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Sample records for hypoxia-cultured human chondrocytes

  1. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  2. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  3. Passaged human chondrocytes accumulate extracellular matrix when induced by bovine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nazish; Taylor, Drew W; Wunder, Jay; Nagy, Andras; Gross, Allan E; Kandel, Rita A

    2010-03-01

    A source of sufficient number of cells is a major limiting factor for cartilage tissue engineering. To circumvent this problem, we developed a co-culture method to induce redifferentiation in bovine articular chondrocytes, which had undergone dedifferentiation following serial passage in monolayer culture. In this study we determine whether human osteoarthritic (OA) and non-diseased passaged dedifferentiated chondrocytes will respond similarly. Human passaged chondrocytes were co-cultured for 4 weeks with primary bovine chondrocytes and their redifferentiation status was determined. Afterwards the cells were cultured either independently or in co-culture with cryopreserved passaged cells for functional analysis. The co-culture of passaged cells with primary chondrocytes resulted in reversion of their phenotype towards articular chondrocytes, as shown by increased gene expression of type II collagen and COMP, decreased type I collagen expression and extracellular matrix formation in vitro. Furthermore, this redifferentiation was stable, as those cells not only formed hyaline-like cartilage tissue when grown on their own but also they could induce redifferentiation of passaged chondrocytes in co-culture. These data suggest that it may be possible to use autologous chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritic cartilage to form tissue suitable to use for cartilage repair. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Influence of ion channels on the proliferation of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, David; Lebek, Susanne; Krüger, Thomas; Reichel, Heiko

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the study was to examine connections between ion channel activity and the proliferation of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated form human osteoarthritic knee joint cartilage. In this study the concentration-dependent influence of the ion channel modulators tetraethylammonium (TEA), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), 4',4' diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonic acid stilbene (SITS), verapamil (vp) and lidocaine (lido) on the membrane potential and the proliferation of human chondrocytes was investigated using flow cytometry and the measurement of (3)H-thymidine incorporation as measure for the cell proliferation. The results show an effect of the used ion channel modulators causing a change of the membrane potential of human chondrocytes. The maximal measurable effects of the membrane potential were listed with 0.25 mmol/l verapamil (-18%) and 0.1 mmol/l lidocaine (+20%). When measuring DNA distribution, it became apparent that the human chondrocytes are diploid cells with a very low proliferation tendency. After 12 days culture duration, lidocaine and 4-AP cause an increase of the DNA synthesis rate being a limited effect. These results allow the conclusion of an influence of ion channel modulators on chondrocyte proliferation. To gain knowledge of the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation via ion channel modulators could serve the research of new osteoarthritis treatment concepts.

  5. [Interaction between human chondrocytes and extracellular matrix in vitro: a contribution to autologous chondrocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, M; Csaki, C; Rahmanzadeh, M; Putz, R

    2008-05-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has had reasonable success for repairing small articular cartilage defects. A limiting factor for ACT is, however, the in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes because it leads to dedifferentiation. Therefore, the goal of this work was to optimize the monolayer culture of chondrocytes in vitro. Human articular chondrocytes were plated on either collagen type II or untreated surfaces. The cells were evaluated morphologically and with immunoblotting. On collagen type II surfaces, a stable chondrogenic phenotype, expression of beta1-integrin, and a significant activation of phosphorylated intracellular proteins and the adaptor protein Shc could be observed up to day 20 in culture. Treatment with beta1 integrin antibody led to a loss of cell adhesion (82%). The results indicate that on collagen type II, beta1-integrin receptors are activated. Through the activation of Shc, these stimulate the Ras-MAPK pathway, which stabilizes the chondrogenic phenotype. Our results provide a practical and low-cost solution for improved long-term chondrocyte cultivation, thus providing a new perspective for using ACT on larger or arthrotic cartilage defects.

  6. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  7. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  8. Astaxanthin reduces matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Shi, Yong-Xiang; Hu, Peng-Fei; Bao, Jia-Peng; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-03-01

    Astaxanthin is a red carotenoid pigment which exerts multiple biological activities. However, little is known about the effects of astaxanthin on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in OA. The present study investigated the effects of astaxanthin on MMPs in human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were pretreated with astaxanthin at 1, 10 or 50μM, then, cells were stimulated with IL-1β (10ng/ml) for 24h. MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 were observed. We found that astaxanthin reduced the expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 as well as the phosphorylation of two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p38 and ERK1/2) in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Astaxanthin also blocked the IκB-α degradation. These results suggest that astaxanthin may be beneficial in the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Recombinant human midkine stimulates proliferation and decreases dedifferentiation of auricular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuanying; Zhang, Zhonghui; Wu, Mingyuan; Zhu, Shunying; Gao, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yunsheng; Zhang, Kejian; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2011-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is widely used for the repair of cartilage defects. However, due to the lack of chondrocyte growth factor and dedifferentiation of the cultured primary chondrocytes, cell source has limited the clinical potential of ACI. Auricular cartilage is an attractive potential source of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Here we demonstrated that recombinant human midkine (rhMK) significantly promoted proliferation of rat primary auricular chondrocytes cultured and passaged in monolayer, which was mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways. Furthermore, rhMK attenuated the dedifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes by maintaining the expression of chondrocyte-specific matrix proteins during culture expansion and passage. Importantly, rhMK-expanded chondrocytes reserved their full chondrogenic potential and redifferentiated into elastic chondrocytes after being cultured in high density. The results suggest that rhMK may be used for the preparation of chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. Human adipose-derived stem cells contribute to chondrogenesis in coculture with human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, Florian; Concaro, Sebastian; Peterbauer, Anja; Wolbank, Susanne; Danzer, Martin; Lindahl, Anders; Gatenholm, Paul; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn

    2009-12-01

    Adipose tissue is easily available and contains high numbers of stem cells that are capable for chondrogenic differentiation. We hypothesize that a partial substitution of chondrocytes with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) might be a possible strategy to reduce the number of chondrocytes needed in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. To lay the ground, in vitro coculture experiments were performed using human chondrocytes and human ASC. Chondrocytes were obtained from donors undergoing matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. ASC were isolated from liposuction material. Chondrocytes and ASC were seeded either in fibrin (Tisseel; Baxter, Vienna, Austria) or collagen matrix (Tissue Fleece; Baxter, Unterschleissheim, Germany). RNA for quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction was isolated after 2 weeks of culture in chondrogenic medium, and after 4 weeks samples were processed for histology. Related to the number of chondrocytes used, coculture with ASC led to strong increase in collagen type IX mRNA expression, which is an indicator for long-term stability of cartilage. Moderate upregulation was shown for SOX9, aggrecan, melanoma inhibitory activity, cartilage link protein 1, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. However, expression of collagen I and collagen II indicates the synthesis of fibrous tissue, which might be due to the use of dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Tisseel provided slightly better chondrogenic conditions than Tissue Fleece. These data support the possibility to take advantage of ASC in cartilage regeneration in conjunction with autologous chondrocytes.

  11. Characteristics of tissue-engineered cartilage from human auricular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen S; Jin, Hong Ryul; Chi, David H; Taylor, Ray S

    2004-05-01

    This study was done to define the mechanical and histological properties of tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC) derived from human chondrocytes and to compare these findings with those of native cartilage. Chondrocytes were obtained from 10 human auricular cartilages and seeded onto a biodegradable template of polyglycolic acid and poly L-lactic acid. Each template was shaped into a 1 cm x 2 cm rectangle. The templates were implanted in athymic mice for 8 weeks. Eight human auricular cartilages were used for comparison. Mechanical analysis with a tensile testing device provided values of ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stiffness, and resilience. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student's t-test. Histological assessment was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining along with other special stains. The TEC had UTS of 2.07 MPa, stiffness of 3.7 MPa, and resilience of 0.37 J/m3. The control specimens had UTS of 2.18 MPa, stiffness of 5.11 MPa, and resilience of 0.42 J/m3. No statistical difference was found between the experimental and control groups for each of the three parameters. Histological analysis showed mature cartilage with characteristic collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and elastin in the TEC. The neo-cartilage showed slightly smaller size and more irregular distribution of chondrocytes and unique fibrous capsule formation with peripheral infiltration of fibrous tissue. This study showed that the mechanical qualities of TEC from human chondrocytes are similar to those of native auricular cartilage. It suggests that the engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes may have sufficient strength and durability for clinical uses. The histological findings revealed some differences with neo-cartilage.

  12. Autologous chondrocyte implantation. Culture in a TGF-beta-containing medium enhances the re-expression of a chondrocytic phenotype in passaged human chondrocytes in pellet culture.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A J; Lee, D A; Bader, D L; Bentley, G

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are treated by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). This study tests the hypothesis that culture within a defined chondrogenic medium containing TGF-beta enhances the re-expression of a chondrocytic phenotype and the subsequent production of cartilaginous extracellular matrix by human chondrocytes used in ACI. Chondrocytes surplus to clinical requirements for ACI from 24 patients were pelleted and cultured in either DMEM (Dulbecco's modified eagles medium)/ITS+Premix/TGF-beta1 or DMEM/10%FCS (fetal calf serum) and were subsequently analysed biochemically and morphologically. Pellets cultured in DMEM/ITS+/TGF-beta1 stained positively for type-II collagen, while those maintained in DMEM/10%FCS expressed type-I collagen. The pellets cultured in DMEM/ITS+/TGF-beta1 were larger and contained significantly greater amounts of DNA and glycosaminoglycans. This study suggests that the use of a defined medium containing TGF-beta is necessary to induce the re-expression of a differentiated chondrocytic phenotype and the subsequent stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and type-II collagen production by human monolayer expanded chondrocytes.

  13. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for control. Cartilaginous matrix production was quantified through light microscopic analysis of Alcian blue staining. Cell number and morphology were detected by histological analysis. Chondrocytes showed a decreased intensity of blue colouring after antiseptic treatment versus PBS. In contrast to that, neither the cell number per view field nor the cell morphology differed between the groups. Polyhexanide has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide. Based on the fact that the cell number and morphology was not altered by the substances at the examined concentrations, the lower intensity of Alcian blue staining of treated chondrocytes indicates a decreased cartilage-specific matrix synthesis by polyhexanide more than by hydrogen peroxide and control.

  14. Stored human septal chondrocyte viability analyzed by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, David L; Sage, August B; Schumacher, Barbara L; Jadin, Kyle D; Agustin, Ramses M; Sah, Robert L; Watson, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    To analyze the effects of prolonged storage time, at warm and cold temperatures, on the viability of human nasal septal chondrocytes and to understand the implications for tissue engineering of septal cartilage. Basic science. Septal cartilage was obtained from 10 patients and placed in bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution. Four specimens were kept at 23 degrees C, and 4 were kept at 4 degrees C. The viability of the chondrocytes within the cartilage was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy every 5 days. The 2 other specimens were assessed for viability on the day of harvest. Viability on the day of harvest was 96%, implying minimal cell death from surgical trauma. After 1 week, cell survival in all specimens was essentially unchanged from the day of harvest. At 23 degrees C, the majority (54%) of cells were alive after 20 days. At 4 degrees C, 70% of cells survived 1 month and 38% were alive at 2 months. Qualitatively, chondrocytes died in a topographically uniform distribution in warm specimens, whereas cold specimens displayed a more irregular pattern of cell death. Septal chondrocytes remain viable for prolonged periods when stored in simple bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution, and such survival is enhanced by cold storage.

  15. Expression Pattern and Role of Chondrocyte Clusters in Osteoarthritic Human Knee Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Hoshiyama, Yoshiaki; Otsuki, Shuhei; Oda, Shuhei; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Nakajima, Mikio; Jotoku, Tsuyoshi; Tamura, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Lotz, Martin K.; Neo, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the site-specific expression pattern and the role of chondrocyte clusters in human OA knee. Cartilage explants were obtained from 45 varus knees of medial and lateral femoral condyle undergoing total knee replacement surgery. Cartilage degeneration, number of chondrocytes, and the cell arrangement were evaluated by live/dead assay and immunohistochemical analyses with antibodies of STRO-1, FGF2, and Ki-67. Chondrocytes from medial and lateral femoral condyle were cultured to compare the potential of cell proliferation and production of cartilaginous nodules. Finally, cartilage tissue from medial femoral condyle, which included cartilage cleft with chondrocyte clusters, was observed the histological alternation. As the results, chondrocyte density adjacent to severe cartilage degeneration was highest, whereas chondrocytes in lateral femoral condyle displayed low density with single type of cells. Over 80% of these chondrocyte clusters were survived, expressing STRO-1, FGF2, and Ki-67. Furthermore, chondrocyte clusters proliferated faster and produced more cartilaginous nodules than single type of chondrocytes. Cartilage clefts involving numerous chondrocyte clusters were filled with extracellular matrix during organ culture. In conclusion, chondrocyte clusters adjacent to severe cartilage degeneration have shown completely specific characteristics with progenitor and proliferative potential. Regulating chondrocyte clusters may offer new approaches to cartilage repair and OA therapy in the future. PMID:25691232

  16. Harpagoside suppresses IL-6 expression in primary human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Abdul; Ansari, Mohammad Yunus; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2017-02-01

    There is growing evidence in support of the involvement of inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Harpagoside, one of the bioactive components of Harpagophytum procumbens (Hp), has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Here we used an in vitro model of inflammation in OA to investigate the potential of harpagoside to suppress the production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-6 and matrix degrading proteases. We further investigated the likely targets of harpagoside in primary human OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes were pre-treated with harpagoside before stimulation with IL-1β. mRNA expression profile of 92 cytokines/chemokines was determined using TaqMan Human Chemokine PCR Array. Expression levels of selected mRNAs were confirmed using TaqMan assays. Protein levels of IL-6 and MMP-13 were assayed by ELISA and immunoblotting. Total protein levels and phosphorylation of signaling proteins were determined by immunoblotting. Cellular localization of IL-6 and c-Fos was performed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. DNA binding activity of c-FOS/AP-1 was determined by ELISA. Harpagoside significantly altered the global chemokine expression profile in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Expression of IL-6 was highly induced by IL-1β, which was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of OA chondrocytes with harpagoside. Harpagoside did not inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB and C/EBPβ transcription factors but suppressed the IL-1β-triggered induction, phosphorylation, and DNA binding activity of c-FOS, one of the main components of AP-1 transcription factors. Further, harpagoside significantly inhibited the expression of MMP-13 in OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. siRNA-mediated knockdown of IL-6 resulted in suppressed expression and secretion of MMP-13 directly linking the role of IL-6 with MMP-13 expression. Taken together, the present study suggests that harpagoside exerts a

  17. Effects of Indigo Carmine on Human Chondrocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zippelius, Timo; Hoburg, Arnd; Preininger, Bernd; Vörös, Pauline; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg; Röhner, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Joint infections following or accompanying superficious soft tissue infections are severe complication in orthopedic surgery. The use of intra-articular blue staining is a helpful method to visualize a fistula and to differentiate between superficial and intra-articular infections. Regarding this clinical implication data about the effects of indigo carmine, a frequently used blue staining substance, on cartilage is missing. The hypothesis of this study was that indigo carmine damages human chondrocytes in a time and concentration dependent manner. Human chondrocytes were isolated from donors with osteoarthritis who were treated with TKA. Cells were cultivated and treated with different concentrations of indigo carmine for 5 and 10 minutes. Morphologic damage was examined by light microscopy. Toxicity was quantified by counting vital cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression. Analysis by light microscopy showed defected cell structure and loss of cell number after treatment with 100% indigo carmine for 10 minutes. Treatment with 10% and 1% indigo carmine showed no significant cell defects and loss of cells. Counting vital cell number showed loss of vital cells after treatment with 100% and 10% indigo carmine for 10 minutes. LDH expression was significantly increased after treatment with 100% indigo carmine. Toxic effects were shown after treatment with indigo carmine. Therefore, it should be used in 1:100 dilution. This is both, sufficient for visualizing a fistula in a possible clinical application and could be protective for chondrocytes. PMID:23341851

  18. Human articular chondrocytes express functional leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ann Kristin; Indrevik, Jill-Tove; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA), while its receptors BLT1 and BLT2 have been found in synovium and subchondral bone. In this study, we have investigated whether these receptors are also expressed by human cartilage cells and their potential effects on cartilage cells. The expression of LTB4 receptors in native tissue and cultured cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electron microscopy. The functional significance of the LTB4 receptor expression was studied by Western blotting, using phospho-specific antibodies in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists. In further studies, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and metalloproteinases by LTB4-stimulated chondrocytes was measured by multiplex protein assays. The effects of LTB4 in cartilage signature gene expression in cultured cells were assessed by quantitative PCR, whereas the LTB4-promoted matrix synthesis was determined using 3D pellet cultures. Both receptors were present in cultured chondrocytes, as was confirmed by immunolabelling and PCR. The relative quantification by PCR demonstrated a higher expression of the receptors in cells from healthy joints compared with OA cases. The stimulation of cultured chondrocytes with LTB4 resulted in a phosphorylation of downstream transcription factor Erk 1/2, which was reduced after blocking BLT1 signalling. No alteration in the secretion of cytokine and metalloproteinases was recorded after challenging cultured cells with LTB4; likewise, cartilage matrix gene expression and 3D tissue synthesis were unaffected. Chondrocytes express BLT1 and BLT2 receptors, and LTB4 activates the downstream Erk 1/2 pathway by engaging the high-affinity receptor BLT1. However, any putative role in cartilage biology could not be revealed, and remains to be clarified. PMID:25677035

  19. Should human chondrocytes fly? The impact of electromagnetic irradiation on chondrocyte viability and implications for their use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Koehler, C; Niederbichler, A D; Scholz, T; Bode, B; Roos, J; Jung, F J; Hoerstrup, S P; Hellermann, J P; Wedler, V

    2006-12-01

    A significant logistic factor as to the successful clinical application of the autologous tissue engineering concept is efficient transportation: the donor cells need to be delivered to tissue processing facilities which in most cases requires air transportation. This study was designed to evaluate how human chondrocytes react to X-ray exposure. Primary cell cultures were established, cultured, incubated and exposed to different doses and time periods of radiation. Subsequently, quantitative cell proliferation assays were done and qualitative evaluation of cellular protein production were performed. Our results show that after irradiation of chondrocytes with different doses, no significant differences in terms of cellular viability occurred compared with the control group. These results were obtained when chondrocytes were exposed to luggage transillumination doses as well as exposure to clinically used radiation doses. Any damage affecting cell growth or quality was not observed in our study. However, information about damage of cellular DNA remains incomplete.

  20. Karyotyping of human chondrocytes in scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Trimborn, Marc; Endres, Michaela; Bommer, Christiane; Janke, Una; Krüger, Jan-Philipp; Morawietz, Lars; Kreuz, Peter C; Kaps, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Scaffold-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an effective clinical procedure for cartilage repair. The aim of our study was to evaluate the chromosomal stability of human chondrocytes subjected to typical cell culture procedures needed for regenerative approaches in polymer-scaffold-assisted cartilage repair. Chondrocytes derived from post mortem donors and from donors scheduled for ACI were expanded, cryopreserved and re-arranged in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds for tissue culture. Chondrocyte redifferentiation was analyzed by electron microscopy, histology and gene expression analysis. Karyotyping was performed using GTG banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization on a single cell basis. Chondrocytes showed de- and redifferentiation accompanied by the formation of extracellular matrix and induction of typical chondrocyte marker genes like type II collagen in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Post mortem chondrocytes showed up to 1.7% structural and high numbers of numerical (up to 26.7%) chromosomal aberrations, while chondrocytes from living donors scheduled for ACI showed up to 1.8% structural and up to 1.3% numerical alterations. Cytogenetically, cell culture procedures and PGA-fibrin scaffolds did not significantly alter chromosomal integrity of the chondrocyte genome. Human chondrocytes derived from living donors subjected to regenerative medicine cell culture procedures like cell expansion, cryopreservation and culture in resorbable polymer-based scaffolds show normal chromosomal integrity and normal karyotypes. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  2. Autophagy Activation Protects from Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Figueroa, Paloma López; Lotz, Martin; Blanco, Francisco J.; Caramés, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autophagy, is a key pathway of cellular homeostasis for removing damaged macromolecules and organelles, including mitochondria. Recent studies indicate that autophagy activation is defective in aging and osteoarthritis (OA), contributing to the cell death and tissue damage. In addition, there is increasing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in OA pathogenesis. The objective of this study is to determine whether activation of autophagy protects from mitochondrial dysfunction in human chondrocytes. Methods Human chondrocytes were treated with Oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex V. Autophagy activation was analyzed by determination of LC3-II, a marker for autophagosome formation. To investigate whether autophagy protects from mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy was induced by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) selective inhibitor Rapamycin and the dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor Torin 1. SiAtg5 was employed to evaluate the role of autophagy in mitochondrial dysfunction. Results Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by treatment with Oligomycin, which significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). This was associated with increased ROS production and cell death. Autophagy activation, reflected by LC3-II, was decreased in a time dependent manner. To evaluate whether autophagy regulates mitochondrial function, chondrocytes were pre-treated with Rapamycin and Torin 1 before Oligomycin. Autophagy activation significantly protected against mitochondrial dysfunction. Conversely, genetic inhibition of autophagy induced significant mitochondrial function defects. Conclusion Our data highlight the role of autophagy as a critical protective mechanism against mitochondrial dysfunction. Pharmacological interventions that enhance autophagy may have chondroprotective activity in cartilage degenerative processes such as OA. PMID:25605458

  3. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  4. Chondroprotective effects of taurine in primary cultures of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lu, Zhenhui; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage is characterized by the lack of blood vessels and has a poor self-healing potential. Limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes when expanded in vitro are the major obstacles of autologous chondrocyte implantation. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment that can be used as a second-line measure to regenerate chondral or osteochondral defects in younger, active patients. There is an urgent need to find an effective chondrogenic protection agent alleviating or inhibiting chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In this study, we explored the effect of taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) on proliferation and phenotype maintenance of human articular chondrocytes by analyzing the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, and expression of cartilage specific mRNAs and proteins. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage tissues. Results showed that taurine effectively promoted chondrocyte growth and enhanced accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and collagens in the conditioned media of chondrocytes. Moreover, taurine exposure caused significant increases in the relative expression levels of mRNAs for cartilage specific markers, including aggrecan, collagen type II and SOX9. Aggrecan is a cartilage-specific proteoglycan, and SOX9 is a chondrogenic transcription factor. In contrast, the mRNA expression of collagen type I, a marker for chondrocyte dedifferentiation, was significantly decreased in cells treated with taurine, indicating that taurine inhibits the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This study reveals that taurine is effective in proliferation promotion and phenotype maintenance of chondrocytes. Thus, taurine may be a useful pro-chondrogenic agent for autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of cartilage repair.

  5. The potential of human allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes for restoration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Adkisson, H Davis; Martin, James A; Amendola, Richard L; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A; Katwal, Arbindra B; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2010-07-01

    Donor-site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/ The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Controlled laboratory study. Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (>13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNA in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (P = .002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (P < .001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. These results document a dramatic age-related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to restore articular cartilage than adult cells, and may be transplanted without the

  6. THE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN ALLOGENEIC JUVENILE CHONDROCYTES FOR RESTORATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, H. Davis; Martin, James A.; Amendola, Richard L.; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A.; Katwal, Arbindra B.; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Donor site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/Purpose The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (> 13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Results Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNAs in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (p = 0.002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (p < 0.001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. Conclusions These results document a dramatic age related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Clinical Relevance Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to

  7. Chondrocyte viability in fresh and frozen large human osteochondral allografts: effect of cryoprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Judas, F; Rosa, S; Teixeira, L; Lopes, C; Ferreira Mendes, A

    2007-10-01

    Chondrocyte survival is a major goal for the effective storage and clinical performance of human osteochondral allografts. The majority of animal and human cryopreservation studies conducted so far have been performed in small osteochondral cylinders. Using human tibial plateaus as a model for large osteochondral pieces, this work sought to evaluate the cryoprotective efficiency of glycerol and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and to identify cryopreservation conditions suitable for use in tissue banks. Human tibial plateaus harvested from 7 cadaveric tissue donors were incubated in the presence or absence of cryoprotective agents (CPA): 10% or 15% glycerol and 10% DMSO in a Ham F-12 nutrient mixture. Chondrocyte viability was assessed immediately after thawing, using the MTT reduction assay and a fluorescence microscopic method. The tibial plateaus frozen in the absence of CPA showed a significant decrease in chondrocyte viability. The use of CPA significantly increased chondrocyte viability compared with cartilage frozen without CPA (nearly 50% versus 80% living chondrocytes with 10% glycerol versus 10% DMSO, respectively) relative to that in fresh cartilage. In this regard, 10% DMSO was slightly more effective than either 10% or 15% glycerol, eliciting the recovery of approximately 15% relative to the living chondrocyte content in fresh cartilage. In all conditions, fluorescence microscopic studies showed that surviving chondrocytes were restricted to the superficial cartilage layer. Human tibial plateaus seemed to be a good experimental model to establish cryopreservation methods applicable to large human osteochondral pieces in tissue banks.

  8. Expansion of the number of human auricular chondrocytes: recycling of culture media containing floating cells.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S H; Rodrigruez, A; Vacanti, C A; Eavey, R D; Vacanti, M P

    2004-01-01

    To grow a complete human size auricle by utilizing the principles of tissue engineering, a large number of chondrocytes is required for initial implantation. The number of chondrocytes can be increased by repeated passaging or by incubation with different growth factors, both of which can promote dedifferentiation. New methods of chondrocyte expansion over a relatively brief time period for potential practical application are required. In this study auricular chondrocytes were obtained from patients and cultured in vitro. Two groups of cells were created. Group A chondrocyte number was increased by repeated passaging. Group B cells were grown from floating culture medium and their number was increased both by passaging and by repeated recycling of the culture medium. Chondrocytes from both groups were implanted in nude mice for 8 weeks to generate tissue-engineered cartilage. Flow cytometry studies performed on both groups confirmed the presence of two distinct populations of structures as the source of chondrocytes from the recycled medium. Repeated recycling of the culture medium demonstrates a promising method to increase the number of chondrocytes in vitro for clinical application.

  9. Scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering using infant chondrocytes from human hip cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, P C; Gentili, C; Samans, B; Martinelli, D; Krüger, J P; Mittelmeier, W; Endres, M; Cancedda, R; Kaps, C

    2013-12-01

    Studies about cartilage repair in the hip and infant chondrocytes are rare. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of infant articular hip chondrocytes for tissue engineering of scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts. Hip cartilage was obtained from five human donors (age 1-10 years). Expanded chondrocytes were cultured in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of chondrocytes were assessed by histological staining and gene expression analysis of typical chondrocytic marker genes. In vivo, cartilage matrix formation was assessed by histology after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte-seeded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in immunocompromised mice. The donor tissue was heterogenous showing differentiated articular cartilage and non-differentiated tissue and considerable expression of type I and II collagens. Gene expression analysis showed repression of typical chondrocyte and/or mesenchymal marker genes during cell expansion, while markers were re-induced when expanded cells were cultured in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Cartilage formation after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte loaded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in nude mice was variable, with grafts showing resorption and host cell infiltration or formation of hyaline cartilage rich in type II collagen. Addition of human platelet rich plasma (PRP) to cartilage grafts resulted robustly in formation of hyaline-like cartilage that showed type II collagen and regions with type X collagen. These results suggest that culture of expanded and/or de-differentiated infant hip cartilage cells in PGA-fibrin scaffolds initiates chondrocyte re-differentiation. The heterogenous donor tissue containing immature chondrocytes bears the risk of cartilage repair failure in vivo, which may be possibly overcome by the addition of PRP. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parkin clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria regulates ROS levels and increases survival of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M Y; Khan, N M; Ahmad, I; Haqqi, T M

    2017-08-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and chondrocyte death are important contributors to the development and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, we determined the expression and role of Parkin in the clearance of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and chondrocyte survival under pathological conditions. Human chondrocytes were from the unaffected area of knee OA cartilage (n = 12) and were stimulated with IL-1β to mimic pathological conditions. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS levels were determined using specific dyes and flow cytometry. Autophagy was determined by Western blotting for ATG5, Beclin1, immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Gene expression was determined by RT-qPCR. siRNA, wild-type and mutant Parkin plasmids were transfected using Amaxa system. Apoptosis was determined by PI staining of chondrocytes and TUNEL assay. IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes showed high levels of ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane damage, accumulation of damaged mitochondria and higher incidence of apoptosis. IL-1β stimulation of chondrocytes with depleted Parkin expression resulted in sustained high levels of ROS, accumulation of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria and enhanced apoptosis. Parkin translocation to depolarized/damaged mitochondria and recruitment of p62/SQSTM1 was required for the elimination of damaged/dysfunctional mitochondria in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Importantly we demonstrate that Parkin elimination of depolarized/damaged mitochondria required the Parkin ubiquitin ligase activity and resulted in reduced ROS levels and inhibition of apoptosis in OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Our data demonstrates that Parkin functions to eliminate depolarized/damaged mitochondria in chondrocytes which is necessary for mitochondrial quality control, regulation of ROS levels and chondrocyte survival under pathological conditions

  11. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  12. Precipitant induced porosity augmentation of polystyrene preserves the chondrogenicity of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Natasja L; Foldager, Casper B; Le, Dang Q S; Lind, Martin; Lysdahl, Helle

    2016-12-01

    Cells constantly sense and receive chemical and physical signals from neighboring cells, interstitial fluid, and extracellular matrix, which they integrate and translate into intracellular responses. Thus, the nature of the surface on which cells are cultured in vitro plays an important role for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Autologs chondrocyte implantation is considered the treatment of choice for larger cartilage defects in the knee. To obtain a sufficient number of chondrocytes for implantation multiple passaging is often needed, which raises concerns about the changes in the chondrogenic phenotype. In the present study, we analyzed the effect at cellular and molecular level of precipitant induced porosity augmentation (PIPA) of polystyrene surfaces on proliferation and differentiation of human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from healthy patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cultured on PIPA modified polystyrene surfaces. Microscopical analysis revealed topographically arranged porosity with micron pores and nanometer pits. Chondrocytes cultured on PIPA surfaces revealed no difference in cell viability and proliferation, but gene- and protein expressions of collagen type II were pronounced in the first passage of chondrocytes when compared to chondrocytes cultured on control surfaces. Additionally, an analysis of 40 kinases revealed that chondrocytes expanded on PIPA caused upregulated PI3K/mTOR pathway activation and inhibition of mTORC1 resulted in reduced sGAG synthesis. These findings indicate that PIPA modified polystyrene preserved the chondrogenicity of expanded human chondrocytes at gene and protein levels, which clinically may be attractive for the next generation of cell-culture surfaces for ex vivo cell growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3073-3081, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hypoxia-cultured human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are non-oncogenic and have enhanced viability, motility, and tropism to brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Zhu, M; Dangelmajer, S; Lee, Y M; Wijesekera, O; Castellanos, C X; Denduluri, A; Chaichana, K L; Li, Q; Zhang, H; Levchenko, A; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A

    2014-12-11

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) are multipotent cells, which are abundant, easily collected, and bypass the ethical concerns that plague embryonic stem cells. Their utility and accessibility have led to the rapid development of clinical investigations to explore their autologous and allogeneic cellular-based regenerative potential, tissue preservation capabilities, anti-inflammatory properties, and anticancer properties, among others. hAMSCs are typically cultured under ambient conditions with 21% oxygen. However, physiologically, hAMSCs exist in an environment of much lower oxygen tension. Furthermore, hAMSCs cultured in standard conditions have shown limited proliferative and migratory capabilities, as well as limited viability. This study investigated the effects hypoxic culture conditions have on primary intraoperatively derived hAMSCs. hAMSCs cultured under hypoxia (hAMSCs-H) remained multipotent, capable of differentiation into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In addition, hAMSCs-H grew faster and exhibited less cell death. Furthermore, hAMSCs-H had greater motility than normoxia-cultured hAMSCs and exhibited greater homing ability to glioblastoma (GBM) derived from brain tumor-initiating cells from our patients in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, hAMSCs-H did not transform into tumor-associated fibroblasts in vitro and were not tumorigenic in vivo. Rather, hAMSCs-H promoted the differentiation of brain cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest an alternative culturing technique that can enhance the function of hAMSCs, which may be necessary for their use in the treatment of various pathologies including stroke, myocardial infarction, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and GBM.

  14. Protein profiling and angiogenic effect of hypoxia-cultured human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Hyun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Kim, Min-Hee; Kim, Do-Hyung; Go, Ha-Nl; Kang, Donglim; Chang, Jong Wook; Choi, Soon Won; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2017-09-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate protein profiles of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) cultured in normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions, and evaluate oxygenation effects on angiogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb mouse model using a modified ischemic scoring system. Hypoxic conditions did not change the expression of phenotypic markers and increased adipogenesis and chondrogenesis. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α), TGF-β RII, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were upregulated in the conditioned medium of hypoxic hUCB-MSCs, which are commonly related to angiogenesis and proliferation of biological processes by Gene Ontology. In the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway, significant enrichment of the phosphorylation of abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (ABL1) (Phospho-Tyr204) and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) (Phospho-Thr47) as anti-apoptotic pathways was observed in hypoxic hUCB-MSCs. Furthermore, hypoxic conditions induced proliferation and migration, and reduced apoptosis of hUCB-MSCs in vitro. Based on the results of protein antibody array, we evaluated the angiogenic effects of injecting normoxic or hypoxic hUCB-MSCs (1×10(6)) into the ischemic hindlimb muscles of mice. Ischemic scores and capillary generation were significantly greater in the hypoxic hUCB-MSC injection group than in the normoxic hUCB-MSC group. Our findings demonstrate that culturing hUCB-MSCs in hypoxic conditions not only significantly enriches phosphorylation in the anti-apoptosis pathway and enhances the secretion of several angiogenic proteins from cells, but also alleviates ischemic injury of hindlimb of mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoxia-cultured human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are non-oncogenic and have enhanced viability, motility, and tropism to brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y; Zhu, M; Dangelmajer, S; Lee, Y M; Wijesekera, O; Castellanos, C X; Denduluri, A; Chaichana, K L; Li, Q; Zhang, H; Levchenko, A; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A

    2014-01-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) are multipotent cells, which are abundant, easily collected, and bypass the ethical concerns that plague embryonic stem cells. Their utility and accessibility have led to the rapid development of clinical investigations to explore their autologous and allogeneic cellular-based regenerative potential, tissue preservation capabilities, anti-inflammatory properties, and anticancer properties, among others. hAMSCs are typically cultured under ambient conditions with 21% oxygen. However, physiologically, hAMSCs exist in an environment of much lower oxygen tension. Furthermore, hAMSCs cultured in standard conditions have shown limited proliferative and migratory capabilities, as well as limited viability. This study investigated the effects hypoxic culture conditions have on primary intraoperatively derived hAMSCs. hAMSCs cultured under hypoxia (hAMSCs-H) remained multipotent, capable of differentiation into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In addition, hAMSCs-H grew faster and exhibited less cell death. Furthermore, hAMSCs-H had greater motility than normoxia-cultured hAMSCs and exhibited greater homing ability to glioblastoma (GBM) derived from brain tumor-initiating cells from our patients in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, hAMSCs-H did not transform into tumor-associated fibroblasts in vitro and were not tumorigenic in vivo. Rather, hAMSCs-H promoted the differentiation of brain cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest an alternative culturing technique that can enhance the function of hAMSCs, which may be necessary for their use in the treatment of various pathologies including stroke, myocardial infarction, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and GBM. PMID:25501828

  16. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  17. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair.

  18. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 reduces dexamethasone-induced terminal differentiation in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ling-Hua; Wu, Shun-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Chang, Je-Ken; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2016-08-10

    Intra-articular injection of dexamethasone (Dex) is occasionally used to relieve pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Dex induces terminal differentiation of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and causes impaired longitudinal skeletal growth in vivo. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 (PTH 1-34) has been shown to reverse terminal differentiation of osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. We hypothesized that Dex induces terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes and that this effect can be mitigated by PTH 1-34 treatment. We tested the effect of Dex on terminal differentiation in human articular chondrocytes and further tested if PTH 1-34 reverses the effects. We found that Dex treatment downregulated chondrogenic-induced expressions of SOX-9, collagen type IIa1 (Col2a1), and aggrecan and reduced synthesis of cartilaginous matrix (Col2a1 and sulfated glycosaminoglycan) synthesis. Dex treatment upregulated chondrocyte hypertrophic markers of collagen type X and alkaline phosphatase at mRNA and protein levels, and it increased the cell size of articular chondrocytes and induced cell death. These results indicated that Dex induces terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes. To test whether PTH 1-34 treatment reverses Dex-induced terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes, PTH 1-34 was co-administered with Dex. Results showed that PTH 1-34 treatment reversed both changes of chondrogenic and hypertrophic markers in chondrocytes induced by Dex. PTH 1-34 also decreased Dex-induced cell death. PTH 1-34 treatment reduces Dex-induced terminal differentiation and apoptosis of articular chondrocytes, and PTH 1-34 treatment may protect articular cartilage from further damage when received Dex administration.

  19. Apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in human chondrocytes following exposure to lidocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine.

    PubMed

    Grishko, Valentina; Xu, Min; Wilson, Glenn; Pearsall, Albert W

    2010-03-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain toxicity of local anesthetics to chondrocytes, including the blockade of potassium channels and mitochondrial injury. The purposes of this investigation were to study the effects of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine on human chondrocyte viability and mitochondrial function in vitro and to characterize the type of cell death elicited following exposure. Primary chondrocyte cultures from patients with osteoarthritis undergoing knee replacement were treated with saline solution and the following concentrations of local anesthetics: 2%, 1%, and 0.5% lidocaine, 0.5% and 0.25% bupivacaine, and 0.5% and 0.2% ropivacaine for one hour. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry at twenty-four hours and 120 hours after treatment. Nuclear staining and caspase 3 and 9 cleavage assays (Western blot) were used to further establish the induction of apoptosis. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated by the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage (quantitative Southern blot), changes in adenosine triphosphate production (bioluminescence kit), and mitochondrial protein levels (Western blot analysis). Exposure of primary human chondrocytes to a 2% concentration of lidocaine caused massive necrosis of chondrocytes after twenty-four hours, 1% lidocaine and 0.5% bupivacaine caused a detectable, but not significant, decrease in viability after twenty-four hours, while 0.5% lidocaine, 0.25% bupivacaine, and both concentrations of ropivacaine (0.5% and 0.2%) did not affect chondrocyte viability. Flow cytometry analysis of chondrocytes 120 hours after drug treatment revealed a significant decrease in viability (p < 0.05) with a concomitant increase in the number of apoptotic cells at all concentrations of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine analyzed, except 0.2% ropivacaine. Apoptosis was verified by observation of condensed and fragmented nuclei and a decrease in procaspase 3 and 9 levels. Local anesthetics

  20. Irradiated human chondrocytes expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 promote healing of osteoporotic bone fracture in rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Youngsuk; Choi, Kyoung Baek; Lim, Chae-Lyul; Hyun, Jong-Pil; Lee, Hyeon-Youl; Lee, Kun Bok; Yun, Lillian; Ayverdi, Asli; Hwang, Sally; Yip, Vivian; Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2009-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was selected as a transgene to regenerate osteoporotic bone defects after several BMPs were tested using a bone formation study in nude mice. Human chondrocytes were transduced with a BMP2-containing retroviral vector, and single clones were selected. The cells were characterized over numerous passages for growth and BMP2 expression. The single clones were irradiated and tested for viability. BMP2 expression lasted for 3 weeks before dying off completely after approximately 1 month. Irradiated and non-irradiated transduced chondrocytes successfully healed fractures in osteoporotic rats induced by ovariectomy. The osteoinducing effect of irradiated cells was better than that of their non-irradiated counterparts or a chondrocytes-only control. This study showed that delivering BMP2 from the transduced and irradiated chondrocytes could be an effective and safe method of repairing osteoporotic bone fractures.

  1. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in human articular chondrocytes assigned for autologous implantation.

    PubMed

    Barlic, Ariana; Drobnic, Matej; Malicev, Elvira; Kregar-Velikonja, Nevenka

    2008-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) relies on the implantation of in vitro expanded cells. The aim was to study the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes under different cultivating conditions [days 0-10 in the primary culture (P0); passages in a monolayer from P0 to P3; monolayer vs. alginate and monolayer vs. alginate/agarose hydrogels] using real-time PCR analysis. The relative gene expressions for collagen type I and II, aggrecan and versican were quantified and the corresponding differentiation indexes (Col2/Col1, Agr/Ver) were calculated. The values of both differentiation indexes decreased exponentially with time in the P0 monolayer culture, and continued with a significant decrease over the subsequent monolayer passages. On the contrary, the chondrocytes seeded in either of the hydrogels significantly increased the indexes compared to their parallel monolayer cultures. These results indicate that alginate and alginate/agarose hydrogels offer an appropriate environment for human articular chondrocytes to redifferentiate after being expanded in vitro. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel chondrocyte cultures present not only surgical, but also biological advantage over the classic suspension-periosteum chondrocyte implantation. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  3. Chitosan Enriched Three-Dimensional Matrix Reduces Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators Production by Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oprenyeszk, Frederic; Sanchez, Christelle; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Maquet, Véronique; Henrist, Catherine; Compère, Philippe; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the metabolism of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes encapsulated in a spherical matrix enriched of chitosan. Human OA chondrocytes were encapsulated and cultured for 28 days either in chitosan-alginate beads or in alginate beads. The beads were formed by slowly passing dropwise either the chitosan 0.6%–alginate 1.2% or the alginate 1.2% solution through a syringe into a 102 mM CaCl2 solution. Beads were analyzed histologically after 28 days. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, prostaglandin (PG) E2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronan and aggrecan were quantified directly in the culture supernatant by specific ELISA and nitric oxide (NO) by using a colorimetric method based on the Griess reaction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that chitosan was homogeneously distributed through the matrix and was in direct contact with chondrocytes. The production of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by chondrocytes significantly decreased in chitosan-alginate beads compared to alginate beads. PGE2 and NO decreased also significantly but only during the first three days of culture. Hyaluronan and aggrecan production tended to increase in chitosan-alginate beads after 28 days of culture. Chitosan-alginate beads reduced the production of inflammatory and catabolic mediators by OA chondrocytes and tended to stimulate the synthesis of cartilage matrix components. These particular effects indicate that chitosan-alginate beads are an interesting scaffold for chondrocytes encapsulation before transplantation to repair cartilage defects. PMID:26020773

  4. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)

    PubMed Central

    Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vogrin, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2), collagen 1 (COL1) and aggrecan (ACAN) was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a common and very

  5. Cryopreservation Effect on Proliferative and Chondrogenic Potential of Human Chondrocytes Isolated from Superficial and Deep Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Muiños-López, Emma; Rendal-Vázquez, Mª Esther; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of fresh and frozen chondrocytes isolated from superficial and deep articular cartilage biopsies. Materials and Methodology: The study included 12 samples of fresh and frozen healthy human knee articular cartilage. Cell proliferation was tested at 3, 6 and 9 days. Studies of mRNA quantification, protein expression and immunofluorescence for proliferation and chondrogenic markers were performed. Results: Stimulation of fresh and frozen chondrocytes from both superficial and deep cartilage with fetal bovine serum produced an increase in the proliferative capacity compared to the non-stimulated control group. In the stimulated fresh cells group, the proliferative capacity of cells from the deep biopsy was greater than that from cells from the superficial biopsy (0.046 vs 0.028, respectively, p<0.05). There was also a significant difference between the proliferative capacity of superficial zone fresh (0.028) and frozen (0.051) chondrocytes (p<0.05). CCND1 mRNA and protein expression levels, and immunopositivity for Ki67 revealed a higher proliferative capacity for fresh articular chondrocytes from deep cartilage. Regarding the chondrogenic potential, stimulated fresh cells showed higher SOX9 and Col II expression in chondrocytes from deep than from superficial zone (p<0.05, T student test). Conclusions: The highest rate of cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential of fresh chondrocytes was found in cells obtained from deep cartilage biopsies, whereas there were no statistically significant differences in proliferative and chondrogenic capacity between biopsy origins with frozen chondrocytes. These results indicate that both origin and cryopreservation affect the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes. PMID:22523526

  6. Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

    PubMed Central

    Nasu, Michiyo; Takayama, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The cell-based therapy for cartilage or bone requires a large number of cells; serial passages of chondrocytes are, therefore, needed. However, fates of expanded chondrocytes from extra fingers remain unclarified. The chondrocytes from human epiphyses morphologically changed from small polygonal cells to bipolar elongated spindle cells and to large polygonal cells with degeneration at early passages. Gene of type II collagen was expressed in the cells only at a primary culture (Passage 0) and Passage 1 (P1) cells. The nodules by implantation of P0 to P8 cells were composed of cartilage and perichondrium. The cartilage consisted of chondrocytes with round nuclei and type II collagen-positive matrix, and the perichondrium consisted of spindle cells with type I collage-positive matrix. The cartilage and perichondrium developed to bone with marrow cavity through enchondral ossification. Chondrogenesis and osteogenesis by epiphyseal chondrocytes depended on replication number in culture. It is noteworthy to take population doubling level in correlation with pharmaceutical efficacy into consideration when we use chondrocytes for cell-based therapies. PMID:27999805

  7. Hyaline cartilage tissue is formed through the co-culture of passaged human chondrocytes and primary bovine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Hayes, Anthony J; Ferguson, Peter; Gross, Allan E; Caterson, Bruce; Kandel, Rita A

    2012-08-01

    To circumvent the problem of a sufficient number of cells for cartilage engineering, the authors previously developed a two-stage culture system to redifferentiate monolayer culture-expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes by co-culture with primary bovine chondrocytes (bP0). The aim of this study was to analyze the composition of the cartilage tissue formed in stage 1 and compare it with bP0 grown alone to determine the optimal length of the co-culture stage of the system. Biochemical data show that extracellular matrix accumulation was evident after 2 weeks of co-culture, which was 1 week behind the bP0 control culture. By 3 to 4 weeks, the amounts of accumulated proteoglycans and collagens were comparable. Expression of chondrogenic genes, Sox 9, aggrecan, and collagen type II, was also at similar levels by week 3 of culture. Immunohistochemical staining of both co-culture and control tissues showed accumulation of type II collagen, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and chondroitin sulfate in appropriate zonal distributions. These data indicate that co-cultured cells form cartilaginous tissue that starts to resemble that formed by bP0 after 3 weeks, suggesting that the optimal time to terminate the co-culture stage, isolate the now redifferentiated cells, and start stage 2 is just after 3 weeks.

  8. Toxicity of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide on human chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Joern B; Hoff, Paula; Dähn-Wollenberg, Stephanie; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-07-07

    The treatment of acute joint infections has an important impact on long-term outcome and remains an unsolved problem. The most frequent bacteria are staphylococci, streptococci, and gram-negative bacteria. In septic surgery, polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide are the most frequently used local antiseptics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that antiseptics induce cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time.Human chondrocytes were treated with different concentrations of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Toxicity analysis was determined by visualization of cell structure using light microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release, and determination of living and total cell numbers after addition of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Light microscopic data revealed a defect cell structure after addition of both antiseptics. Lactate dehydrogenase activity showed a significant increase of enzyme expression after a short incubation with polyhexanide. The determination of vital chondrocytes showed a significant decrease of vital and total cell numbers after addition with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide.Both antiseptic solutions induce significant cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time. Polyhexanide possibly has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide against human chondrocytes after an application >15 minutes. Therefore, both substances should only be applied for a short time (<15 minutes) and the joint irrigated to wash out the antiseptic substance prior to wound closure. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Antirheumatic drug response signatures in human chondrocytes: potential molecular targets to stimulate cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Kristin; Häupl, Thomas; Lübke, Carsten; Ringe, Jochen; Morawietz, Lars; Wachtel, Anja; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leads to progressive destruction of articular cartilage. This study aimed to disclose major mechanisms of antirheumatic drug action on human chondrocytes and to reveal marker and pharmacological target genes that are involved in cartilage dysfunction and regeneration. Methods An interactive in vitro cultivation system composed of human chondrocyte alginate cultures and conditioned supernatant of SV40 T-antigen immortalised human synovial fibroblasts was used. Chondrocyte alginate cultures were stimulated with supernatant of RA synovial fibroblasts, of healthy donor synovial fibroblasts, and of RA synovial fibroblasts that have been antirheumatically treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (azathioprine, gold sodium thiomalate, chloroquine phosphate, and methotrexate), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (piroxicam and diclofenac), or steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs) (methylprednisolone and prednisolone). Chondrocyte gene expression profile was analysed using microarrays. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed for validation of microarray data. Results Genome-wide expression analysis revealed 110 RA-related genes in human chondrocytes: expression of catabolic mediators (inflammation, cytokines/chemokines, and matrix degradation) was induced, and expression of anabolic mediators (matrix synthesis and proliferation/differentiation) was repressed. Potential marker genes to define and influence cartilage/chondrocyte integrity and regeneration were determined and include already established genes (COX-2, CXCR-4, IL-1RN, IL-6/8, MMP-10/12, and TLR-2) and novel genes (ADORA2A, BCL2-A1, CTGF, CXCR-7, CYR-61, HSD11B-1, IL-23A, MARCKS, MXRA-5, NDUFA4L2, NR4A3, SMS, STS, TNFAIP-2, and TXNIP). Antirheumatic treatment with SAIDs showed complete and strong reversion of RA-related gene expression in human chondrocytes, whereas

  10. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante; Tuan, Rocky S; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6-13 cm(2)) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown to

  11. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6–13 cm2) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Significance Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown

  12. The role of BKCa channels on hyperpolarization mediated by hyperosmolarity in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2011-03-01

    Chondrocytes, the only cell in cartilage, are subjected to hyperosmotic challenges continuously since extracellular osmolarity in articular cartilage increases in response to mechanical loads during joint movement. Hyperosmolarity can affect membrane transport, and it is possible that load modulates matrix synthesis through alterations in intracellular composition. In the present study, the effects of hyperosmotic challenges were evaluated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, whole cell mode on freshly isolated human and bovine articular chondrocytes. In human chondrocytes, hypertonicity induced the activation of outward Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents, which were inhibited by iberiotoxin and TEA-Cl. The current induced by hypertonic switching (osmolarity from 300 to 400 mOsm/l) caused cell hyperpolarization (from -39 mV to -70 mV) with a reversal potential of -96 ± 7 mV. These results suggest a role for Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in human articular chondrocytes, leading to hyperpolarization as a consequence of K(+) efflux through these channels. These channels could have a role in the articular chondrocyte's response to a hyperosmotic challenge and matrix metabolism regulation by load.

  13. Hyperosmolarity regulates SOX9 mRNA posttranscriptionally in human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy J.; McKay, Tristan R.; Lowe, Emma T.; Khan, Wasim S.; Hardingham, Timothy E.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX9 regulates cartilage extracellular matrix gene expression and is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. We previously showed that activation of p38 MAPK by cycloheximide in human chondrocytes leads to stabilization of SOX9 mRNA (Tew SR and Hardingham TE. J Biol Chem 281: 39471–39479, 2006). In this study we investigated whether regulation of p38 MAPK caused by changes in osmotic pressure could control SOX9 mRNA levels expression by a similar mechanism. Primary human articular chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritic cartilage at passage 2-4 showed significantly raised SOX9 mRNA levels when exposed to hyperosmotic conditions for 5 h. The effect was strongest and most reproducible when actin stress fibers were disrupted by the Rho effector kinase inhibitor Y27632, or by culturing the cells within alginate beads. Freshly isolated chondrocytes, used within 24–48 h of isolation, did not contain actin stress fibers and upregulated SOX9 mRNA in response to hyperosmolarity in the presence and absence of Y27632. In these freshly isolated chondrocytes, hyperosmolarity led to an increase in the half-life of SOX9 mRNA, which was sensitive to the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190. SOX9 protein levels were increased by hyperosmotic culture over 24 h, and, in passaged chondrocytes, the activity of a COL2A1 enhancer driven luciferase assay was upregulated. However, in freshly isolated chondrocytes, COL2A1 mRNA levels were reduced by hyperosmotic conditions and the half-life was decreased. The results showed that the osmotic environment regulated both SOX9 and COL2A1 mRNA posttranscriptionally, but in fresh cells resulted in increased SOX9, but decreased COL2A1. PMID:19657054

  14. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is functionally expressed in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Elina; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Lauri J; Paukkeri, Erja-Leena; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Teemu; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-08-11

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a membrane-associated cation channel, widely expressed in neuronal cells and involved in nociception and neurogenic inflammation. We showed recently that TRPA1 mediates cartilage degradation and joint pain in the MIA-model of osteoarthritis (OA) suggesting a hitherto unknown role for TRPA1 in OA. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether TRPA1 is expressed and functional in human OA chondrocytes. Expression of TRPA1 in primary human OA chondrocytes was assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. The functionality of the TRPA1 channel was assessed by Ca(2+)-influx measurements. Production of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, IL-6, and PGE2 subsequent to TRPA1 activation was measured by immunoassay. We show here for the first time that TRPA1 is expressed in primary human OA chondrocytes and its expression is increased following stimulation with inflammatory factors IL-1β, IL-17, LPS, and resistin. Further, the TRPA1 channel was found to be functional, as stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist AITC caused an increase in Ca(2+) influx, which was attenuated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1 downregulated the production of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, IL-6, and PGE2 in osteoarthritic chondrocytes and murine cartilage, respectively. The TRPA1 cation channel was found to be functionally expressed in primary human OA chondrocytes, which is an original finding. The presence and inflammatory and catabolic effects of TRPA1 in human OA chondrocytes propose a highly intriguing role for TRPA1 as a pathogenic factor and drug target in OA.

  15. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  16. Activation of Indian Hedgehog Promotes Chondrocyte Hypertrophy and Upregulation of MMP-13 in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fangyuan; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Zhang, Juntao; Fleming, Braden C.; Terek, Richard; Pei, Ming; Chen, Qian; Liu, Tao; Wei, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to 1) determine the correlation between osteoarthritis (OA) and Ihh expression, and 2) establish the effects of Ihh on expression of markers of chondrocyte hypertrophy and MMP-13 in human OA cartilage. Design OA cartilage and synovial fluid samples were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Normal cartilage samples were obtained from intra-articular tumor resections, and normal synovial fluid samples were obtained from healthy volunteers and the contralateral uninjured knee of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. OA was graded using the Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in synovial fluid was determined by western blot. Ihh, type X collagen and MMP-13 mRNA were determined by real time PCR. Protein expression of type X collagen and MMP-13 in cartilage samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry. Chondrocyte size was measured using image analysis. Results Ihh expression was increased 2.6 fold in OA cartilage and 37% in OA synovial fluid when compared to normal control samples. Increased expression of Ihh was associated with the severity of OA and expression of markers of chondrocyte hypertrophy: type X collagen and MMP-13, and chondocyte size. Chondrocytes were more spherical with increasing severity of OA. There was a significant correlation between Mankin score and cell size (r2= 0.80) and Ihh intensity (r2 = 0.89). Exogenous Ihh induced a 6.8 fold increase of type X collagen and 2.8 fold increase of MMP-13 mRNA expression in cultured chondrocytes. Conversely, knockdown of Ihh by siRNA and Hh inhibitor Cyclopamine had the opposite effect. Conclusions Ihh expression correlates with OA progression and changes in chondrocyte morphology and gene expression consistent with chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage degradation seen in OA cartilage. Thus, Ihh may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent OA progression. PMID:22469853

  17. A practical way to prepare primer human chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Isyar, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Yasar Sirin, Duygu; Yalcin, Sercan; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2016-09-01

    Biological cartilage repair is one of the most important targets for orthopedic surgeons currently. For this purpose, it is mandatory to know how to prepare a chondrocyte culture. In this study, our purpose was to introduce a method enabling orthopedic surgeons to practice their knowledge and skills on molecular experimental setup at cellular level, based on our experiences from previous pilot studies. Thus, we believe it will encourage orthopedic surgeons.

  18. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint. PMID:26287176

  19. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2015-08-14

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  20. Surface markers and gene expression to characterize the differentiation of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takashi; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ono, Yohei; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a method of cartilage repair. To improve the quality of regenerated tissue by ACI, it is essential to identify surface marker expression correlated with the differentiation status of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes and to define the index for discriminating dedifferentiated cells from monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until passage 4. At each passage, mRNA expression of collagen type I, II, and X and aggrecan was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the surface marker expression of CD14, CD26, CD44, CD49a, CD49c, CD54, and CD151 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The ratios of mRNA levels of collagen type II to I (Col II/Col I) represented the differentiation status of chondrocytes more appropriately during monolayer culture. The surface marker expression of CD44, CD49c, and CD151 was upregulated according to the dedifferentiation status, whereas that of CD14, CD49a, and CD54 was downregulated. The most appropriate combination of the ratio of Col II/Col I was CD54 and CD44. Cell sorting was performed using a magnetic cell sorting system (MACS) according to CD54 and CD44, and real-time quantitative PCR was performed for the cell subpopulations before and after cell sorting. The expression of collagen type II and aggrecan of the chondrocytes after MACS was higher than that before sorting, but not significantly. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio of CD54 to CD44 could be an adequate candidate as the index of the differentiation status.

  1. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  2. Microcontact printing of BMP-2 and its effect on human chondrocytes behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Nie, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The present study is to investigate human chondrocytes behavior on microcontact printed bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) lines on polystyrene (PS) surface. It was found that the cells aligned with BMP lines and expressed type II and VI collagen. The chondrocytes in vitro cultured on BMP lines were elongated, which resulted in altered cell morphology. Taking all these results into consideration, BMP-2 lines enhance cell adhesion, restrict spreading, and increase type II and VI collagen expression. The results represented in this study may be an approach to the problem of engineering reparative cartilage in vitro.

  3. Viability of human chondrocytes in an ex vivo model in relation to temperature and cartilage depth.

    PubMed

    Drobnic, M; Mars, T; Alibegović, A; Bole, V; Balazic, J; Grubic, Z; Brecelj, J

    2005-01-01

    Chondrocytes in human articular cartilage remain viable post-mortem. It has however not been established yet how the storage temperature affects their survival, which is essential information when post-mortem cartilage is used for toxicologic studies. Our aim was to construct a simple model of explanted knee cartilage and to test the influences of time and temperature on the viability of chondrocytes in the ex vivo conditions. Osteochondral cylinders were procured from the cadaveric femoral condyles. The cylinders were embedded in water-tight rubber tubes, which formed separate chondral and osteal compartments. Tubes were filled with normal saline, without additives, to keep chondrocytes under close-to-normal conditions. The samples were divided into two groups stored at 4 degrees C and 35 degrees C, respectively. Three samples of each of these two groups were analysed at the time of removal, and then three and nine days later. Images of Live-Dead staining were scanned by a confocal laser microscope. Count of viable chondrocytes in four regions, from surface to bone, was obtained using image analysis software. The regression model revealed that the number of viable chondrocytes decreased every day by 19% and that an increase in temperature by 1 degree C decreased their viability by 5.8%. The temperature effect fell by 0.2 percentage points for every 100 microm from the surface to the bone. Herein we demonstrate that chondrocytes remain viable in the ex vivo model of human knee cartilage long enough to be able to serve as a model for toxicologic studies. Their viability is, however, significantly influenced by time and temperature.

  4. Scaffold-free cartilage tissue engineering with a small population of human nasoseptal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; To, William T H; Lee, John M; Waldman, Stephen D

    2017-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide suitable materials for nasal reconstruction; however, it typically requires large numbers of cells. We have previously shown that a small number of chondrocytes cultivated within a continuous flow bioreactor can elicit substantial tissue growth, but translation to human chondrocytes is not trivial. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the application of the bioreactor to generate large-sized tissues from a small population of primary human nasoseptal chondrocytes. Experimental study. Chondrocytes were cultured in the bioreactor using different medium compositions, with varying amounts of serum and with or without growth factors. Resulting engineered tissues were analyzed for physical properties, biochemical composition, tissue microstructure, and protein localization. Bioreactor-cultivated constructs grown with serum and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor beta 2) had greater thickness, as well as DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents, compared to low serum and no growth factor controls. These constructs also showed the most intense proteoglycan and collagen II staining. The combination of bioreactor conditions, serum, and growth factors allowed the generation of large, thick scaffold-free human cartilaginous tissues that resembled the native nasoseptal cartilage. There also may be implications for patient selection in future clinical applications of these engineered tissues because their GAG content decreased with donor age. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E91-E99, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Diosgenin inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leisheng; Ma, Tian; Zheng, Yanpin; Lv, Shiqiao; Li, Yu; Liu, Shaoxian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the inflammatory cytokines play important roles in osteoarthritis (OA). Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of diosgenin in inflammatory responses in OA chondrocytes is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of diosgenin in human OA chondrocytes. We found that diosgenin inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced by interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β). Diosgenin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated expression of metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, diosgenin suppressed the degradation of IκB-α in IL-1β-induced human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, this study showed that diosgenin can effectively inhibit the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that diosgenin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:26191174

  6. Generation and characterization of osteochondral grafts with human nasal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barandun, Marina; Iselin, Lukas Daniel; Santini, Francesco; Pansini, Michele; Scotti, Celeste; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Studler, Ueli; Wirz, Dieter; Haug, Martin; Jakob, Marcel; Schaefer, Dirk Johannes; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether nasal chondrocytes (NC) can be used to generate composite constructs with properties necessary for the repair of osteochondral (OC) lesions, namely maturation, integration and capacity to recover from inflammatory burst. OC grafts were fabricated by combining engineered cartilage tissues (generated by culturing NC or articular chondrocytes - AC - onto Chondro-Gide® matrices) with devitalized spongiosa cylinders (Tutobone®). OC tissues were then exposed to IL-1β for three days and cultured for additional 2 weeks in the absence of IL-1β. Cartilage maturation extent was assessed (immune) histologically, biochemically and by delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) while cartilage/bone integration was assessed using a peel-off mechanical test. The use of NC as compared to AC allowed for more efficient cartilage matrix accumulation and superior integration of the cartilage/bone layers. dGEMRIC and biochemical analyzes of the OC constructs showed a reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents upon IL-1β administration. Cartilaginous matrix contents and integration forces returned to baseline up on withdrawal of IL-1β. By having a cartilage layer well developed and strongly integrated to the subchondral layer, OC tissues generated with NC may successfully engraft in an inflammatory post-surgery joint environment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression is repressed by SIRT1 in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Elayyan, Jinan; Lee, Eun-Jin; Gabay, Odile; Smith, Christopher A; Qiq, Omar; Reich, Eli; Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves; Kimber, Susan J; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona

    2017-04-07

    Reduced SIRT1 activity and levels during osteoarthritis (OA), promotes gradual loss of cartilage. Loss of cartilage matrix is accompanied by an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13, partially because of enhanced LEF1 transcriptional activity. In this study, we assessed the role of SIRT1 in LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression in human OA chondrocytes. Results showed that MMP13 protein levels and enzymatic activity decreased significantly during SIRT1 overexpression or activation by resveratrol. Conversely, MMP13 gene expression was reduced in chondrocytes transfected with SIRT1 siRNA or treated with nicotinamide (NAM), a sirtuin inhibitor. Chondrocytes challenged with IL-1β, a cytokine involved in OA pathogenesis, enhanced LEF1 protein levels, and gene expression, resulting in increased MMP13 gene expression; however, overexpression of SIRT1 during IL-1β challenge impeded LEF1 levels and MMP13 gene expression. Previous reports showed that LEF1 binds to the MMP13 promoter and transactivates its expression, but we observed that SIRT1 repressed LEF1 protein and mRNA expression, ultimately reducing LEF1 transcriptional activity, as judged by luciferase assay. Finally, mouse articular cartilage from Sirt1(-/-) presented increased LEF1 and MMP13 protein levels, similar to human OA cartilage. Thus, demonstrating for the first time that SIRT1 represses MMP13 in human OA chondrocytes, which appears to be mediated, at least in part, through repression of the transcription factor LEF1, a known modulator of MMP13 gene expression.-Elayyan, J. Lee, E.-J., Gabay, O., Smith, C. A., Qiq, O., Reich, E., Mobasheri, A., Henrotin, Y., Kimber, S. J., Dvir-Ginzberg, M. LEF1-mediated MMP13 gene expression is repressed by SIRT1 in human chondrocytes.

  8. Low Shear Stress Attenuates COX-2 Expression Induced by Resistin in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Hsin-I; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lo, Chun-Min; Chang, Shun-Fu

    2017-06-01

    Low shear stress has been proposed to play a reparative role in modulating cartilage homeostasis. Recently, epidemiological studies have found a positive correlation between the resistin level in serum and synovial fluid and osteoarthritis (OA) severity in patients. However, the effect of moderate shear stress on the catabolic stimulation of resistin in OA chondrocytes remains unclear. Hence, this study was to investigate whether low shear stress could regulate resistin-induced catabolic cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in human OA chondrocytes and the underlying mechanism. Human OA chondrocytes and SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells were used in this study. Two modes of low shear stress (2 dyn/cm(2) ), pre-shear and post-shear, were applied to the chondrocytes. A specific activator and siRNAs were used to investigate the mechanism of low shear stress-regulated COX-2 expression of resistin induction. We found that human OA chondrocytes exposed to different modes of low shear stress elicit an opposite effect on resistin-induced COX-2 expression: pre-shear for a short duration attenuates the resistin effect by inhibiting the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB-p65 subunit and the cAMP response element binding protein; however, post-shear over a longer duration enhances the resistin effect by activating only the NF-κB-p65 subunit. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the regulation of both shear modes in resistin-stimulated COX-2 expression occurs through increasing AMP-activated protein kinase activation and then sirtuin 1 expression. This study elucidates the detailed mechanism of low shear stress regulating the resistin-induced catabolic COX-2 expression and indicates a possible reparative role of moderate shear force in resistin-stimulated OA development. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1448-1457, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interleukin-1 Acts via the JNK-2 Signaling Pathway to Induce Aggrecan Degradation by Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Vincent, Tonia L; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda; Saklatvala, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    Aggrecan enables articular cartilage to bear load and resist compression. Aggrecan loss occurs early in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and can be induced by inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). IL-1 induces cleavage of specific aggrecans characteristic of the ADAMTS proteinases. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathways by which IL-1 causes aggrecan degradation by human chondrocytes and to investigate how aggrecanase activity is controlled by chondrocytes. We developed a cell-based assay combining small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown with aggrecan degradation assays. Human articular chondrocytes were overlaid with bovine aggrecan after transfection with siRNAs against molecules of the IL-1 signaling pathway. After IL-1 stimulation, released aggrecan fragments were detected with AGEG and ARGS neoepitope antibodies. Aggrecanase activity and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) shedding was analyzed by Western blotting. ADAMTS-5 is a major aggrecanase in human chondrocytes, regulating aggrecan degradation in response to IL-1. The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated 6 (TRAF-6)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK-1)/MKK-4 signaling axis is essential for IL-1-induced aggrecan degradation, while NF-κB is not. Of the 3 MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK), only JNK-2 showed a significant role in aggrecan degradation. Chondrocytes constitutively secreted aggrecanase, which was continuously endocytosed by LRP-1, keeping the extracellular level of aggrecanase low. IL-1 induced aggrecanase activity in the medium in a JNK-2-dependent manner, possibly by reducing aggrecanase endocytosis, because IL-1 caused JNK-2-dependent shedding of LRP-1. The signaling axis TRAF-6/TAK-1/MKK-4/JNK-2 mediates IL-1-induced aggrecanolysis. The level of aggrecanase is controlled by its

  10. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  11. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  12. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alterations in the Young's modulus and volumetric properties of chondrocytes isolated from normal and osteoarthritic human cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jones, W R; Ting-Beall, H P; Lee, G M; Kelley, S S; Hochmuth, R M; Guilak, F

    1999-02-01

    The mechanical environment of the chondrocyte is an important factor that influences the maintenance of the articular cartilage extracellular matrix. Previous studies have utilized theoretical models of chondrocytes within articular cartilage to predict the stress-strain and fluid flow environments around the cell, but little is currently known regarding the cellular properties which are required for implementation of these models. The objectives of this study were to characterize the mechanical behavior of primary human chondrocytes and to determine the Young's modulus of chondrocytes from non-osteoarthritic ('normal') and osteoarthritic cartilage. A second goal was to quantify changes in the volume of isolated chondrocytes in response to mechanical deformation. The micropipette aspiration technique was used to measure the deformation of a single chondrocyte into a glass micropipette in response to a prescribed pressure. The results of this study indicate that the human chondrocyte behaves as a viscoelastic solid. No differences were found between the Young's moduli of normal (0.65+/-0.63 kPa, n = 44) and osteoarthritic chondrocytes (0.67+/-0.86 kPa, n = 69, p = 0.93). A significant difference in cell volume was observed immediately and 600 s after complete aspiration of the cell into the pipette (p < 0.001), and the magnitude of this volume change between normal (11+/-11%, n = 40) and osteoarthritic (20+/-11%, n = 41) chondroctyes was significantly different at both time points (p < 0.002). This finding suggests that chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage may have altered volume regulation capabilities in response to mechanical deformation. The mechanical and volumetric properties determined in this study will be of use in analytical and finite element models of chondrocyte-matrix interactions in order to better predict the mechanical environment of the cell in vivo.

  14. Human chondrocyte cultures as models of cartilage-specific gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Otero, Miguel; Favero, Marta; Dragomir, Cecilia; Hachem, Karim El; Hashimoto, Ko; Plumb, Darren A; Goldring, Mary B

    2012-01-01

    The human adult articular chondrocyte is a unique cell type that has reached a fully differentiated state as an end point of development. Within the cartilage matrix, chondrocytes are normally quiescent and maintain the matrix constituents in a low-turnover state of equilibrium. Isolated chondrocytes in culture have provided useful models to study cellular responses to alterations in the environment such as those occurring in different forms of arthritis. However, expansion of primary chondrocytes in monolayer culture results in the loss of phenotype, particularly if high cell density is not maintained. This chapter describes strategies for maintaining or restoring differentiated phenotype by culture in suspension, gels, or scaffolds. Techniques for assessing phenotype involving primarily the analysis of synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins as well as the corresponding mRNAs are also described. Approaches for studying gene regulation, including transfection of promoter-driven reporter genes with expression vectors for transcriptional and signaling regulators, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and DNA methylation are also described.

  15. Biotechnological Chondroitin a Novel Glycosamminoglycan With Remarkable Biological Function on Human Primary Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stellavato, Antonietta; Tirino, Virginia; de Novellis, Francesca; Della Vecchia, Antonella; Cinquegrani, Fabio; De Rosa, Mario; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cartilage tissue engineering, with in vitro expansion of autologus chondrocytes, is a promising technique for tissue regeneration and is a new potential strategy to prevent and/or treat cartilage damage (e.g., osteoarthritis). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate and compare the effects of new biotechnological chondroitin (BC) and a commercial extractive chondroitin sulfate (CS) on human chondrocytes in vitro culture; (ii) to evaluate the anti‐inflammatory effects of the innovative BC compared to extractive CS. A chondrogenic cell population was isolated from human nasoseptal cartilage and in vitro cultures were studied through time‐lapse video microscopy (TLVM), immunohistochemical staining and cytometry. In order to investigate the effect of BC and CS on phenotype maintainance, chondrogenic gene expression of aggrecan (AGN), of the transcriptor factor SOX9, of the types I and II collagen (COL1A1 and COL1A2), were quantified through transcriptional and protein evaluation at increasing cultivation time and passages. In addition to resemble the osteoarthritis‐like in vitro model, chondrocytes were treated with IL‐1β and the anti‐inflammatory activity of BC and CS was assessed using cytokines quantification by multiplex array. BC significantly enhances cell proliferation also preserving chondrocyte phenotype increasing type II collagen expression up to 10 days of treatment and reduces inflammatory response in IL‐1β treated chondrocytes respect to CS treated cells. Our results, taken together, suggest that this new BC is of foremost importance in translational medicine because it can be applied in novel scaffolds and pharmaceutical preparations aiming at cartilage pathology treatments such as the osteoarthritis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2158–2169, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018169

  16. The ClC-7 Chloride Channel Is Downregulated by Hypoosmotic Stress in Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Takashi; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Giles, Wayne R; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    Articular chondrocytes in osteoarthritis (OA) patients are exposed to hypoosmotic stress because the osmolality of this synovial fluid is significantly decreased. Hypoosmotic stress can cause an efflux of Cl(-) and an associated decrease of cell volume. We have previously reported that a Cl(-) conductance contributes to the regulation of resting membrane potential and thus can alter intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human chondrocytes. The molecular identity and pathologic function of these Cl(-) channels, however, remained to be determined. Here, we show that the ClC-7 Cl(-) channel is strongly expressed in a human chondrocyte cell line (OUMS-27) and that it is responsible for Cl(-) currents that are activated by extracellular acidification (pH 5.0). These acid-sensitive currents are inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS; IC50 = 13 μM) and are markedly reduced by small-interfering RNA-induced knockdown of ClC-7. DIDS hyperpolarized these chondrocytes, and this was followed by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. ClC-7 knockdown caused a similar hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Short-term culture (48 hours) in hypoosmotic medium (270 mOsm) reduced the expression of ClC-7 and decreased the acid-sensitive currents. Interestingly, these hypoosmotic culture conditions, or ClC-7 knockdown, resulted in enhanced cell death. Taken together, our results show that the significant hyperpolarization due to ClC-7 impairment in chondrocytes can significantly increase [Ca(2+)]i and cell death. Thus, downregulation of ClC-7 channels during the hypoosmotic stress that accompanies OA progression is one important concept of the complex etiology of OA. These findings suggest novel targets for therapeutic intervention(s) and drug development for OA.

  17. Chronic exposure of bone morphogenetic protein-2 favors chondrogenic expression in human articular chondrocytes amplified in monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Claus, S; Aubert-Foucher, E; Demoor, M; Camuzeaux, B; Paumier, A; Piperno, M; Damour, O; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Galéra, P; Mallein-Gerin, F

    2010-12-15

    Articular cartilage is a specialized connective tissue containing chondrocytes embedded in a network of extracellular macromolecules such as type II collagen and presents poor capacity to self-repair. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is worldwide used for treatment of focal damage to articular cartilage. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes occurs during the long term culture necessary for mass cell production. The aim of this study was to investigate if addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, a strong inducer of chondrogenic expression, to human chondrocytes immediately after their isolation from cartilage, could help to maintain their chondrogenic phenotype in long-term culture conditions. Human articular chondrocytes were cultured according to the procedure used for ACT. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the cellular phenotype. Exogenous BMP-2 dramatically improves the chondrogenic character of knee articular chondrocytes amplified over two passages, as assessed by the BMP-2 stimulation on type II procollagen expression and synthesis. This study reveals that BMP-2 could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for supporting the chondrogenic phenotype of human articular chondrocytes expanded in the conditions generally used for ACT. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Are surface antigens suited to verify the redifferentiation potential and culture purity of human chondrocytes in cell-based implants.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Krüger, J P; Kinne, R W; Kaps, C; Endres, M

    2015-10-01

    Cell expansion in vitro is a prequisite to obtain a sufficient quantity of cells for cell-based cartilage repair of articular cartilage lesions. During this process verification of redifferentiation potential of highly expanded chondrocytes is required. Furthermore, cellular impurities of chondrocyte cultures have to be excluded. For this purpose, redifferentiation of expanded human chondrocytes in passage 3 or 5 was initiated in bioresorbable polyglycolic acid-fibrin (PGA-fibrin) scaffolds and selected potential markers were analysed during the process of cell expansion and redifferentiation. Chondrocyte expansion was accompanied by a decrease of collagen type II and COMP and an increase of collagen type I expression indicating cell dedifferentiation. Redifferentiation of chondrocytes in PGA-fibrin scaffolds was accompanied by an increase of collagen II/I ratio. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in contrast to CD44 and CD49e, CD63 and CD166 showed significant changes in the number of positive cells during redifferentiation. CD14 and CD45 are not expressed by chondrocytes and are therefore possible candidates to detect specifically monocytes or haematopoetic cells in chondrocyte cultures. Characterization of surface antigen expression revealed two promising candidates (CD63 and CD166) to describe the process of redifferentiation, while CD14 and CD45 are suitable markers to exclude impurities by monocytes or haematopoetic cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of collagen type I or type II on chondrogenesis by cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, Marijn; Saris, Daniel B; Vonk, Lucienne A; van Rijen, Mattie H; Akrum, Vanessa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Boxtel, Antonette; Dhert, Wouter J; Creemers, Laura B

    2013-01-01

    Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, however, fibrillar collagens were shown to promote cartilage degradation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of collagen type I and type II coating on chondrogenic properties of in vitro cultured human chondrocytes, and to investigate if collagen-mediated cartilage degradation occurs. Human chondrocytes of eight healthy cartilage donors were isolated, expanded, and cultured on culture well inserts coated with either collagen type I, type II, or no coating (control). After 28 days of redifferentiation culture, safranin O and immunohistochemical staining for collagen types I, II, X, and Runx2/Cbfa1 were performed and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content and release were examined. Further, expression of collagen type I, type II, type X, MMP13, Runx2/Cbfa1, DDR2, α2 and β1 integrin were examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The matrix, created by chondrocytes grown on collagen type I- and II-coated membranes, resembled cartilage more than when grown on noncoated membranes as reflected by histological scoring. Immunohistochemical staining did not differ between the conditions. GAG content as well as GAG/DNA were higher for collagen type II-coated cartilage constructs than control. GAG release was also higher on collagen type I- and II-coated constructs. Expression of collagen type X was higher of chondrocytes grown on collagen type II compared to controls, but no collagen X protein could be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. No effects of collagen coating on DDR2 nor MMP-13 gene expression were found. No differences were observed between collagen types I and II. Chondrocyte culture on collagen type I or II promotes more active matrix production

  20. Expression and function of K(ATP) channels in normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes: possible role in glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Ana T; Rosa, Susana C; Judas, Fernando; Mobasheri, Ali; Lopes, M Celeste; Mendes, Alexandrina F

    2013-08-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium [K(ATP)] channels sense intracellular ATP/ADP levels, being essential components of a glucose-sensing apparatus in various cells that couples glucose metabolism, intracellular ATP/ADP levels and membrane potential. These channels are present in human chondrocytes, but their subunit composition and functions are unknown. This study aimed at elucidating the subunit composition of K(ATP) channels expressed in human chondrocytes and determining whether they play a role in regulating the abundance of major glucose transporters, GLUT-1 and GLUT-3, and glucose transport capacity. The results obtained show that human chondrocytes express the pore forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, at the mRNA and protein levels and the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits, SUR2A and SUR2B, but not SUR1. The expression of these subunits was no affected by culture under hyperglycemia-like conditions. Functional impairment of the channel activity, using a SUR blocker (glibenclamide 10 or 20 nM), reduced the protein levels of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3 by approximately 30% in normal chondrocytes, while in cells from cartilage with increasing osteoarthritic (OA) grade no changes were observed. Glucose transport capacity, however, was not affected in normal or OA chondrocytes. These results show that K(ATP) channel activity regulates the abundance of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3, although other mechanisms are involved in regulating the overall glucose transport capacity of human chondrocytes. Therefore, K(ATP) channels are potential components of a broad glucose sensing apparatus that modulates glucose transporters and allows human chondrocytes to adjust to varying extracellular glucose concentrations. This function of K(ATP) channels seems to be impaired in OA chondrocytes.

  1. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  2. Extracellular matrix protein patterns guide human chondrocytes adhesion and alignment characterized by vimentin and matrilin-3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influences of collagen VI (col-VI) patterns on human chondrocytes behaviors. To this end, col-VI stripes with varying width and interstripe spacing are created on polystyrene (PS) surfaces by microcontact printing (μCP). Human chondrocytes are then seeded on these protein patterns and the cell adhesion and alignment are investigated by staining the vimentin and matrilin-3 secreted by seeded chondrocytes. The results indicate that the cells preferentially attach onto the protein areas, rendering cell patterns and the elongated cell shapes. The pattern dimensions can significantly influence cell adhesion, spreading and orientation. The stripe protein patterns can guide cell adhesion and alignment. The cell morphologies can be controlled by carefully designing the pattern shapes and sizes. Our results suggest that the protein patterns can be used to modify biomaterials' surfaces for selective cell-binding and cell alignment. It could provide some cues for the development of novel implantable biomaterials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds for cartilage replacement, where specific cell alignment is needed.

  3. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Contribute to Chondrogenesis in Coculture with Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingfu; Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) have been shown as the most potential stem cell source for articular cartilage repair. In this study, we aimed to develop a method for long-term coculture of human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and hUCB-MSCs at low density in vitro to determine if the low density of hACs could enhance the hUCB-MSC chondrogenic differentiation as well as to determine the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Also, we compared the difference between direct coculture and indirect coculture at low density. Monolayer cultures of hUCB-MSCs and hACs were investigated at different ratios, at direct cell-cell contact groups for 21 days. Compared to direct coculture, hUCB-MSCs and hACs indirect contact culture significantly increased type II collagen (COL2) and decreased type I collagen (COL1) protein expression levels. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) mRNA levels and protein expression were highest in indirect coculture. Overall, these results indicate that low density direct coculture induces fibrocartilage. However, indirect coculture in conditioned chondrocyte cell culture medium can increase expression of chondrogenic markers and induce hUCB-MSCs differentiation into mature chondrocytes. This work demonstrates that it is possible to promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs in combination with hACs, further supporting the concept of novel coculture strategies for tissue engineering.

  4. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces apoptosis in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes: the protective role of glutathione-S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, France; Fahmi, Hassan; Shi, Qin; Lavigne, Patrick; Ranger, Pierre; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Introduction 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and reactive aldehydes of lipid peroxidation products and exerts various effects on intracellular and extracellular signalling cascades. We have previously shown that HNE at low concentrations could be considered as an important mediator of catabolic and inflammatory processes in osteoarthritis (OA). In the present study, we focused on characterizing the signalling cascade induced by high HNE concentration involved in cell death in human OA chondrocytes. Methods Markers of apoptosis were quantified with commercial kits. Protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting. Glutathione (GSH) and ATP levels were measured with commercial kits. Glucose uptake was assessed by 2-deoxy-D-[3H]-glucose. The role of GSH-S-transferase A4-4 (GSTA4-4) in controlling HNE-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was investigated by chondrocyte transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with the expression vector of GSTA4-4. Results Our data showed that HNE at concentrations of up to 10 μM did not alter cell viability but was cytotoxic at concentrations of greater than or equal to 20 μM. HNE-induced chondrocyte death exhibited several classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including caspase activation, cytochrome c and apoptosis-induced factor release from mitochondria, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation, and DNA fragmentation. Our study of signalling pathways revealed that HNE suppressed pro-survival Akt kinase activity but, in contrast, induced Fas/CD95 and p53 expression in chondrocytes. All of these effects were inhibited by an antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Analysis of cellular energy and redox status showed that HNE induced ATP, NADPH, and GSH depletion and inhibited glucose uptake and citric acid cycle activity. GSTA4-4 ablation by the siRNA method augmented HNE cytotoxicity, but, conversely, its overexpression efficiently protected chondrocytes from HNE-induced cell death

  5. Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Anbarasan, Selvam; Baraneedharan, Ulaganathan; Paul, Solomon FD; Kaur, Harpreet; Rangaswami, Subramoniam; Bhaskar, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 μT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired't’ test. Results: In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 μT and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P < 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 μT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 μT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters. Conclusions: Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26955182

  6. Enhanced production of prostaglandins and plasminogen activator during activation of human articular chondrocytes by products of mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Meats, J E; McGuire, M K; Ebsworth, N M; Englis, D J; Russell, R G

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the way in which products of cultured human blood mononuclear cells activate human articular chondrocytes. Conditioned medium from mononuclear cells enhanced the production of prostaglandin E by cultured human chondrocytes and also stimulated fibrinolytic activity in these cultures. These two effects may be interrelated, since the increased fibrinolysis in response to products of mononuclear cells was partially inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis. The increased fibrinolysis is probably attributable to plasminogen activator, since it was strongly dependent on the presence of plasminogen. Increased amounts of PGE and chondroitin sulphate were also released from intact fragments of cartilage exposed to medium from cultured mononuclear cells. The time course and dose dependence of these effects were studied. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid markedly enhanced production of PGE2. Ultrogel AcA54 was used to fractionate medium from cultured mononuclear cells and the chondrocyte-stimulating activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight between 12 000 and 25 000 daltons. Adherent and non-adherent mononuclear blood cells were also partially separated and conditioned medium from each was assayed for chondrocyte-stimulating factors. Both populations released factor(s) which increased the production of prostaglandin E by chondrocytes, but more activity came from the adherent mononuclear cells. The possible interrelationship between the chondrocyte activating factor studied here and others described in the literature is discussed.

  7. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: Integration of experimental and computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Oreffo, ROC; Sengers, BG; Tare, RS

    2014-01-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1876–1885. PMID:24668194

  9. SOCS1 Regulates Apoptosis and Inflammation by Inhibiting IL-4 Signaling in IL-1β-Stimulated Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiang; Sun, Caihong; Lei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) was identified as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. However, the mechanisms and signaling pathways of SOCS1 in the regulation of OA development are unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether interleukin- (IL-) 4 was involved in regulatory mechanism of SOCS1 in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. First, IL-1β was used to stimulate human osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage of OA patients undergoing total knee replacement. The protein and mRNA expression levels of SOCS1 were upregulated in IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritic chondrocytes compared with control cells. The knockdown of SOCS1 increased cell viability and inhibited cell apoptosis. It was also found that IL-4 expression was increased by SOCS1 silencing. Additionally, knockdown of IL-4 reduced cell viability and increased cell apoptosis of osteoarthritic chondrocytes transfected with SOCS1 siRNA. Moreover, the decreased expression of inflammatory factors induced by SOCS1 was enhanced by IL-4 knockdown. In conclusion, IL-4 signaling plays a crucial role in the regulatory functions of SOCS1 in apoptosis and inflammation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. These findings provide a potential therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of OA. PMID:28373981

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid enhanced the angiogenic capability of human chondrocytes by regulating Gi/NF-kB-dependent angiogenic factor expression.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Wen; Chang, Wen-Ming; Chen, Kai-Hua; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chang, Pey-Jium; Hsu, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been found to mediate myeloid differentiation, stimulate osteogenesis, alter cell proliferation and migration, and inhibit apoptosis in chondrocytes. The effect of LPA on the angiogenic capability of chondrocytes is not clear. This study aimed to investigate its effect on the angiogenic capability of human chondrocytes and the underlying mechanism of these effects. Human chondrocyte cell line, CHON-001, commercialized human chondrocytes (HC) derived from normal human articular cartilage, and human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used as cell models in this study. The angiogenic capability of chondrocytes was determined by capillary tube formation, monolayer permeability, cell migration, and cell proliferation. An angiogenesis protein array kit was used to evaluate the secretion of angiogenic factors in conditioned medium. Angiogenin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expressions were evaluated by Q-RT-PCR and EIA, respectively. LPA receptor (LPAR) expression was determined by RT-PCR. Signaling pathways were clarified using inhibitors, Western blot analysis, and reporter assays. The LPA treatment promoted the angiogenic capability of CHON-001 cells and HC, resulting in enhanced HUVEC capillary tube formation, monolayer permeability, migration, and cell growth. Angiogenin, IGFBP-1, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP-9, and VEGF mRNA and protein expressions were significantly enhanced in LPA-treated chondrocytes. LPA2, 3, 4 and 6 were expressed in CHON-001 and HC cells. Pretreatment with the Gi/o type G protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX), and the NF-kB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly inhibited LPA-induced angiogenin, IGFBP-1, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP-9, and VEGF expressions in chondrocytes. The PTX pretreatment also inhibited LPA-mediated NF-kB activation, suggesting

  11. Chondrogenic potential of human articular chondrocytes and skeletal stem cells: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Sengers, Bram G; Oreffo, Richard OC

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies have increasingly focused on skeletal stem cells (SSCs), in response to concerns such as donor site morbidity, dedifferentiation and limited lifespan associated with the use of articular chondrocytes for cartilage repair. The suitability of SSCs for cartilage regeneration, however, remains to be fully determined. This study has examined the chondrogenic potential of human STRO-1-immunoselected SSCs (STRO-1+ SSCs), in comparison to human articular chondrocytes (HACs), by utilising two bioengineering strategies, namely “scaffold-free” three-dimensional (3-D) pellet culture and culture using commercially available, highly porous, 3-D scaffolds with interconnected pore networks. STRO-1+ SSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from bone marrow samples of haematologically normal osteoarthritic individuals following routine hip replacement procedures. Chondrocytes were isolated by sequential enzymatic digestion of deep zone articular cartilage pieces dissected from femoral heads of the same individuals. After expansion in monolayer cultures, the harvested cell populations were centrifuged to form high-density 3-D pellets and also seeded in the 3-D scaffold membranes, followed by culture in serum-free chondrogenic media under static conditions for 21 and 28 days, respectively. Chondrogenic differentiation was determined by gene expression, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Robust cartilage formation and expression of hyaline cartilage-specific markers were observed in both day-21 pellets and day-28 explants generated using HACs. In comparison, STRO-1+ SSCs demonstrated significantly lower chondrogenic differentiation potential and a tendency for hypertrophic differentiation in day-21 pellets. Culture of STRO-1+ SSCs in the 3-D scaffolds improved the expression of hyaline cartilage-specific markers in day-28 explants, however, was unable to prevent hypertrophic differentiation of the SSC population. The

  12. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  13. Human developmental chondrogenesis as a basis for engineering chondrocytes from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Bluguermann, Carolina; Kyupelyan, Levon; Latour, Brooke; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Galic, Zoran; Ge, Sundi; Zhu, Yuhua; Petrigliano, Frank A; Nsair, Ali; Miriuka, Santiago G; Li, Xinmin; Lyons, Karen M; Crooks, Gay M; McAllister, David R; Van Handel, Ben; Adams, John S; Evseenko, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Joint injury and osteoarthritis affect millions of people worldwide, but attempts to generate articular cartilage using adult stem/progenitor cells have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that recapitulation of the human developmental chondrogenic program using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) may represent a superior approach for cartilage restoration. Using laser-capture microdissection followed by microarray analysis, we first defined a surface phenotype (CD166(low/neg)CD146(low/neg)CD73(+)CD44(low)BMPR1B(+)) distinguishing the earliest cartilage committed cells (prechondrocytes) at 5-6 weeks of development. Functional studies confirmed these cells are chondrocyte progenitors. From 12 weeks, only the superficial layers of articular cartilage were enriched in cells with this progenitor phenotype. Isolation of cells with a similar immunophenotype from differentiating human PSCs revealed a population of CD166(low/neg)BMPR1B(+) putative cartilage-committed progenitors. Taken as a whole, these data define a developmental approach for the generation of highly purified functional human chondrocytes from PSCs that could enable substantial progress in cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Human chondrocyte migration behaviour to guide the development of engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grace D; Tan, Andrea R; Cui, Victoria; Bulinski, J Chloe; Cook, James L; Attur, Mukundan; Abramson, Steven B; Ateshian, Gerard A; Hung, Clark T

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-engineering techniques have been successful in developing cartilage-like tissues in vitro using cells from animal sources. The successful translation of these strategies to the clinic will likely require cell expansion to achieve sufficient cell numbers. Using a two-dimensional (2D) cell migration assay to first identify the passage at which chondrocytes exhibited their greatest chondrogenic potential, the objective of this study was to determine a more optimal culture medium for developing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage-like tissues using human cells. We evaluated combinations of commonly used growth factors that have been shown to promote chondrogenic growth and development. Human articular chondrocytes (AC) from osteoarthritic (OA) joints were cultured in 3D environments, either in pellets or encapsulated in agarose. The effect of growth factor supplementation was dependent on the environment, such that matrix deposition differed between the two culture systems. ACs in pellet culture were more responsive to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) alone or combinations containing BMP2 (i.e. BMP2 with PDGF or FGF). However, engineered cartilage development within agarose was better for constructs cultured with TGFβ3. These results with agarose and pellet culture studies set the stage for the development of conditions appropriate for culturing 3D functional engineered cartilage for eventual use in human therapies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Human Developmental Chondrogenesis as a Basis for Engineering Chondrocytes from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Bluguermann, Carolina; Kyupelyan, Levon; Latour, Brooke; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Galic, Zoran; Ge, Sundi; Zhu, Yuhua; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Nsair, Ali; Miriuka, Santiago G.; Li, Xinmin; Lyons, Karen M.; Crooks, Gay M.; McAllister, David R.; Van Handel, Ben; Adams, John S.; Evseenko, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Joint injury and osteoarthritis affect millions of people worldwide, but attempts to generate articular cartilage using adult stem/progenitor cells have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that recapitulation of the human developmental chondrogenic program using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) may represent a superior approach for cartilage restoration. Using laser-capture microdissection followed by microarray analysis, we first defined a surface phenotype (CD166low/negCD146low/negCD73+CD44lowBMPR1B+) distinguishing the earliest cartilage committed cells (prechondrocytes) at 5–6 weeks of development. Functional studies confirmed these cells are chondrocyte progenitors. From 12 weeks, only the superficial layers of articular cartilage were enriched in cells with this progenitor phenotype. Isolation of cells with a similar immunophenotype from differentiating human PSCs revealed a population of CD166low/negBMPR1B+ putative cartilage-committed progenitors. Taken as a whole, these data define a developmental approach for the generation of highly purified functional human chondrocytes from PSCs that could enable substantial progress in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24371811

  16. Human Bone-Forming Chondrocytes Cultured in the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor Retain Matrix Proteins: Similarities to Spaceflight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Hecht, J.; Montufar-Solis, D.

    2006-01-01

    Fracture healing, crucial to a successful Mars mission, involves formation of a cartilaginous fracture callus which differentiates, mineralizes, ossifies and remodels via the endochondral process. Studies of spaceflown and tailsuspended rats found that, without loading, fracture callus formation and cartilage differentiation within the callus were minimal. We found delayed differentiation of chondrocytes within the rat growth plate on Cosmos 1887, 2044, and Spacelab 3. In the current study, differentiation of human bone-forming chondrocytes cultured in the hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) was assessed. Human costochondral chondrocytes in suspension were aggregated overnight, then cultured in the HFB for 25 days. Collagen Type II, aggrecan and unsulfated chondroitin were found extracellularly and chondroitin sulfates 4 and 6 within the cell. Lack of secretion was also found in pancreatic cells of spaceflown rats, and in our SL3 studies. The HFB can be used to study cartilage differentiation in simulated microgravity.

  17. Human Bone-Forming Chondrocytes Cultured in the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor Retain Matrix Proteins: Similarities to Spaceflight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Hecht, J.; Montufar-Solis, D.

    2006-01-01

    Fracture healing, crucial to a successful Mars mission, involves formation of a cartilaginous fracture callus which differentiates, mineralizes, ossifies and remodels via the endochondral process. Studies of spaceflown and tailsuspended rats found that, without loading, fracture callus formation and cartilage differentiation within the callus were minimal. We found delayed differentiation of chondrocytes within the rat growth plate on Cosmos 1887, 2044, and Spacelab 3. In the current study, differentiation of human bone-forming chondrocytes cultured in the hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) was assessed. Human costochondral chondrocytes in suspension were aggregated overnight, then cultured in the HFB for 25 days. Collagen Type II, aggrecan and unsulfated chondroitin were found extracellularly and chondroitin sulfates 4 and 6 within the cell. Lack of secretion was also found in pancreatic cells of spaceflown rats, and in our SL3 studies. The HFB can be used to study cartilage differentiation in simulated microgravity.

  18. CD44 knock-down in bovine and human chondrocytes results in release of bound HYAL2

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Daisuke; Danielson, Ben T.; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2015-01-01

    CD44 shedding occurs in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Previous work of others has suggested that the hyaluronidase isoform HYAL2 has the capacity to bind to CD44, a binding that may itself induce CD44 cleavage. Experiments were developed to elucidate whether chondrocyte HYAL2: (1) was exposed on the extracellular plasma membrane of chondrocytes, (2) bound to CD44, (3) underwent shedding together with CD44 and lastly, (4) exhibited hyaluronidase activity within a near-neutral pH range. Enhancing CD44 shedding by IL-1β resulted in a proportional increase in HYAL2 released from human and bovine chondrocytes into the medium. CD44 knockdown by siRNA also resulted in increased accumulation of HYAL2 in the media of chondrocytes. By hyaluronan zymography only activity at pH 3.7 was observed and this activity was reduced by pre-treatment of chondrocytes with trypsin. CD44 and HYAL2 were found to co-immunoprecipitate, and to co-localize within intracellular vesicles and at the plasma membrane. Degradation of hyaluronan was visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. With this approach, hyaluronidase activity could be observed at pH 4.8 under assay conditions in which CD44 and HYAL2 binding remained intact; additionally, weak hyaluronidase activity could be observed at pH 6.8 under these conditions. This study suggests that CD44 and HYAL2 are bound at the surface of chondrocytes. The release of HYAL2 when CD44 is shed could provide a mechanism for weak hyaluronidase activity to occur within the more distant extracellular matrix of cartilage. PMID:25864644

  19. In vitro human chondrocyte culture on plasma-treated poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Theerathanagorn, Tharinee; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Sakulsombat, Morakot; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Janvikul, Wanida

    2015-01-01

    Porous poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds were prepared using a salt leaching technique and subsequently surface modified by a low oxygen plasma treatment prior to the use in the in vitro culture of human chondrocytes. Condensation polymerization of glycerol and sebacic acid used at various mole ratios, i.e. 1:1, 1:1.25, and 1:1.5, was initially conducted to prepare PGS prepolymers. Porous elastomeric PGS scaffolds were directly fabricated from the mixtures of each prepolymer and 90% (w/w) NaCl particles and then subjected to the plasma treatment to enhance the surface hydrophilicity of the materials. The properties of both untreated and plasma-treated PGS scaffolds were comparatively evaluated, in terms of surface morphology, surface chemical composition, porosity, and storage modulus using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-computed tomography, and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. The responses of chondrocytes cultured on individual PGS scaffolds were assessed, in terms of cell proliferation and ECM production. The results revealed that average pore sizes and porosity of the scaffolds were increased with an increasing sebacic acid concentration used. The storage moduli of the scaffolds were raised after the plasma treatment, possibly due to the further crosslinking of PGS upon treatment. Moreover, the scaffold prepared with a higher sebacic acid content demonstrated a greater capability of promoting cell infiltration, proliferation, and ECM production, especially when it was plasma-treated; the greatest HA, sGAG, uronic acid, and collagen contents were detected in matrix of this scaffold. The H & E and safranin O staining results also strongly supported this finding. The storage modulus of the scaffold was intensified after incubation with the chondrocytes for 21 days, indicating the accretion and retention of matrix ECM on the cell-cultured scaffold.

  20. [Chondrocytes application in regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Katarzyna; Zalewski, Mateusz; Gadek, Artur; Drukała, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage reconstruction is a crucial issue for tissue engineering because of high damage frequency in connection with low regenerative capacity. Microfractures and shaving are the oldest and most commonly used practices. The newest techniques are: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation, Matrix Associated Chondrocytes Implantation and their derivatives. Dedifferentiation of chondrocytes due to low proliferation rate and phenotype loss makes isolation and in vitro culture of normal human chondrocytes very complex. Therefore, obtaining mesenchymal stem cells from various sources and differentiating them into chondrocytes is another interesting approach.

  1. Different ratios of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes used in tissue-engineered cartilage and its application for human ear-shaped substitutes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Liu, Xia; Yan, Li; Wang, Qian; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2013-01-01

    The application of chondrocyte-based cartilage tissue engineering is limited because of the lack of autologous cartilage sources and chondrocyte dedifferentiation after in vitro expansion. Coculture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes has been a promising strategy for cartilage engineering as chondrocytes can provide a chondrogenic environment for BMSCs. However, there are no systematic comparison studies for engineered cartilage constructed using different mixing ratios of BMSCs and chondrocytes, and the most effective mixing ratio with the lowest number of chondrocytes is unknown. Here, we set a gradient of mixing ratios of BMSCs to chondrocytes for an in vitro coculture system and compared the shape retention and quality of the engineered cartilage using macroscopic and histological assays, glycosaminoglycan content assessment and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen, biomechanical evaluation and hypertrophy-related gene expression analysis. The results showed that at least 30% chondrocytes were required to generate cartilage tissue with satisfactory shape and quality. Therefore, we preliminarily assessed the feasibility of engineering a human ear-shaped substitute using a coculture system with a 7:3 ratio of BMSCs to chondrocytes. After 8 weeks of in vitro culture, the precise architecture of the human ear-shaped construct was well maintained with the typical cartilaginous composition confirmed by histological assays.

  2. Meniscal repair in vivo using human chondrocyte-seeded PLGA mesh scaffold pretreated with platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hong Suk; Nam, Jinwoo; Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) pretreatment on a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) mesh scaffold enhances the healing capacity of the meniscus with human chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds in vivo, even when the seeded number of cells was reduced from 10 million to one million. A flexible PLGA mesh scaffold was pretreated with PRP using a centrifugal technique. One million human articular chondrocytes were seeded onto the scaffold by dynamic oscillation. After 7 days, scaffolds were placed between human meniscal discs and were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 6 weeks (n = 16/group). Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated uniform attachment of the chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds 24 h following seeding. Cell attachment analysis revealed a significantly increased number of chondrocytes on PRP-pretreated than non-treated scaffolds (p < 0.05). Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed chondrocytes attached to the PRP-pretreated scaffolds interconnecting their cellular processes with the fibrin network at 24 h and day 7 of culture. Of the 16 constructs containing PRP-pretreated scaffolds implanted in mice, six menisci healed completely, nine healed incompletely and one did not heal. Histological results from the 16 control constructs containing non-treated scaffolds revealed that none had healed completely, four healed incompletely and 12 did not heal. The histological outcome between the groups was significantly different (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that human articular chondrocytes on PRP-pretreated PLGA mesh scaffolds demonstrate increased cell attachment and enhance the healing capacity of meniscus with a reduced number of seeding cells in a meniscal repair mouse model. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. TGFβ inhibition during expansion phase increases the chondrogenic re-differentiation capacity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Signorile, L; Verhaar, J A N; Giannoni, P; van Osch, G J V M

    2012-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment to repair articular cartilage defects, relying on the availability of expanded (de-differentiated) chondrocytes. Unfortunately, the expansion process causes several phenotypical changes, requiring re-establishment of the native chondrogenic phenotype to sustain proper repair. Among other proteins, transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is known to influence the chondrogenic re-differentiation of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) and their matrix deposition. Thus we investigated the effects of TGFβ-depletion during the expansion phase. HACs were isolated from articular cartilage and expanded in the canonical serum-supplemented medium [fetal calf serum (FCS)] or in a chemically-defined (CD) medium, with or without anti-TGFβ antibody administration. The re-differentiation potential of the cells was assessed by pellet cultures, gene expression analysis and histology. Cell proliferation proceeded more rapidly in CD-medium than in FCS-medium; it was not affected by the use of anti-TGFβ antibody but was further increased by addition of exogenous TGFβ1, via increased p-Smad1/5/8. Conversely, in FCS-medium, addition of anti-TGFβ antibody decreased both proliferation and p-Smad1/5/8 level. Challenging either FCS- or CD-medium with anti-TGFβ antibody during expansion enhanced chondrogenesis in the subsequent pellet cultures. Moreover, TGFβ-depletion during expansion in CD-medium inhibited mRNA expression of hypertrophic markers, collagen type-X (COL10) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Interestingly, the TGFβ1 level detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent sandwich assay (ELISA) during cell expansion was correlated with COL10 mRNA expression after re-differentiation. TGFβ-depletion during expansion improves the re-differentiation capacity of chondrocytes and inhibits hypertrophy. These results indicate the importance of the expansion medium composition to improve chondrogenic re-differentiation and

  4. The effect of intracellular alkalinisation on intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in a human chondrocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Browning, Joseph A; Wilkins, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pH(i)) is a well-established determinant of cartilage matrix metabolism. Changes to chondrocyte pH(i), and therefore matrix turnover rates, arise following joint loading. It is not yet clear whether pH changes exert their effects on matrix metabolism directly, or by changing the concentration of another, as yet unidentified, intracellular factor. In this study the effect of intracellular alkalinisation on intracellular [Ca(2+)] has been examined using the human chondrocyte C-20/A4 cell line. pH(i) was manipulated by the addition of weak bases to suspensions of chondrocytes and fluorimetric techniques were employed to measure pH(i) and [Ca(2+)](i). The effect of pH(i) changes on intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) levels was also determined. The pH-sensitive properties of the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluoroprobe employed in this study, Fura-2, were investigated such that artefactual effects of pH changes upon the dye could be discounted. It was demonstrated that, for dye loaded into cells, alkalinisation resulted in a small increase in the affinity of the dye for Ca(2+) ions. Intracellular alkalinisation elicited by treatment with either of the weak bases trimethylamine or ammonium chloride initiated a rise in [Ca(2+)](i). This effect was too large to be explicable by the effects of pH changes on Fura-2 and was not dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) ions. Prior depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by treatment with thapsigargin inhibited alkalinisation-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) and intracellular alkalinisation was also associated with increased levels of intracellular IP(3). These results confirm that alkaline pH(i) changes associated with dynamic loading of cartilage also result in knock-on alterations to [Ca(2+)](i). Given the sensitivity of cartilage matrix metabolism to [Ca(2+)](i) it is likely that this signalling cascade forms an important part of the mechanotransduction pathway that determines the response of

  5. Assessment of TGF-β3 on production of aggrecan by human articular chondrocytes in pellet culture system.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Saeed; Hashemibeni, Batool; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Kabiri, Azadeh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abutorabi, Roshanak

    2014-01-01

    The Autologous Chondrocytes Transplantation (ACT) method is being studied for repair of cartilage diseases. As the chondrocytes dedifferentiated during monolayer culture, three-dimensional cultures are suggested to redifferentiate them. The aim of this study was investigation of the effect of TGF-β3 growth factor on chondrocytes in pellet culture system. The chondrocytes were isolated from three human articular cartilages by enzymatic digestion. The cells of the second passage were transferred to pellet culture system. We determined the chondrogenic medium with TGF-β3 as the experimental group and without it as the control group. After 2 weeks, the aggrecan production was investigated using histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) methods. The presence of glycosaminoglycans was proved through Toluiden blue staining. Comparison of IHC results using MATLAB software showed that aggrecan in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P ≤ 0.05). The presence of TGF-β3 in the chondrogenic medium could lead to the production of more aggrecan in chondrocytes cultivated in pellet culture system.

  6. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes.

  7. Hyperlipidemic microenvironment conditionates damage mechanisms in human chondrocytes by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Medina-Luna, Daniel; Santamaría-Olmedo, Mónica Guadalupe; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Martínez-Flores, Karina; Fernández-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Nava, Gabriela Angélica; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Olivos-Meza, Anell; Gomez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción; Pineda, Carlos; Blanco, Francisco; Reginato, Anthony M; López-Reyes, Alberto

    2017-06-12

    Currently, two pathogenic pathways describe the role of obesity in osteoarthritis (OA); one through biomechanical stress, and the other by the contribution of systemic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of free fatty acids (FFA) in human chondrocytes (HC) expression of proinflammatory factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS). HC were exposed to two different concentrations of FFA in order to evaluate the secretion of adipokines through cytokines immunoassays panel, quantify the protein secretion of FFA-treated chondrocytes, and fluorescent cytometry assays were performed to evaluate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. HC injury was observed at 48 h of treatment with FFA. In the FFA-treated HC the production of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, and the reactive nitrogen species increased significantly in a at the two-dose tested (250 and 500 μM). In addition, we found an increase in the cytokine secretion of IL-6 and chemokine IL-8 in FFA-treated HC in comparison to the untreated HC. In our in vitro model of HC, a hyperlipidemia microenvironment induces an oxidative stress state that enhances the inflammatory process mediated by adipokines secretion in HC.

  8. Secretome analysis of human articular chondrocytes unravels catabolic effects of nicotine on the joint.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Mateos, Jesús; Oreiro, Natividad; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint pathology characterized by articular cartilage degradation that lacks from efficient therapy. Since previous epidemiological data show a high controversy regarding the role of smoking in OA, we aimed to evaluate the effects of nicotine (the most physiologically active compound of tobacco) on the joint. Secretome analyses, based on metabolic labeling followed by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis, were carried out using an in vitro model of articular inflammation (primary human articular chondrocytes treated with interleukin-1β), and also on osteoarthritic cells. ELISA and Western blot assays were performed to verify some of the results. Nineteen proteins were altered by nicotine in the model of articular inflammation, including several cytokines and proteases. We confirmed the increased secretion by nicotine of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and two proposed markers of OA, fibronectin, and chitinase 3-like protein 1. Finally, four components of the extracellular matrix of cartilage were decreased by nicotine in OA chondrocytes. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are modulated by nicotine in cartilage cells, suggesting a negative effect of this drug on the joint. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Sesamin inhibits IL-1β-stimulated inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kong, Pengyu; Chen, Guanghua; Jiang, Anlong; Wang, Yufu; Song, Chengchao; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Xi, Chunyang; Wang, Guangxi; Ji, Ye; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-12-13

    Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and investigated the possible mechanism. Results demonstrated that sesamin treatment significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production induced by IL-1β. Sesamin inhibited MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13 production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Sesamin also inhibited IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Meanwhile, sesamin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. However, Nrf2 siRNA reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin. In conclusion, our results suggested that sesamin showed anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  10. Three-Dimensional Scaffold-Free Fusion Culture: the Way to Enhanced Chondrogenesis of in vitro Propagated Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, M.; Martin, F.; Mannigel, K.; Kaltschmidt, K.; Sack, U.; Anderer, U.

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage regeneration based on isolated and culture-expanded chondrocytes has been studied in various in vitro models, but the quality varies with respect to the morphology and the physiology of the synthesized tissues. The aim of our study was to promote in vitro chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes using a novel three-dimensional (3-D) cultivation system in combination with the chondrogenic differentiation factors transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-β2) and L-ascorbic acid. Articular chondrocytes isolated from six elderly patients were expanded in monolayer culture. A single-cell suspension of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes was then added to agar-coated dishes without using any scaffold material, in the presence, or absence of TGF-β2 and/or L-ascorbic acid. Three-dimensional cartilage-like constructs, called single spheroids, and microtissues consisting of several spheroids fused together, named as fusions, were formed. Generated tissues were mainly characterized using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The morphology of the in vitro tissues shared some similarities to native hyaline cartilage in regard to differentiated S100-positive chondrocytes within a cartilaginous matrix, with strong collagen type II expression and increased synthesis of proteoglycans. Finally, our innovative scaffold-free fusion culture technique supported enhanced chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. These 3-D hyaline cartilage-like microtissues will be useful for in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation and regeneration, enabling optimization of functional tissue engineering and possibly contributing to the development of new approaches to treat traumatic cartilage defects or osteoarthritis. PMID:24441184

  11. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    PubMed

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  12. Phenotypic analysis of cell surface markers and gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes during monolayer expansion.

    PubMed

    Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Huselstein, Céline; Wang, Yun; Galois, Laurent; Mainard, Didier; Decot, Véronique; Netter, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Muller, Sylvaine; Gillet, Pierre; Watrin-Pinzano, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Both chondrocytes and mensenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the most used cell sources for cartilage tissue engineering. However, monolayer expansion to obtain sufficient cells leads to a rapid chondrocyte dedifferentiation and a subsequent ancillary reduced ability of MSCs to differentiate into chondrocytes, thus limiting their application in cartilage repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the monolayer expansion on the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of both cell types, and to find the appropriate compromise between monolayer expansion and the remaining chondrogenic characteristics. To this end, human chondrocytes, isolated enzymatically from femoral head slice, and human MSCs, derived from bone marrow, were maintained in monolayer culture up to passage 5. The respective expressions of cell surface markers (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166) and several chondrogenic-related genes for each passage (P0-P5) of those cells were then analyzed using flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Flow cytometry analyses showed that, during the monolayer expansion, some qualitative and quantitative regulations occur for the expression of cell surface markers. A rapid increase in mRNA expression of type 1 collagen occurs whereas a significant decrease of type 2 collagen and Sox 9 was observed in chondrocytes through the successive passages. On the other hand, the expansion did not induced obvious change in MSCs gene expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that passage 1 might be the up-limit for chondrocytes in order to achieve their subsequent redifferentiation in 3D scaffold. Nevertheless, MSCs could be expanded in monolayer until passage 5 without loosing their undifferentiated phenotypes.

  13. Targeted In Situ Biosynthetic Transcriptional Activation in Native Surface-Level Human Articular Chondrocytes during Lesion Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Safe articular cartilage lesion stabilization is an important early surgical intervention advance toward mitigating articular cartilage disease burden. While short-term chondrocyte viability and chondrosupportive matrix modification have been demonstrated within tissue contiguous to targeted removal of damaged articular cartilage, longer term tissue responses require evaluation to further clarify treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine surface chondrocyte responses within contiguous tissue after lesion stabilization. Methods: Nonablation radiofrequency lesion stabilization of human cartilage explants obtained during knee replacement was performed for surface fibrillation. Time-dependent chondrocyte viability, nuclear morphology and cell distribution, and temporal response kinetics of matrix and chaperone gene transcription indicative of differentiated chondrocyte function were evaluated in samples at intervals to 96 hours after treatment. Results: Subadjacent surface articular cartilage chondrocytes demonstrated continued viability for 96 hours after treatment, a lack of increased nuclear fragmentation or condensation, persistent nucleic acid production during incubation reflecting cellular assembly behavior, and transcriptional up-regulation of matrix and chaperone genes indicative of retained biosynthetic differentiated cell function. Conclusions: The results of this study provide further evidence of treatment efficacy and suggest the possibility to manipulate or induce cellular function, thereby recruiting local chondrocytes to aid lesion recovery. Early surgical intervention may be viewed as a tissue rescue, allowing articular cartilage to continue displaying biological responses appropriate to its function rather than converting to a tissue ultimately governed by the degenerative material property responses of matrix failure. Early intervention may positively impact the late changes and reduce disease burden of damaged articular

  14. [Preliminary study on tissue-engineered cartilage with human dermal fibroblasts co-cultured with porcine chondrocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Zhou, Guang-dong; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yi-lin

    2009-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of constructing tissue-engineered cartilage with human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in vitro. Porcine articular chondrocytes and HDFs were isolated and in vitro expanded respectively. Then they were mixed at the ratio of 1:1 (chondrocytes: fibroblasts) . The mixed cells were seeded onto polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffold at the ultimate concentration of 5.0 x 10(7)/ml as co-culture group. Chondrocytes and HDFs at the same ultimate concentration were seeded respectively onto the scaffold as chondrocyte group ( positive control group) and fibroblast group ( negative control group). The specimens were collected after in vitro culture for 8 weeks. Gross observation, histology and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the results. In chondrocyte group, the cell-scaffold constructs could maintain the original size and shape during in vitro culture. The new formed cartilage-like tissue had typical histological structure and extracellular matrix staining similar to normal cartilage. In co-culture group the constructs shrunk slightly at 8 weeks, cartilage-like tissue formed and GAG could be detected for strong expression by Safranin O staining. Furthermore, using the specific identification, a few HDFs derived cells were found to form lacuna structure at the peripheral area of cartilage-like tissue. In fibroblast group, the constructs deformed and shrunk gradually without mature cartilage lacuna in histology. The 3D-co-culture system can effectively induce the differentiation of HDFs to chondrocytes. The tissue-engineered cartilage can be constructed in vitro with the 3D-co-culture system.

  15. Lovastatin protects chondrocytes derived from Wharton's jelly of human cord against hydrogen-peroxide-induced in vitro injury.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Nadia; Mehmood, Azra; Bhatti, Fazal-ur-Rehman; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to improve the survival and reduce the apoptosis of chondrocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord (WJMSCs) by Lovastatin supplementation under hydrogen-peroxide-induced injury conditions to simulate the osteoarthritic micro-environment. Chondrocytes were differentiated in vitro from WJMSCs. The cultured WJMSCs expressed CD90 (84.07%), CD105 (80.84%), OCT4 (26.90%), CD45 (0.42%) and CD34 (0.48%) as determined by flow cytometry. Increased aggregation of proteoglycans observed by Safranin-O staining accompanied by increased expression of COL2A1, ACAN, SOX9 and BGN shown by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the chondrogenic differentiation of the WJMSCs. The in vitro differentiated chondrocytes were subjected to oxidative stress by exposure to 200 μM hydrogen peroxide, either in the presence or absence of Lovastatin (2 μM) for 5 h. Lovastatin treatment resulted in decreased apoptosis, senescence and LDH release and in increased viability and proliferation of WJMSC-derived chondrocytes. Real time PCR analysis showed markedly up-regulated expression of prosurvival, proliferation and chondrogenic genes (BCL2L1, BCL2, AKT, PCNA, COL2A1, ACAN, SOX9 and BGN) and significantly down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic genes (BAX, FADD) in the Lovastatin-treated group in comparison with injured cells. The reduced expression of VEGF and p53 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and PCR suggests the suitability of the use of Lovastatin in adjunct to WJMSC-derived chondrocytes for the treatment of osteoarthritis. We conclude that Lovastatin protects WJMSC-derived chondrocytes from hydrogen-peroxide-induced in vitro injury.

  16. The cytotoxicity of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine on human chondrocytes and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Breu, Anita; Rosenmeier, Katharina; Kujat, Richard; Angele, Peter; Zink, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Intraarticular injections of local anesthetics are frequently used as part of multimodal pain regimens. However, recent data suggest that local anesthetics affect chondrocyte viability. In this study, we assessed the chondrotoxic effects of mepivacaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine. We hypothesized that specific cytotoxic potencies directly correlate with analgesic potencies, and that cytotoxic effects in intact cartilage are different than in osteoarthritic tissue. Human articular chondrocytes were exposed to equal and equipotent concentrations of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine for 1 hour. Cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis were determined at predefined time points using flow cytometry, live-dead staining, and caspase detection. Intact and osteoarthritic human cartilage explants were treated with equipotent concentrations of named drugs to determine cell viability applying fluorescence microscopy. Chondrotoxic effects increased from ropivacaine to mepivacaine to bupivacaine in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. Compared with control, bupivacaine 0.5% decreased chondrocyte viability to 78% ± 9% (P = 0.0183) 1 hour and 16% ± 10% (P < 0.0001) 24 hours later, as determined by live-dead staining in monolayer cultures. Viability rates were reduced to 80% ± 7% (P = 0.0475) 1 hour and 80% ± 10% (P = 0.0095) 24 hours after treatment with ropivacaine 0.75%. After exposure to mepivacaine 2%, viable cells were scored 36% ± 6% (P < 0.0001) after 1 hour and 30% ± 11% (P < 0.0001) after 24 hours. Ropivacaine treatment was less chondrotoxic than bupivacaine (P = 0.0006) and mepivacaine exposure (P = 0.0059). Exposure to concentrations up to 0.25% of bupivacaine, 0.5% of ropivacaine, and 0.5% of mepivacaine did not reveal significant chondrotoxicity in flow cytometry. However, chondrotoxicity did not correlate with potency of local anesthetics. Immediate cell death was mainly due to necrosis followed by apoptosis. Cellular death rates were

  17. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernandez-Lopez, Carlos; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the MRC dysfunction had an

  18. The effect of additive compounds on glycerol-induced damage to human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Joshua; Laouar, Leila; Elliott, Janet A W; Korbutt, Gregory S; Jomha, Nadr M

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of cryoprotective agents are required for cryopreservation techniques such as vitrification. Glycerol is a common cryoprotective agent used in cryopreservation protocols but this agent is toxic at high concentrations. This work is an attempt to mitigate the toxic effects of high concentrations of glycerol on intact chondrocytes in human knee articular cartilage from total knee arthroplasty patients by simultaneous exposure to glycerol and a variety of additive compounds. The resulting cell viability in the cartilage samples as measured by membrane integrity staining showed that, in at least one concentration or in combination, all of the tested additive compounds (tetramethylpyrazine, ascorbic acid, chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine sulphate) were able to reduce the deleterious effects of glycerol exposure when examination of membrane integrity took place on a delayed time frame. The use of additive compounds to reduce cryoprotectant toxicity in articular cartilage may help improve cell recovery after cryopreservation.

  19. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Methods Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Results Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the

  20. Baicalin Inhibits Inflammatory Responses to Interleukin-1β Stimulation in Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Deguo; Gao, Hongwei; Liu, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yangyang; Gong, Mingzhi

    2017-09-01

    A mix of flavonoids comprising baicalin (BA) and catechin showed effective impacts on controlling the progress of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. The influences of BA on the transcriptional levels of a series of proinflammatory genes were measured using real-time reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expressions of proteins involved in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were detected by Western blot. The in vitro results were confirmed in a mouse OA model. We found that BA treatment led to remarkable reductions of OA-related proinflammatory gene expressions, including interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), and CXCL10. The transcriptional levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/Nos2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)3, and MMP13 were significantly inhibited by BA. We measured the productions of nitrite and prostaglandin E2 from human chondrocytes and BA was shown to reduce their productions. On the contrary, mRNA levels of aggrecan and collagen-II were enhanced by BA treatment. The inhibitory role of BA on OA may possibly be mediated by NF-κB signaling because of comparable decreases of phosphorylated (p)-p65 and p-IκBα and less p65 translocation in the nucleus after BA treatment. In OA mice model, BA significantly reduced synovitis scores and related gene expressions, including IL-6, TNF, CXCL1, CXCL10, MMP3, MMP13, and Nos2. In conclusion, BA suppresses the inflammatory responses of human chondrocytes to IL-1β stimulation, and NF-κB signaling may be involved in the mechanisms of BA functions.

  1. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  2. Chondrogenic capacity and alterations in hyaluronan synthesis of cultured human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yohei; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Omachi, Takaaki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-06-14

    During osteoarthritis there is a disruption and loss of the extracellular matrix of joint cartilage, composed primarily of type II collagen, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In young patients, autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used to repair cartilage defects. However, for more elderly patients with osteoarthritis, such a repair approach is contraindicated because the procedure requires a large expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro leading a rapid, perhaps irreversible, loss of the chondrocyte phenotype. This study investigates whether osteoarthritic chondrocytes obtained from older patients can be expanded in vitro and moreover, induced to re-activate their chondrocyte phenotype. A decrease in chondrocyte phenotype markers, collagen II, aggrecan and SOX9 mRNA was observed with successive expansion of cells in monolayer culture. However, chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet culture successfully rescued the expression of all three marker genes to native levels, even with 4th passage cells-cells representing an approximate 625-fold expansion in cell number. This data supports the use of osteoarthritic cells for autologous implantation repair. In addition, another set of gene products were explored as useful markers of the chondrocyte phenotype. Differentiated primary chondrocytes exhibited a common pattern of hyaluronan synthase isoforms that changed upon cell expansion in vitro and, reverted back to the original pattern following pellet culture. Moreover, the change in isoform pattern correlated with changes in the molecular size of synthesized hyaluronan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Taurine grafting and collagen adsorption on PLLA films improve human primary chondrocyte adhesion and growth.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Luca; Cocchiola, Rossana; Francolini, Iolanda; Lopreiato, Mariangela; Piozzi, Antonella; Zanoni, Robertino; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Martinelli, Andrea

    2017-07-23

    Biocompatible and degradable poly(α-hydroxy acids) are one of the most widely used materials in scaffolds for tissue engineering. Nevertheless, they often need surface modification to improve interaction with cells. Aminolysis is a common method to increase the polymer hydrophilicity and to introduce surface functional groups, able to covalently link or absorb, through electrostatic interaction, bioactive molecules or macromolecules. For this purpose, multi-functional amines, such as diethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine are used. However, common drawbacks are their toxicity and the introduction of positive charges on the surface. Thus, these kind of modified surfaces are unable to link directly proteins, such as collagens, a promising substrate for many cell types, in particular chondrocytes and osteoblasts. In this work, poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) film surface was labelled with negatively charged sulfonate groups by grafting taurine (TAU) through an aminolysis reaction. The novel modified PLLA film (PLLA-TAU) was able to interact directly with collagen. The reaction was carried out in mild conditions by using a solution of tetrabutylammonium salt of TAU in methanol. ATR-FTIR, XPS and contact angle measurements were used to verify the outcome of the reaction. After the exchange of tetrabutylamonium cation with Na(+), collagen was absorbed on the TAU grafted PLLA film (PLLA-TAU-COLL). In vitro biological tests with human primary chondrocytes showed that PLLA-TAU and PLLA-TAU-COLL improved cell viability and adhesion, compared to the unmodified polymer, suggesting that these modifications make PLLA substrate suitable for cartilage repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Echinocystic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced COX-2 and iNOS Expression in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanlong; Piao, Taikui; Liu, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, displays a range of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effect of EA on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocyte has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EA on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocyte. Chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β in the absence or presence of EA. NO and PGE2 production were measured by Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of COX-2, iNOS, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that EA suppressed IL-1β-induced collagenase-3 (MMP-13), NO, and PGE2 production in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β up-regulated the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the increase was inhibited by EA. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation were inhibited by EA. In conclusion, EA effectively attenuated IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in osteoarthritis chondrocyte which suggesting that EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  5. [Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500μM was determined by Live/Dead assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacainechondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500 μM was determined by LIVE/DEAD assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacainechondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of strategies to increase chondrocyte viability in cryopreserved human osteochondral allografts: evaluation of the glycosylated hydroquinone, arbutin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, S C; Gonçalves, J; Judas, F; Lopes, C; Mendes, A F

    2009-12-01

    Allogeneic cartilage is used to repair damaged areas of articular cartilage, requiring the presence of living chondrocytes. So far, no preservation method can effectively meet that purpose. Identification of more effective cryoprotective agents (CPAs) can contribute to this goal. The aim of this study was to determine whether the glycosylated hydroquinone, arbutin, alone or in combination with low concentrations of other CPAs, has cryoprotective properties towards human articular cartilage. Human tibial plateaus were procured from multi-organ donors, with the approval of the Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of Coimbra. The tibial plateaus were treated with or without arbutin (50 or 100mM), alone or in combination with various concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, for 0.5-1.5h/37 degrees C, then frozen at -20 degrees C and 24h later transferred to a biofreezer at -80 degrees C. Two to 3 months later, thawing was achieved by immersion in cell culture medium at 37 degrees C/1h. Chondrocyte viability was assessed before and after freeze-thawing using a colorimetric assay based on the cell's metabolic activity and fluorescent dyes to evaluate cell membrane integrity. Before freezing, chondrocyte metabolic activity was identical in all the conditions tested. After freeze-thawing, the highest activity, corresponding to 34.2+/-2.1% of that in the Fresh Control, was achieved in tibial plateaus incubated in 50mM arbutin for 1h whereas in those left untreated it was 11.1+/-4.7. Addition of DMSO and glycerol to arbutin did not increase chondrocyte viability any further. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed these results and showed that living chondrocytes were mainly restricted to the superficial cartilage layers. Arbutin seems to be an effective cryoprotective agent for osteochondral allografts with potential benefits over DMSO and glycerol.

  8. Hsp90β inhibition modulates nitric oxide production and nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hsp90β is a member of the Hsp90 family of protein chaperones. This family plays essential roles in the folding, maturation and activity of many proteins that are involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. The role of this protein in chondrocytes is not well understood, although its increase in osteoarthritic cells has been reported. The present study aimed to explore the role of Hsp90β in key aspects of OA pathogenesis. Methods Human OA chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage obtained from patients undergoing joint replacement surgery, and primary cultured. Cells were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β or TNF-α) and nitric oxide donors (NOC-12 or SNP). For Hsp90β inhibition, two different chemical inhibitors (Geldanamycin and Novobiocin) were employed, or siRNA transfection procedures were carried out. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry and ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by the Griess method. Indirect immunofluorescence assays were performed to evaluate the presence of Hsp90β in stimulated cells. Results Hsp90β was found to be increased by proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of Hsp90β by the chemicals Geldanamycin (GA) and Novobiocin (NB) caused a dose-dependent decrease of the NO production induced by IL-1β in chondrocytes, up to basal levels. Immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that the NO donors NOC-12 and SNP also increased Hsp90β. Chemical inhibition or specific gene silencing of this chaperone reduced the DNA condensation and fragmentation, typical of death by apoptosis, that is induced by NO donors in chondrocytes. Conclusions The present results show how Hsp90β modulates NO production and NO-mediated cellular death in human OA chondrocytes. PMID:22004293

  9. Effects of sesamin on the biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in human articular chondrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Najarus, Sumet; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that progressively causes a loss of joint functions and the impaired quality of life. The most significant event in OA is a high degree of degradation of articular cartilage accompanied by the loss of chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycans (CS-PGs). Recently, the chondroprotective effects of sesamin, the naturally occurring substance found in sesame seeds, have been proved in a rat model of papain-induced osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that sesamin may be associated with possible promotion of the biosynthesis of CS-PGs in human articular chondrocytes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of sesamin on the major CS-PG biosynthesis in primary human chondrocyte. The effects of sesamin on the gene expression of the PG core and the CS biosynthetic enzymes as well as on the secretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in monolayer and pellet culture systems of articular chondrocytes. Sesamin significantly increased the GAGs content both in culture medium and pellet matrix. Real-time-quantitative PCR showed that sesamin promoted the expression of the genes encoding the core protein (ACAN) of the major CS-PG aggrecan and the biosynthetic enzymes (XYLT1, XYLT2, CHSY1 and CHPF) required for the synthesis of CS-GAG side chains. Safranin-O staining of sesamin treated chondrocyte pellet section confirmed the high degree of GAG accumulation. These results were correlated with an increased level of secreted GAGs in the media of cultured articular chondrocytes in both culture systems. Thus, sesamin would provide a potential therapeutic strategy for treating OA patients.

  10. Endogenous DKK1 and FRZB Regulate Chondrogenesis and Hypertrophy in Three-Dimensional Cultures of Human Chondrocytes and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Rodrigues, Emilie Dooms; Leijten, Jeroen C.H.; Verrips, Theo; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Karperien, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation occurs during in vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), decreasing the quality of the cartilage construct. Previously we identified WNT pathway antagonists Dickkopf 1 homolog (DKK1) and frizzled-related protein (FRZB) as key factors in blocking hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs). In this study, we investigated the role of endogenously expressed DKK1 and FRZB in chondrogenesis of hMSC and chondrocyte redifferentiation and in preventing cell hypertrophy using three relevant human cell based systems, isolated hMSCs, isolated primary human chondrocytes (hChs), and cocultures of hMSCs with hChs for which we specifically designed neutralizing nano-antibodies. We selected and tested variable domain of single chain heavy chain only antibodies (VHH) for their ability to neutralize the function of DKK1 or FRZB. In the presence of DKK1 and FRZB neutralizing VHH, glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II staining were significantly reduced in monocultured hMSCs and monocultured chondrocytes. Furthermore, in cocultures, cells in pellets showed hypertrophic differentiation. In conclusion, endogenous expression of the WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB is necessary for multiple steps during chondrogenesis: first DKK1 and FRZB are indispensable for the initial steps of chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs, second they are necessary for chondrocyte redifferentiation, and finally in preventing hypertrophic differentiation of articular chondrocytes. PMID:27733096

  11. Endogenous DKK1 and FRZB Regulate Chondrogenesis and Hypertrophy in Three-Dimensional Cultures of Human Chondrocytes and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Rodrigues, Emilie Dooms; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Verrips, Theo; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2016-12-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation occurs during in vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), decreasing the quality of the cartilage construct. Previously we identified WNT pathway antagonists Dickkopf 1 homolog (DKK1) and frizzled-related protein (FRZB) as key factors in blocking hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs). In this study, we investigated the role of endogenously expressed DKK1 and FRZB in chondrogenesis of hMSC and chondrocyte redifferentiation and in preventing cell hypertrophy using three relevant human cell based systems, isolated hMSCs, isolated primary human chondrocytes (hChs), and cocultures of hMSCs with hChs for which we specifically designed neutralizing nano-antibodies. We selected and tested variable domain of single chain heavy chain only antibodies (VHH) for their ability to neutralize the function of DKK1 or FRZB. In the presence of DKK1 and FRZB neutralizing VHH, glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II staining were significantly reduced in monocultured hMSCs and monocultured chondrocytes. Furthermore, in cocultures, cells in pellets showed hypertrophic differentiation. In conclusion, endogenous expression of the WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB is necessary for multiple steps during chondrogenesis: first DKK1 and FRZB are indispensable for the initial steps of chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs, second they are necessary for chondrocyte redifferentiation, and finally in preventing hypertrophic differentiation of articular chondrocytes.

  12. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed. We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction. In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal auricular

  13. Reference gene validation for qPCR on normoxia- and hypoxia-cultured human dermal fibroblasts exposed to UVA: is β-actin a reliable normalizer for photoaging studies?

    PubMed

    Brugè, F; Venditti, E; Tiano, L; Littarru, G P; Damiani, E

    2011-12-10

    Data normalization of gene expression on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) exposed to UVA has commonly been done using either GAPDH or β-actin as reference genes without any validation of their expression stability. Since this aspect, important for accurate normalization, has been overlooked, we aimed to establish a suitable set of reference genes for studies on UVA-treated HDF cultured under both standard atmospheric oxygen tension (normoxia, 21%) and under a physiological, low oxygen tension for these cells (hypoxia, 5%). The stability of six commonly used reference genes was assessed using the geNorm and NormFinder softwares subsequent to reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). GAPDH/SDHA were found to be the most stable genes under normoxia, while SDHA/TBP or HPRT1/β2M were the most stable ones under hypoxia in HDF exposed to 18 J/cm(2) UVA. β-Actin was always the most unstable reference gene. To emphasize the importance of selecting the most stably expressed reference genes for obtaining reliable results, mRNA expression levels of MMP-1 and COL1A1 were analyzed vs the best reference genes and the worst one. These reference genes are hence recommended for future qPCR analyses in studies concerning photo-damage on UVA-treated HDF.

  14. Immunophenotypic analysis of human articular chondrocytes: changes in surface markers associated with cell expansion in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Romero, Jose; Gaillard, Jean Philippe; Grogan, Shawn Patrick; Nesic, Dobrila; Trub, Thomas; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering relies on in vitro expansion of primary chondrocytes. Monolayer is the chosen culture model for chondrocyte expansion because in this system the proliferative capacity of chondrocytes is substantially higher compared to non-adherent systems. However, human articular chondrocytes (HACs) cultured as monolayers undergo changes in phenotype and gene expression known as "dedifferentiation." To gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in the dedifferentiation process, our research focused on the characterization of the surface molecule phenotype of HACs in monolayer culture. Adult HACs were isolated by enzymatic digestion of cartilage samples obtained post-mortem. HACs cultured in monolayer for different time periods were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of cell surface markers with a panel of 52 antibodies. Our results show that HACs express surface molecules belonging to different categories: integrins and other adhesion molecules (CD49a, CD49b, CD49c, CD49e, CD49f, CD51/61, CD54, CD106, CD166, CD58, CD44), tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD82, CD151), receptors (CD105, CD119, CD130, CD140a, CD221, CD95, CD120a, CD71, CD14), ectoenzymes (CD10, CD26), and other surface molecules (CD90, CD99). Moreover, differential expression of certain markers in monolayer culture was identified. Up-regulation of markers on HACs regarded as distinctive for mesenchymal stem cells (CD10, CD90, CD105, CD166) during monolayer culture suggested that dedifferentiation leads to reversion to a primitive phenotype. This study contributes to the definition of HAC phenotype, and provides new potential markers to characterize chondrocyte differentiation stage in the context of tissue engineering applications. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Co-culture of dedifferentiated and primary human chondrocytes obtained from cadaveric donor enhance the histological quality of repair tissue: an in-vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Olivos-Meza, Anell; Velasquillo Martínez, Cristina; Olivos Díaz, Brenda; Landa-Solís, Carlos; Brittberg, Mats; Pichardo Bahena, Raul; Ortega Sanchez, Carmina; Martínez, Valentin; Alvarez Lara, Enrique; Ibarra-Ponce de León, José Clemente

    2017-06-05

    To compare the quality of the repair tissue in three-dimensional co-culture of human chondrocytes implanted in an in vivo model. Six cadaveric and five live human donors were included. Osteochondral biopsies from the donor knees were harvested for chondrocyte isolation. Fifty percent of cadaveric chondrocytes were expanded until passage-2 (P2) while the remaining cells were cryopreserved in passage-0 (P0). Fresh primary chondrocytes (P0f) obtained from live human donors were co-cultured. Three-dimensional constructs were prepared with a monolayer of passage-2 chondrocytes, collagen membrane (Geistlich Bio-Gide(®)), and pellet of non-co-cultured (P2) or co-cultured chondrocytes (P2 + P0c, P2 + P0f). Constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of athymic mice and left for 3 months growth. Safranin-O and Alcian blue staining were used to glycosaminoglycan content assessment. Aggrecan and type-II collagen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. New-formed tissue quality was evaluated with an adaptation of the modified O'Driscoll score. Histological quality of non-co-cultured group was 4.37 (SD ±4.71), while co-cultured groups had a mean score of 8.71 (SD ±3.98) for the fresh primary chondrocytes and 9.57 (SD ±1.27) in the cryopreserved chondrocytes. In immunohistochemistry, Co-culture groups were strongly stained for type-II and aggrecan not seen in the non-co-cultured group. It is possible to isolate viable chondrocytes from cadaveric human donors in samples processed in the first 48-h of dead. There is non-significant difference between the numbers of chondrocytes isolated from live or cadaveric donors. Cryopreservation of cadaveric primary chondrocytes does not alter the capability to form cartilage like tissue. Co-culture of primary and passaged chondrocytes enhances the histological quality of new-formed tissue compared to non-co-cultured cells.

  16. Glucose adsorption to chitosan membranes increases proliferation of human chondrocyte via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Su, Yu-Ping; Lee, Ko-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Hsin-I

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is currently still an irreversible degenerative disease of the articular cartilage. Recent, dextrose (d-glucose) intraarticular injection prolotherapy for OA patients has been reported to benefit the chondrogenic stimulation of damaged cartilage. However, the detailed mechanism of glucose's effect on cartilage repair remains unclear. Chitosan, a naturally derived polysaccharide, has recently been investigated as a surgical or dental dressing to control breeding. Therefore, in this study, glucose was adsorbed to chitosan membranes (CTS-Glc), and the study aimed to investigate whether CTS-Glc complex membranes could regulate the proliferation of human OA chondrocytes and to explore the underlying mechanism. Human OA and SW1353 chondrocytes were used in this study. The experiments involving the transfection of cells used SW1353 chondrocytes. A specific inhibitor and siRNAs were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the CTS-Glc-regulated proliferation of human chondrocytes. We found that CTS-Glc significantly increased the proliferation of both human OA and SW1353 chondrocytes comparable to glucose- or chitosan-only stimulation. The role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, including mTOR, raptor, and S6k proteins, has been demonstrated in the regulation of CTS-Glc-increased human chondrocyte proliferation. mTORC1 signaling increased the expression levels of maturated SREBP-1 and FASN and then induced the expressions of cell cycle regulators, that is, cyclin D, cyclin-dependent kinase-4 and -6 in human chondrocytes. This study elucidates the detailed mechanism behind the effect of CTS-Glc complex membranes in promoting chondrocyte proliferation and proposes a possible clinical application of the CTS-Glc complex in the dextrose intraarticular injection of OA prolotherapy in the future to attenuate the pain and discomfort of OA patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  18. Mangiferin Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Inflammatory Response by Activating PPAR-γ in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanlong; Zhou, Li; Wang, Chunlei

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation has been reported to play critical roles in the development of osteoarthritis. In the present study, we investigated whether mangiferin (MFN) had anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. The cells were treated with various concentrations of MFN in the presence or absence of IL-1β. The production of MMP-1, MMP-3, PGE2, and NO was measured in this study. The expression of NF-kB and PPAR-γ was detected by western blot analysis. MFN inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammatory mediators PGE2 and NO production. MFN also inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP1 and MMP3 production. IL-1β-induced NF-kB activation was significantly inhibited by MFN. In addition, MFN was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. PPAR-γ inhibitor GW9662 significantly reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of MFN. These results suggest that MFN inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating PPAR-γ.

  19. Chondrogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by In Vivo Co-graft with Auricular Chondrocytes from Microtia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Pan, Bo; Jiang, Haiyue; Zhang, Lixia

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of chondrogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced by auricular chondrocytes from microtia via subcutaneous co-graft in nude mice. Human ADSCs and auricular chondrocytes were mixed at the ratio of 7:3 and suspended in 0.2 ml of Pluronic F-127 (5.0 × 10(7) cells/ml), and injected into Balb/c nude mice as the experimental group (Exp group). The same quantity of auricular chondrocytes (Ctr.1 group) or ADSCs (Ctr.2 group) in 0.2 ml of Pluronic F-127 was set as positive and negative control groups. The mixture of auricular chondrocytes (1.5 × 10(7) cells/ml) in 0.2 ml of Pluronic F-127 was set as the low concentration of chondrocyte control group (Ctr.3). At 8 weeks after grafting, the newly generated tissue pellets were isolated for morphological examination, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining and safranin O staining of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen, and Verhoeff-iron-hematoxylin staining of elastic fibers. GAG content was determined by Alcian blue colorimetric method, and mRNA expression of type II collagen and aggrecan were examined by real-time PCR. Cartilage-like tissue with a white translucent appearance and good elasticity was generated in the Exp and Ctr.1 groups. The tissue pellets in the Ctr.2 and Ctr.3 groups were much smaller than those in the Ctr.1 group. The mature cartilage lacunas could be observed in the Exp and Ctr.1 groups, while were rarely seen in the Ctr.3 group and not observed in the Ctr.2 group. The expression of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix such as type II collagen, GAG content, aggrecan, and elastic fibers in the Exp group was similar to that in the Ctr.1 group, whereas the expression of these extracellular matrix substances was significantly lower in the Ctr.2 and Ctr.3 groups (both P < 0.01). Auricular chondrocytes from microtia can efficiently promote the chondrogenic differentiation

  20. Blockade of recombinant human IL-6 by tocilizumab suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in the C28/I2 immortalized human chondrocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, Evan C; Dahoud, Wissam; Mesiano, Sam; Malemud, Charles J

    Two immortalized human juvenile chondrocyte cell lines, T/C28a2 and C28/I2, were employed to determine the extent to which recombinant human (rh) IL-6 or rh-TNF-α increased the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The effect of rhIL-6 on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) was also assessed. Although C28/I2 chondrocytes incubated with rhIL-6 (50 ng/ml) increased MMP-9 production which could not be mimicked by the T/C28a2 chondrocyte line, the effect of rhTNF-α on MMP-9 was more robust than with rhIL-6. The combinations of rhIL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor-α (sIL-6Rα) or rhIL-6 and tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully-humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the interaction between IL-6 and IL-6R significantly reduced MMP-9 production by C28/I2 chondrocytes. However, TCZ had no effect on rhTNF-α-induced MMP-9 production. By contrast, rhIL-6 did not increase the production of NGAL by C28/I2 chondrocytes although the number of NGAL-positive cells was significantly reduced by sIL-6R compared to its control group, but not by the combination of rhIL-6 plus TCZ compared to rhIL-6. In summary, these results showed that rhIL-6 stimulated the production of MMP-9, but not NGAL, in the C28/I2 chondrocyte line. TCZ or sIL-6Rα suppressed rhIL-6-induced MMP-9 production.

  1. In vitro isolation and cultivation of human chondrocytes for osteoarthritis renovation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaming; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair effects of chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro on osteoarthritis (OA). Chondrocytes were isolated from fetal rabbits and cultured in Biosilon microcarriers. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into three groups equally (blank group, model group, treatment group). The rabbit knee OA model was established by inducing papain. Rabbits in the treatment group were injected with the chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and gross morphologic observation were conducted. Expression level of cytokines such as IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α in cartilage synovial cells was also analyzed by an ELISA assay. The cultured chondrocyte was validated by a positive stain of type II collagen and vimentin by immunofluorescence. Compared to the model group, the articular cartilage of the rabbit knee in the treatment group showed a normal color, smooth surface, and none of malacia and coloboma. HE staining indicated that the articular surface of the treatment group tended to be smooth and flat; the matrix stained tinge and the cartilage destruction and fiber hyperplasia of the synovia were lightened. The expression levels of IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α also declined in the treatment group. OA symptoms were improved by treating with chondrocytes. In summary, the animal experiment in the present study indicated that chondrocyte injection played an active effect on renovation of OA.

  2. Curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract synergically inhibit inflammatory and catabolic mediator's synthesis by normal bovine and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes in monolayer.

    PubMed

    Comblain, Fanny; Sanchez, Christelle; Lesponne, Isabelle; Balligand, Marc; Serisier, Samuel; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract in normal bovine chondrocytes and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes cultured in monolayer. This study also investigated the synergic or additive effects of these compounds. Enzymatically isolated primary bovine or human chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until confluence and then incubated for 24 hours or 48 hours in the absence or in the presence of interleukin-1β and with or without curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen or green tea extract, added alone or in combination, at different concentrations. Cell viability was neither affected by these compounds, nor by interleukin 1β. In the absence of interleukin-1β, compounds did not significantly affect bovine chondrocytes metabolism. In human chondrocytes and in the absence of interleukin 1β, curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract significantly inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-3 production. In interleukin-1β-stimulated bovine chondrocytes, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 4 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 5 expressions were decreased by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. The combination of the three compounds was significantly more efficient to inhibit interleukin-1β stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression than curcuminoids extract alone. In interleukin-1β-stimulated human chondrocytes, nitric oxide, interleukin-6 and matrix metalloproteinase 3 productions were significantly reduced by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. These findings indicate that a mixture of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea

  3. Phosphatase-1 and -2A inhibition modulates apoptosis in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes independently of nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Armada, M; Carames, B; Cillero-Pastor, B; Lires-Dean, M; Maneiro, E; Fuentes, I; Ruiz, C; Galdo, F; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Methods: Human OA chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage obtained from the femoral heads of patients undergoing joint replacement surgery. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptosis was quantified by ELISA, which measures DNA fragmentation. Nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by the Greiss method, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein synthesis was studied by western blotting. Results: Inhibition of PP1/2A by the specific inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) dose and time dependently caused a reduction of cell viability (OKA at 50 nmol/l: a reduction to 60% and 43% at 48 and 72 hours, respectively). Genomic DNA from chondrocytes treated with OKA at 50 and 100 nmol/l for 48 hours displayed increased internucleosomal DNA fragmentation by 11 and 13 fields, respectively. Light microscopy and DAPI studies showed that OKA induced DNA condensation and fragmentation, typical of death by apoptosis. The caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK increased cell viability, reduced by OKA at 50 nmol/l to 87% and 73%, respectively. OKA did not increase iNOS protein synthesis or NO production. Conclusion: PP1/2A modulate apoptosis in human OA chondrocytes; this is independent of NO production but dependent on caspases. PMID:15958763

  4. Chondroprotective Effects of Ginsenoside Rg1 in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes and a Rat Model of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wendan; Jing, Juehua; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Dongying; Huang, Yumin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) inhibits inflammatory responses in human chondrocytes and reduces articular cartilage damage in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). Gene expression and protein levels of type II collagen, aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined in vitro by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) amounts in the culture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). For in vivo assessment, a rat model of OA was generated by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). Four weeks after ACLT, Rg1 (30 or 60 mg/kg) or saline was administered by gavage once a day for eight consecutive weeks. Joint damage was analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ginsenoside Rg1 inhibited Interleukin (IL)-1β-induced chondrocyte gene and protein expressions of MMP-13, COX-2 and PGE2, and prevented type II collagen and aggrecan degradation, in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of Ginsenoside Rg1 to OA rats attenuated cartilage degeneration, and reduced type II collagen loss and MMP-13 levels. These findings demonstrated that Ginsenoside Rg1 can inhibit inflammatory responses in human chondrocytes in vitro and reduce articular cartilage damage in vivo, confirming the potential therapeutic value of Ginsenoside Rg1 in OA. PMID:28287423

  5. Fetal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating towards Chondrocytes Acquire a Gene Expression Profile Resembling Human Growth Plate Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Leijten, Jeroen C. H.; Decker, Eva; Sticht, Carsten; van Houwelingen, Johannes C.; Goeman, Jelle J.; Kleijburg, Carin; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Gretz, Norbert; Wit, Jan Maarten; Rappold, Gudrun; Post, Janine N.; Karperien, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs) differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP). Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development. PMID:23144774

  6. Upregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Synthesis and Consequent Collagen II Expression in Leptin-stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Hsieh, Rong-Ze; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chang, Cheng Allen; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Su, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play positive roles in cartilage development, but they can barely be detected in healthy articular cartilage. However, recent evidence has indicated that BMPs could be detected in osteoarthritic and damaged cartilage and their precise roles have not been well defined. Extremely high amounts of leptin have been reported in obese individuals, which can be associated with osteoarthritis (OA) development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BMPs could be induced in human primary chondrocytes during leptin-stimulated OA development and the underlying mechanism. We found that expression of BMP-2 mRNA, but not BMP-4, BMP-6, or BMP-7 mRNA, could be increased in human primary chondrocytes under leptin stimulation. Moreover, this BMP-2 induction was mediated through transcription factor-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 activation via JAK2-ERK1/2-induced Ser727-phosphorylation. Of note, histone deacetylases (HDACs) 3 and 4 were both involved in modulating leptin-induced BMP-2 mRNA expression through different pathways: HDAC3, but not HDAC4, associated with STAT3 to form a complex. Our results further demonstrated that the role of BMP-2 induction under leptin stimulation is to increase collagen II expression. The findings in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of BMP-2 induction in leptin-stimulated chondrocytes and suggest that BMP-2 may play a reparative role in regulating leptin-induced OA development.

  7. The effects of p-hydroxycinnamaldehyde from Alpinia galanga extracts on human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phitak, Thanyaluck; Choocheep, Kanyamas; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Pompimon, Wilart; Premanode, Bhusana; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and affects millions of people worldwide. Patients have traditionally been treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but these are associated with significant side effects. Purification of the acetone extract of Alpinia galanga afforded p-hydroxycinnamaldehyde, as identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry analyses. By exploiting the cartilage explant culture, p-hydroxycinnamaldehyde suppressed loss of uronic acid, resulting in release of hyaluronan (HA), sulfated glycosaminoglycans (s-GAGs) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). p-Hydroxycinnamaldehyde and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), when incubated in primary human chondrocytes, also reduced release of HA, s-GAG and MMP-2. The results demonstrated: (a) that expression levels of the catabolic genes MMP-3 and MMP-13 were suppressed and (b) mRNA expression levels of anabolic genes of collagen II, SOX9 and aggrecan were increased. This study shows that p-hydroxycinnaldehyde from A. galanga Linn. is a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of OA.

  8. Regulation of Xylosyltransferase I Gene Expression by Interleukin 1β in Human Primary Chondrocyte Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khair, Mostafa; Bourhim, Mustapha; Barré, Lydia; Li, Dong; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) is an essential enzyme of proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis pathway catalyzing the initial and rate-limiting step in glycosaminoglycan chain assembly. It plays a critical role in the regulation of PG synthesis in cartilage; however, little is known about underlying mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that, in human primary chondrocytes, IL-1β regulates XT-I gene expression into an early phase of induction and a late phase of down-regulation. Based on promoter deletions, the region up to −850 bp was defined as a major element of XT-I gene displaying both constitutive and IL-1β-regulated promoter activity. Point mutation and signaling analyses revealed that IL-1β-induced promoter activity is achieved through AP-1 response elements and mediated by SAP/JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Transactivation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AP-1 is a potent transactivator of XT-I promoter and that IL-1β-induced activity is mediated through increased recruitment of AP-1 to the promoter. Finally, we show that Sp3 is a repressor of XT-I promoter and bring evidence that the repressive effect of IL-1β during the late phase is mediated through Sp3 recruitment to the promoter. This suggests that modulation of Sp3 in cartilage could prevent IL-1β inhibition of PG synthesis and limit tissue degradation. PMID:23223231

  9. In vivo cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in a nude mouse-based contained defect organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Gravius, S; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schneider, U

    2007-01-01

    The nude mouse model is an established method to cultivate and investigate tissue engineered cartilage analogues under in vivo conditions. One limitation of this common approach is the lack of appropriate surrounding articular tissues. Thus the bonding capacity of cartilage repair tissue cannot be evaluated. Widely applied surgical techniques in cartilage repair such as conventional and three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) based on a collagen gel matrix cannot be included into nude mouse studies, since their application require a contained defect. The aim of this study is to apply an organ culture defect model for the in vivo cultivation of different cell-matrix-constructs. Cartilage defects were created on osteochondral specimens which had been harvested from 10 human knee joints during total knee replacement. Autologous chondrocytes were isolated from the cartilage samples and cultivated in monolayer until passage 2. On each osteochondral block defects were treated either by conventional ACI or a collagen gel seeded with autologous chondrocytes, including a defect left empty as a control. The samples were implanted into the subcutaneous pouches of nude mice and cultivated for six weeks. After retrieval, the specimens were examined histologically, immunohistochemically and by cell morphology quantification. In both, ACI and collagen gel based defect treatment, a repair tissue was formed, which filled the defect and bonded to the adjacent tissues. The repair tissue was immature with low production of collagen type II. In both groups redifferentiation of chondrocytes remained incomplete. Different appearances of interface zones between the repair tissue and the adjacent cartilage were found. The presented contained defect organ culture model offers the possibility to directly compare different types of clinically applied biologic cartilage repair techniques using human articular tissues in a nude mouse model.

  10. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  11. Heparin-based self-assembling peptide scaffold reestablish chondrogenic phenotype of expanded de-differentiated human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; Semino, Carlos E

    2016-07-01

    The use of chondrocytes in cell-based therapies for cartilage lesions are limited by quantity and, therefore, require an in vitro expansion. As monolayer culture leads to de-differentiation, different culture techniques are currently under development to recover chondrocyte phenotype after cell expansion. In the present work, we studied the capacity of the bimolecular heparin-based self-assembling peptide scaffold (RAD16-I) as a three-dimensional (3D) culture system to foster reestablishment of chondrogenic phenotype of de-differentiated human Articular Chondrocytes (AC). The culture was performed in a serum-free medium under control and chondrogenic induction and good viability results were observed after 4 weeks of culture in both conditions. Cells changed their morphology to a more elongated shape and established a cellular network that induced the condensation of the constructs in the case of chondrogenic medium, leading to a compacted structure with improved mechanical properties. Specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of mature cartilage, such as collagen type II and aggrecan were up-regulated under chondrogenic medium and significantly enhanced with the presence of heparin in the scaffold. 3D constructs became highly stained with toluidine blue dye after 4 weeks of culture, indicating the presence of synthetized proteoglycans (PGs) by the cells. Interestingly, the full viscoelastic behavior was closely related to that found in chicken native cartilage. Altogether, the results suggest that the 3D culture model described can help de-differentiated human chondrocytes to recover its cartilage phenotype. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1694-1706, 2016.

  12. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  13. Discrimination of micromass-induced chondrocytes from human mesenchymal stem cells by focal plane array-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chonanant, Chirapond; Bambery, Keith R; Jearanaikoon, Nichada; Chio-Srichan, Sirinart; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Tobin, Mark J; Heraud, Philip; Jearanaikoon, Patcharee

    2014-12-01

    Rapid and sensitive methods for identifying stem cell differentiation state are required for facilitating future stem cell therapies. We aimed to evaluate the capability of focal plane array-Fourier transform infrared (FPA-FTIR) microspectroscopy for characterising the differentiation of chondrocytes from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Successful induction was validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis for collagen and aggrecan expression as chondrocyte markers in parallel with the spectroscopy. Spectra derived from chondrocyte-induced cells revealed strong IR absorbance bands attributed to collagen near 1338 and 1234 cm(-1) and proteoglycan at 1245 and 1175-960 cm(-1) compared to the non-induced cells. In addition, spectra from control and induced cells are segregated into separate clusters in partial least squares discriminant analysis score plots at the very early stages of induction and discrimination of an independent set of validation spectra with 100% accuracy. The predominant bands responsible for this discrimination were associated with collagen and aggrecan protein concordant with those obtained from RT-PCR and Western blot techniques. Our findings support the capability of FPA-FTIR microspectroscopy as a label-free tool for stem cell characterization allowing rapid and sensitive detection of macromolecular changes during chondrogenic differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term in vitro expansion of osteoarthritic human articular chondrocytes do not alter genetic stability: a microsatellite instability analysis.

    PubMed

    Neri, Simona; Mariani, Erminia; Cattini, Luca; Facchini, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated genetic damage acquisition during in vitro culture of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes to evaluate their safety for use in regenerative medicine clinical applications. In particular, we have addressed the impact of long-term in vitro culture on simple sequence repeat stability, to evaluate the involvement of the mismatch repair system (MMR) in the accumulation of genetic damage. MMR, the main post-replicative correction pathway, has a fundamental role in maintaining genomic stability and can be monitored by assessing microsatellite instability (MSI). MMR activity has been reported to decrease with age not only in vivo, but also in vitro in relationship to culture passages. OA chondrocytes from seven donors were cultured corresponding to 13-29 population doublings. Aliquots of the cells were collected and analyzed for MSI at five DNA loci (CD4, VWA, FES, TPOX, and P53) and for MMR gene expression at each subculture. Genetic stability was confirmed throughout the culture period. MMR genes demonstrated a strong coordination at the transcriptional level among the different components; expression levels were very low, in accordance with the observed genetic stability. The reduced expression of MMR genes might underline no need for increasing DNA repair control in the culture conditions tested, in which no genetic damage was evidenced. These data argue for the safety of chondrocytes for cellular therapies and are encouraging for the potential use of in vitro expanded OA chondrocytes, supporting the extension of autologous cell therapy procedures to degenerative articular diseases. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. WARP interacts with collagen VI-containing microfibrils in the pericellular matrix of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Uwe; Allen, Justin M; White, Rachel; Moscibrocki, Cathleen; Bruckner, Peter; Bateman, John F; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Collagen VI and WARP are extracellular structural macromolecules present in cartilage and associated with BM suprastructures in non-skeletal tissues. We have previously shown that in WARP-deficient mice, collagen VI is specifically reduced in regions of the peripheral nerve ECM where WARP is expressed, suggesting that both macromolecules are part of the same suprastructure. The object of this study was to conduct a detailed analysis of WARP-collagen VI interactions in vitro in cartilage, a tissue rich in WARP and collagen VI. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse and human articular cartilage showed that WARP and collagen VI co-localize in the pericellular matrix of superficial zone articular chondrocytes. EM analysis on extracts of human articular cartilage showed that WARP associates closely with collagen VI-containing suprastructures. Additional evidence of an interaction is provided by immunogold EM and immunoblot analysis showing that WARP was present in collagen VI-containing networks isolated from cartilage. Further characterization were done by solid phase binding studies and reconstitution experiments using purified recombinant WARP and isolated collagen VI. Collagen VI binds to WARP with an apparent K(d) of approximately 22 nM and the binding site(s) for WARP resides within the triple helical domain since WARP binds to both intact collagen VI tetramers and pepsinized collagen VI. Together, these data confirm and extend our previous findings by demonstrating that WARP and collagen VI form high affinity associations in vivo in cartilage. We conclude that WARP is ideally placed to function as an adapter protein in the cartilage pericellular matrix.

  16. Cellular heterogeneity in cultured human chondrocytes identified by antibodies specific for alpha 2(XI) collagen chains

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Collagen type XI is a component of hyaline cartilage consisting of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI), and alpha 3(XI) chains; with 5-10% of the total collagen content, it is a minor but significant component next to type II collagen, but its function and precise localization in cartilaginous tissues is still unclear. Owing to the homology of the alpha 3(XI) and alpha 1(II) collagen chains, attempts to prepare specific antibodies to native type XI collagen have been unsuccessful in the past. In this study, we report on the preparation and use for immunohistochemistry of a polyclonal antibody specific for alpha 2(XI) denatured collagen chains. The antibody was prepared by immunization with the isolated alpha 2(XI) chain and reacts neither with native type XI collagen nor type I, II, V, or IX by ELISA or immunoblotting, nor with alpha 1(XI) or alpha 3(XI), but with alpha 2(XI) chains. Using this antibody, it was possible to specifically localize alpha 2(XI) in cartilage by pretreating tissue sections with 6 M urea. In double immunofluorescence staining experiments, the distribution of alpha 2(XI) as indicative for type XI collagen in fetal bovine and human cartilage was compared with that of type II collagen, using a monoclonal antibody to alpha 1(II). Type XI collagen was found throughout the matrix of hyaline cartilage. However, owing to cross- reactivity of the monoclonal anti-alpha 1(II) with alpha 3(XI), both antibodies produced the same staining pattern. Cellular heterogeneity was, however, detected in monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2670958

  17. Overexpression of microRNA-634 suppresses survival and matrix synthesis of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by targeting PIK3R1

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xu; Wang, Shaojie; Cai, Heguo; Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Xinpeng; Zhang, Bing; Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of some microRNAs in cartilage damage. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the expression of microRNA-634 (miR-634) in normal and OA chondrocytes, and to determine its role in OA pathogenesis. Human normal and OA chondrocytes obtained from patients were cultured in vitro. Transfection with miR-634 mimic or inhibitor was employed to investigate the effect of miR-634 on chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis, and to identify miR-634 target. The results indicated that miR-634 was expressed at lower level in high grade OA chondrocyte compared with normal chondrocytes. Overexpression of miR-634 could inhibit cell survival and matrix synthesis in high grade OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, miR-634 targeted PIK3R1 gene that encodes the regulatory subunit 1 of class I PI3K (p85α) and exerted its inhibitory effect on the phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and S6 signal molecules in high grade OA chondrocytes. Therefore, the data suggested that miR-634 could suppress survival and matrix synthesis of high grade OA chondrocytes through targeting PIK3R1 gene to modulate the PI3K/Akt/S6 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR/S6 axes, with important implication for validating miR-634 as a potential target for OA therapy. PMID:26972586

  18. Co-culture with human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibits inflammatory activity and increases cell proliferation of sodium nitroprusside-stimulated chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jung, Yeon-Hwa; Cho, Mi-Young; Yeo, Jee Eun; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kim, Yong Il; Koh, Yong-Gon

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes improves anti-inflammation. • Co-culture system produces IGF-1. • Co-culture system suppresses inflammatory genes expression. • Co-culture system improves cell proliferation. • Exogenous IGF-1 inhibits inflammatory activity in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. - Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are primarily chronic inflammatory diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage, and to regulate immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, MSCs have been shown to secrete insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effects on inflammatory activity from a co-culture of human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hSDMSCs) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocytes. First, chondrocytes were treated with SNP to generate an in vitro model of RA or OA. Next, the co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, inhibited expression of inflammation activity-related genes, generated IGF-1 secretion, and increased the chondrocyte proliferation rate. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1 on inhibition of inflammation, chondrocytes pre-treated with IGF-1 were treated with SNP, and then the production of inflammatory cytokines was analyzed. Treatment with IGF-1 was shown to significantly reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that hSDMSCs offer a new strategy to promote cell-based cartilage regeneration in RA or OA.

  19. Human osteoarthritic chondrons outnumber patient- and joint-matched chondrocytes in hydrogel culture - future application in autologous cell-based OA cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Südkamp, Norbert; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Kurz, Bodo; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2017-07-17

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is used in 34-60% for osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage defects, although ACI is neither recommended nor designed for OA. Envisioning a hydrogel-based ACI for OA that uses chondrons instead of classically used chondrocytes, we hypothesized that human OA-chondrons may outperform OA-chondrocytes. We compared patient- and joint surface-matched human OA-chondrons vs. OA-chondrocytes cultured for the first time in a hydrogel, using a self-assembling peptide system. We determined yield, viability, cell numbers, mRNA expression, GAPDH mRNA enzyme activity, collagen II synthesis (CPII) and degradation (C2C), and sGAG. Ex vivo, mRNA expression was comparable. Over time, significant differences in survival led to 3.4-fold higher OA-chondron numbers in hydrogels after two weeks (p=0.002). Significantly more enzymatically active GAPDH protein indicated higher metabolic activity. The number of cultures that expressed mRNA for collagen types I, VI, COMP, aggrecan, VEGF, TGF-β1, and FGF-2 (but not collagen types II, X) was different, resulting in a 3.5-fold higher number of expression-positive OA-chondron cultures (p<0.05). Measuring CPII and C2C per hydrogel, OA-chondron hydrogels synthesized more than they degraded collagen type II, the opposite was true for OA-chondrocytes. Per cell, OA-chondrons but not OA-chondrocytes displayed more synthesis than degradation. Thus, OA-chondrons displayed superior biosynthesis and mRNA expression of tissue engineering and phenotype-relevant genes. Moreover, human OA-chondrons displayed a significant survival advantage in hydrogel culture, whose presence, drastic extent, and time scale was novel and is clinically significant. Collectively, these data highlight the high potential of human OA-chondrons for OA-ACI, as they would outnumber and, thus, surpass OA-chondrocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of stratified culture compared to confluent culture in monolayer on proliferation and differentiation of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Jeanine; Riesle, Jens; Vanblitterswijk, Clemens A

    2006-09-01

    With conventional tissue culture of cells, it is generally assumed that when the available 2D substrate is fully occupied, growth ceases or is greatly reduced.However, in nature wound repair mostly involves proliferation of cells that are attracted to the defect site in a 3D environment.Hence, proliferation continues in 3D until the defect site is filled with cells contributing to repair tissue. With this in mind,we examined the growth behavior of human articular chondrocytes during stratified culture as opposed to routine culture to confluency. Additionally, we studied the influence of growth factors on proliferation during stratified culture and differentiation thereafter. Chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer on tissue culture plastic to confluency or stratified for an additional 7 days. Culture medium was based on DMEM with 10% serum and either supplemented with high concentrations of nonessential amino acids (NEAA) and ascorbic acid (AsAP), or instead with basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDBF-BB), and/or transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta). After expansion, cells were harvested, counted, and their differentiation capacity was examined in pellet culture assay. It was shown that chondrocytes, cultured stratified proliferate exponentially for up to an additional 4 days and that cell yield increased 5-fold. Furthermore, during stratified culture the number of cells increased further in the presence of bFGF, PDBF-BB, and TGFbeta1 or high concentrations of NEAA and AsAP. Depending on donor variation and factors supplemented the cell yield ranged from 0.06 up to 1.1 million cells/cm2 at the second passage. During stratified culture in the presence of either bFGF and PDGF or high concentrations of NEAA and AsAP, exponential growth continued for up to 7 days. Finally, cells maintained their differentiation capacity when cultured stratified with or without growth factors (bFGF, TGF-beta, and PDGF), but not when cultured

  1. Cell-Engineered Human Elastic Chondrocytes Regenerate Natural Scaffold In Vitro and Neocartilage with Neoperichondrium in the Human Body Post-Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed.1–4 We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction.4 In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal

  2. Effects of weak, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (BEMER type) on gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Walther, Markus; Mayer, Florian; Kafka, Wolf; Schütze, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In vitro effects of electromagnetic fields appear to be related to the type of electromagnetic field applied. Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts display effects of BEMER type electromagnetic field (BTEMF) on gene regulation. Here, we analyze effects of BTEMF on gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes. Primary mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and the chondrocyte cell line C28I2 were stimulated 5 times at 12-h intervals for 8 min each with BTEMF. RNA from treated and control cells was analyzed for gene expression using the affymetrix chip HG-U133A. A limited number of regulated gene products from both cell types mainly affect cell metabolism and cell matrix structure. There was no increased expression of cancer-related genes. RT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts partly confirmed array data. Results indicate that BTEMF in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes provide the first indications to understanding therapeutic effects achieved with BTEMF stimulation.

  3. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits interleukin-1β induced matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S L; Wilkinson, J M; Crawford, A; Le Maitre, C L; Bunning, R A D

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is involved in the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) leading to cartilage degradation. Cannabinoids are anti-inflammatory and reduce joint damage in animal models of arthritis. This study aimed to determine a mechanism whereby the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) may inhibit cartilage degradation. Effects of WIN-55 were studied on IL-1β stimulated production of MMP-3 and -13 and their inhibitors TIMP-1 and -2 in human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were obtained from articular cartilage of patients undergoing total knee replacement. Chondrocytes were grown in monolayer and 3D alginate bead cultures. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the gene expression of MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to measure the amount of MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein released into media. Immunocytochemistry was used to investigate the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Treatment with WIN-55 alone or in combination with IL-1β, decreased or abolished MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 gene expression in human chondrocyte monolayer and alginate bead cultures in both a concentration and time dependent manner. WIN-55 treatment alone, and in combination with IL-1β, reduced MMP-3 and -13 protein production by chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Cannabinoid WIN-55 can reduce both basal and IL-1β stimulated gene and protein expression of MMP-3 and -13. However WIN-55 also decreased basal levels of TIMP-1 and -2 mRNA. These actions of WIN-55 suggest a mechanism by which cannabinoids may act to prevent cartilage breakdown in arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PGA-associated heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures: implications of nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Marzahn, U; John, T; Hoyer, M; Zreiqat, H; Witthuhn, A; Kohl, B; Haisch, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2013-01-01

    The availability of autologous articular chondrocytes remains a limiting issue in matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Non-articular heterotopic chondrocytes could be an alternative autologous cell source. The aims of this study were to establish heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures to analyze cell-cell compatibilities and to characterize the chondrogenic potential of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared to articular chondrocytes. Primary porcine and human nasoseptal and articular chondrocytes were investigated for extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) expression in a monolayer culture. 3D polyglycolic acid- (PGA) associated porcine heterotopic mono- and cocultures were assessed for cell vitality, types II, I, and total collagen-, and proteoglycan content. The type II collagen, lubricin, and Sox9 gene expressions were significantly higher in articular compared with nasoseptal monolayer chondrocytes, while type IX collagen expression was lower in articular chondrocytes. Only β1-integrin gene expression was significantly inferior in humans but not in porcine nasoseptal compared with articular chondrocytes, indicating species-dependent differences. Heterotopic chondrocytes in PGA cultures revealed high vitality with proteoglycan-rich hyaline-like ECM production. Similar amounts of type II collagen deposition and type II/I collagen ratios were found in heterotopic chondrocytes cultured on PGA compared to articular chondrocytes. Quantitative analyses revealed a time-dependent increase in total collagen and proteoglycan content, whereby the differences between heterotopic and articular chondrocyte cultures were not significant. Nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes monocultured in PGA or cocultured with articular chondrocytes revealed a comparable high chondrogenic potential in a tissue engineering setting, which created the opportunity to test them in vivo for articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  6. Proteomics of human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF).

    PubMed

    Corallo, Claudio; Battisti, Emilio; Albanese, Antonietta; Vannoni, Daniela; Leoncini, Roberto; Landi, Giacomo; Gagliardi, Assunta; Landi, Claudia; Carta, Serafino; Nuti, Ranuccio; Giordano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent joint disease, characterized by degradation of extracellular matrix and alterations in chondrocyte metabolism. Some authors reported that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can positively interfere with patients affected by OA, even though the nature of the interaction is still debated. Human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from the femoral heads of OA-patients undergoing to total hip replacement, were cultured in vitro and exposed 30 min/day for two weeks to extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) with fixed frequency (100 Hz) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF) with variable frequencies, intensities and waveforms. Sham-exposed (S.E.) cells served as control group. Cell viability was measured at days 2, 7 and 14. After two weeks, cell lysates were processed using a proteomic approach. Chondrocyte exposed to ELF and TAMMEF system demonstrated different viability compared to untreated chondrocytes (S.E.). Proteome analysis of 2D-Electrophoresis and protein identification by mass spectrometry showed different expression of proteins derived from nucleus, cytoplasm and organelles. Function analysis of the identified proteins showed changes in related-proteins metabolism (glyceraldeyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase), stress response (Mn-superoxide-dismutase, heat-shock proteins), cytoskeletal regulation (actin), proteinase inhibition (cystatin-B) and inflammation regulatory functions (S100-A10, S100-A11) among the experimental groups (ELF, TAMMEF and S.E.). In conclusion, EMFs do not cause damage to chondrocytes, besides stimulate safely OA-chondrocytes and are responsible of different protein expression among the three groups. Furthermore, protein analysis of OA-chondrocytes treated with ELF and the new TAMMEF systems could be useful to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms of OA by identifying biomarkers of the disease.

  7. Combined 3D and hypoxic culture improves cartilage-specific gene expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper B; Nielsen, Anna B; Munir, Samir; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael; Søballe, Kjeld; Bünger, Cody; Lind, Martin

    2011-04-01

    In vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes is an essential part of many clinically used cartilage repair treatments. Native chondrocytes reside in a 3-dimensional (3D) network and are exposed to low levels of oxygen. We compared monolayer culture to combined 3D and hypoxic culture using quantitative gene expression analysis. Cartilage biopsies were collected from the intercondylar groove in the distal femur from 12 patients with healthy cartilage. Cells were used for either monolayer or scaffold culture. The scaffolds were clinically available MPEG-PLGA scaffolds (ASEED). After harvesting of cells for baseline investigation, the remainder was divided into 3 groups for incubation in conditions of normoxia (21% oxygen), hypoxia (5% oxygen), or severe hypoxia (1% oxygen). RNA extractions were performed 1, 2, and 6 days after the baseline time point, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using assays for RNA encoding collagen types 1 and 2, aggrecan, sox9, ankyrin repeat domain-37, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase relative to 2 hypoxia-stable housekeeping genes. Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type 2 RNA expression increased with reduced oxygen. On day 6, the expression of collagen type 2 and aggrecan RNA was higher in 3D culture than in monolayer culture. Our findings suggest that there was a combined positive effect of 3D culture and hypoxia on cartilage-specific gene expression. The positive effects of 3D culture alone were not detected until day 6, suggesting that seeding of chondrocytes onto a scaffold for matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation should be performed earlier than 2 days before implantation.

  8. Preventing Friction Induced Chondrocyte Apoptosis: A Comparison of Human Synovial Fluid and Hylan G-F 20

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Fleming, Braden C; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) is a common painful disease with limited treatment options. A rising number of OA patients have been treated with intraarticular injections of hyaluronic acid, including the high molecular weight hylan G-F 20, which is injected following arthrocentesis. This study investigated the effectiveness of hylan G-F 20 to lower coefficient of friction (COF) and prevent chondrocyte apoptosis in vitro. Methods A disc-on-disc bovine cartilage bearing was used to measure the static and kinetic COF when lubricated with hylan G-F 20, human synovial fluid (HSF) and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Following friction testing, we stained paraffin embedded sections of these cartilage bearings for activated caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis. Results Bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 had kinetic COF values that were similar to bearings lubricated with PBS, but significantly higher than those lubricated with HSF. There were no significant differences in static COF values in bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 as compared to PBS or HSF. However, bearings lubricated with HSF had a significantly lower static COF values compared to bearings lubricated with PBS. The mean percentage of caspase-3 positive chondrocytes in the superficial and upper intermediate zones of bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 were significantly higher when compared to bearings lubricated with HSF or unloaded controls, but significantly lower than those lubricated with PBS. Conclusion These findings indicate that joint lubrication may prevent chondrocyte apoptosis by lowering the COF. Furthermore, removal of synovial fluid prior to hylan G-F 20 injection may be detrimental to cartilage health. PMID:22660808

  9. Autologous protein solution inhibits MMP-13 production by IL-1β and TNFα-stimulated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Woodell-May, Jennifer; Matuska, Andrea; Oyster, Megan; Welch, Zachary; O'Shaughnessey, Krista; Hoeppner, Jacy

    2011-09-01

    Catabolic inflammatory cytokines are prevalent in osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate an autologous protein solution (APS) as a potential chondroprotective agent for OA therapy. APS was prepared from platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The APS solution contained both anabolic (bFGF, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, EGF, IGF-1, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, and VEGF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and IFNγ) cytokines but low concentrations of catabolic cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and IL-18). Human articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with the antagonists IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, or APS prior to the addition of recombinant human IL-1β or TNFα. Following exposure to inflammatory cytokines, the levels of MMP-13 in the culture medium were evaluated by ELISA. MMP-13 production stimulated in chondrocytes by IL-1β or TNFα was reduced by rhIL-1ra and sTNF-RI to near basal levels. APS was also capable of inhibiting the production of MMP-13 induced by both IL-1β and TNFα. The combination of anabolic and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the APS created from PRP may render this formulation to be a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammation in patients at early stages of OA. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  10. TWIST1 induces MMP3 expression through up-regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and promotes catabolic responses in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hasei, Joe; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Onodera, Yuta; Horii, Takuro; Olmer, Merissa; Hatada, Izuho; Fukuda, Kanji; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Lotz, Martin K.; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the levels of TWIST1 in normal and OA cartilage and examine its role in regulating gene expression in chondrocytes. Human cartilage tissues and chondrocytes were obtained at autopsy from normal knee joints and from OA-affected joints at the time of total knee arthroplasty. TWIST1 expression was increased in human OA knee cartilage compared to normal knee cartilage. TWIST1 induced matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) expression without direct binding to MMP3 promoter and increased the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) level at the MMP3 promoter. The effect of TWIST1 on expression of TET family (TET1, 2 and 3) was measured in stable TWIST1 transfected TC28 cells, and TET1 expression was up-regulated. TWIST1 dependent upregulation of Mmp3 expression was suppressed in Tet triple KO fibroblast derived from mouse ES cells. Increased TWIST1 expression is a feature of OA-affected cartilage. We identified a novel mechanism of catabolic reaction where TWIST1 up-regulates MMP3 expression by enriching 5hmC levels at the MMP3 promoter via TET1 induction. These findings implicate TWIST1 as an important factor regulating OA related gene expression. Clarifying epigenetic mechanisms of 5hmC induced by TWIST1 is a critical molecule to understanding OA pathogenesis. PMID:28220902

  11. Cartilage graft engineering by co-culturing primary human articular chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Santoro, Rosaria; Gueven, Sinan; Jaquiery, Claude; Wendt, David James; Martin, Ivan; Moretti, Matteo; Barbero, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Co-culture of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with articular chondrocytes (ACs) has been reported to improve the efficiency of utilization of a small number of ACs for the engineering of implantable cartilaginous tissues. However, the use of cells of animal origin and the generation of small-scale micromass tissues limit the clinical relevance of previous studies. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo chondrogenic capacities of scaffold-based constructs generated by combining primary human ACs with human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The two cell types were cultured in collagen sponges (2 × 6 mm disks) at the BM-MSCs:ACs ratios: 100:0, 95:5, 75:25 and 0:100 for 3 weeks. Scaffolds freshly seeded or further precultured in vitro for 2 weeks were also implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 8 or 6 weeks, respectively. Static co-culture of ACs (25%) with BM-MSCs (75%) in scaffolds resulted in up to 1.4-fold higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than what would be expected based on the relative percentages of the different cell types. In vivo GAG induction was drastically enhanced by the in vitro preculture and maximal at the ratio 95:5 (3.8-fold higher). Immunostaining analyses revealed enhanced accumulation of type II collagen and reduced accumulation of type X collagen with increasing ACs percentage. Constructs generated in the perfusion bioreactor system were homogeneously cellularized. In summary, human cartilage grafts were successfully generated, culturing BM-MSCs with a relatively low fraction of non-expanded ACs in porous scaffolds. The proposed co-culture strategy is directly relevant towards a single-stage surgical procedure for cartilage repair. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) and therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF) systems: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Corallo, Claudio; Volpi, Nila; Franci, Daniela; Vannoni, Daniela; Leoncini, Roberto; Landi, Giacomo; Guarna, Massimo; Montella, Antonio; Albanese, Antonietta; Battisti, Emilio; Fioravanti, Antonella; Nuti, Ranuccio; Giordano, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, characterized by matrix degradation and changes in chondrocyte morphology and metabolism. Literature reported that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can produce benefits in OA patients, even if EMFs mechanism of action is debated. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from femoral heads were cultured in vitro in bidimensional (2-D) flasks and in three-dimensional (3-D) alginate beads to mimic closely cartilage environment in vivo. Cells were exposed 30 min/day for 2 weeks to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) with fixed frequency (100 Hz) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic field (TAMMEF) with variable frequencies, intensities, and waveforms. Cell viability was measured at days 7 and 14, while healthy-cell density, heavily vacuolized (hv) cell density, and cluster density were measured by light microscopy only for 3-D cultures after treatments. Cell morphology was observed for 2-D and 3-D cultures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Chondrocyte exposure to TAMMEF enhances cell viability at days 7 and 14 compared to ELF. Light microscopy analysis showed that TAMMEF enhances healthy-cell density, reduces hv-cell density and clustering, compared to ELF. Furthermore, TEM analysis showed different morphology for 2-D (fibroblast-like) and 3-D (rounded shape) cultures, confirming light microscopy results. In conclusion, EMFs are effective and safe for OA chondrocytes. TAMMEF can positively interfere with OA chondrocytes representing an innovative non-pharmacological approach to treat OA.

  13. Effects of regenerative radioelectric asymmetric conveyer treatment on human normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to IL-1β. A biochemical and morphological study

    PubMed Central

    Collodel, Giulia; Fioravanti, Antonella; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Lamboglia, Antonello; Fontani, Vania; Maioli, Margherita; Santaniello, Sara; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alessandro; Moretti, Elena; Iacoponi, Francesca; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage extracellular matrix and is due to functional impairments occurring in chondrocytes. In previous works, we highlighted that Regenerative Tissue Optimization (TO-RGN) treatment with radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology influenced the gene expression profiles controlling stem cell differentiation and the pluripotency of human skin-derived fibroblasts in vitro. Since interleukin-1 beta signaling has been implicated in the induction and progression of this disease (through metalloproteinase-3 synthesis and nitric oxide production), we investigated whether REAC TO-RGN might influence the biochemical and morphological changes induced by interleukin-1 beta in normal and OA chondrocytes. Methods The induction of metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated by a solid-phase enzyme-amplified sensitivity immunoassay, and nitric oxide production was evaluated with the Griess method. Ultrastructural features were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Results REAC TO-RGN treatment decreased nitric oxide and metalloproteinase-3 production in normal and OA chondrocytes, while inducing an increase in proteoglycan synthesis. OA chondrocytes were more affected by REAC TO-RGN treatment than were normal chondrocytes. Ultrastructural changes confirmed that REAC TO-RGN may counteract the negative effects of interleukin-1 beta incubation. Conclusion The results of this in vitro study suggest that REAC TO-RGN treatment may represent a new, promising approach for the management of OA. PMID:23682210

  14. A wogonin-rich-fraction of Scutellaria baicalensis root extract exerts chondroprotective effects by suppressing IL-1β-induced activation of AP-1 in human OA chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nazir M.; Haseeb, Abdul; Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder with varying degrees of inflammation and sustained oxidative stress. The root extract of Scutellaria baicalensis (SBE) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory and other diseases. Here, we performed activity-guided HPLC-fractionation of SBE, identified the active ingredient(s) and investigated its chondroprotective potential. We found that the Wogonin containing fraction-4 (F4) was the most potent fraction based on its ability to inhibit ROS production and the suppression of catabolic markers including IL-6, COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 in IL-1β-treated OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes treated with F4 in the presence of IL-1β showed significantly enhanced expression of anabolic genes ACAN and COL2A1. In an in vitro model of cartilage degradation treatment with F4 inhibited s-GAG release from IL-1β-treated human cartilage explants. The inhibitory effect of F4 was not mediated through the inhibition of MAPKs and NF-κB activation but was mediated through the suppression of c-Fos/AP-1 activity at transcriptional and post transcriptional levels in OA chondrocytes. Purified Wogonin mimicked the effects of F4 in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Our data demonstrates that a Wogonin-rich fraction of SBE exert chondroprotective effects through the suppression of c-Fos/AP-1 expression and activity in OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. PMID:28256567

  15. MiR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes via targeting VEGFA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Tian, Yun

    2017-01-16

    Previous studies demonstrated that miR-15a-5p was probably associated with human hepatocellular carcinoma, while the function of miR-15a-5p in OA (Osteoarthritis) still remains unknown. Here, we uncovered the potential role of miR-15a-5p on OA pathogenesis and confirmed its predicted target VEGFA (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A). Measured by RT-PCR, miR-15a-5p expression increased remarkably while VEGFA expression was significantly decreased in OA chondrocytes compared with normal conditions. According to Luciferase activity assay, miR-15a-5p directly targeted the 3'-UTR of VEGFA to inhibit its expression. Functional analysis including CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry revealed that overexpression of VEGFA or inhibition of miR-15a-5p promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis and reduced matrix degradation in OA chondrocytes. Moreover, rescue assays carried out with both expression of VEGFA and miR-15a-5p demonstrated that miR-15a-5p contributes to cell apoptosis and matrix degradation via inhibiting VEGFA. We further provided evidence that multiple proteins related to matrix synthesis were regulated by miR-15a-5p and VEGFA using Western blot and ELISA assays. Taken together, our findings elucidated an underlying mechanism by which miR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of OA and indicated a new target for OA diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Dennis, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5%) oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential. Methods Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%), and atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically. Results Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions. Conclusions

  17. Viscoelastic properties of human mesenchymally-derived stem cells and primary osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Eric M.; Topel, Matthew; Zauscher, Stefan; Vail, Thomas P.; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single cells play important roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially influencing the process of mechanotransduction. Recent studies also suggest that cellular mechanical properties may provide novel biological markers, or “biomarkers,” of cell phenotype, reflecting specific changes that occur with disease, differentiation, or cellular transformation. Of particular interest in recent years has been the identification of such biomarkers that can be used to determine specific phenotypic characteristics of stem cells that separate them from primary, differentiated cells. The goal of this study was to determine the elastic and viscoelastic properties of three primary cell types of mesenchymal lineage (chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes) and to test the hypothesis that primary differentiated cells exhibit distinct mechanical properties compared to adult stem cells (adipose-derived or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells). In an adherent, spread configuration, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes all exhibited significantly different mechanical properties, with osteoblasts being stiffer than chondrocytes and both being stiffer than adipocytes. Adipose-derived and mesenchymal stem cells exhibited similar properties to each other, but were mechanically distinct from primary cells, particularly when comparing a ratio of elastic to relaxed moduli. These findings will help more accurately model the cellular mechanical environment in mesenchymal tissues, which could assist in describing injury thresholds and disease progression or even determining the influence of mechanical loading for tissue engineering efforts. Furthermore, the identification of mechanical properties distinct to stem cells could result in more successful sorting procedures to enrich multipotent progenitor cell populations. PMID:17825308

  18. Gene expression profiling of primary human articular chondrocytes in high-density micromasses reveals patterns of recovery, maintenance, re- and dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Tilo; Schenk, Rita; Perka, Carsten; Morawietz, Lars; Pruss, Axel; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian; Ringe, Jochen

    2010-08-15

    The high-density micromass culture has been widely applied to study chondrocyte cell physiology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Since an integrated image has not been established so far, we analyzed the phenotypic alterations of human articular chondrocytes in this model on the broad molecular level. Freshly isolated chondrocytes were assembled as micromasses and maintained up to 6 weeks in medium containing human serum. Formation of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) was evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical staining. At 0, 3 and 6 weeks, chondrocyte micromasses were subjected to gene expression analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays and real-time RT-PCR. Micromasses developed a cartilaginous ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. On gene expression level, time-dependent expression patterns was observed. The induction of genes associated with cartilage-specific ECM (COL2A1 and COL11A1) and developmental signaling (GDF5, GDF10, ID1, ID4 and FGFR1-3) indicated redifferentiation within the first 3 weeks. The repression of genes related to stress response (HSPA1A and HSPA4), apoptotic events (HYOU1, NFKBIA and TRAF1), and degradation (MMP1, MMP10 and MMP12) suggested a recovery of chondrocytes. Constant expression of other chondrogenic (ACAN, FN1 and MGP) and hypertrophic markers (COL10A1, ALPL, PTHR1 and PTHR2) indicated a pattern of phenotypic maintenance. Simultaneously, the expression of chondrogenic growth (BMP6, TGFA, FGF1 and FGF2) and transcription factors (SOX9, EGR1, HES1 and TGIF1), and other cartilage ECM-related genes (COMP and PRG4) was consistently repressed and expression of collagens related to dedifferentiation (COL1A1 and COL3A1) was steadily induced indicating a progressing loss of cartilage phenotype. Likewise, a steady increase of genes associated with proliferation (GAS6, SERPINF1, VEGFB and VEGFC) and apoptosis (DRAM, DPAK1, HSPB, GPX1, NGFRAP1 and TIA1) was observed. Sequence and interplay of identified

  19. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  20. Tenuigenin Prevents IL-1β-induced Inflammation in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes by Suppressing PI3K/AKT/NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlei; Zeng, Lihong; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jiakun; Wang, Wenbo

    2016-04-01

    Tenuigenin (TEN), the main active component of Polygala tenuifolia, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of TEN on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocytes have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of TEN on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritis chondrocytes were pretreated with or without TEN for 1 h and then stimulated with IL-1β. The production of NO and PGE2 were detected by the Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of NF-κB and MAPKs (p38, JNK, ERK) were measured by Western blot analysis. The production of MMP-1, MMP3, and MMP13 were measured by ELISA. The results showed that treatment of TEN significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced NO and PGE2 production. TEN also suppressed IL-1β-induced MMP-1, MMP3, and MMP13 expression. Furthermore, TEN was found to inhibit IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation, PI3K, and AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that TEN inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by inhibiting PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  1. Glycophenotyping of osteoarthritic cartilage and chondrocytes by RT-qPCR, mass spectrometry, histochemistry with plant/human lectins and lectin localization with a glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to characterize the glycophenotype of osteoarthritic cartilage and human chondrocytes. Methods Articular knee cartilage was obtained from nine osteoarthritis (OA) patients. mRNA levels for 27 glycosyltransferases were analyzed in OA chondrocytes using RT-qPCR. Additionally, N- and O-glycans were quantified using mass-spectrometry. Histologically, two cartilage areas with Mankin scores (MS) either ≤4 or ≥9 were selected from each patient representing areas of mild and severe OA, respectively. Tissue sections were stained with (1) a selected panel of plant lectins for probing into the OA glycophenotype, (2) the human lectins galectins-1 and -3, and (3) the glycoprotein asialofetuin (ASF) for visualizing β-galactoside-specific endogenous lectins. Results We found that OA chondrocytes expressed oligomannosidic structures as well as non-, mono- and disialylated complex-type N-glycans, and core 2 O-glycans. Reflecting B4GALNT3 mRNA presence in OA chondrocytes, LacdiNAc-terminated structures were detected. Staining profiles for plant and human lectins were dependent on the grade of cartilage degeneration, and ASF-positive cells were observed in significantly higher rates in areas of severe degeneration. Conclusions In summary, distinct aspects of the glycome in OA cartilage are altered with progressing degeneration. In particular, the alterations measured by galectin-3 and the pan-galectin sensor ASF encourage detailed studies of galectin functionality in OA. PMID:24289744

  2. Glycophenotyping of osteoarthritic cartilage and chondrocytes by RT-qPCR, mass spectrometry, histochemistry with plant/human lectins and lectin localization with a glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Stefan; Bieder, Daniela; André, Sabine; Altmann, Friedrich; Walzer, Sonja M; Kaltner, Herbert; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Windhager, Reinhard; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2013-10-04

    This study aimed to characterize the glycophenotype of osteoarthritic cartilage and human chondrocytes. Articular knee cartilage was obtained from nine osteoarthritis (OA) patients. mRNA levels for 27 glycosyltransferases were analyzed in OA chondrocytes using RT-qPCR. Additionally, N- and O-glycans were quantified using mass-spectrometry. Histologically, two cartilage areas with Mankin scores (MS) either ≤ 4 or ≥ 9 were selected from each patient representing areas of mild and severe OA, respectively. Tissue sections were stained with (1) a selected panel of plant lectins for probing into the OA glycophenotype, (2) the human lectins galectins-1 and -3, and (3) the glycoprotein asialofetuin (ASF) for visualizing β-galactoside-specific endogenous lectins. We found that OA chondrocytes expressed oligomannosidic structures as well as non-, mono- and disialylated complex-type N-glycans, and core 2 O-glycans. Reflecting B4GALNT3 mRNA presence in OA chondrocytes, LacdiNAc-terminated structures were detected. Staining profiles for plant and human lectins were dependent on the grade of cartilage degeneration, and ASF-positive cells were observed in significantly higher rates in areas of severe degeneration. In summary, distinct aspects of the glycome in OA cartilage are altered with progressing degeneration. In particular, the alterations measured by galectin-3 and the pan-galectin sensor ASF encourage detailed studies of galectin functionality in OA.

  3. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments.

    PubMed

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-06-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture.

  4. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, increases the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist in human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Gaby; Burger, Danielle; Mezin, Françoise; Magne, David; Gabay, Cem; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Guerne, Pierre-André

    2004-01-01

    Leflunomide is an immunomodulatory agent used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated the effect of A77 1726 - the active metabolite of leflunomide - on the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) by human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes. Cells were incubated with A77 1726 alone or in combination with proinflammatory cytokines. IL-1Ra production was determined by ELISA. A77 1726 alone had no effect, but in the presence of IL-1beta or tumour necrosis factor-alpha it markedly enhanced the secretion of IL-1Ra in synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. The effect of A77 1726 was greatest at 100 micromol/l. In synovial fibroblasts and de-differentiated chondrocytes, A77 1726 also increased IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra production in cell lysates. Freshly isolated chondrocytes contained no significant amounts of intracellular IL-1Ra. A77 1726 is a known inhibitor of pyrimidine synthesis and cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 activity. Addition of exogenous uridine did not significantly modify the effect of A77 1726 on IL-1Ra production, suggesting that it was not mediated by inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis. Indomethacin increased IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra secretion in synovial fibroblasts and de-differentiated chondrocytes, suggesting that inhibition of COX-2 may indeed enhance IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra production. However, the stimulatory effect of indomethacin was consistently less effective than that of A77 1726. A77 1726 increases IL-1Ra production by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines, and thus it may possess chondroprotective effects. The effect of A77 1726 may be partially mediated by inhibition of COX-2, but other mechanisms likely concur to stimulate IL-1Ra production.

  5. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture. PMID:24689495

  6. Alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 elicit a catabolic effect in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes that is dependent on Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Schelbergen, Rik F P; Blom, Arjen B; van den Bosch, Martijn H J; Slöetjes, Annet; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Schreurs, B Wim; Mort, John S; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; van den Berg, Wim B; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2012-05-01

    S100A8 and S100A9 are two Ca(2+) binding proteins classified as damage-associated molecular patterns or alarmins that are found in high amounts in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether S100A8 and/or S100A9 can interact with chondrocytes from OA patients to increase catabolic mediators. Using immunohistochemistry, we stained for S100A8 and S100A9 protein, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and a cartilage-breakdown epitope specific for MMPs (VDIPEN) in cartilage from OA donors. Isolated chondrocytes or explants from OA and non-OA donors were stimulated with S100A8 and/or S100A9. Messenger RNA and protein levels of MMPs, cytokines, and cartilage matrix molecules were determined with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Luminex techniques, respectively. For receptor blocking studies, specific inhibitors for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), and carboxylated glycans were used. In cartilage from OA patients, the expression of S100A8 and S100A9 protein close to chondrocytes was associated with proteoglycan depletion and expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, and VDIPEN. Stimulation of chondrocytes with S100A8 and S100A9 caused a strong up-regulation of catabolic markers (MMPs 1, 3, 9, and 13, interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and down-regulation of anabolic markers (aggrecan and type II collagen), thereby favoring cartilage breakdown. Blocking TLR-4, but not carboxylated glycans or RAGE, inhibited the S100 effect. The catabolic S100 effect was significantly more pronounced in chondrocytes from OA patients as compared to those from non-OA patients, possibly due to higher TLR-4 expression. S100A8 and S100A9 have a catabolic effect on human chondrocytes that is TLR-4 dependent. OA chondrocytes are more sensitive than normal chondrocytes to S100 stimulation. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Association of Reduced Type IX Collagen Gene Expression in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes With Epigenetic Silencing by DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Kei; de Andrés, María C; Hashimoto, Ko; Itoi, Eiji; Otero, Miguel; Roach, Helmtrud I; Goldring, Mary B; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the changes in collagen gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes are associated with changes in the DNA methylation status in the COL2A1 enhancer and COL9A1 promoter. Methods Expression levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and the percentage of DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The effect of CpG methylation on COL9A1 promoter activity was determined using a CpG-free vector; cotransfections with expression vectors encoding SOX9, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and HIF-2α were carried out to analyze COL9A1 promoter activities in response to changes in the methylation status. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were carried out to validate SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter and the influence of DNA methylation. Results Although COL2A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in OA chondrocytes were 19-fold higher than those in the controls, all of the CpG sites in the COL2A1 enhancer were totally demethylated in both samples. The levels of COL9A1 mRNA in OA chondrocytes were 6,000-fold lower than those in controls; 6 CpG sites of the COL9A1 promoter were significantly hypermethylated in OA patients as compared with controls. Treatment with 5-azadeoxycitidine enhanced COL9A1 gene expression and prevented culture-induced hypermethylation. In vitro methylation decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Mutations in the 5 CpG sites proximal to the transcription start site decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Cotransfection with SOX9 enhanced COL9A1 promoter activity; CpG methylation attenuated SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter. Conclusion This first demonstration that hypermethylation is associated with down-regulation of COL9A1 expression in OA cartilage highlights the pivotal role of epigenetics in OA, involving not only hypomethylation, but also hypermethylation, with important therapeutic implications for OA treatment. PMID:25048791

  8. The secretory profiles of cultured human articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells: implications for autologous cell transplantation strategies.

    PubMed

    Polacek, Martin; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Elvenes, Jan; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez, Inigo

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the phenotype of human articular chondrocytes (ACs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after cell expansion by studying the spectrum of proteins secreted by cells into the culture medium. ACs and MSCs were expanded in monolayer cultures for some weeks, as done in standard cell transplantation procedures. Initially, the expression of cartilage signature genes was compared by real-time PCR. Metabolic labeling of proteins (SILAC) in combination with mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was applied to investigate differences in released proteins. In addition, multiplex assays were carried out to quantify the amounts of several matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs). Expanded chondrocytes showed a slightly higher expression of cartilage-specific genes than MSCs, whereas the overall spectra of released proteins were very similar for the two cell types. In qualitative terms MSCs seemed to secrete similar number of extracellular matrix proteins (43% vs. 45% of total proteins found) and catabolic agents (9% vs. 10%), and higher number of anabolic agents (12 % vs. 7%) compared to ACs. Some matrix-regulatory agents such as serpins, BMP-1, and galectins were detected only in MSC supernatants. Quantitative analyses of MMPs and TIMPs revealed significantly higher levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-7 in the medium of ACs. Our data show that after the expansion phase, both ACs and MSCs express a dedifferentiated phenotype, resembling each other. ACs hold a phenotype closer to native cartilage at the gene expression level, whereas MSCs show a more anabolic profile by looking at the released proteins pattern. Our data together with the inherent capability of MSCs to maintain their differentiation potential for longer cultivation periods would favor the use of these cells for cartilage reconstruction.

  9. Oxygen and pH-sensitivity of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes in 3-D alginate bead culture system.

    PubMed

    Collins, J A; Moots, R J; Winstanley, R; Clegg, P D; Milner, P I

    2013-11-01

    To identify the effect of alterations in physical parameters such as oxygen and pH on processes associated with cellular redox balance in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (HOAC) were isolated from total knee arthroplasty samples and cultured in 3-D alginate beads in four different oxygen tensions (<1%, 2%, 5% and 21% O2), at pH 7.2 and 6.2 and in the presence or absence of 10 ng/ml, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Cell viability, media glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels, media nitrate/nitrate levels, active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATPi) were measured over a 96-h time course. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular pH and reduced/oxidised glutathione (GSH/GSSG) were additionally measured after 48-h incubation under these experimental conditions. Hypoxia (2% O2) and anoxia (<1% O2), acidosis (pH 6.2) and 10 ng/ml IL-1β reduced HOAC cell viability and increased GAG media levels. Acidosis and IL-1β increased nitrite/nitrate release, but increases were moderate at 2% O2 and significantly reduced at <1% O2. ATPi was significantly reduced following hypoxia and anoxia and acidosis. At 48 h cellular ROS levels were increased by acidosis and IL-1β but reduced in hypoxia and anoxia. Mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced in low oxygen, acidosis and IL-1β. Anoxia also resulted in intracellular acidosis. GSH/GSSG ratio was reduced in low oxygen conditions, acidosis and IL-1β. This study shows that oxygen and pH affect elements of the redox system in HOAC including cellular anti-oxidants, mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS levels. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular shuttle between extracellular and cytoplasmic space allows for monitoring of GAG biosynthesis in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hiroko; Shimawaki, Ken; Takegawa, Yasuhiro; Ohyanagi, Tatsuya; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-09-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans play vital functional roles in various biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, inflammation, immune response, sustentation of cartilage tissue and intensity of tissues. We show here that serglycin-like synthetic glycopeptides function efficiently as a molecular shuttle to hijack glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthetic pathway within cells across the plasma membrane. Fluorescence (FITC)-labeled tetrapeptide (H-Ser(1)-Gly(2)-Ser(3)-Gly(4)-OH) carrying Galβ(1➝4)Xylβ1➝ defined as proteoglycan initiator (PGI) monomer and its tandem repeating PGI polymer was employed for direct imaging of cellular uptake and intracellular traffic by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Novel method for enrichment analysis of GAG-primed PGIs by combined use of anti-FITC antibody and LC/mass spectrometry was established. PGI monomer was incorporated promptly into human articular chondrocytes and distributed in whole cytoplasm including ER/Golgi while PGI polymer localized specifically in nucleus. It was demonstrated that PGIs become good substrates for GAG biosynthesis within the cells and high molecular weight GAGs primed by PGIs is chondroitin sulfate involving N-acetyl-d-galactosamine residues substituted by 4-O-sulfate or 6-O-sulfate group as major components. PGIs activated chondrocytes proliferation and induced up-regulation of the expression level of type II collagen, suggesting that PGIs can function as new class cytokine-like molecules to stimulate cell growth. Synthetic serglycin-type PGIs allow for live cell imaging during proteoglycan biosynthesis and structural characterization of GAG-primed PGIs by an antibody-based enrichment protocol. Novel glycomics designated for investigating proteoglycan biosynthesis, namely real-time GAGomics using synthetic glycopeptides as PGIs, should facilitate greatly dynamic profiling of GAGs in the living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Glycoproteomics

  11. Cotransfected human chondrocytes: over-expression of IGF-I and SOX9 enhances the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, M; Lara-Arias, J; Álvarez-Lozano, E; Said-Fernández, S; Soto-Domínguez, A; Padilla-Rivas, G R; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G

    2015-12-01

    Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. We evaluated the combined effect of IGF-I and SOX9 transgene expression on Col-II and GAG production by cultured human articular chondrocytes. Transient transfection and cotransfection were performed using two mammalian expression plasmids (pCMV-SPORT6), one for each transgene. At day 9 post-transfection, the chondrocytes that were over-expressing IGF-I/SOX9 showed 2-fold increased mRNA expression of the Col-II gene, as well as a 57% increase in Col-II protein, whereas type I collagen expression (Col-I) was decreased by 59.3% compared with controls. The production of GAG by these cells increased significantly compared with the controls at day 9 (3.3- vs 1.8-times, an increase of almost 83%). Thus, IGF-I/SOX9 cotransfected chondrocytes may be useful for cell-based articular cartilage therapies.

  12. Effects of microRNA-146a on the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by targeting TRAF6 through the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun-Hua; Li, Jing; Liu, Cui-Fang; Liu, Ning; Bian, Rui-Xiang; Zhao, Shou-Mei; Yan, Shu-Yi; Zhang, Yong-Bing

    2017-03-17

    This study aims to investigate the effects of microRNA-146a (miR-146a) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes by targeting TRAF6 through NF-κB signaling pathway. Human normal and OA chondrocytes were selected and divided into the normal group, blank group, negative control (NC) group, miR-146a mimics group, miR-146a inhibitors, miR-146a inhibitor + si-TRAF6 group and si-TRAF6 group. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was applied to detect the expressions of miR-146a, TRAF6 mRNA and NF-κB mRNA. Western blotting was used to detect the protein expressions of TRAF6 and NF-κB. CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis. Compared with normal chondrocytes, the expression of miR-146a decreased, while the mRNA and protein expressions of TRAF6 and NF-κB increased in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes had a lower proliferation rate and a higher apoptosis rate than normal chondrocytes. Compared with the blank, NC and si-TRAF6 groups, the expression of miR-146a increased in the miR-146a mimics group, but decreased in the miR-146a inhibitors and miR-146a inhibitor + si-TRAF6 groups. Compared with the blank, NC and miR-146a inhibitor + si-TRAF6 groups, the mRNA and protein expressions of TRAF6 and NF-κB decreased, cell proliferation rate increased and cell apoptosis rate decreased in the miR-146a mimics and si-TRAF6 groups, while opposite trends were observed in the miR-146a inhibitors group. Our study suggests that miR-146a could promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of OA chondrocytes by inhibiting TRAF6 expression and suppressing the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  13. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  14. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm(2)) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  16. TGF β-1 administration during ex vivo expansion of human articular chondrocytes in a serum-free medium redirects the cell phenotype toward hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Quarto, R; Ulivi, V; Muraglia, A; Molfetta, L; Giannoni, P

    2012-09-01

    Cell-based cartilage resurfacing requires ex vivo expansion of autologous articular chondrocytes. Defined culture conditions minimize expansion-dependent phenotypic alterations but maintenance of the cells' differentiation potential must be carefully assessed. Transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF β-1) positively regulates the expression of several cartilage proteins, but its therapeutic application in damaged cartilage is controversial. Thus we evaluated the phenotypic outcomes of cultured human articular chondrocytes exposed to TGF β-1 during monolayer expansion in a serum-free medium. After five doublings cells were transferred to micromass cultures to assess their chondrogenic differentiation, or replated in osteogenic medium. Immunocytostainings of micromasses of TGF-expanded cells showed loss of aggrecan and type II collagen. Positivity was evidenced for RAGE, IHH, type X collagen and for apoptotic cells, paralleling a reduction of BCL-2 levels, suggesting hypertrophic differentiation. TGF β-1-exposed cells also evidenced increased mRNA levels for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, matrix metalloproteinase-13, TIMP-3, VEGF and SMAD7, enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and pyrophosphate availability. Conversely, SMAD3 mRNA and protein contents were reduced. After osteogenic induction, only TGF-expanded cells strongly mineralized and impaired p38 kinase activity, a contributor of chondrocytes' differentiation. To evaluate possible endochondral ossification progression, we seeded the chondrocytes on hydroxyapatite scaffolds, subsequently implanted in an in vivo ectopic setting, but cells failed to reach overt ossification; nonetheless, constructs seeded with TGF-exposed cells displayed blood vessels of the host vascular supply with enlarged diameters, suggestive of vascular remodeling, as in bone growth. Thus TGF-exposure during articular chondrocytes expansion induces a phenotype switch to hypertrophy, an undesirable effect for cells possibly intended for

  17. Differential gene expression and regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonists follistatin and gremlin in normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Ginette; Hum, David; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Christelle; Ranger, Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2004-08-01

    To compare gene expression in normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes using microarray technology. Of the novel genes identified, we selected follistatin, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, and investigated its expression/regulation as well as that of 3 other antagonists, gremlin, chordin, and noggin, in normal and OA chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Basal and induced gene expression were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Gene regulation was monitored following treatment with inflammatory, antiinflammatory, growth, and developmental factors. Follistatin protein production was measured using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and localization of follistatin and gremlin in cartilage was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. All BMP antagonists except noggin were expressed in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Follistatin and gremlin were significantly up-regulated in OA chondrocytes but not in OA synovial fibroblasts. Chordin was weakly expressed in normal and OA cells. Production of follistatin protein paralleled the gene expression pattern. Follistatin and gremlin were expressed preferentially by the chondrocytes at the superficial layers of cartilage. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon-gamma significantly stimulated follistatin expression but down-regulated expression of gremlin. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) had no effect on follistatin but reduced gremlin expression. Conversely, BMP-2 and BMP-4 significantly stimulated expression of gremlin but down-regulated that of follistatin. IL-13, dexamethasone, transforming growth factor beta1, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor type BB, and endothelial cell growth factor down-regulated the expression of both antagonists. This study is the first to show the possible involvement of follistatin and gremlin in OA pathophysiology. The increased activin/BMP-binding activities of these antagonists could affect tissue

  18. Implantation of juvenile human chondrocytes demonstrates no adverse effect on spinal nerve tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Külling, Fabrice A; Liu, Jane J; Liebenberg, Ellen; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a common disabling condition for millions of individuals. Injection of xenogenic juvenile chondrocytes (XJC) into the disc space has been shown to have a therapeutic potential for disc repair. In the current study, XJC were injected extra-discally on neural structures in an in vivo rat hemilaminectomy model to compare the histological and behavioral effects on XJC and fibrin glue carrier. Twenty-four rats were assigned to four groups: cells plus carrier, carrier alone, sham hemi-laminectomy, and a positive control (nerve root ligation). A right-sided hemilaminectomy was performed and the study material was placed on and around the exposed L4 nerve root and the spinal cord. Pre- and postoperatively mechanical allodynia was tested on the ipsilateral hind paw using the von Frey up-down method. The lumbar spines were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for nerve histology and TNF-α quantification. After a brief period of hyperalgesia, the von Frey data indicate there are no adverse effects of placing XJC on spinal nerve roots in rats. However ligation of nerve root showed significant allodynia compared to the other groups. These behavioral data were supported by histological analyses. While these results need to be confirmed over a larger period of time, they suggest that XJC transplantation into the disc space shows no adverse effect on nerve tissue.

  19. Regulation of human chondrocyte function through direct inhibition of cartilage master regulator SOX9 by microRNA-145 (miRNA-145).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sanchez, Aida; Dudek, Katarzyna A; Murphy, Chris L

    2012-01-06

    Articular cartilage enables weight bearing and near friction-free movement in the joints. Critical to its function is the production of a specialized, mechanocompetent extracellular matrix controlled by master regulator transcription factor SOX9. Mutations in SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia, a haploinsufficiency disorder resulting in severe skeletal defects and dwarfism. Although much is understood about how SOX9 regulates cartilage matrix synthesis and hence joint function, how this master regulator is itself regulated remains largely unknown. Here we identify a specific microRNA, miR-145, as a direct regulator of SOX9 in normal healthy human articular chondrocytes. We show that miR-145 directly represses SOX9 expression in human cells through a unique binding site in its 3'-UTR not conserved in mice. Modulation of miR-145 induced profound changes in the human chondrocyte phenotype. Specifically, increased miR-145 levels cause greatly reduced expression of critical cartilage extracellular matrix genes (COL2A1 and aggrecan) and tissue-specific microRNAs (miR-675 and miR-140) and increased levels of the hypertrophic markers RUNX2 and MMP13, characteristic of changes occurring in osteoarthritis. We propose miR-145 as an important regulator of human chondrocyte function and a new target for cartilage repair.

  20. MicroRNA-602 and microRNA-608 regulate sonic hedgehog expression via target sites in the coding region in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Nahid; Makki, Mohammad Shahidul; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hedgehog(Hh) signaling has recently been associated with cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis(OA). As interleukin-1β(IL-1β) is a critical mediator of OA pathogenesis, here we determined whether IL-1β induces the expression of sonic hedgehog(SHH) and its regulation by microRNAs in human chondrocytes. Methods SHH protein expression in human OA-cartilage and in an animal model of OA was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence respectively. Gene and protein expression in IL-1β or SHH-stimulated chondrocytes was determined by TaqMan assays and immunoblotting respectively. Effect of overexpression of miR-602 and miR-608 or their anatgomirs on SHH expression was evaluated by transient transfections of human chondrocytes and HEK-293 cells. Role of signaling pathways was evaluated using small molecule inhibitors. Binding of miRNAs with the putative “seed sequence” in the SHH mRNA was validated with a SHH luciferase reporter assay. Results Expression of SHH, PTCH-1, GLI-1, HHIP, MMP-13, and COL10A1 was high in damaged OAcartilage. Expression of SHH was inversely correlated with the expression of miR-608 in damaged cartilage and in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-608 or miR-602 mimics inhibited the reporter activity and mutation of the miRNAs “seed sequences” abolished the repression of reporter activity. Overexpression of miR-602 or miR-608 inhibited the expression of SHH mRNA and protein and this was abrogated by antagomirs. Stimulation with SHH-protein up-regulated the MMP-13 expression and inhibition of Hh signaling blocked MMP-13 expression in OA chondrocytes. Conclusions miR-602 and miR-608 are important regulators of SHH expression in chondrocytes and their suppression by IL-1β may contribute to the enhanced expression of SHH and MMP-13 in OA. PMID:25385442

  1. Hyaluronic acid facilitates chondrogenesis and matrix deposition of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells and human chondrocytes co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Amann, Elisabeth; Wolff, Paul; Breel, Ernst; van Griensven, Martijn; Balmayor, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-25

    Clinical success on cartilage regeneration could be achieved by using available biomaterials and cell-based approaches. In this study, we have developed a composite gel based on collagen/hyaluronic acid (Coll-HA) as ideal, physiologically representative 3D support for in vitro chondrogenesis of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) co-cultured with human articular chondrocytes (hAC). The incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) attempted to provide an additional stimulus to the hAMSCs for chondrogenesis and extracellular matrix deposition. Coll-HA gels were fabricated by directly mixing different amounts of HA (0-5%) into collagen solution before gelation. hACs and hAMSCs were co-cultured at different ratios from 100% to 0% in steps of 25%. Thus, five different co-culture groups were tested in the various Coll-HA 3D matrices. HA greatly impacted the cell viability and proliferation as well as the mechanical properties of the Coll-HA gel. The effective Young's modulus changed from 5.8 to 9.0kPa with increasing concentrations of HA in the gel. In addition, significantly higher amounts of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) were detected that seemed to be dependent on HA content. The highest HA concentration used (5%) resulted in the lowest Collagen type X (Col10) expression for most of the cell culture groups. Unexpectedly, culturing in these gels was also associated with decreased SOX9 and Collagen type II (Col2) expression, while Collagen type III (Col3) and metalloproteinase 13 notably increased. By using 1% HA, a positive effect on SOX9 expression was observed in the co-culture groups. In addition, a significant increase in GAGs production was also detected. Regarding co-culturing, the group with 25% hAMSCs+75% hACs was the most chondrogenic one considering SOX9 and Col2 expression as well as GAGs production. This group showed negligible Col10 expression after 35days of culture independently of the gel used. It also featured the highest effective Young's modulus

  2. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase subunit composition in a human chondrocyte cell line; evidence for the presence of α1, α3, β1, β2 and β3 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Trujillo, Elisa; Arteaga, Mari-Francis; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Membrane transport systems participate in fundamental activities such as cell cycle control, proliferation, survival, volume regulation, pH maintenance and regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis. Multiple isoforms of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase are expressed in primary chondrocytes. Some of these isoforms have previously been reported to be expressed exclusively in electrically excitable cells (i.e., cardiomyocytes and neurons). Studying the distribution of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase isoforms in chondrocytes makes it possible to document the diversity of isozyme pairing and to clarify issues concerning Na(+), K(+)-ATPase isoform abundance and the physiological relevance of their expression. In this study, we investigated the expression of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in a human chondrocyte cell line (C-20/A4) using a combination of immunological and biochemical techniques. A panel of well-characterized antibodies revealed abundant expression of the α1, β1 and β2 isoforms. Western blot analysis of plasma membranes confirmed the above findings. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase consists of multiple isozyme variants that endow chondrocytes with additional homeostatic control capabilities. In terms of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase expression, the C-20/A4 cell line is phenotypically similar to primary and in situ chondrocytes. However, unlike freshly isolated chondrocytes, C-20/A4 cells are an easily accessible and convenient in vitro model for the study of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase expression and regulation in chondrocytes.

  3. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), glycosaminoglycan (GAG), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), aggrecan (ACAN) and type II collagen (COL2A1) in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml) and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml). Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Supporting these gene expression results, IL-1β-induced cartilage matrix breakdown, as evidenced by GAG release from cartilage explants, was also significantly blocked (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the presence of herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM) up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of HLM were mediated by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB in human OA chondrocytes in presence of IL-1β. Conclusion Our data

  4. Paracrine effects of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in inflammatory stress-induced senescence features of osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Platas, Julia; Guillén, Maria Isabel; del Caz, Maria Dolores Pérez; Gomar, Francisco; Castejón, Miguel Angel; Mirabet, Vicente; Alcaraz, Maria José

    2016-01-01

    Aging and exposure to stress would determine the chondrocyte phenotype in osteoarthritis (OA). In particular, chronic inflammation may contribute to stress-induced senescence of chondrocytes and cartilage degeneration during OA progression. Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells exert paracrine effects protecting against degenerative changes in chondrocytes. We have investigated whether the conditioned medium (CM) from adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells may regulate senescence features induced by inflammatory stress in OA chondrocytes. Our results indicate that CM down-regulated senescence markers induced by interleukin-1β including senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, accumulation of γH2AX foci and morphological changes with enhanced formation of actin stress fibers. Treatment of chondrocytes with CM also decreased the production of oxidative stress, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, and the expression of caveolin-1 and p21. The effects of CM were related to the reduction in p53 acetylation which would be dependent on the enhancement of Sirtuin 1 expression. Therefore, CM may exert protective effects in degenerative joint conditions by countering the premature senescence of OA chondrocytes induced by inflammatory stress. PMID:27490266

  5. Interleukin 1 suppresses expression of cartilage-specific types II and IX collagens and increases types I and III collagens in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, M B; Birkhead, J; Sandell, L J; Kimura, T; Krane, S M

    1988-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, functions of chondrocytes including synthesis of matrix proteins and proteinases are altered through interactions with cells of the infiltrating pannus. One of the major secreted products of mononuclear inflammatory cells is IL-1. In this study we found that recombinant human IL-1 beta suppressed synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen by cultured human costal chondrocytes associated with decreased steady state levels of alpha 1 (II) and alpha 1(IX) procollagen mRNAs. In contrast, IL-1 increased synthesis of types I and III collagens and levels of alpha 1(I), alpha 2(I), and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNAs, as we described previously using human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. This stimulatory effect of IL-1 was observed only when IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis was blocked by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The suppression of type II collagen mRNA levels by IL-1 alone was not due to IL-1-stimulated PGE2, since addition of indomethacin did not reverse, but actually potentiated, this inhibition. Continuous exposure of freshly isolated chondrocytes from day 2 of culture to approximately half-maximal concentrations of IL-1 (2.5 pM) completely suppressed levels of type II collagen mRNA and increased levels of types I and III collagen mRNAs, thereby reversing the ratio of alpha 1(II)/alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNAs from greater than 6.0 to less than 1.0 by day 7. IL-1, therefore, can modify, at a pretranslational level, the relative amounts of the different types of collagen synthesized in cartilage and thereby could be responsible for the inappropriate repair of cartilage matrix in inflammatory conditions. Images PMID:3264290

  6. Effect of hyaluronic acid and polysaccharides from Opuntia ficus indica (L.) cladodes on the metabolism of human chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Panico, A M; Cardile, V; Garufi, F; Puglia, C; Bonina, F; Ronsisvalle, S

    2007-05-04

    Conventional medications in articular disease are often effective for symptom relief, but they can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favourable influence on the course of the disease. In this study, we assay the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective effect of some lyophilised extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus indica (L.) cladodes and of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the production of key molecules released during chronic inflammatory events such as nitric oxide (NO), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), prostaglandins (PGE(2)) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human chondrocyte culture, stimulated with proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). Further the antioxidant effect of these extracts was evaluated in vitro employing the bleaching of the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH test). All the extracts tested in this study showed an interesting profile in active compounds. Particularly some of these extracts were characterized by polyphenolic and polysaccharidic species. In vitro results pointed out that the extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes were able to contrast the harmful effects of IL-1 beta. Our data showed the protective effect of the extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes in cartilage alteration, which appears greater than that elicited by hyaluronic acid (HA) commonly employed as visco-supplementation in the treatment of joint diseases.

  7. Celecoxib-loaded PLGA/cyclodextrin microspheres: characterization and evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity on human chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Cannavà, Carmela; Tommasini, Silvana; Stancanelli, Rosanna; Cardile, Venera; Cilurzo, Felisa; Giannone, Ignazio; Puglisi, Giovanni; Ventura, Cinzia Anna

    2013-11-01

    PLGA microspheres were prepared as a sustained release system for the intra-articular administration of celecoxib (CCB). The microspheres were prepared in the presence of different concentrations of dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-Cyd), by the simple oil-in-water emulsion/evaporation solvent method. The microspheres were evaluated as to surface morphology, size and technological properties (such as encapsulation efficiency, drug loading capacity and drug release). Ex vivo studies on cultures of human chondrocytes were performed in order to evaluate the influence of the polymeric carriers on the pharmacological activity of CCB. All systems ranged from about 1 to 5 μm in size and had a high encapsulation efficiency percentage ranging from about 80% to 90% (w/w), except for CCB-loaded-PLGA microspheres containing the highest amount of DM-β-Cyd, in which a dramatic drop in the encapsulation efficiency was observed (about 54%, w/w). FIB images evidenced the fact that the microspheres had a porous structure in the presence of the highest amount of DM-β-Cyd. The macrocycle modulated the release profiles of CCB from the microspheres, producing in some cases a zero-order kinetic release. Ex vivo biological studies demonstrated that DM-β-Cyd improved the drug's anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, CCB-loaded PLGA/cyclodextrin microspheres may have a potential therapeutic application in the treatment of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 17β-estradiol reduces expression of MMP-1, -3, and -13 in human primary articular chondrocytes from female patients cultured in a three dimensional alginate system.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Steffen, Reinhard; Hassenpflug, Joachim; Varoga, Deike; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Pufe, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Clinical observations have suggested a relationship between osteoarthritis and a changed sex-hormone metabolism, especially in menopausal women. This study analyzes the effect of 17β-estradiol on expression of matrix metalloproteinases-1, -3, -13 (MMP-1, -3, -13) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1, -2 (TIMP-1, -2) in articular chondrocytes. An imbalance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) specialized on degradation of articular cartilage matrix over the respective inhibitors of these enzymes (TIMPs) that leads to matrix destruction was postulated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Primary human articular chondrocytes from patients of both genders were cultured in alginate beads at 5% O(2) to which 10(-11)M-10(-5)M 17β-estradiol had been added and analyzed by means of immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. Since articular chondrocytes in vivo are adapted to a low oxygen tension, culture was performed at 5% O(2). Immunohistochemical staining in articular cartilage tissue from patients and immunocytochemical staining in articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was positive for type II collagen, estrogen receptor α, MMP-1, and -13. It was negative for type I collagen, MMP-3, TIMP-1 and -2. Using real-time RT-PCR, it was demonstrated that physiological and supraphysiological doses of 17β-estradiol suppress mRNA levels of MMP-3 and -13 significantly in articular chondrocytes of female patients. A significant suppressing effect was also seen in MMP-1 mRNA after a high dose of 10(-5)M 17β-estradiol. Furthermore, high doses of this hormone led to tendentially lower TIMP-1 levels whereas the TIMP-2 mRNA level was not influenced. In male patients, only incubations with high doses (10(-5)M) of 17β-estradiol were followed by a tendency to suppressed MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels while TIMP-2 mRNA level was decreased significantly. There was no effect on MMP-13 expression of cells from male patients. Taken together, application of

  9. Physioxia Promotes the Articular Chondrocyte-Like Phenotype in Human Chondroprogenitor-Derived Self-Organized Tissue.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Devon E; Markway, Brandon D; Weekes, Kenneth J; McCarthy, Helen E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-07-07

    Biomaterial-based tissue engineering has not successfully reproduced the structural architecture or functional mechanical properties of native articular cartilage. In scaffold-free tissue engineering systems, cells secrete and organize the entire extracellular matrix over time in response to environmental signals such as oxygen level. In this study, we investigated the effect of oxygen on the formation of neocartilage from human-derived chondrogenic cells. Articular chondrocytes (ACs) and articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPs) derived from healthy human adults were guided toward cell condensation by centrifugation onto plate inserts that were uncoated or coated with either agarose or fibronectin. Neocartilage discs were cultured at hyperoxic (20%) or physioxic (5%) oxygen levels, and biochemical, biomechanical, and molecular analyses were used to compare the cartilage produced by ACs versus ACPs. Fibronectin-coated inserts proved optimal for growing cartilaginous discs from both cell types. In comparison with culture in hyperoxia, AC neocartilage cultured at physioxia exhibited a significant increase in chondrogenic gene expression, proteoglycan production, and mechanical properties with a concomitant decrease in collagen content. At both oxygen levels, ACP-derived neocartilage produced tissue with significantly enhanced mechanical properties and collagen content relative to AC-derived neocartilage. Both ACs and ACPs produced substantial collagen II and reduced levels of collagens I and X in physioxia relative to hyperoxia. Neocartilage from ACPs exhibited anisotropic organization characteristic of native cartilage with respect to collagen VI of the pericellular matrix when compared with AC-derived neocartilage; however, only ACs produced abundant surface-localized lubricin. Guiding human-derived cells toward condensation and subsequent culture in physioxia promoted the articular cartilage tissue phenotype for ACs and ACPs. Unlike ACs, ACPs are clonable and

  10. Differential gene expression of human chondrocytes cultured under short-term altered gravity conditions during parabolic flight maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Wehland, Markus; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Schulz, Herbert; Saar, Katrin; Hübner, Norbert; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Braun, Markus; Ma, Xiao; Frett, Timo; Warnke, Elisabeth; Riwaldt, Stefan; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-03-20

    Chondrocytes are the main cellular component of articular cartilage. In healthy tissue, they are embedded in a strong but elastic extracelluar matrix providing resistance against mechanical forces and friction for the joints. Osteoarthritic cartilage, however, disrupted by heavy strain, has only very limited potential to heal. One future possibility to replace damaged cartilage might be the scaffold-free growth of chondrocytes in microgravity to form 3D aggregates. To prepare for this, we have conducted experiments during the 20th DLR parabolic flight campaign, where we fixed the cells after the first (1P) and the 31st parabola (31P). Furthermore, we subjected chondrocytes to isolated vibration and hypergravity conditions. Microarray and quantitative real time PCR analyses revealed that hypergravity regulated genes connected to cartilage integrity (BMP4, MMP3, MMP10, EDN1, WNT5A, BIRC3). Vibration was clearly detrimental to cartilage (upregulated inflammatory IL6 and IL8, downregulated growth factors EGF, VEGF, FGF17). The viability of the cells was not affected by the parabolic flight, but showed a significantly increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes after 31 parabolas. The IL-6 release of chondrocytes cultured under conditions of vibration was not changed, but hypergravity (1.8 g) induced a clear elevation of IL-6 protein in the supernatant compared with corresponding control samples. Taken together, this study provided new insights into the growth behavior of chondrocytes under short-term microgravity.

  11. Thymoquinone Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Inflammation in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes by Suppressing NF-κB and MAPKs Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongyan; Qiao, Jiutao; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Tianxin; Guan, Dehong

    2015-12-01

    Thymoquinone, an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of thymoquinone on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocytes remains unclear. In this study, we designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and elucidated the underlying mechanism of thymoquinone on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. The effects of thymoquinone on inflammatory mediators COX-2, iNOS, NO, PGE2, as well as MMP-1, MMP3, MMP13 production were detected. The results demonstrated that thymoquinone concentration-dependently inhibited IL-1β-induced COX-2, iNOS, NO, and PGE2 production. Thymoquinone also suppressed IL-1β-induced MMP-1, MMP3, and MMP13 production. We found that thymoquinone significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation and IκBα degradation. In addition, thymoquinone was found to suppress IL-1β-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. In conclusion, thymoquinone inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammatory mediator production by inhibition of NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways in osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Thymoquinone may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  12. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  13. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  14. Overexpression of HMGB1 A-box reduced IL-1β-induced MMP expression and the production of inflammatory mediators in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yahui; Lei, Jinlai; Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Lu, Daigang

    2016-11-15

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) by stimulating several mediators that contribute to cartilage degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) inhibitors HMGB1 A-box on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and the production of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes after activation by IL-1β. We found that the overexpression of HMGB1 A-box significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated the production of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and also reduced the elevated levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associated with the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. In addition, overexpression of the HMGB1 A-box significantly inhibited the up-regulation of ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5 and HMGB1 caused by IL-1β in chondrocytes. Moreover, the overexpression of HMGB1 A-box markedly suppressed the IL-1β-mediated activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TRL4)/NF-κB pathway. Our observations indicated that the HMGB1 A-box can play a protective role by suppressing the IL-1β-induced expression of MMPs and that the production of inflammatory mediators in chondrocytes was associated with suppression of the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, HMGB1 A-box relieves the development of OA that may be associated with regulating the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway.

  15. The chrondoprotective actions of a natural product are associated with the activation of IGF-1 production by human chondrocytes despite the presence of IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark JS; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Bobrowski, Paul; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2006-01-01

    Background Cartilage loss is a hallmark of arthritis and follows activation of catabolic processes concomitant with a disruption of anabolic pathways like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). We hypothesized that two natural products of South American origin, would limit cartilage degradation by respectively suppressing catabolism and activating local IGF-1 anabolic pathways. One extract, derived from cat's claw (Uncaria guianensis, vincaria®), is a well-described inhibitor of NF-κB. The other extract, derived from the vegetable Lepidium meyenii (RNI 249), possessed an uncertain mechanism of action but with defined ethnomedical applications for fertility and vitality. Methods Human cartilage samples were procured from surgical specimens with consent, and were evaluated either as explants or as primary chondrocytes prepared after enzymatic digestion of cartilage matrix. Assessments included IGF-1 gene expression, IGF-1 production (ELISA), cartilage matrix degradation and nitric oxide (NO) production, under basal conditions and in the presence of IL-1β. Results RNI 249 enhanced basal IGF-1 mRNA levels in human chondrocytes by 2.7 fold, an effect that was further enhanced to 3.8 fold by co-administration with vincaria. Enhanced basal IGF-1 production by RNI 249 alone and together with vincaria, was confirmed in both explants and in primary chondrocytes (P <0.05). As expected, IL-1β exposure completely silenced IGF-1 production by chondrocytes. However, in the presence of IL-1β both RNI 249 and vincaria protected IGF-1 production in an additive manner (P <0.01) with the combination restoring chondrocyte IGF-1 production to normal levels. Cartilage NO production was dramatically enhanced by IL-1β. Both vincaria and RNI 249 partially attenuated NO production in an additive manner (p < 0.05). IL-1β – induced degradation of cartilage matrix was quantified as glycosaminoglycan release. Individually RNI 249 or vincaria, prevented this catabolic action of IL-1

  16. Population doublings and percentage of S100-positive cells as predictors of in vitro chondrogenicity of expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Samoa; Diaz-Romero, Jose; Aigner, Thomas; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Nesic, Dobrila

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interconnection between the processes of proliferation, dedifferentiation, and intrinsic redifferentiation (chondrogenic) capacities of human articular chondrocyte (HAC), and to identify markers linking HAC dedifferentiation status with their chondrogenic potential. Cumulative population doublings (PD) of HAC expanded in monolayer culture were determined, and a threshold range of 3.57-4.19 PD was identified as indicative of HAC loss of intrinsic chondrogenic capacity in pellets incubated without added chondrogenic factors. While several specific gene and surface markers defined early HAC dedifferentiation process, no clear correlation with the loss of intrinsic chondrogenic potential could be established. CD90 expression during HAC monolayer culture revealed two subpopulations, with sorted CD90-negative cells showing lower proliferative capacity and higher chondrogenic potential compared to CD90-positive cells. Although these data further validated PD as critical for in vitro chondrogenesis, due to the early shift in expression, CD90 could not be considered for predicting chondrogenic potential of HAC expanded for several weeks. In contrast, an excellent mathematically modeled correlation was established between PD and the decline of HAC expressing the intracellular marker S100, providing a direct link between the number of cell divisions and dedifferentiation/loss of intrinsic chondrogenic capacity. Based on the dynamics of S100-positive HAC during expansion, we propose asymmetric cell division as a potential mechanism of HAC dedifferentiation, and S100 as a marker to assess chondrogenicity of HAC during expansion, of potential value for cell-based cartilage repair treatments. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Effect of hydrogen sulfide sources on inflammation and catabolic markers on interleukin 1β-stimulated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E F; Vela-Anero, A; Magalhães, J; Meijide-Faílde, R; Blanco, F J

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter together with NO and CO, is emerging as a regulator of inflammation. To test if it might offer therapeutic value in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) we evaluated the effects of two exogenous sources of H2S, NaSH and GYY4137, on inflammation and catabolic markers that characterize OA. Human chondrocytes (CHs) were isolated from OA tissue. Cells were stimulated with a pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-1β, IL1β, 5 ng/ml) and the ability of the two H2S sources to ameliorate its effects on the cells was tested. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through the Griess reaction. Protein levels of inducible NO synthase (NOS2) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were visualized through immunocytochemistry (ICC). Relative mRNA expression was quantified with qRT-PCR. Prostaglandin-2 (PGE-2), interleukin 6 (IL6) and MMP13 levels were measured with specific EIAs. NFκB nuclear translocation was visualized with immunofluorescence. Both H2S sources led to significant reductions in NO, PGE-2, IL6 and MMP13 released by the cells and at the protein level. This was achieved by downregulation of relevant genes involved in the synthesis routes of these molecules, namely NOS2, cyclooxigenase-2 (COX2), prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), IL6 and MMP13. NFκB nuclear translocation was also reduced. NaSH and GYY4137 show anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic properties when added to IL1β activated osteoarthritic CHs. Supplementation with exogenous H2S sources can regulate the expression of relevant genes in OA pathogenesis and progression, counteracting IL1β pro-inflammatory signals that lead to cartilage destruction in part by reducing NFκB activation. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Honokiol, a low molecular weight natural product, prevents inflammatory response and cartilage matrix degradation in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying Ju; Tsai, Keh Sung; Chan, Ding Cheng; Lan, Kuo Cheng; Chen, Cheng Feng; Yang, Rong Sen; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2014-04-01

    Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) stimulates several mediators of cartilage degradation and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Honokiol, a low molecular weight natural product isolated from the Magnolia officinalis, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory effect. Here, we used an in vitro model of cartilage inflammation to investigate the therapeutic potential of honokiol in OA. Human OA chondrocytes were cultured and pretreated with honokiol (2.5-10 µM) with or without IL-1β (10 ng/ml). Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified by Griess reagent. Prostaglandin (PG)E2 , metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) productions were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expressions of collagen II, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-related signaling molecules were determined by Western blotting. Our data showed that IL-1β markedly stimulated the expressions of iNOS and COX-2 and the productions of NO, PGE2 , and IL-6, which could be significantly reversed by honokiol. Honokiol could also suppress the IL-1β-triggered activation of IKK/IκBα/NF-κB signaling pathway. Moreover, honokiol significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced MMP-13 production and collagen II reduction. Taken together, the present study suggests that honokiol may have a chondroprotective effect and may be a potential therapeutic choice in the treatment of OA patients. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gene expression analysis of growth factor receptors in human chondrocytes in monolayer and 3D pellet cultures

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Anika; Salamon, Achim; Boy, Diana; Hansmann, Doris; Büttner, Andreas; Wree, Andreas; Bader, Rainer; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of cartilage repair is to create functional tissue by enhancing the in vitro conditions to more physiological in vivo conditions. Chondrogenic growth factors play an important role in influencing cartilage homeostasis. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 affect the expression of collagen type II (Col2) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and, therefore, the targeted use of growth factors could make chondrogenic redifferentiation more efficient. In the present study, human chondrocytes were postmortally isolated from healthy articular cartilage and cultivated as monolayer or 3D pellet cultures either under normoxia or hypoxia and stimulated with IGF-1 and/or TGF-β1 to compare the impact of the different growth factors. The mRNA levels of the specific receptors (IGF1R, TGFBR1, TGFBR2) were analyzed at different time points. Moreover, gene expression rates of collagen type 1 and 2 in pellet cultures were observed over a period of 5 weeks. Additionally, hyaline-like Col2 protein and sulphated GAG (sGAG) levels were quantified. Stimulation with IGF-1 resulted in an enhanced expression of IGF1R and TGFBR2 whereas TGF-β1 stimulated TGFBR1 in the monolayer and pellet cultures. In monolayer, the differences reached levels of significance. This effect was more pronounced under hypoxic culture conditions. In pellet cultures, increased amounts of Col2 protein and sGAGs after incubation with TGF-β1 and/or IGF-1 were validated. In summary, constructing a gene expression profile regarding mRNA levels of specific growth factor receptors in monolayer cultures could be helpful for a targeted application of growth factors in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28534942

  20. Effects of mechanical stress on chondrocyte phenotype and chondrocyte extracellular matrix expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Yang, Peng; Zhao, Fengyuan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in regulating the development of cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. This study aimed to identify the influence of mechanical stress in cartilage and chondrocytes. To explore the effects of mechanical stress on cartilage morphology, we observed cartilages in different regions by histological and microscopic examination. Nanoindentation was performed to assess cartilage biomechanics. To investigate the effects of mechanical stress on chondrocytes, cyclic tensile strain (CTS, 0.5 Hz, 10%) was applied to monolayer cultures of human articular chondrocytes by using Flexcell-5000. We quantified the mechanical properties of chondrocytes by atomic force microscopy. Chondrocytes were stained with Toluidine blue and Alcian blue after exposure to CTS. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules was detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses in chondrocytes after CTS. Our results demonstrated distinct morphologies and mechanical properties in different cartilage regions. In conclusion, mechanical stress can affect the chondrocyte phenotype, thereby altering the expression of chondrocyte ECM. PMID:27853300

  1. Proteome Analysis During Chondrocyte Differentiation in a New Chondrogenesis Model Using Human Umbilical Cord Stroma Mesenchymal Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J.; Arufe, Maria C.; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies. PMID:22008206

  2. Proteome analysis during chondrocyte differentiation in a new chondrogenesis model using human umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J; Arufe, Maria C; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies.

  3. Clinical application of cultured autologous human auricular chondrocytes with autologous serum for craniofacial or nasal augmentation and repair.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Yanaga, Katsu; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Soejima, Chie; Ohmori, Kitaro

    2006-05-01

    The repair of a craniofacial or nose deformity requires a large volume of reconstructive material. A conventional cartilage graft does not provide a sufficient volume of reconstructive material. Therefore, augmentation of the facial form to the defect shape is quite difficult. The authors developed a new treatment method that provides a sufficiently large volume of reconstructive material and enables an easier reconstruction of the original shape. Ages of the patients ranged between 9 and 63 years. Approximately 1 cm of auricular cartilage was collected from the auricular concha. Isolated chondrocytes were cultured with autologous serum that accelerates cell proliferation. The cells were subcultured and formed a gel-form mass. This mass, together with autologous serum, was grafted (injected) on the periosteum and into the subcutaneous pocket. The volume of grafted cultured chondrocytes ranged from 1.7 to 40 cc (1 to 5 x 10(7) cells/cc). The lesion changed from soft gel form into hard cartilage tissues within 2 to 3 weeks and stabilized. Excellent or good satisfactory results were obtained in all patients and have been maintained for periods ranging from 3 to 34 months. No patient experienced absorption of cultured chondrocytes. Biopsy of the newly formed tissues showed that it was an elastic cartilage derived from the original tissue. A small number of chondrocytes obtained from a 1-cm auricular cartilage are successfully cultured into a large number of cells in a gel form. Those autologous auricular chondrocytes in a gel form allow for the repair of complicated shapes of the defect area. This technique is applicable to various treatments for craniofacial or nose deformity.

  4. Silencing of microRNA-138-5p promotes IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation in human chondrocytes by targeting FOXC1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Y.; Zhang, G. Q.; Chai, W.; Ni, M.; Xu, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterised by articular cartilage degradation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the development of OA. The purpose of our study was to explore the functional role and underlying mechanism of miR-138-5p in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-induced extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation of OA cartilage. Materials and Methods Human articular cartilage was obtained from patients with and without OA, and chondrocytes were isolated and stimulated by IL-1β. The expression levels of miR-138-5p in cartilage and chondrocytes were both determined. After transfection with miR-138-5p mimics, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-miR-138-5p, or their negative controls, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of aggrecan (ACAN), collagen type II and alpha 1 (COL2A1), the protein levels of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and both the mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 were evaluated. Luciferase reporter assay, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and Western blot were performed to explore whether Forkhead Box C1 (FOCX1) was a target of miR-138-5p. Further, we co-transfected OA chondrocytes with miR-138-5p mimics and pcDNA3.1 (+)-FOXC1 and then stimulated with IL-1β to determine whether miR-138-5p-mediated IL-1β-induced cartilage matrix degradation resulted from targeting FOXC1. Results MiR-138-5p was significantly increased in OA cartilage and in chondrocytes in response to IL-1β-stimulation. Overexpression of miR-138-5p significantly increased the IL-1β-induced downregulation of COL2A1, ACAN, and GAGs, and increased the IL-1β-induced over expression of MMP-13.We found that FOXC1 is directly regulated by miR-138-5p. Additionally, co-transfection with miR-138-5p mimics and pcDNA3.1 (+)-FOXC1 resulted in higher levels of COL2A1, ACAN, and GAGs, but lower levels of MMP-13. Conclusion miR-138-5p promotes IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation in human chondrocytes, possibly by targeting FOXC1. Cite this

  5. The mechanical microenvironment of high concentration agarose for applying deformation to primary chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Jutila, Aaron A; Gelbke, Martin K; Gannon, Daniel M; June, Ronald K

    2014-06-27

    Cartilage and chondrocytes experience loading that causes alterations in chondrocyte biological activity. In vivo chondrocytes are surrounded by a pericellular matrix with a stiffness of ~25-200kPa. Understanding the mechanical loading environment of the chondrocyte is of substantial interest for understanding chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The first objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of applied mechanical deformations in physiologically stiff agarose on cellular and sub-cellular length scales. Fluorescent microspheres were embedded in physiologically stiff agarose hydrogels. Microsphere positions were measured via confocal microscopy and used to calculate displacement and strain fields as a function of spatial position. The second objective was to assess the feasibility of encapsulating primary human chondrocytes in physiologically stiff agarose. The third objective was to determine if primary human chondrocytes could deform in high-stiffness agarose gels. Primary human chondrocyte viability was assessed using live-dead imaging following 24 and 72h in tissue culture. Chondrocyte shape was measured before and after application of 10% compression. These data indicate that (1) displacement and strain precision are ~1% and 6.5% respectively, (2) high-stiffness agarose gels can maintain primary human chondrocyte viability of >95%, and (3) compression of chondrocytes in 4.5% agarose can induce shape changes indicative of cellular compression. Overall, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-concentration agarose for applying in vitro compression to chondrocytes as a model for understanding how chondrocytes respond to in vivo loading.

  6. Differences between chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived chondrogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hongsen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lin, Yun-Han; Lin, Shiming; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Implantation of autologous chondrogenic cells has become the mainstay strategy for repairing articular cartilage defects. Because the availability of autologous chondrocytes is extremely limited, many recent studies have used artificially induced mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) as substitutes for chondrocytes. In this study, we analyzed the differences between the iMSCs and chondrocytes, including their molecular biological and mechanical properties. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected and induced to exhibit the chondrogenic phenotype by culturing the pelleted MSCs in a chemically defined culture medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-beta 1. The molecular biological properties of iMSCs and culture-expanded chondrocytes, including their mRNA profiles and surface proteomics, were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry, respectively. The biomechanical properties of iMSCs and native chondrocytes, including their surface topology, adhesion force, and membrane stiffness, were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both iMSCs and chondrocytes presented type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan, whereas only chondrocytes presented type X collagen. Flow cytometric assays showed that the expression of type II collagen and integrin-1 was higher in the chondrocytes than in the iMSCs. AFM revealed that the MSCs, iMSCs, and chondrocytes greatly differed in their shape. The MSCs were spindle shaped and easily distinguishable from the spherical chondrocytes. The iMSCs appeared round and resembled the spherical chondrocytes; however, the iMSCs were flatter with a central hump of condensed mass and a surrounding thin and broad pleat. The mean adhesion force and mean surface stiffness were significantly lower for the iMSCs (4.54 nN and 0.109 N/m, respectively) than for the chondrocytes (6.86 nN and 0.134 N/m, respectively). To conclude, although the iMSCs exhibited the chondrogenic phenotype, they differed

  7. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA) human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only inhibited by chlorogenic

  8. Oleic/Palmitate Induces Apoptosis in Human Articular Chondrocytes via Upregulation of NOX4 Expression and ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dapeng; Lu, Jianmin; Yang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The association between obesity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoarthritis (OA) patients has already been identified. However, the specific mechanism underlying ROS production and OA progression has never been elucidated. Osteoarthritic cartilage was obtained from patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty, and chondrocytes were isolated from these tissues. The cells were treated with varying concentrations (10,100,500 μM, and 5 mM) of oleic/palmitate (O/P) mixture at different times, that is at 6, 24, and 48 h. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay. ROS production was detected using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The protein levels of NOX4 and cleaved-caspase3 were detected using Western blot assay. O/P significantly decreased cell viability at 10, 100, 500 μM, and 5 mM in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the cell viability was reduced by 500 μM O/P mixture at 6, 24, and 48 h in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 500 μM O/P significantly enhanced ROS production and cell apoptosis in chondrocytes. Furthermore, treatment with O/P mixture significantly enhanced the expression of NOX4 and caspase3 activation in a dose- and time- dependent manner. More importantly, inhibition of NOX4 could partially eliminate O/P-induced chondrocytes apoptosis by reducing ROS production. To conclude, O/P treatment enhances ROS production and cell apoptosis mainly by upregulating the protein levels of NOX4 and caspase3 activation in chondrocytes, indicating a potential therapeutic target of OA in obesity patients.

  9. Salvianolic acid B inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory cytokine production in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and has a protective effect in a mouse osteoarthritis model.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yiting; Wang, Chenggui; Zheng, Wenhao; Tang, Qian; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xiaolei; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Jianshun

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic progressive disease that has complicated mechanisms that involve inflammation and cartilage degradation. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory action of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) in both human OA chondrocytes and a mouse OA model that was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus. In vitro, chondrocytes were pretreated with Sal B (0, 25, 50, 100μM) for 2h, then incubated with IL-1β (10ng/mL) for 24h. NO production was determined by Griess method and PGE2 was assessed by ELISA. The expression of INOS, COX-2, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and NF-κB-related signaling molecules were tested by Western blotting. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect P65 nuclear translocation. In vivo, the mouse OA model received intraperitoneal-injection of either Sal B (25mg/kg) or saline every other day. Hematoxylin and Eosin, as well as Safranin-O-Fast green staining, were utilized to evaluate the severity of cartilage lesions up to 8weeks following the surgery. Sal B inhibited the over-production of NO and PGE2, while the elevated expression of INOS, COX-2, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 were reversed by Sal B in IL-1β-induced chondrocytes. In addition, IL-1β significantly induced phosphorylation of NF-κB signaling, and this phosphorylation response was blocked by Sal B. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that Sal B could suppress IL-1β-induced p65 nuclear translocation. In vivo, the cartilage in Sal B-treated mice exhibited less cartilage degradation and lower OARSI scores. Taken together, Sal B possesses great potential value as a therapeutic agent for OA treatment.

  10. In vitro study of the antioxidant properties of nimesulide and 4-OH nimesulide: effects on HRP- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence produced by human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S X; Mouithys-Mickalad, A; Deby-Dupont, G P; Deby, C M; Maroulis, A P; Labasse, A H; Lamy, M L; Crielaard, J M; Reginster, J Y; Henrotin, Y E

    2000-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases and constitute an interesting therapeutic target for drugs. This in vitro study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant properties of nimesulide (NIM), a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug of the sulfonanilide class, and its main metabolite 4-OH nimesulide (4-OHNIM). The scavenging effects of NIM and 4-OH NIM on hydroxyl radical ((.)OH) and superoxide anions (O(minusd)(2)) were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR), using 5, 5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as the spin trap agent. The quenching properties of these drugs on hypochlorite anion was studied by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence. Finally, the effects of NIM and 4-OHNIM on the reactive oxygen species production by human articular chondrocytes were recorded by HRP and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. By this method it has been demonstrated that NIM and 4-OHNIM, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 microM, are potent scavengers of(.)OH whereas only 4-OHNIM was capable to scavenge O(minusd)(2). Chemiluminescence generated by HOCl was also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by both NIM and 4-OHNIM. Nevertheless, at each concentration tested, the inhibitory effect of 4-OHNIM was significantly more marked, even at the highest concentration (100 microM). Furthermore, when chondrocytes were pre-incubated for 48-96 h with NIM or 4-OHNIM, the luminol- and HRP-dependent CL produced by the cells was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. NIM and 4-OHNIM may protect cartilage against oxidative stress, not only by scavenging ROS but also by inhibiting their production by chondrocytes. Copyright 2000 OsteoArthritis Research Society International.

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveals regulatory differences in the chondrocyte secretome from human medial and lateral femoral condyles in osteoarthritic patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease and there are no known biomarkers available for an early diagnosis. To identify potential disease biomarkers and gain further insight into the disease mechanisms of OA we applied quantitative proteomics with SILAC technology on the secretomes from chondrocytes of OA knees, designated as high Mankin (HM) scored secretome. A quantitative comparison was made between the secretomes of the medial and lateral femur condyle chondrocytes in the same knee since the medial femur condyle is usually more affected in OA than the lateral condyle, which was confirmed by Mankin scoring. The medial/lateral comparison was also made on the secretomes from chondrocytes taken from one individual with no clinically apparent joint-disease, designated as low Mankin (LM) scored secretome. Results We identified 825 proteins in the HM secretome and 69 of these showed differential expression when comparing the medial and lateral femoral compartment. The LM scored femoral condyle showed early signs of OA in the medial compartment as assessed by Mankin score. We here report the identification and relative quantification of several proteins of interest for the OA disease mechanism e.g. CYTL1, DMD and STAB1 together with putative early disease markers e.g. TIMP1, PPP2CA and B2M. Conclusions The present study reveals differences in protein abundance between medial/lateral femur condyles in OA patients. These regulatory differences expand the knowledge regarding OA disease markers and mechanisms. PMID:24090399

  12. Characterization of auricular chondrocytes and auricular/articular chondrocyte co-cultures in terms of an application in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Maren; John, Thilo; El-Sayed, Karym; Marzahn, Ulrike; Aue, Annekatrin; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; Ertel, Wolfgang; Blottner, Dieter; Haisch, Andreas; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-05-01

    Cartilage injury remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery as articular cartilage only has a limited capacity for intrinsic healing. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but requires articular cartilage biopsies for autologous chondrocyte expansion. The use of heterotopic chondrocytes derived from non-articular cartilage sources such as auricular chondrocytes may be a novel approach for ACT. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether co-cultured articular/auricular chondrocytes exhibit characteristics comparable to articular chondrocytes. Analysis of the proliferation rate, extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) gene and protein expression (type II and I collagen, elastin, lubricin), beta1-integrins and the chondrogenic transcription factor sox9 in articular/auricular chondrocytes was performed using RTD-PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. Additionally, three-dimensional (3D) chondrocyte mono- and co-cultures were established. The proliferative activity and elastin gene expression were lower and that of type II collagen and lubricin was higher in articular compared with auricular chondrocytes. The species generally did not influence the chondrocyte characteristics, with the exception of type I collagen and sox9 expression, which was higher in porcine but not in human articular chondrocytes compared with both types of auricular chondrocytes. beta1-integrin gene expression did not differ significantly between the chondrocyte types. The type II collagen gene and protein expression was higher in articular chondrocyte monocultures and was slightly higher in co-cultures compared with monocultured auricular chondrocytes. Both chondrocyte types survived in co-culture. Despite their differing expression profiles, co-cultures revealed some adjustment in the ECM expression of both chondrocyte types.

  13. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  14. Chondroprotective effects of a proanthocyanidin rich Amazonian genonutrient reflects direct inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and upregulation of IGF-1 production by human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark JS; Bobrowski, Paul; Shukla, Meenakshi; Gupta, Kalpana; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2007-01-01

    Background The Amazonian medicinal plant Sangre de grado (Croton palanostigma) has traditional applications for the treatment of wound healing and inflammation. We sought to characterize two extracts (progrado and zangrado) in terms of safety and oligomeric proanthocyanidin chain length. Additionally progrado was evaluated for antioxidant activity and possible chondroprotective actions. Methods Acute oral safety and toxicity was tested in rats according under OECD protocol number 420. The profile of proanthocyanidin oligomers was determined by HPLC and progrado's antioxidant activity quantified by the ORAC, NORAC and HORAC assays. Human cartilage explants, obtained from surgical specimens, were used to assess chondroproteciton with activity related to direct inhibitory effects on human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP, gelatinolytic) activity using synovial fluid and chondrocytes activated with IL-1β (10 ng/ml). Additionally, progrado (2–10 μg/ml) was tested for its ability to maintain optimal IGF-1 transcription and translation in cartilage explants and cultured chondrocytes. Results Both progrado and zangrado at doses up to 2000 mg/kg (po) displayed no evidence of toxicity. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin content was high for both progrado (158 mg/kg) and zangrado (124 mg/kg), with zangrado almost entirely composed of short oligomers (<6 mer), whereas the majority of oligomers in progrado exceeded 10 mers. Progrado was a remarkably potent antioxidant in the standardized tests ORAC, NORAC and HORAC. Progrado was exceptionally effective in reducing both basal and IL-1β induced glycosaminoglycan release from human cartilage explants at concentrations that also directly blocked the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Progrado prevented IL-1β induced suppression of IGF-1 production from human cartilage explants as well as stimulating basal IGF-1 production (P < 0.05). Comparable changes in IGF-1 gene expression were noted in cultured human chondrocytes

  15. The novel adipokine progranulin counteracts IL-1 and TLR4-driven inflammatory response in human and murine chondrocytes via TNFR1

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Pirozzi, Claudio; Pino, Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Gualillo, Oreste

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a recently identified adipokine that is supposed to have anti-inflammatory actions. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL1β) stimulates several mediators of cartilage degradation. Toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) can bind to various damage-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammatory condition. So far, no data exist of PGRN effects in inflammatory conditions induced by IL1β or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of PGRN in IL1β- or LPS-induced inflammatory responses of chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and ATDC-5 cells were treated with PGRN in presence or not of IL1β or LPS. First, we showed that recombinant PGRN had no effects on cell viability. We present evidence that PGRN expression was increased during the differentiation of ATDC-5 cell line. Moreover, PGRN mRNA and protein expression is increased in cartilage, synovial and infrapatellar fat pad tissue samples from OA patients. PGRN mRNA levels are upregulated under TNFα and IL1β stimulation. Our data showed that PGRN is able to significantly counteract the IL1β-induced expression of NOS2, COX2, MMP13 and VCAM-1. LPS-induced expression of NOS2 is also decreased by PGRN. These effects are mediated, at least in part, through TNFR1. Taken together, our results suggest that PGRN has a clear anti-inflammatory function. PMID:26853108

  16. Analysis of clones from a human cartilage cDNA library provides insight into chondrocyte gene expression and identifies novel candidate genes for the osteochondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah; Sebald, Eiman T; Pogue, Robert; Rimoin, Lauren P; King, Lily; Cohn, Daniel H

    2003-05-01

    To begin to define the gene expression pattern in fetal cartilage and to identify uncharacterized candidate genes for the osteochondrodysplasias, we analyzed clones from a fetal cartilage cDNA library. Sequence analysis of 420 cDNA clones identified 210 clones derived from established genes but, for many of them, expression in cartilage had not been previously reported. Among the established genes were 14 genes known to produce skeletal abnormalities in either humans or mice when mutated. Thirty-two uncharacterized genes and their respective chromosomal positions were also identified. To further understand the expression profile of these genes in fetal cartilage, we constructed a cDNA microarray utilizing the clones. The microarray was used to determine which genes had higher expression in cartilage as compared with dedifferentiated, cultured chondrocytes. Many of the established genes, as well as five of the uncharacterized genes, had increased expression in cartilage, suggesting an important role for these genes in the differentiated state of chondrocytes. These data provide new candidate genes for the osteochondrodysplasias and demonstrate the usefulness of cartilage cDNA microarrays in expanding our understanding of the complexity of fetal cartilage gene expression.

  17. Galectin-3 Induces a Pro-degradative/inflammatory Gene Signature in Human Chondrocytes, Teaming Up with Galectin-1 in Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Daniela; Schlangen, Karin; André, Sabine; Schmidt, Sebastian; Walzer, Sonja M; Kubista, Bernd; Windhager, Reinhard; Toegel, Stefan; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2016-12-16

    Inflammatory chemo- and cytokines and matrix-degrading proteases underlie the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Aiming to define upstream regulators for these disease markers, we pursued initial evidence for an upregulation of members of the adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin family. Immunohistochemical localization of galectin-3 (Gal-3) in sections of human cartilage with increasing levels of degeneration revealed a linear correlation reaching a chondrocyte positivity of 60%. Presence in situ was cytoplasmic, the lectin was secreted from OA chondrocytes in culture and binding of Gal-3 yielded lactose-inhibitable surface staining. Exposure of cells to the lectin led to enhanced gene expression and secretion of functional disease markers. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis broadened this result to reveal a pro-degradative/inflammatory gene signature under the control of NF-κB. Fittingly, targeting this route of activation by inhibitors impaired the unfavourable response to Gal-3 binding, as also seen by shortening the lectin's collagen-like repeat region. Gal-3's activation profile overlaps with that of homodimeric galectin-1 (Gal-1) and also has distinctive (supplementing) features. Tested at subsaturating concentrations in a mixture, we found cooperation between the two galectins, apparently able to team up to promote OA pathogenesis. In summary, our results suggest that a network of endogenous lectins is relevant for initiating this process cascade.

  18. Fibrin Scaffolds Designing in order to Human Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation to Chondrocytes in the Presence of TGF-β3

    PubMed Central

    Sheykhhasan, Mohsen; Qomi, Reza Tabatabaei; Ghiasi, Mahdieh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives One of the most cellular source used for cartilage tissue engineering are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In present study, human MSCs were used as cellular source. Since scaffold plays an important role in tissue engineering the aim of this study is to assess fibrin scaffold ability in chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). Methods ADMSCs were isolated and cultured in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% FBS. Also ADMSCs expanded and characterised by flow cytometry. ADMSCs expressed CD44, CD90, CD105 but not CD34. After trypsinization, cells were entered within the fibrin scaffold. Then, chondrogenic medium was added to the scaffold. Seven days after cell culture, cell viability and proliferation were assessed by MTT test. Finally, 14 days after the ending of chondrogenic differentiation, analysis of chondrogenic genes expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Real time PCR. Also, formation and development of chondrocyte cells was analysed by histological and immunohistochemistry evaluations. Results Viability and proliferation as well as chondrogenic genes expression within fibrin scaffold increased significantly compared with control group (cells free scaffold). Also, histological and immunohistochemistry evaluation showed that chondrocyte cells and collagen type II are formed on fibrin scaffold. Conclusions Fibrin is a suitable scaffold for chondrogenic differentiation of ADMSCs. PMID:26634070

  19. Galectin-3 Induces a Pro-degradative/inflammatory Gene Signature in Human Chondrocytes, Teaming Up with Galectin-1 in Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Daniela; Schlangen, Karin; André, Sabine; Schmidt, Sebastian; Walzer, Sonja M.; Kubista, Bernd; Windhager, Reinhard; Toegel, Stefan; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory chemo- and cytokines and matrix-degrading proteases underlie the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Aiming to define upstream regulators for these disease markers, we pursued initial evidence for an upregulation of members of the adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin family. Immunohistochemical localization of galectin-3 (Gal-3) in sections of human cartilage with increasing levels of degeneration revealed a linear correlation reaching a chondrocyte positivity of 60%. Presence in situ was cytoplasmic, the lectin was secreted from OA chondrocytes in culture and binding of Gal-3 yielded lactose-inhibitable surface staining. Exposure of cells to the lectin led to enhanced gene expression and secretion of functional disease markers. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis broadened this result to reveal a pro-degradative/inflammatory gene signature under the control of NF-κB. Fittingly, targeting this route of activation by inhibitors impaired the unfavourable response to Gal-3 binding, as also seen by shortening the lectin’s collagen-like repeat region. Gal-3’s activation profile overlaps with that of homodimeric galectin-1 (Gal-1) and also has distinctive (supplementing) features. Tested at subsaturating concentrations in a mixture, we found cooperation between the two galectins, apparently able to team up to promote OA pathogenesis. In summary, our results suggest that a network of endogenous lectins is relevant for initiating this process cascade. PMID:27982117

  20. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase and glucose-regulated protein 78 increase the life span of articular chondrocytes and their repair potential

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Like all mammalian cells, normal adult chondrocytes have a limited replicative life span, which decreases with age. To facilitate the therapeutic use of chondrocytes from older donors, a method is needed to prolong their life span. Methods We transfected chondrocytes with hTERT or GRP78 and cultured them in a 3-dimensional atelocollagen honeycomb-shaped scaffold with a membrane seal. Then, we measured the amount of nuclear DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and the expression level of type II collagen as markers of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation, respectively, in these cultures. In addition, we allografted this tissue-engineered cartilage into osteochondral defects in old rabbits to assess their repair activity in vivo. Results Our results showed different degrees of differentiation in terms of GAG content between chondrocytes from old and young rabbits. Chondrocytes that were cotransfected with hTERT and GRP78 showed higher cellular proliferation and expression of type II collagen than those of nontransfected chondrocytes, regardless of the age of the cartilage donor. In addition, the in vitro growth rates of hTERT- or GRP78-transfected chondrocytes were higher than those of nontransfected chondrocytes, regardless of donor age. In vivo, the tissue-engineered cartilage implants exhibited strong repairing activity, maintained a chondrocyte-specific phenotype, and produced extracellular matrix components. Conclusions Focal gene delivery to aged articular chondrocytes exhibited strong repairing activity and may be therapeutically useful for articular cartilage regeneration. PMID:22472071

  1. Increased chondrocyte death after steroid and local anesthetic combination.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Boglárka; Kvell, Krisztián; Czömpöly, Tamás; Illés, Tamás; Bárdos, Tamás

    2010-11-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage has limited repair and regeneration capacity. Intraarticular administration of glucocorticoid and local anesthetic injections play an important role in the therapy of osteoarthritis. Glucocorticoids and anesthetics reportedly enhance apoptosis in chondrocytes, but effects of the combined use of glucocorticoids and local anesthetics are unknown. We asked whether glucocorticoid and local anesthetic agents combined had any synergistic effects on chondrocyte apoptosis. Cell viability and apoptosis/necrosis assessment of human articular chondrocytes were performed in vitro (chondrocyte cell cultures) and ex vivo (osteochondral specimens) using flow cytometry and TUNEL analysis, respectively. Glucocorticoids and local anesthetics induce apoptosis in chondrocytes at various rates. When used in combination, the percentage of dead chondrocytes was increased in in vitro chondrocyte cell cultures and osteochondral ex vivo specimens. We observed a time-dependent decrease in chondrocyte viability after concurrent steroid and local anesthetic exposure. The combination of glucocorticoids and local anesthetics has an adverse effect on articular chondrocytes, and it raises a question regarding whether concomitant administration should be used in treating osteoarthritis.

  2. Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes Redifferentiate to a Cartilage-Like Tissue Phenotype in a Poly(ε-Caprolactone)/Self-Assembling Peptide Composite Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; Moutos, Franklin T.; Abellà, Jordi; Guilak, Farshid; Semino, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a limited capacity for growth and regeneration and, with injury, new cellular or biomaterial-based therapeutic platforms are required to promote repair. Tissue engineering aims to produce cartilage-like tissues that recreate the complex mechanical and biological properties found in vivo. In this study, a unique composite scaffold was developed by infiltrating a three-dimensional (3D) woven microfiber poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold with the RAD16-I self-assembling nanofibers to obtain multi-scale functional and biomimetic tissue-engineered constructs. The scaffold was seeded with expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes and cultured for four weeks in control and chondrogenic growth conditions. The composite constructs were compared to control constructs obtained by culturing cells with 3D woven PCL scaffolds or RAD16-I independently. High viability and homogeneous cell distribution were observed in all three scaffolds used during the term of the culture. Moreover, gene and protein expression profiles revealed that chondrogenic markers were favored in the presence of RAD16-I peptide (PCL/RAD composite or alone) under chondrogenic induction conditions. Further, constructs displayed positive staining for toluidine blue, indicating the presence of synthesized proteoglycans. Finally, mechanical testing showed that constructs containing the PCL scaffold maintained the initial shape and viscoelastic behavior throughout the culture period, while constructs with RAD16-I scaffold alone contracted during culture time into a stiffer and compacted structure. Altogether, these results suggest that this new composite scaffold provides important mechanical requirements for a cartilage replacement, while providing a biomimetic microenvironment to re-establish the chondrogenic phenotype of human expanded articular chondrocytes. PMID:28773609

  3. Human adult chondrocytes express hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) isoforms but not HgF: potential implication of osteoblasts on the presence of HGF in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Guévremont, Melanie; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Massicotte, Frédéric; Tardif, Ginette; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    HGF is increased in human OA cartilage, possibly from Ob's. RT-PCR shows HGF isoforms are differently regulated between chondrocytes and Ob. A paracrine cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage may occur during OA. Recently, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been identified by immunohistochemistry in cartilage and more particularly in the deep zone of human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. By investigating HGF expression in cartilage, we found that chondrocytes did not express HGF; however, they expressed the two truncated isoforms, namely HGF/NK1 and HGF/NK2. Because the only other cells localized near the deep zone are osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate, we hypothesized that they were expressing HGF. Indeed, we found that HGF was synthesized by osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate. Moreover, OA osteoblasts produced five times more HGF than normal osteoblasts and almost no HGF/NK1, unlike normal osteoblasts. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are involved in OA progression, we investigated whether these factors impact HGF produced by normal osteoblasts. PGE2 was the only factor tested that was able to stimulate HGF synthesis. However, the addition of NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) had no effect on HGF produced by OA osteoblasts. HGF/NK2 had a moderate stimulating effect on HGF production by normal osteoblasts, whereas osteocalcin was not modulated by either HGF or HGF/NK2. When investigating signaling routes that might be implicated in OA osteoblast-produced HGF, we found that protein kinase A was at least partially involved. In summary, this study raises the hypothesis that the HGF found in articular cartilage is produced by osteoblasts, diffuses into the cartilage, and may be implicated in the OA process.

  4. Induction of CD44 Cleavage in Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobunori; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Thankamony, Sai; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Mellor, Liliana; Im, Hee-Jeong; Knudson, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Objective The hyaluronan receptor CD44 provides chondrocytes with a mechanism for sensing and responding to changes in the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study was to document the fragmentation and loss of CD44 and to determine the likely mechanisms involved. Methods A polyclonal anti-CD44 cytotail antibody was generated to detect CD44 fragmentation by Western blot analysis. Chondrocytes were isolated from human or bovine articular cartilage. Primary articular chondrocytes were treated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), hyaluronan oligosaccharides, or phorbol myristate acetate or were passaged and subcultured in monolayer to induce dedifferentiation. Conditions that altered the capacity of CD44 to transit into lipid rafts, or pharmacologic inhibitors of metalloproteinase or γ-secretase activity were used to define the mechanism of fragmentation of CD44. Results Chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage exhibited CD44 fragmentation as low molecular mass bands, corresponding to the CD44-EXT and CD44-ICD bands. Following dedifferentiation of chondrocytes or treatment of primary chondrocytes with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, IL-1β, or phorbol myristate acetate, CD44 fragmentation was enhanced. Subsequent culture of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes in 3-dimensional alginate beads rescued the chondrocyte phenotype and diminished the fragmentation of CD44. Fragmentation of CD44 in chondrocytes was blocked in the presence of the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Conclusion CD44 fragmentation, consistent with a signature pattern reported for sequential metalloproteinase/γ-secretase cleavage of CD44, is a common metabolic feature of chondrocytes that have undergone dedifferentiation in vitro and osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Transit of CD44 into lipid rafts may be required for its fragmentation. PMID:20178130

  5. S100B + A1 CELISA: A Novel Potency Assay and Screening Tool for Redifferentiation Stimuli of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Romero, Jose; Kürsener, Sibylle; Kohl, Sandro; Nesic, Dobrila

    2017-06-01

    During monolayer expansion, a necessary step in autologous chondrocyte implantation, human articular chondrocytes (HAC) dedifferentiate and lose their capacity to produce stable hyaline cartilage. Determining HAC potency and learning how to trigger their redifferentiation would improve cell-based cartilage regeneration therapies. We previously identified S100B and S100A1 proteins as markers of HAC redifferentiation potential. Here, we aimed to: (i) demonstrate a correlation between S100B + A1-positive HAC in monolayer culture and their neochondrogenesis capacity in pellet culture; (ii) develop an S100B + A1 cell-based ELISA, and (iii) prove that S100B + A1 induction in HAC increases their chondrogenic capacity. Expression patterns of S100A1 and S100B were investigated in HAC during dedifferentiation (monolayer) or redifferentiation (pellet or high-osmolarity/BMP4 treatment in monolayer) using qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, or immunohistochemistry. A cell-based ELISA (CELISA) was developed as a 96-well microplate multiplex assay to measure S100B + A1 (chondrogenesis), alkaline phosphatase (hypertrophy), and DNA amount (normalization), and applied to HAC, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5. The direct correlation between the percentage of S100B + A1-positive HAC in monolayer and their neochondrogenesis in pellets validates S100B + A1 as a marker of chondrogenic potency. The S100B + A1-CELISA accurately determines HAC differentiation status, allows identification of chondrogenic stimuli, and permits the simultaneous monitoring of the undesirable hypertrophic phenotype. This novel assay offers a high-throughput, comprehensive and versatile approach for measuring cell chondrogenic potency and for identifying redifferentiation factors/conditions. HAC improved neochondrogenesis in pellets-induced with high-osmolarity and BMP4 treatment in monolayer-suggests that cell instruction prior to implantation

  6. In vitro development of personalized cartilage microtissues uncovers an individualized differentiation capacity of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frank; Lehmann, Mario; Sack, Ulrich; Anderer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Personalized features in the treatment of knee injuries and articular replacement therapies play an important role in modern life with increasing demand. Therefore, cell-based therapeutic approaches for the regeneration of traumatic defects of cartilage tissue were developed. However, great variations in the quality of repair tissue or therapeutic outcome were observed. The aim of the study was to capture and visualize individual differentiation capacities of chondrocytes derived from different donors with regard to a possible personal regeneration capacity using a cell-based therapy. The redifferentiation potential of monolayer cultured cells was analyzed in a scaffold-free three-dimensional tissue model. Furthermore, stimulating options using cartilage maturation factors such as L-ascorbic acid and transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-β2) on this process were of special interest. Cells and tissues were analyzed via histological and immunohistochemical methods. Gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In monolayer culture, cells from all donors showed an almost identical differentiation profile. In contrast, the differentiation state of cartilage-like three-dimensional microtissues revealed clear differences with respect to individual donors. Analyses at the protein and mRNA levels showed high variations regarding cartilage-typical matrix components (e.g. proteoglycans, collagen type II) and intracellular proteins (e.g. S100). Interestingly, only donor chondrocytes with a basic tendency to re-differentiate in a three-dimensional environment were able to increase this tissue-specific maturation when exposed to L-ascorbic acid and/or TGF-β2. Our approach revealed clear-cut possibilities for classification of individual donors into responders or non-responders. On the basis of these results an in vitro platform could be designed to discriminate responders from non-responders. This in vitro three-dimensional test system

  7. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities.

  8. The epigenetic effect of glucosamine and a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) inhibitor on primary human chondrocytes - Implications for osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Imagawa, Kei; Andres, MC de; Hashimoto, Ko; Pitt, Dominic; Itoi, Eiji; Goldring, Mary B.; Roach, Helmtrud I.; Oreffo, Richard O.C.

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Glucosamine and a NF-kB inhibitor reduce inflammation in OA. {yields} Cytokine induced demethylation of CpG site in IL1{beta} promoter prevented by glucosamine. {yields} Glucosamine and NF-kB inhibitor have epigenetic effects on human chondrocytes. -- Abstract: Objective: Idiopathic osteoarthritis is the most common form of osteoarthritis (OA) world-wide and remains the leading cause of disability and the associated socio-economic burden in an increasing aging population. Traditionally, OA has been viewed as a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and changes in the subchondral bone culminating in joint failure. However, the etiology of OA is multifactorial involving genetic, mechanical and environmental factors. Treatment modalities include analgesia, joint injection with steroids or hyaluronic acid, oral supplements including glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, as well as physiotherapy. Thus, there is significant interest in the discovery of disease modifying agents. One such agent, glucosamine (GlcN) is commonly prescribed even though the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action remain controversial. Inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1{beta}, and proteinases such as MMP-13 have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of OA together with an associated CpG demethylation in their promoters. We have investigated the potential of GlcN to modulate NF-kB activity and cytokine-induced abnormal gene expression in articular chondrocytes and, critically, whether this is associated with an epigenetic process. Method: Human chondrocytes were isolated from the articular cartilage of femoral heads, obtained with ethical permission, following fractured neck of femur surgery. Chondrocytes were cultured for 5 weeks in six separate groups; (i) control culture, (ii) cultured with a mixture of 2.5 ng/ml IL-1{beta} and 2.5 ng/ml oncostatin M (OSM), (iii) cultured with 2 mM N

  9. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  10. Differentiation of synovial CD-105(+) human mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocyte-like cells through spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes-Boquete, I; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell lineages, some of which can generate bone, cartilage, or adipose tissue. The presence of MSCs in the synovial membrane was recently reported. Data from comparative studies of MSCs derived from various mesenchymal tissues suggest that MSCs from synovial membranes have a superior chondrogenesis capacity. Previous chondrogenic differentiation studies have used the total population of MSCs, including cells with several MSC markers, such as CD44, CD90, CD105, or CD73. However the chondrogenic capacity of an individual population of MSCs has not been examined. Our aim was to study the chondrogenic capacity of the cellular MSC subset, CD105(+), derived from synovial membrane tissues of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal donors. The tissues were digested with a cocktail of collagenase/dispase and the isolated MSCs were seeded into plates. The subpopulation of CD105(+)-MSCs was separated using a magnetic separator. The MSCs were then differentiated towards chondrocyte-like cells using a specific medium to promote spheroid formation. Spheroids were collected after 14, 28, and 46 days in chondrogenic medium and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, Safranin O or Alcian blue to evaluate the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study collagen types I (COLI) and II (COLII) and aggrecan expression. Phenotypic characterization of the isolated CD105(+)-MSCs shows that these cells are also positive for CD90 and CD44, but negatives for CD34 and CD45. In addition, this cellular subset expressed Sox-9. Spheroids appeared after 7 days in culture in the presence of chondrogenic medium. Our studies show no differences between MSCs obtained from OA and normal synovial membranes during chondrogenesis. The morphological analysis of spheroids revealed characteristics typical of chondrocyte cells. The intensity of Safranin O, Alcian blue and aggrecan staining was positive and constant

  11. A multi-scale finite element model for investigation of chondrocyte mechanics in normal and medial meniscectomy human knee joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Tanska, Petri; Mononen, Mika E; Korhonen, Rami K

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical signals experienced by chondrocytes (articular cartilage cells) modulate cell synthesis and cartilage health. Multi-scale modeling can be used to study how forces are transferred from joint surfaces through tissues to chondrocytes. Therefore, estimation of chondrocyte behavior during certain physical activities, such as walking, could provide information about how cells respond to normal and abnormal loading in joints. In this study, a 3D multi-scale model was developed for evaluating chondrocyte and surrounding peri- and extracellular matrix responses during gait loading within healthy and medial meniscectomy knee joints. The knee joint geometry was based on MRI, whereas the input used for gait loading was obtained from the literature. Femoral and tibial cartilages were modeled as fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic materials, whereas menisci were considered as transversely isotropic. Fluid pressures in the chondrocyte and cartilage tissue increased up to 2MPa (an increase of 30%) in the meniscectomy joint compared to the normal, healthy joint. The elevated level of fluid pressure was observed during the entire stance phase of gait. A medial meniscectomy caused substantially larger (up to 60%) changes in maximum principal strains in the chondrocyte compared to those in the peri- or extracellular matrices. Chondrocyte volume or morphology did not change substantially due to a medial meniscectomy. Current findings suggest that during walking chondrocyte deformations are not substantially altered due to a medial meniscectomy, while abnormal joint loading exposes chondrocytes to elevated levels of fluid pressure and maximum principal strains (compared to strains in the peri- or extracellular matrices). These might contribute to cell viability and the onset of osteoarthritis.

  12. Construction of a functional silk-based biomaterial complex with immortalized chondrocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yusu; Jiang, Yi; Wen, Jianchuan; Shao, Zhenzhong; Chen, Xin; Sun, Shan; Yu, Huiqian; Li, Wen

    2014-04-01

    To explore the feasibility of constructing a functional biomaterial complex with regenerated silk fibroin membrane and immortalized chondrocytes in vivo. Rat auricular chondrocytes (RACs) were transfected with the lentivirus vector pGC-FU-hTERT-3FLAG or pGC-FU-GFP-3FLAG, encoding the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) or GFP gene. The effects of regenerated silk fibroin film on the adhesion, growth of immortalized chondrocytes and expression of collagen II in vitro were analyzed with immunofluorescent histochemistry. Immortalized RACs were transformed. Induction by nutrient medium promoted higher expression levels of collagen II in transformed chondrocytes. The regenerated silk fibroin film was not cytotoxic to immortalized chondrocytes and had no adverse influence on their adhesion. Collagen II expression was good in the immortalized chondrocytes in vivo. The construction of a silk-based biomaterial complex with immortalized chondrocytes may provide a feasible kind of functional biomaterial for the repair of cartilage defects in clinical applications.

  13. Moderate alterations of the cytoskeleton in human chondrocytes after short-term microgravity produced by parabolic flight maneuvers could be prevented by up-regulation of BMP-2 and SOX-9.

    PubMed

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wehland, Markus; Sahana, Jayashree; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Frett, Timo; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grosse, Jirka; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Real and simulated microgravity induce a variety of changes in human cells. Most importantly, changes in the cytoskeleton have been noted, and studies on microtubules have shown that they are gravisensitive. This study focuses on the effects of short-term real microgravity on gene expression, protein content, and cytoskeletal structure of human chondrocytes. We cultivated human chondrocytes, took them along a parabolic flight during the 24th Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Parabolic (DLR) Flight Campaign, and fixed them after the 1st and the 31st parabola. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed no changes after the 1st parabola, but disruptions of β-tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratin networks after the 31st parabola. No F-actin stress fibers were detected even after 31 parabolas. Furthermore, mRNA and protein quantifications after the 31st parabola showed a clear up-regulation of cytoskeletal genes and proteins. The mRNAs were significantly up-regulated as follows: TUBB, 2-fold; VIM, 1.3-fold; KRT8, 1.8-fold; ACTB, 1.9-fold; ICAM1, 4.8-fold; OPN, 7-fold; ITGA10, 1.5-fold; ITGB1, 1.2-fold; TGFB1, 1.5-fold; CAV1, 2.6-fold; SOX9, 1.7-fold; BMP-2, 5.3-fold. However, SOX5 (-25%) and SOX6 (-28%) gene expression was decreased. Contrary, no significant changes in gene expression levels were observed during vibration and hypergravity experiments. These data suggest that short-term microgravity affects the gene expression of distinct proteins. In contrast to poorly differentiated follicular thyroid cancer cells or human endothelial cells, chondrocytes only exert moderate cytoskeletal alterations. The up-regulation of BMP-2, TGF-β1, and SOX9 in chondrocytes may play a key role in preventing cytoskeletal alterations. © FASEB.

  14. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  15. Adenoviral transduction supports matrix expression of alginate cultured articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pohle, D; Kasch, R; Herlyn, P; Bader, R; Mittlmeier, T; Pützer, B M; Müller-Hilke, B

    2012-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of adenoviral (Ad) transduction of human primary chondrocyte on transgene expression and matrix production. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from healthy articular cartilage and from cartilage with mild osteoarthritis (OA), transduced with an Ad vector and either immediately cultured in alginate or expanded in monolayer before alginate culture. Proteoglycan production was measured using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Viral infection of primary chondrocytes results in a stable long time transgene expression for up to 13 weeks. Ad transduction does not significantly alter gene expression and matrix production if chondrocytes are immediately embedded in alginate. However, if expanded prior to three dimension (3D) culture in alginate, chondrocytes produce not only more proteoglycans compared to non-transduced controls, but also display an increased anabolic and decreased catabolic activity compared to non-transduced controls. We therefore suggest that successful autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) should combine adenoviral transduction of primary chondrocytes with expansion in monolayer followed by 3D culture. Future studies will be needed to investigate whether the subsequent matrix production can be further improved by using Ad vectors bearing genes encoding matrix proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee-Jeong; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Lin, Xia; Yan, Dongyao; Kim, Jaesung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Hipskind, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation-dependent transactivation capacity of Elk-1. This attenuates transcription of its downstream target gene MMP-13 to maintain the integrity of cartilage ECM homeostasis.

  17. Characterization of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered cartilage: analysis of its ultrastructure, cell density and chondrocyte phenotype compared to native adult and fetal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hillel, Alexander T; Taube, Janis M; Cornish, Toby C; Sharma, Blanka; Halushka, Marc; McCarthy, Edward F; Hutchins, Grover M; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2010-01-01

    The production of engineered cartilage from mesenchymal stem cells is a rapidly developing field. Potential applications include the treatment of degenerative joint disease as well as the treatment of traumatic and surgical bone injury. Prior to clinical application, however, further characterization of the morphology, ultrastructure, biocompatibility, and performance of the engineered tissue is warranted. To achieve this, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were grown in vitro in pellet culture for 3 weeks in chondrogenic medium conditions. The resultant engineered cartilage was compared to native adult and fetal tissue. Routine histology, special stains, and ultrastructural and quantitative histomorphometric analyses were performed. The engineered tissue demonstrated a similar chondrocyte phenotype, collagen fibril appearance, and matrix distribution when compared to native cartilage. By histomorphometric analysis, the cell density of the engineered cartilage was between that of native fetal and adult cartilage. The cell-to-matrix ratio and cellular area fraction of engineered cartilage samples was significantly greater than in adult samples, but indistinguishable from fetal cartilage samples, supporting the hypothesis that hMSC-engineered cartilage regeneration may mimic fetal cartilage development.

  18. Regulation of xylosyltransferase I gene expression by interleukin 1β in human primary chondrocyte cells: mechanism and impact on proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Khair, Mostafa; Bourhim, Mustapha; Barré, Lydia; Li, Dong; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2013-01-18

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) is an essential enzyme of proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis pathway catalyzing the initial and rate-limiting step in glycosaminoglycan chain assembly. It plays a critical role in the regulation of PG synthesis in cartilage; however, little is known about underlying mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that, in human primary chondrocytes, IL-1β regulates XT-I gene expression into an early phase of induction and a late phase of down-regulation. Based on promoter deletions, the region up to -850 bp was defined as a major element of XT-I gene displaying both constitutive and IL-1β-regulated promoter activity. Point mutation and signaling analyses revealed that IL-1β-induced promoter activity is achieved through AP-1 response elements and mediated by SAP/JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Transactivation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AP-1 is a potent transactivator of XT-I promoter and that IL-1β-induced activity is mediated through increased recruitment of AP-1 to the promoter. Finally, we show that Sp3 is a repressor of XT-I promoter and bring evidence that the repressive effect of IL-1β during the late phase is mediated through Sp3 recruitment to the promoter. This suggests that modulation of Sp3 in cartilage could prevent IL-1β inhibition of PG synthesis and limit tissue degradation.

  19. Resveratrol inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of MMP-13 and IL-6 in human articular chondrocytes via TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Jiao, Yongliang; Yu, Xiaolu; Li, Xingyao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2017-03-01

    The natural polyphenolic compound, resveratrol, has been shown to exhibit anti-osteoarthritic activity. Therefore it is hypothesized that resveratrol may serve as a nutritional supplement to counteract osteoarthritis (OA). However, the mechanisms responsible for these anti-osteoarthritic effects have not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether the biological effects of resveratrol against interleukin (IL)-1β‑induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes involved both Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Human articular chondrocytes derived from patients with OA were stimulated with IL-1β, and then co-treated with resveratrol. Cell viability was subsequently evaluated by MTS assays, and the concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and the pro-inflammatory factor, IL-6, were detected in culture supernatants using ELISA. The mRNA and protein levels of downstream mediators of TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways were also assayed by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results revealed that resveratrol prevented the IL-1β-induced reduction in cell viability. Furthermore, stimulation of the chondrocytes with IL-1β resulted in a significant upregulation of TLR4 and downstream targets of both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that are associated with the synthesis of MMP-13 and IL-6. Correspondingly, IL-1β-induced catabolic and inflammatory responses were effectively reversed by resveratrol. Taken together, these data suggest that resveratrol exerted protective effects against matrix degradation and inflammation in OA-affected chondrocytes by inhibiting both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Thus, resveratrol represents a potential treatment for OA and warrants further investigation.

  20. Serum-free media for articular chondrocytes in vitro expansion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin-xin; Duncan, Neil A; Lin, Lin; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ji-ying; Yu, Chang-long

    2013-07-01

    In vitro chondrocyte expansion is a major challenge in cell-based therapy for human articular cartilage repair. Classical culture conditions usually use animal serum as a medium supplement, which raises a number of undesirable questions. In the present study, two kinds of defined, serum-free media were developed to expand chondrocytes in monolayer culture for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. Bovine chondrocytes were expanded in serum-free media supplemented with fibroblast growth factor-2 and platelet-derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 and insulin-like growth factor. Expansion culture in a conventional 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) medium served as control. Fibronectin coating was used to help cell adhesion in serum-free medium. Next, in vitro three-dimensional pellet culture was used to evaluate the chondrocyte capacity. Cell pellets were expanded in different media to re-express the differentiated phenotype (re-differentiation) and to form cartilaginous tissue. The pellets were assessed by glycosaminoglycans contents, collagen II, collagen I and collagen X immunohistological staining. Chondrocytes cultured in serum-free media showed no proliferation difference than cells grown with 10% FBS medium. In addition, chondrocytes expanded in both serum-free media expressed more differentiated phenotypes at the end of monolayer culture, as indicated by higher gene expression ratios of collagen type II to collagen type I. Pellets derived from chondrocytes cultured in both serum-free media displayed comparable chondrogenic capacities to pellets from cells expanded in 10% FBS medium. These findings provide alternative culture approaches for chondrocytes in vitro expansion, which may benefit the clinical use of autologous chondrocytes implantation.

  1. Human platelet lysate successfully promotes proliferation and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells: a comparison with articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, F; Eder, M J; Hofer, K; Aberl, J; Redl, H; van Griensven, M; Gabriel, C; Peterbauer-Scherb, A

    2015-07-01

    Fetal calf serum (FCS) bears a potential risk for carrying diseases and eliciting immune reactions. Nevertheless, it still represents the gold standard as medium supplement in cell culture. In the present study, human platelet lysate (PL) was tested as an alternative to FCS for the expansion and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). ASCs were expanded with 10% FCS (group F) or 5% PL (group P). Subsequently, three-dimensional (3D) micromass pellets were created and cultured for 5 weeks in chondrogenic differentiation medium. Additionally, the de- and redifferentiation potential of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) was evaluated and compared to ASCs. Both HACs and ASCs cultured with PL showed strongly enhanced proliferation rates. Redifferentiation of HACs was possible for cells expanded up to 3.3 population doublings (PD). At this stage, PL-expanded HACs demonstrated better redifferentiation potential than FCS-expanded cells. ASCs could also be differentiated following extended passaging. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification and qRT-PCR of 10 cartilage related markers demonstrated a tendency for increased chondrogenic differentiation of PL-expanded ASCs compared to cells expanded with FCS. Histologically, collagen type II but also collagen type X was mainly present in group P. The present study demonstrates that PL strongly induces proliferation of ASCs, while the chondrogenic differentiation potential is retained. HACs also showed enhanced proliferation and even better redifferentiation when previously expanded with PL. This suggests that PL is superior to FCS as a supplement for the expansion of ASCs and HACs, particularly with regard to chondrogenic (re)differentiation.

  2. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1α and tumor necrosis factor α promote the expression and secretion of proteolytically active cathepsin S from human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Caglič, Dejan; Repnik, Urška; Jedeszko, Christopher; Kosec, Gregor; Miniejew, Catherine; Kindermann, Maik; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Vito; Wendt, K Ulrich; Sloane, Bonnie F; Goldring, Mary B; Turk, Boris

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are destructive joint diseases that involve the loss of articular cartilage. Degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix is believed to occur due to imbalance between the catabolic and anabolic processes of resident chondrocytes. Previous work has suggested that various lysosomal cysteine cathepsins participate in cartilage degeneration; however, their exact roles in disease development and progression have not been elucidated. In order to study degradation processes under conditions resembling the in vivo milieu of the cartilage, we cultivated chondrocytes on a type II collagen-containing matrix. Stimulation of the cultivated chondrocytes with interleukin-1α and/or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in a time-dependent increase in cathepsin S expression and induced its secretion into the conditioned media. Using a novel bioluminescent activity-based probe, we were able to demonstrate a significant increase in proteolytic activity of cathepsin S in the conditioned media of proinflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes. For the first time, cathepsin S was demonstrated to be secreted from chondrocytes upon stimulation with the proinflammatory cytokines, and displayed proteolytic activity in culture supernatants. Its stability at neutral pH and potent proteolytic activity on extracellular matrix components mean that cathepsin S may contribute significantly to cartilage degradation and may thus be considered a potential drug target in joint diseases.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Enhancer-binding Protein 3 Is Essential for the Expression of Asparagine-linked Glycosylation 2 in the Regulation of Osteoblast and Chondrocyte Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Katsuyuki; Maeda, Shingo; Kawamura, Ichiro; Matsuyama, Kanehiro; Shinohara, Naohiro; Yahiro, Yuhei; Nagano, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Takao; Yokouchi, Masahiro; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein 3 (Hivep3) suppresses osteoblast differentiation by inducing proteasomal degradation of the osteogenesis master regulator Runx2. In this study, we tested the possibility of cooperation of Hivep1, Hivep2, and Hivep3 in osteoblast and/or chondrocyte differentiation. Microarray analyses with ST-2 bone stroma cells demonstrated that expression of any known osteochondrogenesis-related genes was not commonly affected by the three Hivep siRNAs. Only Hivep3 siRNA promoted osteoblast differentiation in ST-2 cells, whereas all three siRNAs cooperatively suppressed differentiation in ATDC5 chondrocytes. We further used microarray analysis to identify genes commonly down-regulated in both MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts and ST-2 cells upon knockdown of Hivep3 and identified asparagine-linked glycosylation 2 (Alg2), which encodes a mannosyltransferase residing on the endoplasmic reticulum. The Hivep3 siRNA-mediated promotion of osteoblast differentiation was negated by forced Alg2 expression. Alg2 suppressed osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in cultured calvarial bone. Alg2 was immunoprecipitated with Runx2, whereas the combined transfection of Runx2 and Alg2 interfered with Runx2 nuclear localization, which resulted in suppression of Runx2 activity. Chondrocyte differentiation was promoted by Hivep3 overexpression, in concert with increased expression of Creb3l2, whose gene product is the endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer crucial for chondrogenesis. Alg2 silencing suppressed Creb3l2 expression and chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells, whereas infection of Alg2-expressing virus promoted chondrocyte maturation in cultured cartilage rudiments. Thus, Alg2, as a downstream mediator of Hivep3, suppresses osteogenesis, whereas it promotes chondrogenesis. To our knowledge, this study is the first to link a mannosyltransferase gene to osteochondrogenesis. PMID:24563464

  4. Leptin induces ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5, and ADAMTS-9 genes expression by mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-ĸB signaling pathways in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yaykasli, Kursat Oguz; Hatipoglu, Omer Faruk; Yaykasli, Emine; Yildirim, Kubra; Kaya, Ertugrul; Ozsahin, Mustafa; Uslu, Mustafa; Gunduz, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the causes of inflammation has vital importance in the development of new approaches for the treatment of arthritic diseases. The degradation of aggrecan by upregulated disintegrin and metalloproteinase with trombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs) is the key event in the development of both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Increased levels of leptin in both RA and OA have been demonstrated, thus linking leptin to arthritic diseases, but the mechanism has not been clarified. This study investigated the putative role of signaling pathways (p38, JNK, MEK1, NF-ĸB, and PI3) involved in leptin-induced cartilage destruction. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured with recombinant human leptin at 100, 250, 500, and 1000 ng/mL doses for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, after which ADAMTS-4, -5, and -9 genes expression were determined by real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western Blot methods. The signaling pathways involved in leptin-induced ADAMTSs upregulation were also investigated by using inhibitors of signaling pathways. It was demonstrated that ADAMTSs expression level was peaked at 1000 ng/mL doses for 48 hours, and MAPKs (p38, JNK, and MEK) and NF-ĸB signaling pathways involving in leptin triggered ADAMTSs upregulation. Obesity as a risk for RA and OA may contribute to the inflammation of both RA and OA diseases by secreting adipokines like leptin. We hypothesize that leptin is involved in the development of RA and OA accompanied with obesity by increasing ADAMTS-4, -5, and -9 genes expression via MAPKs and NF-ĸB signaling pathways.

  5. ATF3 deficiency in chondrocytes alleviates osteoarthritis development.

    PubMed

    Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Inoue, Makoto; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Muneta, Takeshi; Takeda, Shu; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Yuki; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancer and inflammation, as well as in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the involvement of Atf3 in developmental skeletogenesis and joint disease has not been well studied to date. Here, we show that Atf3 is a critical mediator of osteoarthritis (OA) development through its expression in chondrocytes. ATF3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the OA cartilage of both mice and humans. Conditional deletion of Atf3 in chondrocytes did not result in skeletal abnormalities or affect the chondrogenesis, but alleviated the development of OA generated by surgically inducing knee joint instability in mice. Inflammatory cytokines significantly up-regulated Atf3 expression through the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway, while cytokine-induced interleukin-6 (Il6) expression was repressed, in ATF3-deleted murine and human chondrocytes. Mechanistically, Atf3 deficiency decreased cytokine-induced Il6 transcription in chondrocytes through repressing NF-kB signalling by the attenuation of the phosphorylation status of IkB and p65. These findings suggest that Atf3 is implicated in the pathogenesis of OA through modulation of inflammatory cytokine expression in chondrocytes, and the feed-forward loop of inflammatory cytokines/NF-kB/Atf3 in chondrocytes may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment for OA. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effects of intermittent pressure-induced strain on the electrophysiology of cultured human chondrocytes: evidence for the presence of stretch-activated membrane ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wright, M; Jobanputra, P; Bavington, C; Salter, D M; Nuki, G

    1996-01-01

    1. Cyclical pressurization of cultured chondrocytes results in increases in cyclic AMP and in the rate of proteoglycan synthesis. Intermittent increases in hydrostatic pressure are also associated with hyperpolarization of chondrocyte cell membranes and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-ion channels but the physiological basis for this response to mechanical stimulation is unclear. 2. Experiments have been undertaken to better define the types of ion channels involved and to explore the possibility that the hyperpolarization response associated with cyclical pressurization of chondrocytes follows activation of stretch-activated ion channels. 3. The mean membrane potential of chondrocytes in non-confluent monolayer cell culture rose from -15.3 +/- 0.24 mV to -21.1 +/- 0.28 mV (n = 60, P < 0.0001) after intermittent pressurization (0.33 Hz, 16 kPa, 20 min). 4. Strain gauge measurements showed that cyclical pressurization was associated with strain on the base of the culture plate. The amplitude of the hyperpolarization response was proportional to the microstrain to which cells were subjected. 5. Membrane hyperpolarization did not occur when chondrocytes were subjected to cyclical pressurization in rigid glass culture dishes or plastic dishes positioned in the pressurization chamber so as to avoid bending of the base of the culture dish. 6. Indirect evidence that the hyperpolarization response after intermittent pressure-induced strain was associated with stimulation of stretch-activated ion channels was obtained from experiments with gadolinium, amiloride and hexamethylene amiloride, each of which abolished hyperpolarization. 7. Experiments with apamin, charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin showed that the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels involved in the hyperpolarization response are apamin-sensitive, charybdotoxin- and iberiotoxin-resistant, low-conductance channels. 8. Somatostatin and cadmium chloride, which block L-type calcium channels, abolished strain

  7. Expansion of human articular chondrocytes and formation of tissue-engineered cartilage: a step towards exploring a potential use of matrix-induced cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Munirah, S; Samsudin, O C; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2010-10-01

    Monolayer culture expansion remains as a fundamental step to acquire sufficient number of cells for 3D constructs formation. It has been well-documented that cell expansion is however accompanied by cellular dedifferentiation. In order to promote cell growth and circumvent cellular dedifferentiation, we evaluated the effects of Transforming Growth Factor Beta-2 (TGF-β2), Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) combination on articular chondrocytes culture and 'chondrocytes-fibrin' construct formation. Chondrocytes were serially cultured in: (1) F12:DMEM+10% Foetal Bovine Serum (FBS) with growth factors (FD10GFs), (2) F12:DMEM+2%FBS with the growth factors (FD2GFs) and, (3) F12:DMEM+10%FBS without growth factors (FD) as control. Cultured chondrocytes were evaluated by means of growth kinetics parameters, cell cycle analysis, quantitative phenotypic expression of collagen type II, aggrecan core protein sox-9 and collagen type I and, immunochemistry technique. Harvested chondrocytes were incorporated with plasma-derived fibrin and were polymerized to form the 3D constructs and implanted subcutaneously at the dorsum of athymic nude mice for eight (8) weeks. Resulted constructs were assigned for gross inspections and microscopic evaluation using standard histochemicals staining, immunochemistry technique and, quantitative phenotypic expression of cartilage markers to reassure cartilaginous tissue formation. Growth kinetics performance of chondrocytes cultured in three (3) types of culture media from the most to least was in the following order: FD10GFs>FD2GFs>FD. Following growth kinetics analysis, we decided to use FD10GFs and FD (control) for further evaluation and 'chondrocytes-fibrin' constructs formation. Chondrocytes cultured in FD10GFs preserved the normal diploid state (2c) with no evidence of aneuploidy, haploidy or tetraploidy. Expression of cartilage-specific markers namely collagen type II, aggrecan core protein and

  8. Effects of Adipokines and Insulin on Intracellular pH, Calcium Concentration, and Responses to Hypo-Osmolarity in Human Articular Chondrocytes from Healthy and Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    López-Zapata, Diego F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of adipokines and insulin on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pH (pHi) in human articular chondrocytes from healthy (CHC) and osteoarthritic cartilage (COC). Design: pHi and [Ca2+]i were measured using BCECF and Fura-2 fluorometric probes in CHC and COC under control conditions and following a hypotonic shock. The effects of interleukin-1β (IL1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), insulin, leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were assessed. Results: pHi was lower in COC than in CHC. Only IL1β β decreased pHi in both cell types; all the agents enhanced pHi recovery following an ammonium prepulse in CHC, effect that was attenuated by Na+–H+ exchanger inhibitors, but they had no effect in COC. Hypotonic shock (HTS) caused a pHi increase, which was significantly smaller in COC. All the hormones attenuated this response and the effect of IL1β was greater. The basal [Ca2+]i was similar in COC and CHC; IL1β, TNFα, and insulin increased the [Ca2+]i, but leptin, resistin, and adiponectin did not. These effects were greater in COC. This [Ca2+]i increase was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and attenuated by Na+–Ca2+ exchanger inhibitors. HTS caused a [Ca2+]i increase, which was inhibited by transient receptor potential vanilloid blockers and attenuated by all the hormones tested with the exception of adiponectin. Conclusions: These findings may help explain the association between obesity and osteoarthritis, in which these hormones are altered. The responses of CHC and COC are different, which suggests that a modification of pH and Ca2+ homeostasis is part of the osteoarthritis pathophysiology. PMID:26069708

  9. Geranylgeranylacetone suppresses hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Masaki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease, afflicting many sufferers with both pain and functional disorders. Various therapies have been attempted for OA, but no fully effective treatment has been established yet. Apoptosis of chondrocytes caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered important in the pathogenesis of OA. The progression of OA may be prevented by suppressing apoptosis of chondrocytes. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) has been used as an anti-ulcer drug in Japan for more than 20 years. Several recent studies have shown that GGA can induce heat shock protein (HSP) and exert cytoprotective actions on a large variety of cells and tissues. In this study, we investigated the effects of GGA on the apoptosis of OA chondrocytes induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Human isolated OA chondrocytes were cultured in the absence or presence of GGA. Cell viability, caspase 3/7 and 9 activities, HSP70 mRNA and protein expressions were examined, and morphological analyses were conducted after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) to induce apoptosis. Geranylgeranylacetone dose-dependently reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease in cell viability. It was recognized that GGA rendered OA chondrocytes resistant to H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis from Hoechst 33342 staining and TUNEL staining. Caspases 3 and 9 were activated by addition of H(2)O(2), and GGA suppressed this H(2)O(2)-induced activation of both caspases. H(2)O(2)-induced induction of HSP70 was enhanced in OA chondrocytes by pretreatment with GGA. The results showed that GGA can suppress apoptosis of chondrocytes and enhance production of HSP70. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that GGA protects OA chondrocytes from H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis, at least in part by enhancing HSP70 production. These results indicate that GGA is a potentially useful drug for the treatment of OA.

  10. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  11. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis.

  12. Statins do not inhibit the FGFR signaling in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fafilek, B; Hampl, M; Ricankova, N; Vesela, I; Balek, L; Kunova Bosakova, M; Gudernova, I; Varecha, M; Buchtova, M; Krejci, P

    2017-09-01

    Statins are widely used drugs for cholesterol lowering, which were recently found to counteract the effects of aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3) signaling in cell and animal models of FGFR3-related chondrodysplasia. This opened an intriguing therapeutic possibility for human dwarfing conditions caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGFR3, although the mechanism of statin action on FGFR3 remains unclear. Here, we determine the effect of statins on FGFR signaling in chondrocytes. Cultured chondrocyte cell lines, mouse embryonic tibia cultures and limb bud micromasses were treated with FGF2 to activate FGFR signaling. The effects of atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin and pravastatin on FGFR3 protein stability and on FGFR-mediated chondrocyte growth-arrest, loss of extracellular matrix (ECM), induction of premature senescence and hypertrophic differentiation were evaluated. Statins did not alter the level of FGFR3 protein expression nor produce any effect on FGFR-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophic differentiation in cultured chondrocyte cell lines, mouse tibia cultures or limb bud micromasses. We conclude that statins do not inhibit the FGFR signaling in chondrocytes. Therefore the statin-mediated rescue of FGFR3-related chondrodysplasia, described before, is likely not intrinsic to the growth plate cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Devitalisation of human cartilage by high hydrostatic pressure treatment: Subsequent cultivation of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells on the devitalised tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hiemer, B.; Genz, B.; Jonitz-Heincke, A.; Pasold, J.; Wree, A.; Dommerich, S.; Bader, R.

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration of cartilage lesions still represents a major challenge. Cartilage has a tissue-specific architecture, complicating recreation by synthetic biomaterials. A novel approach for reconstruction is the use of devitalised cartilage. Treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) achieves devitalisation while biomechanical properties are remained. Therefore, in the present study, cartilage was devitalised using HHP treatment and the potential for revitalisation with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated. The devitalisation of cartilage was performed by application of 480 MPa over 10 minutes. Effective cellular inactivation was demonstrated by the trypan blue exclusion test and DNA quantification. Histology and electron microscopy examinations showed undamaged cartilage structure after HHP treatment. For revitalisation chondrocytes and MSCs were cultured on devitalised cartilage without supplementation of chondrogenic growth factors. Both chondrocytes and MSCs significantly increased expression of cartilage-specific genes. ECM stainings showed neocartilage-like structure with positive AZAN staining as well as collagen type II and aggrecan deposition after three weeks of cultivation. Our results showed that HHP treatment caused devitalisation of cartilage tissue. ECM proteins were not influenced, thus, providing a scaffold for chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and chondrocytes. Therefore, using HHP-treated tissue might be a promising approach for cartilage repair. PMID:27671122

  14. The effects of monosodium urate monohydrate crystals on chondrocyte viability and function: implications for development of cartilage damage in gout.

    PubMed

    Chhana, Ashika; Callon, Karen E; Pool, Bregina; Naot, Dorit; Gamble, Gregory D; Dray, Michael; Pitto, Rocco; Bentley, Jarome; McQueen, Fiona M; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage damage is frequently observed in advanced destructive gout. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals on chondrocyte viability and function. The alamarBlue assay and flow cytometry were used to assess the viability of primary human chondrocytes and cartilage explants following culture with MSU crystals. The number of dead chondrocytes in cartilage explants cultured with MSU crystals was quantified. Real-time PCR was used to determine changes in the relative mRNA expression levels of chondrocytic genes. The histological appearance of cartilage in joints affected by gout was also examined. MSU crystals rapidly reduced primary human chondrocyte and cartilage explant viability in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.01 for both). Cartilage explants cultured with MSU crystals had a greater percentage of dead chondrocytes at the articular surface compared to untreated cartilage (p = 0.004). Relative mRNA expression of type II collagen and the cartilage matrix proteins aggrecan and versican was decreased in chondrocytes following culture with MSU crystals (p < 0.05 for all). However, expression of the degradative enzymes ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 was increased (p < 0.05 for both). In joints affected by gout, normal cartilage architecture was lost, with empty chondrocyte lacunae observed. MSU crystals have profound inhibitory effects on chondrocyte viability and function. Interactions between MSU crystals and chondrocytes may contribute to cartilage damage in gout through reduction of chondrocyte viability and promotion of a catabolic state.

  15. Chondrocyte-derived extracellular matrix suppresses pathogenesis of human pterygium epithelial cells by blocking the NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyesook; Lee, Minsup; Lee, Yoonjin; Choi, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We previously have reported that chondrocyte-derived extracellular matrix (CDECM) suppresses the growth of pterygium in athymic nude mice. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effect of CDECM on the pterygium epithelial cells and molecular signaling pathways in human primary pterygium epithelial cells (hPECs). Methods Human conjunctival epithelial cells (hConECs) were used for identification of the effect of CDECM on normal conjunctiva. The effects of CDECM on proliferation were measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. Cell migration was evaluated according to the scratch wound closure assay and the Transwell invasion assay. Pterygium-related angiogenesis, inflammation, and extracellular matrix remodeling were analyzed with immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of oxidative stress was detected with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Protein kinase signaling was also analyzed with immunoblot. Results CDECM did not show cytotoxicity until 1 mg/ml in the hConECs and hPECs. Cell migration and invasion were markedly reduced by treatment of 1 mg/ml CDECM in the hPECs to 34% of the control, but not in the hConECs. CDECM significantly downregulated matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and fibronectin and upregulated tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1 (TIMP-1) and -2 in the hPECs. Angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), antivascular cellular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), and proinflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), were dramatically reduced by CDECM in the hPECs. Furthermore, CDECM significantly inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, Nox2 and p47phox. CDECM induced nuclear factor erythroid-2

  16. Homology of lubricin and superficial zone protein (SZP): products of megakaryocyte stimulating factor (MSF) gene expression by human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes localized to chromosome 1q25.

    PubMed

    Jay, G D; Tantravahi, U; Britt, D E; Barrach, H J; Cha, C J

    2001-07-01

    We have previously identified megakaryocyte stimulating factor (MSF) gene expression by synovial fibroblasts as the origin of lubricin in the synovial cavity. Lubricin is a mucinous glycoprotein responsible for the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage. MSF has a significant homology to vitronectin and is composed of 12 exons. RNA was purified from human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes grown in vitro from tissue explants obtained from subjects without degenerative joint disease. RT-PCR was used with multiple complimentary primer pairs spanning the central mucin expressing exon 6 of the MSF gene and individual exons on both the N- and C-terminal sides of exon 6. Exons 2, 4 and 5 appear to be variably expressed by synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes. Lubricating mucin, in the form of MSF, is expressed by both chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts in vitro. Both lubricin and superficial zone protein (SZP), a related proteoglycan, share a similar primary structure but could differ in post-translational modifications with O-linked oligosaccharides which are predominant in lubricin and with limited amounts chondroitin and keratan sulfate found in SZP. Since most of the MSF exons are involved in the expression of lubricating mucin, a strong homology to vitronectin persists. It is therefore appropriate to consider that both SZP and lubricin occupy a new class of biomolecules termed tribonectins. Screening of a human genome bacterial artificial chromsome (BAC) library with a cDNA primer pair complimentary for exon 6 identified two clones. Both clones were complimentary for chromosome 1q25 by in situ hybridization. This same locus was previously implicated in camptodactyl-arthropathy-pericarditis syndrome (CAP) by genetic mapping. It is hypothesized that CAP, a large joint arthropathy, may be associated with ineffective boundary lubrication provided by synovial fluid.

  17. Evaluating Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes through a Novel 3-Dimensional In Vitro System for Cartilage Tissue Engineering and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanwei; Davison, Noel; Moroni, Lorenzo; Feng, Felicia; Crist, Joshua; Salter, Erin; Bingham, Clifton O; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    To characterize and evaluate osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes, in comparison to normal chondrocytes, through a novel 3-dimensional (3-D) culture system, poly(ethylene-glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was also used to simulate an in vitro OA model. Normal and OA chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and analyzed for changes in cartilage-specific gene expressions due to passage number. Then, cells were encapsulated in PEGDA to evaluate phenotype and matrix production capabilities through the in vitro culture system. Characterization was conducted with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), biochemical analyses, and histological staining. 3-D encapsulated chondrocytes (human and bovine) were also treated with IL-1β to characterize how the cytokine affects gene transcription and extracellular matrix (ECM) content. In 2-dimensional monolayer, anabolic genes were down-regulated significantly in both normal and OA chondrocytes. In 3-D culture, OA chondrocytes demonstrated significantly higher expressions of catabolic genes when compared to normal cells. Differentiation medium resulted in significantly more matrix production than growth medium from OA chondrocytes, indicated through histological staining. In addition, normal chondrocytes responded more significantly to exogenous administration of IL-1β than OA chondrocytes. Temporary initial stimulation of IL-1β to OA chondrocytes resulted in comparable gene expressions to untreated cells after 3 weeks of in vitro culture. Our findings demonstrate the use of OA chondrocytes in tissue engineering and their significance for potential future cartilage regeneration research through their matrix production capabilities and the use of a hydrogel culture system.

  18. Topography-Guided Proliferation: Distinct Surface Microtopography Increases Proliferation of Chondrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Natasja Leth; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Andersen, Ole Zoffmann; Foss, Morten; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Lind, Martin; Lysdahl, Helle

    2015-11-01

    Chondrocyte-based cartilage repair techniques require control of articular chondrocyte expansion ex vivo. Articular chondrocytes have limited availability, and prolonged culturing to obtain a cell number sufficient for clinical use often results in phenotypic alterations and increased costs. In this study, we applied a screening library consisting of micrometer-sized topographical features, termed biosurface structure array (BSSA), to identify specific topographical microstructures affecting the proliferation of human chondrocytes in passage 1 (P1) or 2 (P2). The BSSA library comprised 10 patterns and 16 combinations of pillar size (X) and interpillar gap size (Y). Specific microstructures significantly increased the chondrocytes' proliferative responsiveness in term of patterns, X and Y for P2 compared with P1. The P1 and P2 chondrocytes responded independently to similar patterns after 4 days of culturing, whereas only chondrocytes at P2 responded to specific microstructures with Y = 1 μm and X = 2, 4 μm by a 2.3- and 4.4-fold increased proliferation, respectively. In conclusion, these findings indicate that specific surface topographies promote chondrocyte proliferation and may, indeed, be a tool to control the behavior of chondrocytes in vitro.

  19. Phenotypic diversity of neoplastic chondrocytes and extracellular matrix gene expression in cartilaginous neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, T.; Dertinger, S.; Vornehm, S. I.; Dudhia, J.; von der Mark, K.; Kirchner, T.

    1997-01-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is characterized by distinct cellular phenotypes, which can be identified by specific extracellular matrix gene expression profiles. By applying in situ analysis on the mRNA and protein level in a series of benign and malignant human chondrogenic neoplasms, we were able to identify for the first time different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes in vivo: 1) mature chondrocytes, which synthesized the characteristic cartilaginous extracellular tumor matrix, 2) cells resembling hypertrophic chondrocytes of the fetal growth plate, 3) cells resembling so-called dedifferentiated chondrocytes, and 4) well differentiated chondrocytic cells, which expressed type I collagen, indicating the presence of post-hypertrophic differentiated neoplastic chondrocytes. Chondrocytes exhibiting a range of phenotypes were found to be present in the same neoplasm. The different observed phenotypes, including the dedifferentiated phenotype, were in contrast to the anaplastic cells of high-grade chondrosarcomas. Comparison of expression data with tumor morphology revealed a relationship between the cellular phenotypes, the tumor matrix composition, and the matrix and cell morphology within the neoplasms. The distinctly different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes are the basis of the characteristic high biochemical and morphological heterogeneity of chondroid neoplasms and shed light on their biological and clinical behavior. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9176404

  20. Integrated Study of Globally Expressed microRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes and Osteoarthritis Relevant Genes: A Microarray and Bioinformatics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Zafar; Al-Shobaili, Hani A; Rasheed, Naila; Al Salloom, Abdulaziz A M; Al-Shaya, Osama; Mahmood, Amer; Alajez, Nehad M; Alghamdi, Ahmed S S; Mehana, El-Sayed E

    2016-07-02

    This study was undertaken to identify and characterize the globally expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced joint damage and to predict whether miRNAs can regulate the catabolic effects in osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. Out of 1347 miRNAs analyzed by microarrays in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes, 35 miRNAs were down-regulated, 1 miRNA was up-regulated, and the expression of 1311 miRNAs remained unchanged. Bioinformatics analysis showed the key inflammatory mediators and key molecular pathways are targeted by differentially expressed miRNAs. Novel miRNAs identified could have important diagnostic and therapeutic potentials in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for pain managements in OA.

  1. Influence on chondrogenesis of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes in co-culture with donor-matched mesenchymal stem cells from infrapatellar fat pad and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lopa, S; Colombini, A; Sansone, V; Preis, F W Baruffaldi; Moretti, M

    2013-01-01

    Co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) has been proposed for autologous cartilage cell-based therapies, to overcome the issues associated to limited availability of articular chondrocytes (ACs). To evaluate the potentiality of a co-culture approach in aged osteoarthritic patients, MSCs from infrapatellar fat pad (IFP-MSCs) and knee subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASCs) were co-cultured with donor-matched osteoarthritic, expanded and cryopreserved, ACs in a 75%/25% ratio. Co-cultures were prepared also from nasal chondrocytes (NCs) to evaluate their possible use as an alternative to ACs. Pellets were differentiated for 14 days, using mono-cultures of each cell type as reference. Chondrogenic genes SOX9, COL2A1, ACAN were less expressed in co-cultures compared to ACs and NCs. Total GAGs content in co-cultures did not differ significantly from values predicted as the sum of each cell type contribution corrected for the co-culture ratio, as confirmed by histology. No significant differences were observed for GAGs/DNA in mono-cultures, demonstrating a reduced chondrogenic potential of ACs and NCs. In conclusion, a small percentage of expanded and cryopreserved ACs and NCs did not lead to IFP-MSCs and ASCs chondro-induction. Our results suggest that chondrogenic potential and origin of chondrocytes may play a relevant role in the outcome of co-cultures, indicating a need for further investigations to demonstrate their clinical relevance in the treatment of aged osteoarthritic patients.

  2. Serum-free medium supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 for cell expansion culture of human ear chondrocytes promotes redifferentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Erik W; van der Veen, Simone W; Verhaar, Jan A N; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2002-08-01

    For tissue engineering of autologous cartilage, cell expansion is needed to obtain the cell numbers required. Standard expansion media contain bovine serum. This has several disadvantages, that is, the risk of transmitting diseases and serum-batch variations. The aim of this study was to find a serum-free medium with at least the same potential to expand cell numbers as serum-containing media. Ear chondrocytes of three young children were expanded in either serum-containing medium (SCM; DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum) or serum-free medium (SFM; DMEM with ITS+) supplemented with 5 or 100 ng/mL fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). To promote cell adherence onto the culture flask, the serum-free conditions were cultured with 10% serum for 1 day after each trypsinization. After the fourth passage, the chondrocytes were encapsuled in alginate beads and redifferentiated in a SFM (DMEM with ITS+, hydrocortisone, and L-ascorbic acid) supplemented with 10 ng/mL IGF-I and 10 ng/mL TGFbeta-2. Results showed that expansion in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 was comparable to expansion in SCM. Redifferentiation with SFM with IGF-I and TGFbeta-2 showed high collagen type II expression and high GAG/DNA production regardless of which expansion medium had been used. However, chondrocytes expanded in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 resulted in less positive cells for collagen type I and 11-fibrau (a fibroblast membrane marker). The present study shows that it is possible to use serum-free medium for tissue engineering of cartilage. Expansion of immature ear chondrocytes in SFM supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 resulted in high cell numbers, which in addition had better redifferentiation capacity than cells expanded in medium with 10% serum.

  3. Circular RNA Related to the Chondrocyte ECM Regulates MMP13 Expression by Functioning as a MiR-136 ‘Sponge’ in Human Cartilage Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Linghui; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Jiying; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are involved in the development of various diseases, but there is little knowledge of circRNAs in osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of study was to identify circRNA expression in articular cartilage and to explore the function of chondrocyte extracellular matrix (ECM)-related circRNAs (circRNA-CER) in cartilage. To identify circRNAs that are specifically expressed in cartilage, we compared the expression of circRNAs in OA cartilage with that in normal cartilage. Bioinformatics was employed to predict the interaction of circRNAs and mRNAs in cartilage. Loss-of-function and rescue experiments for circRNA-CER were performed in vitro. A total of 71 circRNAs were differentially expressed in OA and normal cartilage. CircRNA-CER expression increased with interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor levels in chondrocytes. Silencing of circRNA-CER using small interfering RNA suppressed MMP13 expression and increased ECM formation. CircRNA-CER could compete for miR-136 with MMP13. Our results demonstrated that circRNA-CER regulated MMP13 expression by functioning as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) and participated in the process of chondrocyte ECM degradation. We propose that circRNA-CER could be used as a potential target in OA therapy. PMID:26931159

  4. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  5. The chondrocytic journey in endochondral bone growth and skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yeung Tsang, Kwok; Wa Tsang, Shun; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S E

    2014-03-01

    The endochondral bones of the skeleton develop from a cartilage template and grow via a process involving a cascade of chondrocyte differentiation steps culminating in formation of a growth plate and the replacement of cartilage by bone. This process of endochondral ossification, driven by the generation of chondrocytes and their subsequent proliferation, differentiation, and production of extracellular matrix constitute a journey, deviation from which inevitably disrupts bone growth and development, and is the basis of human skeletal dysplasias with a wide range of phenotypic severity, from perinatal lethality to progressively deforming. This highly coordinated journey of chondrocyte specification and fate determination is controlled by a myriad of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. SOX9 is the master transcription factor that, in concert with varying partners along the way, directs the different phases of the journey from mesenchymal condensation, chondrogenesis, differentiation, proliferation, and maturation. Extracellular signals, including bone morphogenetic proteins, wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT), fibroblast growth factor, Indian hedgehog, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide, are all indispensable for growth plate chondrocytes to align and organize into the appropriate columnar architecture and controls their maturation and transition to hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, marked by dramatic volume increase in phases, is controlled by transcription factors SOX9, Runt-related transcription factor, and FOXA2. Hypertrophic chondrocytes mediate the cartilage to bone transition and concomitantly face a live-or-die situation, a subject of much debate. We review recent insights into the coordination of the phases of the chondrocyte journey, and highlight the need for a systems level understanding of the regulatory networks that will facilitate the development of therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasia.

  6. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  7. RNA Interference and BMP-2 Stimulation Allows Equine Chondrocytes Redifferentiation in 3D-Hypoxia Cell Culture Model: Application for Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Rodolphe; Bourdon, Bastien; Hervieu, Magalie; Branly, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Saulnier, Nathalie; Audigié, Fabrice; Maddens, Stéphane; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2017-08-24

    As in humans, osteoarthritis (OA) causes considerable economic loss to the equine industry. New hopes for cartilage repair have emerged with the matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI). Nevertheless, its limitation is due to the dedifferentiation occurring during the chondrocyte amplification phase, leading to the loss of its capacity to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). To enhance the MACI therapy efficiency, we have developed a strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation, and demonstrated its feasibility in the equine model. Thus, to mimic the cartilage microenvironment, the equine dedifferentiated chondrocytes were cultured in type I/III collagen sponges for 7 days under hypoxia in the presence of BMP-2. In addition, chondrocytes were transfected by siRNA targeting Col1a1 and Htra1 mRNAs, which are overexpressed during dedifferentiation and OA. To investigate the quality of the neo-synthesized ECM, specific and atypical cartilage markers were evaluated by RT-qPCR and Western blot. Our results show that the combination of 3D hypoxia cell culture, BMP-2 (Bone morphogenetic protein-2), and RNA interference, increases the chondrocytes functional indexes (Col2a1/Col1a1, Acan/Col1a1), leading to an effective chondrocyte redifferentiation. These data represent a proof of concept for this process of application, in vitro, in the equine model, and will lead to the improvement of the MACI efficiency for cartilage tissue engineering therapy in preclinical/clinical trials, both in equine and human medicine.

  8. Nasal chondrocytes and fibrin sealant for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, C; Gauthier, O; Masson, M; Malard, O; Moreau, A; Fellah, B H; Bilban, M; Spaethe, R; Daculsi, G; Guicheux, J

    2009-04-01

    Hybrid constructs associating a biodegradable matrix and autologous chondrocytes hold promise for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. In this context, our objective was to investigate the potential use of nasal chondrocytes associated with a fibrin sealant for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. The phenotype of primary nasal chondrocytes (NC) from human (HNC) and rabbit (RNC) origin were characterized by RT-PCR. The ability of constructs associating fibrin sealant and NC to form a cartilaginous tissue in vivo was investigated, firstly in a subcutaneous site in nude mice and secondly in an articular cartilage defect in rabbit. HNC express type II collagen and aggrecan, the two major hallmarks of a chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, when injected subcutaneously into nude mice within a fibrin sealant, these chondrocytes were able to form a cartilage-like tissue. Our data indicate that RNC also express type II collagen and aggrecan and maintained their phenotype in three-dimensional culture within a fibrin sealant. Moreover, treatment of rabbit articular cartilage defects with autologous RNC embedded in a fibrin sealant led to the formation of a hyalin-like repair tissue. The use of fibrin sealant containing hybrid autologous NC therefore appears as a promising approach for cell-based therapy of articular cartilage. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. LRP4 induces extracellular matrix productions and facilitates chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Asai, Nobuyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-08-22

    Endochondral ossification is an essential step for skeletal development, which requires chondrocyte differentiation in growth cartilage. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), a member of LDLR family, is an inhibitor for Wnt signaling, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation remain to be investigated. Here we found by laser capture microdissection that LRP4 expression was induced during chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate. In order to address the roles, we overexpressed recombinant human LRP4 or knocked down endogenous LRP4 by lentivirus in mouse ATDC5 chondrocyte cells. We found that LRP4 induced gene expressions of extracellular matrix proteins of type II collagen (Col2a1), aggrecan (Acan), and type X collagen (Col10a1), as well as production of total proteoglycans in ATDC5 cells, whereas LRP4 knockdown had opposite effects. Interestingly, LRP4-knockdown reduced mRNA expression of Sox9, a master regulator for chondrogenesis, as well as Dkk1, an extracellular Wnt inhibitor. Analysis of Wnt signaling revealed that LRP4 blocked the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in ATDC5 cells. Finally, the reduction of these extracellular matrix productions by LRP4-knockdown was rescued by a β-catenin/TCF inhibitor, suggesting that LRP4 is an important regulator for extracellular matrix productions and chondrocyte differentiation by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  11. Autophagy Modulates Articular Cartilage Vesicle Formation in Primary Articular Chondrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ann K.; Gohr, Claudia M.; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Jackson, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  12. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes gene expression analysis in monolayer culture and engineered elastic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ruszymah, B H I; Lokman, B S; Asma, A; Munirah, S; Chua, Kienhui; Mazlyzam, A L; Isa, M R; Fuzina, N H; Aminuddin, B S

    2007-08-01

    This study was aimed at regenerating autologous elastic cartilage for future use in pediatric ear reconstruction surgery. Specific attentions were to characterize pediatric auricular chondrocyte growth in a combination culture medium and to assess the possibility of elastic cartilage regeneration using human fibrin. Laboratory experiment using human pediatric auricular chondrocytes. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes growth kinetics and quantitative gene expression profile in three different types of media were compared in primary culture and subsequent three passages. Large-scale culture-expanded chondrocytes from the combination medium were then mixed with human fibrin for the formation of elastic cartilage via tissue engineering technique. The equal mixture of Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (FD) promoted the best chondrocyte growth at every passage compared to the individual media. Chondrocytes differentiation index; ratio of type II to type I collagen gene expression level, aggrecan and elastin expression gradually decreased while passaging but they were then restored in engineered tissues after implantation. The engineered cartilage was glistening white in color and firm in consistency. Histological evaluation, immunohistochemistry analysis and quantitative gene expression assessment demonstrated that the engineered cartilage resemble the features of native elastic cartilage. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes proliferate better in the combination medium (FD) and the utilization of human fibrin as a biomaterial hold promises for the regeneration of an autologous elastic cartilage for future application in ear reconstructive surgery.

  13. Hypoxia promotes redifferentiation and suppresses markers of hypertrophy and degeneration in both healthy and osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia is considered to be a positive influence on the healthy chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage matrix formation. However, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, we assessed whether healthy and OA chondrocytes have distinct responses to oxygen, particularly with regard to hypertrophy and degradation during redifferentiation. Methods Monolayer-expanded healthy and OA chondrocytes were redifferentiated for 14 days in pellet cultures under standard (20% oxygen) or hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions. Cartilage matrix gene expression, matrix quality and quantity, degradative enzyme expression and HIF expression were measured. Results In hypoxia, both healthy and OA chondrocytes had higher human collagen type II, α1 gene (COL2A1), and aggrecan (ACAN) expression and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, concomitant with lower human collagen type X, α1 gene (COL10A1), and human collagen type I, α1 gene (COL1A1), expression and collagen I extracellular accumulation. OA chondrocytes had significantly lower sGAGs/DNA than healthy chondrocytes, but only in high oxygen conditions. Hypoxia also caused significantly greater sGAG retention and hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2) expression by OA chondrocytes. Both healthy and OA chondrocytes had significantly lower expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP1, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP13 in hypoxia and less active MMP2 enzyme, consistent with lower MMP14 expression. However, aggrecanase (ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5) expression was significantly lowered by hypoxia only in healthy cells, and COL10A1 and MMP13 remained significantly higher in OA chondrocytes than in healthy chondrocytes in hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α and HIF-2α had similar expression profiles in healthy and OA cells, increasing to maximal levels early in hypoxia and decreasing over time. Conclusions Hypoxic culture of human chondrocytes has long been acknowledged to result in increased

  14. Selenium effect on selenoprotein transcriptome in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jidong; Zheng, Yuewen; Min, Zixin; Ning, Qilan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-04-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient and exerts its biological functions predominantly through selenoproteins. Selenium deficiency is associated with cartilage function. This study demonstrated that all 24 selenoprotein transcripts in mouse genome were detectable in ATDC5 chondrocytes except deiodinase 1 (DIO1), DIO2, and selenoprotein V (Sel V), while all 25 selenoprotein transcripts in human genome were detectable in C28/I2 chondrocytes except glutathione peroxidase 6 (GPx6) and DIO1. In addition, gene expression of five selenoproteins (GPx1, Sel H, Sel N, Sel P, and Sel W) was up-regulated and two selenoproteins (SPS2 and Sel O) was down-regulated by sodium selenite (Se) in both ATDC5 and C28/I2 cells. Gene expression of six selenoproteins (TrxR1, Sel I, Sel M, Sel R, Sel S, Sel T) and one selenoprotein (GPx3) was up-regulated by Se in ATDC5 and C28/I2 cells, respectively. Gene expression of one selenoprotein (TrxR2) was down-regulated by Se only in ATDC5 cells. Further transcription inhibition assay showed that both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms involved in Se-regulated gene expression of GPx1, TrxR1, TrxR2, SPS2, Sel O, and Sel S. However, Se-regulated gene expression of Sel H, Sel I, Sel M, Sel N, Sel P, Sel R, Sel T, and Sel W mainly at posttranscriptional level. Moreover, new protein synthesis inhibition assay indicated that Se-mediated new protein synthesis also played roles in Se-regulated gene expression of GPx1, TrxR1, TrxR2, Sel H, Sel O, Sel P, Sel R, and Sel W. In summary, this study described the selenoprotein transcriptome, Se-regulated selenoproteins and possible mechanisms involved in chondrocytes.

  15. Inflammation-induced chondrocyte hypertrophy is driven by receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Denise L; Johnson, Kristen; Rediske, John; Lotz, Martin; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2005-12-15

    The multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates certain chronic vascular and neurologic degenerative diseases accompanied by low-grade inflammation. RAGE ligands include S100/calgranulins, a class of low-molecular-mass, calcium-binding polypeptides, several of which are chondrocyte expressed. Here, we tested the hypothesis that S100A11 and RAGE signaling modulate osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis by regulating a shift in chondrocyte differentiation to hypertrophy. We analyzed human cartilages and cultured human articular chondrocytes, and used recombinant human S100A11, soluble RAGE, and previously characterized RAGE-specific blocking Abs. Normal human knee cartilages demonstrated constitutive RAGE and S100A11 expression, and RAGE and S100A11 expression were up-regulated in OA cartilages studied by immunohistochemistry. CXCL8 and TNF-alpha induced S100A11 expression and release in cultured chondrocytes. Moreover, S100A11 induced cell size increase and expression of type X collagen consistent with chondrocyte hypertrophy in vitro. CXCL8-induced, IL-8-induced, and TNF-alpha-induced but not retinoic acid-induced chondrocyte hypertrophy were suppressed by treatment with soluble RAGE or RAGE-specific blocking Abs. Last, via transfection of dominant-negative RAGE and dominant-negative MAPK kinase 3, we demonstrated that S100A11-induced chondrocyte type X collagen expression was dependent on RAGE-mediated p38 MAPK pathway activation. We conclude that up-regulated chondrocyte expression of the RAGE ligand S100A11 in OA cartilage, and RAGE signaling through the p38 MAPK pathway, promote inflammation-associated chondrocyte hypertrophy. RAGE signaling thereby has the potential to contribute to the progression of OA.

  16. Enhanced apoptotic and reduced protective response in chondrocytes following endoplasmic reticulum stress in osteoarthritic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Koji; Hirose, Jun; Senba, Kei; Yamabe, Soichiro; Oike, Yuichi; Gotoh, Tomomi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been shown to participate in many disease pathologies. Although recent reports have demonstrated that ER stress in chondrocytes is present in human osteoarthritis (OA), its role in the pathology of cartilage degeneration, such as chondrocyte apoptosis, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression of phosphorylated PERK (pPERK), ubiquitin (Ub), GRP78, CHOP, phosphorylated JNK (pJNK) and cleaved caspase-3 (C-CASP3) and the mRNA splicing of XBP1 (XBP1 splicing) in human OA cartilage by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Additionally, human chondrocytes were treated with several concentrations of tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer, to assess the impact of ER stress on the mRNA expression of CHOP, XBP1 splicing and apoptosis, as determined by real-time PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses respectively. In human OA cartilage, the number of chondrocytes expressing pPERK, Ub, CHOP and pJNK positively correlated with cartilage degeneration and the number of C-CASP3-positive chondrocytes. XBP1 splicing and GRP78 expression in severe OA containing the greatest number of C-CASP3-positive chondrocytes were similar to the levels in mild OA, however, XBP1 splicing was higher in moderate OA than in mild and severe OA. Tunicamycin dose dependently increased CHOP expression and apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes. Although tunicamycin upregulated XBP1 splicing in cultured chondrocytes, its impact on XBP1 splicing was weakened at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the present results indicate that ER stress may contribute to chondrocyte apoptosis along with OA progression, which was closely associated with an enhanced apoptotic response and a reduced protective response by the cells. PMID:21294793

  17. Regulated transcription of human matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and interleukin-1β (IL1B) genes in chondrocytes depends on methylation of specific proximal promoter CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ko; Otero, Miguel; Imagawa, Kei; de Andrés, María C; Coico, Jonathan M; Roach, Helmtrud I; Oreffo, Richard O C; Marcu, Kenneth B; Goldring, Mary B

    2013-04-05

    The role of DNA methylation in the regulation of catabolic genes such as MMP13 and IL1B, which have sparse CpG islands, is poorly understood in the context of musculoskeletal diseases. We report that demethylation of specific CpG sites at -110 bp and -299 bp of the proximal MMP13 and IL1B promoters, respectively, detected by in situ methylation analysis of chondrocytes obtained directly from human cartilage, strongly correlated with higher levels of gene expression. The methylation status of these sites had a significant impact on promoter activities in chondrocytes, as revealed in transfection experiments with site-directed CpG mutants in a CpG-free luciferase reporter. Methylation of the -110 and -299 CpG sites, which reside within a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) consensus motif in the respective MMP13 and IL1B promoters, produced the most marked suppression of their transcriptional activities. Methylation of the -110 bp CpG site in the MMP13 promoter inhibited its HIF-2α-driven transactivation and decreased HIF-2α binding to the MMP13 proximal promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In contrast to HIF-2α, MMP13 transcriptional regulation by other positive (RUNX2, AP-1, ELF3) and negative (Sp1, GATA1, and USF1) factors was not affected by methylation status. However, unlike the MMP13 promoter, IL1B was not susceptible to HIF-2α transactivation, indicating that the -299 CpG site in the IL1B promoter must interact with other transcription factors to modulate IL1B transcriptional activity. Taken together, our data reveal that the methylation of different CpG sites in the proximal promoters of the human MMP13 and IL1B genes modulates their transcription by distinct mechanisms.

  18. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25755694

  20. Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Increased the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of A2A and A3 Adenosine Receptors in Human T/C-28a2 Chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Goldring, Mary B.; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) have an important role in the regulation of inflammation and their activation is involved in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on inflammation have been reported and we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in different cell lines. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are two key cell types in the skeletal system that play important role in cartilage and bone metabolism representing an interesting target to study the effect of PEMFs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A and/or A3ARs in T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence, mRNA analysis and saturation binding assays revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3AR expression. A2A and A3ARs were able to modulate cAMP production and cell proliferation. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of some of the most relevant pro-inflammatory cytokine release such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, following the treatment with IL-1β as an inflammatory stimuli. In human chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lines, the inhibitory effect of A2A and A3AR stimulation on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important lipid inflammatory mediator, was observed. In addition, in T/C-28a2 cells, the activation of A2A or A3ARs elicited an inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. In hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts, PEMF exposure determined an increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG) production. The effect of the A2A or A3AR agonists in the examined cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and completely blocked by using well-known selective antagonists. These results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increase the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A or A3ARs suggesting their potential therapeutic use in the therapy of inflammatory bone and joint disorders

  1. Pulsed electromagnetic fields increased the anti-inflammatory effect of A₂A and A₃ adenosine receptors in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Goldring, Mary B; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) have an important role in the regulation of inflammation and their activation is involved in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on inflammation have been reported and we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in different cell lines. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are two key cell types in the skeletal system that play important role in cartilage and bone metabolism representing an interesting target to study the effect of PEMFs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A and/or A3ARs in T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence, mRNA analysis and saturation binding assays revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3AR expression. A2A and A3ARs were able to modulate cAMP production and cell proliferation. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of some of the most relevant pro-inflammatory cytokine release such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, following the treatment with IL-1β as an inflammatory stimuli. In human chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lines, the inhibitory effect of A2A and A3AR stimulation on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important lipid inflammatory mediator, was observed. In addition, in T/C-28a2 cells, the activation of A2A or A3ARs elicited an inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. In hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts, PEMF exposure determined an increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG) production. The effect of the A2A or A3AR agonists in the examined cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and completely blocked by using well-known selective antagonists. These results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increase the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A or A3ARs suggesting their potential therapeutic use in the therapy of inflammatory bone and joint disorders.

  2. Toxicity of antiseptics against chondrocytes: what is best for the cartilage in septic joint surgery?

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Kolar, Paula; Seeger, Joern B; Arnholdt, Joerg; Thiele, Kathi; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-11-01

    In septic joint surgery, the most frequently used antiseptics are polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and taurolidine. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of these antiseptics on viability of human chondrocytes. Our hypothesis was that antiseptics and supplemental irrigation with sodium chloride lavage are less toxic on human chondrocytes than treatment with antiseptics only. Primary human chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from six donated human knee joints. Polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide or taurolidine were added to the cultures. Toxicity analysis was performed by visualisation of cell structure using light microscopy and LDH activity. The determination of vital cells and total cell numbers of chondrocytes treated with antiseptics partly followed by irrigation with sodium chloride solution was performed by using Casy Cell-Counter. Light microscopic data revealed a defect in cell structure after addition of antiseptics. We showed a significant increase of LDH enzyme activity after the treatment with polyhexanide or taurolidine. After treatment with antiseptics followed by sodium chloride solution a significant increase of vital and total cell numbers resulted in comparison with the chondrocytes that were only treated with antiseptics. The data show that treatment with polyhexanid, hydrogen peroxide or taurolidine induces cell death of human chondroctes in vitro. The application of sodium chloride solution after the treatment with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide possibly has a protective effect on chondrocyte viability.

  3. Interplay between cytoskeletal polymerization and the chondrogenic phenotype in chondrocytes passaged in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Nabavi Niaki, Mortah; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    Tubulin and actin exist as monomeric units that polymerize to form either microtubules or filamentous actin. As the polymerization status (monomeric/polymeric ratio) of tubulin and/or actin have been shown to be important in regulating gene expression and phenotype in non-chondrocyte cells, the objective of this study was to examine the role of cytoskeletal polymerization on the chondrocyte phenotype. We hypothesized that actin and/or tubulin polymerization status modulates the chondrocyte phenotype during monolayer culture as well as in 3D culture during redifferentiation. To test this hypothesis, articular chondrocytes were grown and passaged in 2D monolayer culture. Cell phenotype was investigated by assessing cell morphology (area and circularity), actin/tubulin content, organization and polymerization status, as well as by determination of proliferation, fibroblast and cartilage matrix gene expression with passage number. Bovine chondrocytes became larger, more elongated, and had significantly (P < 0.05) increased gene expression of proliferation-associated molecules (cyclin D1 and ki67), as well as significantly (P < 0.05) decreased cartilage matrix (type II collagen and aggrecan) and increased fibroblast-like matrix, type I collagen (COL1), gene expression by passage 2 (P2). Although tubulin polymerization status was not significantly (P > 0.05) modulated, actin polymerization was increased in bovine P2 cells. Actin depolymerization, but not tubulin depolymerization, promoted the chondrocyte phenotype by inducing cell rounding, increasing aggrecan and reducing COL1 expression. Knockdown of actin depolymerization factor, cofilin, in these cells induced further P2 cell actin polymerization and increased COL1 gene expression. To confirm that actin status regulated COL1 gene expression in human P2 chondrocytes, human P2 chondrocytes were exposed to cytochalasin D. Cytochalasin D decreased COL1 gene expression in human passaged chondrocytes. Furthermore

  4. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  5. Encapsulation of chondrocytes in high-stiffness agarose microenvironments for in vitro modeling of osteoarthritis mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Jutila, Aaron A; Zignego, Donald L; Schell, William J; June, Ronald K

    2015-05-01

    In articular cartilage, chondrocytes reside within a gel-like pericellular matrix (PCM). This matrix provides a mechanical link through which joint loads are transmitted to chondrocytes. The stiffness of the PCM decreases in the most common degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis. To develop a system for modeling the stiffness of both the healthy and osteoarthritic PCM, we determined the concentration-stiffness relationships for agarose. We extended these results to encapsulate chondrocytes in agarose of physiological stiffness. Finally, we assessed the relevance of stiffness for chondrocyte mechanotransduction by examining the biological response to mechanical loading for cells encapsulated in low- and high-stiffness gels. We achieved agarose equilibrium stiffness values as large as 51.3 kPa. At 4.0% agarose, we found equilibrium moduli of 34.3 ± 1.65 kPa, and at 4.5% agarose, we found equilibrium moduli of 35.7 ± 0.95 kPa. Cyclical tests found complex moduli of ~100-300 kPa. Viability was >96% for all studies. We observed distinct metabolomic responses in >500 functional small molecules describing changes in cell physiology, between primary human chondrocytes encapsulated in 2.0 and 4.5% agarose indicating that the gel stiffness affects cellular mechanotransduction. These data demonstrate both the feasibility of modeling the chondrocyte pericellular matrix stiffness and the importance of the physiological pericellular stiffness for understanding chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  6. Chondrocytes Cocultured with Stromal Vascular Fraction of Adipose Tissue Present More Intense Chondrogenic Characteristics Than with Adipose Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Prins, Henk-Jan; Leijten, Jeroen; Helder, Marco N; Evseenko, Denis; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Lin, Yunfeng; Karperien, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Partial replacement of chondrocytes by stem cells has been proposed to improve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Our previous studies showed that the increased cartilage production in pellet cocultures of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is due to a trophic role of the MSCs by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production rather than MSCs actively undergoing chondrogenic differentiation. The aim of this study is to compare the trophic effects of stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF) and in vitro expanded adipose stem cells (ASC). SVF and culture-expanded ASC (n = 9) were cocultured with primary human chondrocytes in pellets. By glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays, we showed that coculture pellets of SVF and chondrocytes have more GAG deposition than that of ASC and chondrocytes. Results of the short tandem repeats analysis indicated that the increase in the chondrocyte proportion in the coculture pellets is more pronounced in the SVF coculture group than in the ASC coculture group. Using flow cytometry and microarray, we demonstrated that SVF and ASC have different characteristics in cell surface markers and gene expression profiles. SVF is more heterogeneous than ASC, whereas ASC is more enriched in cells from the mesenchymal lineage than SVF. By subcutaneous implantation into nude mice, we showed that constructs of SVF and chondrocytes are better in depositing cartilage matrix than the mixture of ASC and chondrocytes. Taken together, SVF is better than ASC in terms of forming cartilage matrix in pellet coculture and in coimplantation models omitting the need for prior cell expansion. Our study suggests that the SVF in combination with primary human chondrocytes may be a good cell combination for one-stage cartilage repair.

  7. Doublecortin is expressed in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ryan, James A; Di Cesare, Paul E; Liu, Judy; Walsh, Christopher A; You, Zongbing

    2007-11-23

    Articular cartilage and cartilage in the embryonic cartilaginous anlagen and growth plates are both hyaline cartilages. In this study, we found that doublecortin (DCX) was expressed in articular chondrocytes but not in chondrocytes from the cartilaginous anlagen or growth plates. DCX was expressed by the cells in the chondrogenous layers but not intermediate layer of joint interzone. Furthermore, the synovium and cruciate ligaments were DCX-negative. DCX-positive chondrocytes were very rare in tissue engineered cartilage derived from in vitro pellet culture of rat chondrosarcoma, ATDC5, and C3H10T1/2 cells. However, the new hyaline cartilage formed in rabbit knee defect contained mostly DCX-positive chondrocytes. Our results demonstrate that DCX can be used as a marker to distinguish articular chondrocytes from other chondrocytes and to evaluate the quality of tissue engineered or regenerated cartilage in terms of their "articular" or "non-articular" nature.

  8. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I Transduced Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Cartilage Repair in Full-thickness Defects in the Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 105 AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  9. Benzamil sensitive ion channels contribute to volume regulation in canine chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R; Feetham, CH; Gentles, L; Penny, J; Tregilgas, L; Tohami, W; Mobasheri, A; Barrett-Jolley, R

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chondrocytes exist within cartilage and serve to maintain the extracellular matrix. It has been postulated that osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes lose the ability to regulate their volume, affecting extracellular matrix production. In previous studies, we identified expression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in human chondrocytes, but their function remained unknown. Although ENaC typically has Na+ transport roles, it is also involved in the cell volume regulation of rat hepatocytes. ENaC is a member of the degenerin (Deg) family, and ENaC/Deg-like channels have a low conductance and high sensitivity to benzamil. In this study, we investigated whether canine chondrocytes express functional ENaC/Deg-like ion channels and, if so, what their function may be. Experimental Approach Canine chondrocytes were harvested from dogs killed for unassociated welfare reasons. We used immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp electrophysiology to investigate ENaC expression and video microscopy to analyse the effects of pharmacological inhibition of ENaC/Deg on cell volume regulation. Key Results Immunofluorescence showed that canine chondrocytes expressed ENaC protein. Single-channel recordings demonstrated expression of a benzamil-sensitive Na+ conductance (9 pS), and whole-cell experiments show this to be approximately 1.5 nS per cell with high selectivity for Na+. Benzamil hyperpolarized chondrocytes by approximately 8 mV with a pD2 8.4. Chondrocyte regulatory volume decrease (RVI) was inhibited by benzamil (pD2 7.5) but persisted when extracellular Na+ ions were replaced by Li+. Conclusion and Implications Our data suggest that benzamil inhibits RVI by reducing the influx of Na+ ions through ENaC/Deg-like ion channels and present ENaC/Deg as a possible target for pharmacological modulation of chondrocyte volume. PMID:22928819

  10. Generation of Immortalized Equine Chondrocytes With Inducible Sox9 Expression Allows Control of Hypertrophic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Saliya; Hilbert, Bryan; Trope, Gareth; Wang, Lexin; Bandara, Nadeeka; Strappe, Padraig

    2016-10-27

    Immortalization of chondrocytes enables long term in vitro culture; however, the chondrogenic capacity of transformed cells varies, thus highlighting the need to develop a proliferative and tuneable chondrocyte cell line where hypertrophic differentiation can be controlled. In this study the SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase reverse transcriptase were employed to immortalize pooled equine chondrocytes through lentiviral vector mediated transduction either singly or on combination. Transformed chondrocytes proliferated stably over multiple passages, but resulted in significantly lower expression of chondrocyte specific collagen II mRNA (P < 0.0001) and up regulation of the hypertrophic marker collagen X (P < 0.0001) in three dimensional cultures. A Col2a1 promoter driven GFP reporter was constructed for real time monitoring of chondrogenic differentiation and a significant increase in promoter activation was observed in cultures treated with the growth factor TGFβ-3 (P < 0.05). To recapitulate the native articular chondrocyte phenotype we further transduced large T antigen immortalized chondrocytes with lentiviral vectors allowing either constitutive or doxycycline inducible expression of Sox9. In 3D cultures, the Sox9 over-expressing chondrocytes secreted significantly higher levels of extracellular matrix polysaccharide glycosaminoglycan (P < 0.05), while up-regulating collagen II and Aggrecan mRNA (P < 0.05) in both expression systems with a similar patterns observed with imunohistochemical staining. High levels of collagen X mRNA and protein were maintained with constitutive sox9 reflecting hypetrophic differentiation but significantly lower expression could be achieved with inducible Sox9. In conclusion, immortalization of equine chondrocytes results in stable proliferation but a reduction of chondrogenic potential whilst modulation of sox9 expression enabled control of hypertrophic characteristics. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1

  11. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-04-22

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. - Highlights: • Rspo2 is a secreted activator of Wnt, and its knockout shows extended proliferating chondrocytes in endochondral ossification. • In proliferating chondrocytes of Rspo2-knockout mice, Sox9 and collagen type 2 are increased and β-catenin is decreased. • Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5, as well as Sox9 and collagen type 2, are expressed in differentiating ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. • In ATDC5 cells, Rspo2 decreases

  12. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Methods: Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×106/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may

  13. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×10(6)/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may provide a novel approach

  14. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa’s nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting. PMID:26958320

  15. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa's nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting.

  16. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration.

  17. Constitutive activation of MEK1 in chondrocytes causes Stat1-independent achondroplasia-like dwarfism and rescues the Fgfr3-deficient mouse phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shunichi; Balmes, Gener; McKinney, Sandra; Zhang, Zhaoping; Givol, David; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    We generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes. These mice showed a dwarf phenotype similar to achondroplasia, the most common human dwarfism, caused by activating mutations in FGFR3. These mice displayed incomplete hypertrophy of chondrocytes in the growth plates and a general delay in endochondral ossification, whereas chondrocyte proliferation was unaffected. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cranial base in transgenic embryos showed reduced staining for collagen type X and persistent expression of Sox9 in chondrocytes. These observations indicate that the MAPK pathway inhibits hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and negatively regulates bone growth without inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation. Expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes of Fgfr3-deficient mice inhibited skeletal overgrowth, strongly suggesting that regulation of bone growth by FGFR3 is mediated at least in part by the MAPK pathway. Although loss of Stat1 restored the reduced chondrocyte proliferation in mice expressing an achondroplasia mutant of Fgfr3, it did not rescue the reduced hypertrophic zone, the delay in formation of secondary ossification centers, and the achondroplasia-like phenotype. These observations suggest a model in which Fgfr3 signaling inhibits bone growth by inhibiting chondrocyte differentiation through the MAPK pathway and by inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation through Stat1. PMID:14871928

  18. Screening of five essential oils for identification of potential inhibitors of IL-1-induced Nf-kappaB activation and NO production in human chondrocytes: characterization of the inhibitory activity of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Neves, Angela; Rosa, Susana; Gonçalves, Juliana; Rufino, Ana; Judas, Fernando; Salgueiro, Lígia; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Mendes, Alexandrina Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear factor-kappaB is a key transcription factor activated by pro-inflammatory signals, like interleukin-1beta (IL-1), being required for the expression of many inflammatory and catabolic mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), that play an important role in arthritic diseases. This work aimed at screening and identifying natural inhibitors of IL-induced NF-kappaB activation and NO production in human articular chondrocytes. Five essential oils obtained from four plants of the Iberian flora, Mentha x piperita L. (Lamiaceae), Origanum virens L. (Lamiaceae), Lavandula luiseri L. (Lamiaceae), and Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus (Cupressaceae), were screened for their ability to prevent IL-1-induced NO production. The oil showing higher inhibitory activity was fractionated, concentrated, analyzed for composition elucidation and prepared for further assays. For this purpose, the human chondrocytic cell line C-28/I2 was used to evaluate NF-kappaB activation by determining the cytoplasmic levels of the total and phosphorylated forms of the inhibitory protein, I kappaB-alpha, and the NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity. The essential oil from the leaves of J. oxycedrus in a concentration of 0.02 % (v/v) achieved the greatest inhibition (80 +/- 8%) of IL-1-induced NO production. Chemical analysis showed that this essential oil is predominantly composed of monoterpene hydrocabons, being alpha-pinene [2,6,6-trimethyl-bicyclo(3.1.1)hept-3-ene] the major constituent (76 %). Similarly to the effect of the whole oil, a fraction containing 93% alpha-pinene reduced significantly IL-1-induced I kappaB-alpha degradation. Moreover, alpha-pinene also decreased I kappaB-alpha phosphorylation, NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity, and NO production. Another fraction containing oxygenated mono- and sesquiterpenes was nearly as effective as alpha-pinene. The ability of the alpha-pinene-containing fraction to reduce IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activation and NO production warrants further studies

  19. Cysteine-Mediated Redox Regulation of Cell Signaling in Chondrocytes Stimulated With Fibronectin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Scott T.; Long, David L.; Reisz, Julie A.; Yammani, Raghunatha R.; Burke, Elizabeth A.; Klomsiri, Chananat; Poole, Leslie B.; Furdui, Cristina M.; Loeser, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative posttranslational modifications of intracellular proteins can potentially regulate signaling pathways relevant to cartilage destruction in arthritis. In this study, oxidation of cysteine residues to form sulfenic acid (S-sulfenylation) was examined in osteo-arthritic (OA) chondrocytes and investigated in normal chondrocytes as a mechanism by which fragments of fibronectin (FN-f) stimulate chondrocyte catabolic signaling. Methods Chondrocytes isolated from OA and normal human articular cartilage were analyzed using analogs of dimedone that specifically and irreversibly react with protein S-sulfenylated cysteines. Global S-sulfenylation was measured in cell lysates with and without FN-f stimulation by immunoblotting and in fixed cells by confocal microscopy. S-sulfenylation in specific proteins was identified by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by immunoblotting. Src activity was measured in live cells using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor. Results Proteins in chondrocytes isolated from OA cartilage were found to have elevated basal levels of S-sulfenylation relative to those of chondrocytes from normal cartilage. Treatment of normal chondrocytes with FN-f induced increased levels of S-sulfenylation in multiple proteins, including the tyrosine kinase Src. FN-f treatment also increased the levels of Src activity. Pretreatment with dimedone to alter S-sulfenylation function or with Src kinase inhibitors inhibited FN-f–induced production of matrix metalloproteinase 13. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time the presence of oxidative posttranslational modification of proteins in human articular chondrocytes by S-sulfenylation. Due to the ability to regulate the activity of a number of cell signaling pathways, including catabolic mediators induced by fibronectin fragments, S-sulfenylation may contribute to cartilage destruction in OA and warrants further investigation. PMID:26314228

  20. Fisetin inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes through activating SIRT1 and attenuates the progression of osteoarthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenhao; Feng, Zhenhua; You, Shengban; Zhang, Hui; Tao, Zhenyu; Wang, Quan; Chen, Hua; Wu, Yaosen

    2017-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation and inflammation. Fisetin, a polyphenol extracted from fruits and vegetables, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of fisetin on OA both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, chondrocytes were pretreated with fisetin alone or fisetin combined with sirtinol (an inhibitor of SIRT1) for 2h before IL-1β stimulation. Production of NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6 were evaluated by the Griess reaction and ELISAs. The mRNA (COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, Sox-9, aggrecan and collagen-II) and protein expression (COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and SIRT1) were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the expression of collagen-II and SIRT1. SIRT1 activity was quantified with SIRT1 fluorometric assay kit. The in vivo effect of fisetin was evaluated by gavage in mice OA models induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). We found that fisetin inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5. Besides, fisetin remarkably decreased IL-1β-induced degradation of Sox-9, aggrecan and collagen-II. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced SIRT1 decrease and inactivation. However, the inhibitory effect of fisetin was obvious abolished by sirtinol, suggesting that fisetin exerts anti-inflammatory effects through activating SIRT1. In vivo, fisetin-treated mice exhibited less cartilage destruction and lower OARSI scores. Moreover, fisetin reduced subchondral bone plate thickness and alleviated synovitis. Taken together, these findings indicate that fisetin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenotypic changes in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of chondrocytes: 3D in vitro models for joint wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Tang, Ja-Reng; Deng, Win-Ping; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Chung, Andrew; Zuo, Chun S; Bowley, John F

    2010-03-01

    We aim to establish a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, and explore the involvement of chondrocytes in its repair. To characterize chondrocyte involvement in wound healing, an in vitro 3D model composed of chondrocyte mixing with either type II/I collagen or type I collagen matrix was established. The "defects" measuring 5 mm in diameter were made on each collagen matrix-chondrocyte construct to mimic in vivo cartilage defects. The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on chondrocytes migration and differentiation were studied. The migration and Glucosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis of chondrocytes in the defect areas were observed by microscopy after Alcian-blue staining. In the presence of bFGF, GAG expression increased significantly when chondrocytes were cultured in type II/I collagen matrix compared to type I collagen matrix. However, mild GAG accumulation was also found when cells were cultured in either type I or type II/I collagens without bFGF. In a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, bFGF promote chondrocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation in the presence of type II/I collagen matrix, and showed potential to regulate wound healing. These wound healing models may provide feasible methods to explore various drugs prior to human trials.

  2. [Effect of Nivalenol and selenium on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha secretion in cultured chondrocytes].

    PubMed

    Cao, Pei-hua; Cao, Jun-ling; Cao, Li-min; Yang, Ya-juan; Li, Wei-bo

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effect of Nivalenol(NIV) and Selenium(Se) on the levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the cultured chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes cultured in vitro were treated with or without NIV and Se. The morphology of chondrocytes was observed by optic microscope. The DNA content was determined by UV Spectrophotometry. The levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in cultured medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hematoxylin & eosin staining indicated there was cell necrosis in the cartilage reconstructed in vitro from both NIV group and NIV+Se group. Compared with the group of NIV toxin, the damage of chondrocytes was less severe when Se was added. NIV could inhibit chondrocyte DNA synthesis. The content of DNA with NIV was lowest than that in other groups. The levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha with NIV were significantly higher than control group (P<0.05). After Se was added, the levels did not change significantly compared with the groups without Se. NIV toxin could superinduce IL-1beta and TNF-alpha secretion in chondrocytes, which may be the key mechanism of chondrocyte injury by NIV. Se can partially alleviate the effects of NIV on chondrocytes cultured in vitro.

  3. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  4. Fibronectin Fragment Activation of Proline-rich Tyrosine Kinase PYK2 Mediates Integrin Signals Regulating Collagenase-3 Expression by Human Chondrocytes through a Protein Kinase C-dependent Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, Richard F.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Samarel, Allen M.; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin fragments (FN-f), including the 110-kDa fragment that binds the α5β1 integrin, stimulate collagenase-3 (MMP-13) production and cartilage destruction. In the present study, treatment of chondrocytes with the 110-kDa FN-f or an activating antibody to the α5β1 integrin was found to increase tyrosine autophosphorylation (Tyr-402) of the proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (PYK2) without significant change in autophosphorylation (Tyr-397) of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A9, shown previously to block a PYK2-dependent pathway, blocked the FN-f-stimulated increase in MMP-13, whereas tyrphostin A25 did not. FN-f-stimulated PYK2 phosphorylation and MMP-13 production was also blocked by reducing intracellular calcium levels. Adenovirally mediated overexpression of wild type but not mutant PYK2 resulted in increased MMP-13 production. The protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulated PYK2 phosphorylation and MMP-13 production. MMP-13 expression stimulated by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or FN-f was blocked by PKC inhibitors including the PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin. Furthermore, PKCδ translocation from cytosol to membrane was noted within 5 min of stimulation with FN-f. Immortalized human chondrocytes, transiently transfected with MMP-13 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs, showed increased promoter activity after FN-f treatment that was inhibited by co-transfection with either of two dominant negative mutants of PYK2 (Y402F and K457A). No inhibition was seen after co-transfection with wild type PYK2, a dominant negative of FAK (FRNK) or empty vector plasmid. FN-f-stimulated MMP-13 promoter activity was also inhibited by chemical inhibitors of ERK, JNK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases or by co-transfection of dominant negative MAP kinase mutant constructs. These studies have identified a novel pathway for the MAP kinase regulation of MMP-13 production which involves

  5. Filamin B Regulates Chondrocyte Proliferation and Differentiation through Cdk1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gewei; Zhang, Jingping; Hecht, Jonathan L.; Sheen, Volney L.

    2014-01-01

    Humans who harbor loss of function mutations in the actin-associated filamin B (FLNB) gene develop spondylocarpotarsal syndrome (SCT), a disorder characterized by dwarfism (delayed bone formation) and premature fusion of the vertebral, carpal and tarsal bones (premature differentiation). To better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing these seemingly divergent processes, we generated and characterized FlnB knockdown ATDC5 cell lines. We found that FlnB knockdown led to reduced proliferation and enhanced differentiation in chondrocytes. Within the shortened growth plate of postnatal FlnB−/− mice long bone, we observed a similarly progressive decline in the number of rapidly proliferating chondrocytes and premature differentiation characterized by an enlarged prehypertrophic zone, a widened Col2a1+/Col10a1+ overlapping region, but relatively reduced hypertrophic zone length. The reduced chondrocyte proliferation and premature differentiation were, in part, attributable to enhanced G2/M phase progression, where fewer FlnB deficient ATDC5 chondrocytes resided in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. FlnB loss reduced Cdk1 phosphorylation (an inhibitor of G2/M phase progression) and Cdk1 inhibition in chondrocytes mimicked the null FlnB, premature differentiation phenotype, through a β1-integrin receptor- Pi3k/Akt (a key regulator of chondrocyte differentiation) mediated pathway. In this context, the early prehypertrophic differentiation provides an explanation for the premature differentiation seen in this disorder, whereas the progressive decline in proliferating chondrocytes would ultimately lead to reduced chondrocyte production and shortened bone length. These findings begin to define a role for filamin proteins in directing both cell proliferation and differentiation through indirect regulation of cell cycle associated proteins. PMID:24551245

  6. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1β and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1β mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1β levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment. PMID:17596264

  7. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1beta and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1beta mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1beta levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment.

  8. Posttraumatic Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Murine Xiphoid.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher G; Eisner, Eric; McGlynn, Margaret; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James; Borrelli, Joseph; Chen, Christopher C T

    2013-10-01

    To demonstrate posttraumatic chondrocyte apoptosis in the murine xiphoid after a crush-type injury and to ultimately determine the pathway (i.e., intrinsic or extrinsic) by which chondrocytes undergo apoptosis in response to mechanical injury. The xiphoids of adult female wild-type mice were injured with the use of a modified Kelly clamp. Postinjury xiphoid cartilage was analyzed via 3 well-described independent means of assessing apoptosis in chondrocytes: hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay, and activated caspase-3 staining. Injured specimens contained many chondrocytes with evidence of apoptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and the liberation of apoptotic bodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of chondrocytes undergoing apoptosis in the injured specimens as compared with the uninjured specimens. Chondrocytes can be stimulated to undergo apoptosis as a result of mechanical injury. These experiments involving predominantly cartilaginous murine xiphoid in vivo establish a baseline for future investigations that employ the genetic and therapeutic modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis in response to mechanical injury.

  9. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  10. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  11. Autologous Chondrocytes and Next-Generation Matrix-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hinckel, Betina B; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2017-07-01

    Focal chondral defects of the knee are common and can significantly impair quality of life. The autologous chondrocyte implantation technique has evolved over the past 20 years; the newest third-generation technique is matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation. Physical examination is important to characterize location and source of pain and identify associated injuries. Imaging studies allow characterization of the lesions, identification of associated lesions, and alignment. Conservative measures should be exhausted before proceeding with surgical treatment. Steps of surgical treatment are diagnostic arthroscopy and biopsy, chondrocyte culture, and chondrocyte implantation. The techniques and their outcomes are discussed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microenvironmental changes during differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Djouad, Farida; Delorme, Bruno; Maurice, Marielle; Bony, Claire; Apparailly, Florence; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Canovas, François; Charbord, Pierre; Noël, Danièle; Jorgensen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Chondrogenesis is a process involving stem-cell differentiation through the coordinated effects of growth/differentiation factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were found within the cartilage, which constitutes a specific niche composed of ECM proteins with unique features. Therefore, we hypothesized that the induction of MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes might be induced and/or influenced by molecules from the microenvironment. Using microarray analysis, we previously identified genes that are regulated during MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes. In this study, we wanted to precisely assess the differential expression of genes associated with the microenvironment using a large-scale real-time PCR assay, according to the simultaneous detection of up to 384 mRNAs in one sample. Chondrogenesis of bone-marrow-derived human MSCs was induced by culture in micropellet for various periods of time. Total RNA was extracted and submitted to quantitative RT-PCR. We identified molecules already known to be involved in attachment and cell migration, including syndecans, glypicans, gelsolin, decorin, fibronectin, and type II, IX and XI collagens. Importantly, we detected the expression of molecules that were not previously associated with MSCs or chondrocytes, namely metalloproteases (MMP-7 and MMP-28), molecules of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); cef10/cyr61 and nov (CCN) family (CCN3 and CCN4), chemokines and their receptors chemokine CXC motif ligand (CXCL1), Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FlT3L), chemokine CC motif receptor (CCR3 and CCR4), molecules with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain (ADAM8, ADAM9, ADAM19, ADAM23, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5), cadherins (4 and 13) and integrins (α4, α7 and β5). Our data suggest that crosstalk between ECM components of the microenvironment and MSCs within the cartilage is

  13. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA. PMID:27129293

  14. Microenvironmental changes during differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Djouad, Farida; Delorme, Bruno; Maurice, Marielle; Bony, Claire; Apparailly, Florence; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Canovas, François; Charbord, Pierre; Noël, Danièle; Jorgensen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Chondrogenesis is a process involving stem-cell differentiation through the coordinated effects of growth/differentiation factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were found within the cartilage, which constitutes a specific niche composed of ECM proteins with unique features. Therefore, we hypothesized that the induction of MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes might be induced and/or influenced by molecules from the microenvironment. Using microarray analysis, we previously identified genes that are regulated during MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes. In this study, we wanted to precisely assess the differential expression of genes associated with the microenvironment using a large-scale real-time PCR assay, according to the simultaneous detection of up to 384 mRNAs in one sample. Chondrogenesis of bone-marrow-derived human MSCs was induced by culture in micropellet for various periods of time. Total RNA was extracted and submitted to quantitative RT-PCR. We identified molecules already known to be involved in attachment and cell migration, including syndecans, glypicans, gelsolin, decorin, fibronectin, and type II, IX and XI collagens. Importantly, we detected the expression of molecules that were not previously associated with MSCs or chondrocytes, namely metalloproteases (MMP-7 and MMP-28), molecules of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); cef10/cyr61 and nov (CCN) family (CCN3 and CCN4), chemokines and their receptors chemokine CXC motif ligand (CXCL1), Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FlT3L), chemokine CC motif receptor (CCR3 and CCR4), molecules with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain (ADAM8, ADAM9, ADAM19, ADAM23, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5), cadherins (4 and 13) and integrins (alpha4, alpha7 and beta5). Our data suggest that crosstalk between ECM components of the microenvironment and MSCs within the cartilage is

  15. α5β1 integrin induces the expression of noncartilaginous procollagen gene expression in articular chondrocytes cultured in monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Articular chondrocytes undergo an obvious phenotypic change when cultured in monolayers. During this change, or dedifferentiation, the expression of type I and type III procollagen is induced where normal chondrocytes express little type I and type III procollagen. In this study, we attempted to determine the mechanism(s) for the induction of such procollagen expression in dedifferentiating chondrocytes. Methods All experiments were performed using primary-cultured human articular chondrocytes under approval of institutional review boards. Integrin(s) responsible for the induction of type I and type III procollagen expression were specified by RNAi experiments. The signal pathway(s) involved in the induction were determined by specific inhibitors and RNAi experiments. Adenovirus-mediated experiments were performed to identify a small GTPase regulating the activity of integrins in dedifferentiating chondrocytes. The effect of inhibition of integrins on dedifferentiation was investigated by experiments using echistatin, a potent disintegrin. The effect of echistatin was investigated first with monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and then with pellet-cultured chondrocytes. Results In dedifferentiating chondrocytes, α5β1 integrin was found to be involved in the induction of type I and type III procollagen expression. The induction was known to be mediated by v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) signaling. Among the three AKT isoforms, AKT1 seemed to be most involved in the signaling. Elated RAS viral (r-ras) oncogene homolog (RRAS) was considered to regulate the progression of dedifferentiation by modulating the affinity and avidity of α5β1 integrin to ligands. Echistatin inhibited dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Furthermore, the matrix formed by pellet-cultured chondrocytes more closely resembled that of normal cartilage compared with the controls. Conclusions The result of this study has shown, for the first time, that

  16. Col10a1-Runx2 transgenic mice with delayed chondrocyte maturation are less susceptible to developing osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaojuan; Ding, Ming; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Li, Jun; Li, Xin; Gu, Junxia; Im, Hee-Jeong; Lei, Guanghua; Zheng, Qiping

    2014-01-01

    model) to induce OA in TG and WT littermates. The results showed that WT littermates displayed characteristic pathology of fibrotic remodeling at the joint margins and focal cartilage erosion, while the joints in TG mice were essentially protected from remodeling responses, demonstrating that mice with delayed chondrocyte hypertrophy are not susceptible to developing OA. Further translational studies characterizing the role of chondrocyte hypertrophy during OA progression will facilitate identification of therapeutic targets to stop or slow down this degenerative and progressive human joint disease. PMID:25628784

  17. Induction of Re-Differentiation of Passaged Rat Chondrocytes Using a Naturally Obtained Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Myung Hwa; Do, Sun Hee; Park, Ga Ram; Du, Ping; Han, Ki-Chul; Han, Dong Keun

    2013-01-01

    Dedifferentiated human chondrocytes severely limit successful hyaline cartilage repair in clinical practice. The primary interest of this study is to evaluate the naturally obtained cell-derived matrix (CDM) as a physical microenvironment for chondrocyte re-differentiation. Once different cell types were cultured for 6 days and decellularized using detergents and enzymes, the fibroblast-derived matrix (FDM), preosteoblast-derived matrix (PDM), and chondrocyte-derived matrix (CHDM) were obtained. From scanning electron microscope observation, each CDM was found to resemble a fibrous mesh with self-assembled fibrils. Both the FDM and PDM showed a more compact matrix structure compared to the CHDM. For compositional analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed numerous matrix proteins, which were quite different from each CDM in quantity and type. Specific matrix components, such as fibronectin, type I collagen (Col I), and laminin, were detected using immunofluorescent staining. In addition, the water contact angle suggests that the FDM is more hydrophilic than the PDM or CHDM. The proliferation of rat primary chondrocytes growing on CDMs was better than those growing on a plastic coverslip (control) or gelatin. Meanwhile, synthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) was more effective for passaged chondrocytes (P4) cultivated on CDMs, and the difference was significant compared to cells grown on the control or on gelatin. As for the gene expression of cartilage-specific markers, CDMs exhibited good chondrocyte re-differentiation with time: the dedifferentiating marker, Col I was restrained, whereas the ratio between Col II and Col I, and between aggrecan and Col I, as an indicator of re-differentiation, was greatly improved. In addition, immunofluorescence of Col II showed a very positive signal in chondrocytes cultivated for 2 weeks on the CDMs. In an additional study, when three-dimensional cell pellets made from either plate-grown or

  18. Induction of re-differentiation of passaged rat chondrocytes using a naturally obtained extracellular matrix microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Myung Hwa; Do, Sun Hee; Park, Ga Ram; Du, Ping; Han, Ki-Chul; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok

    2013-04-01

    Dedifferentiated human chondrocytes severely limit successful hyaline cartilage repair in clinical practice. The primary interest of this study is to evaluate the naturally obtained cell-derived matrix (CDM) as a physical microenvironment for chondrocyte re-differentiation. Once different cell types were cultured for 6 days and decellularized using detergents and enzymes, the fibroblast-derived matrix (FDM), preosteoblast-derived matrix (PDM), and chondrocyte-derived matrix (CHDM) were obtained. From scanning electron microscope observation, each CDM was found to resemble a fibrous mesh with self-assembled fibrils. Both the FDM and PDM showed a more compact matrix structure compared to the CHDM. For compositional analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed numerous matrix proteins, which were quite different from each CDM in quantity and type. Specific matrix components, such as fibronectin, type I collagen (Col I), and laminin, were detected using immunofluorescent staining. In addition, the water contact angle suggests that the FDM is more hydrophilic than the PDM or CHDM. The proliferation of rat primary chondrocytes growing on CDMs was better than those growing on a plastic coverslip (control) or gelatin. Meanwhile, synthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) was more effective for passaged chondrocytes (P4) cultivated on CDMs, and the difference was significant compared to cells grown on the control or on gelatin. As for the gene expression of cartilage-specific markers, CDMs exhibited good chondrocyte re-differentiation with time: the dedifferentiating marker, Col I was restrained, whereas the ratio between Col II and Col I, and between aggrecan and Col I, as an indicator of re-differentiation, was greatly improved. In addition, immunofluorescence of Col II showed a very positive signal in chondrocytes cultivated for 2 weeks on the CDMs. In an additional study, when three-dimensional cell pellets made from either plate-grown or

  19. Chondrocyte Viability After a Simulated Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K Aaron; Johnson, Peter C; Williams, David; Zumbrun, Steven D; Topolski, Richard; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-07-01

    The effects of blast exposure have gained increasing interest in the military medical community with their continued occurrence on the battlefield. The impact of the direct and indirect energy imparted from blasts to hollow viscera, as well as closed head injuries, have been well studied. However, the injury to articular cartilage has not been investigated, despite previous correlations regarding the development of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of injury to articular chondrocytes after exposure to a simulated blast overpressure wave. Fresh juvenile porcine stifle joints were subjected to a simulated blast overpressure wave utilizing a custom fabricated blast simulator with compressed gases, within the reported range of observed battlefield blasts. Chondrocyte viability was assessed with live/dead staining using ethidium homodimer-2 and calcien acetoxymethylester stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy, calculated as a ratio of dead chondrocytes to live chondrocytes. Testing was performed at time points of 2, 4, and 8 hours after blast exposure and was compared with unblasted control samples. Chondrocyte viability decreased after exposure to a blast overpressure wave when compared with control samples. The amount of death was greater closer to the articular surface and dissipated with increasing tissue depth. Chondrocyte death increased with time after exposure. Chondrocyte death is present after exposure to a simulated blast wave. There is an inverse relationship between chondrocyte viability and the depth from the articular surface. Additional studies are needed to further characterize dose and time effects of blast exposure. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Baicalin suppresses IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines via blocking NF-κB in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and shows protective effect in mice osteoarthritis models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhui; Zhang, Chuanxu; Cai, Leyi; Xie, Huanguang; Hu, Wei; Wang, Te; Lu, Di; Chen, Hua

    2017-09-21

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. Baicalin, a predominant flavonoid isolated from the dry root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of baicalin on OA have not been reported. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of baicalin on OA both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, human OA chondrocytes were pretreated with baicalin (10, 50, 100μM) for 2h and subsequently stimulated with IL-1β for 24h. Production of NO and PGE2 were evaluated by the Griess reaction and ELISAs. The mRNA expression of COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, aggrecan and collagen-II were measured by real-time PCR. The protein expression of COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, p65, p-p65, IκBα and p-IκBα was detected by Western blot. The protein expression of collagen-II was evaluated by immunofluorescence. Luciferase activity assay was used to assess the relative activity of NF-kB. In vivo, the severity of OA was determined by histological analysis. We found that baicalin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced production of NO and PGE2, expression of COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 and degradation of aggrecan and collagen-II. Furthermore, baicalin dramatically suppressed IL-1β-stimulated NF-κB activation. In vivo, treatment of baicalin not only prevented the destruction of cartilage but also relieved synovitis in mice OA models. Taken together, these results suggest that baicalin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord blood: reevaluation of critical factors for successful isolation and high ability to proliferate and differentiate to chondrocytes as compared to mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Hirai, Masako; Cantero, Susana; Ciubotariu, Rodica; Dobrila, Ludy; Hirsh, Allen; Igura, Koichi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Yokomi, Izuru; Nishimura, Toshihide; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Rubinstein, Pablo; Takahashi, Tsuneo A

    2011-04-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (CB) is a potential source for mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) capable of forming specific tissues, for example, bone, cartilage, or muscle. However, difficulty isolating MSC from CB (CB-MSC) has impeded their clinical application. Using more than 450 CB units donated to two public CB banks, we found that successful cell recovery fits a hyper-exponential function of time since birth with very high fidelity. Additionally, significant improvement in the isolation of CB-MSC was achieved by selecting cord blood units having a volume ≥90  ml and time ≤2  h after donor's birth. This resulted in 90% success in isolation of CB-MSC by density gradient purification and without a requirement for immunoaffinity methods as previously reported. Using MSC isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (AT-MSC) as reference controls, we observed that CB-MSC exhibited a higher proliferation rate and expanded to the order of the 1 × 10(9)  cells required for cell therapies. CB-MSC showed karyotype stability after prolonged expansion. Functionally, CB-MSC could be more readily induced to differentiate into chondrocytes than could BM-MSC and AT-MSC. CB-MSC showed immunosuppressive activity equal to that of BM-MSC and AT-MSC. Collectively, our data indicate that viable CB-MSC could be obtained consistently and that CB should be reconsidered as a practical source of MSC for cell therapy and regenerative medicine using the well established CB banking system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  3. Combining Targeted Metabolomic Data with a Model of Glucose Metabolism: Toward Progress in Chondrocyte Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Daniel; Carlson, Ross P.; McCutchen, Carley N.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease likely involving altered metabolism of the chondrocytes in articular cartilage. Chondrocytes can respond metabolically to mechanical loads via cellular mechanotransduction, and metabolic changes are significant because they produce the precursors to the tissue matrix necessary for cartilage health. However, a comprehensive understanding of how energy metabolism changes with loading remains elusive. To improve our understanding of chondrocyte mechanotransduction, we developed a computational model to calculate the rate of reactions (i.e. flux) across multiple components of central energy metabolism based on experimental data. We calculated average reaction flux profiles of central metabolism for SW1353 human chondrocytes subjected to dynamic compression for 30 minutes. The profiles were obtained solving a bounded variable linear least squares problem, representing the stoichiometry of human central energy metabolism. Compression synchronized chondrocyte energy metabolism. These data are consistent with dynamic compression inducing early time changes in central energy metabolism geared towards more active protein synthesis. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrates the utility of combining targeted metabolomic data with a computational model to enable rapid analysis of cellular energy utilization. PMID:28056047

  4. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  5. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  6. Differential regulation of COL2A1 expression in developing and mature chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seghatoleslami, M R; Lichtler, A C; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A; Clark, S H; Mack, K; Rowe, D W

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the regulation of type II collagen gene expression in cells undergoing chondrogenic differentiation, we have employed a 5-kbp genomic fragment of the human type II collagen gene which contains 1.8kbp of upstream sequences, the transcription start site, the first exon and 3 kbp of intronic sequences, fused to either lac Z or chloramphenicol acetyl transferase-reporter gene. Transient expression studies revealed a parallel increase in transgene activity and endogenous type II collagen mRNA levels during the onset of the cartilage differentiation of limb mesenchymal cells in high-density micromass cultures. At later periods in culture, however, the transgene activity declines, although steady-state levels of type II collagen mRNA are reported to continue to increase (Kosher et al.: J. Cell. Biol. 102: 1151-1156, 1986; Kravis and Upholt. Dev. Biol. 108: 164-172, 1985). In addition, the activity of the transgene is seven-fold higher at the onset of chondrogenic differentiation in micromass cultures that in well differentiated sternal chondrocytes, although similar levels of type II collagen transcripts are found in these cells. Furthermore, deletions of intronic segments resulted in greater drop in activity of the constructs in differentiating chondrocytes in micromass cultures than in mature sternal chondrocytes. The expression of the construct in transgenic mice is higher at the onset of chondrogenic differentiation and in newly differentiated chondrocytes than in more mature differentiated chondrocytes. Based on these observations, it appears that the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the type II collagen gene at the onset of chondrocyte differentiation are different from those resulting in the maintenance of its expression in fully differentiated chondrocytes.

  7. Cartilage tissue engineering: molecular control of chondrocyte differentiation for proper cartilage matrix reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Demoor, Magali; Ollitrault, David; Gomez-Leduc, Tangni; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Hervieu, Magalie; Fabre, Hugo; Lafont, Jérôme; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Audigié, Fabrice; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Legendre, Florence; Galera, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a veritable therapeutic problem because therapeutic options are very scarce. Due to the poor self-regeneration capacity of cartilage, minor cartilage defects often lead to osteoarthritis. Several surgical strategies have been developed to repair damaged cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) gives encouraging results, but this cell-based therapy involves a step of chondrocyte expansion in a monolayer, which results in the loss in the differentiated phenotype. Thus, despite improvement in the quality of life for patients, reconstructed cartilage is in fact fibrocartilage. Successful ACI, according to the particular physiology of chondrocytes in vitro, requires active and phenotypically stabilized chondrocytes. This review describes the unique physiology of cartilage, with the factors involved in its formation, stabilization and degradation. Then, we focus on some of the most recent advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering that open up interesting perspectives for maintaining or obtaining the chondrogenic character of cells in order to treat cartilage lesions. Current research involves the use of chondrocytes or progenitor stem cells, associated with "smart" biomaterials and growth factors. Other influential factors, such as cell sources, oxygen pressure and mechanical strain are considered, as are recent developments in gene therapy to control the chondrocyte differentiation/dedifferentiation process. This review provides new information on the mechanisms regulating the state of differentiation of chondrocytes and the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells that will lead to the development of new restorative cell therapy approaches in humans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular regulation of articular chondrocyte function and its significance in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schroeppel, J P; Crist, J D; Anderson, H C; Wang, J

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. Histopathologically, OA is characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, thickening of subchondral bone, and subchondral cyst formation. All current therapies are aimed at symptomatic control and have limited impacts on impeding or reversing the histopathologic progression to advanced OA. Previous studies have shown that overexpression of matrix-degrading proteinases and proinflammatory cytokines is associated with osteoarthritic cartilage degradation. However, clinical trials applying an inhibitor of proteinases or proinflammatory cytokines have been unsuccessful. A more sophisticated understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control the function of articular chondrocytes is paramount to developing effective treatments. Since multiple catabolic factors and pathological chondrocyte hypertrophy are involved in the development of OA, it is important to identify which upstream factors regulate the expression of catabolic molecules and/or chondrocyte hypertrophy in articular cartilage. This review summarizes the current studies on the molecular regulation, with a main focus on transcriptional regulation, of the function of adult articular chondrocytes and its significance in the pathogenesis and treatment of OA. Recent studies have discovered that transcription factor Nfat1 may play an important role in maintaining the physiological function of adult articular chondrocytes. Nfat1-deficient mice exhibit normal skeletal development but display most of the features of human OA as adults, including chondrocyte hypertrophy with overexpression of specific matrix-degrading proteinases and proinflammatory cytokines in adult articular cartilage. ß-catenin transcriptional signaling in articular chondrocytes may also be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Activation of ß-catenin leads to OA-like phenotypes with overexpression of specific matrix-degrading proteinases in

  9. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of chondrocytes in unconfined compression tests for cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Herzog, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is associated with the mechanical environment. For example, excessive, repetitive loading has been found to induce cell death, morphological and cellular damage, as seen in degenerative joint disease, while cyclic, physiological-like loading has been found to trigger a partial recovery of morphological and ultrastructural aspects in osteoarthritic human articular chondrocytes. Mechanical stimuli are believed to influence the biosynthetic activity via the deformation of cells. However, the in situ deformation of chondrocytes for cyclic loading conditions has not been investigated experimentally or theoretically. The purpose of the present study was to simulate the mechanical response of chondrocytes to cyclic loading in unconfined compression tests using a finite element model. The material properties of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix were considered to be biphasic. The time-histories of the shape and volume variations of chondrocytes at three locations (i.e., surface, center, and bottom) within the cartilage were predicted for static and cyclic loading conditions at two frequencies (0.02 and 0.1 Hz) and two amplitudes (0.1 and 0.2 MPa). Our results show that cells at different depths within the cartilage deform differently during cyclic loading, and that the depth dependence of cell deformation is influenced by the amplitude of the cyclic loading. Cell deformations under cyclic loading of 0.02 Hz were found to be similar to those at 0.1 Hz. We conclude from the simulation results that, in homogeneous cartilage layers, cell deformations are location-dependent, and further are affected by load magnitude. In physiological conditions, the mechanical environment of cells are even more complex due to the anisotropy, depth-dependent inhomogeneity, and tension-compression non-linearity of the cartilage matrix. Therefore, it is feasible to speculate that biosynthetic responses of

  10. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation - a comparison : Synovial stem cells as an alternative cell source for autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp; Bernstein, Anke; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen

    2017-05-01

    The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Via clinically validated flow cytometry analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Primary, human BMSC and SDSC revealed similar adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potential and stem cell marker expression. However, the expression of the chondrogenic markers Col2 and ACAN was statistically significant higher in SDSC. CHDR and SDSC expressed ACAN and CD44 equally, but Col2 was expressed more strongly on the SDSC surface. The marker expression of SDSC from osteoarthritic joints (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≥3) versus normal knees (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≤2) did not differ. Similarly, there was no difference between temporarily frozen and fresh SDSC. Col2 and ACAN surface expression declined with further passaging, whereas CD44 remained unchanged. We observed the same effect after reducing the serum content. When comparing CHDR for ACI with SDSC of the same passage (P2/3), both Col2 and ACAN, correlating with clinical outcome, were expressed higher in SDSC. In summary, SDSC demonstrated high differentiation potential and a stable chondrogenic phenotype. They might therefore be better suitable for ACI than BMSC or passaged CHDR.

  11. Advances in autologous chondrocyte implantation and related techniques for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2013-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a specialized tissue exhibiting low intrinsic capabilities of regeneration or healing after injury. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and scaffold-supported ACI are often used for treatment of larger chondral defects (> 2 cm2). These utilize open surgery re-implantation of ex vivo cultured autologous chondrocytes harvested as a biopsy arthroscopically in a prior surgery. This two-step procedure is an advanced and expensive treatment that despite high expectations have failed to regenerate articular cartilage in a consistent and predictable fashion, and as many as 25% the operated of patients have dissatisfactory outcomes. The objective of the present thesis was to address and investigate methods for optimizing the steps involved in the ACI and scaffold-supported ACI treatment including chondrocyte culture environment, chondrocyte labeling and tracking, improved biomaterials, and cell seeding densities. We hypothesized that these areas were eligible for targeted optimization, which has been addressed in the five papers constituting the work performed in the present thesis. The first two studies address the in vitro cell expansion of chondrocytes before re-implantation. After validation of hypoxia-suitable housekeeping genes for quantitative gene expression analysis using previously validated algorithms (study 1) the effect of combined hypoxic- and 3D culture on human chondrocytes gene expression was investigated (study 2). An in vitro experiment was performed to determine the effect on gene expression of an intracellular superparamagnetic labeling agent for 1.5T MRI-tracking of alginate-embedded human chondrocytes (study 3). We further performed a literature study, reviewing the cell seeding densities of the implanted chondrocytes used in clinically available cell transplantation-based treatments for cartilage repair (study 4). Finally, we tested the addition of dermatan sulfate to a clinically approved methoxy-polyethen-glycol (MPEG

  12. Protective effect of Capparis spinosa on chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Panico, A M; Cardile, V; Garufi, F; Puglia, C; Bonina, F; Ronsisvalle, G

    2005-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro chondroprotective effects of the lyophilised methanolic extract from flowering buds of Capparis Spinosa L (LECS). This plant, common to the Mediterranean basin, has been used by the traditional medicine for its diuretic and antihypertensive effects and also in certain pathological conditions related to uncontrolled lipid peroxidation. The extract contains many constituents, in particular some flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin derivatives) and hydrocinammic acids with several known biological effects such as the anti-inflammatory and the antioxidant ones. In this study, we assayed the effect of LECS on human chondrocytes cultures stimulated by proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and we determined the production of key molecules released during chronic inflammatory events (nitric oxide, glycosaminoglycans, prostaglandins and reactive oxygen species). We observed that LECS was able to counteract the harmful effects induced by IL-1beta. This protection appeared to be greater than that elicited by indomethacin, which is usually employed in joint diseases. Since LECS possess a chondroprotective effect, it might be used in the management of cartilage damage during the inflammatory processes.

  13. PGE2 signal through EP2 promotes the growth of articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Liang, Bojian; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Nishijo, Koichi; Ishibe, Tatsuya; Yasura, Ko; Nagayama, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2005-03-01

    EP2 was identified as the major PGE2 receptor expressed in articular cartilage. An EP2 agonist increased intracellular cAMP in articular chondrocytes, stimulating DNA synthesis in both monolayer and 3D cultures. Hence, the EP2 agonist may be a potent therapeutic agent for degenerative cartilage diseases. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exhibits pleiotropic effects in various types of tissue through four types of receptors, EP1-4. We examined the expression of EPs and effects of agonists for each EP on articular chondrocytes. The expression of each EP in articular chondrocytes was examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. A chondrocyte cell line, MMA2, was established from articular cartilage of p53(-/-) mice and used to analyze the effects of agonists for each EP. A search for molecules downstream of the PGE2 signal through the EP2 agonist was made by cDNA microarray analysis. The growth-promoting effect of the EP2 agonist on chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix was examined in an organ culture of rat femora. EP2 was identified as the major EP expressed in articular cartilage. Treatment of MMA2 cells with specific agonists for each EP showed that only the EP2 agonist significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of MMA2 revealed a set of genes upregulated by the EP2 agonist, including several growth-promoting and apoptosis-protecting genes such as the cyclin D1, fibronectin, integrin alpha5, AP2alpha, and 14-3-3gamma genes. The upregulation of these genes by the EP2 agonist was confirmed in human articular chondrocytes by quantitative mRNA analysis. On treatment with the EP2 agonist, human articular chondrocytes showed an increase in the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuracil (BrdU), and the organ culture of rat femora showed an increase of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining in articular chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix, suggesting growth-promoting effects of the PGE2 signal

  14. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A.; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J.; Cervantes, Thomas M.; Kimura, Anya M.; Neville, Craig M.; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  15. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  16. Interaction of periosteal explants with articular chondrocytes alters expression profile of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Matthias; Dreier, Rita; Radons, Jürgen; Opolka, Alfred; Grifka, Joachim; Anders, Sven; Grässel, Susanne

    2010-12-01

    Periosteal tissue is a source of growth factors and of osteochondral progenitor cells which makes it suitable for implantation in chondral defects as known in autologous chondrocyte implantation. The aim of this study was to determine the interaction between periosteal tissue and articular chondrocytes with respect to catabolic effectors such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and IL-6. Human articular chondrocytes were cultured for up to 28 days as micromass pellets in coculture either with physical contact to periosteal explants or allowing paracrine interactions only. Expression, secretion, and activation of MMPs and IL-6 were analyzed in chondrocytes, periosteum, and culture supernatants. Both coculture conditions influence gene expression levels of MMPs and IL-6 in a time-, culture-, and tissue-dependent manner. Coculturing of periosteum with chondrocytes promotes gene expression and secretion of IL-6. In periosteum, physical contact inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-13 gene expression while paracrine coculture induces expression of IL-6, MMP-2, -7, and -13. Pro-MMP-2, -7, and -13 were detected in supernatants of all culture regimens whereas pro-MMP-9 was secreted from periosteum only. As a balanced amount of MMP activity is likely required to achieve sufficient integration of the regenerate tissue with the surrounding healthy cartilage, an exceeding expression of proteinases might result in degradation, hypertrophy or rejection of the graft. © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies.

  18. Osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes are a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Oda, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Ono, Yohei; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Saho; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-21

    The natural healing capacity of damaged articular cartilage is poor, rendering joint surface injuries a prime target for regenerative medicine. While autologous chondrocyte or mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation can be applied to repair cartilage defects in young patients, no appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative is available for elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Multipotent progenitor cells are reported to present in adult human articular cartilage, with a preponderance in OA cartilage. These facts led us to hypothesize the possible use of osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We therefore analyzed chondrocyte- and stem cell-related markers, cell growth rate, and multipotency in OA chondrocytes (OACs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs, along with normal articular chondrocytes (ACs) as a control. OACs demonstrated similar phenotype and proliferation rate to MSCs. Furthermore, OACs exhibited multilineage differentiation ability with a greater chondrogenic differentiation ability than MSCs, which was equivalent to ACs. We conclude that chondrogenic capacity is not significantly affected by OA, and OACs could be a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of purified alginate sponge on the regeneration of chondrocytes: in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, A Ram; Lee, Cheon Jung; Tripathy, Nirmalya; Yoon, Kun Ho; Lee, Dongwon; Khang, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration science has been studied using tissue engineering techniques due to the self-renewal difficulties of damaged or degenerated cartilage. A scaffold with biodegradability and biocompatibility features plays a key role in developing cartilage tissue similar to human biological materials. Herein, we have fabricated three-dimensional sponge using purified alginate for the regeneration of chondrocytes cells and formation of cartilage. We demonstrated that the alginate purification can effectively minimize inflammatory reaction through reducing the content of mannuronic acid causing immune rejection. Cartilage regeneration research was performed using three-dimensional non-purified and purified alginate sponges synthesized by modified Korbutt method. In vitro cell viability and specific gene expression in the cartilage cells were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after seeding chondrocytes on the as-fabricated sponges. Specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of chondrocytes, sGAG, and the content of collagen were also measured. Histological staining was carried out after purified alginate sponge seeded with chondrocytes and was implanted in subcutaneous nude mouse followed by extraction. Compared to the non-purified ones, the purified alginate sponges showed positive effects on maintaining affinities and phenotype of chondrocytes. From these results, it can be suggested that the purified alginate sponges provide a promising platform for cartilage regeneration.

  20. Coumestrol Counteracts Interleukin-1β-Induced Catabolic Effects by Suppressing Inflammation in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Seek; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Oh, Ji-Su; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-catabolic effects of coumestrol, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, against interleukin-1β-induced cartilage degeneration in primary rat chondrocytes and articular cartilage. Coumestrol did not affect the viability of human normal oral keratinocytes and primary rat chondrocytes treated for 24 h and 21 days, respectively. Although coumestrol did not significantly increase the proteoglycan contents in long-term culture, it abolished the interleukin-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans in primary rat chondrocytes and knee articular cartilage. Furthermore, coumestrol suppressed the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase-13, -3, and -1 in primary rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1β. Moreover, the expression of catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and inflammatory cytokines in interleukin-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes was suppressed by coumestrol. In summary, these results indicate that coumestrol counteracts the catabolic effects induced by interleukin-1β through the suppression of inflammation. Therefore, based on its biological activity and safety profile, coumestrol could be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  1. High fat-diet and saturated fatty acid palmitate inhibits IGF-1 function in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nazli, S A; Loeser, R F; Chubinskaya, S; Willey, J S; Yammani, R R

    2017-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes matrix synthesis and cell survival in cartilage. Chondrocytes from aged and osteoarthritic cartilage have a reduced response to IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of free fatty acids (FFA) present in a high-fat diet on IGF-1 function in cartilage and the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. C57BL/6 male mice were maintained on either a high-fat (60% kcal from fat) or a low-fat (10% kcal from fat) diet for 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed; femoral head cartilage caps were collected and treated with IGF-1 to measure proteoglycan (PG) synthesis. Cultured human chondrocytes were treated with 500 μM FFA palmitate or oleate, followed by stimulation with (100 ng/ml) IGF-1 overnight to measure CHOP (a protein marker for ER stress) and PG synthesis. Human chondrocytes were pre-treated with palmitate or 1 mM 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) or 1 μM C-Jun N terminal Kinase (JNK) inhibitor, and IGF-1 function (PG synthesis and signaling) was measured. Cartilage explants from mice on the high fat-diet showed reduced IGF-1 mediated PG synthesis compared to a low-fat group. Treatment of human chondrocytes with palmitate induced expression of CHOP, activated JNK and inhibited IGF-1 function. PBA, a small molecule chemical chaperone that alleviates ER stress rescued IGF-1 function and a JNK inhibitor rescued IGF-1 signaling. Palmitate-induced ER stress inhibited IGF-1 function in chondrocytes/cartilage via activating the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase JNK. This is the first study to demonstrate that ER stress is metabolic factor that regulates IGF-1 function in chondrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ICAM-1 expression on chondrocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: induction by synovial cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was found by immunostaining chondrocytes in cartilage from three patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Expression of ICAM-1 was restricted to chondrocytes in areas of erodedcartilage adjacent to the invading synovial tissue. Toluidine blue staining of these areas demonstrated severe depletion of the cartilage extracellular matrix. In areas of undamaged cartilage there was no ICAM-1 expression. Since ICAM-1 is not constitutively expressed on normal human articular cartilage, but could be induced in vitro by exogenous IL-1α, TNFα and IFNγ or by co-culturing cartilage with inflammatory rheumatoid synovium, we conclude that the induction of ICAM-1 on rheumatoid chondrocytes results from the synergistic action of a variety of cytokines produced by the inflammatory cells of the invading pannus. PMID:18475445

  3. In vitro assays of chondrocyte functions: the influence of drugs and hormones.

    PubMed

    Bassleer, C; Henrotin, Y; Franchimont, P

    1990-01-01

    Human articular chondrocytes may be cultured in three dimensions, according to a method already validated. This model allows us to study the repair processes of the cartilage, by measuring the proliferative activity of chondrocytes and the synthesis of two major constituents of matrix: proteoglycans and type II collagen. Some substances are characterised by stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis and no effect or a defective effect on matrix components: this is the case for Epidermal Growth Factor. Others are able to stimulate (hGH) or to depress (acetyl salicylic acid) both chondrocyte proliferation and matrix components synthesis. Finally, some substances called "chondroprotective", such as the glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, GP-C (Rumalon) stimulate either the proliferative response or the synthesis of proteoglycans and type II collagen, according to the dose.

  4. Characterization of the cells in repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation in mankind: a novel report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wright, Karina T; Mennan, Claire; Fox, Hannah; Richardson, James B; Banerjee, Robin; Roberts, Sally

    2013-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is used worldwide for the treatment of cartilage defects. This study has aimed to assess for the first time the cells that are contained within human ACI repair tissues several years post-treatment. We have compared the phenotypic properties of cells from within the ACI repair with adjacent chondrocytes and subchondral bone-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs). Two patients undergoing arthroplasty of their ACI-treated joint were investigated. Tissue and cells were isolated from the repair site, adjacent macroscopically normal cartilage and MSCs from the subchondral bone were characterized for their growth kinetics, morphology, immunoprofile and differentiation capacity. ACI repair tissue appeared fibrocartilaginous, and ACI repair cells were heterogeneous in morphology and size when freshly isolated, becoming more homogeneous, resembling chondrocytes from adjacent cartilage, after culture expansion. The same weight of ACI repair tissue resulted in less cells than macroscopically normal cartilage. During expansion, ACI repair cells proliferated faster than MSCs but slower than chondrocytes. ACI repair cell immunoprofiles resembled chondrocytes, but their differentiation capacity matched MSCs. This novel report demonstrates that human ACI repair cell phenotypes resemble both chondrocytes and MSCs but at different stages of their isolation and expansion in vitro.

  5. Vitalization of porous polyethylene (Medpor®) with chondrocytes promotes early implant vascularization and incorporation into the host tissue.

    PubMed

    Ehrmantraut, Susanne; Naumann, Andreas; Willnecker, Vivienne; Akinyemi, Stephanie; Körbel, Christina; Scheuer, Claudia; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2012-08-01

    Porous polyethylene (Medpor(®)) is frequently used in craniofacial reconstructive surgery. The successful incorporation of this alloplastic biomaterial depends on adequate vascularization. Here, we analyzed whether the early vascularization of porous polyethylene can be accelerated by vitalization with human chondrocytes. For this purpose, small polyethylene samples were coated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or a suspension of PRP and human chondrocytes. Uncoated polyethylene samples served as controls. Subsequently, the samples were implanted into the dorsal skinfold chamber of CD-1 nude mice to repetitively analyze their vascularization and biocompatibility by means of intravital fluorescence microscopy. PRP-chondrocyte-coated polyethylene exhibited an accelerated and improved vascularization when compared with the other two groups. This was indicated by a significantly higher functional capillary density of the microvascular network developing around the implants. Moreover, a leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction was found in a physiological range at the implantation site of all three groups, demonstrating that the vitalization with PRP and chondrocytes did not affect the good biocompatibility of the alloplastic material. Additional histological, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the chondrocytes formed a bioprotective tissue layer, which prevented the accumulation of macrophages and foreign body giant cells on the polyethylene surface. These findings clearly indicate that vitalization of polyethylene with chondrocytes promotes early implant vascularization and incorporation into the host tissue and, thus, may be a promising approach that prevents postoperative complications such as implant extrusion, migration, and infection.

  6. Extracellular Matrix Domain Formation as an Indicator of Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Kyupelyan, Levon; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.; Adams, John S; Karperien, Marcel; Tuan, Tai-Lan; Benya, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage injury represents one of the most significant clinical conditions. Implantation of expanded autologous chondrocytes from noninjured compartments of the joint is a typical strategy for repairing cartilage. However, two-dimensional culture causes dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, making them functionally inferior for cartilage repair. We hypothesized that functional exclusion of dedifferentiated chondrocytes can be achieved by the selective mapping of collagen molecules deposited by chondrogenic cells in a three-dimensional environment. Freshly isolated and in vitro expanded human fetal or adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in a thermoreversible hydrogel at density of 1×107 cells/mL for 24 h. Chondrocytes were released from the gel, stained with antibodies against collagen type 2 (COL II) or COL I or COL X and sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Imaging flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assays were performed to evaluate the differences between COL II domain forming and COL II domain-negative cells. Freshly dissected periarticular chondrocytes robustly formed domains that consisted of the extracellular matrix surrounding cells in the hydrogel as a capsule clearly detectable by imaging flow cytometry (ImageStream) and confocal microscopy. These domains were almost exclusively formed by COL II. In contrast to that, a significant percentage of freshly isolated growth plate pre-hypertrophic and hyperdrophic chondrocytes deposited matrix domains positive for COL II, COL I, and COL X. The proportion of the cells producing COL II domains decreased with the increased passage of in vitro expanded periarticular fetal or adult articular chondrocytes. Sorted COL II domain forming cells deposited much higher levels of COL II and GAGs in pellet assays than COL II domain-negative cells. COL II domain forming cells expressed chondrogenic genes at higher levels than negative cells

  7. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  8. Cell Death in Chondrocytes, Osteoblasts, and Osteocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Cell death in skeletal component cells, including chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, plays roles in skeletal development, maintenance, and repair as well as in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are important steps for endochondral ossification. Although the inactivation of P53 and RB is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcomas, the deletion of p53 and inactivation of Rb are insufficient to enhance chondrocyte proliferation, indicating the presence of multiple inhibitory mechanisms against sarcomagenesis in chondrocytes. The inflammatory processes induced by mechanical injury and chondrocyte death through the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are involved in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. The overexpression of BCLXL increases bone volume with a normal structure and maintains bone during aging by inhibiting osteoblast apoptosis. p53 inhibits osteoblast proliferation and enhances osteoblast apoptosis, thereby reducing bone formation, but also exerts positive effects on osteoblast differentiation through the Akt–FoxOs pathway. Apoptotic osteocytes release ATP, which induces the receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (Rankl) expression and osteoclastogenesis, from pannexin 1 channels. Osteocyte death ultimately results in necrosis; DAMPs are released to the bone surface and promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce Rankl expression, and osteoclastogenesis is further enhanced. PMID:27929439

  9. Reduced chondrocyte proliferation and chondrodysplasia in mice lacking the integrin-linked kinase in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Leonieke; Prud'homme, Josée; Arabian, Alice; Takeda, Shu; Karsenty, Gérard; Dedhar, Shoukat; St-Arnaud, René

    2003-01-01

    Chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation requires their attachment to the collagen type II–rich matrix of developing bone. This interaction is mediated by integrins and their cytoplasmic effectors, such as the integrin-linked kinase (ILK). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms whereby integrins control these processes, we have specifically inactivated the ILK gene in growth plate chondrocytes using the Cre-lox methodology. Mice carrying an ILK allele flanked by loxP sites (ILK-fl) were crossed to transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the collagen type II promoter. Inactivation of both copies of the ILK-fl allele lead to a chondrodysplasia characterized by a disorganized growth plate and to dwarfism. Expression of chondrocyte differentiation markers such as collagen type II, collagen type X, Indian hedgehog and the PTH-PTHrP receptor was normal in ILK-deficient growth plates. In contrast, chondrocyte proliferation, assessed by BrdU or proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling, was markedly reduced in the mutant growth plates. Cell-based assays showed that integrin-mediated adhesion of primary cultures of chondrocytes from mutant animals to collagen type II was impaired. ILK inactivation in chondrocytes resulted in reduced cyclin D1 expression, and this most likely explains the defect in chondrocyte proliferation observed when ILK is inactivated in growth plate cells. PMID:12835312

  10. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  11. BMP-2, Hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs Favor Neo-Cartilage Hyaline Matrix Formation in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets. PMID:24957638

  12. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  13. FGF signaling targets the pRb-related p107 and p130 proteins to induce chondrocyte growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Laplantine, Emmanuel; Rossi, Ferdinand; Sahni, Malika; Basilico, Claudio; Cobrinik, David

    2002-01-01

    Unregulated FGF signaling affects endochondral ossification and long bone growth, causing several genetic forms of human dwarfism. One major mechanism by which FGFs regulate endochondral bone growth is through their inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. Because mice with targeted mutations of the retinoblastoma (Rb)-related proteins p107 and p130 present severe endochondral bone defects with excessive chondrocyte proliferation, we have investigated the role of the Rb family of cell cycle regulators in the FGF response. Using a chondrocyte cell line, we found that FGF induced a rapid dephosphorylation of all three proteins of the Rb family (pRb, p107, and p130) and a blockade of the cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This cell cycle block was reversed by inactivation of Rb proteins with viral oncoproteins such as polyoma large T (PyLT) antigen and Adenovirus E1A. Expression of a PyLT mutant that efficiently binds pRb, but not p107 and p130, allowed the cells to be growth inhibited by FGF, suggesting that pRb itself is not involved in the FGF response. To investigate more precisely the role of the individual Rb family proteins in FGF-mediated growth inhibition, we used chondrocyte micromass culture of limb bud cells isolated from mice lacking Rb proteins individually or in combination. Although wild-type as well as Rb−/− chondrocytes were similarly growth inhibited by FGF, chondrocytes null for p107 and p130 did not respond to FGF. Furthermore, FGF treatment of metatarsal bone rudiments obtained from p107−/−;p130−/− embryos failed to inhibit proliferation of growth plate chondrocytes, whereas rudiments from p107-null or p130-null embryos showed only a slight inhibition of growth. Our findings indicate that p107 and p130, but not pRb, are critical effectors of FGF-mediated growth inhibition in chondrocytes. PMID:12177046

  14. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism.

  15. Processed xenogenic cartilage as innovative biomatrix for cartilage tissue engineering: effects on chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silke; Elsaesser, Alexander F; Koerber, Ludwig; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Seitz, Andreas M; Bermueller, Christian; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Breiter, Roman; Rotter, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    One key point in the development of new bioimplant matrices for the reconstruction and replacement of cartilage defects is to provide an adequate microenvironment to ensure chondrocyte migration and de novo synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). A recently developed decellularization and sterilization process maintains the three-dimensional (3D) collagen structure of native septal cartilage while increasing matrix porosity, which is considered to be crucial for cartilage tissue engineering. Human primary nasal septal chondrocytes were amplified in monolayer culture and 3D-cultured on processed porcine nasal septal cartilage scaffolds. The influence of chondrogenic growth factors on neosynthesis of ECM proteins was examined at the protein and gene expression levels. Seeding experiments demonstrated that processed xenogenic cartilage matrices provide excellent environmental properties for human nasal septal chondrocytes with respect to cell adhesion, migration into the matrix and neosynthesis of cartilage-specific ECM proteins, such as collagen type II and aggrecan. Matrix biomechanical stability indicated that the constructs retrieve full stability and function during 3D culture for up to 42 days, proportional to collagen type II and GAG production. Thus, processed xenogenic cartilage offers a suitable environment for human nasal chondrocytes and has promising potential for cartilage tissue engineering in the head and neck region.

  16. Evaluation of thermoreversible polymers containing fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF-9) for chondrocyte culture

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Angela; Ha, Jinny; Polotsky, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.; Gutowska, Anna; Hungerford, Davis S.; Frondoza, Carmelita G.

    2004-05-01

    We have evaluated a biomaterial to serve as a scaffold for the propagation and amplification of chondrocytes that promotes the original cellular phenotype of these cells. The goal of the present study was to investigate the use of thermally reversible polymer gels poly(NiPAAm-co-AAc), as a biocompatible supporting scaffold for the propagation of chondrocytic cells. The polymer gels at temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) while liquefying at temperatures below its LCST of 34.5 C. Hence, the polymer, in its gelled form, has the ability to hold cells in situ, forming a matrix similar to the natural cellular environment or the extracellular matrix that comprises cartilage. We tested the hypothesis that the polymer gel promotes cell viability and function. Human osteoblast-like cells, nasal chondrocytes, and articular chondrocytes (1x105/150 ?l) were re-suspended in enriched DMEM media and were plated onto control (without gel) and gel containing 24-well plates. The plates were re-incubated at 37 C, 5% CO2 for the time-point of interest. Additional media was added to the plates and exchanged as needed. Following cell culture, cells were retrieved, enumerated, and cell viability was determined. Other aliquots of the cells were stained for morphological analysis while expression of chondrocyte markers including collagen type II and aggrecan were determined using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The polymer gel was not cytotoxic as the cell number retrieved from three-dimensional culture gel was found to be one to two times higher than that retrieved from monolayer culture. Chondrocytes propagated in the thermo-reversible polymers expressed enhanced or maintained expression of collagen type II and aggrecan. Collagen type I expression was decreased or unaltered. The N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid copolymer gel has potential use as a cell culture substrate and as a cell delivery vehicle.

  17. Standardized cartilage biopsies from the intercondylar notch for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Pestka, Jan M; Kreuz, Peter C; Salzmann, Gian M; Köstler, Wolfgang; Südkamp, Norbert P; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established therapy for the treatment of cartilage defects across the knee joint. Even though different techniques for initial biopsy have been described, the exact location, depth, and volume of the biopsy are chosen individually by the treating surgeon. This study evaluated 252 consecutive cartilage biopsies taken from the intercondylar notch with a standardized hollow cylinder system for the isolation and in vitro cultivation of human chondrocytes assigned to ACI. All biopsies were assessed for weight of total cartilage obtained, cartilage biopsy weight per cylinder, biopsy cylinder quality, and initial cell count after digestive cellular isolation as well as cell vitality. Parameters were correlated with individual patient parameters. Mean patient age was 35.1 years (median 35.9; range 14.7-56.4). Adequate amounts of cartilage assigned to chondrocyte in vitro cultivation could be harvested in all cases. The mean overall biopsy weight averaged 75.5 mg (SD +/- 44.9) and could be identified as main factor for initial cell number (mean 1.05E+05; SD +/- 7.44E+04). No correlation was found between the initial cell count and patient age (correlation coefficient r = 0.005) or grade of joint degeneration (r = 0.040). Concerning cell viability, a total of 4.4% (SD + 3.0) of the chondrocytes harvested were apoptotic. Cartilage biopsies from the intercondylar notch using a standardized hollow cylinder system provides a reliable, safe, and successful method to obtain articular cartilage for further in vitro cultivation of articular chondrocytes to achieve autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

  18. Antisense Reduction of Mutant COMP Reduces Growth Plate Chondrocyte Pathology.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C; Hossain, Mohammad; Gattis, Danielle; Booten, Sheri; Alcorn, Joseph L; Seth, Punit P; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein cause pseudoachondroplasia, a severe disproportionate short stature disorder. Mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein produces massive intracellular retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, stimulating ER and oxidative stresses and inflammation, culminating in post-natal loss of growth plate chondrocytes, which compromises linear bone growth. Treatments for pseudoachondroplasia are limited because cartilage is relatively avascular and considered inaccessible. Here we report successful delivery and treatment using antisense oligonucleotide technology in our transgenic pseudoachondroplasia mouse model. We demonstrate delivery of human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-specific antisense oligonucleotides to cartilage and reduction of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein expression, which largely alleviates pseudoachondroplasia growth plate chondrocyte pathology. One antisense oligonucleotide reduced steady-state levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA and dampened intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, leading to a reduction of inflammatory markers and cell death and partial restoration of proliferation. This novel and exciting work demonstrates that antisense-based therapy is a viable approach for treating pseudoachondroplasia and other human cartilage disorders. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prolactin inhibits the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by serum starvation.

    PubMed

    Zermeño, C; Guzmán-Morales, J; Macotela, Y; Nava, G; López-Barrera, F; Kouri, J B; Lavalle, C; de la Escalera, G Martínez; Clapp, C

    2006-05-01

    The apoptosis of chondrocytes plays an important role in endochondral bone formation and in cartilage degradation during aging and disease. Prolactin (PRL) is produced in chondrocytes and is known to promote the survival of various cell types. Here we show that articular chondrocytes from rat postpubescent and adult cartilage express the long form of the PRL receptor as revealed by immunohistochemistry of cartilage sections and by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses of the isolated chondrocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of these same chondrocytes cultured in low-serum. Chondrocyte apoptosis was measured by hypodiploid DNA content determined by flow cytometry and by DNA fragmentation evaluated by the ELISA and the TUNEL methods. The anti-apoptotic effect of PRL was dose-dependent and was prevented by heat inactivation. These data demonstrate that PRL can act as a survival factor for chondrocytes and that it has potential preventive and therapeutic value in arthropathies characterized by cartilage degradation.

  1. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Cocultured with Chondrocytes Promote the Proliferation of Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury and defect caused by trauma and chronic osteoarthritis vascularity are very common, while the repair of injured cartilage remains a great challenge due to its limited healing capacity. Stem cell-based tissue engineering provides a promising treatment option for injured articular cartilage because of the cells potential for multiple differentiations. However, its application has been largely limited by stem cell type, number, source, proliferation, and differentiation. We hypothesized that (1) adipose-derived stem cells are ideal seed cells for articular cartilage repair because of their accessibility and abundance and (2) the microenvironment of articular cartilage could induce adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into chondrocytes. In order to test our hypotheses, we isolated stem cells from rabbit adipose tissues and cocultured these ADSCs with rabbit articular cartilage chondrocytes. We found that when ADSCs were cocultured with chondrocytes, the proliferation of articular cartilage chondrocytes was promoted, the apoptosis of chondrocytes was inhibited, and the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs was enhanced. The study on the mechanism of this coculture system indicated that the role of this coculture system is similar to the function of TGF-β1 in the promotion of chondrocytes. PMID:28133485

  2. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Holly A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L.; Hutson, Mary R.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4V620I channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of theTRPV4V620I mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4T89I mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis.—Leddy, H. A., McNulty, A. L., Lee, S. H., Rothfusz, N. E., Gloss, B., Kirby, M. L., Hutson, M. R., Cohn, D. H., Guilak, F., Liedtke, W. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations. PMID:24577120

  3. Giant crystals inside mitochondria of equine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, S; Rentenberger, C; Thiel, K; Schädl, B; Grunwald, I; Ponomarev, I; Marlovits, St; Meyer, Ch; Barnewitz, D

    2017-05-01

    The present study reports for the first time the presence of giant crystals in mitochondria of equine chondrocytes. These structures show dark contrast in TEM images as well as a granular substructure of regularly aligned 1-2 nm small units. Different zone axes of the crystalline structure were analysed by means of Fourier transformation of lattice-resolution TEM images proving the crystalline nature of the structure. Elemental analysis reveals a high content of nitrogen referring to protein. The outer shape of the crystals is geometrical with an up to hexagonal profile in cross sections. It is elongated, spanning a length of several micrometres through the whole cell. In some chondrocytes, several crystals were found, sometimes combined in a single mitochondrion. Crystals were preferentially aligned along the long axis of the cells, thus appearing in the same orientation as the chondrocytes in the tissue. Although no similar structures have been found in the cartilage of any other species investigated, they have been found in cartilage repair tissue formed within a mechanically stimulated equine chondrocyte construct. Crystals were mainly located in superficial regions of cartilage, especially in joint regions of well-developed superficial layers, more often in yearlings than in adult horses. These results indicate that intramitochondrial crystals are related to the high mechanical stress in the horse joint and potentially also to the increased metabolic activity of immature individuals.

  4. Changes in morphology, gene expression and protein content in chondrocytes cultured on a random positioning machine.

    PubMed

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Sahana, Jayashree; Ma, Xiao; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of chondrocytes on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional RPM, a device designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of RPM exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of RPM exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis (TGF-β1, osteopontin); and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours of RPM exposure disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours on the RPM, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced during RPM culture for 24 h. Taking these results together, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to the RPM seem to change their extracellular matrix production behaviour while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  5. Changes in Morphology, Gene Expression and Protein Content in Chondrocytes Cultured on a Random Positioning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Sahana, Jayashree; Ma, Xiao; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of chondrocytes on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional RPM, a device designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of RPM exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of RPM exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis (TGF-β1, osteopontin); and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours of RPM exposure disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours on the RPM, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced during RPM culture for 24 h. Taking these results together, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to the RPM seem to change their extracellular matrix production behaviour while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates. PMID:24244418

  6. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    PubMed

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-08-18

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements.

  8. [Toxicity of antiseptics on chondrocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Schaumburger, J; Beckmann, J; Springorum, H-R; Handel, M; Anders, S; Kalteis, T; Grifka, J; Rath, B

    2010-01-01

    Local antiseptics are commonly used for perioperative skin and wound disinfection and as solutions for joint lavage. Therefore, we examined if an intra-articular use of these antiseptics is possible by using an IN VITRO chondrocyte model. Articular chondrocytes harvested from 7 patients were cultured. After reaching 80% confluency different concentrations (0%, 1%, 10%, 50%, 100%) of polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and povidone-iodine were added for 5 minutes. Afterwards, the solution was removed and the chondrocytes were cultured for 24 hours. Subsequently the vitality and proliferation rate (DNA synthesis) were analysed with the WST-1 and BrdU tests. 1% povidone-iodine and 1% hydrogen peroxide solutions significantly (p=0.001) decreased the chondrocyte vitality as compared to our control group. There was no significant difference (p=0.71) after the application of 1% polyhexanide in the vitality ratios. A significant decrease in vitality was also observed after the application of 10% polyhexanide solution (p=0.001). Application of 1% povidone-iodine solution, 1% hydrogen peroxide solution a