patient group and benign patient group (P>0.05). 99TcM-MNLS was selectively concentrated in tumor tissues with a clear imaging in 24 hours. Results from both qualitative analysis and semiquantitative analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging in diagnosing NSCLC were 93.8% and 84.6% and 72.9% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, the receiver operating characteristic curve provided evidence that 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging was a powerful diagnostic tool in distinguishing malignant lung cancer from benign lesions. As suggested by 24-hour imaging, the tumor-to-normal ratio of patients in the 99TcM-MNLS high-intake group and low-intake group had a decline of 24.7% and 14.4% after radiotherapy, respectively. The decline in the tumor-to-normal ratio between the two dosage groups was significantly different (P<0.05). Conclusion 99TcM-MNLS hypoxia imaging had reliable values in both diagnosing NSCLC and evaluating therapeutic effects of radiotherapy on patients with NSCLC. PMID:27799797

  8. Comparison of synthetic HDL contrast agents for MR imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Chandrasekar, Rohith; Delshad, Amanda; Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Calcagno, Claudia; Barazza, Alessandra; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Determining arterial macrophage expression is an important goal in the molecular imaging of atherosclerosis. Here we compare the efficacy of two synthetic, HDL-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of macrophage burden. Each form of HDL was labeled with gadolinium and rhodamine to allow MRI and fluorescence microscopy. Either the 37 or 18 amino acid peptide replaced the apolipoprotein A-I in these agents, which were termed 37pA-Gd or 18A-Gd. The diameters of 37pA-Gd and 18A-Gd are 7.6 nm and 8.0 nm, respectively, while the longitudinal relaxivities are 9.8 and 10.0 (mMs)-1. 37pA has better lipid binding properties. In vitro tests with J774A.1 macrophages proved the particles possessed the functionality of HDL by eliciting cholesterol efflux and were taken up in a receptor-like fashion by the cells. Both agents produced enhancements in atherosclerotic plaques of apolipoprotein E knockout mice of ~90% (n=7 per agent) and are macrophage specific as evidenced by confocal microscopy on aortic sections. The half-lives of 37pA-Gd and 18A-Gd are 2.6 and 2.1 hours, respectively. Despite the more favorable lipid interactions of 37pA, both agents gave similar, excellent contrast for the detection of atherosclerotic macrophages using MRI. PMID:19378935

  9. Semimetal nanomaterials of antimony as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    In this study we report semimetal nanomaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm(2) for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm(2) for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, further development of using other semimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT.

  10. Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents for Enhancing Tissue Engineering Characterization and Therapies.

    PubMed

    Santiesteban, Daniela Y; Kubelick, Kelsey; Dhada, Kabir S; Dumani, Diego; Suggs, Laura; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2016-03-01

    The past three decades have seen numerous advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) therapies. However, despite the successes there is still much to be done before TERM therapies become commonplace in clinic. One of the main obstacles is the lack of knowledge regarding complex tissue engineering processes. Imaging strategies, in conjunction with exogenous contrast agents, can aid in this endeavor by assessing in vivo therapeutic progress. The ability to uncover real-time treatment progress will help shed light on the complex tissue engineering processes and lead to development of improved, adaptive treatments. More importantly, the utilized exogenous contrast agents can double as therapeutic agents. Proper use of these Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents (MIRAs) can help increase TERM therapy successes and allow for clinical translation. While other fields have exploited similar particles for combining diagnostics and therapy, MIRA research is still in its beginning stages with much of the current research being focused on imaging or therapeutic applications, separately. Advancing MIRA research will have numerous impacts on achieving clinical translations of TERM therapies. Therefore, it is our goal to highlight current MIRA progress and suggest future research that can lead to effective TERM treatments.

  11. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  12. The evaluation of NIR-absorbing porphyrin derivatives as contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abuteen, Akram; Zanganeh, Saeid; Akhigbe, Joshua; Samankumara, Lalith P.; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh; Braune, Marcel; Vollertsen, Anke; Röder, Beate; Brückner, Christian; Zhu, Quing

    2016-01-01

    Six free base tetrapyrrolic chromophores, three quinoline-annulated porphyrins and three morpholinobacteriochlorins, that absorb light in the near-IR range and possess, in comparison to regular porphyrins, unusually low fluorescence emission and 1O2 quantum yields were tested with respect to their efficacy as novel molecular photo-acoustic imaging contrast agents in a tissue phantom, providing an up to ~2.5-fold contrast enhancement over that of the benchmark contrast agent ICG. The testing protocol compares the photoacoustic signal output strength upon absorption of approximately the same light energy. Some relationships between photophysical parameters of the dyes and the resulting photoacoustic signal strength could be derived. PMID:24071709

  13. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Whiteman, Suzanne C.; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; El Haj, Alicia J.; Spiteri, Monica A.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment.

  14. Development of fluorescent contrast agents for optical imaging of mouse disease models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovar, J.; Simpson, M.; Schutz-Geschwender, A.; Xu, X.; Volcheck, W. M.; Sevick-Muraca, E.; Olive, D. M.

    2008-02-01

    Optical imaging is a rapidly developing field of research aimed at non-invasively interrogating animals for disease progression, determining the effects of a drug on a particular pathology, assessing the pharmacokinetic behavior of a drug, or identifying molecular biomarkers of disease. One of the key components of molecular imaging is the development of specific, targeted imaging contrast agents to assess these biological processes. The development of robust fluorochrome-labeled optical agents is a process that is often underestimated in terms of its complexity. We describe here the development process and performance issues for three different optical agents: IRDye 800CW EGF (epidermal growth factor), IRDye (R) 800CW 2-DG (2-deoxy D-glucose), and an IRDye 680 BoneTag TM. In vitro competitive assays were developed for two of the markers to demonstrate specificity. Specificity was confirmed in animal studies. Uptake of IRDye 800CW 2-DG was also examined by near-infrared confocal microscopy. Histological examinations were performed on target and non-target tissues following the completion of the imaging studies. The issues unique to the development of each labeled marker are discussed.

  15. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  16. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  17. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging. PMID:26511147

  18. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (<0.2 mm) and (ii) a new low noise amplifier incorporated into the ultrasonic probe and providing the noise equivalent pressure around 2 Pa resulting in increased signal-to-noise ratio and the optical absorption sensitivity of about 0.15 cm-1. We also improved scan time and the image reconstruction times. This prototype has been commercialized for a number of biomedical research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  19. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  20. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  1. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Yin, Xiezhen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy. PMID:23864011

  2. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    DOE PAGES

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form anmore » image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.« less

  3. Computed Tomography Imaging of Primary Lung Cancer in Mice Using a Liposomal-Iodinated Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Athreya, Khannan K.; Espinosa, Gabriela; Clark, Darin; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Li, Yifan; Kirsch, David G.; Johnson, G. Allan; Annapragada, Ananth; Ghaghada, Ketan B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of a liposomal-iodinated nanoparticle contrast agent and computed tomography (CT) imaging for characterization of primary nodules in genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer. Methods Primary lung cancers with mutations in K-ras alone (KrasLA1) or in combination with p53 (LSL-KrasG12D;p53FL/FL) were generated. A liposomal-iodine contrast agent containing 120 mg Iodine/mL was administered systemically at a dose of 16 µl/gm body weight. Longitudinal micro-CT imaging with cardio-respiratory gating was performed pre-contrast and at 0 hr, day 3, and day 7 post-contrast administration. CT-derived nodule sizes were used to assess tumor growth. Signal attenuation was measured in individual nodules to study dynamic enhancement of lung nodules. Results A good correlation was seen between volume and diameter-based assessment of nodules (R2>0.8) for both lung cancer models. The LSL-KrasG12D;p53FL/FL model showed rapid growth as demonstrated by systemically higher volume changes compared to the lung nodules in KrasLA1 mice (p<0.05). Early phase imaging using the nanoparticle contrast agent enabled visualization of nodule blood supply. Delayed-phase imaging demonstrated significant differential signal enhancement in the lung nodules of LSL-KrasG12D;p53FL/FL mice compared to nodules in KrasLA1 mice (p<0.05) indicating higher uptake and accumulation of the nanoparticle contrast agent in rapidly growing nodules. Conclusions The nanoparticle iodinated contrast agent enabled visualization of blood supply to the nodules during the early-phase imaging. Delayed-phase imaging enabled characterization of slow growing and rapidly growing nodules based on signal enhancement. The use of this agent could facilitate early detection and diagnosis of pulmonary lesions as well as have implications on treatment response and monitoring. PMID:22485175

  4. Clinical experience with technetium-99m teboroxime, a neutral, lipophilic myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W. )

    1990-10-16

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) teboroxime is a new technetium-based myocardial perfusion imaging agent (investigational code = SQ30217 (Cardiotec, Squibb Diagnostics)). A member of a class of neutral, lipophilic, technetium-containing complexes known as boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATO) complexes, this agent is chemically very different from the cationic tracer thallium-201 (Tl-201) and from the cationic technetium complex Tc-99m sestamibi (Cardiolite, Du Pont Imaging Agents). Tc-99m teboroxime has high myocardial extraction, rapid blood clearance, little lung uptake and rapid myocardial washout. A biexponential pattern of myocardial washout is demonstrated in animals and in man. Effective half-lives of the 2 washout components in man are 5.2 minutes and 3.8 hours and represent approximately 66 and 33% of the myocardial activity, respectively. The first half-life for the myocardium is approximately 11 minutes. As the agent washes out of the heart, hepatic uptake occurs, peaking at about 5 minutes after injection. The liver is the major organ of excretion and receives, along with the large bowel, the largest radiation dose. Rapid imaging protocols using standard cameras have achieved good myocardial counts from 3 planar views acquired over a 4- to 5-minute period or for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images acquired over a 10-minute period. An entire stress/rest procedure can be completed in 1 hour. Analysis of data from 155 patients from 4 centers using planar or SPECT imaging showed a sensitivity and specificity for blinded readings of 82 and 91%, respectively, when compared against overall clinical impression. 13 references.

  5. Improving Sensitivity in Ultrasound Molecular Imaging by Tailoring Contrast Agent Size Distribution: In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Jason E.; Gessner, Ryan; Miles, Iman; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging with ultrasound relies on microbubble contrast agents (MCAs) selectively adhering to a ligand-specific target. Prior studies have shown that only small quantities of microbubbles are retained at their target sites, therefore, enhancing contrast sensitivity to low concentrations of microbubbles is essential to improve molecular imaging techniques. In order to assess the effect of MCA diameter on imaging sensitivity, perfusion and molecular imaging studies were performed with microbubbles of varying size distributions. To assess signal improvement and MCA circulation time as a function of size and concentration, blood perfusion was imaged in rat kidneys using nontargeted size-sorted MCAs with a Siemens Sequoia ultrasound system (Siemans, Mountain View, CA) in cadence pulse sequencing (CPS) mode. Molecular imaging sensitivity improvements were studied with size-sorted αvβ3-targeted bubbles in both fibrosarcoma and R3230 rat tumor models. In perfusion imaging studies, video intensity and contrast persistence was ≈8 times and ≈3 times greater respectively, for “sorted 3-micron” MCAs (diameter, 3.3 ± 1.95 μm) when compared to “unsorted” MCAs (diameter, 0.9 ± 0.45 μm) at low concentrations. In targeted experiments, application of sorted 3-micron MCAs resulted in a ≈20 times video intensity increase over unsorted populations. Tailoring size-distributions results in substantial imaging sensitivity improvement over unsorted populations, which is essential in maximizing sensitivity to small numbers of MCAs for molecular imaging. PMID:20236606

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of bifunctional bisthiosemicarbazone 64Cu-complexes for the positron emission tomography imaging of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonnitcha, Paul D; Vāvere, Amy L; Lewis, Jason S; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2008-05-22

    The copper(II) bisthiosemicarbazonato complex, copper-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonate) (Cu-ATSM), has been used clinically as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for the delineation of hypoxia. Six novel, asymmetric bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from diacetyl-2-(4-N-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone)-3-(4-N-amino-3-thiosemicarbazone) (H2ATSM/A), one of which contained a nitroimidazole functionality, were radiolabeled with 64Cu (t1/2=12.7 h, beta+=19.3%). In vitro studies were performed on three of the compounds using EMT6 mammary carcinoma cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. All compounds displayed rapid cellular association and appreciable hypoxic selectivity with increased uptake under normoxic and hypoxic conditions when compared to 64Cu-ATSM. Biodistribution and small animal PET imaging studies were then carried out in vivo using two compounds in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice. The compounds showed high tumor uptake, but also substantial accumulation in the liver. These complexes demonstrate that H 2ATSM/A represents a novel and versatile synthetic platform that can be utilized to provide hypoxic cell selectivity through functionalization of the bisthiosemicarbazonate group.

  7. Review of Long-Wavelength Optical and NIR Imaging Materials: Contrast Agents, Fluorophores and Multifunctional Nano Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Pansare, Vikram; Hejazi, Shahram; Faenza, William; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of long wavelength and near infra-red (NIR) imaging has dramatically increased due to the desire to perform whole animal and deep tissue imaging. The adoption of NIR imaging is also growing rapidly due to the availability of targeted biological agents for diagnosis and basic medical research that can be imaged in vivo. The wavelength range of 650–1450 nm falls in the region of the spectrum with the lowest absorption in tissue and therefore enables the deepest tissue penetration. This is the wavelength range we focus on with this review. To operate effectively the imaging agents must both be excited and must emit in this long-wavelength window. We review the agents used both for imaging by absorption, scattering, and excitation (such as fluorescence). Imaging agents comprise both aqueous soluble and insoluble species, both organic and inorganic, and unimolecular and supramolecular constructs. The interest in multi-modal imaging, which involves delivery of actives, targeting, and imaging, requires nanocarriers or supramolecular assemblies. Nanoparticles for diagnostics also have advantages in increasing circulation time and increased imaging brightness relative to single molecule imaging agents. This has led to rapid advances in nanocarriers for long-wavelength, NIR imaging. PMID:22919122

  8. In vivo optical molecular imaging and analysis in mice using dorsal window chamber models applied to hypoxia, vasculature and fluorescent reporters

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M; Fontanella, Andrew N; Shan, Siqing; Hanna, Gabi; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Optical techniques for functional imaging in mice have a number of key advantages over other common imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography or computed tomography, including high resolution, low cost and an extensive library of available contrast agents and reporter genes. A major challenge to such work is the limited penetration depth imposed by tissue turbidity. We describe a window chamber technique by which these limitations can be avoided. This facilitates the study of a wide range of processes, with potential endpoints including longitudinal gene expression, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, and tumor growth and invasion. We further describe several quantitative imaging and analysis techniques for characterizing in vivo fluorescence properties and functional endpoints, including vascular morphology and oxygenation. The procedure takes ~2 h to complete, plus up to several weeks for tumor growth and treatment procedures. PMID:21886101

  9. Detection of viability of transplanted beta cells labeled with a novel contrast agent - polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Biao; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hai; Xie, Qiuping; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Chuanxin; Wu, Yulian

    2012-01-01

    Islets can be visualized on MRI by labeling with superparamagnetic contrast agent during the transplantation procedure. However, whether the signal intensity reflects the cell number and cellular viability has not been determined. We used a self-synthesized novel superparamagnetic contrast agent -polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO) - to label β-TC-6 cells (a mouse insulinoma cell line) or primary islets with commercial Feridex as a control. The labeling efficiency of two agents was compared by Prussian blue staining, intracellular iron content determination and MR scanning. Cells were exposed to hypoxia, high-glucose or exogenous H₂O₂ stimulation before/after PVP-SPIO labeling. Normal and injured cells were also transplanted into renal subcapsule. A clinically used 3.0 T MR scan was performed in vitro and 24 h post-transplantation to investigate the correlation between cellular viability and signal. Our PVP-SPIO displayed superior biocompatibility and magnetic properties. All of the cells could be labeled at 100 µg/ml iron concentration after 24 h incubation. At 100 µg/ml iron concentration, 1 × 10⁵ β cells labeled with PVP-SPIO could already be visualized in vitro by MRI, less than the detection threshold of Feridex. There existed a linear correlation between the number of labeled cells and R₂ value on the T₂ -weighted images. The signal intensity and the intracellular iron content declined along with the decreased viability of labeled cells. There was also a significant difference in signal intensity between injured and normal labeled cells after transplantation. From these results, we concluded that PVP-SPIO possessed superior cell labeling efficiency, and β cells could be labeled without compromising viability and function. The signal intensity on MRI might be a useful predictor to evaluate the number and the viability of PVP-SPIO-labeled cells.

  10. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  11. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS. PMID:22165665

  12. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    PubMed Central

    D’Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of novel tropane derivatives as potential PET imaging agents for the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hongwen; Zhu, Lin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zha, Zhihao; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of tropane derivatives containing a fluorinated tertiary amino or amide at the 2β position was synthesized, labeled with the positron-emitter fluorine-18 (T1/2 = 109.8 min), and tested as potential in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging agents. The corresponding chlorinated analogs were prepared and employed as precursors for radiolabeling leading to the fluorine-18-labeled derivatives via a one-step nucleophilic aliphatic substitution reaction. In vitro binding results showed that the 2β-amino compounds 6b, 6d and 7b displayed moderately high affinities to DAT (Ki < 10 nM). Biodistribution studies of [18F]6b and [18F]6d showed that the brain uptakes in rats were low. This is likely due to their low lipophilicities. Further structural modifications of these tropane derivatives will be needed to improve their in vivo properties as DAT imaging agents. PMID:22658558

  14. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis with nanoparticle-based fluorinated MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Palekar, Rohun U; Jallouk, Andrew P; Lanza, Gregory M; Pan, Hua; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    As atherosclerosis remains one of the most prevalent causes of patient mortality, the ability to diagnose early signs of plaque rupture and thrombosis represents a significant clinical need. With recent advances in nanotechnology, it is now possible to image specific molecular processes noninvasively with MRI, using various types of nanoparticles as contrast agents. In the context of cardiovascular disease, it is possible to specifically deliver contrast agents to an epitope of interest for detecting vascular inflammatory processes, which serve as predecessors to atherosclerotic plaque development. Herein, we review various applications of nanotechnology in detecting atherosclerosis using MRI, with an emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and fluorine imaging, along with theranostic prospects of nanotechnology in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26080701

  15. Development of Anti-EGF Receptor Peptidomimetics (AERP) as Tumor Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ponde, Datta E.; Su, ZiFen; Berezov, Alan; Zhang, Hongtao; Alavi, Abbas; Greene, Mark I.; Murali, Ramachandran

    2011-01-01

    EGFR is over-expressed in several solid tumors including breast, prostate, pancreas and lung cancers and is correlated to the metastasic potential of the tumor. Anti-EGFR receptor-binding peptidomimetics (AERP) were examined to assess the small molecule's potential use as tumor-specific imaging agents. The aim of this work was to design and characterize the binding specificity of the radiolabeled peptidomimetics to EGFR over-expressing cell lysate and to A431 xenograft tumors. Our newly designed peptidomimetic, AERP, was conjugated to DTPA and labeled with 99mTc. The in vivo tumor accumulation of [99mTc] DTPA-AERP-2 was 1.6 ± 0.1 %ID/g and tumor to muscle ratio was 5.5. Our studies suggest that this novel peptidomimetic, AERP-2, warrants further development as an EGFR-specific tumor-imaging agent. PMID:21392985

  16. Optical contrast agents and imaging systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Mark C.; Javier, David J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging has rapidly emerged as a discipline with the potential to impact fundamental biomedical research and clinical practice. Within this field, optical imaging offers several unique capabilities, based on the ability of cells and tissues to effect quantifiable changes in the properties of visible and near-infrared light. Beyond endogenous optical properties, the development of molecularly targeted contrast agents enables disease-specific morphologic and biochemical processes to be labeled with unique optical signatures. Optical imaging systems can then provide real-time visualization of pathophysiology at spatial scales from the sub-cellular to whole organ levels. In this article, we review fundamental techniques and recent developments in optical molecular imaging, emphasizing laboratory and clinical systems that aim to visualize the microscopic and macroscopic hallmarks of cancer. PMID:18712733

  17. Highly stabilized gadolinium chelates functionalized on metal nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Talha S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method for imaging and diagnosing tissue damage, organ function and the vascular system. Magnevist(TM) a complex of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Gd3+ is a clinically approved contrast agent for MRI. A derivative of DTPA was formed by the addition of two cysteine groups (DTPA-L-Cys) through amide linkage. The Gd complex of this ligand bonds with the silver surfaces through the cysteine thiols. GdDTPA-L-Cys was bound to ˜10nm diameter Ag nanoparticles for use as a multifunctional MRI contrast agent. The ligand and complex were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The silver construct was characterized by TEM, TGA and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The per metal complex r1 relaxivity of GdDTPA-L-Cys{Ag} greater than that of Magnavist(TM) with the same molarity for both compounds. The synthesis of a DTPA derivative is described that allows it to bind to silver or gold nanoparticles through a single thiol linkage (DTPASH). The resulting Gd complex, GdDTPASH, was bound to Ag nanoparticles to create a single monolayer on the surface. The construct was further stabilized in buffered solution with the addition of a thiolated PEG chain. The highly stabilized nanoparticle construct delivers a high payload of Gd compelex and is an effective T1 brightening agent. The production of this type of construct opens the way for engineered multimodal MRI contrast agents.

  18. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Williams, D. R.; Schallek, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  19. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  20. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  1. Chitosan oligosaccharide based Gd-DTPA complex as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Cao, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Zheng-rong; Hua, Ming-qing; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A new gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex (Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11) as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with fluorescence was synthesized. It was synthesized by the incorporation of 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA) and chitosan oligosaccharide (CSn; n=11) with low polydispersity index to DTPA anhydride and then chelated with gadolinium chloride. The structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). MRI measurements in vitro were evaluated. The results indicated that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 provided higher molar longitudinal relaxivity (r1) (12.95mM(-1)·s(-1)) than that of commercial Gd-DTPA (3.63mM(-1)·s(-1)) at 0.5T. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 also emitted fluorescence, and the intensity was much stronger than that of Gd-DTPA. Therefore, it can be meanwhile used in fluorescent imaging for improving the sensitivity in clinic diagnosis. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 as a potential contrast agent is preliminarily stable in vitro. The results of thermodynamic action between Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) illustrated that the binding process was exothermic and spontaneous, and the main force was van der Waals' interaction and hydrogen bond. The preliminary study suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 could be used in both magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging as a promising bimodal contrast agent.

  2. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-basedradiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-09-25

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Ourapproach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosinekinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emittingradioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. Allcompounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolarrange. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versusthe ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay usingan iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinityof the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinitiesranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P;lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compoundshave been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFRoverexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake buthighlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline wasnot metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadthof agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation forfuture research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent.

  3. The Feyrter cell in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Homeira; Smith, Paul; Heath, Donald

    1973-01-01

    Moosavi, H., Smith, P., and Heath, D. (1973).Thorax,28, 729-741. The Feyrter cell in hypoxia. It is clear that the bronchial tree has functions beyond the mere conduction of air into the alveolar spaces. In addition to the familiar ciliated respiratory epithelial cells the bronchus is lined by non-ciliated Clara and Feyrter cells. In the present study we investigated the histological and ultrastructural features of the bronchial argyrophilic (Feyrter) cell of the neonatal rat. On electron microscopy this cell has all the features of an APUD cell which is associated with the secretion of polypeptide hormones. It bears a close ultrastructural resemblance to the chief cell of the carotid body and shows the same changes in its membrane-bound bodies on exposure to chronic hypoxia. These are strong grounds for believing that the bronchi and bronchioles have either a chemoreceptor or an endocrine function in the neonatal period. Images PMID:4787985

  4. Hypoxia-sensitive bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate]/chitosan nanoparticles and their phosphorescence tumor imaging in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yun; Zhang, Shaojuan; Jia, Menghui; Liu, Yang; Shang, Jin; Guo, Youmin; Xu, Jianhua; Wu, Daocheng

    2013-11-01

    A new hypoxia-sensitive coordination compound, bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate)], hereafter denoted as (btp)2Ir(PBCA), is synthesized and characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/chitosan [(btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS] nanoparticles (NPs) with a core-shell structure are prepared by a two-step fabrication process. The size distributions of these NPs are measured with a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology is observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The functional groups on the surface are confirmed by FTIR. Phosphorescence spectra are obtained and lifetimes are determined with a spectrophotofluorometer and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus, respectively. HeLa and CT26 cell lines are used to examine the cytotoxicity by the MTT assay, as well as to determine the imaging capability of the samples in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. Tumor-bearing mouse models of colon adenocarcinoma are used for tumor imaging in vivo, and the imaging effect is evaluated with a Maestro 2 fluorescence imaging system. Compared with the hypoxia-associated probe bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium(acetylacetonate) (BTP), the phosphorescence lifetime of (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs significantly decreases, but the hypoxia-sensitivity increases after preparation of NPs. Apart from the significantly lower cytotoxicity, (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs also enhance the tumor imaging effect by more than 10 times, maintaining the phosphorescence signal in tumor tissue for over 24 h and significantly decreasing the phosphorescence signal in normal tissue in vivo compared with the BTP probe.A new hypoxia-sensitive coordination compound, bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate)], hereafter denoted as (btp)2Ir(PBCA), is synthesized and characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform

  5. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  6. Preclinical evaluation of biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi

    Macromolecular contrast agents have been shown to be superior to small molecular weight contrast agents for MRI in blood pool imaging, tumor diagnosis and grading. However, none has been approved by the FDA because they circulate in the bloodstream much longer than small molecular weight contrast agents and result in high tissue accumulation of toxic Gd(III) ions. Biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents (BMCA) were invented to alleviate the toxic accumulation. They have a cleavable disulfide bond based backbone that can be degraded in vivo and excreted out of the body via renal filtration. Furthermore, the side chain of the backbone can be modified to achieve various degradation rates. Three BMCA, (Gd-DTPA)-cystamine copolymers (GDCC), Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), and Gd-DTPA cystine diethyl ester copolymers (GDCEP), were evaluated as blood pool contrast agents in a rat model. They have excellent blood pool enhancement, preferred pharmacokinetics, and only minimal long-term tissue retention of toxic Gd(III) ions. GDCC and GDCP, the lead agents with desired degradation rates, with molecular weights of 20 KDa and 70 KDa, were chosen for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to differentiate human prostate tumor models of different malignancy and growth rates. GDCC and GDCP could differentiate these tumor models, providing more accurate estimations of plasma volume, flow leakage rate, and permeability surface area product than a small molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA-BMA when compared to the prototype macromolecular contrast agent albumin-Gd-DTPA. GDCC was favored for its neutral charge side chain and reasonable uptake rate by the tumors. GDCC with a molecular weight of 40 KDa (GDCC-40, above the renal filtration cutoff size) was used to assess the efficacy of two photothermal therapies (interstitial and indocyanine green enhanced). GDCC-40 provided excellent tumor enhancement shortly after its injection. Acute tumor response (4 hr) after therapies

  7. Experimental evaluation of a hyperspectral imager for near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. S.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems have the potential to combine morphological and spectral information to provide detailed and high sensitivity readouts in biological and medical applications. As HSI enables simultaneous detection in several spectral bands, the technology has significant potential for use in real-time multiplexed contrast agent studies. Examples include tumor detection in intraoperative and endoscopic imaging as well as histopathology. A multiplexed readout from multiple disease targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. Here, we evaluate a commercial, compact, near-infrared HSI sensor that has the potential to enable low cost, video rate HSI for multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent studies in biomedical applications. The hyperspectral imager, based on a monolithically integrated Fabry-Perot etalon, has 70 spectral bands between 600-900 nm, making it ideal for this application. Initial calibration of the imager was performed to determine wavelength band response, quantum efficiency and the effect of F-number on the spectral response. A platform for wide-field fluorescence imaging in reflectance using fluorophore specific LED excitation was then developed. The applicability of the imaging platform for simultaneous readout of multiple fluorophore signals was demonstrated using a dilution series of Alexa Fluor 594 and Alexa Fluor 647, showing that nanomolar fluorophore concentrations can be detected. Our results show that the HSI system can clearly resolve the emission spectra of the two fluorophores in mixtures of concentrations across several orders of magnitude, indicating a high dynamic range performance. We therefore conclude that the HSI sensor tested here is suitable for detecting fluorescence in biomedical imaging applications.

  8. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  9. PEGylated polyethylenimine as enhanced T₁ contrast agent for efficient magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengyuan; Wu, Zhenkai; Chen, Xiongsheng; Jia, Lianshun; Zhu, Wei

    2014-07-23

    Currently used small molecular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrast agents (CAs) in clinics have relatively short half-lives, which has limited the acquisition of high-resolution organ and angiographic images. Therefore, development of a facile strategy for the synthesis of long-circulating CAs with the transforming potential for MR imaging still remains a great challenge. Here we communicate the design and synthesis of PEGylated polyethylenimine (PEI) and its application as enhanced T1 CA for the long-circulating blood pool as well as efficient organ and tumor imaging. In this study, PEI was covalently grafted with gadolinium (Gd(III)) chelator and mPEG-NHS, followed by acetylation of the remaining amines to improve biocompatibility and prolong circulation time. With the relatively long circulation time (3.8 h), the formed multifunctional PEI (PEI.NHAc-DTPA(Gd(III))-mPEG) can be used as an enhanced T1 CA for blood pool and major organ imaging, and could be cleared from the body 96 h post administration through the urinary system. Importantly, the PEI.NHAc-DTPA(Gd(III))-mPEG complexes displayed a strong T1 contrast effect for tumor imaging through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. These findings suggest that the synthesized PEI.NHAc-DTPA(Gd(III))-mPEG may be used as a promising CA for T1 MR imaging of various biological systems.

  10. Hypoxia-sensitive bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C(3'))iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate]/chitosan nanoparticles and their phosphorescence tumor imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yun; Zhang, Shaojuan; Jia, Menghui; Liu, Yang; Shang, Jin; Guo, Youmin; Xu, Jianhua; Wu, Daocheng

    2013-12-21

    A new hypoxia-sensitive coordination compound, bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C(3'))iridium[poly(n-butyl cyanoacrylate)], hereafter denoted as (btp)2Ir(PBCA), is synthesized and characterized by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/chitosan [(btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS] nanoparticles (NPs) with a core-shell structure are prepared by a two-step fabrication process. The size distributions of these NPs are measured with a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology is observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The functional groups on the surface are confirmed by FTIR. Phosphorescence spectra are obtained and lifetimes are determined with a spectrophotofluorometer and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus, respectively. HeLa and CT26 cell lines are used to examine the cytotoxicity by the MTT assay, as well as to determine the imaging capability of the samples in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. Tumor-bearing mouse models of colon adenocarcinoma are used for tumor imaging in vivo, and the imaging effect is evaluated with a Maestro 2 fluorescence imaging system. Compared with the hypoxia-associated probe bis(2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C(3'))iridium(acetylacetonate) (BTP), the phosphorescence lifetime of (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs significantly decreases, but the hypoxia-sensitivity increases after preparation of NPs. Apart from the significantly lower cytotoxicity, (btp)2Ir(PBCA)/CS NPs also enhance the tumor imaging effect by more than 10 times, maintaining the phosphorescence signal in tumor tissue for over 24 h and significantly decreasing the phosphorescence signal in normal tissue in vivo compared with the BTP probe.

  11. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  12. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  13. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  14. Biocompatible polypyrrole nanoparticles as a novel organic photoacoustic contrast agent for deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Deng, Zijian; Li, Yanyan; Li, Changhui; Wang, Jinrui; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-05-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a hybrid, nonionizing imaging modality because of its satisfactory spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast. Here, we demonstrate the application of a novel organic PAT contrast agent based on polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPy NPs). Monodisperse PPy NPs are ~46 nm in diameter with strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range, which allowed visualization of PPy NP-containing agar gel embedded in chicken breast muscle at a depth of ~4.3 cm. Compared with PAT images based on the intrinsic optical contrast in mice, the PAT images acquired within 1 h after intravenous administration of PPy NPs showed the brain vasculature with greater clarity than hemoglobin in blood. Preliminary results showed no acute toxicity to the vital organs (heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys) in mice following a single imaging dose of PPy NPs. Our results indicate that PPy NPs are promising contrast agents for PAT with good biocompatibility, high spatial resolution and enhanced sensitivity.

  15. uPAR-targeted Optical Imaging Contrasts as Theranostic Agents for Tumor Margin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lily; Sajja, Hari Krishna; Cao, Zehong; Qian, Weiping; Bender, Laura; Marcus, Adam I.; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wood, William C.; Wang, Y. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Complete removal of tumors by surgery is the most important prognostic factor for cancer patients with the early stage cancers. The ability to identify invasive tumor edges of the primary tumor, locally invaded small tumor lesions, and drug resistant residual tumors following neoadjuvant therapy during surgery should significantly reduce the incidence of local tumor recurrence and improve survival of cancer patients. In this study, we report that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) are the ligand/cell surface target pair for the development of targeted optical imaging probes for enhancing imaging contrasts in the tumor border. Recombinant peptides of the amino terminal fragment (ATF) of the receptor binding domain of uPA were labeled with near infrared fluorescence (NIR) dye molecules either as peptide-imaging or peptide-conjugated nanoparticle imaging probes. Systemic delivery of the uPAR-targeted imaging probes in mice bearing orthotopic human breast or pancreatic tumor xenografts or mouse mammary tumors led to the accumulation of the probes in the tumor and stromal cells, resulting in strong signals for optical imaging of tumors and identification of tumor margins. Histological analysis showed that a high level of uPAR-targeted nanoparticles was present in the tumor edge or active tumor stroma immediately adjacent to the tumor cells. Furthermore, following targeted therapy using uPAR-targeted theranostic nanoparticles, residual tumors were detectable by optical imaging through the imaging contrasts produced by NIR-dye-labeled theranostic nanoparticles in drug resistant tumor cells. Therefore, results of our study support the potential of the development of uPAR-targeted imaging and theranostic agents for image-guided surgery. PMID:24396518

  16. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  17. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (< 1 g) and early stage (≤ stage II) masses to prevent rapid progression to late stages and ultimately death. The second challenge is differentiating malignant from benign tissue to avoid costly and invasive surgeries (19.5 surgeries are required to find 1 cancer even with multiple screenings). First-line diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and serum marker tests (e.g. CA-125) aid in diagnosis but they lack the sensitivity and specificity required to overcome both challenges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a second-line diagnostic aided by gadolinium based contrast agents (CAs), offers higher resolution pictures for classifying indeterminate ovarian masses. But as currently practiced, MRI still lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to alter patient outcomes. In this work we develop a new paradigm for EOC diagnosis that targets the prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  18. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM-1 s-1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles.

  19. Protein MRI contrast agent with unprecedented metal selectivity and sensitivity for liver cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Jiang, Jie; Hubbard, Kendra; Hekmatyar, Khan; Langley, Jason; Salarian, Mani; Long, Robert C; Bryant, Robert G; Hu, Xiaoping Philip; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-05-26

    With available MRI techniques, primary and metastatic liver cancers that are associated with high mortality rates and poor treatment responses are only diagnosed at late stages, due to the lack of highly sensitive contrast agents without Gd(3+) toxicity. We have developed a protein contrast agent (ProCA32) that exhibits high stability for Gd(3+) and a 10(11)-fold greater selectivity for Gd(3+) over Zn(2+) compared with existing contrast agents. ProCA32, modified from parvalbumin, possesses high relaxivities (r1/r2: 66.8 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1)/89.2 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1) per particle). Using T1- and T2-weighted, as well as T2/T1 ratio imaging, we have achieved, for the first time (to our knowledge), robust MRI detection of early liver metastases as small as ∼0.24 mm in diameter, much smaller than the current detection limit of 10-20 mm. Furthermore, ProCA32 exhibits appropriate in vivo preference for liver sinusoidal spaces and pharmacokinetics for high-quality imaging. ProCA32 will be invaluable for noninvasive early detection of primary and metastatic liver cancers as well as for monitoring treatment and guiding therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery.

  20. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  1. Enhancing the depth of tissue microscope imaging using two-photon excitation of the second singlet state of fluorescent agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Shi, Lingyan; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    Increasing the depth to image inside tissue is critical in biomedicine. Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S2) state of a group of fluorescent agents with near infrared emission, Chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Indocyanine green (ICG), is used to extend the optical imaging regime of 2PM into "tissue optical window" for deep tissue penetration. The fast nonradiative from S2 to S1 yields both emission and absorption wavelengths in the therapeutic window. The salient feature is to place both the 2P excitation and emission wavelengths of the imaging agents falling into the "tissue optical window". As a first step to achieve deeper optical imaging, Chl a and ICG are investigated and demonstrated as imaging agents for 2P S2 excitation microscope image.

  2. A Perspective on Vascular Disrupting Agents that Interact with Tubulin: Preclinical Tumor Imaging and Biological Assessment#

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Liu, Li; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment provides a rich source of potential targets for selective therapeutic intervention with properly designed anticancer agents. Significant physiological differences exist between the microvessels that nourish tumors and those that supply healthy tissue. Selective drug-mediated damage of these tortuous and chaotic microvessels starves a tumor of necessary nutrients and oxygen and eventually leads to massive tumor necrosis. Vascular targeting strategies in oncology are divided into two separate groups: angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs) and vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The mechanisms of action between these two classes of compounds are profoundly distinct. The AIAs inhibit the actual formation of new vessels, while the VDAs damage and/or destroy existing tumor vasculature. One subset of small-molecule VDAs functions by inhibiting the assembly of tubulin into microtubules, thus causing morphology changes to the endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature, triggered by a cascade of cell signaling events. Ultimately this results in catastrophic damage to the vessels feeding the tumor. The rapid emergence and subsequent development of the VDA field over the past decade has led to the establishment of a synergistic combination of preclinical state-of-the-art tumor imaging and biological evaluation strategies that are often indicative of future clinical efficacy for a given VDA. This review focuses on an integration of the appropriate biochemical and biological tools necessary to assess (preclinically) new small-molecule, tubulin active VDAs for their potential to be clinically effective anticancer agents. PMID:21321746

  3. Conception of the first magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents: a brief history.

    PubMed

    de Haën, C

    2001-08-01

    About 20 years ago, a technological innovation process started that eventually led to the affirmation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, which are used today in about 25% of all MRI procedures, as medical diagnostic tools. The process began with exploration of various technical possibilities and the conception in the years 1981 to 1982 of two types of agents (soluble paramagnetic chelates and protection colloid-stabilized colloidal particle solutions of magnetite) that eventually found embodiments in commercially available products. The pioneering products that eventually reached the market were gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist, Schering AG) and the ferumoxides (Endorem, Guerbet SA; or Ferridex , Berlex Laboratories Inc.). The history of the conception phase of the technology is reconstructed here, focusing on the social dynamics rather than on technological aspects. In the period 1981 to 1982, a number of independent inventors from industry and academia conceived of water-soluble paramagnetic chelates and protection colloid-stabilized colloidal solutions of small particles of magnetite, both of acceptable tolerability, as contrast agents for MRI. Priorities on patents conditioned the further course of events. The analyzed history helps in understanding the typical roles of different institutions in technological innovation. The foundation of MRI contrast agent technology in basic science clearly was laid in academia. During the conception of practical products, industry assumed a dominant role. Beginning with the radiological evaluation of candidate products, the collaboration between industry and academia became essential.

  4. The effect of triamcinolone acetonide on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in mice using a hypoxia visualization bio-imaging probe

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Shinsuke; Masuda, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shinsuke; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Nagasawa, Hideko; kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hara, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic stress is a risk factor of ocular neovascularization. Hypoxia visualization may provide clues regarding the underlying cause of angiogenesis. Recently, we developed a hypoxia-specific probe, protein transduction domain-oxygen-dependent degradation domain-HaloTag-Rhodamine (POH-Rhodamine). In this study, we observed the localization of HIF-1α proteins by immunohistochemistry and the fluorescence of POH-Rhodamine on RPE-choroid flat mounts. Moreover, we compared the localization of POH-Rhodamine with pimonidazole which is a standard reagent for detecting hypoxia. Next, we investigated the effects of triamcinolone acetonide (TAAC) against visual function that was evaluated by recording electroretinogram (ERG) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) development. Mice were given laser-induced CNV using a diode laser and treated with intravitreal injection of TAAC. Finally, we investigated POH-Rhodamine on CNV treated with TAAC. In this study, the fluorescence of POH-Rhodamine and HIF-1α were co-localized in laser-irradiated sites, and both the POH-Rhodamine and pimonidazole fluorescent areas were almost the same. Intravitreal injection of TAAC restored the reduced ERG b-wave but not the a-wave and decreased the mean CNV area. Furthermore, the area of the POH-Rhodamine-positive cells decreased. These findings indicate that POH-Rhodamine is useful for evaluating tissue hypoxia in a laser-induced CNV model, suggesting that TAAC suppressed CNV through tissue hypoxia improvement. PMID:25927172

  5. Optimizing Hypoxia Detection and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cameron J.; Evans, Sydney M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies using Eppendorf® needle sensors have invariably documented the resistance of hypoxic human tumors to therapy. These studies first documented the need for individual patient measurement of hypoxia, since hypoxia varied from tumor-to-tumor. Furthermore, hypoxia in sarcomas & cervical cancer leads to distant metastasis or local/regional spread, respectively. For various reasons, the field has moved away from direct needle-sensor oxygen measurements to indirect assays (HIF-related changes; bioreductive metabolism) and the latter can be imaged non-invasively. Many of hypoxia’s detrimental therapeutic effects are reversible in mice but little treatment-improvement in hypoxic human tumors has been seen. The question is why? What factors cause human tumors to be refractory to anti-hypoxia strategies? We suggest the primary cause to be the complexity of hypoxia formation and its characteristics. Three basic types of hypoxia exist, encompassing various diffusional (distance from perfused vessel), temporal (on/off cycling) and perfusional (blood-flow efficiency) limitations. Surprisingly, there is no current information on their relative prevalence in human tumors and even animal models. This is important because different hypoxia sub-types are predicted to require different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, but the implications of this remain unknown. Even more challenging, no agreement exists for the best way to measure hypoxia. Some results even suggest that hypoxia is unlikely to be targetable therapeutically. In this review, the authors will revisit various critical aspects of this field that are sometimes forgotten or misrepresented in the recent literature. Since most current non-invasive imaging studies involve PET-isotope-labelled 2-nitroimidazoles, we will emphasize key findings made in our studies using EF5 [2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetamide] and F18-labelled EF5. These will show the importance of

  6. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Terahertz Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyeongmun; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byungkyu; Lee, Kwangyeol; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2011-04-01

    For the application of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles as terahertz contrast agents, their optical properties in a solvent were studied using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The power absorption and refractive index of the samples were measured with various concentrations of nanoparticles. The power absorption was extremely large, as much as three orders of magnitude higher than that of water, so that a few ppms of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were distinguished in terms of their power absorption capacity. The results show that the interaction between the terahertz electromagnetic waves and the Gd2O3 nanoparticles is strong enough to allow their exploitation as contrast agents for terahertz medical imaging.

  7. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  8. Synthesis, Radiolabeling, and Biological Evaluation of Peptide LIKKPF Functionalized with HYNIC as Apoptosis Imaging Agent.

    PubMed

    Khoshbakht, Sepideh; Beiki, Davood; Geramifar, Parham; Kobarfard, Farzad; Sabzevari, Omid; Amini, Mohsen; Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Shahhosseini, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive method of detecting exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the external surface of the plasma membrane such as nuclear imaging could assist the diagnosis and therapy of apoptosis related pathologies. The most studied imaging agent for apoptosis is Annexin V so far. Because of limitations of Annexin V other agents have been introduced such as small peptides and molecules. Radiopeptides that have affinity and bind to PS are good candidates for noninvasive imaging of apoptosis. The LIKKPF, introduced by Burtea et al, with nanomolar affinity for PS, was used as templete. The biological properties of LIKKPF radiolabeled with Tc-99 m was assessed in-vitro using apoptotic Jurkat cells and in-vivo using mouse model of liver apoptosis. The radiolabeled LIKKPF with (99m)Tc was stable in human serum at 37˚C for at least 2 h. Results showed that the radiolabeled LIKKPF has less affinity to PS compare to original phage peptide, but high enough for specific binding to apoptotic cells in-vitro and in-vivo. It is concluded that the less affinity of radiolabeled LIKKPF might be attributed to hydrophobicity of peptide. The future peptides should be more hydrophobic compare to LIKKPF. PMID:27642312

  9. Virus-mimicking nano-constructs as a contrast agent for near infrared photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-02-01

    We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice.We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice. Electronic supplemental information (ESI) available: Information on experimental procedure for fabrication of the nano-constructs, photoacoustic imaging, and immunogenic studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34124k

  10. Gold nanorods as contrast agents for biological imaging: optical properties, surface conjugation, and photothermal effects†

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ling; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanorods (NRs) have plasmon-resonant absorption and scattering in the near-infrared (NIR) region, making them attractive probes for in vitro and in vivo imaging. In the cellular environment, NRs can provide scattering contrast for darkfield microscopy, or emit a strong two-photon luminescence (TPL) due to plasmon-enhanced two-photon absorption. NRs have also been employed in biomedical imaging modalities such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) or photoacoustic tomography (PAT). Careful control over surface chemistry enhances the capacity of NRs as biological imaging agents by enabling cell-specific targeting, and by increasing their dispersion stability and circulation lifetimes. NRs can also efficiently convert optical energy into heat, and inflict localized damage to tumor cells. Laser-induced heating of NRs can disrupt cell membrane integrity and homeostasis, resulting in Ca2+ influx and the depolymerization of the intracellular actin network. The combination of plasmon-resonant optical properties, intense local photothermal effects, and robust surface chemistry render gold NRs as promising theragnostic agents. PMID:19161395

  11. Lanthanide Phytanates: Liquid-Crystalline Phase Behavior, Colloidal Particle Dispersions, and Potential as Medical Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, Charlotte E.; Panchagnula, Venkateswarlu; Weerawardena, Asoka; Waddington, Lynne J.; Kennedy, Danielle F.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2010-08-23

    Lanthanide salts of phytanic acid, an isoprenoid-type amphiphile, have been synthesized and characterized. Elemental analysis and FTIR spectroscopy were used to confirm the formed product and showed that three phytanate anions are complexed with one lanthanide cation. The physicochemical properties of the lanthanide phytanates were investigated using DSC, XRD, SAXS, and cross-polarized optical microscopy. Several of the hydrated salts form a liquid-crystalline hexagonal columnar mesophase at room temperature, and samarium(III) phytanate forms this phase even in the absence of water. Select lanthanide phytanates were dispersed in water, and cryo-TEM images indicate that some structure has been retained in the dispersed phase. NMR relaxivity measurements were conducted on these systems. It has been shown that a particulate dispersion of gadolinium(III) phytanate displays proton relaxivity values comparable to those of a commercial contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and a colloidal dispersion of europium(III) phytanate exhibits the characteristics of a fluorescence imaging agent.

  12. Near-infrared Au nanorods in photodynamic therapy, hyperthermia agents, and near-infrared optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Shuo; Chang, Chich-Neng; Chang, Yi-Ting; Yang, Meng-Heng; Chien, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Shean-Jen; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    The development of multifunctional nanomaterials is currently a topic of interest in the field of nanotechnology. Integrated systems that incorporate therapeutics, molecular targeting, and diagnostic imaging capabilities are considered to be the next generation of multifunctional nanomedicine. In this work, we present the first example of using Au nanorods simultaneously serving not only as photodynamic and photothermal agents to destroy A549 malignant cells but also as optical contrast agents simultaneously to monitor cellular image. Au nanorods were successfully conjugated with hydrophilic photosensitizer, indocyanine green (ICG), to achieve photodynamic therapy (PDT) and hyperthermia. With the combination of PDT and hyperthermia proved to be efficiently killing cancer cells as compared to PDT or hyperthermia treatment alone and enhanced the effectiveness of photodestruction. Moreover, Au nanorods conjugated with ICG displayed high chemical stability and simultaneously acted as a promising cellular image probe. As a result, the preparation of Au nanorods conjugated with photosensitizers as well as their use in biomedical applications is valuable developments in multifunctional nanomaterials.

  13. Synthesis, Radiolabeling, and Biological Evaluation of Peptide LIKKPF Functionalized with HYNIC as Apoptosis Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Khoshbakht, Sepideh; Beiki, Davood; Geramifar, Parham; Kobarfard, Farzad; Sabzevari, Omid; Amini, Mohsen; Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Shahhosseini, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive method of detecting exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the external surface of the plasma membrane such as nuclear imaging could assist the diagnosis and therapy of apoptosis related pathologies. The most studied imaging agent for apoptosis is Annexin V so far. Because of limitations of Annexin V other agents have been introduced such as small peptides and molecules. Radiopeptides that have affinity and bind to PS are good candidates for noninvasive imaging of apoptosis. The LIKKPF, introduced by Burtea et al, with nanomolar affinity for PS, was used as templete. The biological properties of LIKKPF radiolabeled with Tc-99 m was assessed in-vitro using apoptotic Jurkat cells and in-vivo using mouse model of liver apoptosis. The radiolabeled LIKKPF with 99mTc was stable in human serum at 37˚C for at least 2 h. Results showed that the radiolabeled LIKKPF has less affinity to PS compare to original phage peptide, but high enough for specific binding to apoptotic cells in-vitro and in-vivo. It is concluded that the less affinity of radiolabeled LIKKPF might be attributed to hydrophobicity of peptide. The future peptides should be more hydrophobic compare to LIKKPF. PMID:27642312

  14. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer. PMID:26961312

  15. Nerve-highlighting fluorescent contrast agents for image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L; Nasr, Khaled A; Fish, Kenneth M; Khullar, Onkar; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Siclovan, Tiberiu M; Johnson, Bruce F; Barnhardt, Nicole E; Tan Hehir, Cristina A; Frangioni, John V

    2011-04-01

    Nerve damage is the major morbidity of many surgeries, resulting in chronic pain, loss of function, or both. The sparing of nerves during surgical procedures is a vexing problem because surrounding tissue often obscures them. To date, systemically administered nerve-highlighting contrast agents that can be used for nerve-sparing image-guided surgery have not been reported. In the current study, physicochemical and optical properties of 4,4'-[(2-methoxy-1,4-phenylene)di-(1E)-2,1-ethenediyl]bis-benzenamine (BMB) and a newly synthesized, red-shifted derivative 4-[(1E)-2-[4-[(1E)-2-[4-aminophenyl]ethenyl]-3-methoxyphenyl]ethenyl]-benzonitrile (GE3082) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both agents crossed the blood-nerve barrier and blood-brain barrier and rendered myelinated nerves fluorescent after a single systemic injection. Although both BMB and GE3082 also exhibited significant uptake in white adipose tissue, GE3082 underwent a hypsochromic shift in adipose tissue that provided a means to eliminate the unwanted signal using hyperspectral deconvolution. Dose and kinetic studies were performed in mice to determine the optimal dose and drug-imaging interval. The results were confirmed in rat and pig, with the latter used to demonstrate, for the first time, simultaneous fluorescence imaging of blood vessels and nerves during surgery using the FLARE™ (Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration) imaging system. These results lay the foundation for the development of ideal nerve-highlighting fluorophores for image-guided surgery.

  16. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  17. Metabolic Imaging to Assess Treatment Response to Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Serkova, Natalie J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents were considered the basis of anticancer treatment for patients with metastatic tumors. A decrease in tumor burden, assessed by volumetric computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), was considered as a radiological response to cytotoxic chemotherapies. In addition to RECIST-based dimensional measurements, a metabolic response to cytotoxic drugs can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoro-thymidine (FLT) as a radioactive tracer for drug-disrupted DNA synthesis. The decreased 18FLT-PET uptake is often seen concurrently with increased apparent diffusion coefficients by diffusion-weighted imaging due to chemotherapy-induced changes in tumor cellularity. Recently, the discovery of molecular origins of tumorogenesis led to the introduction of novel signal transduction inhibitors (STIs). STIs are targeted cytostatic agents; their effect is based on a specific biological inhibition with no immediate cell death. As such, tumor size is not anymore a sensitive end point for a treatment response to STIs; novel physiological imaging end points are desirable. For receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as modulators of the downstream signaling pathways, an almost immediate inhibition in glycolytic activity (the Warburg effect) and phospholipid turnover (the Kennedy pathway) has been seen by metabolic imaging in the first 24 h of treatment. The quantitative imaging end points by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolic PET (including 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, FDG, and total choline) provide an early treatment response to targeted STIs, before a reduction in tumor burden can be seen. PMID:27471678

  18. Confocal microendoscopy: Characterization of imaging bundles, fluorescent contrast agents, and early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovich, Joshua Anthony

    . No significant difference was determined between the groups. These data provide preliminary results on determining the effect of these dyes on living tissues. Preliminary results of a clinical trial are presented showing in-vivo use of the CME for imaging of the ovaries. This is the first portion of a two part study to demonstrate the clinical diagnosis potential of the CME system. A mobile version of the bench-top CME was modified to be used in the clinic. Fluorescein sodium is used as an initial contrast agent in these studies to demonstrate fluorescence imaging. Twenty patients were successfully imaged, and results of this study have allowed progression to a clinical validation study showing the diagnostic capabilities of the CME.

  19. High density lipoprotein-based contrast agents for multimodal imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Skajaa, Torjus; Cormode, David P.; Falk, Erling; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Lipoproteins, natural nanoparticles, have a well-recognized biological role and are highly suitable as a platform for delivering imaging agents. The ease with which both the exterior and interior of the particles can be modified permits the creation of multifunctional nanoparticles for imaging as well as the delivery of therapeutics. Importantly, their endogenous nature may make them biocompatible, biodegradable and allows them to avoid the recognition of the reticuloendothelial system. In particular, high density lipoproteins (HDL) are of interest, because of their small size they can easily cross the endothelium and penetrate the underlying tissue. We summarize here the progress in establishing HDL as a vector for delivering a variety of diagnostically active materials to vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in mouse models of atherosclerosis. By loading various types of image-enhancing compounds into either the core or surface of HDL, they can be visualized by different imaging modalities (MRI, CT, optical). By re-routing of HDL away from plaque macrophages, imaging of biological processes in diseases besides atherosclerosis may also be achieved. PMID:19815819

  20. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  1. Radiolabeled Phosphonium Salts as Mitochondrial Voltage Sensors for Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenylphosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed. PMID:27540422

  2. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P.; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W. David; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Brigman, Brian E.; Kirsch, David G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  3. Hypoxia in Diabetic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is now a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In addition, DN accounts for the increased mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and then patients without DN achieve long-term survival compatible with general population. Hypoxia represents an early event in the development and progression of DN, and hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF-) 1 mediates the metabolic responses to renal hypoxia. Diabetes induces the “fraternal twins” of hypoxia, that is, pseudohypoxia and hypoxia. The kidneys are susceptible to hyperoxia because they accept 20% of the cardiac output. Therefore, the kidneys have specific vasculature to avoid hyperoxia, that is, AV oxygen shunting. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) sirtuins are seven mammalian proteins, SIRTs 1–7, which are known to modulate longevity and metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that some isoforms of sirtuins inhibit the activation of HIF by deacetylation or noncatalyzing effects. The kidneys, which have a vascular system that protects them against hyperoxia, unfortunately experience extraordinary hypernutrition today. Then, an unexpected overload of glucose augments the oxygen consumption, which ironically results in hypoxia. This review highlights the primary role of HIF in diabetic kidneys for the metabolic adaptation to diabetes-induced hypoxia. PMID:25054148

  4. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-03-28

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma.

  5. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  6. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  7. Toward hypoxia-selective rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    North, Andrea J; Hayne, David J; Schieber, Christine; Price, Katherine; White, Anthony R; Crouch, Peter J; Rigopoulos, Angela; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Scott, Andrew M; White, Jonathan M; Ackermann, Uwe; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of preparing hypoxia-selective imaging and therapeutic agents, technetium(I) and rhenium(I) tricarbonyl complexes with pyridylhydrazone, dipyridylamine, and pyridylaminocarboxylate ligands containing nitrobenzyl or nitroimidazole functional groups have been prepared. The rhenium tricarbonyl complexes were synthesized with short reaction times using microwave irradiation. Rhenium tricarbonyl complexes with deprotonated p-nitrophenyl pyridylhydrazone ligands are luminescent, and this has been used to track their uptake in HeLa cells using confocal fluorescent microscopy. Selected rhenium tricarbonyl complexes displayed higher uptake in hypoxic cells when compared to normoxic cells. A (99m)Tc tricarbonyl complex with a dipyridylamine ligand bearing a nitroimidazole functional group is stable in human serum and was shown to localize in a human renal cell carcinoma (RCC; SK-RC-52) tumor in a mouse.

  8. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth creates a state of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment and results in release of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HiF-1α) in the local milieu. Hypoxia inducible factor activity is deregulated in many human cancers, especially those that are highly hypoxic. In multiple myeloma (MM) in initial stages of disease establishment, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment supports the initial survival and growth of the myeloma cells. Hypoxic tumour cells are usually resistant to radiotherapy and most conventional chemotherapeutic agents, rendering them highly aggressive and metastatic. Therefore, HIF is an attractive, although challenging, therapeutic target in MM directly or indirectly in recent years. PMID:26900575

  9. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner. PMID:26179212

  10. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  11. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice. PMID:27478927

  12. Contrast Agent Dose Effects in Cerebral Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alger, Jeffry R.; Schaewe, Timothy J.; Lai, Tom C.; Frew, Andrew J.; Vespa, Paul M.; Etchepare, Maria; Liebeskind, David S.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Kidwell, S. Chelsea

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the contrast agent dose sensitivity of hemodynamic parameters derived from brain dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). Materials and Methods Sequential DSC-MRI (1.5T gradient-echo echo-planar imaging using an echo time of 61–64 msec) was performed using contrast agent doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg delivered at a fixed rate of 5.0 mL/second in 12 normal subjects and 12 stroke patients. Results 1) Arterial signal showed the expected doubling in relaxation response (ΔR2*) to dose doubling. 2) The brain signal showed a less than doubled ΔR2* response to dose doubling. 3) The 0.2 mmol/kg dose studies subtly under-estimated cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) relative to the 0.1 mmol/kg studies. 4) In the range of low CBV and CBF, the 0.2 mmol/kg studies over-estimated the CBV and CBF compared with the 0.1 mmol/kg studies. 5) The 0.1 mmol/kg studies reported larger ischemic volumes in stroke. Conclusion Subtle but statistically significant dose sensitivities were found. Therefore, it is advisable to carefully control the contrast agent dose when DSC-MRI is used in clinical trials. The study also suggests that a 0.1 mmol/kg dose is adequate for hemodynamic measurements. PMID:19097106

  13. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Eladio J.; Tran, Lesa A.; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G.; Rusakova, Irene A.; Cheong, Benjamin Y.; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2013-01-01

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking. PMID:24288589

  14. Adrenal medulla imaging agents: a structure-distribution relationship study of radiolabeled aralkylguanidines

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, D.M.; Mangner, T.J.; Inbasekaran, M.N.; Brown, L.E.; Wu, J.L.

    1984-02-01

    Fourteen /sup 125/I-labeled aralkylguanidines were synthesized and evaluated as potential imaging agents for the adrenal medullae and tumors of adrenomedullary origin. These guanidines are radiotracer analogues of guanethidine, an antihypertensive agent thought to mediate neuron blockade by uptake into adrenergic nerves. Dog adrenal medullae were used as a model to test radiotracer affinity for catecholamine storage tissue. Tissue distribution studies revealed that a number of radioiodinated guanidines showed pronounced localization in the adrenal medullae following intravenous injection, in certain cases exceeding that of either (-)-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine or (/sup 14/C)guanethidine. (m-(/sup 125/I)Iodobenzyl)guanidine (m-IBG, 2b) gave the best combination of high concentration and selectivity. The low adrenomedullary affinity observed with (/sup 14/C)guanidine and m-(/sup 125/I)iodobenzylamine demonstrates the uniqueness of the aralkylguanidine structure. Preliminary evidence suggests that 2b is a storage analogue of norepinephrine. (/sup 125/I)2a is now being used clinically in imaging and radiotherapy of catecholamine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma.

  15. A Novel Potential Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent for Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zih-Rou; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Huang, Ya-Yao; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, 9-(+)-11C-dihydrotetrabenazine (9-(+)-11C-DTBZ) was shown to be a useful positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we described the radiosynthesis and evaluation of the 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ analog, 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ, as a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) imaging agent and compare it with 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ. 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ was obtained by 11C-MeI methylation with its 10 hydroxy precursor in the presence of 5 M NaOH. It had a slightly better average radiochemical yield of 35.3 ± 3.6% (decay-corrected to end of synthesis (EOS)) than did 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ (30.5 ± 2.3%). MicroPET studies showed that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ had a striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 3.74 ± 0.21 at 40 min post-injection, while the ratio of 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ was 2.50 ± 0.33. This indicated that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ has a higher specific uptake in VMAT2-rich brain regions, and 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ may be a potential VMAT2 radioligand. Our experiment is the first study of 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ to include dynamic brain distribution in rat brains. PMID:27612194

  16. A Novel Potential Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent for Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zih-Rou; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Huang, Ya-Yao; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, 9-(+)-11C-dihydrotetrabenazine (9-(+)-11C-DTBZ) was shown to be a useful positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we described the radiosynthesis and evaluation of the 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ analog, 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ, as a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) imaging agent and compare it with 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ. 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ was obtained by 11C-MeI methylation with its 10 hydroxy precursor in the presence of 5 M NaOH. It had a slightly better average radiochemical yield of 35.3 ± 3.6% (decay-corrected to end of synthesis (EOS)) than did 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ (30.5 ± 2.3%). MicroPET studies showed that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ had a striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 3.74 ± 0.21 at 40 min post-injection, while the ratio of 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ was 2.50 ± 0.33. This indicated that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ has a higher specific uptake in VMAT2-rich brain regions, and 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ may be a potential VMAT2 radioligand. Our experiment is the first study of 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ to include dynamic brain distribution in rat brains. PMID:27612194

  17. Delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to tumor using pHLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjali; Moshnikova, Anna; Rossi, Bethany; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    We are developing a novel technology for selective delivery of imaging probes and membrane-impermeable molecules to cancer cells. It is based on action of water-soluble membrane peptide, pHLIP^ (pH [Low] Insertion Peptide), which has ability to insert and fold in cellular membrane at slightly acidic environment, which is a characteristic for various pathological states including cancer. The insertion of the peptide is unidirectional: C-terminus moves inside the cell across membrane, while N-terminus flags outside. Thus pHLIP possess dual delivery capability. Imaging agents (fluorescent, PET, SPECT or MRI) could be attached to the N-terminus of the peptide to mark tumor mass and tumor margins with high precision. At the same time, therapeutic molecules attached to the C-inserting end, could be moved across membrane to reach cytoplasmic target. Among translocated molecules are synthetic cyclic peptides, gene regulation agent (peptide nucleic acid) and phalla- and amanita toxins with hydrophobicity tuned by attachment of fatty acids for optimum delivery. Currently we have family of pHLIP peptides for various applications. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  18. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Alexander W; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Shi, Jian; Rannard, Steven P; Liu, Quan; Yang, Chang-Tong; He, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm) possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently encapsulate hydrophobic guest molecules, which could allow simultaneous bioimaging and drug delivery. PMID:26425088

  19. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  20. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  1. Advances in molecular imaging: targeted optical contrast agents for cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, our understanding of the molecular changes associated with cancer development and progression has advanced greatly. This has led to new cancer therapeutics targeted against specific molecular pathways; such therapies show great promise to reduce mortality, in part by enabling physicians to tailor therapy for patients based on a molecular profile of their tumor. Unfortunately, the tools for definitive cancer diagnosis – light microscopic examination of biopsied tissue stained with nonspecific dyes – remain focused on the analysis of tissue ex vivo. There is an important need for new clinical tools to support the molecular diagnosis of cancer. Optical molecular imaging is emerging as a technique to help meet this need. Targeted, optically active contrast agents can specifically label extra-and intracellular biomarkers of cancer. Optical images can be acquired in real time with high spatial resolution to image-specific molecular targets, while still providing morphologic context. This article reviews recent advances in optical molecular imaging, highlighting the advances in technology required to improve early cancer detection, guide selection of targeted therapy and rapidly evaluate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22385200

  2. Stable confinement of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance agents within carbon nanotubes for bimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Brandon T; Law, Justin J; Matson, Michael L; Azhdarinia, Ali; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Simultaneous positron emission tomography/MRI has recently been introduced to the clinic and dual positron emission tomography/MRI probes are rare and of growing interest. We have developed a strategy for producing multimodal probes based on a carbon nanotube platform without the use of chelating ligands. Materials & methods Gd3+ and 64Cu2+ ions were loaded into ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes by sonication. Normal, tumor-free athymic nude mice were injected intravenously with the probe and imaged over 48 h. Results & conclusion The probe was stable for up to 24 h when challenged with phosphate-buffered saline and mouse serum. Positron emission tomography imaging also confirmed the stability of the probe in vivo for up to 48 h. The probe was quickly cleared from circulation, with enhanced accumulation in the lungs. Stable encapsulation of contrast agents within ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes represents a new strategy for the design of advanced imaging probes with variable multimodal imaging capabilities. PMID:24628687

  3. Hybrid graphene/Au activatable theranostic agent for multimodalities imaging guided enhanced photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Guohao; Yang, Kai; Chen, Minglong; Tian, Rui; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has been increasingly investigated. However, there are still challenges in strategies that can further enhance photoconversion efficiency and improve photothermal tumor ablation effect of current nanomaterials. Herein, we developed a fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging guided PTT agent by seeding Gold (Au) nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO). Near infrared dye (Cy5.5) labeled-matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) substrate (CP) was conjugated onto the GO/Au complex (GA) forming tumor targeted theranostic probe (CPGA), whereCy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) capacity from both GO and Au, yet it can boost strong fluorescence signals after degradation by MMP-14. The photothermal effect of GA hybrid was found significantly elevated compared with Au or GO alone. After intravenous administration of CPGA into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.64 ± 0.51 for optical imaging and 2.5 ± 0.27 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and an excellent tumor inhibition was observedwithoutrecurrence. Our studies further encourage applications of the hybrid nanocomposite for image-guided enhanced PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:26691399

  4. Oxidation-responsive Eu(2+/3+)-liposomal contrast agent for dual-mode magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekanger, Levi A; Ali, Meser M; Allen, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    An oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging was synthesized using Eu(2+) and liposomes. Positive contrast enhancement was observed with Eu(2+), and chemical exchange saturation transfer was observed before and after oxidation of Eu(2+). Orthogonal detection modes render the concentration of Eu inconsequential to molecular information provided through imaging.

  5. Dextran coated bismuth-iron oxide nanohybrid contrast agents for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Pratap C.; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hecht, Elizabeth; Chorny, Michael; Chhour, Peter; Blankemeyer, Eric; Yates, Douglas M.; Witschey, Walter R. T.; Litt, Harold I.; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles have been proposed as a novel CT contrast agent, however few syntheses of biocompatible bismuth nanoparticles have been achieved. We herein report the synthesis of composite bismuth-iron oxide nanoparticles (BION) that are based on a clinically approved, dextran-coated iron oxide formulation; the particles have the advantage of acting as contrast agents for both CT and MRI. BION were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. BION CT phantom images revealed that the X-ray attenuation of the different formulations was dependent upon the amount of bismuth present in the nanoparticle, while T2-weighted MRI contrast decreased with increasing bismuth content. No cytotoxicity was observed in Hep G2 and BJ5ta cells after 24 hours incubation with BION. The above properties, as well as the yield of synthesis and bismuth inclusion efficiency, led us to select the Bi-30 formulation for in vivo experiments, performed in mice using a micro-CT and a 9.4 T MRI system. X-ray contrast was observed in the heart and blood vessels over a 2 hour period, indicating that Bi-30 has a prolonged circulation half-life. Considerable signal loss in T2-weighted MR images was observed in the liver compared to pre-injection scans. Evaluation of the biodistribution of Bi-30 revealed that bismuth is excreted via the urine, with significant concentrations found in the kidneys and urine. In vitro experiments confirmed the degradability of Bi-30. In summary, dextran coated BION are biocompatible, biodegradable, possess strong X-ray attenuation properties and also can be used as T2-weighted MR contrast agents. PMID:25485115

  6. Dextran coated bismuth-iron oxide nanohybrid contrast agents for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Naha, Pratap C; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hecht, Elizabeth; Chorny, Michael; Chhour, Peter; Blankemeyer, Eric; Yates, Douglas M; Witschey, Walter R T; Litt, Harold I; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P

    2014-12-14

    Bismuth nanoparticles have been proposed as a novel CT contrast agent, however few syntheses of biocompatible bismuth nanoparticles have been achieved. We herein report the synthesis of composite bismuth-iron oxide nanoparticles (BION) that are based on a clinically approved, dextran-coated iron oxide formulation; the particles have the advantage of acting as contrast agents for both CT and MRI. BION were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. BION CT phantom images revealed that the X-ray attenuation of the different formulations was dependent upon the amount of bismuth present in the nanoparticle, while T2-weighted MRI contrast decreased with increasing bismuth content. No cytotoxicity was observed in Hep G2 and BJ5ta cells after 24 hours incubation with BION. The above properties, as well as the yield of synthesis and bismuth inclusion efficiency, led us to select the Bi-30 formulation for in vivo experiments, performed in mice using a micro-CT and a 9.4 T MRI system. X-ray contrast was observed in the heart and blood vessels over a 2 hour period, indicating that Bi-30 has a prolonged circulation half-life. Considerable signal loss in T2-weighted MR images was observed in the liver compared to pre-injection scans. Evaluation of the biodistribution of Bi-30 revealed that bismuth is excreted via the urine, with significant concentrations found in the kidneys and urine. In vitro experiments confirmed the degradability of Bi-30. In summary, dextran coated BION are biocompatible, biodegradable, possess strong X-ray attenuation properties and also can be used as T2-weighted MR contrast agents.

  7. Tunable, biodegradable gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Ezzibdeh, Rami M; Chhour, Peter; Pulaparthi, Kumidini; Kim, Johoon; Jurcova, Martina; Hsu, Jessica C; Blundell, Cassidy; Litt, Harold I; Ferrari, Victor A; Allcock, Harry R; Sehgal, Chandra M; Cormode, David P

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been proposed for many applications in medicine. Although large AuNP (>5.5 nm) are desirable for their longer blood circulation and accumulation in diseased tissues, small AuNP (<5.5 nm) are required for excretion via the kidneys. We present a novel platform where small, excretable AuNP are encapsulated into biodegradable poly di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene (PCPP) nanospheres. These larger nanoparticles (Au-PCPP) can perform their function as contrast agents, then subsequently break down into harmless byproducts and release the AuNP for swift excretion. Homogeneous Au-PCPP were synthesized using a microfluidic device. The size of the Au-PCPP can be controlled by the amount of polyethylene glycol-polylysine (PEG-PLL) block co-polymer in the formulation. Synthesis of Au-PCPP nanoparticles and encapsulation of AuNP in PCPP were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy and their biocompatibility and biodegradability confirmed in vitro. The Au-PCPP nanoparticles were found to produce strong computed tomography contrast. The UV-Vis absorption peak of Au-PCPP can be tuned into the near infrared region via inclusion of varying amounts of AuNP and controlling the nanoparticle size. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the potential of Au-PCPP as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Therefore, Au-PCPP nanoparticles have high potency as contrast agents for two imaging modalities, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable, and thus represent a platform with potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:27322961

  8. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hypoxia during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia plays a pivotal role in cancer therapy for most therapeutic approaches from radiotherapy to immunotherapy. The detailed and accurate knowledge of the oxygen distribution in a tumour is necessary in order to determine the right treatment strategy. Still, due to the limited spatial and temporal resolution of imaging methods as well as lacking fundamental understanding of internal oxygenation dynamics in tumours, the precise oxygen distribution map is rarely available for treatment planing. We employ an agent-based in silico tumour spheroid model in order to study the complex, localized and fast oxygen dynamics in tumour micro-regions which are induced by radiotherapy. A lattice-free, 3D, agent-based approach for cell representation is coupled with a high-resolution diffusion solver that includes a tissue density-dependent diffusion coefficient. This allows us to assess the space- and time-resolved reoxygenation response of a small subvolume of tumour tissue in response to radiotherapy. In response to irradiation the tumour nodule exhibits characteristic reoxygenation and re-depletion dynamics which we resolve with high spatio-temporal resolution. The reoxygenation follows specific timings, which should be respected in treatment in order to maximise the use of the oxygen enhancement effects. Oxygen dynamics within the tumour create windows of opportunity for the use of adjuvant chemotherapeutica and hypoxia-activated drugs. Overall, we show that by using modelling it is possible to follow the oxygenation dynamics beyond common resolution limits and predict beneficial strategies for therapy and in vitro verification. Models of cell cycle and oxygen dynamics in tumours should in the future be combined with imaging techniques, to allow for a systematic experimental study of possible improved schedules and to ultimately extend the reach of oxygenation monitoring available in clinical treatment. PMID:26273841

  9. Evaluation of a novel gadolinium-based contrast agent for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Wu, Genevieve N.; Chow, Rayland; Kim, Sung-Yop; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd) could serve as an efficient intraoperative contrast agent avoiding problems that arise with surgically-induced intracranial enhancement. F98 orthotopic brain tumors or surgical lesions were induced in Fisher rats. T1-weighted MRI studies were performed with either a single or multiple daily doses of MGd. The last contrast dose was administered either 7 or 24 h prior to scanning in both tumor-bearing and surgically treated animals. Animals receiving either 30 or 60 mg/kg MGd i.v. developed clinical signs of impaired motor activity, and increasing lethargy. MGd given i.p. was tolerated up to a dose of 140 mg/kg. Despite multiple dosages, and several administration modes (i.p. and i.v.), no significant enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 7 or 24 h following the last MGd dose. Clear enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 30 min. following MGd administration. Scans of necrotic lesions were positive 7 h post MGd injection. MGd scans showed no significant enhancement following surgically-induced lesions while scans with conventional contrast agents showed both meningeal and intraparenchymal enhancement. This study suggests that MGd is not sequestered in viable tumor for the necessary time interval required to allow delayed imaging in this model. The agent does seem to remain in necrotic tissue for longer time intervals. MGd therefore would not be suitable as a contrast agent in iMRI for the detection of residual tumor tissue during surgery.

  10. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  11. WE-G-BRD-06: Variation in Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelada, O; Decker, R; Rockwell, S; Carlson, D; Zheng, M; Huang, Y; Xia, Y; Gallezot, J; Liu, C; Carson, R; Oelfke, U

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is correlated with treatment failure. To date, there are no published studies investigating hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing SBRT. We aim to use 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to non-invasively quantify the tumor hypoxic volume (HV), to elucidate potential roles of reoxygenation and tumor vascular response at high doses, and to identify an optimal prognostic imaging time-point. Methods: SBRT-eligible patients with NSCLC tumors >1cm were prospectively enrolled in an IRB-approved study. Computed Tomography and dynamic PET images (0–120min, 150–180min, and 210–240min post-injection) were acquired using a Siemens BiographmCT PET/CT scanner. 18F-FMISO PET was performed on a single patient at 3 different time points around a single SBRT delivery of 18 Gy and HVs were compared using a tumor-to-blood ratio (TBR)>1.2 and rate of influx (Ki)>0.0015 (Patlak). Results: Results from our first patient showed substantial temporal changes in HV following SBRT. Using a TBR threshold >1.2 and summed images 210–240min, the HVs were 19%, 31% and 13% of total tumor volume on day 0, 2 (48 hours post-SBRT), and 4 (96 hours post-SBRT). The absolute volume of hypoxia increased by nearly a factor of 2 after 18 Gy and then decreased almost to baseline 96 hours later. Selected imaging timepoints resulted in temporal changes in HV quantification obtained with TBR. Ki, calculated using 4-hour dynamic data, evaluated HVs as 22%, 75% and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: ith the results of only one patient, this novel pilot study highlights the potential benefit of 18F-FMISO PET imaging as results indicate substantial temporal changes in tumor HV post-SBRT. Analysis suggests that TBR is not a robust parameter for accurate HV quantification and heavily influenced by imaging timepoint selection. Kinetic modeling parameters are more sensitive and may aid in future treatment individualization

  12. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast cancer targeting contrast agent for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgroom, Andrew Carson

    Current clinical use of ultrasound for breast cancer diagnostics is strictly limited to a role as a supplementary detection method to other modalities, such as mammography or MRI. A major reason for ultrasound’s role as a secondary method is its inability to discern between cancerous and non-cancerous bodies of similar density, like dense calcifications or benign fibroadenomas. Its detection capabilities are further diminished by the variable density of the surrounding breast tissue with the progression of age. Preliminary studies suggest that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are a good candidate as an in situ contrast agent for ultrasound. By tagging the silica particle surface with the cancer-targeting antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin), suspect regions of interest can be better identified in real time with standard ultrasound equipment. Once the silica-antibody conjugate is injected into the bloodstream and enters the cancerous growth’s vasculature, the antibody arm will bind to HER2, a cell surface receptor known to be dysfunctional or overexpressed in certain types of breast cancer. As more particles aggregate at the cell surface, backscatter of the ultrasonic waves increases as a result of the higher porous silica concentration. This translates to an increased contrast around the lesion boundary. Tumor detection through ultrasound contrast enhancement provides a tremendous advantage over current cancer diagnostics because is it significantly cheaper and can be monitored in real time. Characterization of MCM-41 type MSNs suggests that these particles have sufficient stability and particle size distribution to penetrate through fenestrated tumor vasculature and accumulate in HER2+ breast cancer cells through the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. A study of acoustic properties showed that particle concentration is linearly correlated to image contrast in clinical frequency-range ultrasound, although less pronounced than typical microbubble

  13. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L.; Cooper, Margaret S.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L.; Shaw, Karen P.; Ordidge, Katherine L.; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M.; Blower, Philip J.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Hailes, Helen C.; Tabor, Alethea B.

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd3+, 64Cu2+, or 111In3+, and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)2000] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. PMID:23131536

  14. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L; Cooper, Margaret S; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L; Shaw, Karen P; Ordidge, Katherine L; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M; Blower, Philip J; Lythgoe, Mark F; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd(3+), (64)Cu(2+), or (111)In(3+), and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)(2000)] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent.

  15. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  16. Approximate Simulation of Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia with Normobaric Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F(sub I) O2 < 0.209 at or near sea level pressure to match the ambient O2 partial pressure (iso-pO2) of the target altitude. METHODS. Literature from investigators and manufacturers indicate that these devices may not properly account for the 47 mmHg of water vapor partial pressure that reduces the inspired partial pressure of O2 (P(sub I) O2). Nor do they account for the complex reality of alveolar gas composition as defined by the Alveolar Gas Equation. In essence, by providing iso-pO2 conditions for normobaric hypoxia (NH) as for HH exposures the devices ignore P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 as more direct agents to induce signs and symptoms of hypoxia during acute training exposures. RESULTS. There is not a sufficient integrated physiological understanding of the determinants of P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 under acute NH and HH given the same hypoxic pO2 to claim a device that provides isohypoxia. Isohypoxia is defined as the same distribution of hypoxia signs and symptoms under any circumstances of equivalent hypoxic dose, and hypoxic pO2 is an incomplete hypoxic dose. Some devices that claim an equivalent HH experience under NH conditions significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 feet (3,048 m). CONCLUSIONS. At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient pO2 at sea level as at altitude (iso-pO2 machines). An approach to reduce the overestimation is to at least provide machines that create the same P(sub I)O2 (iso-P(sub I)O2 machines) conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade.

  17. Hypoxia. 4. Hypoxia and ion channel function

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to oxygen deprivation is required for survival; thus, understanding the mechanisms by which changes in oxygen are linked to cell viability and function is of great importance. Ion channels play a critical role in regulating cell function in a wide variety of biological processes, including neuronal transmission, control of ventilation, cardiac contractility, and control of vasomotor tone. Since the 1988 discovery of oxygen-sensitive potassium channels in chemoreceptors, the effect of hypoxia on an assortment of ion channels has been studied in an array of cell types. In this review, we describe the effects of both acute and sustained hypoxia (continuous and intermittent) on mammalian ion channels in several tissues, the mode of action, and their contribution to diverse cellular processes. PMID:21178108

  18. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  19. Engineered knottin peptides: a new class of agents for imaging integrin expression in living subjects.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Richard H; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2009-03-15

    There is a critical need for molecular imaging agents to detect cell surface integrin receptors that are present in human cancers. Previously, we used directed evolution to engineer knottin peptides that bind with high affinity ( approximately 10 to 30 nmol/L) to integrin receptors that are overexpressed on the surface of tumor cells and the tumor neovasculature. To evaluate these peptides as molecular imaging agents, we site-specifically conjugated Cy5.5 or (64)Cu-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) to their N termini, and used optical and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure their uptake and biodistribution in U87MG glioblastoma murine xenograft models. NIR fluorescence and microPET imaging both showed that integrin binding affinity plays a strong role in the tumor uptake of knottin peptides. Tumor uptake at 1 hour postinjection for two high-affinity (IC(50), approximately 20 nmol/L) (64)Cu-DOTA-conjugated knottin peptides was 4.47% +/- 1.21% and 4.56% +/- 0.64% injected dose/gram (%ID/g), compared with a low-affinity knottin peptide (IC(50), approximately 0.4 mumol/L; 1.48 +/- 0.53%ID/g) and c(RGDyK) (IC(50), approximately 1 mumol/L; 2.32 +/- 0.55%ID/g), a low-affinity cyclic pentapeptide under clinical development. Furthermore, (64)Cu-DOTA-conjugated knottin peptides generated lower levels of nonspecific liver uptake ( approximately 2%ID/g) compared with c(RGDyK) ( approximately 4%ID/g) 1 hour postinjection. MicroPET imaging results were confirmed by in vivo biodistribution studies. (64)Cu-DOTA-conjugated knottin peptides were stable in mouse serum, and in vivo metabolite analysis showed minimal degradation in the blood or tumor upon injection. Thus, engineered integrin-binding knottin peptides show great potential as clinical diagnostics for a variety of cancers.

  20. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-18

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  1. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  2. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  3. In vivo characterization of cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riefke, Bjoern; Licha, Kai; Semmler, Wolfhard; Nolte, Dirk; Ebert, Bernd; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    1996-12-01

    In this study indotricarbocyanines were investigated in vivo as near-infrared contrast agents. The known dye indocyanine green (ICG) has several disadvantages regarding its use in near-infrared imaging. ICG has a very short plasma half- life, limited tolerability and is unstable in aqueous solutions. Therefore, several indotricarbocyanine dyes, structurally related to ICG but with different hydrophilicities and physicochemical properties, were synthesized. The tolerability of synthesized dyes was tested in mice. The pharmacokinetic behavior and elimination characteristics were studied in a rat model. The in vivo imaging properties of synthesized dyes were investigated using a tunable, pulsed, solid state laser system for excitation and an intensified CCD camera for fluorescence imaging of different tumor-bearing nude mice models and mamma-carcinoma-bearing rat models. The dye-specific fluorescence exitance was followed at different times after dye administration. The results are demonstrated in comparison to indocyanine green. Synthesized hydrophilic indotricarbocyanine dyes had longer plasma half-lives and increasing renal elimination, corresponding to higher hydrophilicity. Tolerability in mice was increased up to 60- fold compared to ICG. Increased fluorescence exitance in tumors was observed for several dyes 24 h p.i. in the tumor models studied, whereas ICG showed no tumor fluorescence signal under the same conditions.

  4. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  5. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view.

  6. Location of buried plastic pipes using multi-agent support based on GPR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala-Cabrera, David; Herrera, Manuel; Izquierdo, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Rafael

    2011-12-01

    This work focuses on the generation of tools to aid inspection and identify buried plastic pipes in water supply systems (WSS). In our study we use ground penetrating system (GPR) images as a non-destructive method of obtaining information without altering the system conditions and the environmental characteristics. A viability study for extracting features, and an approach to the above-mentioned application based on multi-agent systems are addressed in this paper. Firstly, we use intensive matrix manipulation of the GPR output for preprocessing the images. As a result, two matrices are produced that classify initial data based on the original radargram of the wave amplitude parameter. Then the plastic pipe characteristics that offer an enhanced likelihood of location are defined. This procedure is evaluated through two case-studies. One study corresponds to a simple case (one pipe) and the other corresponds to various pipes (made of different materials). Both cases were developed under controlled laboratory conditions. The obtained results are promising, and we show that automatic plastic pipe location has been achieved. The main contributions of the procedures proposed in this work are: firstly, highly skilled GPR prospection operators become unnecessary for plastic pipe location using GPR images; and secondly, we have opened a route to further classification that makes use of other methodologies.

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) contains hypoxia response elements: relevance to lytic induction by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Wang, Victoria; Widmer, Isabelle; Yarchoan, Robert

    2003-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8, is an etiologic agent of KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We recently demonstrated that hypoxia can induce lytic replication of KSHV in PEL cell lines. Hypoxia induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), and we hypothesized that the KSHV genome may respond to hypoxia through functional hypoxia response elements (HREs). Here, we demonstrate the presence of at least two promoters within the KSHV genome that are activated by hypoxia or hypoxia mimics. One is in the promoter region of the gene for Rta, the main lytic switch gene, and the other is within the promoter region of ORF34, a lytic gene of unknown function. The ORF34 promoter contains three putative consensus HREs oriented in the direction of the gene. Dissection and site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed that one of the HREs of the ORF34 promoter is functional. Under conditions of hypoxia, the ORF34 promoter was strongly upregulated by HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha. By contrast, the promoter of the gene for Rta appeared to be preferentially upregulated by HIF-2 alpha. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that specific messages for ORF34 and ORF50 are upregulated in BCBL-1 cells exposed to hypoxia. An HIF-1 binding and competition assay demonstrated that the HRE sequence from the ORF34 promoter can compete for HIF-1 alpha binding to an erythropoietin HRE oligonucleotide while a mutant sequence cannot. Thus, we demonstrated that a viral gene can be activated by hypoxia through activation of a functional viral HRE. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a functional HRE in a viral promoter. PMID:12767996

  8. Generation of superparamagnetic liposomes revealed as highly efficient MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Martina, Marie-Sophie; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Ménager, Christine; Clément, Olivier; Barratt, Gillian; Grabielle-Madelmont, Cécile; Gazeau, Florence; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2005-08-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanocrystals stable at neutral pH and in isotonic aqueous media were synthesized and encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) and distearoyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly(ethylene glycol))-2000] (DSPE-PEG(2000), 5 mol %), formed by film hydration coupled with sequential extrusion. The nonentrapped particles were removed by flash gel exclusion chromatography. The magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were homogeneous in size (195 +/- 33 hydrodynamic diameters from quasi-elastic light scattering). Iron loading was varied from 35 up to 167 Fe(III)/lipid mol %. Physical and superparamagnetic characteristics of the iron oxide particles were preserved after liposome encapsulation as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and magnetization curve recording. In biological media, MFLs were highly stable and avoided ferrofluid flocculation while being nontoxic toward the J774 macrophage cell line. Moreover, steric stabilization ensured by PEG-surface-grafting significantly reduced liposome association with the macrophages. The ratios of the transversal (r2) and longitudinal (r1) magnetic resonance (MR) relaxivities of water protons in MFL dispersions (6 < r2/r1 < 18) ranked them among the best T2 contrast agents, the higher iron loading the better the T2 contrast enhancement. Magnetophoresis demonstrated the possible guidance of MFLs by applying a magnetic field gradient. Mouse MR imaging assessed MFLs efficiency as contrast agents in vivo: MR angiography performed 24 h after intravenous injection of the contrast agent provided the first direct evidence of the stealthiness of PEG-ylated magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes. PMID:16045355

  9. New calcium-selective smart contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Forgács, Attila; Uh, Hyounsoo; Beyerlein, Michael; Maier, Martin E; Petoud, Stéphane; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2013-12-23

    Calcium plays a vital role in the human body and especially in the central nervous system. Precise maintenance of Ca(2+) levels is very crucial for normal cell physiology and health. The deregulation of calcium homeostasis can lead to neuronal cell death and brain damage. To study this functional role played by Ca(2+) in the brain noninvasively by using magnetic resonance imaging, we have synthesized a new set of Ca(2+) -sensitive smart contrast agents (CAs). The agents were found to be highly selective to Ca(2+) in the presence of other competitive anions and cations in buffer and in physiological fluids. The structure of CAs comprises Gd(3+)-DO3A (DO3A=1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) coupled to a Ca(2+) chelator o-amino phenol-N,N,O-triacetate (APTRA). The agents are designed to sense Ca(2+) present in extracellular fluid of the brain where its concentration is relatively high, that is, 1.2-0.8 mM. The determined dissociation constant of the CAs to Ca(2+) falls in the range required to sense and report changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels followed by an increase in neural activity. In buffer, with the addition of Ca(2+) the increase in relaxivity ranged from 100-157%, the highest ever known for any T1-based Ca(2+)-sensitive smart CA. The CAs were analyzed extensively by the measurement of luminescence lifetime measurement on Tb(3+) analogues, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD), and (17)O NMR transverse relaxation and shift experiments. The results obtained confirmed that the large relaxivity enhancement observed upon Ca(2+) addition is due to the increase of the hydration state of the complexes together with the slowing down of the molecular rotation and the retention of a significant contribution of the water molecules of the second sphere of hydration.

  10. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongalsky, M. B.; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g.s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  11. Aptamer-Modified Temperature-Sensitive Liposomal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunchi; Liu, Min; Tong, Xiaoyan; Sun, Na; Zhou, Lu; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2015-09-14

    A novel aptamer modified thermosensitive liposome was designed as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging probe. In this paper, Gd-DTPA was encapsulated into an optimized thermosensitive liposome (TSL) formulation, followed by conjugation with AS1411 for specific targeting against tumor cells that overexpress nucleolin receptors. The resulting liposomes were extensively characterized in vitro as a contrast agent. As-prepared TSLs-AS1411 had a diameter about 136.1 nm. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed from MTT assay, which illustrated that the liposomes exhibited excellent biocompatibility. Compared to the control incubation at 37 °C, the liposomes modified with AS1411 exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity in MCF-7 cells incubated at 42 °C. These data indicate that the Gd-encapsulated TSLs-AS1411 may be a promising tool in early cancer diagnosis.

  12. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gongalsky, M. B. Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Maximychev, A. V.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-07

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T{sub 1}) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  14. Radiation dosimetry of iodine-123 HEAT, an alpha-1 receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.D.; Greer, D.M.; Couch, M.W.; Williams, C.M.

    1987-11-01

    Biologic distribution data in the rat were obtained for the alpha-1 adrenoceptor imaging agent (+/-) 2-(beta-(iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (HEAT) labeled with (/sup 123/I). The major excretory routes were through the liver (67%) and the kidney (33%). Internal radiation absorbed dose estimates to nine source organs, total body, the GI tract, gonads, and red bone marrow were calculated for the human using the physical decay data for (/sup 123/I). The critical organ was found to be the lower large intestine, receiving 1.1 rad per mCi of (/sup 123/I)HEAT administered. The total-body dose was found to be 58 mrad per mCi.

  15. Carbon-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hongsub; Ahmad, Tanveer; Rhee, Ilsu; Chang, Yongmin; Jin, Seong-Uk; Hong, Sungwook

    2012-01-01

    Coprecipitated ferrite nanoparticles were coated with carbon using a hydrothermal method. From transmission electron microscope pictures, we could see that the coated iron oxide nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average diameter of 90 nm. The strong bonding of carbon on the nanoparticle surfaces was checked by noting the C = O and C = C vibrations in Fourier transform infrared spectra. The spin-lattice relaxation process [T1] and spin-spin relaxation process [T2] relaxivities of hydrogen protons in the aqueous solution of coated nanoparticles were determined to be 1.139 (mM·s)-1 and 1.115 (mM·s)-1, respectively. These results showed that the carbon-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are applicable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging.PACS: 81.05.y; 76.60.Es; 61.46; 75.50.k; 87.61.

  16. A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -polymer for liver magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-07-01

    A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -copolymer (ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd) has been developed as a potential liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd consisted of a poly (aspartic acid-co-leucine) unit bound with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (Gd-DOTA) via the linkage of ethylenediamine. In vitro, the biodegradable experiment and cytotoxicity assay showed the biodegradability and biocompatibility of this gadolinium-polymer. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd presented an increase in relaxivity of 2.4 times than the clinical Gd-DOTA. In vivo, gadolinium (III)-copolymer was mainly accumulated in the liver, and it could be excreted via the renal and hepatobiliary mechanism. The average enhancement of ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd (60.71±5.93%, 50-80 min) in liver was 2.62-fold greater than that of Gd-DOTA (23.16±3.55%, 10-30 min). ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd could be as a potential liver MRI contrast agent with a long time-window.

  17. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given. PMID:26441654

  18. (Fluorine-18 labeled androgens and progestins: Imaging agents for tumors of the prostate and breast)

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1990-09-20

    The objective of this project is to develop fluorine-18 labeled steroids which possess high binding affinity and selectivity for androgen and progesterone receptors and can be used as positron-emission tomographic imaging agents for prostate tumors and breast tumors, respectively. These novel diagnostic agents may enable an accurate estimation of tumor dissemination (metastasis of prostate cancer and lymph node involvement of breast cancer) and an in vivo determination of the endocrine responsiveness of these tumors. Thus, they will provide essential information for the selection of alternative therapies (the extent of surgical ablation, radiation and chemotherapy vs hormonal therapy, etc.), thereby improving the management of prostate and breast cancer patients. Specific aims of the program include: synthesize fluorine-substituted progestins from the following high affinity classes: R5020 (promegestone), norgestrel, RU486, and retroprogestins; synthesize fluorine-substituted androgens from the following high affinity classes: mibolerone, R1881 (metribolone) and 2-oxametribolone; evaluate the receptor binding and non-specific binding of these fluorosteroids by in vitro binding assays; develop and optimize fluoride ion substitution reactions suitable for the rapid, efficient, and convenient preparation of these fluorosteroids in high specific activity, F-18 labeled form; and evaluate the target tissue uptake of the F-18 labeled androgens and progestins in experimental animals. We have synthesized several new fluorine-substituted androgens (1--6) over the past year. Their structures and binding affinity for the androgen receptor (RBA) are listed in this paper. 6 refs.

  19. Surfactant-stabilized contrast agent on the nanoscale for diagnostic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Margaret A; Forsberg, Flemming; Dube, Neal; Patel, Mihir; Oeffinger, Brian E

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (CA) are generally micron-sized stabilized gas bubbles, injected IV. However, to penetrate beyond the vasculature and accumulate in targets such as tumors, CA must be an order of magnitude smaller. We describe a method of achieving nanometer-sized, surfactant-stabilized CA by differential centrifugation. High g force was shown to destroy bubble integrity. Optimal conditions (300 rpm for 3 min) produced an agent with a mean diameter of 450 nm, which gave 25.5 dB enhancement in vitro at a dose of 10 microL/mL, with a 13 min half-life. In vivo, the CA produced excellent power Doppler and grey-scale pulse inversion harmonic images at low acoustic power when administered. In vivo dose-response curves obtained in three rabbits showed enhancement between 20 and 25 dB for dosages above 0.025 mL/kg. These results encourage further investigation of the possible diagnostic and therapeutic benefits of using nanoparticles as CA, including passive targeting and accumulation in tumors.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  1. Dual-energy subtraction imaging utilizing indium as a contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Le Duc, G.; Zhong, Z.; Warkentien, L.; Laster, B.; Thomlinson, W.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of our current work is to establish the minimum detection, of indium contrast agent using dual-energy subtraction imaging above and below indium K-edge. Experiments were performed on the X12 and X17B2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source using the same method but with two different set-ups. Experiments were first carried out on InCl{sub 3} solutions, then on V79 Chinese hamster cells and on BALB/c mice excised tumors, labeled with indium. For each experiment, several layers of Lucite were placed in front of the phantom to ensure a 43 mm thickness, dose to that of a mammography examination. Results were the same on X12 and X17B2. As expected, indium-free materials disappeared on subtracted images (water, steel reference and screw). Indium samples were easily distinguishable for the following concentrations: 10-5-2-1 mg/cm{sup 2}. Smaller concentrations were not clearly distinguishable and we were unable to see cell samples and tumors. To conclude, the lowest concentration we can image is around 1 mg/cm{sup 2}. These results agree with theoretical results. Such results also suggest that indium concentration in both cells and tumors is lower than 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the current detection is dose to optimum, we conclude that dual energy subtraction imaging using indium to label tumors cells and tumors is not possible unless the indium uptake is increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  2. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  3. Recent advances in ytterbium-based contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging: promises and prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Liu, Jianhua; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in the clinic, and has raised significant interest in recent years both in research and practice owing to its many advantages such as deep penetration depth, high resolution and facile image processing. Developing heavy metal-based CT contrast agents, especially heavy metal-containing nanoparticulate CT contrast agents, has become a key focus in research fields to address issues of clinical iodinated agents involving short circulation time, low contrast efficiency and potential renal toxicity. In this review, we summarize the development of ytterbium (Yb)-based CT contrast agents and highlight the design and applications of Yb-based nanoparticulate CT contrast agents. Yb has high atomic number and higher abundance in the earth's crust relative to Au, Ta and Bi, which have received much attention as a CT contrast agents. In particular, in contrast to these metal elements, as well as I, Yb has K-edge energy that is located just within the higher-intensity region of X-ray spectra, which can induce significant enhancement in the contrast efficiency. When encapsulated in nanoparticles, Yb can remain in the circulation for a long time. This long in vivo circulation time, combined with the proper K-edge energy and a large absorption cross-section of Yb in the near-infrared region, makes Yb-based nanoparticles particularly promising in angiography, 'multicolor' spectral CT imaging, and multimodal imaging. Finally, we also discuss the prospects and the challenges in the development of Yb-based CT contrast agents.

  4. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation (18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma: The Importance of Individualized Treatment Planning and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Clausen, Malene M.; Hansen, Anders E.; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J.; Engelholm, Svend A.; Kjær, Andreas; Kristensen, Annemarie T.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management of cancer patients. A dog with fibrosarcoma was imaged using 18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM, and 18F-FLT before, during, and after 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy radiotherapy. Uptake of all tracers decreased during treatment. Fluctuations in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET uptakes and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the three tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response. PMID:26854160

  5. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation ((18)F-FDG, (64)Cu-ATSM and (18)F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma: The Importance of Individualized Treatment Planning and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Clausen, Malene M; Hansen, Anders E; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend A; Kjær, Andreas; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management of cancer patients. A dog with fibrosarcoma was imaged using (18)F-FDG, (64)Cu-ATSM, and (18)F-FLT before, during, and after 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy radiotherapy. Uptake of all tracers decreased during treatment. Fluctuations in (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET uptakes and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the three tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response. PMID:26854160

  6. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs: paths forward in the era of personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Francis W; Wouters, Bradly G; Wilson, William R

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia has been pursued as a cancer drug target for over 30 years, most notably using bioreductive (hypoxia-activated) prodrugs that target antineoplastic agents to low-oxygen tumour compartments. Despite compelling evidence linking hypoxia with treatment resistance and adverse prognosis, a number of such prodrugs have recently failed to demonstrate efficacy in pivotal clinical trials; an outcome that demands reflection on the discovery and development of these compounds. In this review, we discuss a clear disconnect between the pathobiology of tumour hypoxia, the pharmacology of hypoxia-activated prodrugs and the manner in which they have been taken into clinical development. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs have been evaluated in the manner of broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents, yet a growing body of evidence suggests that their activity is likely to be dependent on the coincidence of tumour hypoxia, expression of specific prodrug-activating reductases and intrinsic sensitivity of malignant clones to the cytotoxic effector. Hypoxia itself is highly variable between and within individual tumours and is not treatment-limiting in all cancer subtypes. Defining predictive biomarkers for hypoxia-activated prodrugs and overcoming the technical challenges of assaying them in clinical settings will be essential to deploying these agents in the era of personalised cancer medicine. PMID:27070712

  7. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  8. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticle-containing microbubble composites as contrast agents for MR and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Lammers, Twan; Ehling, Josef; Fokong, Stanley; Bornemann, Jörg; Kiessling, Fabian; Gätjens, Jessica

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) imaging are widely used diagnostic modalities for various experimental and clinical applications. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticle-embedded polymeric microbubbles were designed as multi-modal contrast agents for hybrid MR-US imaging. These magnetic nano-in-micro imaging probes were prepared via a one-pot emulsion polymerization to form poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) microbubbles, along with the oil-in-water (O/W) encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles in the bubble shell. The nano-in-micro embedding strategy was validated using NMR and electron microscopy. These hybrid imaging agents exhibited strong contrast in US and an increased transversal relaxation rate in MR. Moreover, a significant increase in longitudinal and transversal relaxivities was observed after US-induced bubble destruction, which demonstrated triggerable MR imaging properties. Proof-of-principle in vivo experiments confirmed that these nanoparticle-embedded microbubble composites are suitable contrast agents for both MR and US imaging. In summary, these magnetic nano-in-micro hybrid materials are highly interesting systems for bimodal MR-US imaging, and their enhanced relaxivities upon US-induced destruction recommend them as potential vehicles for MR-guided US-mediated drug and gene delivery.

  10. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  11. Engineered iron-oxide-based nanoparticles as enhanced T1 contrast agents for efficient tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Lirong; Chi, Xiaoqin; Bao, Jianfeng; Yang, Lijiao; Zhao, Wenxiu; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Jinhao

    2013-04-23

    We report the design and synthesis of small-sized zwitterion-coated gadolinium-embedded iron oxide (GdIO) nanoparticles, which exhibit a strong T1 contrast effect for tumor imaging through enhanced permeation and retention effect and the ability to clear out of the body in living subjects. The combination of spin-canting effects and the collection of gadolinium species within small-sized GdIO nanoparticles led to a significantly enhanced T1 contrast effect. For example, GdIO nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼4.8 nm exhibited a high r1 relaxivity of 7.85 mM(-1)·S(-1) and a low r2/r1 ratio of 5.24. After being coated with zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate molecules, the 4.8 nm GdIO nanoparticles showed a steady hydrodynamic diameter (∼5.2 nm) in both PBS buffer and fetal bovine serum solution, indicating a low nonspecific protein absorption. This study provides a valuable strategy for the design of highly sensitive iron-oxide-based T1 contrast agents with relatively long circulation half-lives (∼50 min), efficient tumor passive targeting (SKOV3, human ovarian cancer xenograft tumor as a model), and the possibility of rapid renal clearance after tumor imaging.

  12. Plasmon-resonant nanorods as multimodal agents for two-photon luminescent imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Terry B.; Hansen, Matthew N.; Tong, Ling; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Zweifel, Daniel A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Wei, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods have outstanding potential as multifunctional agents for image-guided therapies. Nanorods have large absorption cross sections at near-infrared (NIR) frequencies, and produce two-photon luminescence (TPL) when excited by fs-pulsed laser irradiation. The TPL signals can be detected with single-particle sensitivity, enabling nanorods to be imaged in vivo while passing through blood vessels at subpicomolar concentrations. Furthermore, cells labeled with nanorods become highly susceptible to photothermal damage when irradiated at plasmon resonance, often resulting in a dramatic blebbing of the cell membrane. However, the straightforward application of gold nanorods for cell-specific labeling is obstructed by the presence of CTAB, a cationic surfactant carried over from nanorod synthesis which also promotes their nonspecific uptake into cells. Careful exchange and replacement of CTAB can be achieved by introducing oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) units capable of chemisorption onto nanorod surfaces by in situ dithiocarbamate formation, a novel method of surface functionalization. Nanorods with a dense coating of methyl-terminated OEG chains are shielded from nonspecific cell uptake, whereas nanorods functionalized with folate-terminated OEG chains accumulate on the surface of tumor cells overexpressing their cognate receptor, with subsequent delivery of photoinduced cell damage at low laser fluence.

  13. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC. PMID:27525313

  14. Developing vascular and hypoxia based theranostics in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koonce, Nathan A.

    Tissue hypoxia was recognized for its biological attenuating effects on ionizing radiation over a century ago and is a characteristic feature of many solid tumors. Clinical and experimental evidence indicates tumor hypoxia plays diverse and key roles in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Hypoxia has known effects on progression and resistance to several standard treatment approaches and the significant history of study might suggest diagnostic imaging and therapeutic interventions would be routine in oncological practice. Curiously, this is not the case and the research results involved in this report will attempt to better understand and contribute to why this gap in knowledge exists and a rationale for harnessing the potential of detecting and targeting hypoxia. Despite the addition of oxygen and reversal of hypoxia being known as the best radiosensitizer, hypoxia remains unexploited in clinical cancer therapy. The studies reported herein detail development of a novel imaging technique to detect a subtype of tumor hypoxia, vascular hypoxia or hypoxemia, with a 17-fold increase (p<0.05) in uptake of pimonidazole targeted microbubbles observed compared to controls. This technique creates the potential to study the role of hypoxemia in progression and therapeutic response. Additionally, description of a nanoparticle-based therapy that targets tumor areas associated with tumor hypoxia and the tumor microenvironment in general is reported. TNF-loaded nanoparticles combined with radiotherapy resulted in a 5.25-fold growth delay that was found to be synergistic (p<0.05) and suggests clinical evaluation is warranted. An additional study to evaluate an approach to use thermal ablation of intratumoral hypoxia by an image-guided technique developed in our group is described along with a sequence dependence of radiation preceding ablation. A final study on the use of galectin-1 antagonist to significantly decrease (p<0.05) hypoxia

  15. Positron emission tomography to assess hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verwer, Eline E; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Veldt, Astrid AM

    2014-01-01

    In lung cancer, tumor hypoxia is a characteristic feature, which is associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. As the development of tumor hypoxia is associated with decreased perfusion, perfusion measurements provide more insight into the relation between hypoxia and perfusion in malignant tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive nuclear imaging technique that is suited for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of dynamic processes including hypoxia and its associated parameter perfusion. The PET technique enables quantitative assessment of hypoxia and perfusion in tumors. To this end, consecutive PET scans can be performed in one scan session. Using different hypoxia tracers, PET imaging may provide insight into the prognostic significance of hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. In addition, PET studies may play an important role in various stages of personalized medicine, as these may help to select patients for specific treatments including radiation therapy, hypoxia modifying therapies, and antiangiogenic strategies. In addition, specific PET tracers can be applied for monitoring therapy. The present review provides an overview of the clinical applications of PET to measure hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. Available PET tracers and their characteristics as well as the applications of combined hypoxia and perfusion PET imaging are discussed. PMID:25493221

  16. Size effect of Au/PAMAM contrast agent on CT imaging of reticuloendothelial system and tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jian; Liu, Ransheng; Zhang, Aixu; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-entrapped Au nanoparticles were synthesized with distinct sizes to figure out the size effect of Au-based contrast agent on CT imaging of passively targeted tissues. Au/PAMAM nanoparticles were first synthesized with narrow distribution of particles size of 22.2 ± 3.1, 54.2 ± 3.7, and 104.9 ± 4.7 nm in diameters. Size effect leads no significant difference on X-ray attenuation when Au/PAMAM was ≤0.05 mol/L. For CT imaging of a tumor model, small Au/PAMAM were more easily internalized via endocytosis in the liver, leading to more obviously enhanced contrast. Similarly, contrast agents with small sizes were more effective in tumor imaging because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Overall, the particle size of Au/PAMAM heavily affected the efficiency of CT enhancement in imaging RES and tumors.

  17. Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama S.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic carbon-based nanostructures are presented as contrast agents (CAs) for advanced imaging applications such as cellular and molecular imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gadolinium-loaded, ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (gadonanotubes; GNTs) are shown to have extremely high r1 relaxivities (contrast enhancement efficacy), especially at low-magnetic field strengths. The inherent lipophilicity of GNTs provides them the ability to image cells at low magnetic field strength. A carboxylated dextran-coated GNT (GadoDex) has been synthesized and proposed as a new biocompatible high-performance MRI CA. The r1 relaxivity is ca. 20 times greater than for other paramagnetic Gd-based CAs. This enhanced relaxivity for GadoDex is due to the synergistic effects of an increased molecular tumbling time (tauR) and a faster proton exchange rate (taum). GNTs also exhibit very large transverse relaxivities (r2) at high magnetic fields (≥ 3 T). The dependence of the transverse relaxation rates (especially R2*) of labeled cells on GNT concentration offers the possibility to quantify cell population in vivo using R2* mapping. The cell-labeling efficiency and high transverse relaxivities of GNTs has enabled the first non-iron oxide-based single-cell imaging using MRI. The residual metal catalyst particles of SWNT materials also have transverse relaxation properties. All of the SWNT materials exhibit superior transverse relaxation properties. However, purified SWNTs and US-tubes with less residual metal content exhibit better transverse relaxivities (r2), demonstrating the importance of the SWNT structure for enhanced MRI CA performance. A strategy to improve the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CAs by geometrically confining them within porous silicon particles (SiMPs) has been investigated. The enhancement in relaxivity is attributed to the slow diffusion of water molecules through the pores and the increase in the molecular tumbling time of the nanoconstruct

  18. 99Tcm-LL1: a potential new bone marrow imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Juweid, M; Dunn, R M; Sharkey, R M; Rubin, A D; Hansen, H J; Goldenberg, D M

    1997-02-01

    LL1, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to HLA Class-II-like antigen (li determinant) on the surface of B-lymphocytes, monocytes and histiocytes, was evaluated as an agent for bone marrow imaging. Six patients with diverse diseases (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, n = 2; multiple myeloma, n = 1; polycythaemia vera, n = 1; lung cancer, n = 1; breast cancer, n = 1) were given low protein doses (< 1 mg) of 99Tcm (30 mCi) labelled Fab' of LL1. 99Tcm-sulphur colloid (SC) imaging was performed in three patients for comparison. Both planar and single photon emission tomographic images were acquired using Sopha gamma cameras. As early as 2 h post-MAb injection, excellent bone marrow images were achieved in all patients, demonstrating both normal or hyperproliferative marrow, as well as 'cold' bone marrow abnormalities such as radiation defects or cancer metastases. Similar to SC, relatively high uptake of LL1 was found in the liver and spleen. However, the bone marrow-to-liver and -spleen uptake ratios were approximately 19-fold higher (0.75 vs 0.04) and 6-fold higher (1.23 vs 0.22), respectively, with LL1 than with SC. The higher bone marrow uptake allowed clearly superior visualization of the thoracic spine when compared to SC. The mean T1/2 of blood and whole-body clearance were 0.4 and 66 h, respectively. The highest radiation absorbed doses (in cGy mCi-1) were observed in the spleen (0.47 +/- 0.24), kidneys (0.25 +/- 0.09) and liver (0.14 +/- 0.04). The bone marrow dose was only 0.05 +/- 0.02 cGy mCi-1. These results indicate that bone marrow imaging with 99Tcm-LL1 is feasible, and that LL1 may be a suitable alternative to SC because of better visualization of the lower thoracic spine. Potential applications include the improved detection of bone marrow metastases of solid tumours and the assessment of haematological disorders. PMID:9076770

  19. Integrating Anatomic and Functional Dual-Mode Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Design and Applicability of a Bifunctional Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dalong; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Renhua; Liu, Jianan; Yi, Meizhi; Wang, Jing; Yao, Zhenwei; Bu, Wenbo; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-03-22

    In recent decades, extensive attention has been paid to developing anatomic and functional imaging contrast agents that could provide a wealth of complementary bioimaging information. Among them, dual-mode nanoprobes that combine anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with functional fluorescent imaging have been mostly used for separated imaging. However, the lack of a machine for simultaneous dual-mode imaging greatly limits further clinical application. One effective strategy is to rationally design MRI contrast agents that own both anatomic and functional MR imaging capability on a single MRI machine, which is highly attractive but remains a great challenge. Herein, ultrasmall NaGdF4@PLL nanodots (NDs) were developed as a novel class of MR contrast agent, which offers a high longitude relaxivity (6.42 mM(-1) s(-1)) for T1-weighted MRI and an excellent sensitive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect for pH mapping (at +3.7 ppm). Further in vivo animal experiments show the feasibility of NaGdF4@PLL NDs as contrast agents for efficient kidney and brain tumor diagnosis and pH mapping, which will undoubtedly enhance the diagnosis accuracy and is beneficial for disease precaution and prognosis. Different from other complex dual-mode nanoprobes, the as-constructed NaGdF4@PLL NDs enable both anatomic and functional imaging on a single MR machine, which is a simple and cost-effective new approach to realize dual-mode MR imaging and holds great potential for future clinical application. PMID:26910513

  20. Hypoxia in paradise: widespread hypoxia tolerance in coral reef fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Göran E; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Using respirometry, we examined the hypoxia tolerance of 31 teleost fish species (seven families) inhabiting coral reefs at a 2-5 m depth in the lagoon at Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia). All fishes studied maintained their rate of oxygen consumption down to relatively severe hypoxia (20-30% air saturation). Indeed, most fishes appeared unaffected by hypoxia until the oxygen level fell below 10% of air saturation. This, hitherto unrecognized, hypoxia tolerance among coral reef fishes could reflect adaptations to nocturnal hypoxia in tide pools. It may also be needed to enable fishes to reside deep within branching coral at night to avoid predation. Widespread hypoxia tolerance in a habitat with such an extreme biodiversity as coral reefs indicate that there is a wealth of hypoxia related adaptations to be discovered in reef fishes. PMID:15101411

  1. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymers as Nanoscopic 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Nyström, Andreas M.; Zhang, Lei; Powell, Kenya T.; Li, Yali; Cheng, Chong; Wickline, Samuel A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Three hyperbranched fluoropolymers were synthesized and their micelles were constructed as potential 19F MRI agents. A hyperbranched star-like core was first synthesized via ATR-SCVCP of 4-chloromethyl styrene (CMS), lauryl acrylate (LA) and 1,1,1-tris(4′-(2″-bromoisobutyryloxy)phenyl)ethane (TBBPE). The polymerization gave a small core with Mn of 5.5 kDa with PDI of 1.6, which served as a macroinitiator. Trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) in different ratio were then “grafted” from the core to give three polymers with Mn of ca. 120 kDa and PDI values of ca. 1.6–1.8. After acidolysis of the tert-butyl ester groups, amphiphilic, hyperbranched star-like polymers with Mn of ca. 100 kDa were obtained. These structures were subjected to micelle formation in aqueous solution to give micelles having TEM-measured diameters ranging from 3–8 nm and DLS-measured hydrodynamic diameters from 20–30 nm. These micelles gave a narrow, single resonance by 19F NMR spectroscopy, with a half width of approximately 130 Hz. The T1/T2 parameters were ca. 500 ms and 50 ms, respectively, and were not significantly affected by the composition and sizes of the micelles. 19F MRI phantom images of these fluorinated micelles were acquired, which demonstrated that these fluorinated micelles maybe useful as novel 19F MRI agents for a variety of biomedical studies. PMID:18795785

  2. Protein-targeted gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents: design and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Caravan, Peter

    2009-07-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful medical diagnostic technique: it can penetrate deep into tissue, provide excellent soft tissue contrast with sub-millimeter resolution, and does not employ ionizing radiation. Targeted contrast agents provide an additional layer of molecular specificity to the wealth of anatomical and functional information already attainable by MRI. However, the major challenge for molecular MR imaging is sensitivity: micromolar concentrations of Gd(III) are required to cause a detectable signal change, which makes detecting proteins by MRI a challenge. Protein-targeted MRI contrast agents are bifunctional molecules comprising a protein-targeting moiety and typically one or more gadolinium chelates for detection by MRI. The ability of the contrast agent to enhance the MR image is termed relaxivity, and it depends upon many molecular factors, including protein binding itself. As in other imaging modalities, protein binding provides the pharmacokinetic effect of concentrating the agent at the region of interest. Unique to MRI, protein binding provides the pharmacodynamic effect of increasing the relaxivity of the contrast agent, thereby increasing the MR signal. In designing new agents, optimization of both the targeting function and the relaxivity is critical. In this Account, we focus on optimization of the relaxivity of targeted agents. Relaxivity depends upon speciation, chemical structure, and dynamic processes, such as water exchange kinetics and rotational tumbling rates. We describe mechanistic studies that relate these factors to the observed relaxivities and use these findings as the basis of rational design of improved agents. In addition to traditional biochemical methods to characterize ligand-protein interactions, the presence of the metal ion enables more obscure biophysical techniques, such as relaxometry and electron nuclear double resonance, to be used to elucidate the mechanism of relaxivity differences. As a case

  3. Iron oxide nanorods as high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Tyagi, Himanshu; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods.An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00055f

  4. Clinical Biomarkers for Hypoxia Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Courter, Don

    2010-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia or a reduction of the tissue oxygen tension is a key microenvironmental factor for tumor progression and treatment resistance in solid tumors. Because hypoxic tumor cells have been demonstrated to be more resistant to ionizing radiation, hypoxia has been a focus of laboratory and clinical research in radiation therapy for many decades. It is believed that proper detection of hypoxic regions would guide treatment options and ultimately improve tumor response. To date, most clinical efforts in targeting tumor hypoxia have yielded equivocal results due to the lack of appropriate patient selection. However, with improved understanding of the molecular pathways regulated by hypoxia and the discovery of novel hypoxia markers, the prospect of targeting hypoxia has become more tangible. This chapter will focus on the development of clinical biomarkers for hypoxia targeting. PMID:18483785

  5. Introducing social cues in multimedia learning: The role of pedagogic agents' image and language in a scientific lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Roxana Arleen

    The present dissertation tested the hypothesis that software pedagogical agents can promote constructivist learning in a discovery-based multimedia environment. In a preliminary study, students who received a computer-based lesson on environmental science performed better on subsequent tests of problem solving and motivation when they learned with the mediation of a fictional agent compared to when they learned the same material from text. In order to investigate further the basis for this personal agent effect, I varied whether the agent's words were presented as speech or on-screen text and whether or not the agent's image appeared on the screen. Both with a fictional agent (Experiment 1) and a video of a human face (Experiment 2), students performed better on tests of retention, problem-solving transfer, and program ratings when words were presented as speech rather than on-screen text (producing a modality effect) but visual presence of the agent did not affect test performance (producing no image effect). Next, I varied whether or not the agent's words were presented in conversational style (i.e., as dialogue) or formal style (i.e., as monologue) both using speech (Experiment 3) and on-screen text (Experiment 4). In both experiments, there was a dialogue effect in which conversational-style produced better retention and transfer performance. Students who learned with conversational-style text rated the program more favorably than those who learned with monologue-style text. The results support cognitive principles of multimedia learning which underlie the understanding of a computer lesson about a complex scientific system.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme: Effect of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factors on therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system-based cancers have a much higher mortality rate with the 2016 estimates at 6.4 for incidence and 4.3 for deaths per 100,000 individuals. Grade IV astrocytomas, known as glioblastomas are highly aggressive and show a high proliferation index, diffused infiltration, angiogenesis, microvascular proliferation and pleomorphic vessels, resistance to apoptosis, and pseudopalisading necrosis. Extensive hypoxic regions in glioblastomas contribute to the highly malignant phenotype of these tumors. Hypoxic regions of glioblastoma exacerbate the prognosis and clinical outcomes of the patients as hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy and are also protected by the malfunctional vasculature that developed due to hypoxia. Predominantly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor, transforming growth factor-β, epidermal growth factor receptor and PI3 kinase/Akt signaling systems are involved in tumor progression and growth. Glioblastomas are predominantly glycolytic and hypoxia-induced factors are useful in the metabolic reprogramming of these tumors. Abnormal vessel formation is crucial in generating pseudopalisading necrosis regions that protect cancer stem cells residing in that region from therapeutic agents and this facilitates the cancer stem cell niche to expand and contribute to cell proliferation and tumor growth. Therapeutic approaches that target hypoxia-induced factors, such as use of the monoclonal antibody against VEGF, bevacizumab, have been useful only in stabilizing the disease but failed to increase overall survival. Hypoxia-activated TH-302, a nitroimidazole prodrug of cytotoxin bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, appears to be more attractive due to its better beneficial effects in glioblastoma patients. A better understanding of the hypoxia-mediated protection of glioblastoma cells is required for developing more effective therapeutics. PMID:27698790

  7. Glioblastoma multiforme: Effect of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factors on therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system-based cancers have a much higher mortality rate with the 2016 estimates at 6.4 for incidence and 4.3 for deaths per 100,000 individuals. Grade IV astrocytomas, known as glioblastomas are highly aggressive and show a high proliferation index, diffused infiltration, angiogenesis, microvascular proliferation and pleomorphic vessels, resistance to apoptosis, and pseudopalisading necrosis. Extensive hypoxic regions in glioblastomas contribute to the highly malignant phenotype of these tumors. Hypoxic regions of glioblastoma exacerbate the prognosis and clinical outcomes of the patients as hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy and are also protected by the malfunctional vasculature that developed due to hypoxia. Predominantly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor, transforming growth factor-β, epidermal growth factor receptor and PI3 kinase/Akt signaling systems are involved in tumor progression and growth. Glioblastomas are predominantly glycolytic and hypoxia-induced factors are useful in the metabolic reprogramming of these tumors. Abnormal vessel formation is crucial in generating pseudopalisading necrosis regions that protect cancer stem cells residing in that region from therapeutic agents and this facilitates the cancer stem cell niche to expand and contribute to cell proliferation and tumor growth. Therapeutic approaches that target hypoxia-induced factors, such as use of the monoclonal antibody against VEGF, bevacizumab, have been useful only in stabilizing the disease but failed to increase overall survival. Hypoxia-activated TH-302, a nitroimidazole prodrug of cytotoxin bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, appears to be more attractive due to its better beneficial effects in glioblastoma patients. A better understanding of the hypoxia-mediated protection of glioblastoma cells is required for developing more effective therapeutics.

  8. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats.

  9. HypoxiaDB: a database of hypoxia-regulated proteins.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Pankaj; Sugadev, Ragumani; Jain, Jaspreet; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-01-01

    There has been intense interest in the cellular response to hypoxia, and a large number of differentially expressed proteins have been identified through various high-throughput experiments. These valuable data are scattered, and there have been no systematic attempts to document the various proteins regulated by hypoxia. Compilation, curation and annotation of these data are important in deciphering their role in hypoxia and hypoxia-related disorders. Therefore, we have compiled HypoxiaDB, a database of hypoxia-regulated proteins. It is a comprehensive, manually-curated, non-redundant catalog of proteins whose expressions are shown experimentally to be altered at different levels and durations of hypoxia. The database currently contains 72 000 manually curated entries taken on 3500 proteins extracted from 73 peer-reviewed publications selected from PubMed. HypoxiaDB is distinctive from other generalized databases: (i) it compiles tissue-specific protein expression changes under different levels and duration of hypoxia. Also, it provides manually curated literature references to support the inclusion of the protein in the database and establish its association with hypoxia. (ii) For each protein, HypoxiaDB integrates data on gene ontology, KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway, protein-protein interactions, protein family (Pfam), OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PDB (Protein Data Bank) structures and homology to other sequenced genomes. (iii) It also provides pre-compiled information on hypoxia-proteins, which otherwise requires tedious computational analysis. This includes information like chromosomal location, identifiers like Entrez, HGNC, Unigene, Uniprot, Ensembl, Vega, GI numbers and Genbank accession numbers associated with the protein. These are further cross-linked to respective public databases augmenting HypoxiaDB to the external repositories. (iv) In addition, HypoxiaDB provides an online sequence-similarity search tool for

  10. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  11. SERS-barcoded colloidal gold NP assemblies as imaging agents for use in biodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Priyanka; Olds, William; Blakey, Idriss; Thurecht, Kristofer J.; Izake, Emad L.; Fredericks, Peter M.

    2014-03-01

    There is a growing need for new biodiagnostics that combine high throughput with enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity. Gold nanoparticle (NP) assemblies with sub-10 nm particle spacing have the benefits of improving detection sensitivity via Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and being of potential use in biomedicine due to their colloidal stability. A promising and versatile approach to form solution-stable NP assemblies involves the use of multi-branched molecular linkers which allows tailoring of the assembly size, hot-spot density and interparticle distance. We have shown that linkers with multiple anchoring end-groups can be successfully employed as a linker to assemble gold NPs into dimers, linear NP chains and clustered NP assemblies. These NP assemblies with diameters of 30-120 nm are stable in solution and perform better as SERS substrates compared with single gold NPs, due to an increased hot-spot density. Thus, tailored gold NP assemblies are potential candidates for use as biomedical imaging agents. We observed that the hot-spot density and in-turn the SERS enhancement is a function of the linker polymer concentration and polymer architecture. New deep Raman techniques like Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) have emerged that allow detection from beneath diffusely scattering opaque materials, including biological media such as animal tissue. We have been able to demonstrate that the gold NP assemblies could be detected from within both proteinaceous and high lipid containing animal tissue by employing a SORS technique with a backscattered geometry.

  12. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Elizabeth; Keating, Jane J; Kularatne, Sumith A; Jiang, Jack; Judy, Ryan; Predina, Jarrod; Nie, Shuming; Low, Philip; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p < 0.001). Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48-5.43). Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR) dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes. PMID:26491562

  13. Iron oxide nanorods as high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Tyagi, Himanshu; Bahadur, D; Aslam, M

    2015-01-01

    An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM(-1) s(-1). The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods.

  14. Radiohalogen-labeled imaging agents. 3. Compounds for measurement of brain blood flow by emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, T.; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    The radioiodine-labeled amines currently available as brain-imaging agents, based on our previous work and that of others, are prepared either by exchange labeling or by direct iodination of a protected intermediate. The intrinsic slowness of these processes limits their potential for use with the positron-emitting 122I, as it has a half-life of only 3.6 min. This isotope has advantages of a low dose to the patient and availability from a generator containing the parent 20-h 122Xe. To develop a radiopharmaceutical in which 122I could be utilized, we prepared a number of secondary and tertiary amines (maintaining the 2,5-dimethoxy substitution pattern which allows direct iodination at the 4-position) with 131I. The organ distributions of these compounds were studied, and the best properties were found in the N,N-dimethyl homologue (2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl-4-iodoamphetamine). This compound was successfully synthesized in a matter of seconds, with a chemical yield and radioactive purity both in excess of 90% and an incorporation efficiency of radioiodine of about 40%.

  15. [Physico-chemical and toxicological profile of gadolinium chelates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Idée, J-M; Fretellier, N; Thurnher, M M; Bonnemain, B; Corot, C

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium chelates (GC) are contrast agents widely used to facilitate or to enable diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From a regulatory viewpoint, GC are drugs. GC have largely contributed to the success of MRI, which has become a major component of clinician's diagnostic armamentarium. GC are not metabolised and are excreted by the kidneys. They distribute into the extracellular compartment. Because of its high intrinsic toxicity, gadolinium must be administered as a chelate. GC can be classified according to two key molecular features: (a) nature of the chelating moiety: either macrocyclic molecules in which gadolinium is caged in the pre-organized cavity of the ligand, or linear, open-chain molecules, (b) ionicity: Gd chelates can be ionic (meglumine or sodium salts) or non-ionic. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of the various GCs differ according to these structural characteristics. The kinetic stability of macrocyclic GCs is much higher than that of linear GCs and the thermodynamic stability of ionic GCs is generally higher than that of non-ionic GC, thus leading to a lower risk of gadolinium dissociation. This class of drugs has enjoyed an excellent reputation in terms of safety for a long time, until a causal link with a recently-described serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), was evidenced. It is acknowledged that the vast majority of NSF cases are related to the administration of some linear CG in renally-impaired patients. Health authorities, worldwide, released recommendations which drastically reduced the occurrence of new cases. PMID:25731664

  16. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with variable size and an iron oxidation state as prospective imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kucheryavy, Pavel; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Maharjan, Pawan; Spinu, Leonard; Goloverda, Galina Z; Kolesnichenko, Vladimir L

    2013-01-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles in the size range of 3.2-7.5 nm were synthesized in high yields under variable reaction conditions using high-temperature hydrolysis of the precursor iron(II) and iron(III) alkoxides in diethylene glycol solution. The average sizes of the particles were adjusted by changing the reaction temperature and time and by using a sequential growth technique. To obtain γ-iron(III) oxide particles in the same range of sizes, magnetite particles were oxidized with dry oxygen in diethylene glycol at room temperature. The products were characterized by DLS, TEM, X-ray powder diffractometry, TGA, chemical analysis, and magnetic measurements. NMR r(1) and r(2) relaxivity measurements in water and diethylene glycol (for OH and CH(2) protons) have shown a decrease in the r(2)/r(1) ratio with the particle size reduction, which correlates with the results of magnetic measurements on magnetite nanoparticles. Saturation magnetization of the oxidized particles was found to be 20% lower than that for Fe(3)O(4) with the same particle size, but their r(1) relaxivities are similar. Because the oxidation of magnetite is spontaneous under ambient conditions, it was important to learn that the oxidation product has no disadvantages as compared to its precursor and therefore may be a better prospective imaging agent because of its chemical stability.

  17. Physicochemical characterization of a novel graphene-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Button, Terry; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel carbon nanostructure-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (MRI CA); graphene nanoplatelets intercalated with manganese (Mn2+) ions, functionalized with dextran (GNP-Dex); and the in vitro assessment of its essential preclinical physicochemical properties: osmolality, viscosity, partition coefficient, protein binding, thermostability, histamine release, and relaxivity. The results indicate that, at concentrations between 0.1 and 100.0 mg/mL, the GNP-Dex formulations are hydrophilic, highly soluble, and stable in deionized water, as well as iso-osmolar (upon addition of mannitol) and iso-viscous to blood. At potential steady-state equilibrium concentrations in blood (0.1–10.0 mg/mL), the thermostability, protein-binding, and histamine-release studies indicate that the GNP-Dex formulations are thermally stable (with no Mn2+ ion dissociation), do not allow non-specific protein adsorption, and elicit negligible allergic response. The r1 relaxivity of GNP-Dex was 92 mM−1s−1 (per-Mn2+ ion, 22 MHz proton Larmor frequency); ~20- to 30-fold greater than that of clinical gadolinium (Gd3+)- and Mn2+-based MRI CAs. The results open avenues for preclinical in vivo safety and efficacy studies with GNP-Dex toward its development as a clinical MRI CA. PMID:23946653

  18. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  19. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    PubMed

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  20. Nano Liposomes Labeled with (99m)Tc-HMPAO, a Novel Agent for Blood Pool Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Kayvan; Momenypoor, Salimeh; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid Reza; Sadeghi, Ramin; Aryana, Kamran; Johari Daha, Fariba; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-01-01

    In-vitro labeling of RBC with (99m)Tc is an intricate procedure and there is always a need for an alternate blood pool imaging agent. The aim of this study was to prepare an effective nano sized liposome (NLs) similar to human RBC for blood pool scintigraphy. This study formulates PEG-NLs and non-PEG-NLs using film method plus high pressure homogenization technique. Biodistribution studies were performed on BALB/C mice 1, 4 and 24 h after tail vein injection of labeled NLs with (99m)Tc hexamethylpropylene-amine-oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO). Planar images were acquired using a 256 × 256 matrix following(99m) Tc-HMPAO-NLs injection into ear vein of rabbits 1, 2 and 24 h later. SPECT images were obtained 15 minutes after the injection (64 slices, 30 second/projection). The mean diameter, zeta potential and polydispersity index (PDI) of the PEG-NLs and the NLs were (80.88 ± 0.594 nm, -12.5 ± 0.56 mv, 0.158 ± 0.025) and (94.14 ± 0.114 nm, -35.5 ± 0.67 mv and 0.198 ± 0.007), respectively. (99m)Tc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs showed a significant circulation tracer activity (7.74 ± 1.63%ID/g at 1 h and 4.9 ± 0.77 %ID/g at 4 h), with low liver accumulation (12.07 ± 3.66 %ID/g at 1 h and 14.85 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 4 h). Heart to liver, spleen and background ROIs (region of interests) for (99m) Tc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs were 1.25, 4 and 4.28 respectively at 2 h which changed to 1.06, 1.75 and 2.51 respectively at 24 h. The (99m)Tc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs with a prolonged blood circulation time could be an excellent RBC alternative for scintigraphy and gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  2. High-performance dendritic contrast agents for X-ray computed tomography imaging using potent tetraiodobenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    You, Suyeon; Jung, Hye-Youn; Lee, Chaewoon; Choe, Yun Hui; Heo, Ju Young; Gang, Gil-Tae; Byun, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Dong-Eog; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Yoonkyung

    2016-03-28

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for vascular imaging is critical in medical emergencies requiring urgent diagnostic decisions, such as cerebral ischemia and many cardiovascular diseases. Small-molecule iodinated contrast media are often injected intravenously as radiopaque agents during CT imaging to achieve high contrast enhancement of vascular systems. The rapid excretion rate of these agents is overcome by injecting a significantly high dose of iodine, which can have serious side effects. Here we report a simple method to prepare blood-pool contrast agents for CT based on dendrimers for the first time using tetraiodobenzene derivatives as potent radiopaque moieties. Excellent in vivo safety has been demonstrated for these small (13-22nm) unimolecular water-soluble dendritic contrast agents, which exhibit high contrast enhancement in the blood-pool and effectively extend their blood half-lives. Our method is applicable to virtually any scaffold with suitable surface groups and may fulfill the current need for safer, next-generation iodinated CT contrast agents. PMID:26812006

  3. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion.

  4. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion. PMID:23980505

  5. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  6. Gentamicin-gold nanoparticles conjugate: a contrast agent for X-ray imaging of infectious foci due to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ahangari, Azam; Salouti, Mojtaba; Saghatchi, Faranak

    2016-08-01

    There is no optimal imaging method for the detection of unknown infectious foci in some diseases. This study introduces a novel method in X-ray imaging of infection foci due to Staphylococcus aureus by developing a contrast agent based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs). GNPs in spherical shape were synthesised by the reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with sodium citrate. Then gentamicin was bound directly to citrate functionalised GNPs and the complex was stabilised by polyethylene glycol. The interaction of gentamicin with GNPs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies. The stability of complex was studied in human blood up to 6 h. The stability of conjugate was found to be high in human blood with no aggregation. The biodistribution study showed localisation of gentamicin-GNPs conjugate at the site of Staphylococcal infection. The infection site was properly visualised in X-ray images in mouse model using the gentamicin-GNPs conjugate as a contrast agent. The results demonstrated that one may consider the potential of new nanodrug as a contrast agent for X-ray imaging of infection foci in human beings which needs more investigations. PMID:27463788

  7. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  8. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  9. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  10. Hypoxia and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jankovic Velickovic, Ljubinka; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2014-05-01

    This review mainly focuses on our understanding of spermatogenesis in physiological and pathological hypoxic condition. Real hypoxia is closely related to vascular changes and an increase in testicular temperature. Both induce a reduction in sperm count and can be related to the increase in germ cell apoptosis. On the other hand, change in the temperature, and oxygen levels in the microenvironment have influence on spermatogonial stem cell function and differentiation. The initial connection between hypoxia and a factor critical for stem cell maintenance is alteration in Oct-4 expression, and these data may be a useful strategy for modulating stem cell function. Unilateral testicular ischemia-induced cell death can be accompanied by an increase in germ cell apoptosis in the contralateral testis. The injury of contralateral testis following unilateral testicular damage is controversial, and it can contribute to the reduction in fertility. PMID:24265038

  11. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F.; Sparks, R.B.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  12. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. PMID:25997947

  13. Yb³⁺/Er³⁺-Codoped Bi₂O₃ Nanospheres: Probe for Upconversion Luminescence Imaging and Binary Contrast Agent for Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pengpeng; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Qinghai; Wang, Zhuo; Dong, Lile; Song, Shuyan; Xu, Xia; Liu, Xiuling; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-12-01

    In this work, water-soluble Yb(3+)/Er(3+) codoped Bi2O3 upconversion (UC) nanospheres with uniform morphology have been successfully synthesized via a solid-state-chemistry thermal decomposition process. With 980 nm near-infrared irradiation, the Bi2O3:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanospheres have bright UC luminescence (UCL). Moreover, multicolor UC emissions (from green to red) can be tuned by simply changing the Yb(3+) ions doping concentration. After citric acid molecules were grafted on the surface of Bi2O3:20% Yb(3+)/2% Er(3+) nanospheres, the MTT assay on HeLa cells and CCK-8 assay on osteoblasts show that the UC nanospheres exhibit excellent stability and biocompatibility. The possibility of using these nanoprobes with red UCL for optical imaging in vivo has been demonstrated. Furthermore, Bi(3+) and Yb(3+) containing nanospheres as binary contrast agent also exhibited significant enhancement of contrast efficacy than iodine-based contrast agent via X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging at different voltage setting (80-140 kVp), indicating they have potential as CT imaging contrast agent. Thus, Yb(3+)/Er(3+) codoped Bi2O3 nanospheres could be used as dual modality probe for optical and CT imagings. PMID:26561383

  14. Yb³⁺/Er³⁺-Codoped Bi₂O₃ Nanospheres: Probe for Upconversion Luminescence Imaging and Binary Contrast Agent for Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pengpeng; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Qinghai; Wang, Zhuo; Dong, Lile; Song, Shuyan; Xu, Xia; Liu, Xiuling; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-12-01

    In this work, water-soluble Yb(3+)/Er(3+) codoped Bi2O3 upconversion (UC) nanospheres with uniform morphology have been successfully synthesized via a solid-state-chemistry thermal decomposition process. With 980 nm near-infrared irradiation, the Bi2O3:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanospheres have bright UC luminescence (UCL). Moreover, multicolor UC emissions (from green to red) can be tuned by simply changing the Yb(3+) ions doping concentration. After citric acid molecules were grafted on the surface of Bi2O3:20% Yb(3+)/2% Er(3+) nanospheres, the MTT assay on HeLa cells and CCK-8 assay on osteoblasts show that the UC nanospheres exhibit excellent stability and biocompatibility. The possibility of using these nanoprobes with red UCL for optical imaging in vivo has been demonstrated. Furthermore, Bi(3+) and Yb(3+) containing nanospheres as binary contrast agent also exhibited significant enhancement of contrast efficacy than iodine-based contrast agent via X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging at different voltage setting (80-140 kVp), indicating they have potential as CT imaging contrast agent. Thus, Yb(3+)/Er(3+) codoped Bi2O3 nanospheres could be used as dual modality probe for optical and CT imagings.

  15. Development of polymer-coated nanoparticle imaging agents for diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairdolf, Brad A.

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, with over 500,000 deaths expected this year. While significant progress has been made in the treatment and management of cancer, challenges remain because of the complexity and the heterogeneous nature of the disease. The improvement that has been seen in survival rates reflects advancements not only in treatment, but also in early stage detection and diagnostics for certain cancers. In particular, early stage detection and treatment of cancer before it has metastasized to other organs has resulted in a dramatic improvement in patient survival rates. One area of research that has shown considerable promise in further advancing diagnostics and early cancer detection is nanotechnology. Specifically, semiconductor and metal nanoparticles have great potential to provide advanced technology platforms for ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of disease markers and probe disease on the molecular level. Because they are in the same size regime as biological molecules, these nanoparticles exhibit unique interactions with proteins, nucleic acids and other biomarkers of interest for detecting and diagnosing disease. However, high-quality nanoparticles are often unsuited for use in complex biological environments because of their coatings and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, we describe the design and development of polymer-coated nanoparticle imaging agents for use in blood, cell and tissue diagnostic applications. First, low-molecular weight, amphiphilic polymers, with hydrocarbon chains capable of noncovalent interactions with nanoparticle surface ligands and a hydrophilic backbone to render the nanoparticle water soluble, were synthesized and characterized for use in nanoparticle coating applications. We demonstrate that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between the nanoparticle surface, the amphiphilic polymer and the aqueous solvent were able to drive the coating and water

  16. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  17. Design and in vitro activities of N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, novel, small-molecule hypoxia inducible factor-1 pathway inhibitors and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiyoung; Jabbar, Adnan Abdul; Devi, Narra Sarojini; Yin, Shaoman; Wang, Yingzhe; Tan, Chalet; Culver, Deborah; Snyder, James P; Van Meir, Erwin G; Goodman, Mark M

    2012-08-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is an attractive target for cancer, as it controls tumor adaptation to growth under hypoxia and mediates chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We previously discovered 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide as a novel, small-molecule HIF-1 pathway inhibitor in a high-throughput cell-based assay, but its in vivo delivery is hampered by poor aqueous solubility (0.009 μM in water; log P(7.4) = 3.7). Here we describe the synthesis of 12 N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, which were designed to possess optimal lipophilicities and aqueous solubilities by in silico calculations. Experimental log P(7.4) values of 8 of the 12 new analogs ranged from 1.2-3.1. Aqueous solubilities of three analogs were measured, among which the most soluble N-[(8-methoxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-(propan-2-yl)pyridine-2-sulfonamide had an aqueous solubility of 80 μM, e.g., a solubility improvement of ∼9000-fold. The pharmacological optimization had limited impact on drug efficacy as the compounds retained IC(50) values at or below 5 μM in our HIF-dependent reporter assay.

  18. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  19. Multi-stimuli responsive Cu2S nanocrystals as trimodal imaging and synergistic chemo-photothermal therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Mohamed, M Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Romero Aburto, Rebeca; Mitcham, Trevor; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Bouchard, Richard R; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2015-05-14

    A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25797920

  20. Dual-purpose linker for alpha helix stabilization and imaging agent conjugation to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Liao, Jianshan; Thurber, Greg M

    2015-02-18

    Peptides display many characteristics of efficient imaging agents such as rapid targeting, fast background clearance, and low non-specific cellular uptake. However, poor stability, low affinity, and loss of binding after labeling often preclude their use in vivo. Using glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) ligands exendin and GLP-1 as a model system, we designed a novel α-helix-stabilizing linker to simultaneously address these limitations. The stabilized and labeled peptides showed an increase in helicity, improved protease resistance, negligible loss or an improvement in binding affinity, and excellent in vivo targeting. The ease of incorporating azidohomoalanine in peptides and efficient reaction with the dialkyne linker enable this technique to potentially be used as a general method for labeling α helices. This strategy should be useful for imaging beta cells in diabetes research and in developing and testing other peptide targeting agents. PMID:25594741

  1. Paramagnetic lipid-coated silica nanoparticles with a fluorescent quantum dot core: a new contrast agent platform for multimodality imaging

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Rolf; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Hilhorst, Jan; Castermans, Karolien; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Nicolay, Klaas; Fayad, Zahi A.; Meijerink, Andries; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Silica particles as a nanoparticulate carrier material for contrast agents have received considerable attention the past few years, since the material holds great promise for biomedical applications. A key feature for successful application of this material in vivo is biocompatibility, which may be significantly improved by appropriate surface modification. In this study we report a novel strategy to coat silica particles with a dense monolayer of paramagnetic and PEGylated lipids. The silica nanoparticles carry a quantum dot in their centre and are made target-specific by the conjugation of multiple αvβ3-integrin-specifc RGD-peptides. We demonstrate their specific uptake by endothelial cells in vitro using fluorescence microscopy, quantitative fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. The lipid coated silica particles introduced here represent a new platform for nanoparticulate multimodality contrast agents. PMID:19035793

  2. A second generation MRI contrast agent for imaging zinc ions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Lubag, Angelo J. M.; López, Jorge A.; Andreu-de-Riquer, Gabriel; Alvarado-Monzón, José C.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2013-01-01

    A Zn2+ specific GdDOTA derivative containing two bis-(3-pyrazolyl) units was prepared and characterized. Unlike a previously reported Zn2+ binding agent, the new agent binds to human albumin both in the presence and absence of Zn2+. PMID:24013159

  3. Biocompatible Low-Retention Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Tumor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yushuang; Liao, Rufang; Liu, Haijuan; Li, Huan; Xu, Haibo; Zhou, Qibing

    2015-05-01

    Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been developed as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acute iron overload due to the persistently high retention of SPIOs in the liver and spleen that are slowly converted to ferroproteins is a serious safety concern. Here, we report that the addition of poly-L-lysine polymers to an SPIO hydroxyethyl starch solution produced tightly controlled, monodispersed nanoparticles in a size-dependent manner as effective contrast agents for the MRI of liver tumors. High MRI contrast was demonstrated with an orthotopic liver tumor model at a low injection dose. Simultaneously, rapid bioclearance of excess iron in the lung and spleen and in blood serum was observed within 24 h post-injection. The full excretion of excess iron was confirmed in urine post-intravenous injection, suggesting that the effective clearance of SPIOs could be achieved with our SPIO nanoclusters as a liver imaging contrast agent to resolve acute iron overload in the clinical usage of SPIOs as a contrast agent.

  4. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  5. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: A multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a new optical contrast agent, based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside a polymer cladding, so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity, compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo, to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90%, following nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NP’s can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities, for broadband multimodal imaging, usable for diagnostic applications and extendable into use as therapeutic agents as well. PMID:25325364

  6. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  7. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well. PMID:25325364

  8. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  9. Multi-stimuli responsive Cu2S nanocrystals as trimodal imaging and synergistic chemo-photothermal therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Mohamed, M. Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Romero Aburto, Rebeca; Mitcham, Trevor; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2015-04-01

    A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies.A size and shape tuned, multifunctional metal chalcogenide, Cu2S-based nanotheranostic agent is developed for trimodal imaging and multimodal therapeutics against brain cancer cells. This theranostic agent was highly efficient in optical, photoacoustic and X-ray contrast imaging systems. The folate targeted NIR-responsive photothermal ablation in synergism with the chemotherapeutic action of doxorubicin proved to be a rapid precision guided cancer-killing module. The multi-stimuli, i.e., pH-, thermo- and photo-responsive drug release behavior of the nanoconjugates opens up a wider corridor for on-demand triggered drug administration. The simple synthesis protocol, combined with the multitudes of interesting features packed into a single nanoformulation, clearly demonstrates the competing role of this Cu2S nanosystem in future cancer treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methodology and additional experimental results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07139e

  10. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents. Final technical report, January 31, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Research conducted in this terminal year of support centered on three distinct areas: mAChR ligand localization in pancreas and the effect of Ca{sup +2} on localization, continuation of assessment of quaternized and neutral mAChR ligands for possible use as PET myocardial imaging agents, and initiation of a study to determine the relationship of the nAChR receptor to the cellular receptor for measles virus. Several tables and figures illustrating the results are included.

  11. Activatable hyaluronic acid nanoparticle as a theranostic agent for optical/photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Gao, Shi; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Kai; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2014-12-23

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is an emerging treatment modality that is under intensive preclinical investigations for the treatment of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of targeting function of PTT agents hampers its clinical application. An effective and nontoxic delivery vehicle that can carry PTT agents into tumor areas is still needed urgently. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomposite by loading copper sulfide (CuS) into Cy5.5-conjugated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANP), obtaining an activatable Cy5.5-HANP/CuS (HANPC) nanocomposite. In this system, Cy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by CuS inside the particle until the whole nanocomposite is degraded by hyaluronidase present in tumor, giving strong fluorescence signals delineating the tumor. Importantly, CuS with strong NIR absorbance appears to be an excellent contrast agent for photoacoustic (PA) imaging and an effective PTT agent. After intravenous administration of HANPC into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.25±0.25 for optical imaging and 3.8±0.42 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and a good tumor inhibition rate (89.74% on day 5) was observed. Our studies further encourage application of this HA-based multifunctional nanocomposite for image-guided PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:25402600

  12. Luminescence Enhanced Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) Co-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Imaging Agents In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunfei; He, Wangmei; Li, Fang; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Gan, Lin; Han, Yingchao; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Dai, Honglian

    2016-04-27

    Biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescent nano material can be used as an alternative bioimaging agent for early cancer diagnosis, which is crucial to achieve successful treatment. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocyrstals have good biocompatibility and biodegradability, and can be used as an excellent host for luminescent rare earth elements. In this study, based on the energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Eu(3+), the luminescence enhanced imaging agent of Eu/Gd codoping HAP (HAP:Eu/Gd) nanocrystals are obtained via coprecipitation with plate-like shape and no change in crystal phase composition. The luminescence can be much elevated (up to about 120%) with a nonlinear increase versus Gd doping content, which is due to the energy transfer ((6)PJ of Gd(3+) → (5)HJ of Eu(3+)) under 273 nm and the possible combination effect of the cooperative upconversion and the successive energy transfer under 394 nm, respectively. Results demonstrate that the biocompatible HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals can successfully perform cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The intracellular HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals display good biodegradability with a cumulative degradation of about 65% after 72 h. This biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescence enhanced HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystal has the potential to act as a fluorescent imaging agent in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27043792

  13. Chlorophyll-a analogues conjugated with aminobenzyl-DTPA as potential bifunctional agents for magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Slansky, Adam; Dobhal, Mahabeer P; Goswami, Lalit N; Graham, Andrew; Chen, Yihui; Kanter, Peter; Alberico, Ronald A; Spernyak, Joseph; Morgan, Janet; Mazurchuk, Richard; Oseroff, Allan; Grossman, Zachary; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2005-01-01

    A clinically relevant photosensitizer, 3-devinyl-3-(1-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH, a chlorophyll-a derivative), was conjugated with Gd(III)-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), an experimental magnetic resonance (MR) imaging agent. In vivo reflectance spectroscopy confirmed tumor uptake of HPPH-aminobenzyl-Gd(III)-DTPA conjugate was higher than free HPPH administered intraveneously (iv) to C3H mice with subcutaneously (sc) implanted radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor cells. In other experiments, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with sc implanted Ward Colon Carcinoma cells yielded markedly increased MR signal intensities from tumor regions-of-interest (ROIs) 24 h post-iv injection of HPPH-aminobenzyl-Gd(III)-DTPA conjugate as compared to unconjugated HPPH. In both in vitro (RIF tumor cells) and in vivo (mice bearing RIF tumors and rats bearing Ward Colon tumors) the conjugate produced significant increases in tumor conspicuity at 1.5 T and retained therapeutic efficacy following PDT. Also synthesized were a series of novel bifunctional agents containing two Gd(III) atoms per HPPH molecule that remained tumor-avid and PDT-active and yielded improved MR tumor conspicuity compared to their corresponding mono-Gd(III) analogues. Administered iv at a MR imaging dose of 10 micromol/kg, these conjugates produced severe skin phototoxicity. However, by replacing the hexyl group of the pyropheophorbide-a with a tri(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (PEG-methyl ether), these conjugates produced remarkable MR tumor enhancement at 8 h post-iv injection, significant tumoricidal activity (80% of mice were tumor-free on day 90), and reduced skin phototoxicity compared to their corresponding hexyl ether analogues. The poor water-solubility characteristic of these conjugates was resolved by incorporation into a liposomal formulation. This paper presents the synthesis of tumor-avid contrast enhancing agents for MR imaging and thus represents an important

  14. Optimization of Multi-Pulse Sequences For Nonlinear Contrast Agent Imaging Using a cMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B.; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), had been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz; peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response. PMID:25803232

  15. PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating as imaging agents: Versatile technology to obtain nanoparticles loaded with fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, C; Feiner-Gracia, N; Calderó, G; García-Celma, M J; Solans, C

    2016-11-01

    The interest in polymeric nanoparticles as imaging systems for biomedical applications has increased notably in the last decades. In this work, PLGA nanoparticles, prepared from nano-emulsion templating, have been used to prepare novel fluorescent imaging agents. Two model fluorescent dyes were chosen and dissolved in the oil phase of the nano-emulsions together with PLGA. Nano-emulsions were prepared by the phase inversion composition (PIC) low-energy method. Fluorescent dye-loaded nanoparticles were obtained by solvent evaporation of nano-emulsion templates. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with the fluorescent dyes showed hydrodynamic radii lower than 40nm; markedly lower than those reported in previous studies. The small nanoparticle size was attributed to the nano-emulsification strategy used. PLGA nanoparticles showed negative surface charge and enough stability to be used for biomedical imaging purposes. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%, which was also attributed to the nano-emulsification approach as well as to the low solubility of the dyes in the aqueous component. Release kinetics of both fluorescent dyes from the nanoparticle dispersions was pH-independent and sustained. These results indicate that the dyes could remain encapsulated enough time to reach any organ and that the decrease of the pH produced during cell internalization by the endocytic route would not affect their release. Therefore, it can be assumed that these nanoparticles are appropriate as systemic imaging agents. In addition, in vitro toxicity tests showed that nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic. Consequently, it can be concluded that the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles from nano-emulsion templating represents a very versatile technology that enables obtaining biocompatible, biodegradable and safe imaging agents suitable for biomedical purposes.

  16. Sodium trimetaphosphate as a bone-imaging agent. I. Animal studies.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M F; Melton, R E; Wazer, J R

    1975-11-01

    When used is conjunction with stannous ion and 99Tc, the nonsequestering, cyclic, trimeric phosphate anion, (P309)3-, introduced in the form of its sodium salt, exhibits admirable properties as a bone-visualizing agent as demonstrated by animal studies. These studies show that this combinatation is easily prepared reproducibly and, compared to the agents described in the recent literature (all based on sequestering phosphates), is at least equivalent for bone visualization while being considerably less toxic. PMID:1185266

  17. Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of myocardial infarction: comparison of image quality between single and double doses of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Kim, Sang Yoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-12-01

    To compare the image quality of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent versus the conventional double dose for assessing myocardial infarction. This retrospective study examined 37 patients with chronic myocardial infarction who underwent LGE CMR using both inversion recovery (IR)-turbo fast low-angle shot magnitude-reconstructed and phase-sensitive images with two different dosages of gadolinium contrast agent: a single dose of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-DTPA in 17 patients and a double dose of 0.2 mmol/kg in 20 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and visual conspicuity between infarct and normal myocardium (CNRinfarct-normal, conspicuityinfarct-normal) and between infarct and left ventricular cavity (CNRinfarct-LVC, conspicuityinfarct-LVC) were compared. Interobserver agreement for the maximal transmural extent of infarction was also evaluated. CNRinfarct-normal was significantly higher with double-dose gadolinium contrast agent (15.5 ± 20.7 vs. 40.4 ± 16.1 in magnitude images and 9.5 ± 2.8 vs. 11.2 ± 2.7 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.001) while conspicuityinfarct-normal showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Both CNRinfarct-LVC (7.7 ± 10.7 vs. -6.6 ± 19.0 in magnitude images and 4.1 ± 2.3 vs. -0.4 ± 4.1 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.05) and conspicuityinfarct-LVC were significantly better with single-dose gadolinium contrast. Interobserver agreement for assessing the transmural extent of infarction was moderate in both groups: 0.591 for single-dose and 0.472 for double-dose. LGE CMR using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent showed significantly better contrast between infarcted myocardium and left ventricular cavity lumen without a significant decrease in visual contrast between infarcted myocardium and normal myocardium, compared to a double dose.

  18. Size effect of Au/PAMAM contrast agent on CT imaging of reticuloendothelial system and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jian; Liu, Ransheng; Zhang, Aixu; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-12-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-entrapped Au nanoparticles were synthesized with distinct sizes to figure out the size effect of Au-based contrast agent on CT imaging of passively targeted tissues. Au/PAMAM nanoparticles were first synthesized with narrow distribution of particles size of 22.2 ± 3.1, 54.2 ± 3.7, and 104.9 ± 4.7 nm in diameters. Size effect leads no significant difference on X-ray attenuation when Au/PAMAM was ≤0.05 mol/L. For CT imaging of a tumor model, small Au/PAMAM were more easily internalized via endocytosis in the liver, leading to more obviously enhanced contrast. Similarly, contrast agents with small sizes were more effective in tumor imaging because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Overall, the particle size of Au/PAMAM heavily affected the efficiency of CT enhancement in imaging RES and tumors. PMID:27671016

  19. In vivo imaging of inflammatory responses by photoacoustics using cell-targeted gold nanorods (GNR) as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Agarwal, A.; Mcdonald, A. M.; Moore, R. M.; Myers, D. D., Jr.; Witte, R. S.; Huang, S.-W.; Ashkenazi, S.; Kaplan, M. J.; Wakefield, T. W.; O'Donnell, M.; Kotov, N. A.

    2008-02-01

    Cardiovascular inflammatory activity was imaged in vivo. Inflammation is known to be a major cause of cardiovascular disease. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was employed using bio-conjugated gold nanorods (GNR) as a contrast agent. A mouse model based on vascular endothelium injury by a photochemical reaction of Rose Bengal (RB) dye to green light laser was used. Following a mid-line laparotomy under an approved animal protocol, anti-ICAM-1 conjugated GNR was injected through the dorsal penile vein followed by RB injection through the same vein. The inferior vena cava immediately distal to the renal veins of a C57BL/6 mouse was exposed to the green light laser for 10 minutes. The peak absorption of GNR was tuned to be 700 nm to minimize possible background absorption by blood and RB. The stability of GNR in the blood plasma was tested in vitro. Photoacoustic images were obtained through an ultrasound gel pouch in the mouse abdomen using a commercial ultrasound probe to evaluate inflammatory changes to the vascular endothelium, confirmed by histology. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo photoacoustic imaging by a commercial ultrasound scanner of inflammation using GNR as a contrast agent.

  20. Anti-biofouling polymer-decorated lutetium-based nanoparticulate contrast agents for in vivo high-resolution trimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Dong, Kai; Liu, Jianhua; Han, Xueli; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-25

    Nanomaterials have gained considerable attention and interest in the development of novel and high-resolution contrast agents for medical diagnosis and prognosis in clinic. A classical urea-based homogeneous precipitation route that combines the merits of in situ thermal decomposition and surface modification is introduced to construct polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG)-decorated hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles (PEG-UCNPs). By utilizing the admirable optical and magnetic properties of the yielded PEG-UCNPs, in vivo up-conversion luminescence and T1 -enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of small animals are conducted, revealing obvious signals after subcutaneous and intravenous injection, respectively. Due to the strong X-ray absorption and high atomic number of lanthanide elements, X-ray computed-tomography imaging based on PEG-UCNPs is then designed and carried out, achieving excellent imaging outcome in animal experiments. This is the first example of the usage of hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles as effective nanoprobes. Furthermore, biodistribution, clearance route, as well as long-term toxicity are investigated in detail after intravenous injection in a murine model, indicating the overall safety of PEG-UCNPs. Compared with previous lanthanide fluorides, our nanoprobes exhibit more advantages, such as facile construction process and nearly total excretion from the animal body within a month. Taken together, these results promise the use of PEG-UCNPs as a safe and efficient nanoparticulate contrast agent for potential application in multimodal imaging.

  1. The expanding universe of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafeng; Semenza, Gregg L

    2008-07-01

    Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) is sensed and transduced into changes in the activity or expression of cellular macromolecules. These responses impact on virtually all areas of biology and medicine. In this meeting report, we summarize major developments in the field that were presented at the 2008 Keystone Symposium on Cellular, Physiological, and Pathogenic Responses to Hypoxia.

  2. Computational modelling of anti-angiogenic therapies based on multiparametric molecular imaging data.

    PubMed

    Titz, Benjamin; Kozak, Kevin R; Jeraj, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Computational tumour models have emerged as powerful tools for the optimization of cancer therapies; ideally, these models should incorporate patient-specific imaging data indicative of therapeutic response. The purpose of this study was to develop a tumour modelling framework in order to simulate the therapeutic effects of anti-angiogenic agents based upon clinical molecular imaging data. The model was applied to positron emission tomography (PET) data of cellular proliferation and hypoxia from a phase I clinical trial of bevacizumab, an antibody that neutralizes the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). When using pre-therapy PET data in combination with literature-based dose response parameters, simulated follow-up hypoxia data yielded good qualitative agreement with imaged hypoxia levels. Improving the quantitative agreement with follow-up hypoxia and proliferation PET data required tuning of the maximum vascular growth fraction (VGF(max)) and the tumour cell cycle time to patient-specific values. VGF(max) was found to be the most sensitive model parameter (CV = 22%). Assuming availability of patient-specific, intratumoural VEGF levels, we show how bevacizumab dose levels can potentially be 'tailored' to improve levels of tumour hypoxia while maintaining proliferative response, both of which are critically important in the context of combination therapy. Our results suggest that, upon further validation, the application of image-driven computational models may afford opportunities to optimize dosing regimens and combination therapies in a patient-specific manner.

  3. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents. PMID:26358160

  4. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; Banga, Jasvinder Paul; O’Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Clarke, Susan E. M.; Ballinger, James R.; Szanda, Istvan; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123I-iodide, 131I-iodide and 99mTc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([18F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. Methods [18F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF4− with [18F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. Results [18F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. Conclusion [18F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00259-010-1523-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20577737

  6. Dynamics of Tumor Hypoxia in Response to Patupilone and Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Katrin; Rohrer Bley, Carla; Zimmermann, Martina; Vuong, Van; Hug, Daniel; Soltermann, Alex; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Pruschy, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is one of the most important parameters that determines treatment sensitivity and is mainly due to insufficient tumor angiogenesis. However, the local oxygen concentration in a tumor can also be shifted in response to different treatment modalities such as cytotoxic agents or ionizing radiation. Thus, combined treatment modalities including microtubule stabilizing agents could create an additional challenge for an effective treatment response due to treatment-induced shifts in tumor oxygenation. Tumor hypoxia was probed over a prolonged observation period in response to treatment with different cytotoxic agents, using a non-invasive bioluminescent ODD-Luc reporter system, in which part of the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-1α is fused to luciferase. As demonstrated in vitro, this system not only detects hypoxia at an ambient oxygen concentration of 1% O2, but also discriminates low oxygen concentrations in the range from 0.2 to 1% O2. Treatment of A549 lung adenocarcinoma-derived tumor xenografts with the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone resulted in a prolonged increase in tumor hypoxia, which could be used as marker for its antitumoral treatment response, while irradiation did not induce detectable changes in tumor hypoxia. Furthermore, despite patupilone-induced hypoxia, the potency of ionizing radiation (IR) was not reduced as part of a concomitant or adjuvant combined treatment modality. PMID:23251549

  7. Preparation and characterization of two new water-soluble endohedral metallofullerenes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Er-Yun; Shu, Chun-Ying; Feng, Lai; Wang, Chun-Ru

    2007-12-27

    Two new water-soluble Gd-containing endohedral metallofullerenes [ScxGd3-xN@C80OmOHn (x = 1, 2; m approximately 12; n approximately 26)] were synthesized in a simple one-step reaction and characterized by Fourier transform (FT)-IR as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Their observed longitudinal relaxivities (R1) for water protons are 20.7 and 17.6 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are significantly higher than that of the commercial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (Gd-DTPA, 3.2 mM(-1) s(-1)). These results indicate these trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenols are potential next-generation high-efficiency MRI contrast agents.

  8. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L; Leung, Ben Y C; Goertz, David E; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  9. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging</