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Sample records for hypoxic transcription gene

  1. Roles of transcription factor Mot3 and chromatin in repression of the hypoxic gene ANB1 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kastaniotis, A J; Mennella, T A; Konrad, C; Torres, A M; Zitomer, R S

    2000-10-01

    The hypoxic genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are repressed by a complex consisting of the aerobically expressed, sequence-specific DNA-binding protein Rox1 and the Tup1-Ssn6 general repressors. The regulatory region of one well-studied hypoxic gene, ANB1, is comprised of two operators, OpA and OpB, each of which has two strong Rox1 binding sites, yet OpA represses transcription almost 10 times more effectively than OpB. We show here that this difference is due to the presence of a Mot3 binding site in OpA. Mutations in this site reduced OpA repression to OpB levels, and the addition of a Mot3 binding site to OpB enhanced repression. Deletion of the mot3 gene also resulted in reduced repression of ANB1. Repression of two other hypoxic genes in which Mot3 sites were associated with Rox1 sites was reduced in the deletion strain, but other hypoxic genes were unaffected. In addition, the mot3Delta mutation caused a partial derepression of the Mig1-Tup1-Ssn6-repressed SUC2 gene, but not the alpha2-Mcm1-Tup1-Ssn6-repressed STE2 gene. The Mot3 protein was demonstrated to bind to the ANB1 OpA in vitro. Competition experiments indicated that there was no interaction between Rox1 and Mot3, indicating that Mot3 functions either in Tup1-Ssn6 recruitment or directly in repression. A great deal of evidence has accumulated suggesting that the Tup1-Ssn6 complex represses transcription through both nucleosome positioning and a direct interaction with the basal transcriptional machinery. We demonstrate here that under repressed conditions a nucleosome is positioned over the TATA box in the wild-type ANB1 promoter. This nucleosome was absent in cells carrying a rox1, tup1, or mot3 deletion, all of which cause some degree of derepression. Interestingly, however, this positioned nucleosome was also lost in a cell carrying a deletion of the N-terminal coding region of histone H4, yet ANB1 expression remained fully repressed. A similar deletion in the gene for histone H3, which had no

  2. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  3. Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light damage independently of hypoxia inducible transcription factors in rods.

    PubMed

    Kast, Brigitte; Schori, Christian; Grimm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration preserving retinal morphology and function. Although hypoxia inducible transcription factors 1 and 2 (HIF1, HIF2) are the main regulators of the hypoxic response, photoreceptor protection does not depend on HIF1 in rods. Here we used rod-specific Hif2a single and Hif1a;Hif2a double knockout mice to investigate the potential involvement of HIF2 in rods for protection after hypoxic preconditioning. To identify potential HIF2 target genes in rods we determined the retinal transcriptome of hypoxic control and rod-specific Hif2a knockouts by RNA sequencing. We show that rods do not need HIF2 for hypoxia-induced increased survival after light exposure. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a number of genes that are potentially regulated by HIF2 in rods; among those were Htra1, Timp3 and Hmox1, candidates that are interesting due to their connection to human degenerative diseases of the retina. We conclude that neither HIF1 nor HIF2 are required in photoreceptors for protection by hypoxic preconditioning. We hypothesize that HIF transcription factors may be needed in other cells to produce protective factors acting in a paracrine fashion on photoreceptor cells. Alternatively, hypoxic preconditioning induces a rod-intrinsic response that is independent of HIF transcription factors.

  4. Regulation of the Sre1 hypoxic transcription factor by oxygen-dependent control of DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Yung S.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Hughes, Bridget T.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Regulation of gene expression plays an integral role in adaptation of cells to hypoxic stress. In mammals, prolyl hydroxylases control levels of the central transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) through regulation of HIFα subunit stability. Here, we report that the hydroxylase Ofd1 regulates the Sre1 hypoxic transcription factor in fission yeast by controlling DNA binding. Prolyl hydroxylases require oxygen as a substrate and the activity of Ofd1 regulates Sre1-dependent transcription. In the presence of oxygen, Ofd1 binds the Sre1 N-terminal transcription factor domain (Sre1N) and inhibits Sre1-dependent transcription by blocking DNA binding. In the absence of oxygen, the inhibitor Nro1 binds Ofd1, thereby releasing Sre1N and leading to activation of genes required for hypoxic growth. In contrast to the HIF system where proline hydroxylation is essential for regulation, Ofd1 inhibition of Sre1N does not require hydroxylation, and thus defines a new mechanism for hypoxic gene regulation. PMID:22017871

  5. Transcriptional Network Analysis in Muscle Reveals AP-1 as a Partner of PGC-1α in the Regulation of the Hypoxic Gene Program

    PubMed Central

    Baresic, Mario; Salatino, Silvia; Kupr, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows an extraordinary cellular plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to unravel the complex transcriptional network of muscle cell plasticity centered on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a regulatory nexus in endurance training adaptation. By integrating data on genome-wide binding of PGC-1α and gene expression upon PGC-1α overexpression with comprehensive computational prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), we uncover a hitherto-underestimated number of transcription factor partners involved in mediating PGC-1α action. In particular, principal component analysis of TFBSs at PGC-1α binding regions predicts that, besides the well-known role of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), the activator protein 1 complex (AP-1) plays a major role in regulating the PGC-1α-controlled gene program of the hypoxia response. Our findings thus reveal the complex transcriptional network of muscle cell plasticity controlled by PGC-1α. PMID:24912679

  6. Transcriptional network analysis in muscle reveals AP-1 as a partner of PGC-1α in the regulation of the hypoxic gene program.

    PubMed

    Baresic, Mario; Salatino, Silvia; Kupr, Barbara; van Nimwegen, Erik; Handschin, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows an extraordinary cellular plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to unravel the complex transcriptional network of muscle cell plasticity centered on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a regulatory nexus in endurance training adaptation. By integrating data on genome-wide binding of PGC-1α and gene expression upon PGC-1α overexpression with comprehensive computational prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), we uncover a hitherto-underestimated number of transcription factor partners involved in mediating PGC-1α action. In particular, principal component analysis of TFBSs at PGC-1α binding regions predicts that, besides the well-known role of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), the activator protein 1 complex (AP-1) plays a major role in regulating the PGC-1α-controlled gene program of the hypoxia response. Our findings thus reveal the complex transcriptional network of muscle cell plasticity controlled by PGC-1α.

  7. Global transcription profiling reveals comprehensive insights into hypoxic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglong; Vantoai, Tara; Moy, Linda P; Bock, Geoffrey; Linford, Lara D; Quackenbush, John

    2005-03-01

    Plants have evolved adaptation mechanisms to sense oxygen deficiency in their environments and make coordinated physiological and structural adjustments to enhance their hypoxic tolerance. To gain insight into how plants respond to low-oxygen stress, gene expression profiling using whole-genome DNA amplicon microarrays was carried out at seven time points over 24 h, in wild-type and transgenic P(SAG12):ipt Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Transcript levels of genes involved in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, ethylene synthesis and perception, calcium signaling, nitrogen utilization, trehalose metabolism, and alkaloid synthesis were significantly altered in response to oxygen limitation. Analysis based on gene ontology assignments suggested a significant down-regulation of genes whose functions are associated with cell walls, nucleosome structures, water channels, and ion transporters and a significant up-regulation of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity, and auxin responses under conditions of oxygen shortage. Promoter analysis on a cluster of up-regulated genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of the AtMYB2-binding motif (GT motif), a sugar response element-like motif, and a G-box-related sequence, and also identified several putative anaerobic response elements. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions using 29 selected genes independently verified the microarray results. This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses conducted to date investigating hypoxia-responsive transcriptional networks in plants.

  8. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  9. Enhanceosomes as integrators of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and other transcription factors in the hypoxic transcriptional response.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, Matthew R; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Hypoxia is a prevalent attribute of the solid tumor microenvironment that promotes the expression of genes through posttranslational modifications and stabilization of alpha subunits (HIF1α and HIF2α) of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Despite significant similarities, HIF1 (HIF1α/ARNT) and HIF2 (HIF2α/ARNT) activate common as well as unique target genes and exhibit different functions in cancer biology. More surprisingly, accumulating data indicates that the HIF1- and/or HIF2-mediated hypoxia responses can be oncogenic as well as tumor suppressive. While the role of HIF in the hypoxia response is well established, recent data support the concept that HIF is necessary, but not sufficient for the hypoxic response. Other transcription factors that are activated by hypoxia are also required for the HIF-mediated hypoxia response. HIFs, other transcription factors, co-factors and RNA poll II recruited by HIF and other transcription factors form multifactorial enhanceosome complexes on the promoters of HIF target genes to activate hypoxia inducible genes. Importantly, HIF1 or HIF2 requires distinct partners in activating HIF1 or HIF2 target genes. Because HIF enhanceosome formation is required for the gene activation and distinct functions of HIF1 and HIF2 in tumor biology, disruption of the HIF1 or HIF2 specific enhanceosome complex may prove to be a beneficial strategy in tumor treatment in which tumor growth is specifically dependent upon HIF1 or HIF2 activity.

  10. Mechanisms of Hypoxic Up-Regulation of Versican Gene Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sotoodehnejadnematalahi, Fattah; Staples, Karl J.; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Pearson, Helen; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Burke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of many pathological tissues. Macrophages accumulate in hypoxic sites and up-regulate a range of hypoxia-inducible genes. The matrix proteoglycan versican has been identified as one such gene, but the mechanisms responsible for hypoxic induction are not fully characterised. Here we investigate the up-regulation of versican by hypoxia in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), and, intriguingly, show that versican mRNA is up-regulated much more highly (>600 fold) by long term hypoxia (5 days) than by 1 day of hypoxia (48 fold). We report that versican mRNA decay rates are not affected by hypoxia, demonstrating that hypoxic induction of versican mRNA is mediated by increased transcription. Deletion analysis of the promoter identified two regions required for high level promoter activity of luciferase reporter constructs in human macrophages. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1 has previously been implicated as a key potential regulator of versican expression in hypoxia, however our data suggest that HIF-1 up-regulation is unlikely to be principally responsible for the high levels of induction observed in HMDM. Treatment of HMDM with two distinct specific inhibitors of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), LY290042 and wortmannin, significantly reduced induction of versican mRNA by hypoxia and provides evidence of a role for PI3K in hypoxic up-regulation of versican expression. PMID:26057378

  11. The effects of moderate intensity training in a hypoxic environment on transcriptional responses in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Davie, Allan J; Wen, Li; Cust, Andrew R E; Beavers, Rosalind; Fyfe, Tom; Zhou, Shi

    2017-07-15

    This study investigated the effects of six weeks of normobaric hypoxic training on transcriptional expression of the genes associated with mitochondrial and glycolytic activities in Thoroughbred horses. Eight horses were divided into two groups of four. They completed an identical incremental, moderate intensity training program, except that one group trained in a hypoxic chamber with 15% oxygen for 30 min on alternate days except Sundays (HT), while the other group trained in normal air (NC). Prior to and post training, heart rate and blood lactate were measured during an incremental treadmill test. Muscle biopsy samples were taken prior to and 24 h post the training period for qPCR analysis of mRNA changes in VEGF, PPARγ, HIF-1α, PGC-1α, COX4, AK3, LDH, PFK, PKm and SOD-2. No significant differences between the HT and NC were detected by independent-samples t-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (P>0.05) in relative changes of mRNA abundance. There were no significant differences between groups for heart rate and blood lactate during the treadmill test. The outcomes indicated that this hypoxia training program did not cause a significant variation in basal level expression of the selected mRNAs in Thoroughbreds as compared with normoxic training. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. NF-kappaB links innate immunity to the hypoxic response through transcriptional regulation of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Rius, Jordi; Guma, Monica; Schachtrup, Christian; Akassoglou, Katerina; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S; Haddad, Gabriel G; Karin, Michael

    2008-06-05

    The hypoxic response is an ancient stress response triggered by low ambient oxygen (O2) (ref. 1) and controlled by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1), whose alpha subunit is rapidly degraded under normoxia but stabilized when O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) that target its O2-dependent degradation domain are inhibited. Thus, the amount of HIF-1alpha, which controls genes involved in energy metabolism and angiogenesis, is regulated post-translationally. Another ancient stress response is the innate immune response, regulated by several transcription factors, among which NF-kappaB plays a central role. NF-kappaB activation is controlled by IkappaB kinases (IKK), mainly IKK-beta, needed for phosphorylation-induced degradation of IkappaB inhibitors in response to infection and inflammation. IKK-beta is modestly activated in hypoxic cell cultures when PHDs that attenuate its activation are inhibited. However, defining the relationship between NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha has proven elusive. Using in vitro systems, it was reported that HIF-1alpha activates NF-kappaB, that NF-kappaB controls HIF-1alpha transcription and that HIF-1alpha activation may be concurrent with inhibition of NF-kappaB. Here we show, with the use of mice lacking IKK-beta in different cell types, that NF-kappaB is a critical transcriptional activator of HIF-1alpha and that basal NF-kappaB activity is required for HIF-1alpha protein accumulation under hypoxia in cultured cells and in the liver and brain of hypoxic animals. IKK-beta deficiency results in defective induction of HIF-1alpha target genes including vascular endothelial growth factor. IKK-beta is also essential for HIF-1alpha accumulation in macrophages experiencing a bacterial infection. Hence, IKK-beta is an important physiological contributor to the hypoxic response, linking it to innate immunity and inflammation.

  13. The Transcription Factor ZNF395 Is Required for the Maximal Hypoxic Induction of Proinflammatory Cytokines in U87-MG Cells.

    PubMed

    Herwartz, Christine; Castillo-Juárez, Paola; Schröder, Linda; Barron, Blanca L; Steger, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia activates the expression of proangiogenic and survival promoting factors as well as proinflammatory cytokines that support tissue inflammation. Hypoxia and inflammation are associated with tumor progression. The identification of the factors participating in the hypoxia associated inflammation is essential to develop strategies to control tumor hypoxia. The transcription factor ZNF395 was found to be overexpressed in various tumors including glioblastomas particularly in the network of a hypoxic response pointing to a functional role of ZNF395. On the other hand, ZNF395 was suggested to have tumor suppressor activities which may rely on its repression of proinflammatory factors. To address these conflictive observations, we investigated the role of ZNF395 in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the astrocytoma cell line U87-MG under hypoxia. We show that ZNF395 is a target gene of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α. By gene expression analysis, RT-PCR and ELISA, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated suppression of ZNF395 impairs the hypoxic induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and LIF in U87-MG cells. At ambient oxygen concentrations, ZNF395 had no enhancing effect, indicating that this transcriptional activation by ZNF395 is restricted to hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that ZNF395 contributes to hypoxia associated inflammation by superactivating proinflammatory cytokines.

  14. The Transcription Factor ZNF395 Is Required for the Maximal Hypoxic Induction of Proinflammatory Cytokines in U87-MG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herwartz, Christine; Castillo-Juárez, Paola; Schröder, Linda; Barron, Blanca L.; Steger, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia activates the expression of proangiogenic and survival promoting factors as well as proinflammatory cytokines that support tissue inflammation. Hypoxia and inflammation are associated with tumor progression. The identification of the factors participating in the hypoxia associated inflammation is essential to develop strategies to control tumor hypoxia. The transcription factor ZNF395 was found to be overexpressed in various tumors including glioblastomas particularly in the network of a hypoxic response pointing to a functional role of ZNF395. On the other hand, ZNF395 was suggested to have tumor suppressor activities which may rely on its repression of proinflammatory factors. To address these conflictive observations, we investigated the role of ZNF395 in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the astrocytoma cell line U87-MG under hypoxia. We show that ZNF395 is a target gene of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α. By gene expression analysis, RT-PCR and ELISA, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated suppression of ZNF395 impairs the hypoxic induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and LIF in U87-MG cells. At ambient oxygen concentrations, ZNF395 had no enhancing effect, indicating that this transcriptional activation by ZNF395 is restricted to hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that ZNF395 contributes to hypoxia associated inflammation by superactivating proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26229239

  15. Time-Course Analysis of Gene Expression During the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hypoxic Response

    PubMed Central

    Bendjilali, Nasrine; MacLeon, Samuel; Kalra, Gurmannat; Willis, Stephen D.; Hossian, A. K. M. Nawshad; Avery, Erica; Wojtowicz, Olivia; Hickman, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Many cells experience hypoxia, or low oxygen, and respond by dramatically altering gene expression. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes that respond are required for many oxygen-dependent cellular processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis, and redox regulation. To more fully characterize the global response to hypoxia, we exposed yeast to hypoxic conditions, extracted RNA at different times, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Time-course statistical analysis revealed hundreds of genes that changed expression by up to 550-fold. The genes responded with varying kinetics suggesting that multiple regulatory pathways are involved. We identified most known oxygen-regulated genes and also uncovered new regulated genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis confirmed that the lysine methyltransferase EFM6 and the recombinase DMC1, both conserved in humans, are indeed oxygen-responsive. Looking more broadly, oxygen-regulated genes participate in expected processes like respiration and lipid metabolism, but also in unexpected processes like amino acid and vitamin metabolism. Using principle component analysis, we discovered that the hypoxic response largely occurs during the first 2 hr and then a new steady-state expression state is achieved. Moreover, we show that the oxygen-dependent genes are not part of the previously described environmental stress response (ESR) consisting of genes that respond to diverse types of stress. While hypoxia appears to cause a transient stress, the hypoxic response is mostly characterized by a transition to a new state of gene expression. In summary, our results reveal that hypoxia causes widespread and complex changes in gene expression to prepare the cell to function with little or no oxygen. PMID:27883312

  16. The effects of mitochondrial genotype on hypoxic survival and gene expression in a hybrid population of the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

    PubMed Central

    Flight, Patrick A.; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Whitehead, Andrew; Rand, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study we draw on a population of the teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, where functionally distinct subspecies hybridize, likely as a result of past glacial events. We had two specific aims: 1) to determine the effect of mtDNA genotype on survivorship of male and female fish under hypoxic stress; 2) to determine the effect of hypoxic stress, sex and mtDNA genotype on gene expression. We found an unexpected and highly significant effect of sex on survivorship under hypoxic conditions, but no significant effect of mtDNA genotype. Gene expression analyses revealed hundreds of transcripts differentially regulated by sex and hypoxia. Mitochondrial transcripts and other predicted pathways were among those influenced by hypoxic stress, and a transcript corresponding to the mtDNA control region was the most highly suppressed transcript under conditions of hypoxia. An RT-PCR experiment on the control region was consistent with microarray results. Effects of mtDNA sequence variation on genome expression were limited, however a potentially important epistasis between mtDNA sequence and expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial translation protein was discovered. Overall, these results confirm that mitochondrial regulation is a major component of hypoxia tolerance and further suggest that purifying selection has been the predominant selective force on mitochondrial genomes in these two subspecies. PMID:21980951

  17. The effects of mitochondrial genotype on hypoxic survival and gene expression in a hybrid population of the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Flight, Patrick A; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Whitehead, Andrew; Rand, David M

    2011-11-01

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study, we draw on a population of the teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, where functionally distinct subspecies hybridize, likely as a result of past glacial events. We had two specific aims: (i) to determine the effect of mtDNA genotype on survivorship of male and female fish under hypoxic stress and (ii) to determine the effect of hypoxic stress, sex and mtDNA genotype on gene expression. We found an unexpected and highly significant effect of sex on survivorship under hypoxic conditions, but no significant effect of mtDNA genotype. Gene expression analyses revealed hundreds of transcripts differentially regulated by sex and hypoxia. Mitochondrial transcripts and other predicted pathways were among those influenced by hypoxic stress, and a transcript corresponding to the mtDNA control region was the most highly suppressed transcript under the conditions of hypoxia. An RT-PCR experiment on the control region was consistent with microarray results. Effects of mtDNA sequence variation on genome expression were limited; however, a potentially important epistasis between mtDNA sequence and expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial translation protein was discovered. Overall, these results confirm that mitochondrial regulation is a major component of hypoxia tolerance and further suggest that purifying selection has been the predominant selective force on mitochondrial genomes in these two subspecies.

  18. Developmental Expression and Hypoxic Induction of Hypoxia Inducible Transcription Factors in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Köblitz, Louise; Fiechtner, Birgit; Baus, Katharina; Lussnig, Rebecca; Pelster, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) has been shown to coordinate the hypoxic response of vertebrates and is expressed in three different isoforms, HIF-1α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α. Knock down of either Hif-1α or Hif-2α in mice results in lethality in embryonic or perinatal stages, suggesting that this transcription factor is not only controlling the hypoxic response, but is also involved in developmental phenomena. In the translucent zebrafish embryo the performance of the cardiovascular system is not essential for early development, therefore this study was designed to analyze the expression of the three Hif-isoforms during zebrafish development and to test the hypoxic inducibility of these transcription factors. To complement the existing zfHif-1α antibody we expressed the whole zfHif-2α protein and used it for immunization and antibody generation. Similarly, fragments of the zfHif-3α protein were used for immunization and generation of a zfHif-3α specific antibody. To demonstrate presence of the Hif-isoforms during development [between 1 day post fertilization (1 dpf) and 9 dpf] affinity-purified antibodies were used. Hif-1α protein was present under normoxic conditions in all developmental stages, but no significant differences between the different developmental stages could be detected. Hif-2α was also present from 1 dpf onwards, but in post hatching stages (between 5 and 9 dpf) the expression level was significantly higher than prior to hatching. Similarly, Hif-3α was expressed from 1 dpf onwards, and the expression level significantly increased until 5 dpf, suggesting that Hif-2α and Hif-3α play a particular role in early development. Hypoxic exposure (oxygen partial pressure = 5 kPa) in turn caused a significant increase in the level of Hif-1α protein even at 1 dpf and in later stages, while neither Hif-2α nor Hif-3α protein level were affected. In these early developmental stages Hif-1α therefore appears to be more important for

  19. Mitochondrial deficiency impairs hypoxic induction of HIF-1 transcriptional activity and retards tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Masaru; Haga, Naomi; Furuno, Aki; Tsukahara, Satomi; Sakurai, Junko; Tani, Yuri; Sato, Shigeo; Tomida, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria can be involved in regulating cellular stress response to hypoxia and tumor growth, but little is known about that mechanistic relationship. Here, we show that mitochondrial deficiency severely retards tumor xenograft growth with impairing hypoxic induction of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Using mtDNA-deficient ρ0 cells, we found that HIF-1 pathway activation was comparable in slow-growing ρ0 xenografts and rapid-growing parental xenografts. Interestingly, we found that ex vivo ρ0 cells derived from ρ0 xenografts exhibited slightly increased HIF-1α expression and modest HIF-1 pathway activation regardless of oxygen concentration. Surprisingly, ρ0 cells, as well as parental cells treated with oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors, were unable to boost HIF-1 transcriptional activity during hypoxia, although HIF-1α protein levels were ordinarily increased in these cells under hypoxic conditions. These findings indicate that mitochondrial deficiency causes loss of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity and thereby might lead to a constitutive HIF-1 pathway activation as a cellular adaptation mechanism in tumor microenvironment. PMID:28060746

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-08-11

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M.; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state. PMID:26235896

  2. Antisense transcription licenses nascent transcripts to mediate transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunkun; Cheng, Jiasen; Sun, Xianyun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, antisense transcription can regulate sense transcription by induction of epigenetic modifications. We showed previously that antisense transcription triggers Dicer-independent siRNA (disiRNA) production and disiRNA locus DNA methylation (DLDM) in Neurospora crassa. Here we show that the conserved exonuclease ERI-1 (enhanced RNAi-1) is a critical component in this process. Antisense transcription and ERI-1 binding to target RNAs are necessary and sufficient to trigger DLDM. Convergent transcription causes stalling of RNA polymerase II during transcription, which permits ERI-1 to bind nascent RNAs in the nucleus and recruit a histone methyltransferase complex that catalyzes chromatin modifications. Furthermore, we show that, in the cytoplasm, ERI-1 targets hundreds of transcripts from loci without antisense transcription to regulate RNA stability. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role for transcription kinetics in long noncoding RNA-mediated epigenetic modifications and identify ERI-1 as an important regulator of cotranscriptional gene silencing and post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. PMID:27856616

  3. Transients in chloroplast gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Allen, John F.

    2008-04-18

    Transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes is demonstrated by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). These genes encode apoproteins of the reaction centres of photosystem I and photosystem II. Their transcription is regulated by changes in wavelength of light selectively absorbed by photosystem I and photosystem II, and therefore by the redox state of an electron carrier located between the two photosystems. Chloroplast transcriptional redox regulation is shown to have greater amplitude, and the kinetics of transcriptional changes are more complex, than suggested by previous experiments using only DNA probes in Northern blot experiments. Redox effects on chloroplast transcription appear to be superimposed on an endogenous rhythm of mRNA abundance. The functional significance of these transients in chloroplast gene transcription is discussed.

  4. Regulation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis hypoxic response gene encoding alpha -crystallin.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D R; Voskuil, M; Schnappinger, D; Liao, R; Harrell, M I; Schoolnik, G K

    2001-06-19

    Unlike many pathogens that are overtly toxic to their hosts, the primary virulence determinant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appears to be its ability to persist for years or decades within humans in a clinically latent state. Since early in the 20th century latency has been linked to hypoxic conditions within the host, but the response of M. tuberculosis to a hypoxic signal remains poorly characterized. The M. tuberculosis alpha-crystallin (acr) gene is powerfully and rapidly induced at reduced oxygen tensions, providing us with a means to identify regulators of the hypoxic response. Using a whole genome microarray, we identified >100 genes whose expression is rapidly altered by defined hypoxic conditions. Numerous genes involved in biosynthesis and aerobic metabolism are repressed, whereas a high proportion of the induced genes have no known function. Among the induced genes is an apparent operon that includes the putative two-component response regulator pair Rv3133c/Rv3132c. When we interrupted expression of this operon by targeted disruption of the upstream gene Rv3134c, the hypoxic regulation of acr was eliminated. These results suggest a possible role for Rv3132c/3133c/3134c in mycobacterial latency.

  5. Novel Genes Critical for Hypoxic Preconditioning in Zebrafish Are Regulators of Insulin and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Manchenkov, Tania; Pasillas, Martina P.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Imam, Farhad B.

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypoxia is a common cause of major brain, heart, and kidney injury in adults, children, and newborns. However, mild hypoxia can be protective against later, more severe hypoxia exposure via “hypoxic preconditioning,” a phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Accordingly, we have established and optimized an embryonic zebrafish model to study hypoxic preconditioning. Using a functional genomic approach, we used this zebrafish model to identify and validate five novel hypoxia-protective genes, including irs2, crtc3, and camk2g2, which have been previously implicated in metabolic regulation. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and affirm the discovery potential of this novel vertebrate hypoxic stress model. PMID:25840431

  6. Effect of ghrelin on aldolase gene expression in the heart of chronic hypoxic rat.

    PubMed

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages.

  7. Effect of Ghrelin on Aldolase Gene Expression in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Materials and Methods Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). Conclusions It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages. PMID:23843819

  8. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  9. Prolyl isomerases in gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases) are enzymes that assist in the folding of newly-synthesized proteins and regulate the stability, localization, and activity of mature proteins. They do so by catalyzing reversible (cis-trans) rotation about the peptide bond that precedes proline, inducing conformational changes in target proteins. Scope of Review This review will discuss how PPIases regulate gene transcription by controlling the activity of (1) DNA-binding transcription regulatory proteins, (2) RNA polymerase II, and (3) chromatin and histone modifying enzymes. Major Conclusions Members of each family of PPIase (cyclophilins, FKBPs, and parvulins) regulate gene transcription at multiple levels. In all but a few cases, the exact mechanisms remain elusive. Structure studies, development of specific inhibitors, and new methodologies for studying cis/trans isomerization in vivo represent some of the challenges in this new frontier that merges two important fields. General Significance Prolyl isomerases have been found to play key regulatory roles in all phases of the transcription process. Moreover, PPIases control upstream signaling pathways that regulate gene-specific transcription during development, hormone response and environmental stress. More broadly, although transcription is often rate-limiting in the production of enzymes and structural proteins, post-transcriptional modifications are also critical, and PPIases play key roles here as well (see other reviews in this issue). PMID:25450176

  10. Identification of hypoxia-inducible target genes of Aspergillus fumigatus by transcriptome analysis reveals cellular respiration as an important contributor to hypoxic survival.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Kristin; Pähtz, Vera; Hillmann, Falk; Vaknin, Yakir; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Roth, Martin; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Osherov, Nir; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2014-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic, airborne pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. During the infection process, A. fumigatus is challenged by hypoxic microenvironments occurring in inflammatory, necrotic tissue. To gain further insights into the adaptation mechanism, A. fumigatus was cultivated in an oxygen-controlled chemostat under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed a significant increase in transcripts associated with cell wall polysaccharide metabolism, amino acid and metal ion transport, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolysis. A concomitant reduction in transcript levels was observed with cellular trafficking and G-protein-coupled signaling. To learn more about the functional roles of hypoxia-induced transcripts, we deleted A. fumigatus genes putatively involved in reactive nitrogen species detoxification (fhpA), NAD(+) regeneration (frdA and osmA), nitrogen metabolism (niaD and niiA), and respiration (rcfB). We show that the nitric oxygen (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoprotein gene fhpA is strongly induced by hypoxia independent of the nitrogen source but is dispensable for hypoxic survival. By deleting the nitrate reductase gene niaD, the nitrite reductase gene niiA, and the two fumarate reductase genes frdA and osmA, we found that alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate, do not have a significant impact on growth of A. fumigatus during hypoxia, but functional mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are essential under these conditions. Inhibition studies indicated that primarily complexes III and IV play a crucial role in the hypoxic growth of A. fumigatus.

  11. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R; Primorac, D; Rešić, B; Pavlov, V; Čapkun, V; Punda, H; Lozić, B; Zemunik, T

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling of a Hypoxic Seizure Model of Epilepsy Suggests a Role for mTOR and Wnt Signaling in Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Theilhaber, Joachim; Rakhade, Sanjay N.; Sudhalter, Judy; Kothari, Nayantara; Klein, Peter; Pollard, Jack; Jensen, Frances E.

    2013-01-01

    Microarray profiling was used to investigate gene expression in the hypoxic seizure model of acquired epilepsy in the rat, with the aim of characterizing functional pathways which are persistently activated or repressed during epileptogenesis. Hippocampal and cortical tissues were transcriptionally profiled over a one week period following an initial series of seizures induced by mild hypoxia at post-natal day 10 (P10), and the gene expression data was then analyzed with a focus on gene set enrichment analysis, an approach which emphasizes regulation of entire pathways rather than of individual genes. Animals were subjected to one of three conditions: a control with no hypoxia, hypoxic seizures, and hypoxic seizures followed by treatment with the AMPAR antagonist NBQX, a compound currently proposed to be a modulator of epileptogenesis. While temporal gene expression in the control samples was found to be consistent with known processes of neuronal maturation in the rat for the given time window, the hypoxic seizure response was found to be enriched for components of the PI3K/mTOR and Wnt signaling pathways, alongside gene sets representative of glutamatergic, synaptic and axonal processes, perhaps regulated as a downstream consequence of activation of these pathways. Wnt signaling components were also found enriched in the more specifically epileptogenic NBQX-responsive gene set. While activation of the mTOR pathway is consistent with its known role in epileptogenesis and strengthens the case for mTOR or PI3K pathway inhibitors as potential anti-epileptogenic drugs, investigation of the role of Wnt signaling and the effect of appropriate inhibitors might offer a parallel avenue of research toward anti-epileptogenic treatment of epilepsy. PMID:24086344

  13. In vivo profiling of hypoxic gene expression in gliomas using the hypoxia marker EF5 and laser-capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Diane; Karar, Jayashree; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Kumanova, Monika; Jenkins, Kevin W.; Tobias, John W.; Baldwin, Donald; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Evans, Sydney M.; Alarcon, Rodolfo; Maity, Amit; Koch, Cameron; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a key determinant of tumor aggressiveness, yet little is known regarding hypoxic global gene regulation in vivo. We have employed the hypoxia marker EF5 coupled with laser capture microdissection to isolate RNA from viable hypoxic and normoxic regions of 9L experimental gliomas. Through microarray analysis, we have identified several mRNAs (including the HIF targets Vegf, Glut-1 and Hsp27) with increased levels under hypoxia compared to normoxia both in vitro and in vivo. However, we also found striking differences between the global in vitro and in vivo hypoxic mRNA profiles. Intriguingly, the mRNA levels of a substantial number of immunomodulatory and DNA repair proteins including CXCL9, CD3D and RAD51 were found to be downregulated in hypoxic areas in vivo, consistent with a pro-tumorigenic role of hypoxia in solid tumors. Immunohistochemical staining verified increased HSP27 and decreased RAD51 protein levels in hypoxic vs. normoxic tumor regions. Moreover, CD8+ T cells which are recruited to tumors upon stimulation by CXCL9 and CXCL10, were largely excluded from viable hypoxic areas in vivo. This is the first study to analyze the influence of hypoxia on mRNA levels in vivo and can be readily adapted to obtain a comprehensive picture of hypoxic regulation of gene expression and its influence on biological functions in solid tumors. PMID:21266355

  14. Field study of cyclic hypoxic effects on gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiandao; Brouwer, Marius

    2013-12-01

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, are widely used for ecological and toxicological research. They commonly experience cyclic hypoxia in their natural habitats. The response of grass shrimp to laboratory-controlled cyclic hypoxia has been studied in detail, but little is known about how field acclimatized grass shrimp regulate the gene expression and response to cyclic hypoxia. In this study we examined morphometric parameters, relative fecundity and gene expression of grass shrimp collected from two areas in Weeks Bay (Mobile, Alabama). One is a traditionally normoxic location (WBM), and the other is a traditionally cyclic hypoxic location (WC). In the week preceding grass shrimp collection dissolved oxygen (DO) at the field sites was measured continuously. DO was <2 (mg/L DO) and between 2 and 3 (mg/L DO) for 0 and 255min at WBM, and for 285 and 1035min at WC, respectively. Weight and length of WBM grass shrimp were significantly greater than weight and length of WC shrimp. WBM shrimp had more eggs than WC shrimp, but the difference was not significant. Shrimp from WC had a significant higher number of parasites than those from WBM. A cDNA microarray was utilized to investigate the changes in gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas. Five genes, previously identified as hypoxia/cyclic hypoxia-responsive genes in laboratory exposure studies, were significantly up-regulated in WC shrimp relative to WBM. A total of 5 genes were significantly down-regulated in the field study. Only one of those genes, vitellogenin, has been previously found in chronic and cyclic hypoxic studies. Up and down-regulation of 7 selected genes was confirmed by qPCR. The overall pattern of gene expression in wild shrimp from cyclic DO sites in Weeks Bay showed only weak correlations with gene expression in shrimp from chronic and cyclic hypoxic laboratory studies. It appears therefore that transcriptome profiles of laboratory acclimated animals are of limited utility for understanding

  15. Inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) reduces neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Mariya; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Fontana, Xavier; Thei, Laura; Buckle, Rheanan; Christou, Melina; Hompoonsup, Supanida; Gostelow, Naomi; Raivich, Gennadij; Peebles, Donald

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy and cognitive disabilities. Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) strongly up-regulates Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) in the immature brain. Our aim was to establish whether STAT3 up-regulation is associated with neonatal HI-brain damage and evaluate the phosphorylated STAT3-contribution from different cell types in eliciting damage. We subjected postnatal day seven mice to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 60 min hypoxia. Neuronal STAT3-deletion reduced cell death, tissue loss, microglial and astroglial activation in all brain regions. Astroglia-specific STAT3-deletion also reduced cell death, tissue loss and microglial activation, although not as strongly as the deletion in neurons. Systemic pre-insult STAT3-blockade at tyrosine 705 (Y705) with JAK2-inhibitor WP1066 reduced microglial and astroglial activation to a more moderate degree, but in a pattern similar to the one produced by the cell-specific deletions. Our results suggest that STAT3 is a crucial factor in neonatal HI-brain damage and its removal in neurons or astrocytes, and, to some extent, inhibition of its phosphorylation via JAK2-blockade reduces inflammation and tissue loss. Overall, the protective effects of STAT3 inactivation make it a possible target for a therapeutic strategy in neonatal HI. Current data show that neuronal and astroglial STAT3 molecules are involved in the pathways underlying cell death, tissue loss and gliosis following neonatal hypoxia-ischaemia, but differ with respect to the target of their effect. Y705-phosphorylation contributes to hypoxic-ischaemic histopathology. Protective effects of STAT3 inactivation make it a possible target for a therapeutic strategy in neonatal hypoxia-ischaemia. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for

  16. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats.

    PubMed

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008), but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005). Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively). In the present study, animals' treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin.

  17. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Methods: Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results: Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008), but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005). Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In the present study, animals’ treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin. PMID:26236657

  18. Ixr1p and the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Vizoso-Vázquez, Angel; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, M Isabel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2012-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adaptation to hypoxia/anaerobiosis requires the transcriptional induction or derepression of multiple genes organized in regulons controlled by specific transcriptional regulators. Ixr1p is a transcriptional regulatory factor that causes aerobic repression of several hypoxic genes (COX5B, TIR1, and HEM13) and also the activation of HEM13 during hypoxic growth. Analysis of the transcriptome of the wild-type strain BY4741 and its isogenic derivative Δixr1, grown in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, reveals differential regulation of genes related not only to the hypoxic and oxidative stress responses but also to the re-adaptation of catabolic and anabolic fluxes in response to oxygen limitation. The function of Ixr1p in the transcriptional regulation of genes from the sulfate assimilation pathway and other pathways producing α-keto acids is of biotechnological importance for industries based on yeast-derived fermentation products.

  19. Massive transcriptional start site analysis of human genes in hypoxia cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Irie, Takuma; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Mizushima-Sugano, Junko; Yamashita, Riu; Nakai, Kenta; Bentley, David; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Sumio

    2009-04-01

    Combining our full-length cDNA method and the massively parallel sequencing technology, we developed a simple method to collect precise positional information of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) together with digital information of the gene-expression levels in a high throughput manner. We applied this method to observe gene-expression changes in a colon cancer cell line cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We generated more than 100 million 36-base TSS-tag sequences and revealed comprehensive features of hypoxia responsive alterations in the transcriptional landscape of the human genome. The features include presence of inducible 'hot regions' in 54 genomic regions, 220 novel hypoxia inducible promoters that may drive non-protein-coding transcripts, 191 hypoxia responsive alternative promoters and detailed views of 120 novel as well as known hypoxia responsive genes. We further analyzed hypoxic response of different cells using additional 60 million TSS-tags and found that the degree of the gene-expression changes were different among cell lines, possibly reflecting cellular robustness against hypoxia. The novel dynamic figure of the human gene transcriptome will deepen our understanding of the transcriptional program of the human genome as well as bringing new insights into the biology of cancer cells in hypoxia.

  20. Thyrotropin controls transcription of the thyroglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Van Heuverswyn, B; Streydio, C; Brocas, H; Refetoff, S; Dumont, J; Vassart, G

    1984-10-01

    The availability of rat thyroglobulin cDNA clones was exploited to study the regulation of thyroglobulin gene transcription by thyrotropin (TSH). Groups of rats were subjected to treatments leading to reduction or increase in the rat serum TSH (rTSH) levels. Thyroid gland nuclei were isolated, incubated in vitro in the presence of 32P-labeled uridine triphosphate, and thyroglobulin transcripts were quantitated by hybridization to immobilized rat thyroglobulin cDNA clones. Transcription of the thyroglobulin gene was found to be very active in thyroid nuclei from control animals. It represented about 10% of total RNA polymerase II activity. Chronic hyperstimulation of the thyroid glands with endogenous rTSH was achieved in rats treated with the goitrogen propylthiouracil. No significant increase of thyroglobulin gene transcription could be measured in thyroid nuclei from these animals. On the contrary, a dramatic decrease in thyroglobulin gene transcription was observed in those animals in which endogenous rTSH levels had been suppressed by hypophysectomy or by the administration of triiodothyronine. Injection of exogenous bovine TSH in such animals readily restored transcriptional activity of the gene. Our results identify transcription as an important regulatory step involved in TSH action. They suggest that normal TSH levels induce close to maximal expression of the thyroglobulin gene but that continuous presence of TSH is required in order to maintain the gene in an activated state.

  1. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  2. The eukaryotic gene transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, R D

    2001-08-01

    Seven purified proteins may be combined to reconstitute regulated, promoter-dependent RNA polymerase II transcription: five general transcription factors, Mediator, and RNA polymerase II. The entire system has been conserved across species from yeast to humans. The structure of RNA polymerase II, consisting of 10 polypeptides with a mass of about 500 kDa, has been determined at atomic resolution. On the basis of this structure, that of an actively transcribing RNA polymerase II complex has been determined as well.

  3. Characteristics of post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chicas, A; Macino, G

    2001-11-01

    A number of gene silencing phenomena that inactivate genes at the post-transcriptional level have been identified. Due to its potential for studying gene function, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has become an intense area of research. In this review we describe the different means of inducing PTGS and discuss the possible biological roles of these artificially induced phenomena. We also discuss other features of PTGS such as the mechanism of mRNA degradation, the nature of the silencing signal and the mechanism of PTGS inhibition by viral proteins.

  4. Characteristics of post-transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chicas, Agustin; Macino, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    A number of gene silencing phenomena that inactivate genes at the post-transcriptional level have been identified. Due to its potential for studying gene function, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has become an intense area of research. In this review we describe the different means of inducing PTGS and discuss the possible biological roles of these artificially induced phenomena. We also discuss other features of PTGS such as the mechanism of mRNA degradation, the nature of the silencing signal and the mechanism of PTGS inhibition by viral proteins. PMID:11713190

  5. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described.

  6. Role of oxidants in NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription induced by hypoxia and endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chandel, N S; Trzyna, W C; McClintock, D S; Schumacker, P T

    2000-07-15

    The transcription factor NF-kappa B stimulates the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha. LPS (endotoxin) and hypoxia both induce NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription. Furthermore, hypoxia augments LPS induction of TNF-alpha mRNA. Previous reports have indicated that antioxidants abolish NF-kappa B activation in response to LPS or hypoxia, which suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in NF-kappa B activation. This study tested whether mitochondrial ROS are required for both NF-kappaB activation and the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA levels during hypoxia and LPS. Our results indicate that hypoxia (1.5% O2) stimulates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription and increases ROS generation as measured by the oxidant sensitive dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate in murine macrophage J774.1 cells. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid abolished the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B, TNF-alpha gene transcription, and increases in ROS levels. Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, abolished the increase in ROS signal, the activation of NF-kappa B, and TNF-alpha gene transcription during hypoxia. LPS stimulated NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription but not ROS generation in J774.1 cells. Rotenone, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid, and N-acetylcysteine had no effect on the LPS stimulation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, indicating that LPS activates NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription through a ROS-independent mechanism. These results indicate that mitochondrial ROS are required for the hypoxic activation of NF-kappa B and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but not for the LPS activation of NF-kappa B.

  7. Transcriptional Control of the TNF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, James V.; Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine TNF is a critical mediator of immune and inflammatory responses. The TNF gene is an immediate early gene, rapidly transcribed in a variety of cell types following exposure to a broad range of pathogens and signals of inflammation and stress. Regulation of TNF gene expression at the transcriptional level is cell type- and stimulus-specific, involving the recruitment of distinct sets of transcription factors to a compact and modular promoter region. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms through which TNF transcription is specifically activated by a variety of extracellular stimuli in multiple cell types, including T cells, B cells, macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, and fibroblasts. We discuss the role of nuclear factor of activated T cells and other transcription factors and coactivators in enhanceosome formation, as well as the contradictory evidence for a role for nuclear factor κB as a classical activator of the TNF gene. We describe the impact of evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory DNA motifs in the TNF locus upon TNF gene transcription, in contrast to the neutral effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We also assess the regulatory role of chromatin organization, epigenetic modifications, and long-range chromosomal interactions at the TNF locus. PMID:20173386

  8. Hypoxic stress inhibits multiple aspects of the potato tuber wound response. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.; Cook, L.; Vayda, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers subjected to wounding under hypoxic stress do not synthesize RNA species that are induced in response to wounding in aerobic conditions. Further, wound-response proteins fail to be synthesized when wounded tubers are transferred to hypoxic conditions although messenger RNAs which encode them persist for many hours after transfer. Hypoxic stress also prevents the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine by wounded tubers that occurs in aerobic conditions. In contrast, hypoxic tubers accumulate and translate transcripts of genes whose products are involved in anaerobic metabolism whether or not they are wounded. Both the hypoxic response and the aerobic wound response preclude the synthesis of proteins encoded by messenger RNAs which accumulated during the tuberization process and which can be translated in vitro. Finally, wounding elicits the degradation of a subset of these tuberization-associated transcripts. These data indicate a complex and precise regulation of gene expression at several levels of macromolecular synthesis.

  9. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  10. Topologies for perfect adaptation in gene transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation is commonly used in sensory systems and signaling networks to allow the detection of further stimuli. Despite enzymatic network topologies for adaptation have been investigated systematically, the topology of transcriptional network that could perform adaptation still remains unclear, due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we systematically investigated all three-node transcriptional networks, and found the topologies of transcriptional networks for adaptation are different from that of enzymatic ones. While both negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed forward loop (IFFL) are capable of performing adaptation analytically, a positive self-regulation on buffer node is necessary for NFBL topology and more flexible structures emerge for IFFL than that of enzymatic networks. Most of the simulation results agree with analytical predictions. This study may explain the mechanism of adapted gene regulation behavior and supply a design table for gene regulatory adaptation.

  11. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  12. BRG1 and BRM chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate the hypoxia response by acting as coactivators for a subset of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Sena, Johnny A; Wang, Liyi; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling is an active process, which represses or enables the access of transcription machinery to genes in response to external stimuli, including hypoxia. However, in hypoxia, the specific requirement, as well as the molecular mechanism by which the chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate gene expression, remains unclear. In this study, we report that the Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) ATPase-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes promote the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) and HIF2α genes and also promote hypoxic induction of a subset of HIF1 and HIF2 target genes. We show that BRG1 or BRM knockdown in Hep3B and RCC4T cells reduces hypoxic induction of HIF target genes, while reexpression of BRG1 or BRM in BRG1/BRM-deficient SW13 cells increases HIF target gene activation. Mechanistically, HIF1 and HIF2 increase the hypoxic induction of HIF target genes by recruiting BRG1 complexes to HIF target gene promoters, which promotes nucleosome remodeling of HIF target gene promoters in a BRG1 ATPase-dependent manner. Importantly, we found that the function of BRG1 complexes in hypoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells is dictated by the HIF-mediated hypoxia response and could be opposite from their function in normoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells.

  13. Yeast TATA-box transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M C; Kao, C C; Pei, R; Berk, A J

    1989-10-01

    The first step in the transcription of most protein-encoding genes in eukaryotes is the binding of a transcription factor to the TATA-box promoter element. This TATA-box transcription factor was purified from extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using reconstitution of in vitro transcription reactions as an assay. The activity copurified with a protein whose sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel mobility is 25 kDa. The sequence of the amino-terminal 21 residues of this protein was determined by sequential Edman degradation. A yeast genomic library was screened with mixed oligonucleotides encoding six residues of the protein sequence. The yeast TATA-box factor gene was cloned, and DNA sequencing revealed a 720-base-pair open reading frame encoding a 27,016-Da protein. The identity of the clone was confirmed by expressing the gene in Escherichia coli and detecting TATA-box factor DNA binding and transcriptional activities in extracts of the recombinant E. coli. The TATA-box factor gene was mapped to chromosome five of S. cerevisiae. RNA blot hybridization and nuclease S1 analysis indicated that the major TATA-box factor mRNA is 1.3 kilobases, including an unusually long 5' untranslated region of 188 +/- 5 nucleotides. Homology searches showed a region of distant similarity to the calcium-binding structures of calpains, a structure that has a conformation similar to the helix-turn-helix motif of DNA binding proteins.

  14. Combined 3D and hypoxic culture improves cartilage-specific gene expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper B; Nielsen, Anna B; Munir, Samir; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael; Søballe, Kjeld; Bünger, Cody; Lind, Martin

    2011-04-01

    In vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes is an essential part of many clinically used cartilage repair treatments. Native chondrocytes reside in a 3-dimensional (3D) network and are exposed to low levels of oxygen. We compared monolayer culture to combined 3D and hypoxic culture using quantitative gene expression analysis. Cartilage biopsies were collected from the intercondylar groove in the distal femur from 12 patients with healthy cartilage. Cells were used for either monolayer or scaffold culture. The scaffolds were clinically available MPEG-PLGA scaffolds (ASEED). After harvesting of cells for baseline investigation, the remainder was divided into 3 groups for incubation in conditions of normoxia (21% oxygen), hypoxia (5% oxygen), or severe hypoxia (1% oxygen). RNA extractions were performed 1, 2, and 6 days after the baseline time point, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using assays for RNA encoding collagen types 1 and 2, aggrecan, sox9, ankyrin repeat domain-37, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase relative to 2 hypoxia-stable housekeeping genes. Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type 2 RNA expression increased with reduced oxygen. On day 6, the expression of collagen type 2 and aggrecan RNA was higher in 3D culture than in monolayer culture. Our findings suggest that there was a combined positive effect of 3D culture and hypoxia on cartilage-specific gene expression. The positive effects of 3D culture alone were not detected until day 6, suggesting that seeding of chondrocytes onto a scaffold for matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation should be performed earlier than 2 days before implantation.

  15. The Archipelago Ubiquitin Ligase Subunit Acts in Target Tissue to Restrict Tracheal Terminal Cell Branching and Hypoxic-Induced Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Moberg, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene archipelago (ago) encodes the F-box/WD-repeat protein substrate specificity factor for an SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box)-type polyubiquitin ligase that inhibits tumor-like growth by targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome. The Ago protein is expressed widely in the fly embryo and larva and promotes degradation of pro-proliferative proteins in mitotically active cells. However the requirement for Ago in post-mitotic developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Ago is an antagonist of the physiologic response to low oxygen (hypoxia). Reducing Ago activity in larval muscle cells elicits enhanced branching of nearby tracheal terminal cells in normoxia. This tracheogenic phenotype shows a genetic dependence on sima, which encodes the HIF-1α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor dHIF and its target the FGF ligand branchless (bnl), and is enhanced by depletion of the Drosophila Von Hippel Lindau (dVHL) factor, which is a subunit of an oxygen-dependent ubiquitin ligase that degrades Sima/HIF-1α protein in metazoan cells. Genetic reduction of ago results in constitutive expression of some hypoxia-inducible genes in normoxia, increases the sensitivity of others to mild hypoxic stimulus, and enhances the ability of adult flies to recover from hypoxic stupor. As a molecular correlate to these genetic data, we find that Ago physically associates with Sima and restricts Sima levels in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify Ago as a required element of a circuit that suppresses the tracheogenic activity of larval muscle cells by antagonizing the Sima-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia. PMID:23459416

  16. Transcriptional effects of gene dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale gene dose reductions usually lead to abnormal phenotypes or death. However, male mammals, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans have only one X chromosome and thus can be considered as monosomic for a major chromosome. Despite the deleterious effects brought about by such gene dose reduction in the case of an autosome, X chromosome monosomy in males is natural and innocuous. This is because of the nearly full transcriptional compensation for X chromosome genes in males, as opposed to no or partial transcriptional compensation for autosomal one-dose genes arising due to deletions. Buffering, the passive absorption of disturbance due to enzyme kinetics, and feedback responses triggered by expression change contribute to partial compensation. Feed-forward mechanisms, which are active responses to genes being located on the X, rather than actual gene dose are important contributors to full X chromosome compensation. In the last decade, high-throughput techniques have provided us with the tools to effectively and quantitatively measure the small-fold transcriptional effects of dose reduction. This is leading to a better understanding of compensatory mechanisms. PMID:24581086

  17. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Gerald F.; Schmidhauser, Christian T.; Bissell, Mina J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  18. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, G.F.; Schmidhauser, C.T.; Bissell, M.J.

    1999-12-21

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  19. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  20. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  1. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  2. HIF-1-mediated activation of transferrin receptor gene transcription by iron chelation.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, L; Tacchini, L; Cairo, G

    1999-11-01

    Treatment with iron chelators mimics hypoxic induction of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) which activates transcription by binding to hypoxia responsive elements (HRE). We investigated whether HIF-1 is involved in transcriptional activation of the transferrin receptor (TfR), a membrane protein which mediates cellular iron uptake, in response to iron deprivation. The transcription rate of the TfR gene in isolated nuclei was up-regulated by treatment of Hep3B human hepatoma cells with the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). The role of HIF-1 in the activation of TfR was indicated by the following observations: (i) DFO-dependent activation of a luciferase reporter gene in transfected Hep3B cells was mediated by a fragment of the human TfR promoter containing a putative HRE sequence; (ii) mutation of this sequence prevented stimulation of luciferase activity; (iii) binding to this sequence of HIF-1alpha, identified by competition experiments and supershift assays, was induced by DFO. Furthermore, in mouse hepatoma cells unable to assemble functional HIF-1, inducibility of TfR transcription by DFO was lost and TfR mRNA up-regulation was reduced. These results, which show the role of HIF-1 in the control of TfR gene expression in conditions of iron depletion, give insights into the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation which concur with the well-characterized post-transcriptional control of TfR expression to expand the extent of response to iron deficiency.

  3. Deletion of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 gene protects neonatal mice against cerebral hypoxic-ischaemic injury.

    PubMed

    Pirianov, Grisha; Brywe, Katarina G; Mallard, Carina; Edwards, A David; Flavell, Richard A; Hagberg, Henrik; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2007-05-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) is a member of the stress-activated group of mitogen-activated protein kinases. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 is a potent mediator of apoptosis and the use of JNK inhibitors or jnk3 gene deletion each protect against brain injury in adults. However, little is known about the role of JNK3 or its mechanism of action in neonatal brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare the vulnerability of neonatal JNK3 knockout (JNK3 KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice to cerebral hypoxic-ischaemic injury (HII) using unilateral-carotid occlusion combined with transient hypoxia. The degree of neural tissue loss in JNK3 KO mice was substantially reduced compared with WT mice (JNK3 KO 27.8%+/-2.8% versus WT 48.3%+/-2.0%, PHypoxic-ischaemic injury increased JNK phosphorylation and activity, with JNK3 as the major isoform. Significantly, in JNK3 KO animals there was no difference in the activation of the upstream kinases mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MKK4) or MKK7. Downstream of JNK3, HII lead to increased phosphorylation of the transcription factors c-Jun and adenovirus transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), which was attenuated in JNK3 KO mice. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 deletion also decrease caspase-3 cleavage and Bim/PUMA expression, coupled with a upregulation of AKT/FOXO3a levels, linking JNK3 to apoptosis. These findings implicate JNK3 involvement in neural cell loss resulting from cerebral HII in the developing brain.

  4. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael E; DiTacchio, Luciano; Hayes, Kevin R; Vollmers, Christopher; Pulivarthy, S; Baggs, Julie E; Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B

    2009-04-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  5. Harmonics of Circadian Gene Transcription in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Kevin R.; Vollmers, Christopher; Pulivarthy, S.; Baggs, Julie E.; Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse. PMID:19343201

  6. Effect of selenium deficiency on gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, M.J.; Burgener, K.W. )

    1991-03-11

    To investigate the general effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency on gene transcription, weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a basal Se-deficient Torula yeast-based diet or the same diet supplemented with 0.5 ppm Se as sodium selenite for 40 days. At that time three rats in each dietary group were sacrificed. Livers were excised and divided into two portions for isolation of nuclei and for assay of cytosolic Se-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity. Se-GPX activity was 279 {plus minus} 4 (mean {plus minus} SEM) mUnits/mg protein in Se-adequate livers, and 10 {plus minus} 2 mUnits/mg protein in Se-deficient livers. One aliquot of nuclei from each dietary group was used in a run-on transcription assay, employing {alpha}-{sup 32}P-UTP to label nascent transcripts. Equal quantities of radioactivity from these nuclei were hybridized with cDNA probes bound to nitrocellulose. Message bound to each probe was quantitated by laser densitometry of autoradiographs, and by scintillation counting of dot blotted nitrocellulose. Transcription of most genes tested, including Se-GPX, was not significantly affected by dietary Se intake. However, the amount of hybridization to a murine oncogene probe (v-fos) was increased in Se deficiency.

  7. Intersecting transcription networks constrain gene regulatory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Booth, Lauren N; Tuch, Brian B; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Epistasis—the non-additive interactions between different genetic loci—constrains evolutionary pathways, blocking some and permitting others1–8. For biological networks such as transcription circuits, the nature of these constraints and their consequences are largely unknown. Here we describe the evolutionary pathways of a transcription network that controls the response to mating pheromone in yeasts9. A component of this network, the transcription regulator Ste12, has evolved two different modes of binding to a set of its target genes. In one group of species, Ste12 binds to specific DNA binding sites, while in another lineage it occupies DNA indirectly, relying on a second transcription regulator to recognize DNA. We show, through the construction of various possible evolutionary intermediates, that evolution of the direct mode of DNA binding was not directly accessible to the ancestor. Instead, it was contingent on a lineage-specific change to an overlapping transcription network with a different function, the specification of cell type. These results show that analyzing and predicting the evolution of cis-regulatory regions requires an understanding of their positions in overlapping networks, as this placement constrains the available evolutionary pathways. PMID:26153861

  8. Profilin is associated with transcriptionally active genes

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Emilia; Hessle, Viktoria; von Euler, Anne; Visa, Neus

    2012-01-01

    We have raised antibodies against the profilin of Chironomus tentans to study the location of profilin relative to chromatin and to active genes in salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We show that a fraction of profilin is located in the nucleus, where profilin is highly concentrated in the nucleoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, profilin is associated with multiple bands in the polytene chromosomes. By staining salivary glands with propidium iodide, we show that profilin does not co-localize with dense chromatin. Profilin associates instead with protein-coding genes that are transcriptionally active, as revealed by co-localization with hnRNP and snRNP proteins. We have performed experiments of transcription inhibition with actinomycin D and we show that the association of profilin with the chromosomes requires ongoing transcription. However, the interaction of profilin with the gene loci does not depend on RNA. Our results are compatible with profilin regulating actin polymerization in the cell nucleus. However, the association of actin with the polytene chromosomes of C. tentans is sensitive to RNase, whereas the association of profilin is not, and we propose therefore that the chromosomal location of profilin is independent of actin. PMID:22572953

  9. Drosophilia alpha-tubulin genes and their transcription patterns.

    PubMed

    Kalfayan, L; Loewenberg, J; Wensink, P C

    1982-01-01

    There are four different alpha-tubulin genes in D. melanogaster DNA; three of them appear as single copies and the other is present as either one or two copies in the haploid genome. The transcripts of three of these genes were examined. Each of them is complementary to a transcript of different length, implying that each is transcribed. Since these transcripts are found on polysomes, it is likely that they are translated. At least two of the genes are complementary to several transcripts, indicating that each of them has more than one transcription start or stop site or perhaps that there are alternative paths of posttranscriptional processing. There is a different developmental pattern of concentrations for transcripts from each of these genes, and different RNAs from the same gene also have different patterns. We conclude that the concentration of transcripts from each gene appears to be independently controlled and that even different transcription products from the same gene appear to independently controlled.

  10. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  11. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  12. The "fourth dimension" of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Bert W

    2009-05-01

    The three dimensions of space provide our relationship to position on the earth, but the fourth dimension of time has an equally profound influence on our lives. Everything from light and sound to weather and biology operate on the principle of measurable temporal periodicity. Consequently, a wide variety of time clocks affect all aspects of our existence. The annual (and biannual) cycles of activity, metabolism, and mating, the monthly physiological clocks of women and men, and the 24-h diurnal rhythms of humans are prime examples. Should it be surprising to us that the fourth dimension also impinges upon gene expression and that the genome itself is regulated by the fastest running of all biological clocks? Recent evidence substantiates the existence of such a ubiquitin-dependent transcriptional clock that is based upon the activation and destruction of transcriptional coactivators.

  13. Reference genes for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies in soybean plants under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T J; Rodrigues, F A; Neumaier, N; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Farias, J R B; de Oliveira, M C N; Borém, A; de Oliveira, A C B; Emygdio, B M; Nepomuceno, A L

    2014-02-13

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful tool used to measure gene expression. However, because of its high sensitivity, the method is strongly influenced by the quality and concentration of the template cDNA and by the amplification efficiency. Relative quantification is an effective strategy for correcting random and systematic errors by using the expression level of reference gene(s) to normalize the expression level of the genes of interest. To identify soybean reference genes for use in studies of flooding stress, we compared 5 candidate reference genes (CRGs) with the NormFinder and GeNorm programs to select the best internal control. The expression stability of the CRGs was evaluated in root tissues from soybean plants subjected to hypoxic conditions. Elongation factor 1-beta and actin-11 were identified as the most appropriate genes for RT-qPCR normalization by both the NormFinder and GeNorm analyses. The expression profiles of the genes for alcohol dehydrogenase 1, sucrose synthase 4, and ascorbate peroxidase 2 were analyzed by comparing different normalizing combinations (including no normalization) of the selected reference genes. Here, we have identified potential genes for use as references for RT-qPCR normalization in experiments with soybean roots growing in O2-depleted environments, such as flooding-stressed plants.

  14. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  15. Transcription-coupled changes to chromatin underpin gene silencing by transcriptional interference.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Allshire, Robin C

    2016-12-15

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcription into a downstream promoter frequently results in transcriptional interference. However, the mechanism of this repression is not fully understood. We recently showed that drug tolerance in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is controlled by lncRNA transcription upstream of the tgp1(+) permease gene. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional interference of tgp1(+) involves several transcription-coupled chromatin changes mediated by conserved elongation factors Set2, Clr6CII, Spt6 and FACT. These factors are known to travel with RNAPII and establish repressive chromatin in order to limit aberrant transcription initiation from cryptic promoters present in gene bodies. We therefore conclude that conserved RNAPII-associated mechanisms exist to both suppress intragenic cryptic promoters during genic transcription and to repress gene promoters by transcriptional interference. Our analyses also demonstrate that key mechanistic features of transcriptional interference are shared between S. pombe and the highly divergent budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Thus, transcriptional interference is an ancient, conserved mechanism for tightly controlling gene expression. Our mechanistic insights allowed us to predict and validate a second example of transcriptional interference involving the S. pombe pho1(+) gene. Given that eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed, transcriptional interference likely represents a more general feature of gene regulation than is currently appreciated.

  16. RNA Activation of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene (VEGF) Promoter by Double-Stranded RNA and Hypoxia: Role of Noncoding VEGF Promoter Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Hofman, Paul; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a gene regulation process in which promoter-targeted short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) or microRNAs (miRs) induce target gene expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigate the presence of cryptic promoter transcripts within the VEGF promoter. Single-strand sense and antisense noncoding vascular endothelial growth factor (NcVEGF) promoter transcripts are identified, and their respective expression is studied in cells transfected with a VEGF promoter targeted dsRNA, namely, dsVEGF706, in hypoxic cells and in human malignant lung tissues. Interestingly, in dsVEGF706-transfected, as well as in hypoxic cells, NcVEGF expression levels increase coordinately with coding VEGF expression. Ago2 interaction with both sense and antisense NcVEGFs is increased in hypoxic cells, whereas in dsVEGF706-transfected cells, Ago2 and the antisense strand of the dsRNA interact specifically with the sense NcVEGF transcript. Furthermore, both dsVEGF706 and ectopic NcVEGF transcripts are able to activate the VEGF promoter endogenously present or in a reporter construct. Finally, using small interfering RNA targeting Ago2, we show that RNAa plays a role in the maintenance of increased VEGF and NcVEGF expression after hypoxia. Given the central role of VEGF in major human diseases, including cancer, this novel molecular mechanism is poised to reveal promising possibilities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26976645

  17. Effects of hemorrhage on cytokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1993-08-01

    Injury and blood loss are often followed by infection and the rapid development of organ system dysfunction, frequently involving mucosal sites, such as the lung and intestine. To examine possible mechanisms contributing to these conditions, we used semiquantitative polymerase chain reactions to determine cytokine mRNA expression among cellular populations isolated from mucosal and systemic anatomic sites of mice at predetermined time points following 30% blood volume hemorrhage with resuscitation 1 hr later. Within 1 hr after hemorrhage, significant increases were observed in mRNA levels for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-5, and TGF-beta in intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells. The levels of TGF-beta transcripts among alveolar macrophages were increased 1 hr following blood loss, and increase in IL-1 alpha transcripts was found starting 2 hr posthemorrhage. Cells from Peyer's patches showed significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TGF-beta during the 4 hr following hemorrhage. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta were present within 4 hr of blood loss among cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. The expression of mRNA for most cytokines was not significantly altered in splenocytes or peripheral blood mononuclear cells at any time point following hemorrhage. These experiments demonstrate that blood loss, even if resuscitated, produces significant increases in proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine gene transcription as early as 1 hr following hemorrhage. These posthemorrhage alterations in cytokine mRNA expression were particularly prominent at mucosal sites, suggesting a mechanism for the increased incidence of pulmonary and intestinal involvement in organ system failure following severe blood loss and injury.

  18. Regulation of hypoxia-inducible genes by ETS1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Salnikow, Konstantin; Aprelikova, Olga; Ivanov, Sergey; Tackett, Sean; Kaczmarek, Monika; Karaczyn, Aldona; Yee, Herman; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S; Niederhuber, John

    2008-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) regulates the expression of genes that facilitate tumor cell survival by making them more resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recent evidence suggests that the activation of other transcription factors, in cooperation with HIF-1 or acting alone, is involved in the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Here we report that high cell density, a condition that might mimic the physiologic situation in growing tumor and most probably representing nutritional starvation, upregulates hypoxia-inducible genes. This upregulation can occur in HIF-independent manner since hypoxia-inducible genes carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), lysyloxidase like 2 (LOXL2) and n-myc-down regulated 1 (NDRG1)/calcium activated protein (Cap43) can be upregulated by increased cell density under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions in both HIF-1 alpha-proficient and -deficient mouse fibroblasts. Moreover, cell density upregulates the same genes in 1HAEo- and A549 human lung epithelial cells. Searching for other transcription factors involved in the regulation of hypoxia-inducible genes by cell density, we focused our attention on ETS1. As reported previously, members of v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ETS) family transcription factors participate in the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Here, we provide evidence that ETS1 protein is upregulated at high cell density in both human and mouse cells. The involvement of ETS1 in the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible genes was further confirmed in a luciferase reporter assay using cotransfection of ETS1 expression vector with NDRG1/Cap43 promoter construct. The downregulation of ETS1 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited the upregulation of CA9 and NDRG1/Cap43 caused by increased cell density. Collectively, our data indicate the involvement of ETS1 along with HIF-1 in regulating hypoxia-inducible genes.

  19. Gene expression in plant mitochondria: transcriptional and post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan; Brennicke, Axel

    2003-01-01

    The informational content of the mitochondrial genome in plants is, although small, essential for each cell. Gene expression in these organelles involves a number of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps. The complex post-transcriptional processes of plant mitochondria such as 5' and 3' RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing and controlled RNA stability extensively modify individual steady-state RNA levels and influence the mRNA quantities available for translation. In this overview of the processes in mitochondrial gene expression, we focus on confirmed and potential sites of regulatory interference and discuss the evolutionary origins of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. PMID:12594926

  20. LncRNA260-specific siRNA targeting IL28RA gene inhibit cardiomyocytes hypoxic/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ge; Yang, Xin-Xing; Li, Yanyan; Geng, Hong-Yu; Yang, Zhi-Jian; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Kim, Hyun Jun; Lu, Xin-Zheng

    2017-08-01

    The interleukin 28 receptor alpha (IL28RA) gene was indicated to be associated with apoptosis. However, it was not clear whether long non-coding RNA 260 (lncRNA 260)-specific siRNA targeting IL28RA gene could inhibit hypoxic reoxygenation (H/R) cardiomyocytes injury or not. To explore the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of lncRNA260-specific siRNA-mediated inhibition of IL28RA from H/R injury in cardiomyocytes, the current research was performed. The primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were transfected with three different pairs of siRNA specific to lncRNA260 targeting IL28RA gene and then were undergone with the conditions simulating H/R injury. All three groups of cardiomyocytes treated with lncRNA260-specific siRNA experienced significantly decreased levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity and apoptosis rate relative to the non-treatment and negative control groups (P<0.05), also expressed reduced levels of IL28RA, and increased levels of PI3KCG and Bcl-2/Bax (P<0.05). The lncRNA260-specific siRNA may reduce cardiomyocyte apoptosis associated with H/R injury by decreasing levels of the IL28RA gene product and thus activating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron–sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O2 starvation. Thus, O2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25603427

  2. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  3. Methyl jasmonate, gibberellic acid, and auxin affect transcription and transcript accumulation of chloroplast genes in barley.

    PubMed

    Zubo, Yan O; Yamburenko, Maria V; Kusnetsov, Viktor V; Börner, Thomas

    2011-08-15

    Phytohormones control growth and development of plants. Their effects on the expression of nuclear genes are well investigated. Although they influence plastid-related processes, it is largely unknown whether phytohormones exert their control also by regulating the expression of plastid/chloroplast genes. We have therefore studied the effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), gibberellic acid (GA(3)), an auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA), a brassinosteroid (24-epibrassinolide, BR) and a cytokinin (6-benzyladenine) on transcription (run-on assays) and transcript levels (RNA blot hybridization) of chloroplast genes after incubation of detached barley leaves in hormone solutions. BR was the only hormone without significant influence on chloroplast transcription. It showed, however, a weak reducing effect on transcript accumulation. MeJA, IAA and GA(3) repressed both transcription and transcript accumulation, while BA counteracted the effects of the other hormones. Effects of phytohormones on transcription differed in several cases from their influence on transcript levels suggesting that hormones may act via separate signaling pathways on transcription and transcript accumulation in chloroplasts. We observed striking differences in the response of chloroplast gene expression on phytohormones between the lower (young cells) and the upper segments (oldest cells) of barley leaves. Quantity and quality of the hormone effects on chloroplast gene expression seem to depend therefore on the age and/or developmental stage of the cells. As the individual chloroplast genes responded in different ways on phytohormone treatment, gene- and transcript-specific factors should be involved. Our data suggest that phytohormones adjust gene expression in the nucleo-cytoplasmic compartment and in plastids/chloroplasts in response to internal and external cues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems.

  5. Transcription of functionally related constitutive genes is not coordinated.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Zenklusen, Daniel; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Expression of an individual gene can vary considerably among genetically identical cells because of stochastic fluctuations in transcription. However, proteins comprising essential complexes or pathways have similar abundances and lower variability. It is not known whether coordination in the expression of subunits of essential complexes occurs at the level of transcription, mRNA abundance or protein expression. To directly measure the level of coordination in the expression of genes, we used highly sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to count individual mRNAs of functionally related and unrelated genes within single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Our results revealed that transcript levels of temporally induced genes are highly correlated in individual cells. In contrast, transcription of constitutive genes encoding essential subunits of complexes is not coordinated because of stochastic fluctuations. The coordination of these functional complexes therefore must occur post-transcriptionally, and likely post-translationally.

  6. Spatially coordinated dynamic gene transcription in living pituitary tissue.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Karen; Hey, Kirsty; Momiji, Hiroshi; McNamara, Anne V; Patist, Amanda L; Woodburn, Joanna; Spiller, David G; Christian, Helen C; McNeilly, Alan S; Mullins, John J; Finkenstädt, Bärbel F; Rand, David A; White, Michael R H; Davis, Julian R E

    2016-02-01

    Transcription at individual genes in single cells is often pulsatile and stochastic. A key question emerges regarding how this behaviour contributes to tissue phenotype, but it has been a challenge to quantitatively analyse this in living cells over time, as opposed to studying snap-shots of gene expression state. We have used imaging of reporter gene expression to track transcription in living pituitary tissue. We integrated live-cell imaging data with statistical modelling for quantitative real-time estimation of the timing of switching between transcriptional states across a whole tissue. Multiple levels of transcription rate were identified, indicating that gene expression is not a simple binary 'on-off' process. Immature tissue displayed shorter durations of high-expressing states than the adult. In adult pituitary tissue, direct cell contacts involving gap junctions allowed local spatial coordination of prolactin gene expression. Our findings identify how heterogeneous transcriptional dynamics of single cells may contribute to overall tissue behaviour.

  7. Nitrogen regulation of lignin peroxidase gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D; Alic, M; Gold, M H

    1994-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a polyclonal antibody to lignin peroxidase (LiP) isozyme H8 from the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium demonstrates that LiP protein is detectable in the extracellular media of 5- and 6-day-old nitrogen-limited, but not nitrogen-sufficient, cultures. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrates that lip mRNA is detectable from 5- and 6-day old cells grown in nitrogen-limited, but not nitrogen-sufficient, cultures. These results indicate that LiP expression is regulated at the level of gene transcription by nutrient nitrogen. Since lignin degradation by P. chrysosporium is derepressed by nitrogen starvation, it appears that lignin degradation and LiP expression are coordinately regulated in this organism. These results contradict a recent report which concluded that LiP protein expression is not regulated by nutrient nitrogen (C. G. Johnston and S. D. Aust, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 200:108-112, 1994). Images PMID:7944376

  8. The Association between NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms and Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Susceptibility and Symptoms in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongqin; Zhu, Zhiling; Fang, Xiaoxia; Yin, Ling; Liu, Yuxia; Xu, Shouxia; Li, Aixue

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial NOS (NOS3) has a potential role in the prevention of neuronal injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Thus, we aimed to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and HIE susceptibility and symptoms in a Chinese Han population. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS3 gene, rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744, were detected in 226 children with HIE and 212 healthy children in a Chinese Han population. Apgar scores and magnetic resonance image scans were used to estimate the symptoms and brain damage. The association analyses were conducted by using SNPStats and SPSS 18.0 software. The genotype and allele distributions of rs1800779 and rs1799983 displayed no significant differences between the patients and the controls, while the rs2070744 allele distribution was significantly different (corrected P = 0.009). For clinical characteristics, the rs2070744 genotype distribution was significantly different in patients with different Apgar scores (≤5, TT/TC/CC = 6/7/5; 6~7, TT/TC/CC = 17/0/0; 8~9, TT/TC/CC = 6/2/0; 10, TT/TC/CC = 7/1/0; corrected P = 0.006) in the 1001 to 1449 g birth weight subgroup. The haplotype test did not show any associations with the risk and clinical characteristics of HIE. The results suggest that NOS3 gene SNP rs2070744 was significantly associated with HIE susceptibility and symptom expression in Chinese Han population.

  9. The Association between NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms and Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Susceptibility and Symptoms in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongqin; Fang, Xiaoxia; Yin, Ling; Liu, Yuxia; Xu, Shouxia; Li, Aixue

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial NOS (NOS3) has a potential role in the prevention of neuronal injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Thus, we aimed to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and HIE susceptibility and symptoms in a Chinese Han population. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS3 gene, rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744, were detected in 226 children with HIE and 212 healthy children in a Chinese Han population. Apgar scores and magnetic resonance image scans were used to estimate the symptoms and brain damage. The association analyses were conducted by using SNPStats and SPSS 18.0 software. The genotype and allele distributions of rs1800779 and rs1799983 displayed no significant differences between the patients and the controls, while the rs2070744 allele distribution was significantly different (corrected P = 0.009). For clinical characteristics, the rs2070744 genotype distribution was significantly different in patients with different Apgar scores (≤5, TT/TC/CC = 6/7/5; 6~7, TT/TC/CC = 17/0/0; 8~9, TT/TC/CC = 6/2/0; 10, TT/TC/CC = 7/1/0; corrected P = 0.006) in the 1001 to 1449 g birth weight subgroup. The haplotype test did not show any associations with the risk and clinical characteristics of HIE. The results suggest that NOS3 gene SNP rs2070744 was significantly associated with HIE susceptibility and symptom expression in Chinese Han population. PMID:28070505

  10. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  11. Lentiviral vector PLV-PI3KCG gene transfer inhibits hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xin-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signal pathway was suggested to be associated with apoptosis. However, it was still unclear whether activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could inhibit hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis. In this research, the recombinant PI3KCG lentiviral vector plasmid (PLV-PI3KCG) was constructed and transfected into neonatal rat hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury cardiomyocytes models which were randomly divided into five groups as the normal control group, H/R group, HR empty plasmid group (HRE group), HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection preconditioning group (HRP group), and HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection + LY294002 group (HRPL group). Compared with the H/R, HRE and HRPL groups, the cardiomyocytes beat frequency and survival rate in the HRP group were significantly increased (P<0.05) and the released LDH were significantly decreased (P<0.05). The Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly lower in H/R, HRE and HRPL groups than that in HRP group (P<0.05). Activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could play a protection role in the cardiomyocytes H/R injury process which could be inhibited by LY294002. PMID:26884933

  12. N-myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) mediates pomegranate juice protection from apoptosis in hypoxic BeWo cells but not in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baosheng; Zaveri, Parul G.; Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) expression is increased in placentas of human pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction and in hypoxic cultured primary trophoblasts. We previously showed that elevated NDRG1 decreases trophoblast apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Separately, we found that pomegranate juice (PJ) decreases cell death induced by hypoxia in trophoblasts. Here, we test the hypothesis that PJ protects trophoblasts from hypoxia-induced apoptosis by modulating NDRG1 expression. Methods Quantitative rtPCR was used to investigate the effects of PJ treatment on mRNA levels of 22 candidate genes involved in apoptosis, oxidative stress, and differentiation in trophoblasts. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to analyze NDRG1 protein levels. siRNA-mediated NDRG1 knockdown was used to investigate the role of NDRG1 in response to PJ in hypoxic BeWo choriocarcinoma cells and hypoxic cultured primary human trophoblasts. Results The mRNA levels of eight genes were altered, with NDRG1 showing the largest response to PJ and thus, we pursued the role of NDRG1 here. PJ significantly increased NDRG1 protein expression in primary trophoblasts and in BeWo cells. Knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic BeWo cells in the presence of PJ yielded increased apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic primary trophoblasts in the presence of PJ did not increase apoptosis. Discussion We conclude that the PJ-mediated decrease in cell death in hypoxia is partially mediated by NDRG1 in BeWo cells but not in primary trophoblasts. The disparate effects of NDRG1 between BeWo cells and primary trophoblasts indicate caution is required when extrapolating from results obtained with cell lines to primary trophoblasts. PMID:26028238

  13. A Complete Set of Nascent Transcription Rates for Yeast Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pelechano, Vicent; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2010-01-01

    The amount of mRNA in a cell is the result of two opposite reactions: transcription and mRNA degradation. These reactions are governed by kinetics laws, and the most regulated step for many genes is the transcription rate. The transcription rate, which is assumed to be exercised mainly at the RNA polymerase recruitment level, can be calculated using the RNA polymerase densities determined either by run-on or immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal model organism to generate a complete set of nascent transcription rates that will prove useful for many gene regulation studies. By combining genomic data from both the GRO (Genomic Run-on) and the RNA pol ChIP-on-chip methods we generated a new, more accurate nascent transcription rate dataset. By comparing this dataset with the indirect ones obtained from the mRNA stabilities and mRNA amount datasets, we are able to obtain biological information about posttranscriptional regulation processes and a genomic snapshot of the location of the active transcriptional machinery. We have obtained nascent transcription rates for 4,670 yeast genes. The median RNA polymerase II density in the genes is 0.078 molecules/kb, which corresponds to an average of 0.096 molecules/gene. Most genes have transcription rates of between 2 and 30 mRNAs/hour and less than 1% of yeast genes have >1 RNA polymerase molecule/gene. Histone and ribosomal protein genes are the highest transcribed groups of genes and other than these exceptions the transcription of genes is an infrequent phenomenon in a yeast cell. PMID:21103382

  14. Structural basis of eukaryotic gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Boeger, Hinrich; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Lorch, Yahli; Strattan, J Seth; Westover, Kenneth D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-02-07

    An RNA polymerase II promoter has been isolated in transcriptionally activated and repressed states. Topological and nuclease digestion analyses have revealed a dynamic equilibrium between nucleosome removal and reassembly upon transcriptional activation, and have further shown that nucleosomes are removed by eviction of histone octamers rather than by sliding. The promoter, once exposed, assembles with RNA polymerase II, general transcription factors, and Mediator in a approximately 3 MDa transcription initiation complex. X-ray crystallography has revealed the structure of RNA polymerase II, in the act of transcription, at atomic resolution. Extension of this analysis has shown how nucleotides undergo selection, polymerization, and eventual release from the transcribing complex. X-ray and electron crystallography have led to a picture of the entire transcription initiation complex, elucidating the mechanisms of promoter recognition, DNA unwinding, abortive initiation, and promoter escape.

  15. The relationship between gene transcription and combinations of histone modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangjun; Li, Hong; Luo, Liaofu

    2012-09-01

    Histone modification is an important subject of epigenetics which plays an intrinsic role in transcriptional regulation. It is known that multiple histone modifications act in a combinatorial fashion. In this study, we demonstrated that the pathways within constructed Bayesian networks can give an indication for the combinations among 12 histone modifications which have been studied in the TSS+1kb region in S. cerevisiae. After Bayesian networks for the genes with high transcript levels (H-network) and low transcript levels (L-network) were constructed, the combinations of modifications within the two networks were analyzed from the view of transcript level. The results showed that different combinations played dissimilar roles in the regulation of gene transcription when there exist differences for gene expression at transcription level.

  16. BRCA1 can stimulate gene transcription by a unique mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, G; Boufaied, N; Moisan, A; Lemieux, K M; Cayanan, C; Monteiro, A N; Gaudreau, L

    2000-09-01

    Most familial breast and ovarian cancers have been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to affect gene transcription but how it does so remains elusive. Here we show that BRCA1 can stimulate transcription without the requirement for a DNA-tethering function in mammalian and yeast cells. Furthermore, the BRCA1 C-terminal region can stimulate transcription of the p53-responsive promoter, MDM2. Unlike many enhancer-specific activators, non-tethered BRCA1 does not require a functional TATA element to stimulate transcription. Our results suggest that BRCA1 can enhance transcription by a function additional to recruiting the transcriptional machinery to a targeted gene.

  17. BRCA1 can stimulate gene transcription by a unique mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Guy; Boufaied, Nadia; Moisan, Annie; Lemieux, Karine M.; Cayanan, Charmagne; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gaudreau, Luc

    2000-01-01

    Most familial breast and ovarian cancers have been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to affect gene transcription but how it does so remains elusive. Here we show that BRCA1 can stimulate transcription without the requirement for a DNA-tethering function in mammalian and yeast cells. Furthermore, the BRCA1 C-terminal region can stimulate transcription of the p53-responsive promoter, MDM2. Unlike many enhancer-specific activators, non-tethered BRCA1 does not require a functional TATA element to stimulate transcription. Our results suggest that BRCA1 can enhance transcription by a function additional to recruiting the transcriptional machinery to a targeted gene. PMID:11256609

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Valerie; Krause, Michael; Okkema, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein coding gene sequences are converted to mRNA by the highly regulated process of transcription. The precise temporal and spatial control of transcription for many genes is an essential part of development in metazoans. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control is essential to understanding cell fate determination during embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, many environmental interactions, and disease-related processes. Studies of transcriptional regulation in C. elegans exploit its genomic simplicity and physical characteristics to define regulatory events with single cell and minute time scale resolution. When combined with the genetics of the system, C. elegans offers a unique and powerful vantage point from which to study how chromatin-associated protein and their modifications interact with transcription factors and their binding sites to yield precise control of gene expression through transcriptional regulation. PMID:23801596

  19. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  20. Absolute measurement of gene transcripts with Selfie-digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Podlesniy, Petar; Trullas, Ramon

    2017-08-21

    Absolute measurement of the number of RNA transcripts per gene is necessary to compare gene transcription among different tissues or experimental conditions and to assess transcription of genes that have a variable copy number per cell such as mitochondrial DNA. Here, we present a method called Selfie-digital PCR that measures the absolute amount of an RNA transcript produced by its own coding DNA at a particular moment. Overcoming the limitations of previous approaches, Selfie-digital PCR allows for the quantification of nuclear and mitochondrial gene transcription in a strand-specific manner that is comparable among tissues and cell types that differ in gene copy number or metabolic state. Using Selfie-digital PCR, we found that, with the exception of the liver, different organs exhibit marked variations in mitochondrial DNA copy number but similar transcription of mitochondrial DNA heavy and light chains, thus suggesting a preferential role of mitochondrial DNA abundance over its transcription in organ function. Moreover, the strand-specific analysis of mitochondrial transcription afforded by Selfie-digital PCR showed that transcription of the heavy strand was significantly higher than that of the light strand in all the tissues studied.

  1. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  2. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Vanková, Radomíra; Kusnetsov, Victor V; Kulaeva, Olga N; Börner, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  4. ERN1 knockdown modifies the hypoxic regulation of TP53, MDM2, USP7 and PERP gene expressions in U87 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Danilovskyi, S V; Minchenko, D O; Moliavko, O S; Kovalevska, O V; Karbovskyi, L L; Minchenko, O H

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress and hypoxia are necessary components of malignant tumors growth and suppression of ERN1 (from endoplasmic reticulum to nuclei-1) signalling pathway, which is linked to the apoptosis and cell death processes, significantly decreases proliferative processes. Glioma cells with ERN1 knockdown were used in order to investigate the effect of ERNI blockade on the expression of TP53, MDM2, PERP, and USP7 genes and its hypoxic regulation. We have studied the expression of TP53 (tumor protein 53), MDM2 (TP53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog), PERP (TP53 apoptosis effector), and USP7 (ubiquitin specific peptidase 7) genes, which are related to cell proliferation and apoptosis, in glioma cells with ERN1 knockdown under hypoxic condition. It was shown that blockade of ERNI gene function in U87 glioma cells intensified the expression of TP53 and USP7 genes, but decreased the expression ofMDM2 and PERP genes. Thus, an enhanced expression of TP53 gene in ERN1 knockdown glioma cells correlates with the decreased level of ubiquitin ligase MDM2 and increased expression level of USP7 which deubiquitinates TP53 and MDM2 and induces TP53-dependent cell growth repression and apoptosis. At the same time, the expression levels of TP53, MDM2, and USP7 genes do not change significantly in glioma cells with suppression of endoribonuclease activity only, but PERP gene expression is strongly increased. Moreover, the expression of TP53 and UPS7 genes is decreased in hypoxic conditions in control glioma cells only; however, MDM2 and PERP gene expressions are increased in both cell types, being more significant in ERN1 knockdown cells. Thus, the expression of genes encoding TP53 and related to TP53 factors depends upon the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling as well as on hypoxia, and correlates with suppression of glioma growth under ERN1 knockdown.

  5. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  6. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tania; Fischl, Harry; Howe, Françoise S; Woloszczuk, Ronja; Serra Barros, Ana; Xu, Zhenyu; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-11-19

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change.

  7. Marine Natural Products as Inhibitors of Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Marine natural products have become a major source of new chemical entities in the discovery of potential anticancer agents that potently suppress various antitumor molecular targets. As a consequence of insufficient vascularization, hypoxic regions form within rapidly growing solid tumor masses. Specific alterations of gene expression in these hypoxic tumor cells help facilitate the survival and metastatic spread of solid tumors. The transcriptional response to cellular hypoxia is primarily mediated by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) that regulates the expression of more than 100 genes involved in cellular adaptation and survival under hypoxic stress. Clinical studies in cancer patients indicate that HIF-1 activation is directly correlated with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. HIF-1 has emerged as an important tumor-selective molecular target for anticancer drug discovery. As a result, natural product-based inhibitors of HIF-1 activation have been identified from plants and microorganisms. Recently, structurally unique natural products from marine sponges, crinoids, and algae have been identified as HIF-1 activation inhibitors. The US National Cancer Institute’s Open Repository of marine invertebrate and algae extracts has proven to be a valuable source of natural product HIF-1 inhibitors. Among the active compounds identified, certain marine natural products have also been shown to suppress the hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some of these marine HIF-1 inhibitors act by interfering with the generation of mitochondrial signaling molecules in hypoxic cells. However, the precise mechanisms of action for many newly identified marine natural product HIF-1 inhibitors remain unresolved. PMID:20622986

  8. [Transcription start site determination in Stylonychia lemnae tubulin genes].

    PubMed

    Pimenov, A Iu

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary experimental literature concerning transcription regulation study contains a lot of inconsistencies between data on precise transcription start site position in tubulin genes of hypotrychious ciliates. We have revealed that the reason of these inconsistencies lies in the methods applied by scientists. In present study, the basic methods of transcription start site identification were analyzed. The modification of transcription start site identification method based on the analysis of sequencing and primer extension reactions products on the same PAA gel was elaborated using Stylonychia lemnae tubulin genes as a model object. The use ofnon-phosphorylated primers in sequencing reaction (in accordance with standard procedure) leads to the appearance of band shifting which causes mistakes in results evaluation. This band shifting can be eliminated by the use of primers phosphorylated by non-radioactive phosphorus. In present study we applied this method to redetermine transcription start sites in alpha1-, alpha2-, beta1- and beta2-tubulin genes of S. lemnae.

  9. Inactivation of transcription by UV irradiation of T. brucei provides evidence for a multicistronic transcription unit including a VSG gene

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.J.; Kooter, J.M.; Borst, P.

    1987-10-23

    We have used inactivation of transcription by UV irradiation to map transcription units in trypanosomes. The relative inactivation rate of the transcription of mini-exon, 5S, and rRNA genes was inversely proportional to the previously estimated lengths of these transcription units. The telomeric transcription unit containing the gene for variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) 221 was inactivated as a single unit of 60 kb. This long transcription unit comprises at least one other protein-coding gene and yields seven other stable mRNAs. These data thus provide evidence for a multicistronic transcription unit for cellular genes in a eukaryote.

  10. Functional Profiling of Transcription Factor Genes in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Alexander J; Schacht, Patrick; Cabrera, Ilva E; Blahut, Johnathon; Prudhomme, Loren; Dietrich, Sarah; Bekman, Thomas; Mei, Jennifer; Carrera, Cristian; Chen, Vivian; Clark, Isaiah; Fierro, Gerardo; Ganzen, Logan; Orellana, Jose; Wise, Shelby; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Hui; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2017-09-07

    Regulation of gene expression by DNA-binding transcription factors is essential for proper control of growth and development in all organisms. In this study, we annotate and characterize growth and developmental phenotypes for transcription factor genes in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa We identified 312 transcription factor genes, corresponding to 3.2% of the protein coding genes in the genome. The largest class was the fungal-specific Zn2Cys6 (C6) binuclear cluster, with 135 members, followed by the highly conserved C2H2 zinc finger group, with 61 genes. Viable knockout mutants were produced for 273 genes, and complete growth and developmental phenotypic data are available for 242 strains, with 64% possessing at least one defect. The most prominent defect observed was in growth of basal hyphae (43% of mutants analyzed), followed by asexual sporulation (38%), and the various stages of sexual development (19%). Two growth or developmental defects were observed for 21% of the mutants, while 8% were defective in all three major phenotypes tested. Analysis of available mRNA expression data for a time course of sexual development revealed mutants with sexual phenotypes that correlate with transcription factor transcript abundance in wild type. Inspection of this data also implicated cryptic roles in sexual development for several cotranscribed transcription factor genes that do not produce a phenotype when mutated. Copyright © 2017 Carrillo et al.

  11. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  12. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  13. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  15. Modulation of Elk-dependent-transcription by Gene33.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Messina, Joseph L

    2005-04-15

    Gene33 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in many cell types, including those of renal and hepatic origin. Its expression is regulated by a large number of mitogenic and stressful stimuli, both in cultured cells and in vivo. Gene33 protein possesses binding domains for ErbB receptors, 14-3-3 proteins, SH-3 domains, and GTP bound Cdc42, suggesting that it may play a role in signal transduction. Indeed, these regions of Gene33 have been reported to modulate signaling through the ERK, JNK, and NFkappaB pathways. In the present work, epitope-tagged full-length and truncation mutants, as well as wild-type Gene33, were overexpressed in 293 cells. The expression of these proteins was compared to the level of endogenous Gene33 by Western blot using a newly developed polyclonal antibody. As proxies for activity of the ERK and JNK pathways, Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription were measured by a luciferase reporter gene. Moderate expression levels of full-length Gene33 caused a twofold increase in Elk-dependent transcription, while at higher levels, c-Jun-dependent transcription was partially inhibited. The C-terminal half of Gene33 significantly increased both Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription when expressed at approximately threefold above control levels. This effect on Elk-dependent transcription was lost at higher levels of Gene33 expression. In contrast, higher levels of the C-terminal half of Gene33 caused a progressively greater effect on c-Jun-dependent transcription. These findings suggest that Gene33 may increase ERK activity, and that the C-terminal half of Gene33 may act less specifically in the absence of the N-terminal half, inducing JNK activity.

  16. TransFind—predicting transcriptional regulators for gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Klein, Holger; Roider, Helge G.; Vingron, Martin; Blüthgen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of putative transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of coregulated genes allows to infer the transcription factors that underlie observed changes in gene expression. While such analyses constitute a central component of the in-silico characterization of transcriptional regulatory networks, there is still a lack of simple-to-use web servers able to combine state-of-the-art prediction methods with phylogenetic analysis and appropriate multiple testing corrected statistics, which returns the results within a short time. Having these aims in mind we developed TransFind, which is freely available at http://transfind.sys-bio.net/. PMID:20511592

  17. Accelerated gene evolution through replication-transcription conflicts.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sandip; Million-Weaver, Samuel; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Merrikh, Houra

    2013-03-28

    Several mechanisms that increase the rate of mutagenesis across the entire genome have been identified; however, how the rate of evolution might be promoted in individual genes is unclear. Most genes in bacteria are encoded on the leading strand of replication. This presumably avoids the potentially detrimental head-on collisions that occur between the replication and transcription machineries when genes are encoded on the lagging strand. Here we identify the ubiquitous (core) genes in Bacillus subtilis and determine that 17% of them are on the lagging strand. We find a higher rate of point mutations in the core genes on the lagging strand compared with those on the leading strand, with this difference being primarily in the amino-acid-changing (nonsynonymous) mutations. We determine that, overall, the genes under strong negative selection against amino-acid-changing mutations tend to be on the leading strand, co-oriented with replication. In contrast, on the basis of the rate of convergent mutations, genes under positive selection for amino-acid-changing mutations are more commonly found on the lagging strand, indicating faster adaptive evolution in many genes in the head-on orientation. Increased gene length and gene expression amounts are positively correlated with the rate of accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations in the head-on genes, suggesting that the conflict between replication and transcription could be a driving force behind these mutations. Indeed, using reversion assays, we show that the difference in the rate of mutagenesis of genes in the two orientations is transcription dependent. Altogether, our findings indicate that head-on replication-transcription conflicts are more mutagenic than co-directional conflicts and that these encounters can significantly increase adaptive structural variation in the coded proteins. We propose that bacteria, and potentially other organisms, promote faster evolution of specific genes through orientation

  18. Regulation of cytokine gene transcription in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Holloway, A F; Rao, S; Shannon, M F

    2002-01-01

    The controlled expression of cytokine genes is an essential component of an immune response. The specific types of cytokines as well as the time and place of their production is important in generating an appropriate immune response to an infectious agent. Aberrant expression is associated with pathological conditions of the immune system such as autoimmunity, atopy and chronic inflammation. Cytokine gene transcription is generally induced in a cell-specific manner. Over the last 15 years, a large amount of information has been generated describing the transcriptional controls that are exerted on cytokine genes. Recently, efforts have been directed at understanding how these genes are transcribed in a chromatin context. This review will discuss the mechanisms by which cytokine genes become available for transcription in a cell-restricted manner as well as the mechanisms by which these genes sense their environment and activate high level transcription in a transient manner. Particular attention will be paid to the role of chromatin in allowing transcription factor access to appropriate genes.

  19. Rampant polyuridylylation of plastid gene transcripts in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunling; Morse, David

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellate plastid genes are believed to be encoded on small generally unigenic plasmid-like minicircles. The minicircle gene complement has reached saturation with an incomplete set of plastid genes (18) compared with typical functional plastids (60–200). While some of the missing plastid genes have recently been found in the nucleus, it is still unknown if additional genes, not located on minicircles, might also contribute to the plastid genome. Sequencing of tailed RNA showed that transcripts derived from the known minicircle genes psbA and atpB contained a homogenous 3′ polyuridine tract of 25–40 residues. This unusual modification suggested that random sequencing of a poly(dA) primed cDNA library could be used to characterize the plastid transcriptome. We have recovered only 12 different polyuridylylated transcripts from our library, all of which are encoded on minicircles in several dinoflagellate species. The correspondence of all polyuridylylated transcripts with previously described minicircle genes thus supports the dinoflagellate plastid as harbouring the smallest genome of any functional chloroplast. Interestingly, northern blots indicate that the majority of transcripts are modified, suggesting that polyuridylylation is unlikely to act as a degradation signal as do the heterogeneous poly(A)-rich extensions of transcripts in cyanobacteria and other plastids. PMID:16434702

  20. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  1. Regulation of mammalian ribosomal gene transcription by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Grummt, I

    1999-01-01

    All cells, from prokaryotes to vertebrates, synthesize vast amounts of ribosomal RNA to produce the several million new ribosomes per generation that are required to maintain the protein synthetic capacity of the daughter cells. Ribosomal gene (rDNA) transcription is governed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) assisted by a dedicated set of transcription factors that mediate the specificity of transcription and are the targets of the pleiotrophic pathways the cell uses to adapt rRNA synthesis to cell growth. In the past few years we have begun to understand the specific functions of individual factors involved in rDNA transcription and to elucidate on a molecular level how transcriptional regulation is achieved. This article reviews our present knowledge of the molecular mechanism of rDNA transcriptional regulation.

  2. Widespread transcription of a Qa region gene in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The mouse MHC class I family includes genes encoded in four regions: H- 2K, H-2D, Qa and Tla. While K/D genes are well characterized, relatively little is known about Qa or Tla genes. We have studied the transcription of a B10.P Qa region gene. DNA sequence comparisons of the transmembrane region, supported by Southern blot analysis of cosmid and genomic DNAs from BALB/c and C57BL/10, demonstrate the lambda 3a gene corresponds to Q4p. In both Northern blots and RNA protection experiments using probes derived from the 3' noncoding region, we found that Q4, like the H-2K and H-2D genes, is widely transcribed in B10.P tissues. These data demonstrate for the first time widespread transcription of a Qa gene. PMID:2439640

  3. Gene Expression Suggests Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats May Have Altered Metabolism and Reduced Hypoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Marie-Françoise; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Engelter, Stefan; Lyrer, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke, cognitive decline and vascular dementia (VaD). It is associated with diffuse white matter abnormalities and small deep cerebral ischemic infarcts. The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of SVD are unclear. As hypertension is a major risk factor for developing SVD, Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) are considered an appropriate experimental model for SVD. Prior work suggested an imbalance between the number of blood microvessels and astrocytes at the level of the neurovascular unit in 2-month-old SHR, leading to neuronal hypoxia in the brain of 9-month-old animals. To identify genes and pathways involved in the development of SVD, we compared the gene expression profile in the cortex of 2 and 9-month-old of SHR with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats using microarray-based technology. The results revealed significant differences in expression of genes involved in energy and lipid metabolisms, mitochondrial functions, oxidative stress and ischemic responses between both groups. These results strongly suggest that SHR suffer from chronic hypoxia, and therefore are unable to tolerate ischemia-like conditions, and are more vulnerable to high-energy needs than WKY. This molecular analysis gives new insights about pathways accounting for the development of SVD. PMID:22272763

  4. Regulatory sequences of duck hepatitis B virus C gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, R; Will, H

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory elements involved in transcription of the C gene of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were investigated. Several DHBV DNA fragments were assayed for C gene promoter, enhancer, and silencer activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and transfection of established liver and nonliver cell lines. A major transcript initiating at nucleotide positions 2532 and 2533 and three minor transcripts initiating at positions 2453/2454 and 2461 were identified in cells containing these constructs. These positions correspond to the 5' end of the C mRNA and were close to that of the pre-C mRNAs, respectively, found in infected livers. The pre-C mRNAs were only detected when sequences located between the initiation sites of the pre-C and C mRNAs were deleted. These sequences downregulated, in an orientation-independent fashion, a heterologous promoter and were found to contain a consensus motif common to negative transcriptional regulatory elements previously characterized in other cellular and viral genes. C gene promoter activity was only observed in highly differentiated liver cells and was dependent on a short DHBV DNA fragment containing an enhancer core consensus motif. These data indicate that transcription of the DHBV C gene is regulated by positive, negative, and differentiation factor-responsive elements. Images PMID:1920612

  5. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  6. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  7. Endogenous Targets of Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Steimer, Andrea; Amedeo, Paolo; Afsar, Karin; Fransz, Paul; Scheid, Ortrun Mittelsten; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) frequently inactivates foreign genes integrated into plant genomes but very likely also suppresses an unknown subset of chromosomal information. Accordingly, RNA analysis of mutants impaired in silencing should uncover endogenous targets of this epigenetic regulation. We compared transcripts from wild-type Arabidopsis carrying a silent transgene with RNA from an isogenic transgene-expressing TGS mutant. Two cDNA clones were identified representing endogenous RNA expressed only in the mutant. The synthesis of these RNAs was found to be released in several mutants affected in TGS, implying that TGS in general and not a particular mutation controls the transcriptional activity of their templates. Detailed analysis revealed that the two clones are part of longer transcripts termed TSI (for transcriptionally silent information). Two major classes of related TSI transcripts were found in a mutant cDNA library. They are synthesized from repeats present in heterochromatic pericentromeric regions of Arabidopsis chromosomes. These repeats share sequence homology with the 3′ terminal part of the putative retrotransposon Athila. However, the transcriptional activation does not include the transposon itself and does not promote its movement. There is no evidence for a general release of silencing from retroelements. Thus, foreign genes in plants encounter the epigenetic control normally directed, at least in part, toward a subset of pericentromeric repeats. PMID:10899982

  8. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb

  9. Comparative expression and transcript initiation of three peach dehydrin genes.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Carole Leavel; Wisniewski, Michael E; Artlip, Timothy S; Richart, Greg; Norelli, John L; Farrell, Robert E

    2009-06-01

    Dehydrin genes encode proteins with demonstrated cryoprotective and antifreeze activity, and they respond to a variety of abiotic stress conditions that have dehydration as a common component. Two dehydrins from peach (Prunus persica L. [Batsch.]) have been previously characterized; here, we describe the characterization of a third dehydrin from peach bark, PpDhn3, isolated by its response to low temperature. The expression of all three dehydrin genes was profiled by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and transcript initiation was mapped for all three genes using the RNA ligase-mediated 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. PpDhn3 transcripts from bark collected in December or July, as well as transcripts from developing fruit, initiated at a single site. Although most of the PpDhn1 transcripts initiated at a similar position, those from young fruit initiated much further upstream of the consensus TATA box. Bark and fruit transcripts encoding PpDhn2 initiated ca. 30 bases downstream of a consensus TATA box; however, transcripts from ripe fruit initiated further upstream. Ripe fruit transcripts of PpDhn2 contain a 5' leader intron which is predicted to add some 34 amino acids to the N-terminal methionine of the cognate protein when properly processed. Secondary structure prediction of sequences surrounding the TATA box suggests that conformational transitions associated with decreasing temperature contribute to the regulation of expression of the cold-responsive dehydrin genes. Taken together these results reveal new, unexpected levels of gene regulation contributing to the overall expression pattern of peach dehydrins.

  10. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  11. Hypoxic regulation of the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins in U87 glioma cells: eff ect of IRE1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Do, Minchenko; Oo, Riabovol; Oo, Ratushna; Oh, Minchenko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling, mediated by IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme 1), which is a central mediator of the unfolded protein response on the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins (NRIP1/RIP140, TRIM16/EBBP, ESRRA/NR3B1, FAM162A/E2IG5, PGRMC2/PMBP, and SLC39A6/LIV-1) and their hypoxic regulation in U87 glioma cells for evaluation of their possible significance in the control of glioma cells proliferation. The expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells, transfected by empty vector pcDNA3.1 (control) and cells without IRE1 signaling enzyme function (transfected by dnIRE1) upon hypoxia, was studied by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Inhibition of both enzymatic activities (kinase and endoribonuclease) of IRE1 signaling enzyme function up-regulates the expression of EBBP, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes is in U87 glioma cells in comparison with the control glioma cells, with more significant changes for E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes. At the same time, the expression of NRIP1 and ESRRA genes is strongly down-regulated in glioma cells upon inhibition of IRE1. We also showed that hypoxia increases the expression of E2IG5, PGRMC2, and EBBP genes and decreases NRIP1 and ESRRA genes expression in control glioma cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRE1 in U87 glioma cells decreases the eff ect of hypoxia on the expression of E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes, eliminates hypoxic regulation of NRIP1 gene, and enhances the sensitivity of ESRRA gene to hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the expression of SLC39A6 gene is resistant to hypoxia in both the glioma cells with and without IRE1 signaling enzyme function. Results of this investigation demonstrate that inhibition of IRE1 signaling enzyme function affects the expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells in gene specific manner and these changes

  12. Gene looping facilitates TFIIH kinase-mediated termination of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Scott; Ansari, Athar

    2015-01-01

    TFIIH is a general transcription factor with kinase and helicase activities. The kinase activity resides in the Kin28 subunit of TFIIH. The role of Kin28 kinase in the early steps of transcription is well established. Here we report a novel role of Kin28 in the termination of transcription. We show that RNAPII reads through a termination signal upon kinase inhibition. Furthermore, the recruitment of termination factors towards the 3′ end of a gene was compromised in the kinase mutant, thus confirming the termination defect. A concomitant decrease in crosslinking of termination factors near the 5′ end of genes was also observed in the kinase-defective mutant. Simultaneous presence of termination factors towards both the ends of a gene is indicative of gene looping; while the loss of termination factor occupancy from the distal ends suggest the abolition of a looped gene conformation. Accordingly, CCC analysis revealed that the looped architecture of genes was severely compromised in the Kin28 kinase mutant. In a looping defective sua7-1 mutant, even the enzymatically active Kin28 kinase could not rescue the termination defect. These results strongly suggest a crucial role of Kin28 kinase-dependent gene looping in the termination of transcription in budding yeast. PMID:26286112

  13. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  14. Spatially coordinated dynamic gene transcription in living pituitary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, Karen; Hey, Kirsty; Momiji, Hiroshi; McNamara, Anne V; Patist, Amanda L; Woodburn, Joanna; Spiller, David G; Christian, Helen C; McNeilly, Alan S; Mullins, John J; Finkenstädt, Bärbel F; Rand, David A; White, Michael RH; Davis, Julian RE

    2016-01-01

    Transcription at individual genes in single cells is often pulsatile and stochastic. A key question emerges regarding how this behaviour contributes to tissue phenotype, but it has been a challenge to quantitatively analyse this in living cells over time, as opposed to studying snap-shots of gene expression state. We have used imaging of reporter gene expression to track transcription in living pituitary tissue. We integrated live-cell imaging data with statistical modelling for quantitative real-time estimation of the timing of switching between transcriptional states across a whole tissue. Multiple levels of transcription rate were identified, indicating that gene expression is not a simple binary ‘on-off’ process. Immature tissue displayed shorter durations of high-expressing states than the adult. In adult pituitary tissue, direct cell contacts involving gap junctions allowed local spatial coordination of prolactin gene expression. Our findings identify how heterogeneous transcriptional dynamics of single cells may contribute to overall tissue behaviour. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08494.001 PMID:26828110

  15. The ORD1 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in oxygen regulation and is identical to IXR1, a gene that confers cisplatin sensitivity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J R; Bilanchone, V W; Cumsky, M G

    1994-01-01

    The yeast COX5a and COX5b genes encode isoforms of subunit Va of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein complex cytochrome c oxidase. These genes have been shown to be inversely regulated at the level of transcription by oxygen, which functions through the metabolic coeffector heme. In earlier studies we identified several regulatory elements that control transcriptional activation and aerobic repression of one of these genes, COX5b. Here, we report the isolation of trans-acting mutants that are defective in the aerobic repression of COX5b transcription. The mutants fall into two complementation groups. One group specifies ROX1, which encodes a product reported to be involved in transcriptional repression. The other group identified the gene we have designated ORD1. Mutations in ORD1 cause overexpression of COX5b aerobically but do not affect the expression of the hypoxic genes CYC7, HEM13, and ANB1. ORD1 mutations also do not affect the expression of the aerobic genes COX5a, CYC1, ROX1, ROX3, and TIF51A. The yeast genome contains a single ORD1 gene that resides on chromosome XI. Strains carrying chromosomal deletions of the ORD1 locus are viable and exhibit phenotypes similar to, but less severe than, that of the original mutant. The nucleotide sequence of ORD1 revealed that it is identical to IXR1, a yeast gene whose product contains two high mobility group boxes, binds to platinated DNA, and confers sensitivity to the antitumor drug cisplatin. Consistent with the latter observations, we found that the ORD1 product could bind to both the upstream region of COX5b and to DNA modified with cisplatin. Images PMID:8041793

  16. Global analysis of gene transcription regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Yang, R

    2006-10-01

    Prokaryotes have complex mechanisms to regulate their gene transcription, through the action of transcription factors (TFs). This review deals with current strategies, approaches and challenges in the understanding of i) how to map the repertoires of TF and operon on a genome, ii) how to identify the specific cis-acting DNA elements and their DNA-binding TFs that are required for expression of a given gene, iii) how to define the regulon members of a given TF, iv) how a given TF interacts with its target promoters, v) how these TF-promoter DNA interactions constitute regulatory networks, and vi) how transcriptional regulatory networks can be reconstructed by the reverse-engineering methods. Our goal is to depict the power of newly developed genomic techniques and computational tools, alone or in combination, to dissect the genetic circuitry of transcription regulation, and how this has the tremendous potential to model the regulatory networks in the prokaryotic cells.

  17. Combinatorial Gene Regulation through Kinetic Control of the Transcription Cycle.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Clarissa; DePace, Angela H; Sánchez, Álvaro

    2017-01-25

    Cells decide when, where, and to what level to express their genes by "computing" information from transcription factors (TFs) binding to regulatory DNA. How is the information contained in multiple TF-binding sites integrated to dictate the rate of transcription? The dominant conceptual and quantitative model is that TFs combinatorially recruit one another and RNA polymerase to the promoter by direct physical interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to explore kinetic control, an alternative model in which combinatorial gene regulation can result from TFs working on different kinetic steps of the transcription cycle. Kinetic control can generate a wide range of analog and Boolean computations without requiring the input TFs to be simultaneously bound to regulatory DNA. We propose experiments that will illuminate the role of kinetic control in transcription and discuss implications for deciphering the cis-regulatory "code."

  18. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  19. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the novobiocin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Dangel, Volker; Härle, Johannes; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Gust, Bertolt; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Heide, Lutz

    2009-12-01

    The aminocoumarin antibiotic novobiocin is a gyrase inhibitor formed by a Streptomyces strain. The biosynthetic gene cluster of novobiocin spans 23.4 kb and contains 20 coding sequences, among them the two regulatory genes novE and novG. We investigated the location of transcriptional promoters within this cluster by insertion of transcriptional terminator cassettes and RT-PCR analysis of the resulting mutants. The cluster was found to contain eight DNA regions with promoter activity. The regulatory protein NovG binds to a previously identified binding site within the promoter region located upstream of novH, but apparently not to any of the other seven promoters. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare the number of transcripts in a strain carrying an intact novobiocin cluster with strains carrying mutated clusters. Both in-frame deletion of the regulatory gene novG and insertion of a terminator cassette into the biosynthetic gene novH led to a strong reduction of the number of transcripts of the genes located between novH and novW. This suggested that these 16 biosynthetic genes form a single operon. Three internal promoters are located within this operon but appear to be of minor importance, if any, under our experimental conditions. Transcription of novG was found to depend on the presence of NovE, suggesting that the two regulatory genes, novE and novG, act in a cascade-like mechanism. The resistance gene gyrB(R), encoding an aminocoumarin-resistant gyrase B subunit, may initially be co-transcribed with the genes from novH to novW. However, when the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin accumulates in the cultures, gyrB(R) is transcribed from its own promoter. Previous work has suggested that this promoter is controlled by the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA.

  1. The SCL gene is formed from a transcriptionally complex locus.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Begley, C G; Bertness, V; Nussmeier, M; Ezquerra, A; Coligan, J; Kirsch, I R

    1990-01-01

    We describe the structural organization of the human SCL gene, a helix-loop-helix family member which we believe plays a fundamental role in hematopoietic differentiation. The SCL locus is composed of eight exons distributed over 16 kb. SCL shows a pattern of expression quite restricted to early hematopoietic tissues, although in malignant states expression of the gene may be somewhat extended into later developmental stages. A detailed analysis of the transcript(s) arising from the SCL locus revealed that (i) the 5' noncoding portion of the SCL transcript, which resides within a CpG island, has a complex pattern of alternative exon utilization as well as two distinct transcription initiation sites; (ii) the 5' portions of the SCL transcript contain features that suggest a possible regulatory role for these segments; (iii) the pattern of utilization of the 5' exons is cell lineage dependent; and (iv) all of the currently studied chromosomal aberrations that affect the SCL locus either structurally or functionally eliminate the normal 5' transcription initiation sites. These data suggest that the SCL gene, and specifically its 5' region, may be a target for regulatory interactions during early hematopoietic development. Images PMID:2247063

  2. Transcription of Inflammatory Genes: Long Noncoding RNA and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system must coordinate elaborate signaling pathways to turn on expression of hundreds of genes to provide protection against pathogens and resolve acute inflammation. Multiple genes within distinct functional categories are coordinately and temporally regulated by transcriptional on and off switches in response to distinct external stimuli. Three classes of transcription factors act together with transcriptional coregulators and chromatin-modifying complexes to control these programs. In addition, newer studies implicate long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) as additional regulators of these responses. LncRNAs promote, fine-tune, and restrain the inflammatory program. In this study, we provide an overview of gene regulation and the emerging importance of lncRNAs in the immune system. PMID:25250698

  3. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  4. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  5. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  6. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-05

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  7. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  8. Reference genes for normalizing transcription in diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibin; Wang, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Fadi

    2014-10-27

    Published transcription data from a set of 19 diploid Arabidopsis thaliana and 5 tetraploid (3 allo- and 2 auto- tetraploid) Arabidopsis accessions were re-analysed to identify reliable reference genes for normalization purposes. Five conventional and 16 novel reference genes previously derived from microarray data covering a wide range of abundance in absolute expression levels in diploid A. thaliana Col-0 were employed. Transcript abundance was well conserved for all 21 potential reference genes in the diploid A. thaliana accessions, with geNorm and NormFinder analysis indicating that AT5G46630, AT1G13320, AT4G26410, AT5G60390 and AT5G08290 were the most stable. However, conservation was less good among the tetraploid accessions, with the transcription of seven of the 21 genes being undetectable in all allotetraploids. The most stable gene was AT5G46630, while AT1G13440 was the unstable one. Hence, the choice of reference gene(s) for A. thaliana is quite wide, but with respect to the analysis of transcriptomic data derived from the tetraploids, it is probably necessary to select more than one reference gene.

  9. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  10. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, Ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-11-26

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures.

  11. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  12. Transcriptional oscillation of canonical clock genes in mouse peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuro; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Soma, Haruhiko; Akashi, Makoto; Mamine, Takayoshi; Takumi, Toru

    2004-10-09

    The circadian rhythm of about 24 hours is a fundamental physiological function observed in almost all organisms from prokaryotes to humans. Identification of clock genes has allowed us to study the molecular bases for circadian behaviors and temporal physiological processes such as hormonal secretion, and has prompted the idea that molecular clocks reside not only in a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of hypothalamus in mammals, but also in peripheral tissues, even in immortalized cells. Furthermore, previous molecular dissection revealed that the mechanism of circadian oscillation at a molecular level is based on transcriptional regulation of clock and clock-controlled genes. We systematically analyzed the mRNA expression of clock and clock-controlled genes in mouse peripheral tissues. Eight genes (mBmal1, mNpas2, mRev-erbalpha, mDbp, mRev-erbbeta, mPer3, mPer1 and mPer2; given in the temporal order of the rhythm peak) showed robust circadian expressions of mRNAs in all tissues except testis, suggesting that these genes are core molecules of the molecular biological clock. The bioinformatics analysis revealed that these genes have one or a combination of 3 transcriptional elements (RORE, DBPE, and E-box), which are conserved among human, mouse, and rat genome sequences, and indicated that these 3 elements may be responsible for the biological timing of expression of canonical clock genes. The observation of oscillatory profiles of canonical clock genes is not only useful for physiological and pathological examination of the circadian clock in various organs but also important for systematic understanding of transcriptional regulation on a genome-wide basis. Our finding of the oscillatory expression of canonical clock genes with a temporal order provides us an interesting hypothesis, that cyclic timing of all clock and clock-controlled genes may be dependent on several transcriptional elements including 3 known elements, E-box, RORE, and DBPE.

  13. Transcription, chromatin condensation, and gene migration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The binding of fluorescently tagged proteins to tandem DNA arrays has been instrumental in understanding nuclear organization and function. Through the use of more natural tandem DNA arrays, Hu et al. (Hu, Y., I. Kireev, M. Plutz, N. Ashourian, and A.S. Belmont. 2009. J. Cell Biol. 185:87–100) gain new insights into chromatin organization and dynamics, and into the association of splicing factors with active genes. PMID:19349577

  14. Promoter RNA links transcriptional regulation of inflammatory pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Masayuki; Chu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huiying; Gagnon, Keith T.; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Manoharan, Muthiah; Corey, David R.; Janowski, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Although many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, their function and their association with RNAi factors in the nucleus have remained obscure. Here, we identify RNA transcripts that overlap the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promoter and contain two adjacent binding sites for an endogenous miRNA, miR-589. We find that miR-589 binds the promoter RNA and activates COX-2 transcription. In addition to miR-589, fully complementary duplex RNAs that target the COX-2 promoter transcript activate COX-2 transcription. Activation by small RNA requires RNAi factors argonaute-2 (AGO2) and GW182, but does not require AGO2-mediated cleavage of the promoter RNA. Instead, the promoter RNA functions as a scaffold. Binding of AGO2 protein/small RNA complexes to the promoter RNA triggers gene activation. Gene looping allows interactions between the promoters of COX-2 and phospholipase A2 (PLA2G4A), an adjacent pro-inflammatory pathway gene that produces arachidonic acid, the substrate for COX-2 protein. miR-589 and fully complementary small RNAs regulate both COX-2 and PLA2G4A gene expression, revealing an unexpected connection between key steps of the eicosanoid signaling pathway. The work demonstrates the potential for RNA to coordinate locus-dependent assembly of related genes to form functional operons through cis-looping. PMID:23999091

  15. Role of non-coding RNA transcription around gene regulatory elements in transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells produce a variety of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which have been shown to play pivotal roles in biological processes such as differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and cellular response to various stresses. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that many ncRNAs are transcribed around regulatory DNA elements located proximal or distal to gene promoters, but their biological functions are largely unknown. Recently, it has been demonstrated in yeast and mouse that ncRNA transcription around gene promoters and enhancers facilitates DNA binding of transcription factors to their target sites. These results suggest universal roles of promoter/enhancer-associated ncRNAs in the recruitment of transcription factors to their binding sites. PMID:27763805

  16. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Welcsh, Piri L.; Lee, Ming K.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rachel M.; Black, Daniel J.; Mahadevappa, Mamatha; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Warrington, Janet A.; King, Mary-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of BRCA1 caused by inherited mutation and tissue-specific somatic mutation leads to breast and ovarian cancer. Nearly all BRCA1 germ-line mutations involve truncation or loss of the C-terminal BRCT transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that transcriptional regulation is a critical function of the wild-type gene. The purpose of this project was to determine whether there is a link between the role of BRCA1 in transcriptional regulation and its role in tumor suppression. We developed a cell line (in which BRCA1 can be induced) and used microarray analysis to compare transcription profiles of epithelial cells with low endogenous levels of BRCA1 vs. transcription profiles of cells with 2–4-fold higher induced levels of expression of BRCA1. At these levels of expression, BRCA1 did not induce apoptosis. Undirected cluster analysis of six paired experiments revealed 373 genes, the expression of which was altered significantly and consistently by BRCA1 induction. Expression of 62 genes was altered more than 2-fold. BRCA1-regulated genes associated with breast tumorigenesis included the estrogen-responsive genes MYC and cyclin D1, which are overexpressed in many breast tumors; STAT1 and JAK1, key components of the cytokine signal transduction pathway; the extracellular matrix protein laminin 3A; ID4, an inhibitor of DNA-binding transcriptional activators, which in turn negatively regulates BRCA1 expression; and the prohormone stanniocalcin, expression of which is lost in breast tumor cells. Coordinated expression of BRCA1 with ID4 and with stanniocalcin was confirmed in primary breast and ovarian tumors. PMID:12032322

  17. GGRNA: an ultrafast, transcript-oriented search engine for genes and transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Bono, Hidemasa

    2012-01-01

    GGRNA (http://GGRNA.dbcls.jp/) is a Google-like, ultrafast search engine for genes and transcripts. The web server accepts arbitrary words and phrases, such as gene names, IDs, gene descriptions, annotations of gene and even nucleotide/amino acid sequences through one simple search box, and quickly returns relevant RefSeq transcripts. A typical search takes just a few seconds, which dramatically enhances the usability of routine searching. In particular, GGRNA can search sequences as short as 10 nt or 4 amino acids, which cannot be handled easily by popular sequence analysis tools. Nucleotide sequences can be searched allowing up to three mismatches, or the query sequences may contain degenerate nucleotide codes (e.g. N, R, Y, S). Furthermore, Gene Ontology annotations, Enzyme Commission numbers and probe sequences of catalog microarrays are also incorporated into GGRNA, which may help users to conduct searches by various types of keywords. GGRNA web server will provide a simple and powerful interface for finding genes and transcripts for a wide range of users. All services at GGRNA are provided free of charge to all users. PMID:22641850

  18. GGRNA: an ultrafast, transcript-oriented search engine for genes and transcripts.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuki; Bono, Hidemasa

    2012-07-01

    GGRNA (http://GGRNA.dbcls.jp/) is a Google-like, ultrafast search engine for genes and transcripts. The web server accepts arbitrary words and phrases, such as gene names, IDs, gene descriptions, annotations of gene and even nucleotide/amino acid sequences through one simple search box, and quickly returns relevant RefSeq transcripts. A typical search takes just a few seconds, which dramatically enhances the usability of routine searching. In particular, GGRNA can search sequences as short as 10 nt or 4 amino acids, which cannot be handled easily by popular sequence analysis tools. Nucleotide sequences can be searched allowing up to three mismatches, or the query sequences may contain degenerate nucleotide codes (e.g. N, R, Y, S). Furthermore, Gene Ontology annotations, Enzyme Commission numbers and probe sequences of catalog microarrays are also incorporated into GGRNA, which may help users to conduct searches by various types of keywords. GGRNA web server will provide a simple and powerful interface for finding genes and transcripts for a wide range of users. All services at GGRNA are provided free of charge to all users.

  19. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  20. Transcript analysis of 250 novel yeast genes from chromosome XIV.

    PubMed

    Planta, R J; Brown, A J; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, M E; de Jonge, M; Gent, M E; Hayes, A; Kolen, C P; Lombardia, L J; Sefton, M; Oliver, S G; Thevelein, J; Tournu, H; van Delft, Y J; Verbart, D J; Winderickx, J

    1999-03-15

    The European Functional Analysis Network (EUROFAN) is systematically analysing the function of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes revealed by genome sequencing. As part of this effort our consortium has performed a detailed transcript analysis for 250 novel ORFs on chromosome XIV. All transcripts were quantified by Northern analysis under three quasi-steady-state conditions (exponential growth on rich fermentative, rich non-fermentative, and minimal fermentative media) and eight transient conditions (glucose derepression, glucose upshift, stationary phase, nitrogen starvation, osmo-stress, heat-shock, and two control conditions). Transcripts were detected for 82% of the 250 ORFs, and only one ORF did not yield a transcript of the expected length (YNL285w). Transcripts ranged from low (62%), moderate (16%) to high abundance (2%) relative to the ACT1 mRNA. The levels of 73% of the 206 chromosome XIV transcripts detected fluctuated in response to the transient states tested. However, only a small number responded strongly to the transients: eight ORFs were induced upon glucose upshift; five were repressed by glucose; six were induced in response to nitrogen starvation; three were induced in stationary phase; five were induced by osmo-stress; four were induced by heat-shock. These data provide useful clues about the general function of these ORFs and add to our understanding of gene regulation on a genome-wide basis.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  2. Most "dark matter" transcripts are associated with known genes.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Nislow, Corey; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Hughes, Timothy R

    2010-05-18

    A series of reports over the last few years have indicated that a much larger portion of the mammalian genome is transcribed than can be accounted for by currently annotated genes, but the quantity and nature of these additional transcripts remains unclear. Here, we have used data from single- and paired-end RNA-Seq and tiling arrays to assess the quantity and composition of transcripts in PolyA+ RNA from human and mouse tissues. Relative to tiling arrays, RNA-Seq identifies many fewer transcribed regions ("seqfrags") outside known exons and ncRNAs. Most nonexonic seqfrags are in introns, raising the possibility that they are fragments of pre-mRNAs. The chromosomal locations of the majority of intergenic seqfrags in RNA-Seq data are near known genes, consistent with alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site usage, promoter- and terminator-associated transcripts, or new alternative exons; indeed, reads that bridge splice sites identified 4,544 new exons, affecting 3,554 genes. Most of the remaining seqfrags correspond to either single reads that display characteristics of random sampling from a low-level background or several thousand small transcripts (median length = 111 bp) present at higher levels, which also tend to display sequence conservation and originate from regions with open chromatin. We conclude that, while there are bona fide new intergenic transcripts, their number and abundance is generally low in comparison to known exons, and the genome is not as pervasively transcribed as previously reported.

  3. Tracing the dynamics of gene transcripts after organismal death

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In life, genetic and epigenetic networks precisely coordinate the expression of genes—but in death, it is not known if gene expression diminishes gradually or abruptly stops or if specific genes and pathways are involved. We studied this by identifying mRNA transcripts that apparently increase in relative abundance after death, assessing their functions, and comparing their abundance profiles through postmortem time in two species, mouse and zebrafish. We found mRNA transcript profiles of 1063 genes became significantly more abundant after death of healthy adult animals in a time series spanning up to 96 h postmortem. Ordination plots revealed non-random patterns in the profiles by time. While most of these transcript levels increased within 0.5 h postmortem, some increased only at 24 and 48 h postmortem. Functional characterization of the most abundant transcripts revealed the following categories: stress, immunity, inflammation, apoptosis, transport, development, epigenetic regulation and cancer. The data suggest a step-wise shutdown occurs in organismal death that is manifested by the apparent increase of certain transcripts with various abundance maxima and durations. PMID:28123054

  4. Pioneer transcription factors: establishing competence for gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zaret, Kenneth S.; Carroll, Jason S.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are adaptor molecules that detect regulatory sequences in the DNA and target the assembly of protein complexes that control gene expression. Yet much of the DNA in the eukaryotic cell is in nucleosomes and thereby occluded by histones, and can be further occluded by higher-order chromatin structures and repressor complexes. Indeed, genome-wide location analyses have revealed that, for all transcription factors tested, the vast majority of potential DNA-binding sites are unoccupied, demonstrating the inaccessibility of most of the nuclear DNA. This raises the question of how target sites at silent genes become bound de novo by transcription factors, thereby initiating regulatory events in chromatin. Binding cooperativity can be sufficient for many kinds of factors to simultaneously engage a target site in chromatin and activate gene expression. However, in cases in which the binding of a series of factors is sequential in time and thus not initially cooperative, special “pioneer transcription factors” can be the first to engage target sites in chromatin. Such initial binding can passively enhance transcription by reducing the number of additional factors that are needed to bind the DNA, culminating in activation. In addition, pioneer factor binding can actively open up the local chromatin and directly make it competent for other factors to bind. Passive and active roles for the pioneer factor FoxA occur in embryonic development, steroid hormone induction, and human cancers. Herein we review the field and describe how pioneer factors may enable cellular reprogramming. PMID:22056668

  5. Transcriptional gene silencing as a tool for uncovering gene function in maize.

    PubMed

    Cigan, A Mark; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Haug-Collet, Kristin

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing has broad applications for studying gene function in planta. In maize, a large number of genes have been identified as tassel-preferred in their expression pattern, both by traditional genetic methods and by recent high-throughput expression profiling platforms. Approaches using RNA suppression may provide a rapid alternative means to identify genes directly related to pollen development in maize. The male fertility gene Ms45 and several anther-expressed genes of unknown function were used to evaluate the efficacy of generating male-sterile plants by transcriptional gene silencing. A high frequency of male-sterile plants was obtained by constitutively expressing inverted repeats (IR) of the Ms45 promoter. These sterile plants lacked MS45 mRNA due to transcriptional inactivity of the target promoter. Moreover, fertility was restored to these promoter IR-containing plants by expressing the Ms45 coding region using heterologous promoters. Transcriptional silencing of other anther-expressed genes also significantly affected male fertility phenotypes and led to increased methylation of the target promoter DNA sequences. These studies provide evidence of disruption of gene activity in monocots by RNA interference constructs directed against either native or transformed promoter regions. This approach not only enables the correlation of monocot anther-expressed genes with functions that are important for reproduction in maize, but may also provide a tool for studying gene function and identifying regulatory components unique to transcriptional gene control.

  6. Sequential Logic Model Deciphers Dynamic Transcriptional Control of Gene Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Sum Thai; Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tsuchiya, Masa

    2007-01-01

    Background Cellular signaling involves a sequence of events from ligand binding to membrane receptors through transcription factors activation and the induction of mRNA expression. The transcriptional-regulatory system plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression. A novel computational approach to the study of gene regulation circuits is presented here. Methodology Based on the concept of finite state machine, which provides a discrete view of gene regulation, a novel sequential logic model (SLM) is developed to decipher control mechanisms of dynamic transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. The SLM technique is also used to systematically analyze the dynamic function of transcriptional inputs, the dependency and cooperativity, such as synergy effect, among the binding sites with respect to when, how much and how fast the gene of interest is expressed. Principal Findings SLM is verified by a set of well studied expression data on endo16 of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) during the embryonic midgut development. A dynamic regulatory mechanism for endo16 expression controlled by three binding sites, UI, R and Otx is identified and demonstrated to be consistent with experimental findings. Furthermore, we show that during transition from specification to differentiation in wild type endo16 expression profile, SLM reveals three binary activities are not sufficient to explain the transcriptional regulation of endo16 expression and additional activities of binding sites are required. Further analyses suggest detailed mechanism of R switch activity where indirect dependency occurs in between UI activity and R switch during specification to differentiation stage. Conclusions/Significance The sequential logic formalism allows for a simplification of regulation network dynamics going from a continuous to a discrete representation of gene activation in time. In effect our SLM is non-parametric and model-independent, yet providing rich biological

  7. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Gene Isoform Specificity through Enhancer-Associated Antisense Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Courtney S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Katzman, Sol; Jacobs, Frank; Greenberg, David; Salama, Sofie R.; Haussler, David

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers and antisense RNAs play key roles in transcriptional regulation through differing mechanisms. Recent studies have demonstrated that enhancers are often associated with non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), yet the functional role of these enhancer:ncRNA associations is unclear. Using RNA-Sequencing to interrogate the transcriptomes of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their derived neural precursor cells (NPs), we identified two novel enhancer-associated antisense transcripts that appear to control isoform-specific expression of their overlapping protein-coding genes. In each case, an enhancer internal to a protein-coding gene drives an antisense RNA in mESCs but not in NPs. Expression of the antisense RNA is correlated with expression of a shorter isoform of the associated sense gene that is not present when the antisense RNA is not expressed. We demonstrate that expression of the antisense transcripts as well as expression of the short sense isoforms correlates with enhancer activity at these two loci. Further, overexpression and knockdown experiments suggest the antisense transcripts regulate expression of their associated sense genes via cis-acting mechanisms. Interestingly, the protein-coding genes involved in these two examples, Zmynd8 and Brd1, share many functional domains, yet their antisense ncRNAs show no homology to each other and are not present in non-murine mammalian lineages, such as the primate lineage. The lack of homology in the antisense ncRNAs indicates they have evolved independently of each other and suggests that this mode of lineage-specific transcriptional regulation may be more widespread in other cell types and organisms. Our findings present a new view of enhancer action wherein enhancers may direct isoform-specific expression of genes through ncRNA intermediates. PMID:22937057

  9. Transient Phenomena in Gene Expression after Induction of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Deneke, Carlus; Rudorf, Sophia; Valleriani, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    When transcription of a gene is induced by a stimulus, the number of its mRNA molecules changes with time. Here we discuss how this time evolution depends on the shape of the mRNA lifetime distribution. Analysis of the statistical properties of this change reveals transient effects on polysomes, ribosomal profiles, and rate of protein synthesis. Our studies reveal that transient phenomena in gene expression strongly depend on the specific form of the mRNA lifetime distribution. PMID:22558114

  10. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  11. The transcriptional interactome: gene expression in 3D.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Clay, Ieuan; Fraser, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Transcription in the eukaryotic nucleus has long been thought of as conforming to a model in which RNA polymerase complexes are recruited to and track along isolated templates. However, a more dynamic role for chromatin in transcriptional regulation is materializing: enhancer elements interact with promoters forming loops that often bridge considerable distances and genomic loci, even located on different chromosomes, undergo chromosomal associations. These associations amass to form an extensive 'transcriptional interactome', enacted at functional subnuclear compartments, to which genes dynamically relocate. The emerging view is that long-range chromosomal associations between genomic regions, and their repositioning in the three-dimensional space of the nucleus, are key contributors to the regulation of gene expression. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  13. Inferring transcription factor collaborations in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Living cells are realized by complex gene expression programs that are moderated by regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). The TFs control the differential expression of target genes in the context of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), either individually or in groups. Deciphering the mechanisms of how the TFs control the expression of target genes is a challenging task, especially when multiple TFs collaboratively participate in the transcriptional regulation. Results We model the underlying regulatory interactions in terms of the directions (activation or repression) and their logical roles (necessary and/or sufficient) with a modified association rule mining approach, called mTRIM. The experiment on Yeast discovered 670 regulatory interactions, in which multiple TFs express their functions on common target genes collaboratively. The evaluation on yeast genetic interactions, TF knockouts and a synthetic dataset shows that our algorithm is significantly better than the existing ones. Conclusions mTRIM is a novel method to infer TF collaborations in transcriptional regulation networks. mTRIM is available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/mTRIM. PMID:24565025

  14. The WRKY Transcription Factor Genes in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Nan, Zhibiao; Wang, Xingjun

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factor genes play critical roles in plant growth and development, as well as stress responses. WRKY genes have been examined in various higher plants, but they have not been characterized in Lotus japonicus. The recent release of the L. japonicus whole genome sequence provides an opportunity for a genome wide analysis of WRKY genes in this species. In this study, we identified 61 WRKY genes in the L. japonicus genome. Based on the WRKY protein structure, L. japonicus WRKY (LjWRKY) genes can be classified into three groups (I-III). Investigations of gene copy number and gene clusters indicate that only one gene duplication event occurred on chromosome 4 and no clustered genes were detected on chromosomes 3 or 6. Researchers previously believed that group II and III WRKY domains were derived from the C-terminal WRKY domain of group I. Our results suggest that some WRKY genes in group II originated from the N-terminal domain of group I WRKY genes. Additional evidence to support this hypothesis was obtained by Medicago truncatula WRKY (MtWRKY) protein motif analysis. We found that LjWRKY and MtWRKY group III genes are under purifying selection, suggesting that WRKY genes will become increasingly structured and functionally conserved.

  15. The WRKY Transcription Factor Genes in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Xingjun

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factor genes play critical roles in plant growth and development, as well as stress responses. WRKY genes have been examined in various higher plants, but they have not been characterized in Lotus japonicus. The recent release of the L. japonicus whole genome sequence provides an opportunity for a genome wide analysis of WRKY genes in this species. In this study, we identified 61 WRKY genes in the L. japonicus genome. Based on the WRKY protein structure, L. japonicus WRKY (LjWRKY) genes can be classified into three groups (I–III). Investigations of gene copy number and gene clusters indicate that only one gene duplication event occurred on chromosome 4 and no clustered genes were detected on chromosomes 3 or 6. Researchers previously believed that group II and III WRKY domains were derived from the C-terminal WRKY domain of group I. Our results suggest that some WRKY genes in group II originated from the N-terminal domain of group I WRKY genes. Additional evidence to support this hypothesis was obtained by Medicago truncatula WRKY (MtWRKY) protein motif analysis. We found that LjWRKY and MtWRKY group III genes are under purifying selection, suggesting that WRKY genes will become increasingly structured and functionally conserved. PMID:24745006

  16. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates uncoupling protein 3 gene transcription in Phodopus sungorus

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Tobias; Reichwald, Kathrin; Platzer, Matthias; Li, Xing-Sheng; Klingenspor, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Background Ucp3 is an integral protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane with a role in lipid metabolism preventing deleterious effects of fatty acids in states of high lipid oxidation. Ucp3 is expressed in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and controlled by a transcription factor complex including PPARalpha, MyoD and the histone acetyltransferase p300. Several studies have demonstrated interaction of these factors with chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (Coup-TFII). This nuclear receptor is involved in organogenesis and other developmental processes including skeletal muscle development, but also co-regulates a number of metabolic genes. In this study we in silico analyzed the upstream region of Ucp3 of the Djungarian hamster Phodopus sungorus and identified several putative response elements for Coup-TFII. We therefore investigated whether Coup-TFII is a further player in the transcriptional control of the Ucp3 gene in rodents. Results By quantitative PCR we demonstrated a positive correlation of Coup-TFII and Ucp3 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue in response to food deprivation and cold exposure, respectively. In reporter gene assays Coup-TFII enhanced transactivation of the Ucp3 promoter conveyed by MyoD, PPARalpha, RXRalpha and/or p300. Using deletions and mutated constructs, we identified a Coup-TFII enhancer element 816–840 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Binding of Coup-TFII to this upstream enhancer was confirmed in electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays. Conclusion Transcriptional regulation of the Coup-TFII gene in response to starvation and cold exposure seems to be the regulatory mechanism of Ucp3 mRNA expression in brown adipose and skeletal muscle tissue determining the final appropriate rate of transcript synthesis. These findings add a crucial component to the complex transcriptional machinery controlling expression of Ucp3. Given the substantial evidence

  17. Transcriptional analysis of the titin cap gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Londhe, Priya; Zhang, Meiling

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in titin cap (Tcap), also known as telethonin, cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G (LGMD2G). Tcap is one of the titin interacting Z-disc proteins involved in the regulation and development of normal sarcomeric structure. Given the essential role of Tcap in establishing and maintaining normal skeletal muscle architecture, we were interested in determining the regulatory elements required for expression of this gene in myoblasts. We have defined a highly conserved 421 bp promoter proximal promoter fragment that contains two E boxes and multiple putative Mef2 binding sequences. This promoter can be activated by MyoD and myogenin in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells, and maintains the differentiated cell-specific expression pattern of the endogenous Tcap in C2C12 cells. We find that while both E boxes are required for full activation by MyoD or myogenin in NIH3T3 cells, the promoter proximal E box has a greater contribution to activation of this promoter in C2C12 cells and to activation by MyoD in NIH3T3 cells. Together, the data suggest an important role for MyoD in activating Tcap expression through the promoter proximal E box. We also show that myogenin is required for normal expression in vivo and physically binds to the Tcap promoter during embryogenesis. PMID:21305318

  18. Transcript profiling of Eucalyptus xylem genes during tension wood formation.

    PubMed

    Paux, Etienne; Carocha, Víctor; Marques, Cristina; Mendes de Sousa, António; Borralho, Nuno; Sivadon, Pierre; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2005-07-01

    Tension wood formed in response to gravitational force is a striking example of the plasticity of angiosperm wood. In this study our goal was to characterize the early changes in gene expression during tension wood formation in Eucalyptus. Using cDNA array technology, transcript profiling of 231 genes preferentially expressed in differentiating Eucalyptus xylem was followed from 6 h to 1 wk of a tension time course of artificially bent Eucalyptus trees. 196 genes were differentially regulated between control and bent trees, some exhibiting distinctive expression patterns related to changes in secondary cell wall structure and composition. For instance, expression of a cellulose synthase gene was well correlated with the appearance of the G-layers. Cluster correlation analysis revealed differential regulation of lignin biosynthetic genes and may also be used to help infer the function of unknown gene products. Eucalyptus wood transcriptome analysis during tension wood formation not only provided new clues into the transcriptional regulatory network of genes preferentially expressed in xylem, but also highlighted candidate genes responsible for the genetic and environmentally induced variation of wood quality traits.

  19. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  20. NELF Potentiates Gene Transcription in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoling; Hang, Saiyu; Prazak, Lisa; Gergen, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of genes that are subject to developmental regulation of transcriptional elongation is association of the negative elongation factor NELF with the paused RNA polymerase complex. Here we use a combination of biochemical and genetic experiments to investigate the in vivo function of NELF in the Drosophila embryo. NELF associates with different gene promoter regions in correlation with the association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the initial activation of gene expression during the early stages of embryogenesis. Genetic experiments reveal that maternally provided NELF is required for the activation, rather than the repression of reporter genes that emulate the expression of key developmental control genes. Furthermore, the relative requirement for NELF is dictated by attributes of the flanking cis-regulatory information. We propose that NELF-associated paused Pol II complexes provide a platform for high fidelity integration of the combinatorial spatial and temporal information that is central to the regulation of gene expression during animal development. PMID:20634899

  1. Structure and in vitro transcription of human globin genes.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, N J; Shander, M H; Manley, J L; Gefter, M L; Maniatis, T

    1980-09-19

    The alpha-like and beta-like subunits of human hemoglobin are encoded by a small family of genes that are differentially expressed during development. Through the use of molecular cloning procedures, each member of this gene family has been isolated and extensively characterized. Although the alpha-like and beta-like globin genes are located on different chromosomes, both sets of genes are arranged in closely linked clusters. In both clusters, each of the genes is transcribed from the same DNA strand, and the genes are arranged in the order of their expressions during development. Structural comparisons of immediately adjacent genes within each cluster have provided evidence for the occurrence of gene duplication and correction during evolution and have led to the discovery of pseudogenes, genes that have acquired numerous mutations that prevent their normal expression. Recently, in vivo and in vitro systems for studying the expression of cloned eukaryotic genes have been developed as a means of identifying DNA sequences that are necessary for normal gene function. This article describes the application of an in vitro transcription procedure to the study of human globin gene expression.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of steroid hydroxylase genes by corticotropin.

    PubMed Central

    John, M E; John, M C; Boggaram, V; Simpson, E R; Waterman, M R

    1986-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal steroidogenic capacity in the adrenal cortex is the result of a cAMP-dependent response to the peptide hormone corticotropin (ACTH). The molecular mechanism of this action of ACTH has been examined by using five recombinant DNA clones specific for enzymes of the steroidogenic pathway (P-450scc, P-45011 beta, P-450C21, P-45017 alpha, and adrenodoxin). The presence of nuclear precursors in steady-state RNA samples derived from cultured bovine adrenocortical cells and moderate increases in the number of RNA chain initiations, as determined by in vitro nuclear run-off assays, indicate that ACTH controls the expression of the gene(s) for each of these proteins at the transcriptional level. The ACTH-mediated increase in accumulation of transcripts specific for steroid hydroxylases in nuclear RNA can be specifically blocked by inhibiting protein synthesis in bovine adrenocortical cell cultures. The steady-state concentrations of nuclear RNA for control genes show no decrease upon cycloheximide treatment. These studies suggest that a primary action of ACTH in the adrenal cortex is to activate (via cAMP) the synthesis of rapidly turning over protein factors that in turn mediate increased initiation of transcription of steroid hydroxylase genes. We propose that these protein factors impart specificity of induction to genes encoding components of this pathway in steroidogenic tissues. Images PMID:3014507

  3. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes citA and citZ were repressed during early exponential growth phase in nutrient broth medium and were induced as cells reached the end of exponential phase. Both genes were also induced by treatment of cells with the drug decoyinine. After induction, the steady-state level of citZ mRNA was about five times higher than that of citA mRNA. At least some of the citZ transcripts read through into the isocitrate dehydrogenase (citC) gene. Transcription from an apparent promoter site located near the 3' end of the citZ gene also contributed to expression of citC. In minimal medium, citA transcription was about 6-fold lower when glucose was the sole carbon source than it was when succinate was the carbon source. Expression of the citZ gene was repressed 2-fold by glucose and 10-fold when glucose and glutamate were present simultaneously. This latter synergistic repression is similar to the effect of glucose and glutamate on steady-state citrate synthase enzyme activity. CitR, a protein of the LysR family, appeared to be a repressor of citA but not of citZ.

  4. Gene transcription in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Waters, Shannon C.; Meyerson, Randi; Rode, Karyn D.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears in the Beaufort (SB) and Chukchi (CS) Seas experience different environments due primarily to a longer history of sea ice loss in the Beaufort Sea. Ecological differences have been identified as a possible reason for the generally poorer body condition and reproduction of Beaufort polar bears compared to those from the Chukchi, but the influence of exposure to other stressors remains unknown. We use molecular technology, quantitative PCR, to identify gene transcription differences among polar bears from the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as well as captive healthy polar bears. We identified significant transcriptional differences among a priori groups (i.e., captive bears, SB 2012, SB 2013, CS 2013) for ten of the 14 genes of interest (i.e., CaM, HSP70, CCR3, TGFβ, COX2, THRα, T-bet, Gata3, CD69, and IL17); transcription levels of DRβ, IL1β, AHR, and Mx1 did not differ among groups. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated separation among the groups of polar bears. Specifically, we detected transcript profiles consistent with immune function impairment in polar bears from the Beaufort Sea, when compared with Chukchi and captive polar bears. Although there is no strong indication of differential exposure to contaminants or pathogens between CS and SB bears, there are clearly differences in important transcriptional responses between populations. Further investigation is warranted to refine interpretation of potential effects of described stress-related conditions for the SB population.

  5. Transcription factor clusters regulate genes in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Erik G; Friemann, Rosmarie; Hohmann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Transcription is regulated through binding factors to gene promoters to activate or repress expression, however, the mechanisms by which factors find targets remain unclear. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we determined in vivo stoichiometry and spatiotemporal dynamics of a GFP tagged repressor, Mig1, from a paradigm signaling pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find the repressor operates in clusters, which upon extracellular signal detection, translocate from the cytoplasm, bind to nuclear targets and turnover. Simulations of Mig1 configuration within a 3D yeast genome model combined with a promoter-specific, fluorescent translation reporter confirmed clusters are the functional unit of gene regulation. In vitro and structural analysis on reconstituted Mig1 suggests that clusters are stabilized by depletion forces between intrinsically disordered sequences. We observed similar clusters of a co-regulatory activator from a different pathway, supporting a generalized cluster model for transcription factors that reduces promoter search times through intersegment transfer while stabilizing gene expression. PMID:28841133

  6. The RNA polymerase flow model of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Edri, Shlomit; Gazit, Eran; Cohen, Eyal; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process by which proteins are synthesized based on the information coded in the genes. The two major steps of this process are the transcription of the DNA segment corresponding to a gene to mRNA molecules and the translation of the mRNA molecules to proteins by the ribosome. Thus, understanding, modeling and engineering the different stages of this process have both important biotechnological applications and contributions to basic life science. In previous studies we have introduced the Homogenous Ribosome Flow Model (HRFM) and demonstrated its advantages in analyses of the translation process. In this study we introduce the RNA Polymerase Flow Model (RPFM), a non trivial extension of the HRFM, which also includes a backward flow and can be used for modeling transcription and maybe other similar processes. We compare the HRFM and the RPFM in the three regimes of the transcription process: rate limiting initiation, rate limiting elongation and rate limiting termination via a simulative and analytical analysis. In addition, based on experimental data, we show that RPFM is a better choice for modeling transcription process.

  7. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

  8. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE HUMAN KiSS1 GENE

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Johanna K.; Dietzel, Anja; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Loche, Alberto; Tefs, Katrin; Kiess, Wieland; Danne, Thomas; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Heger, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Kisspeptin, the product of the KiSS1 gene, has emerged as a key component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus controls puberty and reproductive development. It does so by stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Little is known about the transcriptional control of the KiSS1 gene. Here we show that a set of proteins postulated to be upstream components of a hypothalamic network involved in controlling female puberty regulates KiSS1 transcriptional activity. Using RACE-PCR we determined that transcription of KiSS1 mRNA is initiated at a single transcription start site (TSS) located 153–156 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation codon. Promoter assays performed using 293 MSR cells showed that the KiSS1 promoter is activated by TTF1 and CUX1-p200, and repressed by EAP1, YY1, and CUX1-p110. EAP1 and CUX-110 were also repressive in GT1-7 cells. All four TFs are recruited in vivo to the KiSS1 promoter and are expressed in kisspeptin neurons. These results suggest that expression of the KiSS1 gene is regulated by trans-activators and repressors involved in the system-wide control of mammalian puberty. PMID:21672609

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Modular construction of mammalian gene circuits using TALE transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Weixi; Li, Zhihua; Weiss, Ron; Xie, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    An important goal of synthetic biology is the rational design and predictable implementation of synthetic gene circuits using standardized and interchangeable parts. However, engineering of complex circuits in mammalian cells is currently limited by the availability of well-characterized and orthogonal transcriptional repressors. Here, we introduce a library of 26 reversible transcription activator-like effector repressors (TALERs) that bind newly designed hybrid promoters and exert transcriptional repression through steric hindrance of key transcriptional initiation elements. We demonstrate that using the input-output transfer curves of our TALERs enables accurate prediction of the behavior of modularly assembled TALER cascade and switch circuits. We also show that TALER switches employing feedback regulation exhibit improved accuracy for microRNA-based HeLa cancer cell classification versus HEK293 cells. Our TALER library is a valuable toolkit for modular engineering of synthetic circuits, enabling programmable manipulation of mammalian cells and helping elucidate design principles of coupled transcriptional and microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:25643171

  11. Stochastic model of transcription factor-regulated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Rajesh; Bose, Indrani

    2006-09-01

    We consider a stochastic model of transcription factor (TF)-regulated gene expression. The model describes two genes, gene A and gene B, which synthesize the TFs and the target gene proteins, respectively. We show through analytic calculations that the TF fluctuations have a significant effect on the distribution of the target gene protein levels when the mean TF level falls in the highest sensitive region of the dose-response curve. We further study the effect of reducing the copy number of gene A from two to one. The enhanced TF fluctuations yield results different from those in the deterministic case. The probability that the target gene protein level exceeds a threshold value is calculated with the knowledge of the probability density functions associated with the TF and target gene protein levels. Numerical simulation results for a more detailed stochastic model are shown to be in agreement with those obtained through analytic calculations. The relevance of these results in the context of the genetic disorder haploinsufficiency is pointed out. Some experimental observations on the haploinsufficiency of the tumour suppressor gene, Nkx 3.1, are explained with the help of the stochastic model of TF-regulated gene expression.

  12. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  13. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  15. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  16. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Boian S; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R; Rasmussen, Kim Ø; Usheva, Anny

    2010-04-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding-DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely 'transcription factor-centric' view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation.

  17. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  18. Transcription of a poxvirus early gene is regulated both by a short promoter element and by a transcriptional termination signal controlling transcriptional interference.

    PubMed Central

    Ink, B S; Pickup, D J

    1989-01-01

    The promoter region of an early gene (38K gene) of cowpox virus has been characterized by deletion and linker scanning mutational analyses. Modified versions of this promoter region were placed into the genome of vaccinia virus, and their transcriptional efficiencies were assessed by quantifying RNAs transcribed from these sequences. These analyses showed that the sequences in the region between 33 and 4 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site affect the efficiency of transcription from this promoter. Linker scanning mutations in the -27 to -10 region inhibited transcription. This region contains the sequence 5'-GAAAATATATT-3', which is present in at least two other early genes in the same positions (-21 to -11) relative to the transcriptional start sites of these genes. Elements of this sequence are similarly positioned in the promoter regions of several other poxvirus genes, suggesting that this sequence represents a transcriptional control element of at least a subset of poxvirus genes. The -8 to -2 sequence (5'-TTTTTAT-3') contains a transcriptional termination signal. Mutation of this sequence had two separate effects: (i) it reduced the efficiency of transcription from the promoter by approximately 30%, and (ii) it prevented this sequence from terminating the transcription from upstream genes. When overlapping transcription from upstream genes was not prevented by a termination signal present either within the 38K promoter or upstream of the promoter, transcription from this promoter was reduced by about 30%. This indicates that transcriptional termination has a role in the regulation of viral gene expression by controlling transcriptional interference. Images PMID:2795715

  19. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L; Folch, Josep M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Ovilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  20. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Andersen, Kristin; Kilen Andersen, Hege; Meling, Torstein R; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2016-12-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After algorithmic and manual filtering, the final list consisted of 24 potential fusion events. Raw RNA-seq read sequences and PCR validation supports two novel fusion genes: a reciprocal fusion gene involving UQCR10 and C1orf194 in an adult spinal ependymoma and a TSPAN4-CD151 fusion gene in a pediatric infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial or spinal ependymomas. Further studies are required to characterize the genomic rearrangements causing these fusion genes, as well as the frequency and functional importance of the fusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. ULTRAPETALA trxG genes interact with KANADI transcription factor genes to regulate Aradopsis Gynoecium patterning

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organ formation relies upon precise patterns of gene expression that are under tight spatial and temporal regulation. Transcription patterns are specified by several cellular processes during development, including chromatin remodeling, but little is known about how chromatin remodeling factors cont...

  2. Quantification of genes and gene transcripts for microbial perchlorate reduction in fixed-bed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    De Long, S K; Li, X; Bae, S; Brown, J C; Raskin, L; Kinney, K A; Kirisits, M J

    2012-03-01

    Optimization of full-scale, biological perchlorate treatment processes for drinking water would benefit from knowledge of the location and quantity of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) and expression of perchlorate-related genes in bioreactors. The aim of this study was to quantify perchlorate removal and perchlorate-related genes (pcrA and cld) and their transcripts in bioreactors and to determine whether these genes or transcripts could serve as useful biomarkers for perchlorate treatment processes. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting pcrA and cld were applied to two pilot-scale, fixed-bed bioreactors treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater. pcrA and cld genes per microgram of DNA were two- to threefold higher and three- to fourfold higher, respectively, in the bioreactor showing superior perchlorate-removal performance. In a laboratory-scale bioreactor, quantities of pcrA and cld genes and transcripts were compared under two distinct performance conditions (c.60 and 20% perchlorate removal) for a 5-min empty bed contact time. cld genes per microgram of DNA were approximately threefold higher and cld transcripts per microgram of RNA were approximately sixfold higher under the higher perchlorate-removal condition. No differences in pcrA genes or transcripts per microgram of DNA or RNA, respectively, were detected between the c.60 and 20% perchlorate-removal conditions, possibly because these assays did not accurately quantify pcrA genes and transcripts in the mixed culture present. Quantities of cld genes and transcripts per microgram of DNA and RNA, respectively, were found to be higher when perchlorate removal was higher. However, quantities of pcrA and cld genes or transcripts were not found to directly correlate with perchlorate-removal rates. To our knowledge, this study represents the first application of qPCR assays to quantify perchlorate-related genes and transcripts in continuous-flow bioreactors. The results indicate that cld gene and

  3. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  4. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  5. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine.

  6. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer–promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them. PMID:25588787

  7. Transcriptional analysis of exopolysaccharides biosynthesis gene clusters in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Vastano, Valeria; Perrone, Filomena; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita; Muscariello, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) from lactic acid bacteria contribute to specific rheology and texture of fermented milk products and find applications also in non-dairy foods and in therapeutics. Recently, four clusters of genes (cps) associated with surface polysaccharide production have been identified in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, a probiotic and food-associated lactobacillus. These clusters are involved in cell surface architecture and probably in release and/or exposure of immunomodulating bacterial molecules. Here we show a transcriptional analysis of these clusters. Indeed, RT-PCR experiments revealed that the cps loci are organized in five operons. Moreover, by reverse transcription-qPCR analysis performed on L. plantarum WCFS1 (wild type) and WCFS1-2 (ΔccpA), we demonstrated that expression of three cps clusters is under the control of the global regulator CcpA. These results, together with the identification of putative CcpA target sequences (catabolite responsive element CRE) in the regulatory region of four out of five transcriptional units, strongly suggest for the first time a role of the master regulator CcpA in EPS gene transcription among lactobacilli.

  8. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  9. Transcriptional Activators of Human Genes with Programmable DNA-Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Simone; Streubel, Jana; Bonas, Ulla; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Boch, Jens

    2011-01-01

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors are translocated by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells where they activate transcription of target genes. DNA target sequence recognition occurs in a unique mode involving a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat recognizes a single base pair in a contiguous DNA sequence and a pair of adjacent hypervariable amino acid residues per repeat specifies which base is bound. Rearranging the repeats allows the design of novel TAL proteins with predictable DNA-recognition specificities. TAL protein-based transcriptional activation in plant cells is mediated by a C-terminal activation domain (AD). Here, we created synthetic TAL proteins with designed repeat compositions using a novel modular cloning strategy termed “Golden TAL Technology”. Newly programmed TAL proteins were not only functional in plant cells, but also in human cells and activated targeted expression of exogenous as well as endogenous genes. Transcriptional activation in different human cell lines was markedly improved by replacing the TAL-AD with the VP16-AD of herpes simplex virus. The creation of TAL proteins with potentially any desired DNA-recognition specificity allows their versatile use in biotechnology. PMID:21625585

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  11. Analysis of gene order conservation in eukaryotes identifies transcriptionally and functionally linked genes.

    PubMed

    Dávila López, Marcela; Martínez Guerra, Juan José; Samuelsson, Tore

    2010-05-14

    The order of genes in eukaryotes is not entirely random. Studies of gene order conservation are important to understand genome evolution and to reveal mechanisms why certain neighboring genes are more difficult to separate during evolution. Here, genome-wide gene order information was compiled for 64 species, representing a wide variety of eukaryotic phyla. This information is presented in a browser where gene order may be displayed and compared between species. Factors related to non-random gene order in eukaryotes were examined by considering pairs of neighboring genes. The evolutionary conservation of gene pairs was studied with respect to relative transcriptional direction, intergenic distance and functional relationship as inferred by gene ontology. The results show that among gene pairs that are conserved the divergently and co-directionally transcribed genes are much more common than those that are convergently transcribed. Furthermore, highly conserved pairs, in particular those of fungi, are characterized by a short intergenic distance. Finally, gene pairs of metazoa and fungi that are evolutionary conserved and that are divergently transcribed are much more likely to be related by function as compared to poorly conserved gene pairs. One example is the ribosomal protein gene pair L13/S16, which is unusual as it occurs both in fungi and alveolates. A specific functional relationship between these two proteins is also suggested by the fact that they are part of the same operon in both eubacteria and archaea. In conclusion, factors associated with non-random gene order in eukaryotes include relative gene orientation, intergenic distance and functional relationships. It seems likely that certain pairs of genes are conserved because the genes involved have a transcriptional and/or functional relationship. The results also indicate that studies of gene order conservation aid in identifying genes that are related in terms of transcriptional control.

  12. Analysis of Gene Order Conservation in Eukaryotes Identifies Transcriptionally and Functionally Linked Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dávila López, Marcela; Martínez Guerra, Juan José; Samuelsson, Tore

    2010-01-01

    The order of genes in eukaryotes is not entirely random. Studies of gene order conservation are important to understand genome evolution and to reveal mechanisms why certain neighboring genes are more difficult to separate during evolution. Here, genome-wide gene order information was compiled for 64 species, representing a wide variety of eukaryotic phyla. This information is presented in a browser where gene order may be displayed and compared between species. Factors related to non-random gene order in eukaryotes were examined by considering pairs of neighboring genes. The evolutionary conservation of gene pairs was studied with respect to relative transcriptional direction, intergenic distance and functional relationship as inferred by gene ontology. The results show that among gene pairs that are conserved the divergently and co-directionally transcribed genes are much more common than those that are convergently transcribed. Furthermore, highly conserved pairs, in particular those of fungi, are characterized by a short intergenic distance. Finally, gene pairs of metazoa and fungi that are evolutionary conserved and that are divergently transcribed are much more likely to be related by function as compared to poorly conserved gene pairs. One example is the ribosomal protein gene pair L13/S16, which is unusual as it occurs both in fungi and alveolates. A specific functional relationship between these two proteins is also suggested by the fact that they are part of the same operon in both eubacteria and archaea. In conclusion, factors associated with non-random gene order in eukaryotes include relative gene orientation, intergenic distance and functional relationships. It seems likely that certain pairs of genes are conserved because the genes involved have a transcriptional and/or functional relationship. The results also indicate that studies of gene order conservation aid in identifying genes that are related in terms of transcriptional control. PMID:20498846

  13. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. For example, through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress pre-mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs, and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs. PMID:23178169

  14. Land use type significantly affects microbial gene transcription in soil.

    PubMed

    Nacke, Heiko; Fischer, Christiane; Thürmer, Andrea; Meinicke, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in sustaining biogeochemical processes and cycling of nutrients across different land use types. To gain insights into microbial gene transcription in forest and grassland soil, we isolated mRNA from 32 sampling sites. After sequencing of generated complementary DNA (cDNA), a total of 5,824,229 sequences could be further analyzed. We were able to assign nonribosomal cDNA sequences to all three domains of life. A dominance of bacterial sequences, which were affiliated to 25 different phyla, was found. Bacterial groups capable of aromatic compound degradation such as Phenylobacterium and Burkholderia were detected in significantly higher relative abundance in forest soil than in grassland soil. Accordingly, KEGG pathway categories related to degradation of aromatic ring-containing molecules (e.g., benzoate degradation) were identified in high abundance within forest soil-derived metatranscriptomic datasets. The impact of land use type forest on community composition and activity is evidently to a high degree caused by the presence of wood breakdown products. Correspondingly, bacterial groups known to be involved in lignin degradation and containing ligninolytic genes such as Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium, and Azospirillum exhibited increased transcriptional activity in forest soil. Higher solar radiation in grassland presumably induced increased transcription of photosynthesis-related genes within this land use type. This is in accordance with high abundance of photosynthetic organisms and plant-infecting viruses in grassland.

  15. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.

  16. A gene transcription signature of obesity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Chad J; Sada, Yvonne H; Zhang, Yiqun; Tsimelzon, Anna; Wong, Helen; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Landis, Melissa D; Bear, Harry D; Rodriguez, Angel; Chang, Jenny C

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is thought to contribute to worse disease outcome in breast cancer as a result of increased levels of adipocyte-secreted endocrine factors, insulin, and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) that accelerate tumor cell proliferation and impair treatment response. We examined the effects of patient obesity on primary breast tumor gene expression, by profiling transcription of a set of 103 tumors for which the patients' body mass index (BMI) was ascertained. Sample profiles were stratified according to patients' obesity phenotype defined as normal (BMI < 25), overweight (BMI 25-29.9), or obese (BMI ≥ 30). Widespread gene expression alterations were evident in breast tumors from obese patients as compared to other tumors, allowing us to define an obesity-associated cancer transcriptional signature of 662 genes. In multiple public expression data sets of breast cancers (representing > 1,500 patients), manifestation of the obesity signature patterns correlated with manifestation of a gene signature for IGF signaling and (to a lesser extent) with lower levels of estrogen receptor. In one patient cohort, manifestation of the obesity signature correlated with shorter time to metastases. A number of small molecules either induced or suppressed the obesity-associated transcriptional program in vitro; estrogens alpha-estradiol, levonorgestrel, and hexestrol induced the program, while several anti-parkinsonian agents targeting neurotransmitter receptor pathways repressed the program. Obesity in breast cancer patients appears to impact the gene expression patterns of the tumor (perhaps as a result of altered body chemistry). These results warrant further investigation of obesity-associated modifiers of breast cancer risk and disease outcome.

  17. Quantitative characterization of gene regulation by Rho dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Razika; Lee, Tiffany Y; Lim, Han N

    2015-08-01

    Rho factor dependent transcription termination (RTT) is common within the coding sequences of bacterial genes and it acts to couple transcription and translation levels. Despite the importance of RTT for gene regulation, its effects on mRNA and protein concentrations have not been quantitatively characterized. Here we demonstrate that the exogenous cfp gene encoding the cyan fluorescent protein can serve as a model for gene regulation by RTT. This was confirmed by showing that Psu and bicyclomycin decrease RTT and increase full length cfp mRNAs (but remarkably they have little effect on protein production). We then use cfp to characterize the relationship between its protein and full length mRNA concentrations when the translation initiation rate is varied by sequence modifications of the translation initiation region (TIR). These experiments reveal that the fold change in protein concentration (RP) and the fold change in full length mRNA concentration (Rm) have the relationship RP≈Rm(b), where b is a constant. The average value of b was determined from three separate data sets to be ~3.6. We demonstrate that the above power law function can predict how altering the translation initiation rate of a gene in an operon will affect the mRNA concentrations of downstream genes and specify a lower bound for the associated changes in protein concentrations. In summary, this study defines a simple phenomenological model to help program expression from single genes and operons that are regulated by RTT, and to guide molecular models of RTT.

  18. Analysis of CTNS gene transcripts in nephropathic cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilmer, Martijn J.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Bencivenga, Paola; Bellomo, Francesco; Levtchenko, Elena N.; Emma, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the CTNS gene that encodes for a cystine transmembrane transporter. Several mutations have been described in the coding and promoter regions of the CTNS gene in affected individuals. We selected three patients with NC from two unrelated families, in whom sequence analysis of the CTNS gene detected only one or no mutations. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or fibroblasts and CTNS transcripts were analyzed. We observed a skipping of exon 5 (85 bp) in two siblings and an intron 9 retention of 75 bp associated with partial replication of exon 9 in the third patient. Genomic DNA analysis of intron regions surrounding exon 5 showed a point mutation in the hypothetical lariat branch site of intron 4 at position –24 (c.141–24 T > C) in the first two patients and a duplication of 266 bp including a part of exon and intron 9 in the third patient. Analysis of CTNS gene transcripts allowed identification of mutations in patients in whom CTNS mutations could not be detected by traditional DNA sequencing. These results support the hypothesis that cystinosis is a monogenic disorder. PMID:20352457

  19. Analysis of CTNS gene transcripts in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Taranta, Anna; Wilmer, Martijn J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Bencivenga, Paola; Bellomo, Francesco; Levtchenko, Elena N; Emma, Francesco

    2010-07-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the CTNS gene that encodes for a cystine transmembrane transporter. Several mutations have been described in the coding and promoter regions of the CTNS gene in affected individuals. We selected three patients with NC from two unrelated families, in whom sequence analysis of the CTNS gene detected only one or no mutations. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or fibroblasts and CTNS transcripts were analyzed. We observed a skipping of exon 5 (85 bp) in two siblings and an intron 9 retention of 75 bp associated with partial replication of exon 9 in the third patient. Genomic DNA analysis of intron regions surrounding exon 5 showed a point mutation in the hypothetical lariat branch site of intron 4 at position -24 (c.141-24 T > C) in the first two patients and a duplication of 266 bp including a part of exon and intron 9 in the third patient. Analysis of CTNS gene transcripts allowed identification of mutations in patients in whom CTNS mutations could not be detected by traditional DNA sequencing. These results support the hypothesis that cystinosis is a monogenic disorder.

  20. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-08-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  1. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J.

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. PMID:27345721

  2. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  3. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. In vitro transcription of a cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Yamamoto, O; Kominami, R; Muramatsu, M

    1981-01-01

    An in vitro transcription system which utilizes cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) fragments and a mouse cell extract has been developed. RNA polymerases I is apparently responsible for this transcription as evidenced by the complete resistance to a high concentration (200 micrograms/ml) of alpha-amanitin. Run-off products obtained with three different truncated rDNA fragments indicated that RNA was transcribed from a unique site of rDNA. The S1 nuclease protection mapping of the in vitro product and of in vivo 45S RNA confirmed this site, indicating that, in this in vitro system, transcription of rDNA started from the same site as in vivo. This site is located at several hundred nucleotides upstream from the putative initiation site reported by us (1) and by others (2). Some sequence homology surrounding this region was noted among mouse, Xenopus laevis and Drosophila melanogaster. The data also suggest that some processing of the primary transcript occurs in this in vitro system. Images PMID:6278446

  5. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  6. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  7. V-src-induced-transcription of the avian clusterin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Herault, Y; Chatelain, G; Brun, G; Michel, D

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated the avian gene T64 corresponding to the mammalian clusterin, on the basis of high accumulation of its template mRNA in cells infected with oncogenic retroviruses. Since the clusterin was shown to have a protective effect against the immune system, its induction by oncogenic viruses is of major biological importance. The unique, short 5 kb-long T64 genomic locus is inactive in normal quail embryo fibroblasts in primary culture whereas it shows a high transcriptional activity after transformation by the Rous sarcoma virus. The 963 bp-long 5' flanking region is sufficient to drive the transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in a thermodependent manner when a thermosensitive version of pp60v-src is used. Deletion and point mutation analyses of the promoter show that the v-src response requires at least two separate elements: PUR and AP-1, located respectively at positions -167 to -152 and -25 to -19 relative to the single transcription initiation site. In addition, the binding of specific nuclear factors to these responsive elements correlates with the T64 promoter activation. Images PMID:1475199

  8. Novel Transcriptional Regulons for Autotrophic Cycle Genes in Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autotrophic microorganisms are able to utilize carbon dioxide as their only carbon source, or, alternatively, many of them can grow heterotrophically on organics. Different variants of autotrophic pathways have been identified in various lineages of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Aerobic members of the order Sulfolobales utilize the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HHC) to fix inorganic carbon, whereas anaerobic Thermoproteales use the dicarboxylate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (DHC). Knowledge of transcriptional regulation of autotrophic pathways in Archaea is limited. We applied a comparative genomics approach to predict novel autotrophic regulons in the Crenarchaeota. We report identification of two novel DNA motifs associated with the autotrophic pathway genes in the Sulfolobales (HHC box) and Thermoproteales (DHC box). Based on genome context evidence, the HHC box regulon was attributed to a novel transcription factor from the TrmB family named HhcR. Orthologs of HhcR are present in all Sulfolobales genomes but were not found in other lineages. A predicted HHC box regulatory motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays with the recombinant HhcR protein from Metallosphaera yellowstonensis. For the DHC box regulon, we assigned a different potential regulator, named DhcR, which is restricted to the order Thermoproteales. DhcR in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Tneu_0751) was previously identified as a DNA-binding protein with high affinity for the promoter regions of two autotrophic operons. The global HhcR and DhcR regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics were reconciled with available omics data in Metallosphaera and Thermoproteus spp. The identified regulons constitute two novel mechanisms for transcriptional control of autotrophic pathways in the Crenarchaeota. IMPORTANCE Little is known about transcriptional regulation of carbon dioxide fixation pathways in Archaea. We previously applied the comparative genomics approach for reconstruction of Dtx

  9. The transcription analysis of duck enteritis virus UL49.5 gene using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Gao, Xinghong; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-01

    Duck enteritis virus (DEV) UL49.5 encoding glycoprotein N was a conserved gene. The transcription dynamic process of UL49.5 homologous genes in herpesviruses was reported. However, the transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene has not yet been established. In this study, a real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) assay was established to test the transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene, and the recombinant plasmid pUCm-T/UL49.5 was constructed as the standard DNA. The samples prepared from DEV-infected (at different time points) and uninfected cell were detected and calculated. The results demonstrated that the real-time qRT-PCR assay was successfully established. The transcription product of DEV UL49.5 gene was first detected at 0.5 h post infection (p.i.), increased at 8 h p.i. and reached a peak at 60 h p.i. Our results illustrated that DEV UL49.5 gene could be regarded as a late gene. The transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene may provide a significant clue for further studies of DEV UL49.5 gene.

  10. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of cold-regulated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, C; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-07-29

    Chilling and freezing temperatures adversely affect the productivity and quality of crops. Hence improving the cold hardiness of crop plants is an important goal in agriculture, which demands a clear understanding of cold stress signal perception and transduction. Pharmacological and biochemical evidence shows that membrane rigidification followed by cytoskeleton rearrangement, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation are involved in cold stress signal transduction. Cold-responsive genes are regulated through C-repeat/dehydration-responsive elements (CRT/DRE) and abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element cis elements by transacting factors C-repeat binding factors/dehydration-responsive element binding proteins (CBFs/DREBs) and basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) (SGBF1), respectively. We have carried out a forward genetic analysis using chemically mutagenized Arabidopsis plants expressing cold-responsive RD29A promoter-driven luciferase to dissect cold signal transduction. We have isolated the fiery1 (fry1) mutant and cloned the FRY1 gene, which encodes an inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase. The fry1 plants showed enhanced induction of stress genes in response to cold, ABA, salt and dehydration due to higher accumulation of the second messenger, inositol (1,4,5)- triphosphate (IP(3)). Thus our study provides genetic evidence suggesting that cold signal is transduced through changes in IP(3) levels. We have also identified the hos1 mutation, which showed super induction of cold-responsive genes and their transcriptional activators. Molecular cloning and characterization revealed that HOS1 encodes a ring finger protein, which has been implicated as an E3 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. HOS1 is present in the cytoplasm at normal growth temperatures but accumulates in the nucleus upon cold stress. HOS1 appears to regulate temperature sensing by the cell as cold-responsive gene expression occurs in the hos1 mutant at relatively warm temperatures. Thus HOS1 is a

  12. appR gene product activates transcription of microcin C7 plasmid genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, L; Moreno, F; San Millán, J L

    1989-01-01

    Microcin C7 (MccC7) is encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid pMccC7. However, some strains of E. coli K-12 carrying this plasmid do not produce this antibiotic. Here we show that these strains differ in the gene locus appR. This chromosomal gene product controls MccC7 production by activating the transcription of some, but not all, MccC7 plasmid genes. PMID:2651423

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the bovine oxytocin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Telgmann, Ralph; Bathgate, Ross A D; Jaeger, Stefanie; Tillmann, Gina; Ivell, Richard

    2003-03-01

    The oxytocin receptor (OTR) is expressed in the cow uterus at high levels at estrus and at term of pregnancy. This expression appears to be controlled mostly at the transcriptional level and correlates with increasing estrogen concentration and progesterone withdrawal. Approximately 3200 base pairs of the upstream region of the bovine OTR gene were cloned and analyzed using a combination of bioinformatic, electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA), and transfection analyses. Using nuclear proteins from high- and low-expressing tissues, EMSA indicated no significant quantitative or qualitative changes in specific DNA-protein binding, suggesting that transcription is probably controlled by signalling systems targeting constitutive factors. Using various cell types, including primary and immortalized ruminant endometrial epithelial cells, as hosts for transfection of promoter-reporter constructs showed that endogenous activity resided only in the longest, i.e., 3.2-kb, construct but not in those shorter than 1.0 kb. While estrogen appears to be important in vivo, no effect of estradiol was found on any construct directly; only when the longest 3.2-kb construct was used in combination with some cotransfected steroid receptor cofactors, e.g., SRC1e, was an estradiol-dependent effect observed. A putative interferon-responsive element (IRE) was found at approximately -2,400 from the transcription start site. This element was shown to bind mouse IRF1 and IRF2 as well as similar proteins from bovine endometrial and myometrial nuclear extracts. This element also responded to these factors when cotransfected into various cell types. The bovine equivalents to IRF1 and IRF2 were molecularly cloned from endometrial tissue and shown to be expressed in a temporal fashion, supporting the role of interferon-tau in maternal recognition of pregnancy. Of many factors tested or analyzed, these components of the IFN system are the only ones found to significantly influence the transcription

  14. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  15. Current insights into the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic pre- and postconditioning using hypobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Rybnikova, Elena; Samoilov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of organisms to repetitive mild hypoxia results in development of brain hypoxic/ischemic tolerance and cross-tolerance to injurious factors of a psycho-emotional nature. Such preconditioning by mild hypobaric hypoxia functions as a “warning” signal which prepares an organism, and in particular the brain, to subsequent more harmful conditions. The endogenous defense processes which are mobilized by hypoxic preconditioning and result in development of brain tolerance are based on evolutionarily acquired gene-determined mechanisms of adaptation and neuroprotection. They involve an activation of intracellular cascades including kinases, transcription factors and changes in expression of multiple regulatory proteins in susceptible areas of the brain. On the other hand they lead to multilevel modifications of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal endocrine axis regulating various functions in the organism. All these components are engaged sequentially in the initiation, induction and expression of hypoxia-induced tolerance. A special role belongs to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, in particular of histone acetylation leading to changes in chromatin structure which ensure access of pro-adaptive transcription factors activated by preconditioning to the promoters of target genes. Mechanisms of another, relatively novel, neuroprotective phenomenon termed hypoxic postconditioning (an application of mild hypoxic episodes after severe insults) are still largely unknown but according to recent data they involve apoptosis-related proteins, hypoxia-inducible factor and neurotrophins. The fundamental data accumulated to date and discussed in this review open new avenues for elaboration of the effective therapeutic applications of hypoxic pre- and postconditioning. PMID:26557049

  16. Transcription of antifreeze protein genes in Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Qin, W; Doucet, D; Tyshenko, M G; Walker, V K

    2007-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are encoded by approximately 17 genes in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana. Northern analysis using 6 different cDNA probes showed isoform-specific patterns that varied during development. Transcripts for the majority of isoforms were most abundant in the second instar overwintering stage, but some were also detected in first instar and even in egg stages. In situ hybridization using riboprobes corresponding to two 9 kDa protein isoforms showed differential AFP expression even in second instars; CfAFP10 RNA was detected in all tissues, but CfAFP337 RNA distribution was more limited. Two genomic regions encoding three AFP genes have been isolated. Presumptive regulatory regions conferred transcriptional activity when placed upstream of a luciferase reporter sequence and transfected into a C. fumiferana cell line. The CfAFP2.26 core promoter is an 87 bp sequence containing a TATA box, whereas the CfAFP2.7 core promoter is a 76 bp sequence with both a TATA box and CAAT box, which directed higher reporter activities when tested in vitro. Reporter activity was not enhanced with five different hormones, although lower activities were observed with all intron-containing constructs. AFP message half-life, as assessed using reporter assays, was not appreciably influenced by isoform-specific-3'UTRs. These studies successfully demonstrate the temporal and spatial diversity of AFP expression encoded by this small gene family, and underscore the complexity of their regulation.

  17. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of the CTNS gene.

    PubMed

    Corallini, Serena; Taranta, Anna; Bellomo, Francesco; Palma, Alessia; Pastore, Anna; Emma, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    Cell cysteine (Cys) levels and/or the [Cys/CySS] redox potential have been shown to regulate mRNA levels of the CTNS gene, which encodes for a lysosomal cystine (CySS) carrier that is defective in cystinosis. To investigate the mechanisms involved CTNS mRNA regulation, different portions of the CTNS promotor were cloned into a luciferase vector and transfected in HK2 cells. A 1.5-2.4-fold increase in luciferase activity was observed when cells were incubated in culture medium containing low CySS concentrations. Conversely, CTNS mRNA levels decreased by 47-56% in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Chase experiments with actinomycin D (ActD) demonstrated a 3-fold stabilization of the CTNS mRNA when cells were cultured in low CySS medium for 48 h. Treatment of control cells with cyclohexamide (CHX) increased CTNS mRNA levels, suggesting that CHX blocked the synthesis of proteins involved in mRNA degradation or in repression of the CTNS gene. Finally, in vitro binding assays showed increased binding (30-110%) of the Sp-1 transcription factor to two regions of the CTNS promotor when cells were incubated in low CySS medium. These results indicate that the CTNS gene is actively regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and suggest that CTNS plays a pivotal role in regulating cell thiol concentrations.

  18. Characterization of transcript processing of the gene encoding precerebellin-1.

    PubMed

    Kavety, B; Morgan, J I

    1998-12-10

    Precerebellin-1 (Cbln1) is a cerebellum-specific protein that shares significant sequence identity with the globular domains of the complement components C1qA, B and C, suggesting some common aspects of function and/or structure. As the C1q complex is composed of heterotrimers of C1qA, B and C it was hypothesized that multiple precerebellins may exist in a ternary complex. Northern blotting for cbln1 revealed multiple bands that could represent further family members or alternatively spliced variants. To discriminate these alternatives, probes derived from different regions of the cbln1 gene were used to identify and clone the transcripts detected on Northern blots. Four independent transcripts were repeatedly cloned from an adult mouse cerebellum cDNA library. Upon sequencing, all of these clones were found to be derived from the cbln1 gene and no additional precerebellin-related genes were isolated. Moreover, these clones accounted for the four cbln1-hybridizing bands (1.9, 2. 2, 3.2 and 5.5 kb) detected on Northern blots of adult cerebellum RNA. With one possible exception, these clones were all derived through alterations in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of cbln1 that did not affect the coding sequence. This was achieved by the use of two polyadenylation sites and alternative (non-canonical) splicing in the 3'-UTR. Some additional variation in mRNA structure is provided by the use of alternative transcription start sites in cbln1. The possible significance of this level of diversity in the 3'-UTR is discussed.

  19. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  20. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-07

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare.

  1. Structure and transcription of the actin gene of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Amar, M.F.; Pays, A.; Tebabi, P.; Dero, B.; Seebeck, T.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E.

    1988-05-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the actin gene is present in a cluster of two, three, or four tandemly linked copies, depending on the strain. Each cluster seems to exist in two allelic versions, as suggested by the polymorphism of both gene number and restriction fragment length in the DNA from cloned trypanosomes. The amplification of the gene copy number probably occurs through unequal sister chromatic exchange. The chromosomes harboring the actin genes belong to the large size class. The coding sequence was 1,128 nucleotides long and showed 60 to 70% homology to other eucaryotic actin genes. Surprisingly, this homology seemed weaker with Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma mega, or Leishmania acting-specific sequences. The mRNA was around 1.6 kilobases long and was synthesized at the same level in bloodstream and procyclic forms of the parasite. Large RNA precursors, up to 7.7 kilobases, were found in a pattern identical in strains containing either two or three gene copies. Probing of the flanking regions of the gene with either steady-state or in vitro transcripts, as well as S1 nuclease protection and primer extension experiments, allowed mapping of the 3' splice site of the actin mRNA, 38 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. A variably sized poly(dT) tract was found about 30 base pairs ahead of the splice site. The largest detected actin mRNA precursor seemed to give rise to at least two additional stable mRNAs. The RNA polymerase transcribing the actin gene exhibited the same sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin as that transcribing both the spliced leader and the bulk of polyadenylated mRNAs.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes and its effect on neural functions: transcriptional regulation of neuropeptide Y gene by leptin and its effect on feeding.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2005-07-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived secretory hormone that suppresses appetite by inhibition of neuropepeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in arcuate nucleus (ARC) in the hypothalamus. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of NPY gene by leptin, we carried out a luciferase assay using NPY gene promotor plasmid (NPY-luc) in NPY expressing cells such as N18TG2, NG108-15, and PC12 cells. In these cells, the NPY gene was transactivated by leptin through activation of leptin receptor. Leptin-induced transactivation was mediated through the 221-bp region of the NPY gene promotor, which possesses two putative STAT3 binding sites. To investigate the mechanism of in vivo suppression of NPY gene transcription in ARC by leptin, the effect of SOCS members on the leptin-induced transactivation of NPY gene was studied. In vivo SOCS2 and SOCS3 mRNAs were induced in mouse hypothalamus by leptin. Although leptin (125 ng/ml) induced significant increase in NPY gene transcriptional activity in mock-transfected cells, the leptin-induced NPY gene transcriptional activity was completely abolished in SOCS3-transfected cells. SOCS3 also suppressed the basal NPY gene transcription. These finding suggested that leptin inhibits NPY gene transcription in the hypothalamus in vivo and SOCS3 is a negative regulator of the NPY gene.

  3. Gene Transcript Abundance Profiles Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Watson, Virginia E.; Shimizu, Chisato; Kanegaye, John T.; Burns, Jane C.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute Kawasaki disease (KD) is difficult to distinguish from other illnesses that involve acute rash or fever, in part because the etiologic agent(s) and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. As a result, diagnosis and critical therapies may be delayed. Methods We used DNA microarrays to identify possible diagnostic features of KD. We compared gene expression patterns in the blood of 23 children with acute KD and 18 age-matched febrile children with 3 illnesses that resemble KD. Results Genes associated with platelet and neutrophil activation were expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in patients with acute adenovirus infections or systemic adverse drug reactions, but levels in patients with KD were not higher than those in patients with scarlet fever. Genes associated with B cell activation were also expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in control subjects. A striking absence of interferon-stimulated gene expression in patients with KD was confirmed in an independent cohort of patients with KD. Using a set of 38 gene transcripts, we successfully predicted the diagnosis for 21 of 23 patients with KD and 7 of 8 patients with adenovirus infection. Conclusions These findings provide insight into the molecular features that distinguish KD from other febrile illnesses and support the feasibility of developing novel diagnostic reagents for KD based on the host response. PMID:19583510

  4. Unsaturated fatty acids-dependent linkage between respiration and fermentation revealed by deletion of hypoxic regulatory KlMGA2 gene in the facultative anaerobe-respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ottaviano, Daniela; Montanari, Arianna; De Angelis, Lorenzo; Santomartino, Rosa; Visca, Andrea; Brambilla, Luca; Rinaldi, Teresa; Bello, Cristiano; Reverberi, Massimo; Bianchi, Michele M

    2015-08-01

    In the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the inactivation of structural or regulatory glycolytic and fermentative genes generates obligate respiratory mutants which can be characterized by sensitivity to the mitochondrial drug antimycin A on glucose medium (Rag(-) phenotype). Rag(-) mutations can occasionally be generated by the inactivation of genes not evidently related to glycolysis or fermentation. One such gene is the hypoxic regulatory gene KlMGA2. In this work, we report a study of the many defects, in addition to the Rag(-) phenotype, generated by KlMGA2 deletion. We analyzed the fermentative and respiratory metabolism, mitochondrial functioning and morphology in the Klmga2Δ strain. We also examined alterations in the regulation of the expression of lipid biosynthetic genes, in particular fatty acids, ergosterol and cardiolipin, under hypoxic and cold stress and the phenotypic suppression by unsaturated fatty acids of the deleted strain. Results indicate that, despite the fact that the deleted mutant strain had a typical glycolytic/fermentative phenotype and KlMGA2 is a hypoxic regulatory gene, the deletion of this gene generated defects linked to mitochondrial functions suggesting new roles of this protein in the general regulation and cellular fitness of K. lactis. Supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids suppressed or modified these defects suggesting that KlMga2 modulates membrane functioning or membrane-associated functions, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial.

  5. 7SK small nuclear RNA, a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA with gene-specific features.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Sylvain; Studniarek, Cécilia; Kiss, Tamás

    2017-08-18

    The 7SK small nuclear RNA is a multifunctional transcriptional regulatory RNA that controls the nuclear activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), specifically targets P-TEFb to the promoter regions of selected protein-coding genes and promotes transcription of RNA polymerase II-specific spliceosomal small nuclear RNA genes.

  6. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella . E-mail: stella@szn.it

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca{sup 2+} interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  7. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca(2+) interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypoxic injury to the murine placenta.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Tracy M; Garbow, Joel R; Anderson, Jeff R; Engelbach, John A; Nelson, D Michael; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define placental hypoxic injury associated with fetal growth restriction. On embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) we utilized dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI on a 4.7-tesla small animal scanner to examine the uptake and distribution of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Quantitative DCE parameter analysis was performed for the placenta and fetal kidneys of three groups of pregnant C57BL/6 mice: 1) mice that were exposed to Fi(O(2)) = 12% between E15.5 and E18.5, 2) mice in normoxia with food restriction similar to the intake of hypoxic mice between E15.5 and E18.5, and 3) mice in normoxia that were fed ad libitum. After imaging, we assessed fetoplacental weight, placental histology, and gene expression. We found that dams exposed to hypoxia exhibited fetal growth restriction (weight reduction by 28% and 14%, respectively, P < 0.05) with an increased placental-to-fetal ratio. By using MRI-based assessment of placental contrast agent kinetics, referenced to maternal paraspinous muscle, we found decreased placental clearance of contrast media in hypoxic mice, compared with either control group (61%, P < 0.05). This was accompanied by diminished contrast accumulation in the hypoxic fetal kidneys (23%, P < 0.05), reflecting reduced transplacental gadolinium transport. These changes were associated with increased expression of placental Phlda2 and Gcm1 transcripts. Exposure to hypoxia near the end of mouse pregnancy reduces placental perfusion and clearance of contrast. MRI-based DCE imaging provides a novel tool for dynamic, in vivo assessment of placental function.

  9. Ribosome profiling reveals translational regulation of mammalian cells in response to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwen; Yang, Jiaqi; Dai, Aimei; Wang, Yuming; Li, Wei; Xie, Zhi

    2017-08-21

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells transfer oxygen and nutrients from choroid to the neural retina. Reduced oxygen to RPE perturbs development and functions of blood vessels in retina. Previous efforts of genome-wide studies have been largely focused on transcriptional changes of cells in response to hypoxia. Recently developed ribosome profiling provides an opportunity to study genome-wide translational changes. To gain systemic insights into the transcriptional and translational regulation of cellular in response to hypoxic stress, we used simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling on an RPE cells line, ARPE-19, under hypoxia condition. Both HIF-1α and EPAS1 (HIF-2α) proteins were stabilized in ARPE-19 under hypoxic stress treatment at 1 h, 2 h and 4 h. Analysis of simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling data showed genome-wide gene expression changes at both transcriptional and translational levels. Comparative analysis of ribosome profiling and RNA-seq data revealed that hypoxia induced changes of more genes at the translational than the transcriptional levels. Ribosomes densities at 5' untranslated region (UTR) significantly increased under hypoxic stress. Interestingly, the increase in ribosome densities at 5' UTR is positively correlated with the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5' UTR of mRNAs. Our results characterized translational profiles of mRNAs for a RPE cell line in response to hypoxia. In particular, uORFs play important roles in the regulation of translation efficiency by affecting ribosomes loading onto mRNAs. This study provides the first attempt to understand translational response of mammalian cells under hypoxic condition.

  10. Preferential associations between co-regulated genes reveal a transcriptional interactome in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Sexton, Tom; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Cope, Nathan F; Horton, Alice; Andrews, Simon; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Umlauf, David; Dimitrova, Daniela S; Eskiw, Christopher H; Luo, Yanquan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Bieker, James J; Fraser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of interchromosomal interactions in higher eukaryotes points to a functional interplay between genome architecture and gene expression, challenging the view of transcription as a one-dimensional process. However, the extent of interchromosomal interactions and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we present the first genome-wide analysis of transcriptional interactions using the mouse globin genes in erythroid tissues. Our results show that the active globin genes associate with hundreds of other transcribed genes, revealing extensive and preferential intra- and interchromosomal transcription interactomes. We show that the transcription factor Klf1 mediates preferential co-associations of Klf1-regulated genes at a limited number of specialized transcription factories. Our results establish a new gene expression paradigm, implying that active co-regulated genes and their regulatory factors cooperate to create specialized nuclear hot spots optimized for efficient and coordinated transcriptional control.

  11. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, V; Maa, M C; Harless, M L; Wright, D A; Kellems, R E

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that a transcription arrest site near the 5' end of the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene is significantly involved in the regulation of ADA gene expression. To facilitate the analysis of this transcription arrest site, we have analyzed the transcription products from cloned ADA gene fragments injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. When genomic fragments spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene were injected into oocytes, a 96-nucleotide (nt) ADA RNA was the major transcription product. The 5' end of this RNA mapped to the transcription initiation site for the ADA gene, and its 3' terminus mapped 7 nt downstream of the translation initiation codon within exon 1. A 300-base-pair fragment of genomic DNA spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene was sufficient to generate the 96-nt transcript which accounted for approximately one-half of the transcription products from injected templates. Deletion of a segment of approximately 65 base pairs, located immediately downstream of the 3' terminus of the 96-nt transcript, resulted in a substantial reduction in the synthesis of the 96-nt transcript and a corresponding increase in the production of larger transcripts. These studies show that the transcriptional apparatus of X. laevis oocytes responds to the transcription arrest site associated with exon 1 of the murine ADA gene and that oocyte injections provide a convenient functional assay for additional mechanistic studies. Images PMID:1690842

  12. Genome wide analysis of human genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated by the HTLV-I protein p30

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John M; Ghorbel, Sofiane; Nicot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus that is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive and fatal lymphoproliferative disease. The viral transactivator, Tax, is thought to play an important role during the initial stages of CD4+ T-cell immortalization by HTLV-1. Tax has been shown to activate transcription through CREB/ATF and NF-KB, and to alter numerous signaling pathways. These pleiotropic effects of Tax modify the expression of a wide array of cellular genes. Another viral protein encoded by HTLV-I, p30, has been shown to affect virus replication at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Little is currently known regarding the effect of p30 on the expression and nuclear export of cellular host mRNA transcripts. Identification of these RNA may reveal new targets and increase our understanding of HTLV-I pathogenesis. In this study, using primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we report a genome wide analysis of human genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated by the HTLV-I protein p30. Results Using microarray analysis, we analyzed total and cytoplasmic cellular mRNA transcript levels isolated from PBMCs to assess the effect of p30 on cellular RNA transcript expression and their nuclear export. We report p30-dependent transcription resulting in the 2.5 fold up-regulation of 15 genes and the down-regulation of 65 human genes. We further tested nuclear export of cellular mRNA and found that p30 expression also resulted in a 2.5 fold post-transcriptional down-regulation of 90 genes and the up-regulation of 33 genes. Conclusion Overall, our study describes that expression of the HTLV-I protein p30 both positively and negatively alters the expression of cellular transcripts. Our study identifies for the first time the cellular genes for which nuclear export is affected by p30. These results suggest that p30 may possess a more global function with respect to m

  13. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  14. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  15. Computational identification of transcriptionally co-regulated genes, validation with the four ANT isoform genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The analysis of gene promoters is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation required under the effects of physiological processes, nutritional intake or pathologies. In higher eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation implies the recruitment of a set of regulatory proteins that bind on combinations of nucleotide motifs. We developed a computational analysis of promoter nucleotide sequences, to identify co-regulated genes by combining several programs that allowed us to build regulatory models and perform a crossed analysis on several databases. This strategy was tested on a set of four human genes encoding isoforms 1 to 4 of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier ANT. Each isoform has a specific tissue expression profile linked to its role in cellular bioenergetics. Results From their promoter sequence and from the phylogenetic evolution of these ANT genes in mammals, we constructed combinations of specific regulatory elements. These models were screened using the full human genome and databases of promoter sequences from human and several other mammalian species. For each of transcriptionally regulated ANT1, 2 and 4 genes, a set of co-regulated genes was identified and their over-expression was verified in microarray databases. Conclusions Most of the identified genes encode proteins with a cellular function and specificity in agreement with those of the corresponding ANT isoform. Our in silico study shows that the tissue specific gene expression is mainly driven by promoter regulatory sequences located up to about a thousand base pairs upstream the transcription start site. Moreover, this computational strategy on the study of regulatory pathways should provide, along with transcriptomics and metabolomics, data to construct cellular metabolic networks. PMID:22978616

  16. Kinetics of transcription of infectious laryngotracheitis virus genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of expression of only a few genes of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) have been determined, using northern blot analysis. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR to examine the kinetics of expression of 74 ILTV genes in LMH cells. ICP4 was the only gene fully expressed in the presence of cycloheximide, and thus classified as immediate-early. The genes most highly expressed early in infection, and thus classified as early, included UL1 (gL), UL2, UL3, UL4, UL5, UL6, UL7, UL8, UL13, UL14, UL19, UL20, UL23 (TK), UL25, UL28, UL29, UL31, UL33, UL34, UL38, UL39, UL40, UL42, UL43, UL44 (gC), UL47, UL48 (α-TIF), UL49, UL54 (ICP27), US3 and US10. ORF A, ORF B, ORF C, ORF E, sORF 4/3, UL[-1], UL0, UL3.5, UL9, UL10 (gM), UL11, UL15a, UL15b, UL18, UL22 (gH), UL24, UL26, UL30, UL32, UL36, UL45, UL49.5 (gN), UL52, US2, US4 (gG), US5 (gJ) and US9 were most highly expressed late in infection and were thus considered late genes. Several genes, including ORF D, UL12, UL17, UL21, UL27 (gB), UL35, UL37, UL41, UL46, UL50, UL51, UL53 (gK), US8 (gE), US6 (gD) and US7 (gI), had features of both early and late genes and were classified as early/late. Our findings suggest transcription from most of ILTV genes is leaky or subject to more complex patterns of regulation than those classically described for herpesviruses. This is the first study examining global expression of ILTV genes and the data provide a basis for future investigations of the pathogenesis of infection with ILTV.

  17. Identification of differentially expressed microRNAs and their PKC-isoform specific gene network prediction during hypoxic pre-conditioning and focal cerebral ischemia of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiying; Peng, Zhifeng; Zhang, Nan; Yu, Li; Han, Song; Li, Dongguo; Li, Junfa

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported the involvement of conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) βII, γ, novel PKC (nPKC) ε and their interacting proteins in hypoxic pre-conditioning (HPC)-induced neuroprotection. In this study, the large-scale miRNA microarrays and bioinformatics analysis were used to determine the differentially expressed miRNAs and their PKC-isoform specific gene network in mouse brain after HPC and 6 h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We found 4 up-regulated and 13 down-regulated miRNAs in the cortex of HPC mice, 26 increased and 39 decreased gene expressions of miRNAs in the peri-infarct region of 6 h MCAO mice, and 11 up-regulated and 22 down-regulated miRNAs in the peri-infarct region of HPC and 6 h MCAO mice. Based on Diff Score, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in HPC and 6 h MCAO mouse brain. Then the miRNA-gene-network of 19 specified miRNAs target genes of cPKCβII, γ and nPKCε-interacting protein was predicted by using bioinformatics analysis of genome databases. Furthermore, the down-regulated miR-615-3p during HPC had a detrimental effect on the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced N2A cell injury. These results suggested that the identified 19 miRNAs, notably miR-615-3p, might target these genes of cPKCβII, γ and nPKCε-interacting proteins involved in HPC-induced neuroprotection. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  19. Forkhead Transcription Factor 3a (FOXO3a) Modulates Hypoxia Signaling via Up-regulation of the von Hippel-Lindau Gene (VHL).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Cai, Xiaolian; Hu, Bo; Mei, Zhichao; Zhang, Dawei; Ouyang, Gang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Wuhan

    2016-12-02

    FOXO3a, a member of the forkhead homeobox type O (FOXO) family of transcriptional factors, regulates cell survival in response to DNA damage, caloric restriction, and oxidative stress. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene encodes a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates hypoxia-inducible factor α degradation under aerobic conditions, thus acting as one of the key regulators of hypoxia signaling. However, whether FOXO3a impacts cellular hypoxia stress remains unknown. Here we show that FOXO3a directly binds to the VHL promoter and up-regulates VHL expression. Using a zebrafish model, we confirmed the up-regulation of vhl by foxo3b, an ortholog of mammalian FOXO3a Furthermore, by employing the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we deleted foxo3b in zebrafish and determined that expression of hypoxia-inducible genes was affected under hypoxia. Moreover, foxo3b-null zebrafish exhibited impaired acute hypoxic tolerance, resulting in death. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, by modulating hypoxia-inducible factor activity via up-regulation of VHL, FOXO3a (foxo3b) plays an important role in survival in response to hypoxic stress.

  20. Structure and transcription of the Drosophila mulleri alcohol dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J A; Maniatis, T

    1985-10-11

    The D. melanogaster Adh gene is transcribed from two different promoters; a proximal (larval) promoter is active during late embryonic and larval stages, and a distal (adult) promoter is active primarily in third instar larvae and in adult flies (1). Genetic analyses suggest that several species of the mulleri subgroup (distant relatives of D. melanogaster) have two closely-linked Adh genes, Adh-1 and Adh-2, each of which expresses a different ADH protein (2). The temporal pattern of expression of Adh-1 and Adh-2 is similar to the expression of D. melanogaster Adh from the proximal and distal promoters (2,3,4). We are interested in the molecular basis for the pattern of Adh expression in the mulleri subgroup species and in the mechanism of the switch in Adh promoter utilization. For these reasons, we have studied the structure and transcription of the Adh locus of D. mulleri, a species of the mulleri subgroup. We show that the ADH-1 and ADH-2 proteins are expressed from two distinct genes separated by 2 kilobase pairs, and that Adh-1 and Adh-2 are transcribed in the expected temporal pattern. In addition, we find a pseudogene 1.2 kb upstream from Adh-2, which is transcribed in a temporal pattern similar to Adh-2.

  1. Transcriptional Targeting in the Airway Using Novel Gene Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Burnight, Erin R.; Wang, Guoshun; McCray, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to airway epithelia is a goal of many gene therapy strategies to treat cystic fibrosis. Because the native regulatory elements of the CFTR are not well characterized, the development of vectors with heterologous promoters of varying strengths and specificity would aid in our selection of optimal reagents for the appropriate expression of the vector-delivered CFTR gene. Here we contrasted the performance of several novel gene-regulatory elements. Based on airway expression analysis, we selected putative regulatory elements from BPIFA1 and WDR65 to investigate. In addition, we selected a human CFTR promoter region (∼ 2 kb upstream of the human CFTR transcription start site) to study. Using feline immunodeficiency virus vectors containing the candidate elements driving firefly luciferase, we transduced murine nasal epithelia in vivo. Luciferase expression persisted for 30 weeks, which was the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, when the nasal epithelium was ablated using the detergent polidocanol, the mice showed a transient loss of luciferase expression that returned 2 weeks after administration, suggesting that our vectors transduced a progenitor cell population. Importantly, the hWDR65 element drove sufficient CFTR expression to correct the anion transport defect in CFTR-null epithelia. These results will guide the development of optimal vectors for sufficient, sustained CFTR expression in airway epithelia. PMID:22447971

  2. Modulation of Aanat gene transcription in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony K; Chik, Constance L

    2010-01-01

    The main function of the rat pineal gland is to transform the circadian rhythm generated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus into a rhythmic signal of circulating melatonin characterized by a large nocturnal increase that closely reflects the duration of night period. This is achieved through the tight coupling between environmental lighting and the expression of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase, the rhythm-controlling enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The initiation of Aanat transcription at night is controlled largely by the norepinephrine-stimulated phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein by protein kinase A. However, to accurately reflect the duration of darkness, additional signaling mechanisms also participate to fine-tune the temporal profile of adrenergic-induced Aanat transcription. Here, we reviewed some of these signaling mechanisms, with emphasis on the more recent findings. These signaling mechanisms can be divided into two groups: those involving modification of constitutively expressed proteins and those requiring synthesis of new proteins. This review highlights the pineal gland as an excellent model system for studying neurotransmitter-regulated rhythmic gene expression.

  3. Nuclear actin-binding proteins as modulators of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Gettemans, Jan; Van Impe, Katrien; Delanote, Veerle; Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joël; De Corte, Veerle

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic transformations in the organization of the cellular microfilament system are the driving force behind fundamental biological processes such as cellular motility, cytokinesis, wound healing and secretion. Eukaryotic cells express a plethora of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allowing cells to control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. These structural proteins were, not surprisingly, originally described as (major) constituents of the cytoplasm. However, in recent years, there has been a steady flow of reports detailing not only translocation of ABPs into and out of the nucleus but also describing their role in the nuclear compartment. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to nucleocytoplasmic transport of ABPs, including their mode of translocation and nuclear function. In particular, evidence that structurally and functionally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs regulate transcription activation by various nuclear (steroid hormone) receptors is steadily accruing. Furthermore, the recent finding that actin is a necessary component of the RNA polymerase II-containing preinitiation complex opens up new opportunities for nuclear ABPs in gene transcription regulation.

  4. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  5. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  7. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  8. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  9. 5' sequences are important positive and negative determinants of the longevity of Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, M L; Klein, U; Bogorad, L

    1993-01-01

    We have found that sequences in the 5' leader of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast rbcL gene, when fused 5' to foreign genes, destabilize transcripts of these chimeric genes in the chloroplast of transgenic Chlamydomonas but that 5' sequences of the rbcL structural gene prevent this destabilization. Transcripts of the chloroplast rbcL gene are about equally abundant at all times in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growing on an alternating 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. However, Chlamydomonas chloroplast transformants, harboring chimeric genes containing the same rbcL promoter with 63 or 92 bp of the rbcL 5' leader sequence fused upstream of the Escherichia coli uidA (beta-glucuronidase, GUS) gene, accumulated GUS transcripts only in the dark. Transcripts disappeared rapidly upon illumination of the cells. The same phenomenon was exhibited by transcripts of chimeric genes in which the GUS gene coding sequence was replaced by other unrelated genes. The precipitous light-induced drop in GUS transcript abundance was found to be due to an approximately 16-fold increase in the rate of degradation of GUS transcripts in light rather than to a decrease in the rate of transcription of the GUS gene. Transcripts of a chimeric rbcL-GUS construct in which the leader sequence of the rbcL gene was replaced by 103 bp of the leader sequence of the atpB gene were stable in illuminated cells. The destabilizing effect of the rbcL 5' leader sequence was reversed by adding 257 bp of the 5' coding region of the rbcL gene. The results show that chloroplast transcript levels in illuminated Chlamydomonas cells--and perhaps in other cases--can be determined, at least to some extent, by sequences and interactions of sequences transcribed from the 5' ends of genes. Images PMID:8434017

  10. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context.

  11. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  12. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  13. Identification of candidate downstream genes for the homeodomain transcription factor Labial in Drosophila through oligonucleotide-array transcript imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Ronny; Loop, Thomas; Egger, Boris; He, Haiqiong; Kammermeier, Lars; Hartmann, Beate; Certa, Ullrich; Reichert, Heinrich; Hirth, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Background: Homeotic genes are key developmental regulators that are highly conserved throughout evolution. Their encoded homeoproteins function as transcription factors to control a wide range of developmental processes. Although much is known about homeodomain-DNA interactions, only a small number of genes acting downstream of homeoproteins have been identified. Here we use a functional genomic approach to identify candidate target genes of the Drosophila homeodomain transcription factor Labial. Results: High-density oligonucleotide arrays with probe sets representing 1,513 identified and sequenced genes were used to analyze differential gene expression following labial overexpression in Drosophila embryos. We find significant expression level changes for 96 genes belonging to all functional classes represented on the array. In accordance with our experimental procedure, we expect that these genes are either direct or indirect targets of labial gene action. Among these genes, 48 were upregulated and 48 were downregulated following labial overexpression. This corresponds to 6.3% of the genes represented on the array. For a selection of these genes, we show that the data obtained with the oligonucleotide arrays are consistent with data obtained using quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions: Our results identify a number of novel candidate downstream target genes for Labial, suggesting that this homeoprotein differentially regulates a limited and distinct set of embryonically expressed Drosophila genes. PMID:11387036

  14. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  15. Parental origin of transcription from the human GNAS1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R; Gosden, C M; Bonthron, D T

    1994-01-01

    Variation in the phenotypic expression of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) determined by the parent of transmission, suggests that the human Gs alpha gene (GNAS1), in which mutations occur in AHO, may be under imprinted control. GNAS1 is also known to map to a chromosomal region (20q13.11) showing syntenic homology with the imprinted mouse region 2E1-2H3. To establish if GNAS1 is indeed imprinted, we have examined the parental origin of GNAS1 transcription in human fetal tissues. Of 75 fetuses genotyped, at gestational ages ranging from 6 to 13 weeks, 13 heterozygous for a FokI polymorphism in exon 5 of GNAS1 were identified whose mothers were homozygous for one or other allele. RNA from up to 10 different tissues from each fetus was analysed by RT-PCR. In all cases expression from both parental alleles was shown by FokI digestion of RT-PCR products and quantification of the resulting fragments. No tissue specific pattern of expression was discerned in these experiments. If genomic imprinting regulates the expression of the human GNAS1 gene, our data suggest that the effect must either be subtle and quantitative, or be confined to a small subset of specialised hormone responsive cells within the target tissues. Images PMID:7815417

  16. Parental origin of transcription from the human GNAS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R; Gosden, C M; Bonthron, D T

    1994-08-01

    Variation in the phenotypic expression of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) determined by the parent of transmission, suggests that the human Gs alpha gene (GNAS1), in which mutations occur in AHO, may be under imprinted control. GNAS1 is also known to map to a chromosomal region (20q13.11) showing syntenic homology with the imprinted mouse region 2E1-2H3. To establish if GNAS1 is indeed imprinted, we have examined the parental origin of GNAS1 transcription in human fetal tissues. Of 75 fetuses genotyped, at gestational ages ranging from 6 to 13 weeks, 13 heterozygous for a FokI polymorphism in exon 5 of GNAS1 were identified whose mothers were homozygous for one or other allele. RNA from up to 10 different tissues from each fetus was analysed by RT-PCR. In all cases expression from both parental alleles was shown by FokI digestion of RT-PCR products and quantification of the resulting fragments. No tissue specific pattern of expression was discerned in these experiments. If genomic imprinting regulates the expression of the human GNAS1 gene, our data suggest that the effect must either be subtle and quantitative, or be confined to a small subset of specialised hormone responsive cells within the target tissues.

  17. Expression of a Mutant kcnj2 Gene Transcript in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ivone U. S.; Skinner, Jonathan R.; Shelling, Andrew N.; Love, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Long QT 7 syndrome (LQT7, also known as Andersen-Tawil syndrome) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder that causes cardiac arrhythmias, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. Mutations in the human KCNJ2 gene, which encodes for the subunit of the potassium inwardly-rectifying channel (IK1), have been associated with the disorder. The majority of mutations are considered to be dominant-negative as mutant proteins interact to limit the function of wild type KCNJ2 proteins. Several LQT7 syndrome mouse models have been created that vary in the physiological similarity to the human disease. To complement the LQT7 mouse models, we investigated the usefulness of the zebrafish as an alternative model via a transient approach. Initial bioinformatic analysis identified the zebrafish orthologue of the human KCNJ2 gene, together with a spatial expression profile that was similar to that of human. The expression of a kcnj2-12 transcript carrying an in-frame deletion of critical amino acids identified in human studies resulted in embryos that exhibited defects in muscle development, thereby affecting movement, a decrease in jaw size, pupil-pupil distance, and signs of scoliosis. These defects correspond to some phenotypes expressed by human LQT7 patients. PMID:27335675

  18. Identification, Phylogeny, and Transcript of Chitinase Family Genes in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function. PMID:26035173

  19. Comprehensive analysis of the transcription of starch synthesis genes and the transcription factor RSR1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guo-Zhang; Xu, Wei; Liu, Guo-Qin; Peng, Xiao-Qi; Guo, Tian-Cai

    2013-02-01

    The cDNA sequences of 26 starch synthesis genes were identified in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and their transcript levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR to assess the function of individual genes and the regulatory mechanism in wheat endosperm. The expression patterns of 26 genes in wheat endosperm were classified into three groups. The genes in group 1 were richly expressed in the early stage of grain development and may be involved in the construction of fundamental cell machinery, synthesis of glucan primers, and initiation of starch granules. The genes in group 2 were highly expressed during the middle and late stages of grain development, and their expression profiles were similar to the accumulation rate of endosperm starch; these genes are presumed to play a crucial role in starch production. The genes in group 3 were scantily expressed throughout the grain development period and might be associated with transitory starch synthesis. Transcripts of the negative transcription factor TaRSR1 were high at the early and late stages of grain development but low during the middle stage. The expression pattern of TaRSR1 was almost opposite to those of the group 2 starch synthesis genes, indicating that TaRSR1 might negatively regulate the expression of many endosperm starch synthesis genes during grain development.

  20. Accurate Gene Expression-Based Biodosimetry Using a Minimal Set of Human Gene Transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, James D.; Joiner, Michael C.; Thomas, Robert A.; Grever, William E.; Bakhmutsky, Marina V.; Chinkhota, Chantelle N.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Divine, George W.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Rapid and reliable methods for conducting biological dosimetry are a necessity in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Conventional biodosimetry methods lack the speed, portability, ease of use, and low cost required for triaging numerous victims. Here we address this need by showing that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a small number of gene transcripts can provide accurate and rapid dosimetry. The low cost and relative ease of PCR compared with existing dosimetry methods suggest that this approach may be useful in mass-casualty triage situations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood from 60 adult donors was acutely exposed to cobalt-60 gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. mRNA expression levels of 121 selected genes were obtained 0.5, 1, and 2 days after exposure by reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. Optimal dosimetry at each time point was obtained by stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels. Results: Only 3 to 4 different gene transcripts, ASTN2, CDKN1A, GDF15, and ATM, are needed to explain ≥0.87 of the variance (R{sup 2}). Receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of 0.98 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. Conclusions: The actual and predicted radiation doses agree very closely up to 6 Gy. Dosimetry at 8 and 10 Gy shows some effect of saturation, thereby slightly diminishing the ability to quantify higher exposures. Analyses of these gene transcripts may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations or in clinical radiation emergencies.

  1. NDRG1 deficiency attenuates fetal growth and the intrauterine response to hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Jacob; Chen, Baosheng; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Mishima, Takuya; Kokame, Koichi; Barak, Yaacov; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2014-03-01

    Intrauterine mammalian development depends on the preservation of placental function. The expression of the protein N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is increased in placentas of human pregnancies affected by fetal growth restriction and in hypoxic primary human trophoblasts, where NDRG1 attenuates cell injury. We sought to assess the function of placental NDRG1 in vivo and tested the hypothesis that NDRG1 deficiency in the mouse embryo impairs placental function and consequently intrauterine growth. We found that Ndrg1 knock-out embryos were growth restricted in comparison to wild-type or heterozygous counterparts. Furthermore, hypoxia reduced the survival of female, but not male, knock-out embryos. Ndrg1 deletion caused significant alterations in placental gene expression, with a marked reduction in transcription of several lipoproteins in the placental labyrinth. These transcriptional changes were associated with reduced fetal:maternal serum cholesterol ratio exclusively in hypoxic female embryos. Collectively, our findings indicate that NDRG1 promotes fetal growth and regulates the metabolic response to intrauterine hypoxic injury in a sexually dichotomous manner.

  2. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  3. Induction of AhR-mediated gene transcription by coffee.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health.

  4. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  5. Hypoxic preconditioning decreases nuclear factor κB activity via Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ren; Liu, Qian; Khoury, Joseph; Li, Yue-Jin; Han, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jing; Ibla, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB is a key mediator of inflammation during conditions of hypoxia. Here, we used models of hypoxic pre-conditioning as mechanism to decrease nuclear factor κB activity induced by hypoxia. Our initial studies suggested that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 may be induced by hypoxic pre-conditioning and possibly involved in the regulation of nuclear factor κB. In this study we used Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 exogenous over-expression and knock-down to determine its effect on ataxia telangiectasia mutated--nuclear factor κB activation cascade. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic pre-conditioning significantly increased the expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 at mRNA and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 significantly attenuated the hypoxia-mediated ataxia telangiectasia mutated phosphorylation and prevented its cytoplasm translocation where it functions to activate nuclear factor κB. We further determined that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 activated the protein phosphatase 2A, preventing the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated serine-1981, the main regulatory site of ataxia telangiectasia mutated activity. Cellular levels of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 protein significantly decreased nuclear factor κB activation profiles and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxic pre-conditioning decreases the activation of nuclear factor κB through the transcriptional induction of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

  6. Metabolic and hypoxic adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy: a target for induced essentiality

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has increased the progression-free survival of many cancer patients but has had little effect on overall survival, even in colon cancer (average 6–8 weeks) due to resistance. The current licensed targeted therapies all inhibit VEGF signalling (Table1). Many mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy have been identified that enable cancers to bypass the angiogenic blockade. In addition, over the last decade, there has been increasing evidence for the role that the hypoxic and metabolic responses play in tumour adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy. The hypoxic tumour response, through the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), induces major gene expression, metabolic and phenotypic changes, including increased invasion and metastasis. Pre-clinical studies combining anti-angiogenics with inhibitors of tumour hypoxic and metabolic adaptation have shown great promise, and combination clinical trials have been instigated. Understanding individual patient response and the response timing, given the opposing effects of vascular normalisation versus reduced perfusion seen with anti-angiogenics, provides a further hurdle in the paradigm of personalised therapeutic intervention. Additional approaches for targeting the hypoxic tumour microenvironment are being investigated in pre-clinical and clinical studies that have potential for producing synthetic lethality in combination with anti-angiogenic therapy as a future therapeutic strategy. PMID:25700172

  7. The transcription factor c-Myc enhances KIR gene transcription through direct binding to an upstream distal promoter element

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Frank; Hanson, Rebecca J.; Lenvik, Todd; Pitt, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Li, Hongchuan; Anderson, Stephen K.

    2009-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) repertoire of natural killer (NK) cells determines their ability to detect infected or transformed target cells. Although epigenetic mechanisms play a role in KIR gene expression, work in the mouse suggests that other regulatory elements may be involved at specific stages of NK-cell development. Here we report the effects of the transcription factor c-Myc on KIR expression. c-Myc directly binds to, and promotes transcription from, a distal element identified upstream of most KIR genes. Binding of endogenous c-Myc to the distal promoter element is significantly enhanced upon interleukin-15 (IL-15) stimulation in peripheral blood NK cells and correlates with an increase in KIR transcription. In addition, the overexpression of c-Myc during NK-cell development promotes transcription from the distal promoter element and contributes to the overall transcription of multiple KIR genes. Our data demonstrate the significance of the 5′ promoter element upstream of the conventional KIR promoter region and support a model whereby IL-15 stimulates c-Myc binding at the distal KIR promoter during NK-cell development to promote KIR transcription. This finding provides a direct link between NK-cell activation signals and KIR expression required for acquisition of effector function during NK-cell education. PMID:18987359

  8. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the stimulator of interferon genes by transcription factors CREB and c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Xu, Hua-Guo

    2016-12-20

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) plays an important role in host defense, autoimmune disease, osteoclast differentiation and anti-tumor response. Although many downstream targets have been studied in depth, the regulation of STING gene expression remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc maintain the transcriptional activity of STING. By 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis, we identified the transcriptional start site (TSS) of STING. We illustrated that the region -124/+1 relative to TSS was sufficient for full promoter activity by a series of 5' deletion promoter constructs. Transcriptional activity of the STING minimal promoter was dependent on CREB and c-Myc binding motifs and was abolished after mutation of these two DNA elements. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc bind to STING promoter in vivo. Overexpression of CREB and c-Myc increased the STING promoter activity. Meanwhile, knocking-down of CREB and c-Myc by a small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategy markedly reduced endogenous STING expression. In summary, these results demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc are involved in the regulation of STING transcription.

  9. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  10. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - First gene therapy cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript First gene therapy cancer treatment : 09/11/2017 To use ... to follow up on weekly topics. The first gene therapy treatment for cancer recently was approved by ...

  11. Introns and gene expression: Cellular constraints, transcriptional regulation, and evolutionary consequences

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Patricia; Kalinka, Alex T; Tomancak, Pavel; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2015-01-01

    A gene's “expression profile” denotes the number of transcripts present relative to all other transcripts. The overall rate of transcript production is determined by transcription and RNA processing rates. While the speed of elongating RNA polymerase II has been characterized for many different genes and organisms, gene-architectural features – primarily the number and length of exons and introns – have recently emerged as important regulatory players. Several new studies indicate that rapidly cycling cells constrain gene-architecture toward short genes with a few introns, allowing efficient expression during short cell cycles. In contrast, longer genes with long introns exhibit delayed expression, which can serve as timing mechanisms for patterning processes. These findings indicate that cell cycle constraints drive the evolution of gene-architecture and shape the transcriptome of a given cell type. Furthermore, a tendency for short genes to be evolutionarily young hints at links between cellular constraints and the evolution of animal ontogeny. PMID:25400101

  12. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  13. Maternal transfer and transcriptional onset of immune genes during ontogenesis in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Johnsen, Hanne; Mennen, Saskia; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Tveiten, Helge

    2009-11-01

    The immune system in teleosts is not completely developed during embryonic and larval stages and immune competence is assumed to be restricted. This study is the first to address whether immune transcripts are maternally transferred to offspring and when immune genes are transcriptionally active in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). In unfertilised eggs, transcripts encoding lysozyme and cathelicidin were found indicating maternal transfer of antibacterial transcripts. Lysozyme activity was also present at this stage suggesting the presence of a functional protein. Transcripts of two other putative antibacterial genes (hepcidin and pentraxin) and antiviral genes (ISG15 and LGP2) were absent in unfertilised eggs. The transcriptional onset of these genes occurred during the gastrula period. Transcripts of the heavy chain constant regions of the immunoglobulin (Ig) D, membrane-associated and secreted form of IgM were absent in unfertilised eggs. Transcription of the heavy chain locus commenced at low levels during the segmentation period indicating the onset of B-cell development. Most innate immune genes showed an increase in transcription around hatch and first feeding, indicating a preparation for increased pathogen exposure at this time. Prior to and during metamorphosis all genes showed a pronounced elevation in transcript levels indicating a further maturation of the immune system during this period.

  14. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene. PMID:28289142

  15. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-02-15

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene.

  16. Characterization of porcine ASB6 gene and transcripts-comparison of mammalian transcripts.

    PubMed

    Robic, Annie; Faraut, Thomas; Liaubet, Laurence; Riquet, Juliette; Milan, Denis; Lobjois, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    A member of the porcine Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) Box protein family (ASB), designed as ASB6, was sequenced and the genomic organization of the six exons was determined. We present here a detailed analysis of ASB6 transcripts in pigs. We demonstrate the existence of an alternative transcript resulting from intron retention. This secondary transcript, if functional, encodes a protein without SOCS box. A comparison of mammalian ASB6 transcripts is performed to demonstrate the importance of transcripts encoding for a truncated ASB6 protein.

  17. The effects of transcription factor competition on gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) molecules translocate by facilitated diffusion (a combination of 3D diffusion around and 1D random walk on the DNA). Despite the attention this mechanism received in the last 40 years, only a few studies investigated the influence of the cellular environment on the facilitated diffusion mechanism and, in particular, the influence of “other” DNA binding proteins competing with the TF molecules for DNA space. Molecular crowding on the DNA is likely to influence the association rate of TFs to their target site and the steady state occupancy of those sites, but it is still not clear how it influences the search in a genome-wide context, when the model includes biologically relevant parameters (such as: TF abundance, TF affinity for DNA and TF dynamics on the DNA). We performed stochastic simulations of TFs performing the facilitated diffusion mechanism, and considered various abundances of cognate and non-cognate TFs. We show that, for both obstacles that move on the DNA and obstacles that are fixed on the DNA, changes in search time are not statistically significant in case of biologically relevant crowding levels on the DNA. In the case of non-cognate proteins that slide on the DNA, molecular crowding on the DNA always leads to statistically significant lower levels of occupancy, which may confer a general mechanism to control gene activity levels globally. When the “other” molecules are immobile on the DNA, we found a completely different behavior, namely: the occupancy of the target site is always increased by higher molecular crowding on the DNA. Finally, we show that crowding on the DNA may increase transcriptional noise through increased variability of the occupancy time of the target sites. PMID:24109486

  18. The effects of transcription factor competition on gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) molecules translocate by facilitated diffusion (a combination of 3D diffusion around and 1D random walk on the DNA). Despite the attention this mechanism received in the last 40 years, only a few studies investigated the influence of the cellular environment on the facilitated diffusion mechanism and, in particular, the influence of "other" DNA binding proteins competing with the TF molecules for DNA space. Molecular crowding on the DNA is likely to influence the association rate of TFs to their target site and the steady state occupancy of those sites, but it is still not clear how it influences the search in a genome-wide context, when the model includes biologically relevant parameters (such as: TF abundance, TF affinity for DNA and TF dynamics on the DNA). We performed stochastic simulations of TFs performing the facilitated diffusion mechanism, and considered various abundances of cognate and non-cognate TFs. We show that, for both obstacles that move on the DNA and obstacles that are fixed on the DNA, changes in search time are not statistically significant in case of biologically relevant crowding levels on the DNA. In the case of non-cognate proteins that slide on the DNA, molecular crowding on the DNA always leads to statistically significant lower levels of occupancy, which may confer a general mechanism to control gene activity levels globally. When the "other" molecules are immobile on the DNA, we found a completely different behavior, namely: the occupancy of the target site is always increased by higher molecular crowding on the DNA. Finally, we show that crowding on the DNA may increase transcriptional noise through increased variability of the occupancy time of the target sites.

  19. Effect of orientation of transcription of a gene in an inverted transferred DNA repeat on transcriptional gene silencing in rice transgenics-a case study.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Thakku R; Parameswari, Chidambaram; Sugapriya, Thennavan; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    We studied transgene silencing in two transgenic rice plants, OSM25 and COT-OSM4, which harboured two different types of right border (RB)-centered inverted transferred DNA (T-DNA) repeats (IRs). The T-DNA in OSM25 has three genes gus, OSM and hph, all under the transcriptional control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S). The gus gene, which is proximal to the RB, is in a convergent orientation of transcription in the IR. OSM25 displayed silencing of all three transgenes. Nuclear run-on transcription analysis revealed that silencing of gus, OSM and hph genes in OSM25 operates at the transcriptional level. P35S showed hypermethylation in OSM25 plants. COT-OSM4 has P35S-driven gus and hph genes in its T-DNA. The hph gene, which is proximal to the RB, is in a divergent orientation of transcription in the IR. Unlike in OSM25, the transgenes in COT-OSM4 showed no silencing. These findings show that convergent orientation of transcription of a gene at the origin of an IR is important for transgene silencing.

  20. Isopentenyl transferase gene (ipt) downstream transcriptionally fused with gene expression improves the growth of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Duan, Rui-Jun; Hu, Xin-Wen; Li, Kai-Mian; Fu, Shao-Ping

    2010-04-01

    This research reports a promising approach to increase a plant's physiological cytokinin content. This approach also enables the increase to play a role in plant growth and development by introducing the ipt gene to downstream transcriptionally fuse with other genes under the control of a CaMV35S promoter, in which the ipt gene is far from the 35S promoter. According to Kozak's ribosome screening model, expression of the ipt gene is reduced by the terminal codon of the first gene and the internal untranslated nucleotides between the fused genes. In the transgenic plants pVKH35S-GUS-ipt, pVKH35S-AOC-ipt, and pVKH35S-AtGolS2-ipt, cytokinins were increased only two to threefold, and the plants grew more vigorously than the pVKH35S-AOC or pVKH35S-AtGolS2 transgenic plants lacking the ipt gene. The vigorous growth was reflected in rapid plant growth, a longer flowering period, a greater number of flowers, more seed product, and increased chlorophyll synthesis. The AOC and AtGolS2 genes play a role in a plant's tolerance of salt or cold, respectively. When the ipt gene transcriptionally fuses with AOC or AtGolS2 in the frame of AOC-ipt and AtGolS2-ipt, slight cytokinin increases were obtained in their transgenic plants; furthermore, those increases played a positive role in improvements of plant growth. Notably, an increased cytokinin volume at the physiological level, in concert with AtGolS2 expression, enhances a plant's tolerance to cold.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of defence genes and involvement of the WRKY transcription factor in arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization.

    PubMed

    Gallou, Adrien; Declerck, Stéphane; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie

    2012-03-01

    The establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal associations causes major changes in plant roots and affects significantly the host in term of plant nutrition and resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. As a consequence, major changes in root transcriptome, especially in plant genes related to biotic stresses, are expected. Potato microarray analysis, followed by real-time quantitative PCR, was performed to detect the wide transcriptome changes induced during the pre-, early and late stages of potato root colonization by Glomus sp. MUCL 41833. The microarray analysis revealed 526 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated genes during the pre-stage, 272 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated genes during the early stage and 734 up-regulated and 122 down-regulated genes during the late stage of root colonization. The most important class of regulated genes was associated to plant stress and in particular to the WRKY transcription factors genes during the pre-stage of root colonization. The expression profiling clearly demonstrated a wide transcriptional change during the pre-, early and late stages of root colonization. It further suggested that the WRKY transcription factor genes are involved in the mechanisms controlling the arbuscular mycorrhizal establishment by the regulation of plant defence genes.

  2. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Shingles, Jane; Dupuy, Denis; Grove, Christian A; Walhout, Albertha JM; Vidal, Marc; Hope, Ian A

    2007-01-01

    Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale. PMID:17244357

  3. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  4. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  5. Improved methods and resources for paramecium genomics: transcription units, gene annotation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Olivier; Van Dijk, Erwin; Bétermier, Mireille; Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; de Vanssay, Augustin; Duharcourt, Sandra; Sallet, Erika; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sperling, Linda

    2017-06-26

    The 15 sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia cryptic species complex emerged after a whole genome duplication that occurred tens of millions of years ago. Given extensive knowledge of the genetics and epigenetics of Paramecium acquired over the last century, this species complex offers a uniquely powerful system to investigate the consequences of whole genome duplication in a unicellular eukaryote as well as the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that drive speciation. High quality Paramecium gene models are important for research using this system. The major aim of the work reported here was to build an improved gene annotation pipeline for the Paramecium lineage. We generated oriented RNA-Seq transcriptome data across the sexual process of autogamy for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia. We determined, for the first time in a ciliate, candidate P. tetraurelia transcription start sites using an adapted Cap-Seq protocol. We developed TrUC, multi-threaded Perl software that in conjunction with TopHat mapping of RNA-Seq data to a reference genome, predicts transcription units for the annotation pipeline. We used EuGene software to combine annotation evidence. The high quality gene structural annotations obtained for P. tetraurelia were used as evidence to improve published annotations for 3 other Paramecium species. The RNA-Seq data were also used for differential gene expression analysis, providing a gene expression atlas that is more sensitive than the previously established microarray resource. We have developed a gene annotation pipeline tailored for the compact genomes and tiny introns of Paramecium species. A novel component of this pipeline, TrUC, predicts transcription units using Cap-Seq and oriented RNA-Seq data. TrUC could prove useful beyond Paramecium, especially in the case of high gene density. Accurate predictions of 3' and 5' UTR will be particularly valuable for studies of gene expression (e.g. nucleosome positioning, identification of cis

  6. VEGF gene expression in adult human thymus fat: a correlative study with hypoxic induced factor and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Tinahones, Francisco; Salas, Julian; Mayas, María Dolores; Ruiz-Villalba, Adrian; Macias-Gonzalez, Manuel; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; DeMora, Manuel; Moreno-Santos, Inmaculada; Bernal, Rosa; Cardona, Fernando; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-12-14

    It is well known that the adult human thymus degenerates into fat tissue; however, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. Recently, we have described that this fat (TAT) produces angiogenic factors and induces human endothelial cell proliferation and migration, indicating its potential angiogenic properties. Adult thymus fat and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were obtained from 28 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, making this tissue readily available as a prime source of adipose tissue. We focused our investigation on determining VEGF gene expression and characterizing the different genes, mediators of inflammation and adipogenesis, and which are known to play a relevant role in angiogenesis regulation. We found that VEGF-A was the isoform most expressed in TAT. This expression was accompanied by an upregulation of HIF-1alpha, COX-2 and HO-1 proteins, and by increased HIF-1 DNA binding activity, compared to SAT. Furthermore, we observed that TAT contains a high percentage of mature adipocytes, 0.25% of macrophage cells, 15% of endothelial cells and a very low percentage of thymocyte cells, suggesting the cellular variability of TAT, which could explain the differences in gene expression observed in TAT. Subsequently, we showed that the expression of genes known as adipogenic mediators, including PPARgamma1/gamma2, FABP-4 and adiponectin was similar in both TAT and SAT. Moreover the expression of these latter genes presented a significantly positive correlation with VEGF, suggesting the potential association between VEGF and the generation of adipose tissue in adult thymus. Here we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function related to ongoing adipogenesis, which substitutes immune functions within the adult thymus. The expression of VEGF seems to be associated with COX-2, HO-1 and adipogenesis related genes, suggesting the importance that this new fat has acquired in research in relation to adipogenesis and

  7. VEGF Gene Expression in Adult Human Thymus Fat: A Correlative Study with Hypoxic Induced Factor and Cyclooxigenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Tinahones, Francisco; Salas, Julian; Mayas, María Dolores; Ruiz-Villalba, Adrian; Macias-Gonzalez, Manuel; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; DeMora, Manuel; Moreno-Santos, Inmaculada; Bernal, Rosa; Cardona, Fernando; Bekay, Rajaa El

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the adult human thymus degenerates into fat tissue; however, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. Recently, we have described that this fat (TAT) produces angiogenic factors and induces human endothelial cell proliferation and migration, indicating its potential angiogenic properties. Design Adult thymus fat and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were obtained from 28 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, making this tissue readily available as a prime source of adipose tissue. We focused our investigation on determining VEGF gene expression and characterizing the different genes, mediators of inflammation and adipogenesis, and which are known to play a relevant role in angiogenesis regulation. Results We found that VEGF-A was the isoform most expressed in TAT. This expression was accompanied by an upregulation of HIF-1α, COX-2 and HO-1 proteins, and by increased HIF-1 DNA binding activity, compared to SAT. Furthermore, we observed that TAT contains a high percentage of mature adipocytes, 0.25% of macrophage cells, 15% of endothelial cells and a very low percentage of thymocyte cells, suggesting the cellular variability of TAT, which could explain the differences in gene expression observed in TAT. Subsequently, we showed that the expression of genes known as adipogenic mediators, including PPARγ1/γ2, FABP-4 and adiponectin was similar in both TAT and SAT. Moreover the expression of these latter genes presented a significantly positive correlation with VEGF, suggesting the potential association between VEGF and the generation of adipose tissue in adult thymus. Conclusion Here we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function related to ongoing adipogenesis, which substitutes immune functions within the adult thymus. The expression of VEGF seems to be associated with COX-2, HO-1 and adipogenesis related genes, suggesting the importance that this new fat has acquired in research in relation to

  8. Requirement of gene VII in cis for the expression of downstream genes on the major transcript of figwort mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1991-12-01

    The six major conserved genes of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, appear in tandem array on an RNA transcript that spans the entire viral genome. Gene VI, the only cistron that appears as a separate subgenomic RNA, has been reported to transactivate the expression of downstream genes of the full-length transcript. This transcript has a long 5'-leader of about 600 nucleotides followed by a small nonconserved region (gene VII), a smaller intergenic region (57 nucleotides), and the major conserved genes in a closely spaced array. In our present experiments we have constructed expression units containing the promoter for the full-length transcript followed by the 5' leader region, gene VII, and a reporter gene. These have been tested for expression with and without gene VI as a separate plasmid by electroporation into plant protoplasts. A series of these expression units containing truncated versions of the 5' leader region placed upstream of a reporter gene (CAT) showed that gene VI transactivation occurred only when gene VII sequences were present in cis between the leader region and the reporter gene. In addition, a more complete version of the FMV genome containing the reporter gene further downstream (in viral gene IV) showed CAT expression only when gene VII sequences were present in an upstream position. A similar construct failed to express CAT activity when gene VII was absent.

  9. Transcription factor regulation can be accurately predicted from the presence of target gene signatures in microarray gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Essaghir, Ahmed; Toffalini, Federica; Knoops, Laurent; Kallin, Anders; van Helden, Jacques; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-01-01

    Deciphering transcription factor networks from microarray data remains difficult. This study presents a simple method to infer the regulation of transcription factors from microarray data based on well-characterized target genes. We generated a catalog containing transcription factors associated with 2720 target genes and 6401 experimentally validated regulations. When it was available, a distinction between transcriptional activation and inhibition was included for each regulation. Next, we built a tool (www.tfacts.org) that compares submitted gene lists with target genes in the catalog to detect regulated transcription factors. TFactS was validated with published lists of regulated genes in various models and compared to tools based on in silico promoter analysis. We next analyzed the NCI60 cancer microarray data set and showed the regulation of SOX10, MITF and JUN in melanomas. We then performed microarray experiments comparing gene expression response of human fibroblasts stimulated by different growth factors. TFactS predicted the specific activation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription factors by PDGF-BB, which was confirmed experimentally. Our results show that the expression levels of transcription factor target genes constitute a robust signature for transcription factor regulation, and can be efficiently used for microarray data mining. PMID:20215436

  10. Regulation of Cell Cycle Associated Genes by microRNA and Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Nitai P; Das, Eashita; Bucha, Sudha; Das, Srijit; Choudhury, Ananyo

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle is a complex process and regulated at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Large numbers of genes are implicated in the process. Abnormality at any stage of cell cycle may lead to diseases including cancer. To gain global view of genes associated with cell cycle, their regulation by transcription factors and microRNAs, we collected genes related to cell cycle from different databases. Experimentally validated targets of microRNAs are collected from miRTarbase. Transcription factors that bind to upstream sequences of cell cycle associated genes and microRNA genes were collected from published papers. We collected 3028 genes associated with cell cycle. These proteins belong to different protein classes like nucleic acid binding (594 proteins), transcription factors (305 proteins), cytoskeletal (232 proteins), kinases (174 proteins), phosphatase (111 proteins) and chaperones (84 proteins). Among 3028 cell cycle associated genes, 2125 genes are validated targets of 424 microRNAs; CDKN1A is a target of 46 miRNAs and miR-335 targets 301 genes. About 100 transcription factors had binding sites at potential promoter regions of 2722 genes and 329 microRNAs that target cell cycle associated genes. We presented the largest numbers of cell cycle associated genes. Many transcription factors regulate both cell cycle associated genes and the miRNAs that target cell cycle associated genes. These resources will be utilized to identify the co-regulation of cell cycle associated genes by transcription factors and miRNAs and to test specific hypothesis for cell cycle regulation and its alteration in different diseases.

  11. Effect of Soil Clay Content on RNA Isolation and on Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Soil by Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Novinscak, A.; Filion, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) quantification of microbial gene transcripts. The amount of clay significantly altered RNA isolation yields and qRT-PCR analyses. Recommendations are made for quantifying microbial gene transcripts in soil samples varying in clay content. PMID:21724880

  12. Transcription of Nearly All Yeast RNA Polymerase II-Transcribed Genes Is Dependent on Transcription Factor TFIID.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Linda; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Baptista, Tiago; Devys, Didier; Tora, Laszlo; Hahn, Steven

    2017-09-13

    Previous studies suggested that expression of most yeast mRNAs is dominated by either transcription factor TFIID or SAGA. We re-examined the role of TFIID by rapid depletion of S. cerevisiae TFIID subunits and measurement of changes in nascent transcription. We find that transcription of nearly all mRNAs is strongly dependent on TFIID function. Degron-dependent depletion of Taf1, Taf2, Taf7, Taf11, and Taf13 showed similar transcription decreases for genes in the Taf1-depleted, Taf1-enriched, TATA-containing, and TATA-less gene classes. The magnitude of TFIID dependence varies with growth conditions, although this variation is similar genome-wide. Many studies have suggested differences in gene-regulatory mechanisms between TATA and TATA-less genes, and these differences have been attributed in part to differential dependence on SAGA or TFIID. Our work indicates that TFIID participates in expression of nearly all yeast mRNAs and that differences in regulation between these two gene categories is due to other properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene length as a biological timer to establish temporal transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Kirkconnell, Killeen S; Magnuson, Brian; Paulsen, Michelle T; Lu, Brian; Bedi, Karan; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-02-01

    Transcriptional timing is inherently influenced by gene length, thus providing a mechanism for temporal regulation of gene expression. While gene size has been shown to be important for the expression timing of specific genes during early development, whether it plays a role in the timing of other global gene expression programs has not been extensively explored. Here, we investigate the role of gene length during the early transcriptional response of human fibroblasts to serum stimulation. Using the nascent sequencing techniques Bru-seq and BruUV-seq, we identified immediate genome-wide transcriptional changes following serum stimulation that were linked to rapid activation of enhancer elements. We identified 873 significantly induced and 209 significantly repressed genes. Variations in gene size allowed for a large group of genes to be simultaneously activated but produce full-length RNAs at different times. The median length of the group of serum-induced genes was significantly larger than the median length of all expressed genes, housekeeping genes, and serum-repressed genes. These gene length relationships were also observed in corresponding mouse orthologs, suggesting that relative gene size is evolutionarily conserved. The sizes of transcription factor and microRNA genes immediately induced after serum stimulation varied dramatically, setting up a cascade mechanism for temporal expression arising from a single activation event. The retention and expansion of large intronic sequences during evolution have likely played important roles in fine-tuning the temporal expression of target genes in various cellular response programs.

  14. Correcting Transcription Factor Gene Sets for Copy Number and Promoter Methylation Variations

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Komal S.; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Hennesey, Patrick; Califano, Joseph A.; Ochs, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene set analysis provides a method to generate statistical inferences across sets of linked genes, primarily using high-throughput expression data. Common gene sets include biological pathways, operons, and targets of transcriptional regulators. In higher eukaryotes, especially when dealing with diseases with strong genetic and epigenetic components such as cancer, copy number loss and gene silencing through promoter methylation can eliminate the possibility that a gene is transcribed. This, in turn, can adversely affect the estimation of transcription factor or pathway activity from a set of target genes, since some of the targets may not be responsive to transcriptional regulation. Here we introduce a simple filtering approach that removes genes from consideration if they show copy number loss or promoter methylation and demonstrate the improvement in inference of transcription factor activity in a simulated data set based on the background expression observed in normal head and neck tissue. PMID:25195578

  15. Correcting transcription factor gene sets for copy number and promoter methylation variations.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Komal S; Gaykalova, Daria A; Hennessey, Patrick; Califano, Joseph A; Ochs, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Gene set analysis provides a method to generate statistical inferences across sets of linked genes, primarily using high-throughput expression data. Common gene sets include biological pathways, operons, and targets of transcriptional regulators. In higher eukaryotes, especially when dealing with diseases with strong genetic and epigenetic components such as cancer, copy number loss and gene silencing through promoter methylation can eliminate the possibility that a gene is transcribed. This, in turn, can adversely affect the estimation of transcription factor or pathway activity from a set of target genes, as some of the targets may not be responsive to transcriptional regulation. Here we introduce a simple filtering approach that removes genes from consideration if they show copy number loss or promoter methylation, and demonstrate the improvement in inference of transcription factor activity in a simulated dataset based on the background expression observed in normal head and neck tissue.

  16. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M. R.; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F. V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA’s and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  17. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  18. Assessment of reference genes for reliable analysis of gene transcription by RT-qPCR in ovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Mahakapuge, T A N; Scheerlinck, J-P Y; Rojas, C A Alvarez; Every, A L; Hagen, J

    2016-03-01

    With the availability of genetic sequencing data, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is increasingly being used for the quantification of gene transcription across species. Too often there is little regard to the selection of reference genes and the impact that a poor choice has on data interpretation. Indeed, RT-qPCR provides a snapshot of relative gene transcription at a given time-point, and hence is highly dependent on the stability of the transcription of the reference gene(s). Using ovine efferent lymph cells and peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells (PBMCs), the two most frequently used leukocytes in immunological studies, we have compared the stability of transcription of the most commonly used ovine reference genes: YWHAZ, RPL-13A, PGK1, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT, SDHA and ACTB. Using established algorithms for reference gene normalization "geNorm" and "Norm Finder", PGK1, GAPDH and YWHAZ were deemed the most stably transcribed genes for efferent leukocytes and PGK1, YWHAZ and SDHA were optimal in PBMCs. These genes should therefore be considered for accurate and reproducible RT-qPCR data analysis of gene transcription in sheep.

  19. Correlation of methane production and functional gene transcriptional activity in a peat soil.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Prosser, James I

    2009-11-01

    The transcription dynamics of subunit A of the key gene in methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) was studied to evaluate the relationship between process rate (methanogenesis) and gene transcription dynamics in a peat soil ecosystem. Soil methanogen process rates were determined during incubation of peat slurries at temperatures from 4 to 37 degrees C, and real-time quantitative PCR was applied to quantify the abundances of mcrA genes and transcripts; corresponding transcriptional dynamics were calculated from mcrA transcript/gene ratios. Internal standards suggested unbiased recovery of mRNA abundances in comparison to DNA levels. In comparison to those in pure-culture studies, mcrA transcript/gene ratios indicated underestimation by 1 order of magnitude, possibly due to high proportions of inactive or dead methanogens. Methane production rates were temperature dependent, with maxima at 25 degrees C, but changes in abundance and transcription of the mcrA gene showed no correlation with temperature. However, mcrA transcript/gene ratios correlated weakly (regression coefficient = 0.76) with rates of methanogenesis. Methanogen process rates increased over 3 orders of magnitude, while the corresponding maximum transcript/gene ratio increase was only 18-fold. mcrA transcript dynamics suggested steady-state expression in peat soil after incubation for 24 and 48 h, similar to that in stationary-phase cultures. mcrA transcript/gene ratios are therefore potential in situ indicators of methanogen process rate changes in complex soil systems.

  20. The effects of transcription on the nucleosome structure of four Dictyostelium genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, J; Banz, E; Parish, R W

    1989-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease digestion of Dictyostelium discoideum nuclei from various developmental stages was used to investigate transcription-related changes in the chromatin structure of the coding region of four genes. Gene activity was determined by Northern blotting and nuclear run on experiments. During strong transcription of the developmentally regulated cysteine proteinase I gene, a smear superimposed on a nucleosomal ladder was observed, indicating perturbation of nucleosomal structure was occurring. However, two other developmentally regulated genes, discoidin I and pSC253, showed only slight nucleosome disruption during high levels of transcription. The chromatin structure of a fourth gene (pCZ22) was disrupted throughout development, even at those stages where transcription was greatly reduced. We suggest that although nucleosome structure can be transiently perturbed by the passage of the transcription complex in vivo, the degree of perturbation and the speed with which nucleosomes reassemble is also influenced by the DNA sequence. Images PMID:2704621

  1. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila glial gene repo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce P; Jones, Bradley W

    2005-06-01

    reversed polarity (repo) is a putative target gene of glial cells missing (gcm), the primary regulator of glial cell fate in Drosophila. Transient expression of Gcm is followed by maintained expression of repo. Multiple Gcm binding sites are found in repo upstream DNA. However, while repo is expressed in Gcm positive glia, it is not expressed in Gcm positive hemocytes. These observations suggest factors in addition to Gcm are required for repo expression. Here we have undertaken an analysis of the cis-regulatory DNA elements of repo using lacZ reporter activity in transgenic embryos. We have found that a 4.2 kb DNA region upstream of the repo start site drives the wild-type repo expression pattern. We show that expression is dependent on multiple Gcm binding sites. By ectopically expressing Repo, we show that Repo can regulate its own enhancer. Finally, by systematically analyzing fragments of repo upstream DNA, we show that expression is dependent on multiple elements that are responsible for activity in subsets of glia, as well as repressing inappropriate expression in the epidermis. Our results suggest that Gcm acts synergistically with other factors to control repo transcription in glial cells.

  3. [Association of schizophrenia with variations in genes encoding transcription factors].

    PubMed

    Boyajyan, A S; Atshemyan, S A; Zakharyan, R V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal plasticity and immune system play a key role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Identification of genetic factors contributing to these alterations will significantly encourage elucidation of molecular etiopathomechanisms of this disorder. Transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and Ier5 are the important regulators of neuronal plasticity and immune response. In the present work we investigated a potential association of schizophrenia with a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of c-Fos-,c-Jun and Ier5 encoding genes (FOS, JUN, and IER5 respectively). Genotyping of DNA samples of patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals was performed using polymerase chain reaction with allele specific primers. The results obtained demonstrated association between schizophrenia and FOS rs1063169, FOS rs7101, JUN rs11688, and IER5 rs6425663 polymorphisms. Namely, it was found that the inheritance of FOS rs1063169*T, JUN rs11688*A, and IER5 rs6425663*T minor variants decreases risk for development of schizophrenia whereas the inheritance of FOS rs7101*T minor variant, especially its homozygous form, increases risk for development of this disorder.

  4. Widespread transcriptional autosomal dosage compensation in Drosophila correlates with gene expression level.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Ashley A; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2009-12-23

    Little is known about dosage compensation in autosomal genes. Transcription-level compensation of deletions and other loss-of-function mutations may be a mechanism of dominance of wild-type alleles, a ubiquitous phenomenon whose nature has been a subject of a long debate. We measured gene expression in two isogenic Drosophila lines heterozygous for long deletions and compared our results with previously published gene expression data in a line heterozygous for a long duplication. We find that a majority of genes are at least partially compensated at transcription, both for (1/2)-fold dosage (in heterozygotes for deletions) and for 1.5-fold dosage (in heterozygotes for a duplication). The degree of compensation does not vary among functional classes of genes. Compensation for deletions is stronger for highly expressed genes. In contrast, the degree of compensation for duplications is stronger for weakly expressed genes. Thus, partial transcriptional compensation appears to be based on regulatory mechanisms that insure high transcription levels of some genes and low transcription levels of other genes, instead of precise maintenance of a particular homeostatic expression level. Given the ubiquity of transcriptional compensation, dominance of wild-type alleles may be at least partially caused by of the regulation at transcription level.

  5. Nested transcripts of gap junction gene have distinct expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Curtin, K D; Sun, Y A; Wyman, R J

    1999-09-05

    The shaking B locus (shakB, or Passover) codes for structural molecules of gap junctions in Drosophila. This report describes the complex set of transcripts from the shakB locus. A nested set of five transcripts is described. The transcripts share 3' exons, but each has its own 5' exon. The transcripts are arrayed as a series in the genomic DNA stretching over 60 kb. The 5' end of each successive transcript lies further proximal on the chromosome. Each new transcript shares all the 3' exons with the one preceding it, but adds one or two more 5' exons. The different transcripts are expressed in a wide variety of locations in the nervous system and in non-neural tissues. Some tissues express more than one transcript, and the expression pattern of each is developmentally regulated. Within the adult central nervous system (CNS), these transcripts have an expression pattern that is restricted to the giant fiber system (GFS). The GFS is a small set of neurons which mediates the visually induced escape jump. shakB is required for function of the GFS electrical synapses. The transcript previously defined as active in the giant fiber is not, in fact, expressed in that cell. Instead, we find that another transcript, shakB(N3), and perhaps shakB(N4) as well, is expressed in the GFS; this transcript is not expressed elsewhere in the adult CNS. Two other transcripts, shakB(N1) and shakB(N2), are expressed in the optic lamina but not elsewhere in the CNS. This expression pattern explains the neurophysiological and behavioral defects in escape exhibited in mutants of shakB.

  6. [Effects of amitrole on thyroid hormone-associated gene transcription in FRTL-5 cells].

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Shi; Wu, De-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    To observe the effects of amitrole on the transcription of thyroglobulin (tg), thyroid peroxidase (tpo), Na(+)/I- symporter (nis), Na(+)/I- symporter (nis), thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (tshr), thyroid transcription factor 1 (ttf-1) and paired-domain protein-8 (pax-8) genes in FRTL-5 cells and investigate the mechanism of amitrole for intervening in thyroid hormone activity. FRTL-5 cells were treated with amitrole at 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml for 24 h, respectively, after which the cells were collected for extraction of the total RNA. RT-PCR was used to examine the effects of amitrole on the transcription of tg, tpo, nis, tshr, pax-8 and ttf-1 genes in FRTL-5 cells. Amitrole significantly induced tg gene transcription at all the doses, but produced no obvious effects on tpo and nis gene transcription. At the concentration of 0.1 mg/ml, amitrole significantly reduced pax-8 and tshr gene transcription but increased ttf-1 gene transcription. The effects of amitrole on thyroid hormone activity may be related with its actions on tg, ttf-1, tshr and pax-8 gene transcription.

  7. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of PHO8 expression by PHO regulatory genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Y; Tamai, Y; Toh-e, A; Oshima, Y

    1985-01-01

    A DNA fragment bearing the PHO8 gene, which encodes repressible alkaline phosphatase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was cloned. Northern hybridizations with the PHO8 DNA as probe indicated that the PHO8 transcript is 1.8 kilobases in length and is more abundant in cells grown in low-phosphate medium than in high-phosphate medium. The pho9 mutant, whose phenotype is defective in the activity of repressible alkaline phosphatase, produced as much of the PHO8 transcript as did the PHO9+ cells. Hence, the PHO9 product should act at the post-transcriptional level. The pho4 mutant could not derepress the PHO8 transcript, whereas the pho80 mutant could, irrespective of the amount of Pi in the medium, as has been suggested by genetic study. Images PMID:2984552

  8. Functional analysis of a WRKY transcription factor involved in transcriptional activation of the DBAT gene in Taxus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Zhang, P; Zhang, M; Fu, C; Yu, L

    2013-01-01

    Although the regulation of taxol biosynthesis at the transcriptional level remains unclear, 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10 β-O-acetyl transferase (DBAT) is a critical enzyme in the biosynthesis of taxol. The 1740 bp fragment 5'-flanking sequence of the dbat gene was cloned from Taxus chinensis cells. Important regulatory elements needed for activity of the dbat promoter were located by deletion analyses in T. chinensis cells. A novel WRKY transcription factor, TcWRKY1, was isolated with the yeast one-hybrid system from a T. chinensis cell cDNA library using the important regulatory elements as bait. The gene expression of TcWRKY1 in T. chinensis suspension cells was specifically induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Biochemical analysis indicated that TcWRKY1 protein specifically interacts with the two W-box (TGAC) cis-elements among the important regulatory elements. Overexpression of TcWRKY1 enhanced dbat expression in T. chinensis suspension cells, and RNA interference (RNAi) reduced the level of transcripts of dbat. These results suggest that TcWRKY1 participates in regulation of taxol biosynthesis in T. chinensis cells, and that dbat is a target gene of this transcription factor. This research also provides a potential candidate gene for engineering increased taxol accumulation in Taxus cell cultures. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178] PMID:26521940

  10. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-03-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor- 1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178].

  11. Nuclear actin and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Han, Mei; Bernier, Michel; Wen, Jin-kun

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear actin is involoved in transcription of all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, and formation of hnRNP complexes as well as recruitment of histone modifier to the active gene. In addition, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) control actin nucleation, bundling, filament capping, fragmentation, and monomer availability in the cytoplasm. In recent years, more and more attention is on the role of actin and ABPs in the modulation of the subcellular localization of transcriptional regulators. This review focuses on the recent developments about transcription and transcriptional regulation by nuclear actin, regulation of muscle-specific gene expression, nuclear receptor and transcription complexes by ABPs. Among them, STARS and ABLIM regulate actin dynamics and SRF-dependent muscle-specific gene expression. Functionally and structurally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs interact cooperatively with nuclear receptor and regulate its transactivation. Furthermore, ABPs also participate in the formation of transcription complexes. PMID:19459931

  12. SUMO functions in constitutive transcription and during activation of inducible genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rosonina, Emanuel; Duncan, Sarah M; Manley, James L

    2010-06-15

    Transcription factors represent one of the largest groups of proteins regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, and their sumoylation is usually associated with transcriptional repression. To investigate whether sumoylation plays a general role in regulating transcription in yeast, we determined the occupancy of sumoylated proteins at a variety of genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody that recognizes the yeast SUMO peptide. Surprisingly, we detected sumoylated proteins at all constitutively transcribed genes tested but not at repressed genes. Ubc9, the SUMO conjugation enzyme, was not present on these genes, but its inactivation reduced SUMO at the constitutive promoters and modestly decreased RNA polymerase II levels. In contrast, activation of the inducible GAL1, STL1, and ARG1 genes caused not only a striking accumulation of SUMO at all three promoter regions, but also recruitment of Ubc9, indicating that gene activation involves sumoylation of promoter-bound factors. However, Ubc9 inactivation, while reducing sumoylation at the induced promoters, paradoxically resulted in increased transcription. Providing an explanation for this, the reduced sumoylation impaired the cell's ability to appropriately shut off transcription of the induced ARG1 gene, indicating that SUMO can facilitate transcriptional silencing. Our findings thus establish unexpected roles for sumoylation in both constitutive and activated transcription, and provide a novel mechanism for regulating gene expression.

  13. DNA methylation profiling of transcription factor genes in normal lymphocyte development and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Claudia; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Lesche, Ralf; Dong, Jun; Stein, Harald; Thiel, Andreas; Eckhardt, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a crucial role during hematopoiesis by orchestrating lineage commitment and determining cellular fate. Although tight regulation of transcription factor expression appears to be essential, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved in transcription factor gene regulation. We have analyzed DNA methylation profiles of 13 key transcription factor genes in primary cells of the hematopoietic cascade, lymphoma cell lines and lymph node biopsies of diffuse large B-cell- and T-cell-non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Several of the transcription factor genes (SPI1, GATA3, TCF-7, Etv5, c-maf and TBX21) are differentially methylated in specific cell lineages and stages of the hematopoietic cascade. For some genes, such as SPI1, Etv5 and Eomes, we found an inverse correlation between the methylation of the 5' untranslated region and expression of the associated gene suggesting that these genes are regulated by DNA methylation. Differential methylation is not limited to cells of the healthy hematopoietic cascade, as we observed aberrant methylation of c-maf, TCF7, Eomes and SPI1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Our results suggest that epigenetic remodelling of transcription factor genes is a frequent mechanism during hematopoietic development. Aberrant methylation of transcription factor genes is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and might have a functional role during tumorigenesis.

  14. Early-late genes of the ecdysone cascade as models for transcriptional studies

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Marina Yu; Nikolenko, Julia V; Fursova, Nadezda A; Nedil'ko, Petr N; Krasnov, Aleksey N; Vorobyeva, Nadezhda E

    2015-01-01

    The DHR3 and Hr4 early-late genes of the ecdysone cascade are described as models for transcriptional studies in Drosophila cells. In a set of experiments, it became clear that these genes are a convenient and versatile system for research into the physiological conditions upon 20-hydroxyecdysone induction. DHR3 and Hr4 gene transcription is characterized by fast activation kinetics, which enables transcriptional studies without the influence of indirect effects. A limited number of activated genes (only 73 genes are induced one hour after treatment) promote the selectivity of transcriptional studies via 20-hydroxyecdysone induction. DHR3 and Hr4 gene expression is dose dependent, is completely controlled by the hormone titer and decreases within hours of 20-hydroxyecdysone withdrawal. The DHR3 and Hr4 gene promoters become functional within 20 minutes after induction, which makes them useful tools for investigation if the early activation process. Their transcription is controlled by the RNA polymerase II pausing mechanism, which is widespread in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster but is still underinvestigated. Uniform expression activation of the DHR3 and Hr4 genes in a cell population was confirmed at both the RNA and protein levels. Homogeneity of the transcription response makes DHR3/Hr4 system valuable for investigation of the protein dynamics during transcription induction. PMID:26506480

  15. Is transcription the dominant force during dynamic changes in gene expression?

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic changes in gene expression punctuate lymphocyte development and are a characteristic of lymphocyte activation. A prevailing view has been that these changes are driven by DNA transcription factors, which are the dominant force in gene expression. Accumulating evidence is challenging this DNA centric view and has highlighted the prevalence and dynamic nature of RNA handling mechanisms. Alternative splicing and differential polyadenylation appear to be more widespread than first thought. Changes in mRNA decay rates also affect the abundance of transcripts and this mechanism may contribute significantly to gene expression. Additional RNA handling mechanisms that control the intracellular localization of mRNA and association with translating ribosomes are also important. Thus, gene expression is regulated through the coordination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Developing a more "RNA centric" view of gene expression will allow a more systematic understanding of how gene expression and cell function are integrated.

  16. Divergent transcription of long noncoding RNA/mRNA gene pairs in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Mullen, Alan C.; Molinie, Benoit; Gupta, Sumeet; Orlando, David A.; Guenther, Matthew G.; Almada, Albert E.; Lin, Charles; Sharp, Phillip A.; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Young, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) species have been identified in mammalian cells, but the genomic origin and regulation of these molecules in individual cell types is poorly understood. We have generated catalogs of lncRNA species expressed in human and murine embryonic stem cells and mapped their genomic origin. A surprisingly large fraction of these transcripts (>60%) originate from divergent transcription at promoters of active protein-coding genes. The divergently transcribed lncRNA/mRNA gene pairs exhibit coordinated changes in transcription when embryonic stem cells are differentiated into endoderm. Our results reveal that transcription of most lncRNA genes is coordinated with transcription of protein-coding genes. PMID:23382218

  17. NanoScript: A Nanoparticle-Based Artificial Transcription Factor for Effective Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) proteins are master regulators of transcriptional activity and gene expression. TF-based gene regulation is a promising approach for many biological applications; however, several limitations hinder the full potential of TFs. Herein, we developed an artificial, nanoparticle-based transcription factor, termed NanoScript, which is designed to mimic the structure and function of TFs. NanoScript was constructed by tethering functional peptides and small molecules called synthetic transcription factors, which mimic the individual TF domains, onto gold nanoparticles. We demonstrate that NanoScript localizes within the nucleus and initiates transcription of a reporter plasmid by over 15-fold. Moreover, NanoScript can effectively transcribe targeted genes on endogenous DNA in a nonviral manner. Because NanoScript is a functional replica of TF proteins and a tunable gene-regulating platform, it has great potential for various stem cell applications. PMID:25133310

  18. A genome-wide view of transcription factor gene diversity in chordate evolution: less gene loss in amphioxus?

    PubMed

    Paps, Jordi; Holland, Peter W H; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies of gene diversity in the homeobox superclass have shown that the Florida amphioxus Branchiostoma floridae has undergone remarkably little gene family loss. Here we use a combined BLAST and HMM search strategy to assess the family level diversity of four other transcription factor superclasses: the Paired/Pax genes, Tbx genes, Fox genes and Sox genes. We apply this across genomes from five chordate taxa, including B. floridae and Ciona intestinalis, plus two outgroup taxa. Our results show scattered gene family loss. However, as also found for homeobox genes, B. floridae has retained all ancient Pax, Tbx, Fox and Sox gene families that were present in the common ancestor of living chordates. We conclude that, at least in terms of transcription factor gene complexity, the genome of amphioxus has experienced remarkable stasis compared to the genomes of other chordates.

  19. Endosymbiotic gene transfer and transcriptional regulation of transferred genes in Paulinella chromatophora.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Eva C M; Vogel, Heiko; Groth, Marco; Grossman, Arthur R; Melkonian, Michael; Glöckner, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Paulinella chromatophora is a cercozoan amoeba that contains "chromatophores," which are photosynthetic inclusions of cyanobacterial origin. The recent discovery that chromatophores evolved independently of plastids, underwent major genome reduction, and transferred at least two genes to the host nucleus has highlighted P. chromatophora as a model to infer early steps in the evolution of photosynthetic organelles. However, owing to the paucity of nuclear genome sequence data, the extent of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) and host symbiont regulation are currently unknown. A combination of 454 and Illumina next generation sequencing enabled us to generate a comprehensive reference transcriptome data set for P. chromatophora on which we mapped short Illumina cDNA reads generated from cultures from the dark and light phases of a diel cycle. Combined with extensive phylogenetic analyses of the deduced protein sequences, these data revealed that 1) about 0.3-0.8% of the nuclear genes were obtained by EGT compared with 11-14% in the Plantae, 2) transferred genes show a distinct bias in that many encode small proteins involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation, 3) host cells established control over expression of transferred genes, and 4) not only EGT, but to a minor extent also horizontal gene transfer from organisms that presumably served as food sources, helped to shape the nuclear genome of P. chromatophora. The identification of a significant number of transferred genes involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation of thylakoid membranes as well as the observed transcriptional regulation of these genes strongly implies import of the encoded gene products into chromatophores, a feature previously thought to be restricted to canonical organelles. Thus, a possible mechanism by which P. chromatophora exerts control over the performance of its newly acquired photosynthetic organelle may involve controlling the expression of nuclear-encoded chromatophore

  20. Transcriptional activation of plant defense genes by fungal elicitor, wounding, and infection.

    PubMed

    Lawton, M A; Lamb, C J

    1987-01-01

    Activation of plant defense genes was investigated by analysis of transcripts completed in vitro by isolated nuclei. Elicitor treatment of suspension-cultured bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cells caused marked transient stimulation of transcription of genes encoding apoproteins of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGP) and the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS), concomitant with the onset of rapid accumulation of the respective mRNAs and hence expression of the phytoalexin (PAL, CHS), lignin (PAL), and HRGP defense responses. While there was a lag of 2 h prior to stimulation of HRGP gene transcription, induction of the transcription of PAL and CHS genes occurred within 5 min of elicitor treatment. Induction of transcription of PAL, CHS, and HRGP genes was also observed in wounded hypocotyls and in infected hypocotyls during race-cultivar-specific interactions with the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose. Transcriptional activation occurred not only in directly infected tissue but also in distant, hitherto uninfected tissue, indicating intercellular transmission of an endogenous signal for defense gene activation. It is concluded that transcriptional activation of defense genes characteristically underlies induction of the corresponding defense responses and expression of disease resistance.

  1. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms.

  2. Fur-Mediated Activation of Gene Transcription in the Human Pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:22287521

  3. Alternatively spliced adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene transcripts that delete exons mutated in attenuated APC.

    PubMed

    Samowitz, W S; Thliveris, A; Spirio, L N; White, R

    1995-09-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR combined with either (a) restriction enzyme digestion and repeat PCR or (b) ligase chain reaction has identified two new alternatively spliced transcripts of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. In one of these transcripts exons 1-4 and the first 16 bases of exon 5 are deleted; in the other exons 2-4 and the first 16 bases of 5 are deleted. Both transcripts use an intraexonic splice acceptor in exon 5. These transcripts delete exons mutated in attenuated APC (3 and 4) and could account for the reduction in severity of this variant.

  4. Tumor suppressor genes which encode transcriptional repressors: studies on the EGR and Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene products.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F J

    1993-01-01

    The study of the WT1 and EGR-1 transcription factors has provided a molecular paradigm for regulation of a coordinate set of target genes during cell growth and differentiation. The next critical questions that must be addressed are: what are the target genes which are normally regulated by WT1-EGR-1, and how does misregulation of these genes result in tumor formation?

  5. Promoter mapping and cell cycle regulation of flagellin gene transcription in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Minnich, S A; Newton, A

    1987-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus contains a 25- and a 27-kDa flagellin, which are assembled into the flagellar filament, and a 29-kDa flagellin, which is related in sequence but is of unknown function. We have used DNA sequence analysis and nuclease S1 assays to map the in vivo transcription start sites of the three flagellin genes and to study their regulation. These experiments lead to several conclusions. First, copies of the 29-, 25-, and 27-kDa flagellin genes are organized in a tandem array in the flaEY gene cluster of C. crescentus. Second, flagellin genes are under transcriptional control and each gene is expressed with a characteristic periodicity in the cell cycle. Third, flagellin gene promoters contain conserved nucleotide sequence elements at -13, -24, and -100 that are homologous to the fla genes in the hook gene cluster. The -13 and -24 sequences conform to a fla gene promoter consensus sequence (C/TTGGCC/GC-N5-TTGC) that is similar in sequence to the -12, -24 consensus sequence of the Klebsiella pneumonia nif gene promoters. Fourth, the sequence element at approximately -100 in the 25- and the 27-kDa flagellin genes is homologous to a 19-base-pair sequence [designated previously as II-1; see Chen, L.-S., Mullin, D. M. & Newton, A. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2860-2864]at -101 in the promoter of transcription unit II of the hook gene cluster; the two flagellin genes, like the fla genes examined in the hook gene cluster that contain the -100 element, are under positive control by transcription unit III of the hook gene cluster. This result supports a model in which the timing of fla gene transcription in the C. crescentus cell cycle is determined in part by a cascade of trans-acting regulatory gene products. Images PMID:3469658

  6. Honey dilution impact on in vitro wound healing: Normoxic and hypoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Amrita; Bag, Swarnendu; Barui, Ananya; Banerjee, Provas; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-01-01

    Honey is known as a popular healing agent against tropical infections and wounds. However, the effects of honey dilutions on keratinocyte (HaCaT) wound healing under hypoxic condition is still not explored. In this study, we examined whether honey dilution have wound healing potential under hypoxic stress. The antioxidant potential and healing efficacy of honey dilution on in vitro wound of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT cells) under hypoxia (3% O2 ), and normoxia is explored by nitro blue tetrazolium assay. The cell survival % quantified by MTT assay to select four honey dilutions like 10, 1, 0.1, and 0.01 v/v% and the changes in cellular function was observed microscopically. Further, the cell proliferation, migration, cell-cell adhesion, and relevant gene expression were studied by flow cytometry, migration/scratch assay, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The expression pattern of cardinal molecular features viz. E-cadherin, cytoskeletal protein F-actin, p63, and hypoxia marker Hif 1α were examined. Honey dilution in 0.1% v/v combat wound healing limitations in vitro under normoxia and hypoxia (3%). Its wound healing potential was quantified by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR for the associated molecular features that were responsible for cell proliferation and migration. Our data showed that honey dilution can be effective in hypoxic wound healing. Additionally, it reduced superoxide generation and supplied favorable bioambience for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation during hypoxic wound healing. These findings may reveal the importance of honey as an alternative and cost effective therapeutic natural product for wound healing in hypoxic condition.

  7. Inferring biological functions and associated transcriptional regulators using gene set expression coherence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Rhyu, Mun-Gan; Ho Jung, Myeong

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene clustering has been widely used to group genes with similar expression pattern in microarray data analysis. Subsequent enrichment analysis using predefined gene sets can provide clues on which functional themes or regulatory sequence motifs are associated with individual gene clusters. In spite of the potential utility, gene clustering and enrichment analysis have been used in separate platforms, thus, the development of integrative algorithm linking both methods is highly challenging. Results In this study, we propose an algorithm for discovery of molecular functions and elucidation of transcriptional logics using two kinds of gene information, functional and regulatory motif gene sets. The algorithm, termed gene set expression coherence analysis first selects functional gene sets with significantly high expression coherences. Those candidate gene sets are further processed into a number of functionally related themes or functional clusters according to the expression similarities. Each functional cluster is then, investigated for the enrichment of transcriptional regulatory motifs using modified gene set enrichment analysis and regulatory motif gene sets. The method was tested for two publicly available expression profiles representing murine myogenesis and erythropoiesis. For respective profiles, our algorithm identified myocyte- and erythrocyte-related molecular functions, along with the putative transcriptional regulators for the corresponding molecular functions. Conclusion As an integrative and comprehensive method for the analysis of large-scaled gene expression profiles, our method is able to generate a set of testable hypotheses: the transcriptional regulator X regulates function Y under cellular condition Z. GSECA algorithm is implemented into freely available software package. PMID:18021416

  8. Transcriptional activation of Xenopus class III genes in chromatin isolated from sperm and somatic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wolffe, A P

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus sperm chromatin lacks class III transcription complexes and somatic histone H1. Inactive class III genes in sperm chromatin are easily programmed with transcription complexes de novo and transcribed in Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. In contrast, repressed class III genes in somatic chromatin are not transcribed in the oocyte nuclear extract. Class III genes that are initially inactive or repressed in both types of chromatin can be efficiently transcribed in a cell free preparation of Xenopus eggs. Chromatin mediated repression of class III genes in somatic nuclei is reversible in Xenopus egg extract, but not in the oocyte nuclear extract. Any inhibition of transcription attributed to chromatin assembly onto a gene, will therefore depend on the extract in which transcription is assayed. Images PMID:2915929

  9. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    SciTech Connect

    Coquelet, H.; Tebabi, P.; Pays, A.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E. )

    1989-09-01

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model.

  10. DNA regions that regulate the ovarian transcriptional specificity of Drosophila yolk protein genes.

    PubMed

    Logan, S K; Garabedian, M J; Wensink, P C

    1989-09-01

    Yolk protein genes 1 and 2 (yp1 and yp2) of Drosophila melanogaster are divergently transcribed neighboring genes. Both are transcribed in only two tissues, the ovarian follicle cells and the fat bodies of adult females. Previous work has identified a yolk protein enhancer between the genes that is sufficient to direct transcription in one of the tissues, female fat bodies. Using germ-line transformation methods, we identify two cis-acting regions with positive effects on transcription in ovaries. One, a 301-bp region located between the genes, influences both genes and is an enhancer determining the stage and cell type specificity of ovarian transcription. The other, a 105-bp region located in the first exon of yp2, acts across the yp2 promoter region to stimulate yp1 transcription in ovaries. Additional observations suggest how a single enhancer influences both promoters.

  11. Identification of sequences regulating the transcription of a Dictyostelium gene selectively expressed in prespore cells.

    PubMed Central

    Early, A E; Williams, J G

    1989-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relative contributions of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to the regulation of prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium. We have determined the DNA sequence upstream of D19, the Dictyostelium gene encoding PsA, a prespore-specific, cell surface protein of unknown function. Our analysis of gene fusions, in which D19 upstream sequences are placed adjacent to a heterologous reporter gene, indicates that transcriptional signals alone are sufficient for the correct temporal and cell-type specific expression of this gene. We also show that the 5' and 3' boundaries of the minimal sequences necessary for correct developmental regulation lie within the region 338 to 122 nucleotides upstream of the start site of transcription but that flanking sequences seem to be necessary for optimal expression. Images PMID:2550894

  12. Impact of room air resuscitation on early growth response gene-1 in a neonatal piglet model of cerebral hypoxic ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tyree, Melissa M; Dalgard, Clifton; O'Neill, J Timothy

    2006-03-01

    Early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) is up-regulated by hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in adult animals, functioning as a master switch in inflammation and thrombogenesis. We hypothesized that resuscitation from HI with 100% O2 would result in greater Egr-1 expression, ROS, and cell death (CD) in the brains of newborn piglets than 21% O2. Two control groups breathed 21% O2 for 1 h followed by 21% or 100% O2 for 1 h. Two HI groups underwent carotid artery occlusion and breathed 8-12% O2 for 1 h followed by occlusion release and 21% or 100% O2 for 1 h. Brain Egr-1 mRNA and protein were analyzed via quantitative PCR and Western blot. CD and ROS were measured by fluorescence microscopy. Egr-1 mRNA expression increased throughout the brain in response to HI with regional heterogeneity, but protein levels did not. Resuscitation with 100% oxygen did not cause any additional Egr-1 mRNA, Egr-1 protein, CD, or ROS production as compared with 21% oxygen. There was no difference in physiologic recovery after HI with room air compared with 100% O2 resuscitation. However, 100% O2 administration was associated with increased CD in the brainstem independent of HI. Therefore, 100% O2 may have been toxic to some brainstem cells and potentially have significance in long-term neurologic sequelae seen after neonatal HI/resuscitation. Egr-1 protein levels may be tightly regulated in an attempt to diminish neurotoxicity or to enhance plasticity at this stage of development.

  13. Glucagon and Insulin Cooperatively Stimulate Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Transcription by Increasing the Expression of Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Alonge, Kimberly M; Meares, Gordon P; Hillgartner, F Bradley

    2017-03-31

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon cooperatively interacts with insulin to stimulate hepatic FGF21 gene expression. Here we investigated the mechanism by which glucagon and insulin increased FGF21 gene transcription in primary hepatocyte cultures. Transfection analyses demonstrated that glucagon plus insulin induction of FGF21 transcription was conferred by two activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) binding sites in the FGF21 gene. Glucagon plus insulin stimulated a 5-fold increase in ATF4 protein abundance, and knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to increase FGF21 expression. In hepatocytes incubated in the presence of insulin, treatment with a PKA-selective agonist mimicked the ability of glucagon to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Inhibition of PKA, PI3K, Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Additional analyses demonstrated that chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) induced a 6-fold increase in ATF4 expression and that knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of CDCA to increase FGF21 gene expression. CDCA increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α, and inhibition of eIF2α signaling activity suppressed CDCA regulation of ATF4 and FGF21 expression. These results demonstrate that glucagon plus insulin increases FGF21 transcription by stimulating ATF4 expression and that activation of cAMP/PKA and PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 mediates the effect of glucagon plus insulin on ATF4 expression. These results also demonstrate that CDCA regulation of FGF21 transcription is mediated at least partially by an eIF2α-dependent increase in ATF4 expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Mechanistic basis for transcriptional bursting of ribosomal genes in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandeep; Sanchez, Alvaro; Kondev, Jane

    2012-02-01

    Upon adding more ribosomal genes to the E. coli cell, it adjusts the overall transcription of these genes by reducing the average transcription rate per gene, so as to keep constant the level of ribosomal RNA in the cell. It was observed that this reduction in the average transcription level per gene is accompanied by the generation of transcriptional bursts. The biophysical mechanism responsible for this type of transcriptional control is not yet known. We consider three possible mechanisms suggested in the literature: proximal pausing by RNA polymerase, cooperative recruitment of RNA polymerase by DNA supercoiling, and competition between RNA polymerase and a transcription factor for binding to regulatory DNA. We compute the expected statistical properties of transcription initiation for each one of these models,and compare our predictions with published distributions of distances between the polymerases transcribing the ribosomal genes, obtained from electron micrographs.We use this data to estimate the rates of transcription initiation, which are found to be in good agreement with independent measurements. We also show that the three mechanisms considered here can be discriminated by comparing their predictions for the mean and the variance of interpolymerase distances.

  15. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  16. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:21645289

  17. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  18. Methoprene-tolerant 1 regulates gene transcription to maintain insect larval status.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Wen; Wang, Di; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-08-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are regulated by two hormones: 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). The hormone 20E regulates gene transcription via the nuclear receptor EcR to promote metamorphosis, whereas JH regulates gene transcription via its intracellular receptor methoprene-tolerant (Met) to prevent larval-pupal transition. However, the function and mechanism of Met in various insect developments are not well understood. We propose that Met1 plays a key role in maintaining larval status not only by promoting JH-responsive gene transcription but also by repressing 20E-responsive gene transcription in the Lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. Met1 protein is increased during feeding stage and decreased during molting and metamorphic stages. Met1 is upregulated by JH III and a low concentration of 20E independently, but is downregulated by a high concentration of 20E. Knockdown of Met1 in larvae causes precocious pupation, decrease in JH pathway gene expression, and increase in 20E pathway gene expression. Met1 interacts with heat shock protein 90 and binds to JH response element to regulate Krüppel homolog 1 transcription in JH III induction. Met1 interacts with ultraspiracle protein 1 (USP1) to repress 20E transcription complex EcRB1/USP1 formation and binding to ecdysone response element. These data indicate that JH via Met1 regulates JH pathway gene expression and represses 20E pathway gene expression to maintain the larval status.

  19. Genetic architecture of gene transcription in two Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations.

    PubMed

    He, X; Houde, A L S; Pitcher, T E; Heath, D D

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression regulation has an important role in short-term acclimation and long-term adaptation to changing environments. However, the genetic architecture of gene expression has received much less attention than that of traditional phenotypic traits. In this study, we used a 5 × 5 full-factorial breeding design within each of two Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations to characterize the genetic architecture of gene transcription. The two populations (LaHave and Sebago) are being used for reintroduction efforts into Lake Ontario, Canada. We used high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR to measure gene transcription levels for 22 genes in muscle tissue of Atlantic salmon fry. We tested for population differences in gene transcription and partitioned the transcription variance into additive genetic, non-additive genetic and maternal effects within each population. Interestingly, average additive genetic effects for gene transcription were smaller than those reported for traditional phenotypic traits in salmonids, suggesting that the evolutionary potential of gene transcription is lower than that of traditional traits. Contrary to expectations for early life stage traits, maternal effects were small. In general, the LaHave population had higher additive genetic effects for gene transcription than the Sebago population had, indicating that the LaHave fish have a higher adaptive potential to respond to the novel selection pressures associated with reintroduction into a novel environment. This study highlights not only the profound variation in gene transcription possible among salmonid populations but also the among-population variation in the underlying genetic architecture of such traits.

  20. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  1. Intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks coordinate the expression of genes for organellar functions.

    PubMed

    Leister, Dario; Wang, Xi; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F X; Kleine, Tatjana

    2011-09-01

    Genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are distributed between the nuclear and organellar genomes. Organelle biogenesis and metabolism, therefore, require appropriate coordination of gene expression in the different compartments to ensure efficient synthesis of essential multiprotein complexes of mixed genetic origin. Whereas organelle-to-nucleus signaling influences nuclear gene expression at the transcriptional level, organellar gene expression (OGE) is thought to be primarily regulated posttranscriptionally. Here, we show that intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks coordinate the expression of genes for organellar functions. Nearly 1,300 ATH1 microarray-based transcriptional profiles of nuclear and organellar genes for mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were analyzed. The activity of genes involved in organellar energy production (OEP) or OGE in each of the organelles and in the nucleus is highly coordinated. Intracompartmental networks that link the OEP and OGE gene sets serve to synchronize the expression of nucleus- and organelle-encoded proteins. At a higher regulatory level, coexpression of organellar and nuclear OEP/OGE genes typically modulates chloroplast functions but affects mitochondria only when chloroplast functions are perturbed. Under conditions that induce energy shortage, the intercompartmental coregulation of photosynthesis genes can even override intracompartmental networks. We conclude that dynamic intracompartmental and intercompartmental transcriptional networks for OEP and OGE genes adjust the activity of organelles in response to the cellular energy state and environmental stresses, and we identify candidate cis-elements involved in the transcriptional coregulation of nuclear genes. Regarding the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes, novel tentative target genes of σ factors are identified.

  2. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  3. Identifying Novel Transcriptional and Epigenetic Features of Nuclear Lamina-associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feinan; Yao, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Because a large portion of the mammalian genome is associated with the nuclear lamina (NL), it is interesting to study how native genes resided there are transcribed and regulated. In this study, we report unique transcriptional and epigenetic features of nearly 3,500 NL-associated genes (NL genes). Promoter regions of active NL genes are often excluded from NL-association, suggesting that NL-promoter interactions may repress transcription. Active NL genes with higher RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment levels tend to display Pol II promoter-proximal pausing, while Pol II recruitment and Pol II pausing are not correlated among non-NL genes. At the genome-wide scale, NL-association and H3K27me3 distinguishes two large gene classes with low transcriptional activities. Notably, NL-association is anti-correlated with both transcription and active histone mark levels among genes not significantly enriched with H3K9me3 or H3K27me3, suggesting that NL-association may represent a novel gene repression pathway. Interestingly, an NL gene subgroup is not significantly enriched with H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 and is transcribed at higher levels than the rest of NL genes. Furthermore, we identified distal enhancers associated with active NL genes and reported their epigenetic features.

  4. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  5. Autocrine production of IL-11 mediates tumorigenicity in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Onnis, Barbara; Fer, Nicole; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Perez, Victor S.; Melillo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    IL-11 and its receptor, IL-11Ra, are expressed in human cancers; however, the functional role of IL-11 in tumor progression is not known. We found that IL11 is a hypoxia-inducible, VHL-regulated gene in human cancer cells and that expression of IL11 mRNA was dependent, at least in part, on HIF-1. A cooperative interaction between HIF-1 and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation of the IL11 promoter. Additionally, we found that human cancer cells expressed a functional IL-11Ra subunit, which triggered signal transduction either by exogenous recombinant human IL-11 or by autocrine production of IL-11 in cells cultured under hypoxic conditions. Silencing of IL11 dramatically abrogated the ability of hypoxia to increase anchorage-independent growth and significantly reduced tumor growth in xenograft models. Notably, these results were phenocopied by partial knockdown of STAT1 in a human prostate cancer cell line (PC3), suggesting that this pathway may play an important role in mediating the effects of IL-11 under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, these results identify IL11 as an oxygen- and VHL-regulated gene and provide evidence of a pathway “hijacked” by hypoxic cancer cells that may contribute to tumor progression. PMID:23549086

  6. Reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in citrus genotypes under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Valéria; Kubo, Karen S; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Stuart, Rodrigo M; Boava, Leonardo P; Rodrigues, Carolina M; Machado, Marcos A

    2012-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) has emerged as an accurate and widely used technique for expression profiling of selected genes. However, obtaining reliable measurements depends on the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization. The aim of this work was to assess the expression stability of 15 candidate genes to determine which set of reference genes is best suited for transcript normalization in citrus in different tissues and organs and leaves challenged with five pathogens (Alternaria alternata, Phytophthora parasitica, Xylella fastidiosa and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus). We tested traditional genes used for transcript normalization in citrus and orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes described as superior reference genes based on transcriptome data. geNorm and NormFinder algorithms were used to find the best reference genes to normalize all samples and conditions tested. Additionally, each biotic stress was individually analyzed by geNorm. In general, FBOX (encoding a member of the F-box family) and GAPC2 (GAPDH) was the most stable candidate gene set assessed under the different conditions and subsets tested, while CYP (cyclophilin), TUB (tubulin) and CtP (cathepsin) were the least stably expressed genes found. Validation of the best suitable reference genes for normalizing the expression level of the WRKY70 transcription factor in leaves infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus showed that arbitrary use of reference genes without previous testing could lead to misinterpretation of data. Our results revealed FBOX, SAND (a SAND family protein), GAPC2 and UPL7 (ubiquitin protein ligase 7) to be superior reference genes, and we recommend their use in studies of gene expression in citrus species and relatives. This work constitutes the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for transcript normalization in different citrus organs and under biotic stress.

  7. Reference Genes for Accurate Transcript Normalization in Citrus Genotypes under Different Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Valéria; Kubo, Karen S.; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Stuart, Rodrigo M.; Boava, Leonardo P.; Rodrigues, Carolina M.; Machado, Marcos A.

    2012-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) has emerged as an accurate and widely used technique for expression profiling of selected genes. However, obtaining reliable measurements depends on the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization. The aim of this work was to assess the expression stability of 15 candidate genes to determine which set of reference genes is best suited for transcript normalization in citrus in different tissues and organs and leaves challenged with five pathogens (Alternaria alternata, Phytophthora parasitica, Xylella fastidiosa and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus). We tested traditional genes used for transcript normalization in citrus and orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes described as superior reference genes based on transcriptome data. geNorm and NormFinder algorithms were used to find the best reference genes to normalize all samples and conditions tested. Additionally, each biotic stress was individually analyzed by geNorm. In general, FBOX (encoding a member of the F-box family) and GAPC2 (GAPDH) was the most stable candidate gene set assessed under the different conditions and subsets tested, while CYP (cyclophilin), TUB (tubulin) and CtP (cathepsin) were the least stably expressed genes found. Validation of the best suitable reference genes for normalizing the expression level of the WRKY70 transcription factor in leaves infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus showed that arbitrary use of reference genes without previous testing could lead to misinterpretation of data. Our results revealed FBOX, SAND (a SAND family protein), GAPC2 and UPL7 (ubiquitin protein ligase 7) to be superior reference genes, and we recommend their use in studies of gene expression in citrus species and relatives. This work constitutes the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for transcript normalization in different citrus organs and under biotic stress. PMID:22347455

  8. Definition of a Novel Feed-Forward Mechanism for Glycolysis-HIF1α Signaling in Hypoxic Tumors Highlights Aldolase A as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Geoffrey; De Jong, Petrus; James, Brian; Koh, Mei Yee; Lemos, Robert; Kingston, John; Aleshin, Alexander; Bankston, Laurie A; Miller, Claudia P; Cho, Eun Jeong; Edupuganti, Ramakrishna; Devkota, Ashwini; Stancu, Gabriel; Liddington, Robert C; Dalby, Kevin; Powis, Garth

    2016-07-15

    The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1α drives expression of many glycolytic enzymes. Here, we show that hypoxic glycolysis, in turn, increases HIF1α transcriptional activity and stimulates tumor growth, revealing a novel feed-forward mechanism of glycolysis-HIF1α signaling. Negative regulation of HIF1α by AMPK1 is bypassed in hypoxic cells, due to ATP elevation by increased glycolysis, thereby preventing phosphorylation and inactivation of the HIF1α transcriptional coactivator p300. Notably, of the HIF1α-activated glycolytic enzymes we evaluated by gene silencing, aldolase A (ALDOA) blockade produced the most robust decrease in glycolysis, HIF-1 activity, and cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, either RNAi-mediated silencing of ALDOA or systemic treatment with a specific small-molecule inhibitor of aldolase A was sufficient to increase overall survival in a xenograft model of metastatic breast cancer. In establishing a novel glycolysis-HIF-1α feed-forward mechanism in hypoxic tumor cells, our results also provide a preclinical rationale to develop aldolase A inhibitors as a generalized strategy to treat intractable hypoxic cancer cells found widely in most solid tumors. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4259-69. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Identification of a novel reference gene for apple transcriptional profiling under postharvest conditions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Tatiane Timm; Pegoraro, Camila; Finatto, Taciane; Quecini, Vera; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor; Girardi, César Luis

    2015-01-01

    Reverse Transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is one of the most important techniques for gene expression profiling due to its high sensibility and reproducibility. However, the reliability of the results is highly dependent on data normalization, performed by comparisons between the expression profiles of the genes of interest against those of constitutively expressed, reference genes. Although the technique is widely used in fruit postharvest experiments, the transcription stability of reference genes has not been thoroughly investigated under these experimental conditions. Thus, we have determined the transcriptional profile, under these conditions, of three genes commonly used as reference--ACTIN (MdACT), PROTEIN DISULPHIDE ISOMERASE (MdPDI) and UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYME E2 (MdUBC)--along with two novel candidates--HISTONE 1 (MdH1) and NUCLEOSSOME ASSEMBLY 1 PROTEIN (MdNAP1). The expression profile of the genes was investigated throughout five experiments, with three of them encompassing the postharvest period and the other two, consisting of developmental and spatial phases. The transcriptional stability was comparatively investigated using four distinct software packages: BestKeeper, NormFinder, geNorm and DataAssist. Gene ranking results for transcriptional stability were similar for the investigated software packages, with the exception of BestKeeper. The classic reference gene MdUBC ranked among the most stably transcribed in all investigated experimental conditions. Transcript accumulation profiles for the novel reference candidate gene MdH1 were stable throughout the tested conditions, especially in experiments encompassing the postharvest period. Thus, our results present a novel reference gene for postharvest experiments in apple and reinforce the importance of checking the transcription profile of reference genes under the experimental conditions of interest.

  10. Differential transcription of multiple copies of a silk worm gene encoding tRNA(Gly1).

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Taneja, R; Gopalkrishnan, R; Prudhomme, J C; Gopinathan, K P

    1993-12-08

    Ten different tRNA(Gly1) genes from the silk worm, Bombyx mori, have been cloned and characterized. These genes were transcribed in vitro in homologous nuclear extracts from the posterior silk gland (PSG) or nuclear extracts derived from the middle silk gland or ovarian tissues. Although the transcription levels were much higher in the PSG nuclear extracts, the transcriptional efficiency of the individual genes followed a similar pattern in all the extracts. Based on the levels of in vitro transcription, the ten tRNA(Gly1) genes could be divided into three groups, viz., those which were transcribed at very high levels (e.g., clone pR8), high to medium levels (e.g., pBmi1, pBmp1, pBmh1, pBmt1) and low to barely detectable levels (e.g., pBms1, pBmj1 and pBmk1). The coding sequences of all these tRNA genes being identical, the differential transcription suggested that the flanking sequences modulate their transcriptional efficiency. The presence of positive and negative regulatory elements in the 5' flanking regions of these genes was confirmed by transcription competition experiments. A positive element was present in the immediate upstream A+T-rich sequences in all the genes, but no consensus sequences correlating to the transcriptional status could be generated. The presence of negative elements on the other hand was indicated only in some of the genes and therefore may have a role in the differential transcription of these tRNA(Gly1) genes in vivo.

  11. Joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in rat knee joints.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Suda, Hideaki; Ando, Akira; Onoda, Yoshito; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hatori, Kouki; Itoi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoxic and inflammatory conditions after immobilization in the joint capsule of rat knees. The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were immobilized with an internal fixator (Im group) for 1 day, 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and tibia and screws inserted without a plate (control group). The number of cells and blood vessels in the capsule were histologically examined. The hypoxic condition in the capsule was histologically examined with a Hypoxyprobe™-1. The gene expressions related to the hypoxic (hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and fibroblast growth factor 2) and inflammatory conditions [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and tumor necrosis factor-β] were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The number of cells was unchanged at 1 day in the two groups; however, the number significantly increased at 3 days in the Im group. The number of blood vessels in the Im group gradually decreased. Strong immunostaining of Hypoxyprobe™-1 around the blood vessels was observed in the Im group. The gene expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and fibroblast growth factor 2 were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. The gene expressions of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-β were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. These data indicated that joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in the joint capsule, which might be an initiating factor for joint contracture.

  12. PPB1, a putative spliced leader RNA gene transcription factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Wen, L M; Xu, P; Benegal, G; Carvalho, M R; Buck, G A

    2000-10-01

    In trypanosomatids, the spliced leader RNA, or SL RNA, donates its 5' 39 nucleotides to mature nuclear mRNAs in a process termed trans-splicing. We have previously characterized the SL RNA gene from Trypanosoma cruzi and identified its transcription promoter, including a 14 nt proximal sequence element, or PSE, that binds a putative transcription factor and activates transcription of the gene. Herein, we describe establishment of a yeast one-hybrid system using the 14 nt PSE as bait, and use this system to select T. cruzi cDNAs encoding a putative transcription factor that activates transcription of the SL RNA gene. The cDNA was selected from a normalized library and encodes an approximately 45 kDa putative PSE promoter-binding protein, PPB1. PPB1 in vitro translated or overexpressed in and isolated from transformed E. coli, showed PSE-specific binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Finally, overexpression of PPB1 in T. cruzi led to increased expression of the SL RNA gene as well as reporter genes in episomal constructs under the control of the SL RNA gene promoter. These observations suggest that PPB1 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in SL RNA gene expression.

  13. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt7 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein Important for Transcription in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, L. J.; Dollard, C.; Tan, P.; Winston, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally were identified as suppressors of Ty and {delta small} insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Other genes that have been identified in mutant hunts of this type have been shown to play a role in transcription. In this work we show that SPT7 is also important for proper transcription in vivo. We have cloned and sequenced the SPT7 gene and have shown that it encodes a large, acidic protein that is localized to the nucleus. The SPT7 protein contains a bromodomain sequence; a deletion that removes the bromodomain from the SPT7 protein causes no detectable mutant phenotype. Strains that contain an spt7 null mutation are viable but grow very slowly and have transcriptional defects at many loci including insertion mutations, Ty elements, the INO1 gene and the MFA1 gene. These transcriptional defects and other mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by certain mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA binding protein (TBP). The similarity of the phenotypes of spt7 and spt15 mutants, including effects of spt7 mutations on the transcription start site of certain genes, suggests that SPT7 plays an important role in transcription initiation in vivo. PMID:7713415

  14. Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR and DosR-DNA Complex Involved in Gene Activation during Adaptation to Hypoxic Latency

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Wu, Meiting; Rice, Adrian E; Roberts, David M; Sherman, David R; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    On encountering low oxygen conditions, DosR activates the transcription of 47 genes, promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a non-replicating state. Here, we report the crystal structures of the DosR C-terminal domain and its complex with a consensus DNA sequence of the hypoxia-induced gene promoter. The DosR C-terminal domain contains four {alpha}-helices and forms tetramers consisting of two dimers with non-intersecting dyads. In the DNA-bound structure, each DosR C-terminal domain in a dimer places its DNA-binding helix deep into the major groove, causing two bends in the DNA. DosR makes numerous protein-DNA base contacts using only three amino acid residues per subunit: Lys179, Lys182, and Asn183. The DosR tetramer is unique among response regulators with known structures.

  15. Sumoylation of Rap1 mediates the recruitment of TFIID to promote transcription of ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Nguéa, Aurélie P; Aanes, Håvard; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd; Lorenz, Susanne; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Klungland, Arne; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2015-06-01

    Transcription factors are abundant Sumo targets, yet the global distribution of Sumo along the chromatin and its physiological relevance in transcription are poorly understood. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the genome-wide localization of Sumo along the chromatin. We discovered that Sumo-enriched genes are almost exclusively involved in translation, such as tRNA genes and ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). Genome-wide expression analysis showed that Sumo positively regulates their transcription. We also discovered that the Sumo consensus motif at RPG promoters is identical to the DNA binding motif of the transcription factor Rap1. We demonstrate that Rap1 is a molecular target of Sumo and that sumoylation of Rap1 is important for cell viability. Furthermore, Rap1 sumoylation promotes recruitment of the basal transcription machinery, and sumoylation of Rap1 cooperates with the target of rapamycin kinase complex 1 (TORC1) pathway to promote RPG transcription. Strikingly, our data reveal that sumoylation of Rap1 functions in a homeostatic feedback loop that sustains RPG transcription during translational stress. Taken together, Sumo regulates the cellular translational capacity by promoting transcription of tRNA genes and RPGs. © 2015 Chymkowitch et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Sumoylation of Rap1 mediates the recruitment of TFIID to promote transcription of ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Nguéa P, Aurélie; Aanes, Håvard; Koehler, Christian J.; Thiede, Bernd; Lorenz, Susanne; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A.; Klungland, Arne; Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are abundant Sumo targets, yet the global distribution of Sumo along the chromatin and its physiological relevance in transcription are poorly understood. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the genome-wide localization of Sumo along the chromatin. We discovered that Sumo-enriched genes are almost exclusively involved in translation, such as tRNA genes and ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). Genome-wide expression analysis showed that Sumo positively regulates their transcription. We also discovered that the Sumo consensus motif at RPG promoters is identical to the DNA binding motif of the transcription factor Rap1. We demonstrate that Rap1 is a molecular target of Sumo and that sumoylation of Rap1 is important for cell viability. Furthermore, Rap1 sumoylation promotes recruitment of the basal transcription machinery, and sumoylation of Rap1 cooperates with the target of rapamycin kinase complex 1 (TORC1) pathway to promote RPG transcription. Strikingly, our data reveal that sumoylation of Rap1 functions in a homeostatic feedback loop that sustains RPG transcription during translational stress. Taken together, Sumo regulates the cellular translational capacity by promoting transcription of tRNA genes and RPGs. PMID:25800674

  17. Alternative transcripts of the SERPINA1 gene in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Matamala, Nerea; Martínez, Maria Teresa; Lara, Beatriz; Pérez, Laura; Vázquez, Irene; Jimenez, Azucena; Barquín, Miguel; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Blanco, Ignacio; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2015-07-04

    SERPINA1 is the gene for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein with anti-protease and immunoregulatory activities. Mutations in SERPINA1 gene cause AAT deficiency and predispose individuals to early-onset emphysema and liver diseases. Expression of the SERPINA1 gene is regulated by different promoters and alternative splicing events among non-coding exons 1A, 1B and 1C. We have developed three quantitative PCR (QT-PCR) assays (1A, 1B and 1C). These assays were applied for the analysis of SERPINA1 alternative transcripts in: (1) 16 human tissues and (2) peripheral blood leukocytes from 33 subjects with AAT mutations and 7 controls. Tissue-specific expression was found for the SERPINA1 transcripts. The 1A transcripts were mainly expressed in leukocytes and lung tissue while those detected with the 1B assay were highly restricted to leukocytes. Only 1B transcripts significantly correlated with serum AAT levels. The 1C transcripts were specifically found in lung, liver, kidney and pancreas. Furthermore, the expression of transcripts was related to AAT genotypes. While deficient variants of AAT had no pronounced effect on the transcript expression, null alleles were associated with significant reduction of different transcripts. The possibility to discriminate between SERPINA1 alternative splicing products will help us to understand better the regulation of SERPINA1 gene and its association with SERPINA1 mutations-related diseases.

  18. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L.; Sander, Guy W.; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I.

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a “fine-tune” regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  20. The WRKY Transcription Factor WRKY71/EXB1 Controls Shoot Branching by Transcriptionally Regulating RAX Genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongshu; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wang, Xinlei; Han, Xiang; Wei, Baoye; Wang, Jianqiao; Li, Boxun; Yu, Hao; Huang, Qingpei; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2015-11-01

    Plant shoot branching is pivotal for developmental plasticity and crop yield. The formation of branch meristems is regulated by several key transcription factors including REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1), RAX2, and RAX3. However, the regulatory network of shoot branching is still largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of EXCESSIVE BRANCHES1 (EXB1), which affects axillary meristem (AM) initiation and bud activity. Overexpression of EXB1 in the gain-of-function mutant exb1-D leads to severe bushy and dwarf phenotypes, which result from excessive AM initiation and elevated bud activities. EXB1 encodes the WRKY transcription factor WRKY71, which has demonstrated transactivation activities. Disruption of WRKY71/EXB1 by chimeric repressor silencing technology leads to fewer branches, indicating that EXB1 plays important roles in the control of shoot branching. We demonstrate that EXB1 controls AM initiation by positively regulating the transcription of RAX1, RAX2, and RAX3. Disruption of the RAX genes partially rescues the branching phenotype caused by EXB1 overexpression. We further show that EXB1 also regulates auxin homeostasis in control of shoot branching. Our data demonstrate that EXB1 plays pivotal roles in shoot branching by regulating both transcription of RAX genes and auxin pathways. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. The WRKY Transcription Factor WRKY71/EXB1 Controls Shoot Branching by Transcriptionally Regulating RAX Genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongshu; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wang, Xinlei; Han, Xiang; Wei, Baoye; Yu, Hao; Huang, Qingpei

    2015-01-01

    Plant shoot branching is pivotal for developmental plasticity and crop yield. The formation of branch meristems is regulated by several key transcription factors including REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1), RAX2, and RAX3. However, the regulatory network of shoot branching is still largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of EXCESSIVE BRANCHES1 (EXB1), which affects axillary meristem (AM) initiation and bud activity. Overexpression of EXB1 in the gain-of-function mutant exb1-D leads to severe bushy and dwarf phenotypes, which result from excessive AM initiation and elevated bud activities. EXB1 encodes the WRKY transcription factor WRKY71, which has demonstrated transactivation activities. Disruption of WRKY71/EXB1 by chimeric repressor silencing technology leads to fewer branches, indicating that EXB1 plays important roles in the control of shoot branching. We demonstrate that EXB1 controls AM initiation by positively regulating the transcription of RAX1, RAX2, and RAX3. Disruption of the RAX genes partially rescues the branching phenotype caused by EXB1 overexpression. We further show that EXB1 also regulates auxin homeostasis in control of shoot branching. Our data demonstrate that EXB1 plays pivotal roles in shoot branching by regulating both transcription of RAX genes and auxin pathways. PMID:26578700

  2. Selenite transiently represses transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Valeria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Di Sanza, Claudio; Negri, Rodolfo; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    A striking response of potato leaves to aspersion with selenite was observed at the transcriptional level by means of cDNA microarrays analysis. This response is characterized by a general transient repression of genes coding for components of photosynthetic systems and of other light-regulated genes. In particular, maximal repression was observed 8 h after selenite aspersion, while 24 h after the treatment a complete recovery of normal transcriptional levels was detected. Another general feature of the transcriptional response to selenite is represented by the transcriptional induction of genes related to amino acid metabolism, and to stress defense; interestingly, two genes coding for glutathione S-transferases were found early-induced upon selenite treatment.

  3. Acetylation of RNA polymerase II regulates growth-factor-induced gene transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2013-11-07

    Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes.

  4. Circuit-wide transcriptional profiling reveals brain region-specific gene networks regulating depression susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bagot, Rosemary C.; Cates, Hannah M.; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S.; Walker, Deena M.; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J.; Heller, Elizabeth A.; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-min; Stein, Jason. L.; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A.; Scobie, Kimberly N.; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L.; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here we performed RNA-sequencing on 4 brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  5. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF EXPOSURE TO 17-ALPHA-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally persistent chemicals that functionally mimic estrogen are ubiquitous in surface waters and have been shown to effect reproductive health of species living in these habitats. Toxicant induced transcription of specific genes is a sensitive indicator of exposure and ...

  6. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF EXPOSURE TO 17-ALPHA-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally persistent chemicals that functionally mimic estrogen are ubiquitous in surface waters and have been shown to effect reproductive health of species living in these habitats. Toxicant induced transcription of specific genes is a sensitive indicator of exposure and ...

  7. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently

  8. Possible role of lysophosphatidic acid in rat model of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the vascular wall of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid, is implicated in this vascular remodeling in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Exposure of Wistar rats to 10% O2 for 3 weeks induced an increase in the mean serum levels of LPA, to 40.9 (log-detransformed standard deviations: 23.4–71.7) μM versus 21.6 (11.0–42.3) μM in a matched control animal group (P = 0.037). We also observed perivascular LPA immunohistochemical staining in lungs of hypoxic rats colocalized with the secreted lysophospholipase D autotaxin (ATX). Moreover, ATX colocalized with mast cell tryptase, suggesting implication of these cells in perivascular LPA production. Hypoxic rat lungs expressed more ATX transcripts (2.4-fold) and more transcripts of proteins implicated in cell migration: β2 integrin (1.74-fold), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; 1.84-fold), and αM integrin (2.70-fold). Serum from the hypoxic group of animals had significantly higher chemoattractant properties toward rat primary lung fibroblasts, and this increase in cell migration could be prevented by the LPA receptor 1 and 3 antagonists. LPA also increased adhesive properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells as well as those of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, via the activation of LPA receptor 1 or 3 followed by the stimulation of gene expression of ICAM-1, β-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule integrins. In conclusion, chronic hypoxia increases circulating and tissue levels of LPA, which might induce fibroblast migration and recruitment of mononuclear cells in pulmonary vasculature, both of which contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:25621161

  9. Phytoglobins Improve Hypoxic Root Growth by Alleviating Apical Meristem Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mira, Mohamed M; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic root growth in maize (Zea mays) is influenced by the expression of phytoglobins (ZmPgbs). Relative to the wild type, suppression of ZmPgb1.1 or ZmPgb1.2 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to 4% oxygen, causing structural abnormalities in the root apical meristems. These effects were accompanied by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), possibly through the transcriptional induction of four Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs TUNEL-positive nuclei in meristematic cells indicated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the process. These cells also accumulated nitric oxide and stained heavily for ethylene biosynthetic transcripts. A sharp increase in the expression level of several 1-aminocyclopropane synthase (ZmAcs2, ZmAcs6, and ZmAcs7), 1-aminocyclopropane oxidase (Aco15, Aco20, Aco31, and Aco35), and ethylene-responsive (ZmErf2 and ZmEbf1) genes was observed in hypoxic ZmPgb-suppressing roots, which overproduced ethylene. Inhibiting ROS synthesis with diphenyleneiodonium or ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene suppressed PCD, increased BAX inhibitor-1, an effective attenuator of the death programs in eukaryotes, and restored root growth. Hypoxic roots overexpressing ZmPgbs had the lowest level of ethylene and showed a reduction in ROS staining and TUNEL-positive nuclei in the meristematic cells. These roots retained functional meristems and exhibited the highest growth performance when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of Pgbs in protecting root apical meristems from hypoxia-induced PCD through mechanisms initiated by nitric oxide and mediated by ethylene via ROS. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Phytoglobins Improve Hypoxic Root Growth by Alleviating Apical Meristem Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic root growth in maize (Zea mays) is influenced by the expression of phytoglobins (ZmPgbs). Relative to the wild type, suppression of ZmPgb1.1 or ZmPgb1.2 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to 4% oxygen, causing structural abnormalities in the root apical meristems. These effects were accompanied by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), possibly through the transcriptional induction of four Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs. TUNEL-positive nuclei in meristematic cells indicated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the process. These cells also accumulated nitric oxide and stained heavily for ethylene biosynthetic transcripts. A sharp increase in the expression level of several 1-aminocyclopropane synthase (ZmAcs2, ZmAcs6, and ZmAcs7), 1-aminocyclopropane oxidase (Aco15, Aco20, Aco31, and Aco35), and ethylene-responsive (ZmErf2 and ZmEbf1) genes was observed in hypoxic ZmPgb-suppressing roots, which overproduced ethylene. Inhibiting ROS synthesis with diphenyleneiodonium or ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene suppressed PCD, increased BAX inhibitor-1, an effective attenuator of the death programs in eukaryotes, and restored root growth. Hypoxic roots overexpressing ZmPgbs had the lowest level of ethylene and showed a reduction in ROS staining and TUNEL-positive nuclei in the meristematic cells. These roots retained functional meristems and exhibited the highest growth performance when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of Pgbs in protecting root apical meristems from hypoxia-induced PCD through mechanisms initiated by nitric oxide and mediated by ethylene via ROS. PMID:27702845

  11. Transcriptional effects on double-strand break-induced gene conversion tracts.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y S; Xing, D; Clikeman, J A; Nickoloff, J A

    2000-10-16

    Transcription stimulates spontaneous homologous recombination, but prior studies have not investigated the effects of transcription on double-strand break (DSB)-induced recombination in yeast. We examined products of five ura3 direct repeat substrates in yeast using alleles that were transcribed at low or high levels. In each strain, recombination was stimulated by DSBs created in vivo at an HO site in one copy of ura3. Increasing transcription levels in donor or recipient alleles did not further stimulate DSB-induced recombination, nor did it alter the relative frequencies of conversion and deletion (pop-out) events. This result is consistent with the idea that transcription enhances spontaneous recombination by increasing initiation. Gene conversion tracts were measured using silent restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) at approximately 100bp intervals. Transcription did not alter average tract lengths, but increased transcription in donor alleles increased both the frequency of promoter-proximal (5') unidirectional tracts and conversion of 5' markers. Increased transcription in recipient alleles increased the frequency of bidirectional tracts. We demonstrate that these effects are due to transcription per se, and not just transcription factor binding. These results suggest that transcription influences aspects of gene conversion after initiation, such as strand invasion and/or mismatch repair (MMR).

  12. DAL82, a second gene required for induction of allantoin system gene transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M G; Daugherty, J R; Cooper, T G

    1991-01-01

    Several highly inducible enzyme activities are required for the degradation of allantoin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Induction of these pathway enzymes has been shown to be regulated at transcription, and response to inducer is lost in dal81 and dal82/durM mutants. The similar phenotypes generated by dal81 and dal82 mutations prompted the question of whether they were allelic. We demonstrated that the DAL81 and DAL82 loci are distinct, unlinked genes situated on chromosomes IX and XIV. DAL82 gene expression did not respond to induction by the allantoin pathway inducer or to nitrogen catabolite repression. Expression was also not significantly affected by mutation of the dal80 locus. From the nucleotide sequence of the DAL82 gene, we deduced that it encodes a protein with a mass of 29,079 Da that may possess the structural motifs expected of a regulatory protein. This protein was shown to be required for the function mediated by the cis-acting upstream induction sequence situated in the 5'-flanking regions of the inducible allantoin pathway genes. Images PMID:1898922

  13. The transcription factor SOX17 is involved in the transcriptional control of the uteroglobin gene in rabbit endometrium.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos; Calvo, Enrique; Nieto, Antonio

    2007-10-15

    The transcription of the uteroglobin gene (ug) is induced by progesterone in the rabbit endometrium, primarily through the binding of the progesterone receptor to the distal region of the ug promoter. However, other transcription factors participate in the progesterone action. The proximal ug promoter contains several putative consensus sequences for the binding of various progesterone-dependent endometrial nuclear factors (Perez Martinez et al. [1996] Arch Biochem Biophys 333: 12-18), suggesting that several transcription factors might be implicated in the hormonal induction of ug. We report here that one of these progesterone-dependent factors specifically binds to the sequence CACAATG (-183/-177) of the rabbit ug promoter. This sequence (hereafter called element G') is very similar to the consensus sequence for binding of the SOX family of transcription factors. Mutation of the element G' reduced transcription from the ug promoter in transient expression experiments. The endometrial factor was purified and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography and ion trap coupled mass spectrometry yielding two partial amino acid sequences corresponding to a region of SOX17 that is highly conserved inter-species. This identification was confirmed by immunological techniques using a specific anti-SOX17 antibody. In agreement with the above findings, overexpression of SOX17 in transfected endometrial cells increased transcription from the ug promoter. SOX17 gradually accumulated in the nucleus in vivo concomitant with the induction of ug expression by progesterone in the endometrium. Thus, these findings implicate, for the first time, SOX17 in the transcriptional control of rabbit ug.

  14. The transcription factor ultraspiracle influences honey bee social behavior and behavior-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ament, Seth A; Wang, Ying; Chen, Chieh-Chun; Blatti, Charles A; Hong, Feng; Liang, Zhengzheng S; Negre, Nicolas; White, Kevin P; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Mizzen, Craig A; Sinha, Saurabh; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E

    2012-01-01

    Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor), working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily "nursing" brood) to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP-chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH- and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how "single gene effects" on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues.

  15. The Transcription Factor Ultraspiracle Influences Honey Bee Social Behavior and Behavior-Related Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Blatti, Charles A.; Hong, Feng; Liang, Zhengzheng S.; Negre, Nicolas; White, Kevin P.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Mizzen, Craig A.; Sinha, Saurabh; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor), working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily “nursing” brood) to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP–chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH– and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how “single gene effects” on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues. PMID:22479195

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Tomomi; Azuma, Yutaro; Matsumoto, Kojiro

    2013-01-01

    The α1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS). Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region −91 to −81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp) assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5′-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells. PMID:23533340

  17. Changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition, gene transcription and alternative splicing in germinating barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Pettolino, Filomena; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-02-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seed germination initiates many important biological processes such as DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs. However, little is known on cell wall modifications in germinating embryos. We have investigated cell wall polysaccharide composition change, gene transcription and alternative splicing events in four barley varieties at 24h and 48 h germination. Cell wall components in germinating barley embryos changed rapidly, with increases in cellulose and (1,3)(1,4)-β-D-glucan (20-100%) within 24h, but decreases in heteroxylan and arabinan (3-50%). There were also significant changes in the levels of type I arabinogalactans and heteromannans. Alternative splicing played very important roles in cell wall modifications. At least 22 cell wall transcripts were detected to undergo either alternative 3' splicing, alternative 5' splicing or intron retention type of alternative splicing. These genes coded enzymes catalyzing synthesis and degradation of cellulose, heteroxylan, (1,3)(1,4)-β-D-glucan and other cell wall polymers. Furthermore, transcriptional regulation also played very important roles in cell wall modifications. Transcript levels of primary wall cellulase synthase, heteroxylan synthesizing and nucleotide sugar inter-conversion genes were very high in germinating embryos. At least 50 cell wall genes changed transcript levels significantly. Expression patterns of many cell wall genes coincided with changes in polysaccharide composition. Our data showed that cell wall polysaccharide metabolism was very active in germinating barley embryos, which was regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of fucosyltransferase 1 gene expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Tomomi; Azuma, Yutaro; Matsumoto, Kojiro

    2013-01-01

    The α 1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α 1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site -10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS). Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region -91 to -81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp) assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5'-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  19. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Henson, Brian J; Zhu, Wan; Hardaway, Kelsey; Wetzel, Jaime L; Stefan, Mihaela; Albers, Kathryn M; Nicholls, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  20. E-Cadherin Is Transcriptionally Activated via Suppression of ZEB1 Transcriptional Repressor by Small RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Mazda, Minami; Nishi, Kenji; Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2011-01-01

    RNA activation has been reported to be induced by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that act on the promoters of several genes containing E-cadherin. In this study, we present an alternative mechanism of E-cadherin activation in human PC-3 cells by siRNAs previously reported to possess perfect-complementary sequences to E-cadherin promoter. We found that activation of E-cadherin can be also induced via suppression of ZEB1, which is a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin, by seed-dependent silencing mechanism of these siRNAs. The functional seed-complementary sites of the siRNAs were found in the coding region in addition to the 3′ untranslated region of ZEB1 mRNA. Promoter analyses indicated that E-boxes, which are ZEB1-binding sites, in the upstream promoter region are indispensable for E-cadherin transcription by the siRNAs. Thus, the results caution against ignoring siRNA seed-dependent silencing effects in genome-wide transcriptional regulation. In addition, members of miR-302/372/373/520 family, which have the same seed sequences with one of the siRNAs containing perfect-complementarity to E-cadherin promoter, are also found to activate E-cadherin transcription. Thus, E-cadherin could be upregulated by the suppression of ZEB1 transcriptional repressor by miRNAs in vivo. PMID:22205962

  1. Transcription of novel genes, including a gene linked to the mating-type locus, induced by Chlamydomonas fertilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, P J; Goodenough, U W

    1987-01-01

    Six cDNA clones have been identified that are complementary to transcripts present in young zygotes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii but absent from vegetative and gametic cells. Five early transcripts are synthesized within 5 to 10 min of fertilization; the sixth, late, transcript is not synthesized until 90 min following fertilization. Synthesis of both classes requires cell fusion between gametes. Cycloheximide fails to inhibit early mRNA synthesis, indicating that transcription factors must preexist in the gametes and be activated by cytoplasmic confluence. By contrast, cycloheximide blocks synthesis of the late transcript, suggesting that an early protein product(s) is required for expression of the late gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of inter- and intraspecific genetic crosses demonstrates that one of the early genes is very tightly linked to the mating-type locus. Images PMID:3614194

  2. Clustered Transcription Factor Genes Regulate Nicotine Biosynthesis in Tobacco[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) synthesizes nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids in the root, and their synthesis increases upon herbivory on the leaf via a jasmonate-mediated signaling cascade. Regulatory NIC loci that positively regulate nicotine biosynthesis have been genetically identified, and their mutant alleles have been used to breed low-nicotine tobacco varieties. Here, we report that the NIC2 locus, originally called locus B, comprises clustered transcription factor genes of an ethylene response factor (ERF) subfamily; in the nic2 mutant, at least seven ERF genes are deleted altogether. Overexpression, suppression, and dominant repression experiments using transgenic tobacco roots showed both functional redundancy and divergence among the NIC2-locus ERF genes. These transcription factors recognized a GCC-box element in the promoter of a nicotine pathway gene and specifically activated all known structural genes in the pathway. The NIC2-locus ERF genes are expressed in the root and upregulated by jasmonate with kinetics that are distinct among the members. Thus, gene duplication events generated a cluster of highly homologous transcription factor genes with transcriptional and functional diversity. The NIC2-locus ERFs are close homologs of ORCA3, a jasmonate-responsive transcriptional activator of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus, indicating that the NIC2/ORCA3 ERF subfamily was recruited independently to regulate jasmonate-inducible secondary metabolism in distinct plant lineages. PMID:20959558

  3. Transcription termination between polo and snap, two closely spaced tandem genes of D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Telmo; Ji, Zhe; Tan-Wong, Sue Mei; Carmo, Alexandre M; Tian, Bin; Proudfoot, Nicholas J; Moreira, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Transcription termination of RNA polymerase II between closely spaced genes is an important, though poorly understood, mechanism. This is true, in particular, in the Drosophila genome, where approximately 52% of tandem genes are separated by less than 1 kb. We show that a set of Drosophila tandem genes has a negative correlation of gene expression and display several molecular marks indicative of promoter pausing. We find that an intergenic spacing of 168 bp is sufficient for efficient transcription termination between the polo-snap tandem gene pair, by a mechanism that is independent of Pcf11 and Xrn2. In contrast, analysis of a tandem gene pair containing a longer intergenic region reveals that termination occurs farther downstream of the poly(A) signal and is, in this case, dependent on Pcf11 and Xrn2. For polo-snap, displacement of poised polymerase from the snap promoter by depletion of the initiation factor TFIIB results in an increase of polo transcriptional read-through. This suggests that poised polymerase is necessary for transcription termination. Interestingly, we observe that polo forms a TFIIB dependent gene loop between its promoter and terminator regions. Furthermore, in a plasmid containing the polo-snap locus, deletion of the polo promoter causes an increase in snap expression, as does deletion of polo poly(A) signals. Taken together, our results indicate that polo forms a gene loop and polo transcription termination occurs by an Xrn2 and Pcf11 independent mechanism that requires TFIIB.

  4. Checks and balances between cohesin and polycomb in gene silencing and transcription.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Dale; Kassis, Judith A

    2014-06-02

    The cohesin protein complex was discovered for its roles in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, and the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins for their roles in epigenetic gene silencing during development. Cohesin also controls gene transcription via multiple mechanisms. Genetic and molecular evidence from Drosophila argue that cohesin and the PRC1 PcG complex interact to control transcription of many active genes that are critical for development, and that via these interactions cohesin also controls the availability of PRC1 for gene silencing.

  5. Validation of Reference Genes for Transcriptional Analyses in Pleurotus ostreatus by Using Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Castanera, Raúl; López-Varas, Leticia; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Ramírez, Lucía

    2015-06-15

    Recently, the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus has become a widely used model organism for fungal genomic and transcriptomic analyses. The increasing interest in this species has led to an increasing number of studies analyzing the transcriptional regulation of multigene families that encode extracellular enzymes. Reverse transcription (RT) followed by real-time PCR is the most suitable technique for analyzing the expression of gene sets under multiple culture conditions. In this work, we tested the suitability of 13 candidate genes for their use as reference genes in P. ostreatus time course cultures for enzyme production. We applied three different statistical algorithms and obtained a combination of stable reference genes for optimal normalization of RT-quantitative PCR assays. This reference index can be used for future transcriptomic analyses and validation of transcriptome sequencing or microarray data. Moreover, we analyzed the expression patterns of a laccase and a manganese peroxidase (lacc10 and mnp3, respectively) in lignocellulose and glucose-based media using submerged, semisolid, and solid-state fermentation. By testing different normalization strategies, we demonstrate that the use of nonvalidated reference genes as internal controls leads to biased results and misinterpretations of the biological responses underlying expression changes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Validation of Reference Genes for Transcriptional Analyses in Pleurotus ostreatus by Using Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Castanera, Raúl; López-Varas, Leticia; Pisabarro, Antonio G.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus has become a widely used model organism for fungal genomic and transcriptomic analyses. The increasing interest in this species has led to an increasing number of studies analyzing the transcriptional regulation of multigene families that encode extracellular enzymes. Reverse transcription (RT) followed by real-time PCR is the most suitable technique for analyzing the expression of gene sets under multiple culture conditions. In this work, we tested the suitability of 13 candidate genes for their use as reference genes in P. ostreatus time course cultures for enzyme production. We applied three different statistical algorithms and obtained a combination of stable reference genes for optimal normalization of RT-quantitative PCR assays. This reference index can be used for future transcriptomic analyses and validation of transcriptome sequencing or microarray data. Moreover, we analyzed the expression patterns of a laccase and a manganese peroxidase (lacc10 and mnp3, respectively) in lignocellulose and glucose-based media using submerged, semisolid, and solid-state fermentation. By testing different normalization strategies, we demonstrate that the use of nonvalidated reference genes as internal controls leads to biased results and misinterpretations of the biological responses underlying expression changes. PMID:25862220

  7. The URF 5 gene of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondria: DNA sequence and mode of transcription.

    PubMed

    Boer, P H; Gray, M W

    1986-01-01

    A gene homologous to unassigned reading frame (URF) 5 of the mammalian mitochondrial genome has been identified in the mitochondrial DNA of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The algal URF 5 gene is closely flanked by the gene for subunit I of cytochrome oxidase (COI) and by an unidentified gene (ORF x). The URF 5 and ORF x genes are transcribed in the same direction, but opposite to that of the COI gene. Transcript analysis reveals a 1.9-kb mRNA whose major 5' terminus maps to the putative URF 5 initiation codon and whose 3' end abuts the 5' end of the ORF x transcript. Characterization of other C. reinhardtii mitochondrial RNAs suggests a general pattern of abutting transcripts and mature mRNAs having little or no 5' leader sequence. While this is reminiscent of post-transcriptional processing in animal mitochondria, different mechanisms must be employed in the two systems, since tRNA sequences (which appear to function as transcript processing signals in animal mitochondria) do not generally flank protein coding sequences in the C. reinhardtii mitochondrial genome. Nevertheless, characteristic secondary structure motifs do occur within the 3'-terminal regions of C. reinhardtii mitochondrial mRNAs, and their location close to mRNA termini suggests that such motifs may play a role in directing the precise endonucleolytic cleavage of long primary transcripts.

  8. The URF 5 gene of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondria: DNA sequence and mode of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boer, P H; Gray, M W

    1986-01-01

    A gene homologous to unassigned reading frame (URF) 5 of the mammalian mitochondrial genome has been identified in the mitochondrial DNA of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The algal URF 5 gene is closely flanked by the gene for subunit I of cytochrome oxidase (COI) and by an unidentified gene (ORF x). The URF 5 and ORF x genes are transcribed in the same direction, but opposite to that of the COI gene. Transcript analysis reveals a 1.9-kb mRNA whose major 5' terminus maps to the putative URF 5 initiation codon and whose 3' end abuts the 5' end of the ORF x transcript. Characterization of other C. reinhardtii mitochondrial RNAs suggests a general pattern of abutting transcripts and mature mRNAs having little or no 5' leader sequence. While this is reminiscent of post-transcriptional processing in animal mitochondria, different mechanisms must be employed in the two systems, since tRNA sequences (which appear to function as transcript processing signals in animal mitochondria) do not generally flank protein coding sequences in the C. reinhardtii mitochondrial genome. Nevertheless, characteristic secondary structure motifs do occur within the 3'-terminal regions of C. reinhardtii mitochondrial mRNAs, and their location close to mRNA termini suggests that such motifs may play a role in directing the precise endonucleolytic cleavage of long primary transcripts. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3007117

  9. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of reference genes with different transcript abundances for Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-01-01

    The lack of reliable reference genes (RGs) in the genus Streptomyces hampers effort to obtain the precise data of transcript levels. To address this issue, we aimed to identify reliable RGs in the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor. A pool of potential RGs containing 1,471 genes was first identified by determining the intersection of genes with stable transcript levels from four time-series transcriptome microarray datasets of S. coelicolor M145 cultivated in different conditions. Then, following a strict rational selection scheme including homology analysis, disturbance analysis, function analysis and transcript abundance analysis, 13 candidates were selected from the 1,471 genes. Based on real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays, SCO0710, SCO6185, SCO1544, SCO3183 and SCO4758 were identified as the top five genes with the most stable transcript levels among the 13 candidates. Further analyses showed these five genes also maintained stable transcript levels in different S. coelicolor strains, as well as in Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 and Streptomyces clavuligerus NRRL 3585, suggesting they could fulfill the requirements of accurate data normalization in streptomycetes. Moreover, the systematic strategy employed in this work could be used for reference in other microorganism to select reliable RGs. PMID:26527303

  11. Role of Ser7 phosphorylation of the CTD during transcription of snRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase (pol) II, Rpb1, contains an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) composed of consecutive repeats of the sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). During transcription, Ser2, Ser5 and Ser7 are subjected to dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by CTD kinases and phosphatases, creating a characteristic CTD phosphorylation pattern along genes. This CTD “code” allows the coupling of transcription with co-transcriptional RNA processing, through the timely recruitment of the appropriate factors at the right point of the transcription cycle. In mammals, phosphorylation of Ser7 (Ser7P) is detected on all pol II-transcribed genes, but is only essential for expression of a sub-class of genes encoding small nuclear (sn)RNAs. The molecular mechanisms by which Ser7P influences expression of these particular genes are becoming clearer. Here, I discuss our recent findings clarifying how Ser7P facilitates transcription of these genes and 3′end processing of the transcripts, through recruitment of the RPAP2 phosphatase and the snRNA gene-specific Integrator complex. PMID:22858677

  12. Assessment of Anaerobic Toluene Biodegradation Activity by bssA Transcript/Gene Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Brow, Christina N.; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Johnson, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes associated with toluene degradation were profiled across a groundwater contaminant plume under nitrate-reducing conditions and were detected in significant numbers throughout the plume. However, differences between groundwater and core sediment samples suggested that microbial transport, rather than local activity, was the underlying cause of the high copy numbers within the downgradient plume. Both gene transcript and reactant concentrations were consistent with this hypothesis. Expression of bssA genes from denitrifying toluene degraders was induced by toluene but only in the presence of nitrate, and transcript abundance dropped rapidly following the removal of either toluene or nitrate. The drop in bssA transcripts following the removal of toluene could be described by an exponential decay function with a half-life on the order of 1 h. Interestingly, bssA transcripts never disappeared completely but were always detected at some level if either inducer was present. Therefore, the detection of transcripts alone may not be sufficient evidence for contaminant degradation. To avoid mistakenly associating basal-level gene expression with actively degrading microbial populations, an integrated approach using the ratio of functional gene transcripts to gene copies is recommended. This approach minimizes the impact of microbial transport on activity assessment and allows reliable assessments of microbial activity to be obtained from water samples. PMID:23811506

  13. Transcription Profiling and Mutation Detection of Soybean Homoeologous Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soybean genome maintains numerous gene duplications, many of which are derived from ancient large-scale duplication. We are interested in exploring the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes and the extent to which gene duplication affects selectable trait variation. We are applying quantitative ...

  14. Towards a Quantitative Understanding of Single-Gene Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid

    2008-03-01

    The transcription of the genetic information in DNA into RNA is the first step in protein synthesis. This process is highly regulated and is carried out by RNA polymerase (RNAP), a complex molecular motor. Here we discuss some of the consequences of a Brownian ratchet model of transcription, which incorporates internal structural degrees of freedom of RNAP and kinetic barriers to backtracking of RNAP resulting from steric clashes with co-transcriptionally folded RNA. This approach was previously used (a) to successfully predict sequence dependent positions of pauses during the elongation process [1,2]; (b) to study the behavior of a number of mutants of RNAP, with different elongation behaviors, believed to involve different internal motions of the enzyme [3]; and (c) to gain insight into the interpretation of single-molecule transcription elongation experiments [2]. The same model can be used to characterize the stability of the elongation complex at specific termination sequences, places along DNA where, with high probability, RNAP releases the RNA transcript and disengages from the template. Recent experimental results on termination reinforce a picture of the elongation complex as a flexible structure, not a rigid body [4]. In more general terms, some of the modeling to be presented raises fundamental issues related to ``model comparison'' and ``model selection,'' the problem of identifying and characterizing quantitative models on the basis of limited sets of experimental data [5]. [1] Tadigotla V. R., 'O Maoil'eidigh D., Sengupta A. M., Epshtein V., Ebright R. H., Nudler E., Ruckenstein A. E., Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling of Transcriptional Pausing. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A,03:4439-4444 (2006). [2] D. 'O Maoil'eidigh, Ph.D. Thesis, Rutgers University, 2006 [3] Bar-Nahum, G., Epshtein, V., Ruckenstein, A. E., Rafikov, R., Mustaev, A. and Nudler E., A Ratchet Mechanism of Transcription Elongation and its Control. Cell, 120:183-193 (2005). [4] Epshtein, V

  15. Identification of Gene Transcription Start Sites and Enhancers Responding to Pulmonary Carbon Nanotube Exposure in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Jette; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lilje, Berit; Boyd, Mette; Jørgensen, Mette; Chen, Yun; Vitezic, Morana; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Berthing, Trine; Bressendorff, Simon; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Yauk, Carole L; Halappanavar, Sabina; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Sandelin, Albin

    2017-03-31

    Increased use of nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products has raised concerns over their toxicity. To ensure safe use of nanomaterials, understanding their biological effects at the molecular level is crucial. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the cascade of genes activated by nanomaterial exposure are not well-characterized. To this end, we profiled the genome-wide usage of gene transcription start sites and linked active enhancer regions in lungs of C57BL/6 mice 24 h after intratracheal instillation of a single dose of the multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) Mitsui-7. Our results revealed a massive gene regulatory response, where expression of key inflammatory genes (e.g., Csf3, Il24, and Fgf23) was increased >100-fold 24 h after Mitsui-7 exposure. Many of the Mitsui-7-responsive transcription start sites were alternative transcription start sites for known genes, and the number of alternative transcription start sites used in a given gene was correlated with overall Mitsui-7 response. Strikingly, genes that were up-regulated after Mitsui-7 exposure only through their main annotated transcription start site were linked to inflammatory and defense responses, while genes up-regulated only through alternative transcription start sites were functionally heterogeneous and not inflammation-associated. Furthermore, we identified almost 12 000 active enhancers, many of which were Mitsui-7-responsive, and we identified similarly responding putative target genes. Overall, our study provides the location and activity of Mitsui-7-induced enhancers and transcription start sites, providing a useful resource for targeted experiments elucidating the biological effects of nanomaterials and the identification of biomarkers for early detection of MWCNT-induced inflammation.

  16. Tandem transcription termination sites in the dnaN gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M E; García-Sogo, M; Pérez-Roger, I; Macián, F; Navarro-Aviñó, J P

    1991-10-15

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of DNA polymerase III and maps between the dnaA and recF genes. We demonstrated previously that dnaN and recF constitute a transcriptional unit under control of the dnaN promoters. However, the recF gene has its own promoter region located in the middle of the dnaN structural gene. In this report, we use S1 mapping of mRNAs, transcriptional and translational fusions to the galK and lacZ genes, and in vitro mutagenesis to identify and characterize three tandem transcription termination sites responsible for transcriptional polarity in the dnaN-recF operon. These sites are located in the dnaN gene, downstream from the recF promoter region. Cumulatively, they terminate about 80% of the untranslated transcripts started at the recF promoters. As expected, they do not reduce transcription coming from the dnaN promoters unless dnaN translation was prematurely disrupted by the presence of a nonsense codon. The particular arrangement of regulatory elements (promoters and terminators) in the dnaN-recF region provides an exceptional in vivo system to confirm the latent termination site model of transcriptional polarity. In addition, our results contribute to the understanding of the complex regulation of the dnaA, dnaN, and recF genes. We propose that these three genes constitute an operon and that the terminators described in this work could be used to reduce expression of the distal genes of the operon under circumstances in which the dnaN translation happens to be slowed down.

  17. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-value< 0.001), which are closely related to K562. That is, cell type specific binding patterns are crucial for choosing the correct transcription factors for the model. Comparison of predictors obtained from binding sites in the GM12878 cell line with those from K562 shows that the amount of difference between binding patterns is directly related to the quality of the prediction. By identifying individual genes whose expression is predicted accurately by the binding sites, we are able to link transcription factors FOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation. PMID:22721266

  18. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-06-27

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1 Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1 Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them.

  19. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  20. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination in long noncoding microRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J.; Jopling, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) play a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with co-transcriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. While most miRNA are located within introns of protein coding genes, a substantial minority of miRNA originate from long non coding (lnc) RNA where transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lnc-pri-miRNA do not use the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation (CPA) pathway, but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. This Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a novel RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells. PMID:25730776

  1. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M C; Harding, James J; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2011-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34(+) progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV.

  2. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew W.; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M.C.; Harding, James J.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34+ progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV. PMID:21458073

  3. Landscape of post-transcriptional gene regulation during hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schwerk, Johannes; Jarret, Abigail P.; Joslyn, Rochelle C.; Savan, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a pivotal role in various gene regulatory networks including, but not limited to metabolism, embryogenesis and immune responses. Different mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation, which can act individually, synergistically, or even in an antagonistic manner have been described. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is notorious for subverting host immune responses and indeed exploits several components of the host’s post-transcriptional regulatory machinery for its own benefit. At the same time, HCV replication is post-transcriptionally targeted by host cell components to blunt viral propagation. This review discusses the interplay of post-transcriptional mechanisms that affect host immune responses in the setting of HCV infection and highlights the sophisticated mechanisms both host and virus have evolved in the race for superiority. PMID:25890065

  4. Interval hypoxic training.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, L

    2001-01-01

    Interval hypoxic training (IHT) is a technique developed in the former Soviet Union, that consists of repeated exposures to 5-7 minutes of steady or progressive hypoxia, interrupted by equal periods of recovery. It has been proposed for training in sports, to acclimatize to high altitude, and to treat a variety of clinical conditions, spanning from coronary heart disease to Cesarean delivery. Some of these results may originate by the different effects of continuous vs. intermittent hypoxia (IH), which can be obtained by manipulating the repetition rate, the duration and the intensity of the hypoxic stimulus. The present article will attempt to examine some of the effects of IH, and, whenever possible, compare them to those of typical IHT. IH can modify oxygen transport and energy utilization, alter respiratory and blood pressure control mechanisms, induce permanent modifications in the cardiovascular system. IHT increases the hypoxic ventilatory response, increase red blood cell count and increase aerobic capacity. Some of these effects might be potentially beneficial in specific physiologic or pathologic conditions. At this stage, this technique appears interesting for its possible applications, but still largely to be explored for its mechanisms, potentials and limitations.

  5. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  6. FoxO1 deacetylation regulates thyroid hormone-induced transcription of key hepatic gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-10-18

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ(-/-)) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status.

  7. Histone ADP-Ribosylation Facilitates Gene Transcription by Directly Remodeling Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zamudio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes imposes obstacles on gene transcription, and histone-modifying and nucleosome-remodeling complexes work in concert to alleviate these obstacles so as to facilitate transcription. Emerging evidence shows that chromatin-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and its enzymatic activity facilitate inflammatory gene transcription and modulate the inflammatory response in animal models. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates transcription are not well understood. Here we show that through an intracellular signaling pathway, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induces PARP-1 enzymatic activity and the ADP-ribosylation of histones at transcriptionally active and accessible chromatin regions in macrophages. In vitro DNase I footprinting and restriction endonuclease accessibility assays reveal that histone ADP-ribosylation directly destabilizes histone-DNA interactions in the nucleosome and increases the site accessibility of the nucleosomal DNA to nucleases. Consistent with this, LPS stimulation-induced ADP-ribosylation at the nucleosome-occupied promoters of il-1β, mip-2, and csf2 facilitates NF-κB recruitment and the transcription of these genes in macrophages. Therefore, our data suggest that PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates gene transcription through increasing promoter accessibility by histone ADP-ribosylation. PMID:22547677

  8. Transcription Profile of Aging and Cognition-Related Genes in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ianov, Lara; Rani, Asha; Beas, Blanca S.; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive function depends on transcription; however, there is little information linking altered gene expression to impaired prefrontal cortex function during aging. Young and aged F344 rats were characterized on attentional set shift and spatial memory tasks. Transcriptional differences associated with age and cognition were examined using RNA sequencing to construct transcriptomic profiles for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), white matter, and region CA1 of the hippocampus. The results indicate regional differences in vulnerability to aging. Age-related gene expression in the mPFC was similar to, though less robust than, changes in the dorsolateral PFC of aging humans suggesting that aging processes may be similar. Importantly, the pattern of transcription associated with aging did not predict cognitive decline. Rather, increased mPFC expression of genes involved in regulation of transcription, including transcription factors that regulate the strength of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and neural activity-related immediate-early genes was observed in aged animals that exhibit delayed set shift behavior. The specificity of impairment on a mPFC-dependent task, associated with a particular mPFC transcriptional profile indicates that impaired executive function involves altered transcriptional regulation and neural activity/plasticity processes that are distinct from that described for impaired hippocampal function. PMID:27242522

  9. Temporal and Spatial Coexistence of Archaeal and Bacterial amoA Genes and Gene Transcripts in Lake Lucerne

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Elisabeth W.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Muyzer, Gerard; Schleper, Christa; Tourna, Maria; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in the nitrogen cycle, freshwater ecosystems are relatively rarely studied for active ammonia oxidizers (AO). This study of Lake Lucerne determined the abundance of both amoA genes and gene transcripts of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) over a period of 16 months, shedding more light on the role of both AO in a deep, alpine lake environment. At the surface, at 42 m water depth, and in the water layer immediately above the sediment, AOA generally outnumbered AOB. However, in the surface water during summer stratification, when both AO were low in abundance, AOB were more numerous than AOA. Temporal distribution patterns of AOA and AOB were comparable. Higher abundances of amoA gene transcripts were observed at the onset and end of summer stratification. In summer, archaeal amoA genes and transcripts correlated negatively with temperature and conductivity. Concentrations of ammonium and oxygen did not vary enough to explain the amoA gene and transcript dynamics. The observed herbivorous zooplankton may have caused a hidden flux of mineralized ammonium and a change in abundance of genes and transcripts. At the surface, AO might have been repressed during summer stratification due to nutrient limitation caused by active phytoplankton. PMID:23533328

  10. The loose evolutionary relationships between transcription factors and other gene products across prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    del Grande, Marc; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2014-12-17

    Tests for the evolutionary conservation of associations between genes coding for transcription factors (TFs) and other genes have been limited to a few model organisms due to the lack of experimental information of functional associations in other organisms. We aimed at surmounting this limitation by using the most co-occurring gene pairs as proxies for the most conserved functional interactions available for each gene in a genome. We then used genes predicted to code for TFs to compare their most conserved interactions against the most conserved interactions for the rest of the genes within each prokaryotic genome available. We plotted profiles of phylogenetic profiles, p-cubic, to compare the maximally scoring interactions of TFs against those of other genes. In most prokaryotes, genes coding for TFs showed lower co-occurrences when compared to other genes. We also show that genes coding for TFs tend to have lower Codon Adaptation Indexes compared to other genes. The co-occurrence tests suggest that transcriptional regulation evolves quickly in most, if not all, prokaryotes. The Codon Adaptation Index analyses suggest quick gene exchange and rewiring of transcriptional regulation across prokaryotes.

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor represses proinflammatory genes at distinct steps of the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Rebecca; Muse, Ginger W; Chinenov, Yurii; Adelman, Karen; Rogatsky, Inez

    2013-09-03

    Widespread anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoid hormones are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In conjunction with its corepressor GR-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1), GR tethers to the DNA-bound activator protein-1 and NF-κB and represses transcription of their target proinflammatory cytokine genes. However, these target genes fall into distinct classes depending on the step of the transcription cycle that is rate-limiting for their activation: Some are controlled through RNA polymerase II (PolII) recruitment and initiation, whereas others undergo signal-induced release of paused elongation complexes into productive RNA synthesis. Whether these genes are differentially regulated by GR is unknown. Here we report that, at the initiation-controlled inflammatory genes in primary macrophages, GR inhibited LPS-induced PolII occupancy. In contrast, at the elongation-controlled genes, GR did not affect PolII recruitment or transcription initiation but promoted, in a GRIP1-dependent manner, the accumulation of the pause-inducing negative elongation factor. Consistently, GR-dependent repression of elongation-controlled genes was abolished specifically in negative elongation factor-deficient macrophages. Thus, GR:GRIP1 use distinct mechanisms to repress inflammatory genes at different stages of the transcription cycle.

  12. Myh7b/miR-499 gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by MRFs and Eos.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Fan; Chung, Eunhee; Guess, Martin G; Bell, Matthew L; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-08-01

    The sarcomeric myosin gene, Myh7b, encodes an intronic microRNA, miR-499, which regulates cardiac and skeletal muscle biology, yet little is known about its transcriptional regulation. To identify the transcription factors involved in regulating Myh7b/miR-499 gene expression, we have mapped the transcriptional start sites and identified an upstream 6.2 kb region of the mouse Myh7b gene whose activity mimics the expression pattern of the endogenous Myh7b gene both in vitro and in vivo. Through promoter deletion analysis, we have mapped a distal E-box element and a proximal Ikaros site that are essential for Myh7b promoter activity in muscle cells. We show that the myogenic regulatory factors, MyoD, Myf5 and Myogenin, bind to the E-box, while a lymphoid transcription factor, Ikaros 4 (Eos), binds to the Ikaros motif. Further, we show that through physical interaction, MyoD and Eos form an active transcriptional complex on the chromatin to regulate the expression of the endogenous Myh7b/miR-499 gene in muscle cells. We also provide the first evidence that Eos can regulate expression of additional myosin genes (Myosin 1 and β-Myosin) via the miR-499/Sox6 pathway. Therefore, our results indicate a novel role for Eos in the regulation of the myofiber gene program.

  13. Myh7b/miR-499 gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by MRFs and Eos

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Fan; Chung, Eunhee; Guess, Martin G.; Bell, Matthew L.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    The sarcomeric myosin gene, Myh7b, encodes an intronic microRNA, miR-499, which regulates cardiac and skeletal muscle biology, yet little is known about its transcriptional regulation. To identify the transcription factors involved in regulating Myh7b/miR-499 gene expression, we have mapped the transcriptional start sites and identified an upstream 6.2 kb region of the mouse Myh7b gene whose activity mimics the expression pattern of the endogenous Myh7b gene both in vitro and in vivo. Through promoter