Science.gov

Sample records for hysteresis

  1. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  2. Hysteresis in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Jorgelina; Lynch, Stephen; Jones, David; Degens, Hans

    This paper presents examples of hysteresis from a broad range of scientific disciplines and demonstrates a variety of forms including clockwise, counterclockwise, butterfly, pinched and kiss-and-go, respectively. These examples include mechanical systems made up of springs and dampers which have been the main components of muscle models for nearly one hundred years. For the first time, as far as the authors are aware, hysteresis is demonstrated in single fibre muscle when subjected to both lengthening and shortening periodic contractions. The hysteresis observed in the experiments is of two forms. Without any relaxation at the end of lengthening or shortening, the hysteresis loop is a convex clockwise loop, whereas a concave clockwise hysteresis loop (labeled as kiss-and-go) is formed when the muscle is relaxed at the end of lengthening and shortening. This paper also presents a mathematical model which reproduces the hysteresis curves in the same form as the experimental data.

  3. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  4. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  5. Hysteresis and Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erber, T.; Guralnick, S. A.; Michels, S. C.

    1993-06-01

    Fatigue in materials is the result of cumulative damage processes that are usually induced be repeated loading cycles. Since the energy dissipation associated with damage is irreversible, and the loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat, the corresponding relation between stress and strain is not single-valued; but rather exhibits a memory dependence, or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Engineering design and safety standards for estimating fatigue life are based in part on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress-strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. Experimental and theoretical results show that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Detailed features of the hysteresis can be understood with the help of analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials. In particular, scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns may be used to check on the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level.

  6. Hysteresis and fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Erber, T. ); Guralnick, S.A.; Michels, S.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Energy dissipation associated with damage of materials is irreversible and loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat. The relation between energy dissipation and loading therefore exhibits a memory dependence or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Standards for estimating fatigue life are partially based on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. In the present study, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials are used to aid understanding of the detailed features of hysteresis. Scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns are used to detect the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level. 61 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  8. [Mathematical models of hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    The research described in this proposal is currently being supported by the US Department of Energy under the contract Mathematical Models of Hysteresis''. Thus, before discussing the proposed research in detail, it is worthwhile to describe and summarize the main results achieved in the course of our work under the above contract. Our ongoing research has largely been focused on the development of mathematical models of hysteretic nonlinearities with nonlocal memories''. The distinct feature of these nonlinearities is that their current states depend on past histories of input variations. It turns out that memories of hysteretic nonlinearities are quite selective. Indeed, experiments show that only some past input extrema leave their marks upon future states of hysteretic nonlinearities. Thus special mathematical tools are needed in order to describe nonlocal selective memories of hysteretic nonlinearities. Our research has been primarily concerned with Preisach-type models of hysteresis. All these models have a common generic feature; they are constructed as superpositions of simplest hysteretic nonlinearities-rectangular loops. Our study has by and large been centered around the following topics: various generalizations and extensions of the classical Preisach model, finding of necessary and sufficient conditions for the representation of actual hysteretic nonlinearities by various Preisach type models, solution of identification problems for these models, numerical implementation and experimental testing of Preisach type models. Although the study of Preisach type models has constituted the main direction of the research, some effort has also been made to establish some interesting connections between these models and such topics as: the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis, the classical Stoner-Wohlfarth model of vector magnetic hysteresis, thermal activation type models for viscosity, magnetostrictive hysteresis and neural networks.

  9. Hysteresis in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Banerjee, Shreya

    2016-07-01

    Hysteresis is a phenomenon occurring naturally in several magnetic and electric materials in condensed matter physics. When applied to cosmology, aka cosmological hysteresis, has interesting and vivid implications in the scenario of a cyclic bouncy universe. Most importantly, this physical prescription can be treated as an alternative proposal to inflationary paradigm. Cosmological hysteresis is caused by the asymmetry in the equation of state parameter during expansion and contraction phase of the universe, due to the presence of a single scalar field. This process is purely thermodynamical in nature, results in a non-vanishing hysteresis loop integral (∮pdV) in cosmology. When applied to variants of modified gravity models 1) Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) brane world gravity, 2) Cosmological constant dominated Einstein gravity, 3) Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), 4) Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet brane world gravity and 5) Randall Sundrum single brane world gravity (RSII), under certain circumstances, this phenomenon leads to the increase in amplitude of the consecutive cycles and to a universe with older and larger successive cycles, provided we have physical mechanisms to make the universe bounce and turnaround. This inculcates an arrow of time in a dissipationless cosmology. Remarkably, this phenomenon appears to be widespread in several cosmological potentials in variants of modified gravity background, which we explicitly study for i) Hilltop, ii) Natural and iii) Coleman-Weinberg potentials, in this paper. Semi-analytical analysis of these models, for different potentials with minimum/minima, show that the conditions which creates a universe with an ever increasing expansion, depend on the signature of the hysteresis loop integral (∮pdV) as well as on the variants of model parameters.

  10. Hysteresis in structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, A.; Ivanyi, P.; Ivanyi, M. M.; Ivanyi, M.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the Preisach hysteresis model is applied to determine the dynamic behavior of a steel column with mass on the top and loaded by an impulse force. The column is considered as a rigid element, while the fixed end of the column is modeled with a rotational spring of hysterestic characteristic. In the solution of the non-linear dynamical equation of motion the fix-point technique is inserted to the time marching iteration. In the investigation the non-linearity of the rotation spring is modeled with the Preisach hysteresis model. The variation of amplitude and the action time interval of force are changing. The results are plotted in figures.

  11. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  12. A magnetic hysteresis model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatley, Thomas W.; Henretty, Debra A.

    1995-01-01

    The Passive Aerodynamically Stabilized Magnetically Damped Satellite (PAMS) will be deployed from the Space Shuttle and used as a target for a Shuttle-mounted laser. It will be a cylindrical satellite with several corner cube reflectors on the ends. The center of mass of the cylinder will be near one end, and aerodynamic torques will tend to align the axis of the cylinder with the spacecraft velocity vector. Magnetic hysteresis rods will be used to provide passive despin and oscillation-damping torques on the cylinder. The behavior of the hysteresis rods depends critically on the 'B/H' curves for the combination of materials and rod length-to-diameter ratio ('l-over-d'). These curves are qualitatively described in most Physics textbooks in terms of major and minor 'hysteresis loops'. Mathematical modeling of the functional relationship between B and H is very difficult. In this paper, the physics involved is not addressed, but an algorithm is developed which provides a close approximation to empirically determined data with a few simple equations suitable for use in computer simulations.

  13. Characterization of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Match W L; Dongming Wei; Leung, Christopher K S

    2015-01-01

    Corneal indentation is adapted for the design and development of a characterization method for corneal hysteresis behavior - Corneal Indentation Hysteresis (CIH). Fourteen porcine eyes were tested using the corneal indentation method. The CIH measured in enucleated porcine eyes showed indentation rate and intraocular pressure (IOP) dependences. The CIH increased with indentation rate at lower IOP (<; 25 mmHg) and decreased with indentation rate at higher IOP (> 25 mmHg). The CIH was linear proportional to the IOP within an individual eye. The CIH was positively correlated with the IOP, corneal in-plane tensile stress and corneal tangent modulus (E). A new method based on corneal indentation for the measurement of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis in vivo is developed. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introduce the corneal indentation hysteresis and correlate the corneal indentation hysteresis and corneal tangent modulus.

  14. Thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J

    2001-02-01

    Extreme environments present a wealth of biochemical adaptations. Thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria and fungi and are able to depress the freezing point of water (in the presence of ice crystals) in a non-colligative manner by binding to the surface of nascent ice crystals. The THPs comprise a disparate group of proteins with a variety of tertiary structures and often no common sequence similarities or structural motifs. Different THPs bind to different faces of the ice crystal, and no single mechanism has been proposed to account for THP ice binding affinity and specificity. Experimentally THPs have been used in the cryopreservation of tissues and cells and to induce cold tolerance in freeze susceptible organisms. THPs represent a remarkable example of parallel and convergent evolution with different proteins being adapted for an anti-freeze role.

  15. Vortex flow hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  16. Mach, methodology, hysteresis and economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2008-11-01

    This methodological note examines the epistemological foundations of hysteresis with particular reference to applications to economic systems. The economy principles of Ernst Mach are advocated and used in this assessment.

  17. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, H. J.; Luo, X. W.; Chen, Y. L.; Xu, H. Y.; Farhat, M.

    2012-11-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  18. Mastering hysteresis in magnetocaloric materials.

    PubMed

    Gutfleisch, O; Gottschall, T; Fries, M; Benke, D; Radulov, I; Skokov, K P; Wende, H; Gruner, M; Acet, M; Entel, P; Farle, M

    2016-08-13

    Hysteresis is more than just an interesting oddity that occurs in materials with a first-order transition. It is a real obstacle on the path from existing laboratory-scale prototypes of magnetic refrigerators towards commercialization of this potentially disruptive cooling technology. Indeed, the reversibility of the magnetocaloric effect, being essential for magnetic heat pumps, strongly depends on the width of the thermal hysteresis and, therefore, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms causing hysteresis and to find solutions to minimize losses associated with thermal hysteresis in order to maximize the efficiency of magnetic cooling devices. In this work, we discuss the fundamental aspects that can contribute to thermal hysteresis and the strategies that we are developing to at least partially overcome the hysteresis problem in some selected classes of magnetocaloric materials with large application potential. In doing so, we refer to the most relevant classes of magnetic refrigerants La-Fe-Si-, Heusler- and Fe2P-type compounds.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  19. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  20. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-19

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles.

  1. Efficient Computational Model of Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel

    2005-01-01

    A recently developed mathematical model of the output (displacement) versus the input (applied voltage) of a piezoelectric transducer accounts for hysteresis. For the sake of computational speed, the model is kept simple by neglecting the dynamic behavior of the transducer. Hence, the model applies to static and quasistatic displacements only. A piezoelectric transducer of the type to which the model applies is used as an actuator in a computer-based control system to effect fine position adjustments. Because the response time of the rest of such a system is usually much greater than that of a piezoelectric transducer, the model remains an acceptably close approximation for the purpose of control computations, even though the dynamics are neglected. The model (see Figure 1) represents an electrically parallel, mechanically series combination of backlash elements, each having a unique deadband width and output gain. The zeroth element in the parallel combination has zero deadband width and, hence, represents a linear component of the input/output relationship. The other elements, which have nonzero deadband widths, are used to model the nonlinear components of the hysteresis loop. The deadband widths and output gains of the elements are computed from experimental displacement-versus-voltage data. The hysteresis curve calculated by use of this model is piecewise linear beyond deadband limits.

  2. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects

    PubMed Central

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles. PMID:26721395

  3. Modeling of hysteresis in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Qin, K R; Xiang, C; Lee, T H

    2012-08-01

    Hysteresis, observed in many gene regulatory networks, has a pivotal impact on biological systems, which enhances the robustness of cell functions. In this paper, a general model is proposed to describe the hysteretic gene regulatory network by combining the hysteresis component and the transient dynamics. The Bouc-Wen hysteresis model is modified to describe the hysteresis component in the mammalian gene regulatory networks. Rigorous mathematical analysis on the dynamical properties of the model is presented to ensure the bounded-input-bounded-output (BIBO) stability and demonstrates that the original Bouc-Wen model can only generate a clockwise hysteresis loop while the modified model can describe both clockwise and counter clockwise hysteresis loops. Simulation studies have shown that the hysteresis loops from our model are consistent with the experimental observations in three mammalian gene regulatory networks and two E.coli gene regulatory networks, which demonstrate the ability and accuracy of the mathematical model to emulate natural gene expression behavior with hysteresis. A comparison study has also been conducted to show that this model fits the experiment data significantly better than previous ones in the literature. The successful modeling of the hysteresis in all the five hysteretic gene regulatory networks suggests that the new model has the potential to be a unified framework for modeling hysteresis in gene regulatory networks and provide better understanding of the general mechanism that drives the hysteretic function.

  4. Contact angle hysteresis on fluoropolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tavana, H; Jehnichen, D; Grundke, K; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2007-10-31

    Contact angle hysteresis of liquids with different molecular and geometrical properties on high quality films of four fluoropolymers was studied. A number of different causes are identified for hysteresis. With n-alkanes as probe liquids, contact angle hysteresis is found to be strongly related to the configuration of polymer chains. The largest hysteresis is obtained with amorphous polymers whereas the smallest hysteresis occurs for polymers with ordered molecular chains. This is explained in terms of sorption of liquid by the solid and penetration of liquid into the polymer film. Correlation of contact angle hysteresis with the size of n-alkane molecules supports this conclusion. On the films of two amorphous fluoropolymers with different molecular configurations, contact angle hysteresis of one and the same liquid with "bulky" molecules is shown to be quite different. On the surfaces of Teflon AF 1600, with stiff molecular chains, the receding angles of the probe liquids are independent of contact time between solid and liquid and similar hysteresis is obtained for all the liquids. Retention of liquid molecules on the solid surface is proposed as the most likely cause of hysteresis in these systems. On the other hand, with EGC-1700 films that consist of flexible chains, the receding angles are strongly time-dependent and the hysteresis is large. Contact angle hysteresis increases even further when liquids with strong dipolar intermolecular forces are used. In this case, major reorganization of EGC-1700 chains due to contact with the test liquids is suggested as the cause. The effect of rate of motion of the three-phase line on the advancing and receding contact angles, and therefore contact angle hysteresis, is investigated. For low viscous liquids, contact angles are independent of the drop front velocity up to approximately 10 mm/min. This agrees with the results of an earlier study that showed that the rate-dependence of the contact angles is an issue only

  5. Hysteresis in the phase transition of chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruilong; Lu, Qunfeng; Lin, Sihua; Dong, Xiaoyan; Fu, Hao; Wu, Shaoyi; Wu, Minghe; Teng, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    We designed an experiment to reproduce the hysteresis phenomenon of chocolate appearing in the heating and cooling process, and then established a model to relate the solidification degree to the order parameter. Based on the Landau-Devonshire theory, our model gave a description of the hysteresis phenomenon in chocolate, which lays the foundations for the study of the phase transition behavior of chocolate.

  6. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid 'atomtronic' circuit.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W; Lobb, Christopher J; Phillips, William D; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2014-02-13

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits-it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  7. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid `atomtronic' circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G.; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W.; Lobb, Christopher J.; Phillips, William D.; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2014-02-01

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits--it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  8. Hysteresis rarefaction in the Riemann problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejčí, P.

    2008-11-01

    We consider the wave equation with Preisach hysteresis and Riemann initial data as a model for wave propagation in hysteretic (e.g. elastoplastic) media. The main result consists in proving that in the convex hysteresis loop domain, there exists a unique self-similar locally Lipschitz continuous solution. In other words, smooth rarefaction waves propagate in both directions from the initial jump discontinuity.

  9. Corneal hysteresis and its relevance to glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Deol, Madhvi; Taylor, David A.; Radcliffe, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. It is estimated that roughly 60.5 million people had glaucoma in 2010 and that this number is increasing. Many patients continue to lose vision despite apparent disease control according to traditional risk factors. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent findings with regard to corneal hysteresis, a variable that is thought to be associated with the risk and progression of glaucoma. Recent findings Low corneal hysteresis is associated with optic nerve and visual field damage in glaucoma and the risk of structural and functional glaucoma progression. In addition, hysteresis may enhance intraocular pressure (IOP) interpretation: low corneal hysteresis is associated with a larger magnitude of IOP reduction following various glaucoma therapies. Corneal hysteresis is dynamic and may increase in eyes after IOP-lowering interventions are implemented. Summary It is widely accepted that central corneal thickness is a predictive factor for the risk of glaucoma progression. Recent evidence shows that corneal hysteresis also provides valuable information for several aspects of glaucoma management. In fact, corneal hysteresis may be more strongly associated with glaucoma presence, risk of progression, and effectiveness of glaucoma treatments than central corneal thickness. PMID:25611166

  10. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  11. Understanding rheological hysteresis in soft glassy materials.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rangarajan; Divoux, Thibaut; Manneville, Sébastien; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by recent experimental studies of rheological hysteresis in soft glassy materials, we study numerically strain rate sweeps in simple yield stress fluids and viscosity bifurcating yield stress fluids. Our simulations of downward followed by upward strain rate sweeps, performed within fluidity models and the soft glassy rheology model, successfully capture the experimentally observed monotonic decrease of the area of the rheological hysteresis loop with sweep time in simple yield stress fluids, and the bell shaped dependence of hysteresis loop area on sweep time in viscosity bifurcating fluids. We provide arguments explaining these two different functional forms in terms of differing tendencies of simple and viscosity bifurcating fluids to form shear bands during the sweeps, and show that the banding behaviour captured by our simulations indeed agrees with that reported experimentally. We also discuss the difference in hysteresis behaviour between inelastic and viscoelastic fluids. Our simulations qualitatively agree with the experimental data discussed here for four different soft glassy materials.

  12. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  13. Contact angle hysteresis at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Mathieu; Monthioux, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Using atomic force microscopy with nonconventional carbon tips, the pinning of a liquid contact line on individual nanometric defects was studied. This mechanism is responsible for the occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis. The presence of weak defects which do not contribute to the hysteresis is evidenced for the first time. The dissipated energy associated with strong defects is also measured down to values in the range of kT, which correspond to defect sizes in the order of 1 nm.

  14. Spatial versus time hysteresis in damping mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fabiano, R. H.; Wang, Y.; Inman, D. J.; Cudney, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of continuing investigations on the task of estimating internal damping mechanisms in flexible structures. Specifically, two models for internal damping in Euler-Bernoulli beams are considered: spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis. A theoretically sound computational algorithm for estimation is described, and experimental results are discussed. It is concluded that both models perform well in the sense that they accurately predict response for the experiments conducted.

  15. Structural hysteresis model of transmitting mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M.; Bertram, T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a structural hysteresis model which describes the dynamic behavior of transmitting mechanical systems with a hysteretic spring and damped bedstop element, both connected in series. From the application point view this approach can be used for predicting the transmitted mechanical force based only on the known kinematic excitation. Using the case study of an elastic gear transmission we show and identify a hysteresis response which multivariate behavior depends on an internal state of the bedstop motion.

  16. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  17. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  18. Mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis in a magnetorheological elastomer.

    PubMed

    Biller, A M; Stolbov, O V; Raikher, Yu L

    2015-08-01

    Field-induced magnetostatic interaction in a pair of identical particles made of a magnetically soft ferromagnet is studied. It is shown that due to saturation of the ferromagnet magnetization, this case differs significantly from the (super)paramagnetic one. A numerical solution is given, discussed, and compared with that provided by a simpler model (nonlinear mutual dipoles). We show that for multidomain ferromagnetic particles embedded in an elastomer matrix, as for paramagnetic ones in the same environment, pair clusters may form or break by a hysteresis scenario. However, the magnetization saturation brings in important features to this effect. First, the bistability state and the hysteresis take place only in a limited region of the material parameters of the system. Second, along with the hysteresis jumps occurring under the sole influence of the field, the "latent" hysteresis is possible which realizes only if the action of the field is combined with some additional (nonmagnetic) external factor. The obtained conditions, when used to assess the possibility of clustering in real magnetorheological polymers, infer an important role of mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis for the macroscopic properties of these composites.

  19. Anomalous Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Snaith, Henry J; Abate, Antonio; Ball, James M; Eperon, Giles E; Leijtens, Tomas; Noel, Nakita K; Stranks, Samuel D; Wang, Jacob Tse-Wei; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells have rapidly risen to the forefront of emerging photovoltaic technologies, exhibiting rapidly rising efficiencies. This is likely to continue to rise, but in the development of these solar cells there are unusual characteristics that have arisen, specifically an anomalous hysteresis in the current-voltage curves. We identify this phenomenon and show some examples of factors that make the hysteresis more or less extreme. We also demonstrate stabilized power output under working conditions and suggest that this is a useful parameter to present, alongside the current-voltage scan derived power conversion efficiency. We hypothesize three possible origins of the effect and discuss its implications on device efficiency and future research directions. Understanding and resolving the hysteresis is essential for further progress and is likely to lead to a further step improvement in performance.

  20. Magnetomechanical damping and magnetoelastic hysteresis in permalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercuta, A.; Mihalca, I.

    2002-11-01

    The inverse Wiedemann effect (IWE) consisting in longitudinal magnetization reversals was detected with a cylindrical permalloy layer subjected to circular DC magnetic fields while performing low frequency (~1 Hz) free torsion oscillations. Hysteresis occurring in the magnetization vs elastic strain dependence (the `magnetoelastic hysteresis') suggested irreversible processes activated mechanically. Joint vibration and magnetization time records were carried out by means of an experimental set-up including inverted pendulum and conventional integrating fluxmeter, in order to compare the relative energy losses ascribed to the magnetomechanical damping (MMD) and to the magnetoelastic hysteresis, respectively. The experimental results clearly pointed out a close connection between IWE and MMD providing evidence that, when simultaneously examined, both effects reflect the same basic phenomenon: the irreversible magnetization changes induced by the elastic strain.

  1. Hysteresis modeling in graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.; Rorsman, N.; Sveinbjörnsson, E. Ö.

    2015-02-21

    Graphene field effect transistors with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric are fabricated on H-intercalated bilayer graphene grown on semi-insulating 4H-SiC by chemical vapour deposition. DC measurements of the gate voltage v{sub g} versus the drain current i{sub d} reveal a severe hysteresis of clockwise orientation. A capacitive model is used to derive the relationship between the applied gate voltage and the Fermi energy. The electron transport equations are then used to calculate the drain current for a given applied gate voltage. The hysteresis in measured data is then modeled via a modified Preisach kernel.

  2. Application of geometry based hysteresis modelling in compensation of hysteresis of piezo bender actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milecki, Andrzej; Pelic, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents results of studies of an application of a new method of piezo bender actuators modelling. A special hysteresis simulation model was developed and is presented. The model is based on a geometrical deformation of main hysteresis loop. The piezoelectric effect is described and the history of the hysteresis modelling is briefly reviewed. Firstly, a simple model for main loop modelling is proposed. Then, a geometrical description of the non-saturated hysteresis is presented and its modelling method is introduced. The modelling makes use of the function describing the geometrical shape of the two hysteresis main curves, which can be defined theoretically or obtained by measurement. These main curves are stored in the memory and transformed geometrically in order to obtain the minor curves. Such model was prepared in the Matlab-Simulink software, but can be easily implemented using any programming language and applied in an on-line controller. In comparison to the other known simulation methods, the one presented in the paper is easy to understand, and uses simple arithmetical equations, allowing to quickly obtain the inversed model of hysteresis. The inversed model was further used for compensation of a non-saturated hysteresis of the piezo bender actuator and results have also been presented in the paper.

  3. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-03

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  4. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θY) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θY') is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δ θ ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θY' and Δ θ are examined. θY' deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  5. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θ_{Y}) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θ_{Y}^{'}) is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δθ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θ_{Y}^{'} and Δθ are examined. θ_{Y}^{'} deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  6. Role of hysteresis in stomatal aperture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Antônio M. T.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Stomata are pores responsible for gas exchange in leaves. Several experiments indicate that stomata synchronize into clusters or patches. The patches’ coordination may produce oscillations in stomatal conductance. Previous studies claim to reproduce some experimental results. However, none was able to explain the variety of behavior observed in the stomatal dynamics. Recently, Ferraz and Prado suggested a realistic geometry of vein distribution. Although it reproduces the patches, no oscillation was observed and the patches remain static. Without exploring significant details, the authors stated that hysteresis in stomatal aperture could explain several experimental features. In this paper, the hysteresis hypothesis is further explored through the concept of hysteretic operators. We have shown that the hysteresis assumption is sufficient to obtain dynamical patches and oscillations in stomatal conductance. The robustness of this hypothesis is tested by using different hysteresis operators. The model analysis reveals a dependence between the period of oscillation in stomatal conductance and the water deficit between the leaf and the environment. This underlying feature of the model might inspire further experiments to test this hypothesis.

  7. Managing Hysteresis: Three Cornerstones to Fiscal Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the Great Recession of 2007-2009 continue to challenge school business officials (SBOs) and other education leaders as they strive to prepare students for the global workforce. Economists have borrowed a word from chemistry to describe this state of affairs: hysteresis--the lingering effects of the past on the present. Today's SBOs…

  8. Circuit increases capability of hysteresis synchronous motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, I. N.

    1967-01-01

    Frequency and phase detector circuit enables a hysteresis synchronous motor to drive a load of given torque value at a precise speed determined by a stable reference. This technique permits driving larger torque loads with smaller motors and lower power drain.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis: a different view and a trivial recipe for low hysteresis hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is addressed from two perspectives. The first is an analysis of the events that occur during motion of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces. Hysteresis is discussed in terms of receding contact line pinning and the tensile failure of capillary bridges. The sign of the curvature of the solid surface is implicated as playing a key role. The second is the report of a new method to prepare smooth low hysteresis surfaces. The thermal treatment of oxygen plasma-cleaned silicon wafers with trimethylsilyl-terminated linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS - commercial silicone oils) in disposable glass vessels is described. This treatment renders silicon/silica surfaces that contain covalently attached PDMS chains. The grafted layers of nanometre scale thickness are liquid-like (rotationally dynamic at room temperature), decrease activation barriers for contact line motion and minimize water contact angle hysteresis. This simple method requires neither sophisticated techniques nor substantial laboratory skills to perform.

  10. Fatigue and hysteresis modeling of ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, In. K.; Desu, Seshu B.

    1993-10-01

    Due to their nonlinear properties, ferroelectric materials are ideal candidates for smart materials. Degradation properties such as low voltage breakdown, fatigue, and aging have been major problems in commercial applications of these materials. Such degradations affect the lifetime of ferroelectric materials. Therefore, it is important to understand degradation for reliability improvement. In this article, recent studies on fatigue and hysteresis of ferroelectric ceramics such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) thin films is reviewed. A new fatigue model is discussed in detail which is based on effective one-directional movement of defects by internal field difference, defect entrapment at the ferroelectrics-electrode interface, and resultant polarization loss at the interface. A fatigue equation derived from this model is presented. Fatigue parameters such as initial polarization, piling constant, and decay constant are defined from the fatigue equation and voltage and temperature dependence of fatigue parameters are discussed. The jump distance of defect calculated from voltage dependence of the decay constant is close to the lattice constant of ferroelectric materials, which implies that oxygen or lead vacancies migrate either parallel or antiparallel to the polarization direction. From the temperature dependence of the decay constant, it is shown that the activation energy for domain wall movement plays an important role in fatigue. The hysteresis model of ferroelectrics is shown using polarization reversal. The hysteresis loop is made by four polarization stages: nucleation, growth, merging, and shrinkage of domains. The hysteresis equation confirms that dielectric viscosity controls hysteresis properties, and temperature dependence of the coefficient of dielectric viscosity is also discussed in conjunction with fatigue mechanism.

  11. Torque meter aids study of hysteresis motor rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, M.

    1967-01-01

    Torque meter, simulating hysteresis motor operation, allows rotor ring performance characteristics to be analyzed. The meter determines hysteresis motor torque and actual stresses of the ring due to its mechanical situation and rotation, aids in the study of asymmetries or defects in motor rings, and measures rotational hysteresis.

  12. Study of contact angle hysteresis using the Cellular Potts Model.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Vahid; D'Souza, Roshan M; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2013-02-28

    We use the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) to study the contact angle (CA) hysteresis in multiphase (solid-liquid-vapour) systems. We simulate a droplet over the tilted patterned surface, and a bubble placed under the surface immersed in liquid. The difference between bubbles and droplets was discussed through their CA hysteresis. Dependency of CA hysteresis on the surface structure and other parameters was also investigated. This analysis allows decoupling of the 1D (pinning of the triple line) and 2D (adhesion hysteresis in the contact area) effects and provides new insight into the nature of CA hysteresis.

  13. Wetting Hysteresis at the Molecular Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Wei; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1996-01-01

    The motion of a fluid-fluid-solid contact line on a rough surface is well known to display hysteresis in the contact angle vs. velocity relationship. In order to understand the phenomenon at a fundamental microscopic level, we have conducted molecular dynamics computer simulations of a Wilhelmy plate experiment in which a solid surface is dipped into a liquid bath, and the force-velocity characteristics are measured. We directly observe a systematic variation of force and contact angle with velocity, which is single-valued for the case of an atomically smooth solid surface. In the microscopically rough case, however, we find (as intuitively expected) an open hysteresis loop. Further characterization of the interface dynamics is in progress.

  14. Magnetic hysteresis of limestones: facies control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Chow, Nancy; Werner, Tomasz

    1993-03-01

    The hysteresis properties of 116 non-red, marine limestones from 92 localities indicate that remanence is carried by magnetite of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) and small multidomain (MD) size. Pelagic limestones have paramagnetic matrices and hysteresis properties compatible with larger PSD or MD grain sizes of magnetite, probably associated with detrital clay minerals introduced by pelagic rain-out. Thus they may be less suitable recorders of stable remanence. Other limestone facies (excepting dolomitized examples) have diamagnetic matrices. They include shallow—subtidal limestones which tend to have smaller PSD sizes of magnetite, as do backreef—lagoonal, undifferentiated-shelf and reef facies. It is believed that the wide geographical and temporal range of samples minimizes effects related to post-compaction groundwater flow (late diagenesis) and that the associations recognized should be tested in future studies.

  15. Constitutive modeling of contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Vedantam, Srikanth; Panchagnula, Mahesh V

    2008-05-15

    We introduce a phase field model of wetting of surfaces by sessile drops. The theory uses a two-dimensional non-conserved phase field variable to parametrize the Gibbs free energy of the three-dimensional system. Contact line tension and contact angle hysteresis arise from the gradient term in the free energy and the kinetic coefficient respectively. A significant advantage of this approach is in the constitutive specification of hysteresis. The advancing and receding angles of a surface, the liquid-vapor interfacial energy and three-phase line tension are the only required constitutive inputs to the model. We first simulate hysteresis on a smooth chemically homogeneous surface using this theory. Next we show that it is possible to study heterogeneous surfaces whose component surfaces are themselves hysteretic. We use this theory to examine the wetting of a surface containing a circular heterogeneous island. The contact angle for this case is found to be determined solely by the material properties at the contact line in accord with recent experimental data.

  16. Role of reversible susceptibility in ferromagnetic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Carl S.

    2002-05-01

    An equation of state based upon saturation magnetization, Ms, coercive field, Hc, and the reversible susceptibility function of magnetization is proposed for ferromagnetic hysteresis. Reversible susceptibility divided by the initial susceptibility is the anisotropy function of magnetization, χr, ranging from one in the demagnetized state to zero at saturation, and varying with magnetic history. Its dependence on scaled magnetization, m=M/Ms on the interval (-1,1) varies with material, allowing characterization of anisotropy classes. Precise measurements have been made of reversible susceptibility, initial and saturate magnetization curves, and loops for Orthonol™, annealed 3% nickel steel and as-received 1018 steel, representing crystals, isotropic polycrystals and composite ferromagnets, respectively. Magnetization change is the product of the reversible susceptibility, change in the applied field and the cooperative function due to domain interactions. This function is 1+βm for the virgin curve with half this slope from any reversal, where β=Ms/XiHc is the hysteresis coefficient. Variation of β for 1018 steel is due to distributed coercivities, and causes sigmoid B(H) curves. In the scaled field representation, where h=H/Hc, the cooperative function is 1/(1-hχr), a hyperbolic field dependence smeared by the anisotropy function. Constant anisotropy causes closed hysteresis loops, while variable anisotropy causes creeping of cycled asymmetric loops. In ferromagnetism, 1/χ=1/χr-h, normal scaled reluctivity is reduced from its reversible value by the scaled field.

  17. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  18. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  19. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application

    SciTech Connect

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-15

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  20. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application.

    PubMed

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  1. Fingerprint image enhancement by differential hysteresis processing.

    PubMed

    Blotta, Eduardo; Moler, Emilce

    2004-05-10

    A new method to enhance defective fingerprints images through image digital processing tools is presented in this work. When the fingerprints have been taken without any care, blurred and in some cases mostly illegible, as in the case presented here, their classification and comparison becomes nearly impossible. A combination of spatial domain filters, including a technique called differential hysteresis processing (DHP), is applied to improve these kind of images. This set of filtering methods proved to be satisfactory in a wide range of cases by uncovering hidden details that helped to identify persons. Dactyloscopy experts from Policia Federal Argentina and the EAAF have validated these results.

  2. Mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuruş, I. M.; Dimian, M.; Graur, A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and experimental study of designing a mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis. Our research is centred upon designing transducers on the basis of optical sensors, as photoelectric conversions eliminate the influence of electromagnetic disturbances. Conversion of the rotation/translation motions into electric signals is performed with the help of a LED-photoresistor Polaroid optocoupler. The driver of the optocoupler's transmitter module is an independent current source. The signal conditioning circuit is a Schmitt trigger circuit. The device is designed to be applied in the field of automation and mechatronics.

  3. Contact angle hysteresis on randomly rough surfaces: a computational study.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-04-09

    Wetting is important in many applications, and the solid surfaces being wet invariably feature some amount of surface roughness. A free energy-based computational simulation is used to study the effect of roughness on wetting and especially contact angle hysteresis. On randomly rough, self-affine surfaces, it is found that hysteresis depends primarily on the value of the Wenzel roughness parameter r, increasing in proportion with r - 1. Micrometer-level roughness causes hysteresis of a few degrees.

  4. Method and apparatus for sub-hysteresis discrimination

    DOEpatents

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2015-12-29

    Embodiments of comparator circuits are disclosed. A comparator circuit may include a differential input circuit, an output circuit, a positive feedback circuit operably coupled between the differential input circuit and the output circuit, and a hysteresis control circuit operably coupled with the positive feedback circuit. The hysteresis control circuit includes a switching device and a transistor. The comparator circuit provides sub-hysteresis discrimination and high speed discrimination.

  5. THE EFFECT OF LIQUID STRUCTURE ON CONTACT ANGLE HYSTERESIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contact angle hysteresis was measured for a variety of liquids on condensed monolayers of 17-(perfluoroheptyl)-heptadecanoic acid adsorbed on...into the porous monolayer. However, contact angle hysteresis was negligible when the average diameter of the liquid molecules was larger than the...monolayers by contact angle hysteresis measurements on a series of liquids having gradations in molecular volume. The results of this investigation

  6. On the rationale for hysteresis in economic decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Luis A.; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Cross, Rod

    2017-02-01

    In the social sciences there are plausible reasons to postulate that hysteresis effects are important. The available evidence, however, is predominantly at the macro level. In this paper we review the evidence regarding hysteresis in the neural processes underlying human behavior. We argue that there is a need for experimental and neuroimaging studies to fill the gap in knowledge about hysteresis processes at the micro level in the social sciences.

  7. Hysteresis phenomena of the intelligent driver model for traffic flow.

    PubMed

    Dahui, Wang; Ziqiang, Wei; Ying, Fan

    2007-07-01

    We present hysteresis phenomena of the intelligent driver model for traffic flow in a circular one-lane roadway. We show that the microscopic structure of traffic flow is dependent on its initial state by plotting the fraction of congested vehicles over the density, which shows a typical hysteresis loop, and by investigating the trajectories of vehicles on the velocity-over-headway plane. We find that the trajectories of vehicles on the velocity-over-headway plane, which usually show a hysteresis loop, include multiple loops. We also point out the relations between these hysteresis loops and the congested jams or high-density clusters in traffic flow.

  8. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  9. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  10. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  11. Modeling Anomalous Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, Stephan; Kemerink, Martijn; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites are distinct from most other semiconductors because they exhibit characteristics of both electronic and ionic motion. Accurate understanding of the optoelectronic impact of such properties is important to fully optimize devices and be aware of any limitations of perovskite solar cells and broader optoelectronic devices. Here we use a numerical drift-diffusion model to describe device operation of perovskite solar cells. To achieve hysteresis in the modeled current-voltage characteristics, we must include both ion migration and electronic charge traps, serving as recombination centers. Trapped electronic charges recombine with oppositely charged free electronic carriers, of which the density depends on the bias-dependent ion distribution in the perovskite. Our results therefore show that reduction of either the density of mobile ionic species or carrier trapping at the perovskite interface will remove the adverse hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. This gives a clear target for ongoing research effort and unifies previously conflicting experimental observations and theories.

  12. Hysteresis and feedback of ice sheet response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Takahashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Investigating the response of ice sheets to climatic forcings in the past by climate-ice sheet modelling is important for understanding the ice sheets' change. The 100-kyr cycle of the large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and fast termination of the glacial cycle are the prominent pattern known from paleoclimate records. We simulate the past glacial cycles with an ice sheet model, IcIES in combination with a general circulation model, MIROC, using the time series of insolation and atmospheric CO2. Feedback processes between ice sheet and atmosphere such as the ice albedo feedback, the elevation-mass balance feedback, desertification effect and stationary wave feedback are analyzed. We show that the threshold of termination of the glacial cycles can be explained by the pattern of the hysteresis of ice sheet change, i.e. multiple steady states of the ice sheets under climatic forcings. We find that slope of the upper branch of the multiple equilibria curve for Laurentide ice volumes is fundamental for the observed glacial patterns. Finally, we discuss the similarity and difference between the hysteresis structure of ice sheets variation for Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland.

  13. Percolation and hysteresis in macroscopic capillarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The concepts of relative permeability and capillary pressure are crucial for the accepted traditional theory of two phase flow in porous media. Recently a theoretical approach was introduced that does not require these concepts as input [1][2][3]. Instead it was based on the concept of hydraulic percolation of fluid phases. The presentation will describe this novel approach. It allows to simulate processes with simultaneous occurence of drainage and imbibition. Furthermore, it predicts residual saturations and their spatiotemporal changes during two phase immiscible displacement [1][2][3][4][5]. [1] R. Hilfer. Capillary Pressure, Hysteresis and Residual Saturation in Porous Media, Physica A, vol. 359, pp. 119, 2006. [2] R. Hilfer. Macroscopic Capillarity and Hysteresis for Flow in Porous Media, Physical Review E, vol. 73, pp. 016307, 2006. [3] R. Hilfer. Macroscopic capillarity without a constitutive capillary pressure function, Physica A, vol. 371, pp. 209, 2006. [4] R. Hilfer. Modeling and Simulation of Macrocapillarity, in: P. Garrido et al. (eds.) Modeling and Simulation of Materials vol. CP1091, pp. 141, American Institute of Physcis, New York, 2009. [5] R. Hilfer and F. Doster. Percolation as a basic concept for macroscopic capillarity, Transport in Porous Media, DOI 10.1007/s11242-009-9395-0, in print, 2009.

  14. Fatigue, Hysteresis and Acoustic Emission. Parts 1 and 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    Strain Controlled Fatigue Experiment in Progress ............ 47 25. Typical Hysteresis Loop Displayed with Data Points ..................... 48 26...88 52. Typical Hysteresis Loops from a Staircase Load Program ................. 89 53. Typical Strain Controlled Fatigue Experiment Displaying Strain ...area is difficult, if not impossible. Hence, the shift from stress controlled to strain controlled experiments. During this period, separating the total

  15. Coexistence of negative photoconductivity and hysteresis in semiconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Shendong; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Tang, Nujiang; Xu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Jingguo; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed graphene quantum dots (GQDs) possess a moderate bandgap, which make them a promising candidate for optoelectronics devices. However, negative photoconductivity (NPC) and hysteresis that happen in the photoelectric conversion process could be harmful to performance of the GQDs-based devices. So far, their origins and relations have remained elusive. Here, we investigate experimentally the origins of the NPC and hysteresis in GQDs. By comparing the hysteresis and photoconductance of GQDs under different relative humidity conditions, we are able to demonstrate that NPC and hysteresis coexist in GQDs and both are attributed to the carrier trapping effect of surface adsorbed moisture. We also demonstrate that GQDs could exhibit positive photoconductivity with three-order-of-magnitude reduction of hysteresis after a drying process and a subsequent encapsulation. Considering the pervasive moisture adsorption, our results may pave the way for a commercialization of semiconducting graphene-based and diverse solution-based optoelectronic devices.

  16. A Hysteresis Model for Piezoceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of nonlinear constitutive relations and hysteresis inherent to piezoceramic materials at moderate to high drive levels. Such models are, necessary to realize the, full potential of the materials in high performance control applications, and a necessary prerequisite is the development of techniques which permit control implementation. The approach employed here is based on the qualification of reversible and irreversible domain wall motion in response to applied electric fields. A comparison with experimental data illustrates that because the resulting ODE model is physics-based, it can be employed for both characterization and prediction of polarization levels throughout the range of actuator operation. Finally, the ODE formulation is amenable to inversion which facilitates the development of an inverse compensator for linear control design.

  17. Modified Davidenkov hysteresis and the propagation of sawtooth waves in polycrystals with hysteresis loss saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. E.; Kiyashko, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    A modified Davidenkov hysteresis equation of the state has been proposed for describing the saturation of the effects of amplitude-dependent internal friction in polycrystalline metals and other solids, which possess imperfect elasticity. Using this equation, an exact analytical solution of the problem of the propagation of a periodic sawtooth wave in media characterized by quadratic hysteresis with nonlinear loss saturation has been obtained. Regularities of variations in the characteristics of a sawtooth wave, such as nonlinear loss, the change in the velocity of the propagation of the wave, and the amplitudes of the higher harmonics of the wave, have been determined. A graphical analysis of the evolution of the shape and the spectral components of the wave has been carried out.

  18. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic stripes.

    PubMed

    Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Möller, Martin; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-08-21

    We study experimentally and discuss quantitatively the contact angle hysteresis on striped superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of a solid fraction, ϕS. It is shown that the receding regime is determined by a longitudinal sliding motion of the deformed contact line. Despite an anisotropy of the texture the receding contact angle remains isotropic, i.e., is practically the same in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The cosine of the receding angle grows nonlinearly with ϕS. To interpret this we develop a theoretical model, which shows that the value of the receding angle depends both on weak defects at smooth solid areas and on the strong defects due to the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which scales as ϕS(2)lnϕS. The advancing contact angle was found to be anisotropic, except in a dilute regime, and its value is shown to be determined by the rolling motion of the drop. The cosine of the longitudinal advancing angle depends linearly on ϕS, but a satisfactory fit to the data can only be provided if we generalize the Cassie equation to account for weak defects. The cosine of the transverse advancing angle is much smaller and is maximized at ϕS ≃ 0.5. An explanation of its value can be obtained if we invoke an additional energy due to strong defects in this direction, which is shown to be caused by the adhesion of the drop on solid sectors and is proportional to ϕS(2). Finally, the contact angle hysteresis is found to be quite large and generally anisotropic, but it becomes isotropic when ϕS ≤ 0.2.

  19. Hysteresis in Pressure-Driven DNA Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Nicasio-Collazo, Luz Adriana; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like) charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue. PMID:22496765

  20. Mechanism of Wettability Hysteresis in Natural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J. L.; Demond, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Because models of subsurface flow and transport depend on the contact angles made by the air/water and waste liquid/water interfaces with soil and rock surfaces, accurate knowledge of the wettability of subsurface systems is necessary. Sessile drop contact angles were measured on dry rock surfaces and on the same rock surfaces immersed in a second fluid. Quartz slides and cut rock faces that had been leveled and polished served as representative surfaces for silica sand, talc, kerogen containing shales, bituminous coal, and mineralized carbon. For several carbon-containing materials, contact angles are reversed from near 170 degrees when water is the receding fluid to less than 70 degrees if water is the advancing fluid. However, some mineral soils do not display wetting reversal. This work seeks to explain the mechanisms of the wetting order hysteresis. Utilizing an aqueous 0.01 M NaCl solution, glycerol, 1-bromonapthalene, and diidomethane as probe fluids, contact angle values are assessed with the method of van Oss et al. (1988) to determine the surface energy components of each type of soil. The quartz mineral surface energy has a large polar component and the calculated quartz surface energy does not depend on the wetting history of the slide. However, the magnitudes of the surface energy components of the carbon-containing materials change depending on the wetting history, indicating that the nature of the surface is altered by the surrounding fluid. The presence of wetting order hysteresis may contribute to the heterogeneous fluid distributions found at many waste liquid sites. When soil is known to contain carbon, some knowledge of the wetting history is necessary to predict the contact angle and thus the transport behavior.

  1. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  2. Understanding the Hysteresis Loop Conundrum in Pharmacokinetic / Pharmacodynamic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Louizos, Christopher; Yáñez, Jaime A.; Forrest, Laird; Davies, Neal M.

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops are phenomena that sometimes are encountered in the analysis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships spanning from pre-clinical to clinical studies. When hysteresis occurs it provides insight into the complexity of drug action and disposition that can be encountered. Hysteresis loops suggest that the relationship between drug concentration and the effect being measured is not a simple direct relationship, but may have an inherent time delay and disequilibrium, which may be the result of metabolites, the consequence of changes in pharmacodynamics or the use of a non-specific assay or may involve an indirect relationship. Counter-clockwise hysteresis has been generally defined as the process in which effect can increase with time for a given drug concentration, while in the case of clockwise hysteresis the measured effect decreases with time for a given drug concentration. Hysteresis loops can occur as a consequence of a number of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms including tolerance, distributional delay, feedback regulation, input and output rate changes, agonistic or antagonistic active metabolites, uptake into active site, slow receptor kinetics, delayed or modified activity, time-dependent protein binding and the use of racemic drugs among other factors. In this review, each of these various causes of hysteresis loops are discussed, with incorporation of relevant examples of drugs demonstrating these relationships for illustrative purposes. Furthermore, the effect that pharmaceutical formulation has on the occurrence and potential change in direction of the hysteresis loop, and the major pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic modeling approaches utilized to collapse and model hysteresis are detailed. PMID:24735761

  3. Understanding the hysteresis loop conundrum in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    PubMed

    Louizos, Christopher; Yáñez, Jaime A; Forrest, M Laird; Davies, Neal M

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis loops are phenomena that sometimes are encountered in the analysis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships spanning from pre-clinical to clinical studies. When hysteresis occurs it provides insight into the complexity of drug action and disposition that can be encountered. Hysteresis loops suggest that the relationship between drug concentration and the effect being measured is not a simple direct relationship, but may have an inherent time delay and disequilibrium, which may be the result of metabolites, the consequence of changes in pharmacodynamics or the use of a non-specific assay or may involve an indirect relationship. Counter-clockwise hysteresis has been generally defined as the process in which effect can increase with time for a given drug concentration, while in the case of clockwise hysteresis the measured effect decreases with time for a given drug concentration. Hysteresis loops can occur as a consequence of a number of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms including tolerance, distributional delay, feedback regulation, input and output rate changes, agonistic or antagonistic active metabolites, uptake into active site, slow receptor kinetics, delayed or modified activity, time-dependent protein binding and the use of racemic drugs among other factors. In this review, each of these various causes of hysteresis loops are discussed, with incorporation of relevant examples of drugs demonstrating these relationships for illustrative purposes. Furthermore, the effect that pharmaceutical formulation has on the occurrence and potential change in direction of the hysteresis loop, and the major pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic modeling approaches utilized to collapse and model hysteresis are detailed.

  4. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  5. Static measurements of slender delta wing rolling moment hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Levin, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Slender delta wing planforms are susceptible to self-induced roll oscillations due to aerodynamic hysteresis during the limit cycle roll oscillation. Test results are presented which clearly establish that the static rolling moment hysteresis has a damping character; hysteresis tends to be greater when, due to either wing roll or side slip, the vortex burst moves back and forth over the wing trailing edge. These data are an indirect indication of the damping role of the vortex burst during limit cycle roll oscillations.

  6. Applications of a theory of ferromagnetic hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The differential equation B = ..cap alpha../vertical/ bar H /vertical bar/(f(H) - B) + Hg(H) and a set of restrictions on the material functions f and g yield a theory of rate independent hyseresis for isoperm ferromagnetic materials. A modification based on exchanging the positions of B and H in the differential equation and on allowing for the dependence of the material functions on H extends the theory to rate dependent, nonisoperm materials. The theory and its extension exhibit all of the important features of ferromagnetic hysteresis, including the existence and stability of minor loops. Both are well suited for use in numerical field solving codes. Examples in which the material functions are simple combinations of analytic functions are presented here for MnZn ferrite, NiZn ferrite, NiFe tape, and CoCr thin film. Also presented is a procedure for constructing a two dimensional vector model that yields bell-shaped and M-shaped curves for graphs of the angular variation of the coercive field.

  7. Permeation hysteresis in PdCu membranes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lixiang; Goldbach, Andreas; Xu, Hengyong

    2008-10-09

    H 2 permeation hysteresis has been observed during cycling of a 3 mum thick supported PdCu membrane with approximately 50 atom % Pd through the fcc/bcc (face-centered cubic/body-centered cubic) miscibility gap between 723 and 873 K. Structural investigations after annealing of membrane fragments under H 2 at 823 K reveal retardation of the fcc(H) --> bcc(H) transition, which is attributed to the occurrence of metastable hydrogenated fcc PdCu(H) phases. The H(2) flux at 0.1 MPa H(2) pressure difference in the well-annealed bcc single phase regime below 723 K can be described by J(H2) = (1.3 +/- 0.2) mol.m (-2).s (-1) exp[(-11.1 +/- 0.6) kJ.mol (-1)/( RT)] and that in the fcc single phase regime above 873 K by J(H2) = (7 +/- 2) mol.m (-2).s (-1) exp[(-30.3 +/- 2.5) kJ.mol (-1)/( RT)].

  8. HYSTERESIS OF BACKFLOW IMPRINTED IN COLLIMATED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Kino, Motoki; Nagakura, Hiroki

    2010-01-20

    We report two different types of backflow from jets by performing two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. One is anti-parallel and quasi-straight to the main jet (quasi-straight backflow), and the other is a bent path of the backflow (bent backflow). We find that the former appears when the head advance speed is comparable to or higher than the local sound speed at the hotspot, while the latter appears when the head advance speed is slower than the sound speed at the hotspot. Bent backflow collides with the unshocked jet and laterally squeezes the jet. At the same time, a pair of new oblique shocks is formed at the tip of the jet and new bent fast backflows are generated via these oblique shocks. The hysteresis of backflow collisions is thus imprinted in the jet as a node and anti-node structure. This process also promotes broadening of the jet cross-sectional area and also causes a decrease in the head advance velocity. This hydrodynamic process may be tested by observations of compact young jets.

  9. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  10. Hysteresis and nonlinear elasticity in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, K.R.; Guyer, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a theory of the propagation of elastic waves in hysteretic nonlinear elastic materials, e.g., rock. In the next section, we introduce the Priesach-Mayergoyz (P-M) model [6,7] of hysteretic systems and adapt it to describe the hysteretic mesoscopic elastic units (HMEU) determining the elastic properties of a rock. We combine the P-M model with effective medium theory (EMT) [8] to find the elastic response of a rock that has experienced a specified pressure history. Next, we consider elastic wave propagation in a hysteretic nonlinear elastic system governed by a history dependent equation of state. We consider one-dimensional propagation of compressional waves. The equation of motion for the longitudinal displacement field contains the same hysteretic nonlinear interactions that characterize the equation of state. We solve the equation of motion using the Green function technique developed by McCall [9]. This solution lets us identify the qualitative features in harmonic generation that are signatures of nonlinearity and hysteresis.

  11. Perovskite-Fullerene Hybrid Materials Eliminate Hysteresis In Planar Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H.; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Sun, Jon-Paul; Lan, Xinzheng; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha; Hill, Ian; Maksymovych, Petro; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-03-31

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite–PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3 antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.

  12. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior.

  13. Hysteresis loop of nonperiodic outbreaks of recurrent epidemics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hengcong; Zheng, Muhua; Wu, Dayu; Wang, Zhenhua; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-12-01

    Most of the studies on epidemics so far have focused on the growing phase, such as how an epidemic spreads and what are the conditions for an epidemic to break out in a variety of cases. However, we discover from real data that on a large scale, the spread of an epidemic is in fact a recurrent event with distinctive growing and recovering phases, i.e., a hysteresis loop. We show here that the hysteresis loop can be reproduced in epidemic models provided that the infectious rate is adiabatically increased or decreased before the system reaches its stationary state. Two ways to the hysteresis loop are revealed, which is helpful in understanding the mechanics of infections in real evolution. Moreover, a theoretical analysis is presented to explain the mechanism of the hysteresis loop.

  14. Low-Hysteresis Flow-Through Wind-Tunnel Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, N.; Luna, P. M.; Roberts, A. C.; Smith, R. C.; Horne, W. L.; Smith, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    Improved flow-through wind-tunnel balance includes features minimizing both spurious force readings caused by internal pressurized flow and mechanical hysteresis. Symmetrical forces caused by internal flow cancelled.

  15. Hysteresis loop of nonperiodic outbreaks of recurrent epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hengcong; Zheng, Muhua; Wu, Dayu; Wang, Zhenhua; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-12-01

    Most of the studies on epidemics so far have focused on the growing phase, such as how an epidemic spreads and what are the conditions for an epidemic to break out in a variety of cases. However, we discover from real data that on a large scale, the spread of an epidemic is in fact a recurrent event with distinctive growing and recovering phases, i.e., a hysteresis loop. We show here that the hysteresis loop can be reproduced in epidemic models provided that the infectious rate is adiabatically increased or decreased before the system reaches its stationary state. Two ways to the hysteresis loop are revealed, which is helpful in understanding the mechanics of infections in real evolution. Moreover, a theoretical analysis is presented to explain the mechanism of the hysteresis loop.

  16. Hysteresis as a Marker for Complex, Overlapping Landscapes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Benjamin T.; Capraro, Dominique T.; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Topologically complex proteins fold by multiple routes as a result of hard-to-fold regions of the proteins. Oftentimes these regions are introduced into the protein scaffold for function and increase frustration in the otherwise smooth-funneled landscape. Interestingly, while functional regions add complexity to folding landscapes, they may also contribute to a unique behavior referred to as hysteresis. While hysteresis is predicted to be rare, it is observed in various proteins, including proteins containing a unique peptide cyclization to form a fluorescent chromophore as well as proteins containing a knotted topology in their native fold. Here, hysteresis is demonstrated to be a consequence of the decoupling of unfolding events from the isomerization or hula-twist of a chromophore in one protein and the untying of the knot in a second protein system. The question now is- can hysteresis be a marker for the interplay of landscapes where complex folding and functional regions overlap? PMID:23525263

  17. Perovskite-fullerene hybrid materials suppress hysteresis in planar diodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H; Li, Wei; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Jeon, Seokmin; Ning, Zhijun; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Sun, Jon-Paul; Lan, Xinzheng; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha; Hill, Ian G; Maksymovych, Peter; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-05-08

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite-PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3(-) antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.

  18. A nonlinear state-space approach to hysteresis identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, J. P.; Esfahani, A. F.; Kerschen, G.; Schoukens, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies tackling hysteresis identification in the technical literature follow white-box approaches, i.e. they rely on the assumption that measured data obey a specific hysteretic model. Such an assumption may be a hard requirement to handle in real applications, since hysteresis is a highly individualistic nonlinear behaviour. The present paper adopts a black-box approach based on nonlinear state-space models to identify hysteresis dynamics. This approach is shown to provide a general framework to hysteresis identification, featuring flexibility and parsimony of representation. Nonlinear model terms are constructed as a multivariate polynomial in the state variables, and parameter estimation is performed by minimising weighted least-squares cost functions. Technical issues, including the selection of the model order and the polynomial degree, are discussed, and model validation is achieved in both broadband and sine conditions. The study is carried out numerically by exploiting synthetic data generated via the Bouc-Wen equations.

  19. Aileron roll hysteresis effects on entry of space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom simulations of the space shuttle orbiter entry with control hysteresis were conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center interactive simulator known as the automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator. These simulations revealed that the vehicle can tolerate control hysteresis producing a + or - 50 percent change in the nominal aileron roll characteristics and an offset in the nominal characteristics equivalent to a + or - 5 deg aileron deflection with little increase in the reaction control system's fuel consumption.

  20. Hysteresis as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Sabrina D; Bitzer, Sebastian; Nierhaus, Till; Kalberlah, Christian; Preusser, Sven; Neumann, Jane; Nikulin, Vadim V; van der Meer, Elke; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Perceptual decisions not only depend on the incoming information from sensory systems but constitute a combination of current sensory evidence and internally accumulated information from past encounters. Although recent evidence emphasizes the fundamental role of prior knowledge for perceptual decision making, only few studies have quantified the relevance of such priors on perceptual decisions and examined their interplay with other decision-relevant factors, such as the stimulus properties. In the present study we asked whether hysteresis, describing the stability of a percept despite a change in stimulus property and known to occur at perceptual thresholds, also acts as a form of an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making, supporting the stability of a decision across successively presented random stimuli (i.e., decision hysteresis). We applied a variant of the classical 2-point discrimination task and found that hysteresis influenced perceptual decision making: Participants were more likely to decide 'same' rather than 'different' on successively presented pin distances. In a direct comparison between the influence of applied pin distances (explicit stimulus property) and hysteresis, we found that on average, stimulus property explained significantly more variance of participants' decisions than hysteresis. However, when focusing on pin distances at threshold, we found a trend for hysteresis to explain more variance. Furthermore, the less variance was explained by the pin distance on a given decision, the more variance was explained by hysteresis, and vice versa. Our findings suggest that hysteresis acts as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making that becomes increasingly important when explicit stimulus properties provide decreasing evidence.

  1. Stabilization of supercooled fluids by thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P W; Leader, J P

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that thermal hysteresis proteins found in many cold-hardy, freeze-avoiding arthropods stabilize their supercooled body fluids. We give evidence that fish antifreeze proteins, which also produce thermal hysteresis, bind to and reduce the efficiency of heterogenous nucleation sites, rather than binding to embryonic ice nuclei. We discuss both possible mechanisms for stabilization of supercooled body fluids and also describe a new method for measuring and defining the supercooling point of small volumes of liquid. PMID:7612853

  2. A MHO-based magnetic hysteresis model for amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lianwei; Shen, Yu; Li, Jinrong; Zhao, Xinlong

    2014-12-01

    A magnetic hysteretic operator (MHO) is proposed in this paper. Based on the constructed MHO, the input space of neural networks is expanded from one-dimension to two-dimension using the expanded space method so that the one-to-multiple mapping of magnetic hysteresis is transformed into one-to-one mapping. Based on the expanded input space, a neural network is employed to identify magnetic hysteresis. The result of an experimental example suggests the proposed approach is effective.

  3. The significance of observed rotational magnetic hysteresis in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1974-01-01

    Rotational magnetic hysteresis curves for lunar soils 10084, 12070, and 14259, and rock 14053 have been published. There is no adequate explanation to date for the observed large hysteresis at high fields. Lunar rock magnetism researchers consider fine particle iron to be the primary source of stable magnetic remanence in lunar samples. Iron has cubic anisotropy with added shape anisotropy for extreme particle shapes. The observed high-field hysteresis must have its source in uniaxial or unidirectional anisotropy. This implies the existence of minerals with uniaxial anisotropy or exchange-coupled spin states. Therefore, the source of this observed high-field hysteresis must be identified and understood before serious paleointensity studies are made. It is probable that the exchange-coupled spin states and/or the source of uniaxial anisotropy responsible for the high-field hysteresis might be influenced by the lunar surface diurnal temperature cycling. The possible sources of high-field hysteresis in lunar samples are presented and considered.

  4. Perceptual hysteresis in the judgment of auditory pitch shift.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Claire; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Perceptual hysteresis can be defined as the enduring influence of the recent past on current perception. Here, hysteresis was investigated in a basic auditory task: pitch comparisons between successive tones. On each trial, listeners were presented with pairs of tones and asked to report the direction of subjective pitch shift, as either "up" or "down." All tones were complexes known as Shepard tones (Shepard, 1964), which comprise several frequency components at octave multiples of a base frequency. The results showed that perceptual judgments were determined both by stimulus-related factors (the interval ratio between the base frequencies within a pair) and by recent context (the intervals in the two previous trials). When tones were presented in ordered sequences, for which the frequency interval between tones was varied in a progressive manner, strong hysteresis was found. In particular, ambiguous stimuli that led to equal probabilities of "up" and "down" responses within a randomized context were almost fully determined within an ordered context. Moreover, hysteresis did not act on the direction of the reported pitch shift, but rather on the perceptual representation of each tone. Thus, hysteresis could be observed within sequences in which listeners varied between "up" and "down" responses, enabling us to largely rule out confounds related to response bias. The strength of the perceptual hysteresis observed suggests that the ongoing context may have a substantial influence on fundamental aspects of auditory perception, such as how we perceive the changes in pitch between successive sounds.

  5. Elastic hysteresis in human eyes is age dependent value.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kotaro; Saito, Kei; Kameda, Toshihiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2012-06-19

    Background:  The elastic hysteresis phenomenon is observed when cyclic loading is applied to a viscoelastic system. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate elastic hysteresis in living human eyes against an external force. Design:  Prospective case series. Participants:  Twenty-four eyes of 24 normal human subjects (mean age: 41.5 ± 10.6 years) were recruited. Methods:  A non-contact tonometry process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal thickness at 4 mm from the center, corneal curvature, and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was also measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and dynamic contour tonometer (DCT). Main Outcome Measures:  Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis was calculated and graphed. Results:  The mean CCT was 552.5 ± 36.1 µm, corneal curvature was 7.84 ± 0.26 mm, and ACD was 2.83 ± 0.29 mm. The mean GAT-IOP was 14.2 ± 2.7 mmHg and DCT-IOP was 16.3 ± 3.5 mmHg. The mean energy loss due to elastic hysteresis was 3.90 × 10(-6) ± 2.49 × 10(-6) Nm. Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis correlated significantly with age (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.596, p = 0.0016). There were no significant correlations between energy loss due to elastic hysteresis and other measurements. Conclusion:  Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis in the eyes of subjects was found to positively correlate with age, independent of anterior eye structure or IOP. Therefore, it is believed that the viscosity of the eye increases with age. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2010 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  6. Hydrograph Asymmetry Drives Bedload Transport Hysteresis: Evidence from Fluvial Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, N. J.; Roth, D. L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Hsu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates are frequently different for an equivalent stage or discharge on the rising and falling limbs of a hydrograph. This asymmetry in transport results in hysteresis in sediment rating curves, which although widely documented, is not well understood mechanistically. A major factor contributing to the uncertain origins of hysteresis is the difficulty associated with making continuous bedload transport measurements in large rivers during floods. However, recent work demonstrates that seismic signals from rivers can provide quantitative constraints on the evolution of bedload transport during storms on large rivers, when direct measurements would otherwise be impossible. Here, we analyze patterns in the amplitude of seismic shaking along the Cho-Shui River in Taiwan and along the Erlenbach Stream in Switzerland during a total of 10 storm events. The storms exhibit varying amounts of hysteresis in the amplitude of seismic shaking as a function of flood discharge (as measured from nearby gages). However, the amount of hysteresis, which we quantify with a non-dimensional metric, correlates strongly with the degree of asymmetry in the flood hydrograph. Specifically, the degree of hysteresis observed during an event scales inversely with the ratio of the rising limb time to the recessional limb time. Flume experiments and field observations indicate that vertical sorting and, hence, armor formation in gravel-bedded river channels is more pronounced during longer storms. Although we lack direct constraints on the bed surface during the observed events, our results support the possibility that differential gravel sorting on the rising and falling limbs is responsible for the observed hysteresis. Specifically, our results imply that for a given stage, armor will be better developed on a slow recessional limb, resulting in lower gravel transport rates and a pattern of clockwise hysteresis.

  7. Dynamic Hysteresis in Compacted Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdary, Krishna M.

    The frequency and temperature dependent magnetic response of a bulk soft magnetic nanocomposite made by compacting Fe10Co 90 nanoparticles was measured and modeled. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to characterize the size, composition, and structure of the nanoparticles and nanocomposite. Polyol synthesis was used to produce 200 nm particles with average grain size 20 nm and large superparamagnetic fraction. The nanoparticles were consolidated to 90% theoretical density by plasma pressure compaction. The compacted nanoparticles retained the 20 nm average grain size and large superparamagnetic fraction. The nanocomposite resistivity was more than three times that of the bulk alloy. Vibrating sample and SQUID-MPMS magnetometers were used for low frequency magnetic measurements of the nanoparticles and nanocomposite. Compaction reduced the coercivity from 175 Oe to 8 Oe and the effective anisotropy from 124 x 10 3 ergs/cc to 7.9 x 103 ergs/cc. These reductions were caused by increased exchange coupling between surface nanograins, consistent with predictions from the Random Anisotropy model. Varying degrees of exchange coupling existed within the nanocomposite, contributing to a distribution of energy barriers. A permeameter was used for frequency dependent magnetic measurements on a toroid cut from the nanocomposite. Complex permeability, coercivity, and power loss were extracted from dynamic minor hysteresis loops measured over a range of temperatures (77 K - 873 K) and frequencies (0.1 kHz - 100 kHz). The real and imaginary parts of the complex permeability spectrum showed asymmetries consistent with a distribution of energy barriers and high damping. When the complex permeability, power loss, and coercivity were scaled relative to the peak frequency of the imaginary permeability, all fell on universal curves. Various microscopic and macroscopic models for the complex permeability were investigated. The complex permeability was successfully fit

  8. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-01-01

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe3+ cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe3+ core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe3+ shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe3+ concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields. PMID:28220793

  9. Surface free energy of a solid from contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Chibowski, Emil

    2003-04-25

    Nature of contact angle hysteresis is discussed basing on the literature data (Colloids Surf. A 189 (2001) 265) of dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of n-alkanes and n-alcohols on a very smooth surface of 1,1,2,-trichloro-1,2,2,-trifluoroethane (FC-732) film deposited on a silicon plate. The authors considered the liquid absorption and/or retention (swelling) processes responsible for the observed hysteresis. In this paper hysteresis is considered to be due to the liquid film left behind the drop during retreating of its contact line. Using the contact angle hysteresis an approach is suggested for evaluation of the solid surface free energy. Molecular spacing and the film structure are discussed to explain the difference in n-alkanes and n-alcohols behaviour as well as to explain the difference between dispersion free energy gamma(s)(d) and total surface free energy gamma(s)(tot) of FC-732, as determined from the advancing contact angles and the hysteresis, respectively.

  10. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-02-21

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe(3+) cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe(3+) core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe(3+) shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe(3+) concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields.

  11. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage-dependent anion channel.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Shay M; Teijido, Oscar; Hoogerheide, David P; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-09-01

    Hysteresis in the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels is observed when the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, because the focus was solely on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. We studied the hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp the frequency of which was varied over three orders of magnitude, from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We found that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, suggesting broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior is observed for hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening. This enables calculation of the usual equilibrium gating parameters, gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which were found to be almost insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, and, in the opening branch, follows quasi-equilibrium paths.

  12. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-02-01

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe3+ cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe3+ core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe3+ shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe3+ concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields.

  13. Hysteresis in Transport Critical-Current Measurements of Oxide Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, L F; Stauffer, T C

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated magnetic hysteresis in transport critical-current (I c) measurements of Ag-matrix (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10- x (Bi-2223) and AgMg-matrix Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+ x (Bi-2212) tapes. The effect of magnetic hysteresis on the measured critical current of high temperature superconductors is a very important consideration for every measurement procedure that involves more than one sweep of magnetic field, changes in field angle, or changes in temperature at a given field. The existence of this hysteresis is well known; however, the implications for a measurement standard or interlaboratory comparisons are often ignored and the measurements are often made in the most expedient way. A key finding is that I c at a given angle, determined by sweeping the angles in a given magnetic field, can be 17 % different from the I c determined after the angle was fixed in zero field and the magnet then ramped to the given field. Which value is correct is addressed in the context that the proper sequence of measurement conditions reflects the application conditions. The hysteresis in angle-sweep and temperature-sweep data is related to the hysteresis observed when the field is swept up and down at constant angle and temperature. The necessity of heating a specimen to near its transition temperature to reset it to an initial state between measurements at different angles and temperatures is discussed.

  14. Hysteresis in the production of force by larval Dipteran muscle.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Bethany A; Anikin, Ilya Marko; Krans, Jacob L

    2010-07-15

    We describe neuromuscular hysteresis - the dependence of muscle force on recent motoneuron activity - in the body wall muscles of larval Sarcophaga bullata and Drosophila melanogaster. In semi-intact preparations, isometric force produced by a train of nerve impulses at a constant rate was significantly less than that produced by the same train of stimuli with a brief (200 ms) high-frequency burst of impulses interspersed. Elevated force did not decay back to predicted values after the burst but instead remained high throughout the duration of the stimulus train. The increased force was not due to a change in excitatory junction potentials (EJPs); EJP voltage and time course before and after the high-frequency burst were not statistically different. Single muscle and semi-intact preparations exhibited hysteresis similarly, suggesting that connective tissues of the origin or insertion are not crucial to the mechanism of hysteresis. Hysteresis was greatest at low motoneuron rates - yielding a approximately 100% increase over predicted values based on constant-rate stimulation alone - and decreased as impulse rate increased. We modulated motoneuron frequency rhythmically across rates and cycle periods similar to those observed during kinematic analysis of larval crawling. Positive force hysteresis was also evident within these more physiological activation parameters.

  15. Ocean and atmosphere feedbacks affecting AMOC hysteresis in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L. C.; Smith, R. S.; Wood, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Theories suggest that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) can exhibit a hysteresis where, for a given input of fresh water into the north Atlantic, there are two possible states: one with a strong overturning in the north Atlantic (on) and the other with a reverse Atlantic cell (off). A previous study showed hysteresis of the AMOC for the first time in a coupled general circulation model (Hawkins et al. in Geophys Res Lett. doi: 10.1029/2011GL047208, 2011). In this study we show that the hysteresis found by Hawkins et al. (2011) is sensitive to the method with which the fresh water input is compensated. If this compensation is applied throughout the volume of the global ocean, rather than at the surface, the region of hysteresis is narrower and the off states are very different: when the compensation is applied at the surface, a strong Pacific overturning cell and a strong Atlantic reverse cell develops; when the compensation is applied throughout the volume there is little change in the Pacific and only a weak Atlantic reverse cell develops. We investigate the mechanisms behind the transitions between the on and off states in the two experiments, and find that the difference in hysteresis is due to the different off states. We find that the development of the Pacific overturning cell results in greater atmospheric moisture transport into the North Atlantic, and also is likely responsible for a stronger Atlantic reverse cell. These both act to stabilize the off state of the Atlantic overturning.

  16. Real-time inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric actuators with a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a novel real-time inverse hysteresis compensation method for piezoelectric actuators exhibiting asymmetric hysteresis effect. The proposed method directly utilizes a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model to characterize the inverse hysteresis effect of piezoelectric actuators. The hysteresis model is then cascaded in the feedforward path for hysteresis cancellation. It avoids the complex and difficult mathematical procedure for constructing an inversion of the hysteresis model. For the purpose of validation, an experimental platform is established. To identify the model parameters, an adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm is adopted. Based on the identified model parameters, a real-time feedforward controller is implemented for fast hysteresis compensation. Finally, tests are conducted with various kinds of trajectories. The experimental results show that the tracking errors caused by the hysteresis effect are reduced by about 90%, which clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed inverse compensation method with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

  17. The antifreeze potential of the spruce budworm thermal hysteresis protein.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, M G; Doucet, D; Davies, P L; Walker, V K

    1997-09-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) inhibit ice growth by surface adsorption that results in a depression of the freezing point below the melting point. The maximum level of this thermal hysteresis shown by the four structurally unrelated fish AFP is approximately 1.5 degrees C. In contrast, hemolymph and crude extracts from insects can have 5 degrees to 10 degrees C of thermal hysteresis. Based on the isolation, cloning, and expression of a thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana), the vastly greater activity is attributable to a 9 kDa protein. This novel, threonine- and cysteine-rich THP has striking effects on ice crystal morphology, both before and during freezing. It is also 10 to 30 times more active than any known fish AFP, offering the prospect of superior antifreeze properties in cryoprotective applications.

  18. Modeling contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kusumaatmaja, H; Yeomans, J M

    2007-05-22

    We investigate contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces, as the drop volume is quasistatically increased and decreased. We consider both two (cylindrical drops) and three (spherical drops) dimensions using analytical and numerical approaches to minimize the free energy of the drop. In two dimensions, we find, in agreement with other authors, a slip, jump, stick motion of the contact line. In three dimensions, this behavior persists, but the position and magnitude of the contact line jumps are sensitive to the details of the surface patterning. In two dimensions, we identify analytically the advancing and receding contact angles on the different surfaces, and we use numerical insights to argue that these provide bounds for the three-dimensional cases. We present explicit simulations to show that a simple average over the disorder is not sufficient to predict the details of the contact angle hysteresis and to support an explanation for the low contact angle hysteresis of suspended drops on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  19. Sinusoidal input describing function for hysteresis followed by elementary backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The author proposes a new sinusoidal input describing function which accounts for the serial combination of hysteresis followed by elementary backlash in a single nonlinear element. The output of the hysteresis element drives the elementary backlash element. Various analytical forms of the describing function are given, depending on the a/A ratio, where a is the half width of the hysteresis band or backlash gap, and A is the amplitude of the assumed input sinusoid, and on the value of the parameter representing the fraction of a attributed to the backlash characteristic. The negative inverse describing function is plotted on a gain-phase plot, and it is seen that a relatively small amount of backlash leads to domination of the backlash character in the describing function. The extent of the region of the gain-phase plane covered by the describing function is such as to guarantee some form of limit cycle behavior in most closed-loop systems.

  20. Hysteresis Modeling in Magnetostrictive Materials Via Preisach Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological characterization of hysteresis in magnetostrictive materials is presented. Such hysteresis is due to both the driving magnetic fields and stress relations within the material and is significant throughout, most of the drive range of magnetostrictive transducers. An accurate characterization of the hysteresis and material nonlinearities is necessary, to fully utilize the actuator/sensor capabilities of the magnetostrictive materials. Such a characterization is made here in the context of generalized Preisach operators. This yields a framework amenable to proving the well-posedness of structural models that incorporate the magnetostrictive transducers. It also provides a natural setting in which to develop practical approximation techniques. An example illustrating this framework in the context of a Timoshenko beam model is presented.

  1. Completely inverted hysteresis loops: Inhomogeneity effects or experimental artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C. Cui, B.; Pan, F.; Yu, H. Y.

    2013-11-14

    Completely inverted hysteresis loops (IHL) are obtained by the superconducting quantum interference device with large cooling fields (>10 kOe) in (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} films with self-assembled LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an antiferromagnetic interface. Although the behaviours of measured loops show many features characteristic to the IHL, its origin, however, is not due to the exchange coupling between (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an often accepted view on IHL. Instead, we demonstrate that the negative remanence arises from the hysteresis of superconducting coils, which drops abruptly when lower cooling fields are utilized. Hence the completely inverted hysteresis loops are experimental artifacts rather than previously proposed inhomogeneity effects in complicated materials.

  2. An Energy-Based Hysteresis Model for Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkins, F. T.; Smith, R. C.; Flatau, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of hysteresis in magnetostrictive transducers. This is considered in the context of control applications which require an accurate characterization of the relation between input currents and strains output by the transducer. This relation typically exhibits significant nonlinearities and hysteresis due to inherent properties of magnetostrictive materials. The characterization considered here is based upon the Jiles-Atherton mean field model for ferromagnetic hysteresis in combination with a quadratic moment rotation model for magnetostriction. As demonstrated through comparison with experimental data, the magnetization model very adequately quantifies both major and minor loops under various operating conditions. The combined model can then be used to accurately characterize output strains at moderate drive levels. The advantages to this model lie in the small number (six) of required parameters and the flexibility it exhibits in a variety of operating conditions.

  3. Contact Hysteresis and Friction of Alkanethiol SAMs on Au

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Kiely, J.D.

    1998-10-14

    Nanoindentation has been combhed with nanometer-scale friction measurements to identi~ dissipative mechanisms responsible for friction in hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au. We have demonstrated that friction is primarily due to viscoelastic relaxations within the films, which give rise to contact hysteresis when deformation rates are within the ranges of 5 and 200 k. We observe that this contact hysteresis increases with exposure to air such that the friction coefficient increases from 0.004 to 0.075 when films are exposed to air for 40 days. Both hysteresis and friction increase with probe speed, and we present a model of friction that characterizes this speed dependence and which also predicts a linear dependence of friction on normal force in thin organic films. Finally, we identify several short-term wear regimes and identify that wear changes dramatically when fdms age.

  4. A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii modeling method for hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruili; Tan, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii modeling method for rate-independent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators is proposed in this paper. In this method, a generalized backlash operator (GBO) regarded as the elementary operator is introduced into the model so as to be more flexible for modeling of complex hysteresis. Moreover, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the model. Thus, all the parameters of the modified PI model can be determined automatically. From this way, it avoids the tedious procedure for the selection of the operator parameters by trial and error. Then, a group of proper Clarke subgradients of the GBO outputs with respect to their parameters at a non-smooth point is obtained based on the bundle method. Finally, the experimental results of applying the proposed method to the modeling of hysteresis in a piezoelectric actuator and an ultrasonic motor (USM) are illustrated, respectively.

  5. Direct recursive identification of the Preisach hysteresis density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a novel direct method of recursive identification of the Preisach hysteresis density function is proposed. Using the discrete dynamic Preisach model, which is a state-space realization of the classical scalar Preisach model, the method is designed based on the output increment error. After giving the general formulation, the identification scheme implemented for a discretized Preisach plane is introduced and evaluated through the use of numerical simulations. Two cases of Gaussian mixtures are considered for mapping the hysteresis system to be identified. The parameter convergence is shown for a low-pass filtered white-noise input. Further, the proposed identification method is applied to a magnetism-related application example, where the flux linkage hysteresis of a proportional solenoid is assumed from the measurements, and then the inverse of a standard demagnetization procedure is utilized as the identification sequence.

  6. Persistent hysteresis in graphene-mica van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Jens; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Danneau, Romain

    2015-01-09

    We report the study of electronic transport in graphene-mica van der Waals heterostructures. We have designed various graphene field-effect devices in which mica is utilized as a substrate and/or gate dielectric. When mica is used as a gate dielectric we observe a very strong positive gate voltage hysteresis of the resistance, which persists in samples that were prepared in a controlled atmosphere down to even millikelvin temperatures. In a double-gated mica-graphene-hBN van der Waals heterostructure, we found that while a strong hysteresis occurred when mica was used as a substrate/gate dielectric, the same graphene sheet on mica substrate no longer showed hysteresis when the charge carrier density was tuned through a second gate with the hBN dielectric. While this hysteretic behavior could be useful for memory devices, our findings confirm that the environment during sample preparation has to be controlled strictly.

  7. Origin of J-V Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Mengjin; Priya, Shashank; Zhu, Kai

    2016-03-03

    High-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on organometal halide perovskite have emerged in the past five years as excellent devices for harvesting solar energy. Some remaining challenges should be resolved to continue the momentum in their development. The photocurrent density-voltage (J-V) responses of the PSCs demonstrate anomalous dependence on the voltage scan direction/rate/range, voltage conditioning history, and device configuration. The hysteretic J-V behavior presents a challenge for determining the accurate power conversion efficiency of the PSCs. Here, we review the recent progress on the investigation of the origin(s) of J-V hysteresis behavior in PSCs. We discuss the impact of slow transient capacitive current, trapping and detrapping process, ion migrations, and ferroelectric polarization on the hysteresis behavior. The remaining issues and future research required toward the understanding of J-V hysteresis in PSCs will also be discussed.

  8. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  9. Hidden hysteresis – population dynamics can obscure gene network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive feedback is a common motif in gene regulatory networks. It can be used in synthetic networks as an amplifier to increase the level of gene expression, as well as a nonlinear module to create bistable gene networks that display hysteresis in response to a given stimulus. Using a synthetic positive feedback-based tetracycline sensor in E. coli, we show that the population dynamics of a cell culture has a profound effect on the observed hysteretic response of a population of cells with this synthetic gene circuit. Results The amount of observable hysteresis in a cell culture harboring the gene circuit depended on the initial concentration of cells within the culture. The magnitude of the hysteresis observed was inversely related to the dilution procedure used to inoculate the subcultures; the higher the dilution of the cell culture, lower was the observed hysteresis of that culture at steady state. Although the behavior of the gene circuit in individual cells did not change significantly in the different subcultures, the proportion of cells exhibiting high levels of steady-state gene expression did change. Although the interrelated kinetics of gene expression and cell growth are unpredictable at first sight, we were able to resolve the surprising dilution-dependent hysteresis as a result of two interrelated phenomena - the stochastic switching between the ON and OFF phenotypes that led to the cumulative failure of the gene circuit over time, and the nonlinear, logistic growth of the cell in the batch culture. Conclusions These findings reinforce the fact that population dynamics cannot be ignored in analyzing the dynamics of gene networks. Indeed population dynamics may play a significant role in the manifestation of bistability and hysteresis, and is an important consideration when designing synthetic gene circuits intended for long-term application. PMID:23800122

  10. A survey on hysteresis modeling, identification and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Vahid; Tjahjowidodo, Tegoeh; Do, Thanh Nho

    2014-12-01

    The various mathematical models for hysteresis such as Preisach, Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP), Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI), Maxwell-Slip, Bouc-Wen and Duhem are surveyed in terms of their applications in modeling, control and identification of dynamical systems. In the first step, the classical formalisms of the models are presented to the reader, and more broadly, the utilization of the classical models is considered for development of more comprehensive models and appropriate controllers for corresponding systems. In addition, the authors attempt to encourage the reader to follow the existing mathematical models of hysteresis to resolve the open problems.

  11. Large-scale separation and hysteresis in cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothmayer, A. P.; Smith, F. T.

    1985-01-01

    An approach using a two-dimensional thin aerofoil, allied with the theory of viscous bluff-body separation, is used to study the initial cross-over from massive separation to an attached flow in a single-row unstaggered cascade. Analytic solutions are developed for the limit of small cascade-spacing. From the analytic solutions several interesting features of the cascade are examined, including multiple-solution branches and multiple regions of hysteresis. In addition, numerical results are presented for several selected aerofoils. Some of the aerofoils are found to contain markedly enlarged regions of hysteresis for certain critical cascade spacings.

  12. Modeling of Switching and Hysteresis in Molecular Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The conventional way of modeling current transport in two and three terminal molecular devices could be inadequate for certain cases involving switching and hysteresis. Here we present an alternate approach. Contrary to the regular way where applied bias directly modulates the conducting energy levels of the molecule, our method introduces a nonlinear potential energy surface varying with the applied bias as a control parameter. A time-dynamics is also introduced properly accounting for switching and hysteresis behavior. Although the model is phenomenological at this stage, we believe any detailed model would contain similar descriptions at its core.

  13. Hysteresis in Analytical Solutions for Three-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambers, J. V.; LaForce, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hysteresis in relative permeability is a widely-recognized phenomenon that impacts oil recovery in water and gas (WAG) injection. Several authors (1-3) have constructed analytical solutions for two-phase oil/water or gas/water flow in enhanced oil recovery however, analytical solutions have not previously been constructed for the three-phase flow problem for immiscible water, oil and gas including hysteresis. In this work analytical solutions are constructed for water and gas floods in a previously water-flooded oil reservoir with and without hysteresis. A simplified model is used in the analysis that qualitatively captures the behavior of oil-phase hysteresis for repeated water imbibition and drainage cycles. Many of the displacements considered have a reversal of flow direction within the displacement, requiring a matching condition to be enforced between the imbibition and drainage relative permeability curves at the point of flow reversal. A suitable matching criterion for the hysteretic curves is presented. A single water/gas injection mixture is considered, with varying initial oil and water volumes present in the reservoir. When hysteresis occurs in a displacement the entire saturation path depends on the initial volumes of oil and water present at the onset of WAG flooding. When hysteresis is ignored most of the displacement is identical for a large range of initial oil and water mixtures, with only the velocity of the leading shock changing. For the displacements which only encounter drainage of the water phase, solutions with and without hysteresis are identical. 1) K. M. Furati, ``Effects of Relative Permeability History Dependence on Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media,'' Transport in Porous Media 28: 181-203, 1997. 2) B. Plohr, D. Marchesin, P. Bedrikovetsky and P. Krause, ``Modeling hysteresis in porous media flow via relaxation,'' Computational Geosciences 5: 225-256, 2001. 3) F. M. Van Kats and C. J. Van Duijn, ``A Mathematical Model for Hysteretic Two

  14. Numerical hysteresis model for intermittent studies in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, M.

    1986-07-01

    In the present study, the use of one of the recent dependent domain models of capillary hysteresis in the numerical analysis of intermittent infiltration and redistribution of water in two types of soils (a sand and Rubicon Sandy Loam) has been shown. The numerical results for both the soils have been presented in terms of pressure head depth, moisture content depth and the pressure head-moisture content relationships. The capillary hysteresis model has been found to be very useful for the prediction of both wetting and drying scanning curves of various orders.

  15. Low hysteresis FeMn-based top spin valve.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, V V; Krinitsina, T P; Milyaev, M A; Naumova, L I; Proglyado, V V

    2012-09-01

    FeMn-based top spin valves Ta/[FeNi/CoFe]/Cu/CoFe/FeMn/Ta with different Cu and FeMn layers thicknesses were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature. It was shown that low field hysteresis due to free layer magnetization reversal can be reduced down to (0.1 divided by 0.2) Oe keeping the GMR ratio higher 8% by using both layers thicknesses optimization and non-collinear geometry of magnetoresistance measurements. Dependence of low field hysteresis and GMR ratio on the angle between applied magnetic field and pinning direction are presented.

  16. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  17. Hysteresis and the Dynamic Elasticity of Consolidated Granular Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guyer, R.A.; TenCate, J.; Johnson, P.

    1999-04-01

    Quasistatic elasticity measurements on rocks show them to be strikingly nonlinear and to have elastic hysteresis with end point memory. When the model for this quasistatic elasticity is extended to the description of nonlinear dynamic elasticity the elastic elements responsible for the hysteresis dominate the behavior. Consequently, in a resonant bar, driven to nonlinearity, the frequency shift and the attenuation are predicted to be nonanalytic functions of the strain field. A resonant bar experiment yielding results in substantial qualitative and quantitative accord with these predictions is reported. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  18. Assessing temporal variations in connectivity through suspended sediment hysteresis analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; Melland, Alice; Mellander, Per-Erik; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Connectivity provides a valuable concept for understanding catchment-scale sediment dynamics. In intensive agricultural catchments, land management through tillage, high livestock densities and extensive land drainage practices significantly change hydromorphological behaviour and alter sediment supply and downstream delivery. Analysis of suspended sediment-discharge hysteresis has offered insights into sediment dynamics but typically on a limited selection of events. Greater availability of continuous high-resolution discharge and turbidity data and qualitative hysteresis metrics enables assessment of sediment dynamics during more events and over time. This paper assesses the utility of this approach to explore seasonal variations in connectivity. Data were collected from three small (c. 10 km2) intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland with contrasting morphologies, soil types, land use patterns and management practices, and are broadly defined as low-permeability supporting grassland, moderate-permeability supporting arable and high-permeability supporting arable. Suspended sediment concentration (using calibrated turbidity measurements) and discharge data were collected at 10-min resolution from each catchment outlet and precipitation data were collected from a weather station within each catchment. Event databases (67-90 events per catchment) collated information on sediment export metrics, hysteresis category (e.g., clockwise, anti-clockwise, no hysteresis), numeric hysteresis index, and potential hydro-meteorological controls on sediment transport including precipitation amount, duration, intensity, stream flow and antecedent soil moisture and rainfall. Statistical analysis of potential controls on sediment export was undertaken using Pearson's correlation coefficient on separate hysteresis categories in each catchment. Sediment hysteresis fluctuations through time were subsequently assessed using the hysteresis index. Results showed the numeric

  19. Perovskite-Fullerene Hybrid Materials Eliminate Hysteresis In Planar Diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Jixian; Buin, Andrei; Ip, Alexander H.; ...

    2015-03-31

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite–PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3 antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solarmore » cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.« less

  20. Hierarchically structured superoleophobic surfaces with ultralow contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Kota, Arun K; Li, Yongxin; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2012-11-14

    Hierarchically structured, superoleophobic surfaces are demonstrated that display one of the lowest contact angle hysteresis values ever reported - even with extremely low-surface-tension liquids such as n-heptane. Consequently, these surfaces allow, for the first time, even ≈2 μL n-heptane droplets to bounce and roll-off at tilt angles. ≤ 2°.

  1. Contact angle hysteresis on regular pillar-like hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Li-Jen; Chang, Jeng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    A series of pillar-like patterned silicon wafers with different pillar sizes and spacing are fabricated by photolithography and further modified by a self-assembled fluorosilanated monolayer. The dynamic contact angles of water on these surfaces are carefully measured and found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of the Cassie model and the Wenzel model. When a water drop is at the Wenzel state, its contact angle hysteresis increases along with an increase in the surface roughness. While the surface roughness is further raised beyond its transition roughness (from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state), the contact angle hysteresis (or receding contact angle) discontinuously drops (or jumps) to a lower (or higher) value. When a water drop is at the Cassie state, its contact angle hysteresis strongly depends on the solid fraction and has nothing to do with the surface roughness. Even for a superhydrophobic surface, the contact angle hysteresis may still exhibit a value as high as 41 degrees for the solid fraction of 0.563.

  2. Dynamic contact angles and hysteresis under electrowetting-on-dielectric.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wyatt C; Sen, Prosenjit; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2011-08-16

    By designing and implementing a new experimental method, we have measured the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles and the resulting hysteresis of droplets under electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). Measurements were obtained over wide ranges of applied EWOD voltages, or electrowetting numbers (0 ≤ Ew ≤ 0.9), and droplet sliding speeds, or capillary numbers (1.4 × 10(-5) ≤ Ca ≤ 6.9 × 10(-3)). If Ew or Ca is low, dynamic contact angle hysteresis is not affected much by the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed; that is, the hysteresis increases by less than 50% with a 2 order-of-magnitude increase in sliding speed when Ca < 10(-3). If both Ew and Ca are high, however, the hysteresis increases with either the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed. Stick-slip oscillations were observed at Ew > 0.4. Data are interpreted with simplified hydrodynamic (Cox-Voinov) and molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) models; the Cox-Voinov model captures the trend of the data, but it yields unreasonable fitting parameters. MKT fitting parameters associated with the advancing contact line are reasonable, but a lack of symmetry indicates that a more intricate model is required.

  3. Hysteresis, Stability, and Ion Migration in Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Kenjiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-16

    Ion migration has been suspected as the origin of various irreproducible and unstable properties, most notably the hysteresis, of lead halide perovskite photovoltaic (PV) cells since the early stage of the research. Although many evidence of ionic movement have been presented both numerically and experimentally, a coherent and quantitative picture that accounts for the observed irreproducible phenomena is still lacking. At the same time, however, it has been noticed that in certain types of PV cells, the hysteresis is absent or at least within the measurement reproducibility. We have previously shown that the electronic properties of hysteresis-free cells are well represented in terms of the conventional inorganic semiconductors. The reproducibility of these measurements was confirmed typically within tens of minutes under the biasing field of -1 V to +1.5 V. In order to probe the effect of ionic motion in the hysteresis-free cells, we extended the time scale and the biasing rage in the electronic measurements, from which we conclude the following: (1) From various evidence, it appears that ion migration is inevitable. However, it does not cause detrimental effects to the PV operation. (2) We propose, based on the quantitative characterization, that the degradation is more likely due to the chemical change at the interfaces between the carrier selective layers and perovskite rather than the compositional change of the lead iodide perovskite bulk. Together, they give much hope in the use of the lead iodide perovskite in the use of actual application.

  4. Small hysteresis and high energy storage power of antiferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfei; Yang, Tongqing; Chen, Shengchen; Yao, Xi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, modified Pb(Zr,Ti)O3(PZT) antiferroelectric (AFE) ceramics system was investigated by traditional solid state method. It was observed that the effect of different contents of Zr/Sn, Zr/Ti on modified PZT antiferroelectrics. With increasing Zr/Sn content, the EAFE (electric field of AFE phase to ferroelectric (FE) phase) value was enlarged. The phase switch field was reduced from FE to AFE (EFA). The hysteresis loops were changed from "slanted" to "square"-types. With increasing Zr/Ti concentrate, the EAFE value, and also the EFA was enlarged, while the hysteresis switch ΔE was reduced. The hysteresis loops was from "square" to "slanted"-types. The samples with square hysteresis loops are suitable for energy storage capacitor applications, the composition of ceramics was Pb0.97La0.02(Zr0.90Sn0.05Ti0.05)O3, which have the largest energy storage density 4.426J/cm3 at 227 kV/cm, and ΔE was 80 kV/cm, energy efficient η was about 0.612.

  5. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1...

  6. Hysteresis loops revisited: An efficient method to analyze ferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbellini, Luca; Plathier, Julien; Lacroix, Christian; Harnagea, Catalin; Ménard, David; Pignolet, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis loops characterize a wide variety of behaviors in fields ranging from physics and chemistry to economics and sociology. In particular, they represent the main characteristic of ferroic materials such as ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, which, in recent years, have attracted much interest due to their multifunctional properties. Although measuring such loops may not be experimentally complicated, extracting the intrinsic values of the characteristic parameters of the loop may prove difficult due to the different contributions to the measured hysteresis. In this paper, a simple technique is proposed to analyze hysteresis loops and to extract solely the contribution of the ferromagnetic or ferroelectric material. Such method consists in differentiating the measured loop, deconvoluting the different contributions and selectively integrating only the signals belonging to the ferroic response. A discussion of the limitations of the method is presented. Different measured ferromagnetic and ferroelectric hysteresis loops were also used to validate the technique. Comparison between experimental and reconstructed data demonstrated the precision and reliability of the technique. Moreover, application of such method allowed us to highlight properties of a Bi2FeCrO6 room temperature multiferroic thin film that were not previously observed.

  7. Micromagnetic simulation of hysteresis loop of elliptic permalloy nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amaresh Chandra

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic hysteresis behavior of isotropic permalloy elliptic nanorings of outer semi-major axis length (aout) 100 nm and thickness (t) 20 nm were studied with respect to the variation of two parameters: outer semiminor axis length (bout) and the difference between outer and inner dimensions (r). The outer semiminor axis length (bout) varied from 90 nm to 20 nm which covers from nearly circular nanoring to elliptic nanoring of high aspect ratio. The value of r varied in steps of 10 nm. Micromagnetic simulation of in-plane hysteresis curve of these nanorings revealed that the remanent state of all of these elliptic rings are onion states if the magnetic field is applied along the longer side of the elliptic rings. If the magnetic field is applied along the shorter side, then the remanent states turn out to be vortex state. The hysteresis loss indicated by area of the hysteresis loop was found to be decreasing gradually with the increment of either r or bout. On the other hand, the remanent magnetization increased with increment of r but decreased with the increment of bout. The changes were attributed to three parameters mainly: inner curvature, exchange energy and demagnetization energy. The changes in loop area were discussed in light of variation of these three parameters.

  8. Intrinsic Hysteresis Loops Calculation of BZT Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikam, M.; Adnan, S. R.

    2014-04-01

    The Landau Devonshire (LK) simulation is utilized to calculate the intrinsic hysteresis properties of Barium Zirconium Titanate (BZT) doped by Indium and Lanthanum. A Delphi program run on Windows platform is used to facilitate the calculation. The simulation is very useful to calculate and understand the Gibbs free energy and the relationship between spontaneous polarization and electric field.

  9. A simple model of hysteresis behavior using spreadsheet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, A.; Blachowicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops occur in many scientific and technical problems, especially as field dependent magnetization of ferromagnetic materials, but also as stress-strain-curves of materials measured by tensile tests including thermal effects, liquid-solid phase transitions, in cell biology or economics. While several mathematical models exist which aim to calculate hysteresis energies and other parameters, here we offer a simple model for a general hysteretic system, showing different hysteresis loops depending on the defined parameters. The calculation which is based on basic spreadsheet analysis plus an easy macro code can be used by students to understand how these systems work and how the parameters influence the reactions of the system on an external field. Importantly, in the step-by-step mode, each change of the system state, compared to the last step, becomes visible. The simple program can be developed further by several changes and additions, enabling the building of a tool which is capable of answering real physical questions in the broad field of magnetism as well as in other scientific areas, in which similar hysteresis loops occur.

  10. Limestones distinguished by magnetic hysteresis in three-dimensional projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Hamilton, Tom

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic hysteresis data determine the suitability of rocks for paleomagnetic work, provide clues to paleo-environment and paleo-climate and they may characterize depositional environments for limestones. However, the variables chosen for conventional two-dimensional hysteresis plots, such as that of Day et al. [1977], are not always suitable to discriminate between samples. Distinguishing samples by their regression surfaces in 3D hysteresis space may be more successful in some cases [Borradaile and Lagroix, 2000] but a 2D projection with a less arbitrary viewing axis is preferable for routine reporting. We show that limestone samples are simply discriminated in a new 2D projection produced by projecting hysteresis data from three dimensions (x, y, z = Mr/Ms, Bcr, Bc) onto a plane containing the Mr/Ms axis. The orientation of the plane is controlled by its x-axis that is defined by a suitably selected Bcr/Bc ratio, most often in the magnetite PSD range, 2< (Bcr/Bc) < 4.

  11. Hysteresis Can Grant Fitness in Stochastically Varying Environment

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary; McCarthy, Stephen; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of multiple stable phenotypes of living organisms enables random switching between phenotypes as well as non-random history dependent switching called hysteresis, only random switching has been considered in prior experimental and theoretical models of adaptation to variable environments. This work considers the possibility that hysteresis may also evolve together with random phenotype switching to maximize population growth. In addition to allowing the possibility that switching rates between different phenotypes may depend not only on a continuous environmental input variable, but also on the phenotype itself, the present work considers an opportunity cost of the switching events. This opportunity cost arises as a result of a lag phase experimentally observed after phenotype switching and stochastic behavior of the environmental input. It is shown that stochastic environmental variation results in maximal asymptotic growth rate when organisms display hysteresis for sufficiently slowly varying environmental input. At the same time, sinusoidal input does not cause evolution of memory suggesting that the connection between the lag phase, stochastic environmental variation and evolution of hysteresis is a result of a stochastic resonance type phenomenon. PMID:25068284

  12. Hysteresis in the dynamic perception of scenes and objects.

    PubMed

    Poltoratski, Sonia; Tong, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Scenes and objects are effortlessly processed and integrated by the human visual system. Given the distinct neural and behavioral substrates of scene and object processing, it is likely that individuals sometimes preferentially rely on one process or the other when viewing canonical "scene" or "object" stimuli. This would allow the visual system to maximize the specific benefits of these 2 types of processing. It is less obvious which of these modes of perception would be invoked during naturalistic visual transition between a focused view of a single object and an expansive view of an entire scene, particularly at intermediate views that may not be assigned readily to either stimulus category. In the current study, we asked observers to report their online perception of such dynamic image sequences, which zoomed and panned between a canonical view of a single object and an entire scene. We found a large and consistent effect of prior perception, or hysteresis, on the classification of the sequence: observers classified the sequence as an object for several seconds longer if the trial started at the object view and zoomed out, whereas scenes were perceived for longer on trials beginning with a scene view. This hysteresis effect resisted several manipulations of the movie stimulus and of the task performed, but hinged on the perceptual history built by unidirectional progression through the image sequence. Multiple experiments confirmed that this hysteresis effect was not purely decisional and was more prominent for transitions between corresponding objects and scenes than between other high-level stimulus classes. This finding suggests that the competitive mechanisms underlying hysteresis may be especially prominent in the perception of objects and scenes. We propose that hysteresis aids in disambiguating perception during naturalistic visual transitions, which may facilitate a dynamic balance between scene and object processing to enhance processing efficiency.

  13. Magnetic hysteresis based on dipolar interactions in granular magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allia, Paolo; Coisson, Marco; Knobel, Marcelo; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco

    1999-11-01

    The magnetic hysteresis of granular magnetic systems is investigated in the high-temperature limit (T>> blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles). Measurements of magnetization curves have been performed at room temperature on various samples of granular bimetallic alloys of the family Cu100-xCox (x=5-20 at. %) obtained in ribbon form by planar flow casting in a controlled atmosphere, and submitted to different thermal treatments. The loop amplitude and shape, which are functions of sample composition and thermal history, are studied taking advantage of a novel method of graphical representation, particularly apt to emphasize the features of thin, elongated loops. The hysteresis is explained in terms of the effect of magnetic interactions of the dipolar type among magnetic-metal particles, acting to hinder the response of the system of moments to isothermal changes of the applied field. Such a property is accounted for in a mean-field scheme, by introducing a memory term in the argument of the Langevin function which describes the anhysteretic behavior of an assembly of noninteracting superparamagnetic particles. The rms field arising from the cumulative effect of dipolar interactions is linked by the theory to a measurable quantity, the reduced remanence of a major symmetric hysteresis loop. The theory's self-consistence and adequacy have been properly tested at room temperature on all examined systems. The agreement with experimental results is always striking, indicating that at high temperatures the magnetic hysteresis of granular systems is dominated by interparticle, rather than single-particle, effects. Dipolar interactions seem to fully determine the magnetic hysteresis in the high-temperature limit for low Co content (x<=10). For higher concentrations of magnetic metal, the experimental results indicate that additional hysteretic mechanisms have to be introduced.

  14. Hysteresis heating based induction bonding of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanwatana, Witchuda

    The viability of using magnetic particulate susceptor materials for induction heating during bonding of polymer matrix composites is well established in this work. The unique ability to offer localized heating, geometric flexibility, and self-controlled temperature is the major advantage of this technique. Hysteresis heating is tailored through careful design of the microstructure of nickel particulate polymer films (Ni/PSU). An excellent heating rate can be attained in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz for particle volume fraction below percolation of 0.26. The diameter of nickel particle should be kept between 65 nm to 10 mum to ensure multi-domain heating, Curie temperature control, negligible shielding effect, minimum eddy current, and slight particle oxidation. The hysteresis heating behavior of the Ni/PSU films is found to be volumetric in nature and proportional to the cube of applied magnetic field. On the other hand, heat generation is inversely proportional to the size of the multi-domain particles. The frequency effect; however, provide maximum heat generation at the domain wall resonance frequency. Curie temperature control is observed when sufficiently high magnetic fields (˜138 Oe) are applied. The master curves of AC heat generation in Ni/PSU films are established and show a strong particle size effect. Hysteresis fusion bonding of glass/polyphenylene sulfide thermoplastic composites using a magnetic film as the thermoplastic adhesive shows that the bond strength of hysteresis-welded materials is comparable to that of autoclave-welded materials while offering an order of magnitude reduction in cycle time. The relative contribution of the intimate contact and healing mechanisms to the fusion bonding process indicates that hysteresis bonding is controlled by intimate contact. The macroscopic failure modes vary from mostly adhesive composite/film (low bond strength) to a combination of adhesive composite/film, cohesive film, cohesive composite and

  15. The hysteresis behavior of an Ising nanowire with core/shell morphology: Monte Carlo treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughazi, B.; Boughrara, M.; Kerouad, M.

    2014-08-01

    We have used Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) to study the hysteresis behavior of the magnetic nanowire with core/shell morphology described by the spin {1}/{2} Ising particles in the core and the spin {3}/{2} Ising particles in the surface shell. The hysteresis curves are obtained for different temperatures. We find that the hysteresis loop areas decrease when the temperature increases and the hysteresis loops disappear at certain temperatures. Barkhausen jumps are observed for the ferromagnetic nanowire system. An unusual form of triple hysteresis behaviors is observed for the ferrimagnetic nanowire system. The thermal behaviors of the coercivity and the remanent magnetization are also investigated.

  16. Modeling of sharp change in magnetic hysteresis behavior of electrical steel at small plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Rios, S.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Yonamine, T.; Campos, M.F. de

    2005-05-15

    In 2.2% Si electrical steel, the magnetic hysteresis behavior is sharply sheared by a rather small plastic deformation (0.5%). A modification to the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model makes it possible to model magnetic effects of plastic deformation. In this paper, with this model, it is shown how a narrow hysteresis with an almost steplike hysteresis curve for an undeformed specimen is sharply sheared by plastic deformation. Computed coercivity and hysteresis loss show a sharp step to higher values at small strain due to an n=1/2 power law dependence on residual strain. The step is seen experimentally.

  17. PREFACE: International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortell, Michael P.; O'Malley, Robert E.; Pokrovskii, Alexei; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2008-07-01

    We are interested in singular perturbation problems and hysteresis as common strongly nonlinear phenomena that occur in many industrial, physical and economic systems. The wording `strongly nonlinear' means that linearization will not encapsulate the observed phenomena. Often these two types of phenomena are manifested for different stages of the same or similar processes. A number of fundamental hysteresis models can be considered as limit cases of time relaxation processes, or admit an approximation by a differential equation which is singular with respect to a particular parameter. However, the amount of interaction between practitioners of theories of systems with time relaxation and systems with hysteresis (and between the `relaxation' and `hysteresis' research communities) is still low, and cross-fertilization is small. In recent years Ireland has become a home for a series of prestigious International Workshops in Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis: International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College Cork, Ireland, 3-8 April 2006). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series, volume 55. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2008.htm International Workshop on Hysteresis and Multi-scale Asymptotics (University College Cork, Ireland, 17-21 March 2004). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series, volume 22. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm International Workshop on Relaxation Oscillations and Hysteresis (University College Cork, Ireland, 1-6 April 2002). The related collection of invited lectures, was published as a volume Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2005. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/hamsa2004.htm International Workshop on Geometrical Methods of Nonlinear Analysis and Semiconductor Laser Dynamics (University College Cork, Ireland, 5-5 April 2001). A collection of invited papers has been

  18. Hysteresis and Kinetic Effects During Liquid-Solid Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Streitz, F H; Chau, R

    2009-02-17

    We address the fundamental issue of phase transition kinetics in dynamically compressed materials. Focusing on solid bismuth (Bi) as a prototype material, we used a variety of time-resolved experiments including electrical conductivity and velocimetry to study the phase transition kinetics of the solid-solid phase transitions. Simple single shock experiments performed on several low-lying high pressure phases of Bi, revealed surprisingly complex behavior and slow dynamics. Strong hysteresis effects were observed in the transition behavior in experiments where the compressed Bi was allowed to release back across a phase line. These experiments represent the first reported simultaneous use of resistivity and velocimetry in a shock compression experiment, and the first observation of hysteresis effects occurring during dynamic compression and release.

  19. Linear Stepper Actuation Driving Drop Resonance and Modifying Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Katariya, Mayur; Huynh, So Hung; McMorran, Darren; Lau, Chun Yat; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-23

    In this work, 2 μL water drops are placed on substrates that are created to have a circular hydrophilic region bounded by superhydrophobicity so that they exhibit high contact angles. When the substrate is translated by a linear stepper actuator, the random force components present in the actuator are shown to cause the drop to rock resonantly. When the substrate is translated downward at inclination angles of up to 6° with respect to the horizontal, the contact angle hysteresis increases progressively to a limiting condition. When the substrate is moved up at inclined angles, alternatively, the contact angle hysteresis increases initially to the limiting condition before it is progressively restored to its static state. These behaviors are accounted for by the reversible micro-Cassie to Wenzel wetting state transformations that are made possible by the hierarchical microscale and nanoscale structures present in the superhydrophobic regions.

  20. Contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with nanowire clusters.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying-Chih; Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Nanowire arrays with various agglomeration patterns were synthesized by adjusting the solvent evaporation rates. Nanowires with 200 nm diameter and 2-25 microm in length were fabricated from an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous template. Various drying treatments were applied to develop nanostructured surfaces with topological differences. Due to surface tension forces, copper nanowires after thermal and evaporative drying treatments agglomerated into clusters, while supercritical drying technique provided excellent bundled-free and vertically-standing nanowire arrays. Although all dried surfaces exhibited hydrophobic nature, the contact angle hysteresis, or the difference between advancing and receding angles, was found to be larger on those surfaces with bundled nanowire clusters. To explain the difference, the wetted solid fraction on each surface was calculated using the Cassie-Baxter model to show that the hysteresis was contributed by liquid/solid contact area on the textured surfaces.

  1. Contact angle hysteresis generated by strong dilute defects.

    PubMed

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Quéré, David

    2009-03-26

    Water on solid decorated with hydrophobic defects (such as micropillars) often stays at the top of the defects in a so-called fakir state, which explains the superhydrophobicity observed in such case, provided that the density of defects is small enough. Here we show that this situation provides an ideal frame for studying the contact angle hysteresis; the phase below the liquid is "perfect" and slippery (it is air), contrasting with pillars' tops whose edges form strong pining sites for the contact line. This model system thus allows us to study the hysteresis as a function of the density of defects and to compare it to the classical theory by Joanny and de Gennes, which is based on very similar hypothesis.

  2. Method of thermal strain hysteresis reduction in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dries, Gregory A. (Inventor); Tompkins, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for treating graphite reinforced metal matrix composites so as to eliminate thermal strain hysteresis and impart dimensional stability through a large thermal cycle. The method is applied to the composite post fabrication and is effective on metal matrix materials using graphite fibers manufactured by both the hot roll bonding and diffusion bonding techniques. The method consists of first heat treating the material in a solution anneal oven followed by a water quench and then subjecting the material to a cryogenic treatment in a cryogenic oven. This heat treatment and cryogenic stress reflief is effective in imparting a dimensional stability and reduced thermal strain hysteresis in the material over a -250.degree. F. to +250.degree. F. thermal cycle.

  3. Microscopic Origin of Hysteresis in Water Sorption on Protein Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Sparano, Evan M; Singh, Rakesh S; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2017-02-28

    Despite the importance of water sorption isotherms for a fundamental understanding of protein-water interactions, the microscopic origin of hysteresis between the adsorption and desorption branches is not well understood. Using our recently developed simulation technique, we compute the water sorption isotherms of two proteins, lysozyme and Trp-cage, a miniprotein. We explicitly compare protein-water interactions in adsorption and desorption processes, by analyzing local hydration in terms of hydrogen bonding, water density, and solvent-accessible surface area. We find that significant differences in hydration behavior between adsorption and desorption manifest themselves at the individual amino acid level, in particular around polar or charged residues. We confirm this observation by demonstrating that Trp-cage's hysteresis can be significantly reduced by mutating charged residues to alanine, a neutral and nonpolar amino acid.

  4. Charge metastability and hysteresis in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollanen, J.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    We report simultaneous quasi-dc magnetotransport and high-frequency surface acoustic wave measurements on bilayer two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs. Near strong integer quantized Hall states, a strong magnetic-field-sweep hysteresis in the velocity of the acoustic waves is observed at low temperatures. This hysteresis indicates the presence of a metastable state with anomalously high conductivity in the interior of the sample. This nonequilibrium state is not revealed by conventional low-frequency transport measurements which are dominated by dissipationless transport at the edge of the two-dimensional system. We find that a field-cooling technique allows the equilibrium charge configuration within the interior of the sample to be established. A simple model for this behavior is discussed.

  5. Hysteresis Behaviors of Poly (Naphthalene Quinone) Radical Electrorheological Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyoung J.; Cho, Min S.; Jhon, Myung S.

    As a potential electrorheological(ER) material, poly(naphthalene quinone) radical (PNQR) ER fluid was prepared, and its rheological behavior and hysteresis phenomenon were investigated. PNQR was synthesized by Friedel-Crafts acylation between naphthalene and phthalic anhydride, using zinc chloride as a catalyst at 256°C. A Physica rheometer equipped with a high voltage generator was used to measure the rheological properties of the ER fluids, which were prepared by dispersing PNQR in silicone oil at several particle concentrations. Shear stresses were observed to decrease as shear rate increased in the region of slow deformation rate. It was further found that ER fluid showed different hysteresis behaviors according to the shear rate ranges; thixotropy was observed in the low shear rate region (0.007-0.51/s) and anti-thixotropy in the high shear rate region (0.5-10001/s). Controlled shear stress mode was also applied to observe similar behaviors.

  6. Hysteresis in modeling of poroelastic systems: quasistatic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Guyer, R A; Kim, H Alicia; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan; TenCate, J

    2011-06-01

    The behavior of hysteretic, coupled elastic and fluid systems is modeled. The emphasis is on quasistatic equilibrium in response to prescribed chemical potential (μ) protocols and prescribed stress (σ) protocols. Hysteresis arises in these models either from the presence of hysterons or from the presence of self-trapping internal fields. This latter mechanism is modeled in finite element calculations which serve to illustrate the creation of hysteresis in a range of circumstances that go from conventionally hysteretic systems, a sandstone, to systems like a wood fiber. An essential ingredient in the behavior of these systems, the interaction between the mechanical variables and the fluid variables, is accorded special attention. The proper venue for the exploration of these systems is (μ,σ) space and appropriate μ protocols, σ protocols, and combined μ-σ protocols.

  7. New approach to the calculation of pistachio powder hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolipour, Hamid; Mokhtarian, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms for pistachio powder were determined by gravimetric method at temperatures of 15, 25, 35 and 40°C. A selected mathematical models were tested to determine the best suitable model to predict isotherm curve. The results show that Caurie model had the most satisfactory goodness of fit. Also, another purpose of this research was to introduce a new methodology to determine the amount of hysteresis at different temperatures by using best predictive model of isotherm curve based on definite integration method. The results demonstrated that maximum hysteresis is related to the multi-layer water (in the range of water activity 0.2-0.6) which corresponds to the capillary condensation region and this phenomenon decreases with increasing temperature.

  8. Hysteresis and multiple stable configurations in a magnetic fluid system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P

    2008-05-21

    A magnetic liquid in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell is subjected to a vertical magnetic field. The width of the magnetic fluid finger is measured as a function of applied field and compared to a theoretical model. The theoretical model uses an energy minimization procedure and predicts a double energy minimum, hysteresis, and discontinuous transitions between a circle and a finger. The experimental data set agrees very well with the theory for a well-defined magnetic fluid finger. Near the transitions, the experiments show hysteresis and support for a double energy minimum; however, the agreement is not quite so good. The discrepancy between theory and experiment near the transition region is likely due to the simplified finger model used in the theory.

  9. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  10. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  11. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  12. Degradation and capacitance: voltage hysteresis in CdTe devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, D. S.; Dhere, R. G.; Glynn, S. C.; del Cueto, J. A.; Metzger, W. K.

    2009-08-01

    CdS/CdTe photovoltaic solar cells were made on two different transparent conducting oxide (TCO) structures in order to identify differences in fabrication, performance, and reliability. In one set of cells, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to deposit a bi-layer TCO on Corning 7059 borosilicate glass consisting of a F-doped, conductive tin-oxide (cSnO2) layer capped by an insulating (undoped), buffer (iSnO2) layer. In the other set, a more advanced bi-layer structure consisting of sputtered cadmium stannate (Cd2SnO4; CTO) as the conducting layer and zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4; ZTO) as the buffer layer was used. CTO/ZTO substrates yielded higher performance devices however performance uniformity was worse due to possible strain effects associated with TCO layer fabrication. Cells using the SnO2-based structure were only slightly lower in performance, but exhibited considerably greater performance uniformity. When subjected to accelerated lifetime testing (ALT) at 85 - 100 °C under 1-sun illumination and open-circuit bias, more degradation was observed in CdTe cells deposited on the CTO/ZTO substrates. Considerable C-V hysteresis, defined as the depletion width difference between reverse and forward direction scans, was observed in all Cu-doped CdTe cells. These same effects can also be observed in thin-film modules. Hysteresis was observed to increase with increasing stress and degradation. The mechanism for hysteresis is discussed in terms of both an ionic-drift model and one involving majority carrier emission in the space-charge region (SCR). The increased generation of hysteresis observed in CdTe cells deposited on CTO/ZTO substrates suggests potential decomposition of these latter oxides when subjected to stress testing.

  13. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles{endash}Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Novel thermal hysteresis proteins from low temperature basidiomycete, Coprinus psychromorbidus.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, T; Kiriaki, M; Nakajima, T

    2003-01-01

    The low temperature basidiomycete, Coprinus psychromorbidus, produced three kinds of thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) in the extracellular space. Molecular mass of purified fungal THPs were approximately 23 kDa, respectively, however those fungal THPs had different N-terminal amino acid sequences. Those fungal THPs formed ice crystals resembling "stone Age arrow head". These observations indicate that fungal THPs did not form hexagonal ice crystals to inhibit its growth.

  15. Energy Barriers and Hysteresis in Martensitic Phase Transformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    I) ∂F2 (Gλ,Gλ) + ω(|λGλ|)|Gλ|2 ] Jλdt1dt2 (93) Since Gλ is bounded uniformly in L2(Ω`) and ω(|λGλ|)→ 0 uniformly, then the error term can be...small hysteresis width. Nature Materials 5 (2006), 286-290. [9] E. De Giorgi and T. Franzoni, Su un tipo di convergenza variazionale. Atti Accad. Naz

  16. Robust homoclinic orbits in planar systems with Preisach hysteresis operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, Alexander; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2016-06-01

    We construct examples of robust homoclinic orbits for systems of ordinary differential equations coupled with the Preisach hysteresis operator. Existence of such orbits is demonstrated for the first time. We discuss a generic mechanism that creates robust homoclinic orbits and a method for finding them. An example of a homoclinic orbit in a population dynamics model with hysteretic response of the prey to variations of the predator is studied numerically.

  17. Vector magnetic hysteresis modeling of stress annealed galfenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, A. A.; Davino, D.; Giustiniani, A.; Visone, C.

    2013-05-01

    In the past years, utilization of magnetostrictive materials has been increasing in different applications including actuation, sensing, and energy harvesting. Special interest has been recently directed to galfenol (iron-gallium alloy). This paper experimentally investigates the vector hysteresis properties of stress-annealed galfenol as well as to test the capability of recently proposed models to mimic those properties. Details of the measurements, model identification, and experimental testing of the model accuracy are reported in the paper.

  18. Barkhausen discontinuities and hysteresis of ferromagnetics: New stochastic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrinovich, Valeriy

    2014-02-18

    The magnetization of ferromagnetic material is considered as periodically inhomogeneous Markov process. The theory assumes both statistically independent and correlated Barkhausen discontinuities. The model, based on the chain evolution-type process theory, assumes that the domain structure of a ferromagnet passes successively the steps of: linear growing, exponential acceleration and domains annihilation to zero density at magnetic saturation. The solution of stochastic differential Kolmogorov equation enables the hysteresis loop calculus.

  19. A Hydrodynamic Model of Dynamic Contact Angle Hysteresis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    contact angle hysteresis is developed in terms of the interaction of capillary, viscous, and...used to obtain the equations which describe the contact angle region and thereby to define the dynamic contact angle . The analysis is limited to...velocity dependence of the receding contact angle and of the thickness of the deposited film of the receding interface of a wetting liquid are determined as functions of the capillary, viscous, and disjoining forces.

  20. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  1. Hysteresis and Wavenumber Vacillation in Unstable Baroclinic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hysteresis and wavenumber vacillation are studied numerically in a weakly stratified quasigeostrophic model. In general, the amplitude of the most unstable wave increases, as the flow becomes more unstable. When the wave becomes saturated, the next longer wave will grow at the expanse of the most unstable wave and becomes the dominant wave. However, once the longwave state is established, it may remain in that regime even as the instability is decreased beyond the threshold where it first developed, thus constituting a hysteresis loop. In a highly unstable case, the flow may not show a preference for any single wave. Instead, the dominant wave aperiodically varies among several long waves. This phenomenon is known as wavenumber vacillation. Hysteresis is further examined in terms of eddy heat flux. It is shown that total eddy heat flux increases as the flow becomes more unstable, but displays a sharp drop when transition to a longer wave occurs. However, in a longwave state, the heat flux always decreases with decreasing instability even pass the threshold when wave transition first occurs.

  2. Oscillating hysteresis in the q-neighbor Ising model.

    PubMed

    Jȩdrzejewski, Arkadiusz; Chmiel, Anna; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    We modify the kinetic Ising model with Metropolis dynamics, allowing each spin to interact only with q spins randomly chosen from the whole system, which corresponds to the topology of a complete graph. We show that the model with q≥3 exhibits a phase transition between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases at temperature T*, which linearly increases with q. Moreover, we show that for q=3 the phase transition is continuous and that it is discontinuous for larger values of q. For q>3, the hysteresis exhibits oscillatory behavior-expanding for even values of q and shrinking for odd values of q. Due to the mean-field-like nature of the model, we are able to derive the analytical form of transition probabilities and, therefore, calculate not only the probability density function of the order parameter but also precisely determine the hysteresis and the effective potential showing stable, unstable, and metastable steady states. Our results show that a seemingly small modification of the kinetic Ising model leads not only to the switch from a continuous to a discontinuous phase transition, but also to an unexpected oscillating behavior of the hysteresis and a puzzling phenomenon for q=5, which might be taken as evidence for the so-called mixed-order phase transition.

  3. Tuning size and thermal hysteresis in bistable spin crossover nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Galán-Mascarós, José Ramón; Coronado, Eugenio; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Monrabal-Capilla, María; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Ceolin, Marcelo

    2010-06-21

    Nanoparticles of iron(II) triazole salts have been prepared from water-organic microemulsions. The mean size of the nanoparticles can be tuned down to 6 nm in diameter, with a narrow size distribution. A sharp spin transition from the low spin (LS) to the high spin (HS) state is observed above room temperature, with a 30-40-K-wide thermal hysteresis. The same preparation can yield second generation nanoparticles containing molecular alloys by mixing triazole with triazole derivatives, or from metallic mixtures of iron(II) and zinc(II). In these nanoparticles of 10-15 nm, the spin transition "moves" towards lower temperatures, reaching a 316 K limit for the cooling down transition and maintaining a thermal hysteresis over 15-20-K-wide. The nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, and AFM, after deposition on gold or silicon surfaces. The spin transition was characterized by magnetic susceptibility measurements and EXAFS (in solid samples after solvent removal) and also by the color change between the LS (violet) and HS (colorless) states in an organic solvent suspension. The discovery of bistable magnetic nanoparticles of 6 nm with a wide thermal hysteresis above room temperature showcases the actual possibilities of spin crossover materials for nanotechnological applications.

  4. Does adsorption in a single nanogroove exhibit hysteresis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2012-12-01

    A simple fluid, in a microscopic capillary capped at one end, is studied by means of fundamental measure density functional. The model represents a single, infinitely long nanogroove with long-range wall-fluid attractive (dispersion) forces. It is shown that the presence or absence of hysteresis in adsorption isotherms is determined by wetting properties of the wall as follows: Above wetting temperature, Tw, appropriate to a single wall of the groove, the adsorption is a continuous process corresponding to a rise of a meniscus from the capped to the open end of the groove. For a sufficiently deep capillary, the meniscus rise is shown to be a steep, yet continuous process taking place near the capillary condensation of a corresponding slit. However, for temperatures lower than Tw the condensation exhibits a first-order transition accompanied by hysteresis of the adsorption isotherm. Finally, it is shown that hysteresis may occur even for T > Tw as a consequence of prewetting on the side and bottom walls of the groove.

  5. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  6. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  7. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng; Woon, Wei-Yen; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-11-01

    Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  8. Analysis of the Hysteresis Behavior of Perovskite Solar Cells with Interfacial Fullerene Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Valles-Pelarda, Marta; Hames, Bruno Clasen; García-Benito, Inés; Almora, Osbel; Molina-Ontoria, Agustin; Sánchez, Rafael S; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Martín, Nazario; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-11-17

    The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of fullerene derivatives reduces the hysteresis of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We have investigated three different fullerene derivatives observing a decrease on hysteresis for all the cases. Several processes can contribute to the hysteresis behavior on PSCs. We have determined that the reduced hysteresis observed for devices with SAMs is produced by a decrease of the capacitive hysteresis. In addition, with an appropriated functionalization, SAMs can increase photocurrent even when no electron selective contact (ESC) is present and a SAM is deposited just on top of the transparent conductive oxide. Appropriated functionalization of the fullerene derivative, as introducing -CN groups, can enhance cell performance and reduce hysteresis. This work paves the way for a future enhancement of PSCs by a tailored design of the fullerene molecules that could actuate as an ESC by themselves.

  9. Evidence for ion migration in hybrid perovskite solar cells with minimal hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Calado, Philip; Telford, Andrew M; Bryant, Daniel; Li, Xiaoe; Nelson, Jenny; O'Regan, Brian C; Barnes, Piers R F

    2016-12-22

    Ion migration has been proposed as a possible cause of photovoltaic current-voltage hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells. A major objection to this hypothesis is that hysteresis can be reduced by changing the interfacial contact materials; however, this is unlikely to significantly influence the behaviour of mobile ionic charge within the perovskite phase. Here, we show that the primary effects of ion migration can be observed regardless of whether the contacts were changed to give devices with or without significant hysteresis. Transient optoelectronic measurements combined with device simulations indicate that electric-field screening, consistent with ion migration, is similar in both high and low hysteresis CH3NH3PbI3 cells. Simulation of the photovoltage and photocurrent transients shows that hysteresis requires the combination of both mobile ionic charge and recombination near the perovskite-contact interfaces. Passivating contact recombination results in higher photogenerated charge concentrations at forward bias which screen the ionic charge, reducing hysteresis.

  10. Impact of back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in partially depleted SOI MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jie-Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wu, Qing-Qing; Chai, Zhan; Yu, Tao; Wang, Xi

    2012-05-01

    The hysteresis effect in the output characteristics, originating from the floating body effect, has been measured in partially depleted (PD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs at different back-gate biases. ID hysteresis has been developed to clarify the hysteresis characteristics. The fabricated devices show the positive and negative peaks in the ID hysteresis. The experimental results show that the ID hysteresis is sensitive to the back gate bias in 0.13-μm PD SOI MOSFETs and does not vary monotonously with the back-gate bias. Based on the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination theory, we have successfully interpreted the impact of the back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in PD SOI MOSFETs.

  11. Evidence for ion migration in hybrid perovskite solar cells with minimal hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, Philip; Telford, Andrew M.; Bryant, Daniel; Li, Xiaoe; Nelson, Jenny; O'Regan, Brian C.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Ion migration has been proposed as a possible cause of photovoltaic current-voltage hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells. A major objection to this hypothesis is that hysteresis can be reduced by changing the interfacial contact materials; however, this is unlikely to significantly influence the behaviour of mobile ionic charge within the perovskite phase. Here, we show that the primary effects of ion migration can be observed regardless of whether the contacts were changed to give devices with or without significant hysteresis. Transient optoelectronic measurements combined with device simulations indicate that electric-field screening, consistent with ion migration, is similar in both high and low hysteresis CH3NH3PbI3 cells. Simulation of the photovoltage and photocurrent transients shows that hysteresis requires the combination of both mobile ionic charge and recombination near the perovskite-contact interfaces. Passivating contact recombination results in higher photogenerated charge concentrations at forward bias which screen the ionic charge, reducing hysteresis.

  12. Tuning the hysteresis voltage in 2D multilayer MoS2 FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Zhouming; Guo, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    The hysteresis tuning is of great significance before the two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) can be practically used in the next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, a simple and effective annealing method was developed to tune the hysteresis voltage in 2D MoS2 transistors. It was found that high temperature (175 °C) annealing in air could increase the hysteresis voltage from 8.0 V (original device) to 28.4 V, while a next vacuum annealing would reduce the hysteresis voltage to be only 2.0 V. An energyband diagram model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption is proposed to understand the hysteresis mechanism in multilayer MoS2 FET. This simple method for tuning the hysteresis voltage of MoS2 FET can make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications.

  13. Origin of hysteresis in bed form response to unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Raleigh L.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    Field and laboratory studies indicate that changes in riverbed morphology often lag changes in water discharge. This lagged response produces hysteresis in the relationship between water discharge and bed form geometry. To understand these phenomena, we performed flume experiments to observe the response of a sand bed to step increases and decreases in water discharge. For an abrupt rise in discharge, we observed that bed forms grew rapidly by collision and merger of bed forms migrating with different celerities. Growth rate slowed as bed forms approached equilibrium with the higher discharge regime. After an abrupt discharge drop, bed form decay occurred through formation of smaller secondary bed forms, in equilibrium with the lower discharge, which cannibalized the original, relict features. We present a simple model framework to quantitatively predict time scales of bed form adjustment to flow changes, based on equilibrium bed form heights, lengths, and celerities at low and high flows. For rising discharge, the model assumes that all bed form collisions result in irreversible merger, due to a dispersion of initial celerities. For falling discharge, we derive a diffusion model for the decay of relict high-stage features. Our models predict the form and time scale of experimental bed form adjustments. Additional experiments applying slow and fast triangular flood waves show that bed form hysteresis occurs only when the time scale of flow change is faster than the modeled (and measured) bed form adjustment time. We show that our predicted adjustment time scales can also be used to predict the occurrence of bed form hysteresis in natural floods.

  14. Hysteresis and charge trapping in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Hemen; V, Harikrishnan; Shinde, Dhanraj B.; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K.; Aslam, M.

    2013-04-01

    We report current hysteresis in response to applied voltage in graphene quantum dots of average diameter 4.5 ± 0.55 nm, synthesized electrochemically using multiwalled carbon nanotubes. In response to step voltages, transient current decay, characteristic of deep and shallow level charge traps with time constants 186 ms and 6 s, is observed. Discharging current transients indicate charge storage of the order of 100 μC. Trap states are believed to arise due to the fast physisorption of external adsorbates, which are found to have a significant effect on charge transport and changes the resistance of the prepared device by an order of 3.

  15. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  16. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  17. Internal hysteresis experienced on a high pressure syn gas compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidan, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A vibration instability phenomenon experienced in operating high pressure syn gas centrifugal compressors in two ammonia plants is described. The compressors were monitored by orbit and spectrum analysis for changes from baseline readings. It is found that internal hysteresis was the major destabilizing force; however, the problem was further complicated by seal lockup at the suction end of the compressor. A coupling lockup problem and a coupling fit problem, which frettage of the shaft, are also considered as contributors to the self excited vibrations.

  18. Origins and Mechanisms of Hysteresis in Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Guerrero, Antonio; Zhong, Yu; Huettner, Sven

    2017-02-23

    Inorganic-organic organometal halide perovskites, such as CH3NH3PbI3 or CsPbI3, etc., are an unprecedented rising star in the field of photovoltaics since 2009, owing to its exceptionally high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and simple fabrication processability. Despite its relatively short history of development, intensive investigations have been concentrating on this material, ranging from crystal structure analysis and photophysical characterization, to performance optimization and device integration, etc. Yet, applied in photovoltaic devices, this material is suffering from hysteresis, that is, the difference of the current-voltage (I-V) curve during sweeping in two directions (from short-circuit towards open-circuit and vice versa). This behavior may significantly impede the large-scale commercial application. This Review will focus on the recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the origin and mechanism of hysteresis. The proposed origins include (1) ferroelectric polarization, (2) charge trapping/detrapping and (3) ion migration. Among them, recent evidences consistently support that ion migration plays a key role for the hysteretic behavior in perovskite solar cells (PSC). Hence, this Review will summarize the recent results on ion migration, such as the migrating ion species, activation energy measurement, capacitive characterization and internal electrical field modulation, etc. In addition, this Review will also present the devices with alleviation/elimination of hysteresis by incorporating either large size grains or phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) molecules. In a different application, the hysteretic property has been utilized in photovoltaic and memristive switching devices. In sum, by examining above three possible mechanisms, it is concluded that the origin of hysteresis of PSCs is associated with a combination of effects, both ion/defect migration and charge trapping

  19. Role of measurement voltage on hysteresis loop shape in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Yang, J.-C.; Chu, Ying Hao; Yu, Pu; Lu, X.; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of on-field and off-field hysteresis loop shape in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) on driving voltage, Vac, is explored. A nontrivial dependence of hysteresis loop parameters on measurement conditions is observed. The strategies to distinguish between paraelectric and ferroelectric states with small coercive bias and separate reversible hysteretic and non-hysteretic behaviors are suggested. Generally, measurement of loop evolution with Vac is a necessary step to establish the veracity of PFM hysteresis measurements.

  20. Hysteresis zone or locus - Aerodynamic of bulbous based bodies at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which seem to suggest that a well-defined hysteresis locus on bulbous based bodies at low speeds does not exist. Instead, if the experiment is repeated several times, the entire hysteresis region seems to fill with data rather than trace out a specific hysteresis locus. Data obtained on an oscillating model even at low reduced frequencies may be well defined but when applied to arbitrary motion lead to less accurate results than desired.

  1. Role of measurement voltage on hysteresis loop shape in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelcov, E.; Kim, Y.; Yang, J. C.; Chu, Y. H.; Yu, P.; Lu, X.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2012-11-01

    The dependence of field-on and field-off hysteresis loop shape in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) on driving voltage, Vac, is explored. A nontrivial dependence of hysteresis loop parameters on measurement conditions is observed. The strategies to distinguish between paraelectric and ferroelectric states with small coercive bias and separate reversible hysteretic and non-hysteretic behaviors are suggested. Generally, measurement of loop evolution with Vac is a necessary step to establish the veracity of PFM hysteresis measurements.

  2. Calculations on Hard Ferroelectric PbZr1-xTixO3 Dynamic Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Mahmoud A.

    2017-02-01

    A phenomenological model was modified for dynamic hysteresis loops of hard ferroelectric PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT). The comparison with experimental results showed that the modified model can reproduce polarization versus an electric field. A predicted hysteresis loss of hard ferroelectric PZT was formulated and estimated. The calculations showed an increase in hysteresis loss with a decrease of frequency at a 40-kV/cm electric field amplitude.

  3. Hysteresis modelling and experimental verification of a Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhu; Lei Xiang, Bian; Gangli, Chen; Shuxin, Liu; Qinbo, Zhou; Xiaoting, Rui

    2017-03-01

    In order to accurately describe the asymmetric rate-bias-dependent hysteresis of a Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator, a comprehensive model, which is composed of a phenomenon model, describing hysteresis by the modified Bouc–Wen hysteresis operator, and a theoretical model, representing the dynamics characteristics, is put forward. The experimental system is setup to verify the performance of the comprehensive model. Results show that the modified Bouc–Wen model can effectively describe the dynamics and hysteresis characteristics of the Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator. The results highlight significantly improved accuracy in the modelling of the magnetostrictive actuator.

  4. Fabrication of surfaces with extremely high contact angle hysteresis from polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Wei, Jingjing; Su, Zhaohui

    2011-12-20

    High contact angle hysteresis on polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) ion-paired with hydrophobic perfluorooctanoate anions is reported. Both the bilayer number of PEMs and the ionic strength of deposition solutions have significant influence on contact angle hysteresis: higher ionic strength and greater bilayer number cause increased contact angle hysteresis values. The hysteresis values of ~100° were observed on smooth PEMs and pinning of the receding contact line on hydrophilic defects is implicated as the cause of hysteresis. Surface roughness can be used to further tune the contact angle hysteresis on the PEMs. A surface with extremely high contact angle hysteresis of 156° was fabricated when a PEM was deposited on a rough substrate coated with submicrometer scale silica spheres. It was demonstrated that this extremely high value of contact angle hysteresis resulted from the penetration of water into the rough asperities on the substrate. The same substrate hydrophobized by chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane exhibits high advancing contact angle and low hysteresis.

  5. Conditions necessary for capillary hysteresis in porous media: Tests of grain size and surface tension influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-05-01

    Hysteresis in the relation between water saturation and matric potential is generally regarded as a basic aspect of unsaturated porous media. However, the nature of an upper length scale limit for saturation hysteresis has not been previously addressed. Since hysteresis depends on whether or not capillary rise occurs at the grain scale, this criterion was used to predict required combinations of grain size, surface tension, fluid-fluid density differences, and acceleration in monodisperse systems. The Haines number (Ha), composed of the aforementioned variables, is proposed as a dimensionless number useful for separating hysteretic (Ha < 15) versus nonhysteretic (Ha > 15) behavior. Vanishing of hysteresis was predicted to occur for grain sizes greater than 10.4 ± 0.5 mm, for water-air systems under the acceleration of ordinary gravity, based on Miller-Miller scaling and Haines' original model for hysteresis. Disappearance of hysteresis was tested through measurements of drainage and wetting curves of sands and gravels and occurs between grain sizes of 10 and 14 mm (standard conditions). The influence of surface tension was tested through measurements of moisture retention in 7 mm gravel, without and with a surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS)). The ordinary water system (Ha = 7) exhibited hysteresis, while the SDBS system (Ha = 18) did not. The experiments completed in this study indicate that hysteresis in moisture retention relations has an upper limit at Ha = 16 ± 2 and show that hysteresis is not a fundamental feature of unsaturated porous media.

  6. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  7. Equivalent circuit representation of hysteresis in solar cells that considers interface charge accumulation: Potential cause of hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-01

    If charge carriers accumulate in the charge transport layer of a solar cell, then the transient response of the electric field that originates from these accumulated charges results in hysteresis in the current-voltage (J-V) characteristics. While this mechanism was previously known, a theoretical model to explain these J-V characteristics has not been considered to date. We derived an equivalent circuit from the proposed hysteresis mechanism. By solving the equivalent circuit model, we were able to reproduce some of the features of hysteresis in perovskite solar cells.

  8. Contact-angle hysteresis on super-hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Newton, M I

    2004-11-09

    The relationship between perturbations to contact angles on a rough or textured surface and the super-hydrophobic enhancement of the equilibrium contact angle is discussed theoretically. Two models are considered. In the first (Wenzel) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle and the droplet completely contacts the surface upon which it rests. In the second (Cassie-Baxter) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle, but the droplet bridges across surface protrusions. The theoretical treatment emphasizes the concept of contact-angle amplification or attenuation and distinguishes between the increases in contact angles due to roughening or texturing surfaces and perturbations to the resulting contact angles. The theory is applied to predicting contact-angle hysteresis on rough surfaces from the hysteresis observable on smooth surfaces and is therefore relevant to predicting roll-off angles for droplets on tilted surfaces. The theory quantitatively predicts a "sticky" surface for Wenzel-type surfaces and a "slippy" surface for Cassie-Baxter-type surfaces.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  10. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  11. The capillary hysteresis model HYSTR: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, A.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    The potential disposal of nuclear waste in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has generated increased interest in the study of fluid flow through unsaturated media. In the near future, large-scale field tests will be conducted at the Yucca Mountain site, and work is now being done to design and analyze these tests. As part of these efforts a capillary hysteresis model has been developed. A computer program to calculate the hysteretic relationship between capillary pressure {phi} and liquid saturation (S{sub 1}) has been written that is designed to be easily incorporated into any numerical unsaturated flow simulator that computes capillary pressure as a function of liquid saturation. This report gives a detailed description of the model along with information on how it can be interfaced with a transport code. Although the model was developed specifically for calculations related to nuclear waste disposal, it should be applicable to any capillary hysteresis problem for which the secondary and higher order scanning curves can be approximated from the first order scanning curves. HYSTR is a set of subroutines to calculate capillary pressure for a given liquid saturation under hysteretic conditions.

  12. Hysteresis in myo-inositol utilization by Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hellinckx, Jessica; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2016-12-27

    Growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 14028 with myo-inositol (MI) as the sole carbon and energy source is characterized by a bistable phenotype that manifests in a growth phenotype with an extraordinarily long and length-variable lag phase. However, in the presence of hydrogen carbonate, in the absence of IolR that represses the MI degradation pathway, or if cells are already adapted to minimal medium (MM) with MI, the lag phase is drastically shortened, and the bistable phenotype is abolished. We hypothesized that memory development or hysteresis is a further characteristic of MI degradation by S. Typhimurium; therefore, we investigated the transition from a short to a long lag phase in more detail. Growth experiments demonstrated that memory on the population level is successively lost within approximately 8 hr after cells, which had been adapted to MI utilization, were transferred to lysogeny broth (LB) medium. Flow cytometry (FC) analysis using a chromosomal fusion to PiolE , a promoter controlling the expression of the enzymatic genes iolE and iolG involved in MI degradation, indicated a gradual reversion within a few hours from a population in the "ON" status with respect to iolE transcription to one that is mainly in the "OFF" status. Growth and FC experiments revealed that IolR does not affect hysteresis.

  13. Wavenumber selection and hysteresis in nonlinear baroclinic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung

    1995-01-01

    Wavenumber transition and hysteresis in a highly unstable baroclinic flow are investigated using a high-resolution spectral numerical model. As the flow becomes more supercritical, the dominant wave gradually shifts from the most unstable wave predicted by the linear theory to a longer wave with a larger time-averaged amplitude, while the rectified mean flow attains a stronger shear at the center of the channel. The numerical results display a complex hysteresis behavior, which occurs not only between the states of different dominant wavenumbers, but also between the states of identical dominant wavenumber but of different dynamic characteristics. In a certain parameter range three stable states, each with different dominant wavenumber, are possible, and in another parameter range four stable states are possible, among them three stable states with an identical dominant wave. The numerical results suggest that a multiple weather regime exists even without external forcing in which the flow aperiodically varies between two distinct behaviors. The effects of stable higher harmonics are assessed and it is found that their presence contributes not only to the better approximation of the model solutions but also to the selection of the final equilibrium state, due to the chaotic nature of the initial transient period.

  14. Deformation Hysteresis of Electrohydrodynamic Patterning on a Thin Polymer Film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingzhen; Li, Ben Q; Tian, Hongmiao; Li, Xiangming; Shao, Jinyou; Chen, Xiaoliang; Xu, Feng

    2016-07-13

    Electrohydrodynamic patterning is a technique that enables micro/nanostructures via imposing an external voltage on thin polymer films. In this investigation, we studied the electrohydrodynamic patterning theoretically and experimentally, with special interest focused on the equilibrium state. It is found that the equilibrium structure height increases with the voltage. In addition, we have observed, and believe it to be the first time, a hysteresis phenomenon exists in the relationship between the voltage and structure height. With an increase in the voltage, a critical value (the first critical voltage) is noticed, above which the polymer film would increase dramatically until it comes into contact with the template. However, with a decrease in the voltage, a smaller voltage (the second critical voltage) is needed to detach the polymer from the template. The mismatch of the first and second critical voltages distorts the voltage-structure height curve into an "S" shape. Such a phenomenon is verified for three representative templates and also by experiments. Furthermore, the effects of some parameters (e.g., polymer film thickness and dielectric constant) on this hysteresis phenomenon are also discussed.

  15. Computational micromagnetic study of particulate media hysteresis and recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seberino, Christian

    2000-11-01

    A description of the micromagnetic theory, algorithms, computer software and computer hardware built and used to study particulate media particles, hysteresis and recording is first provided. This includes a derivation and analysis of the modified version of the Fast Multipole Method used in this dissertation. Results will then be presented on particulate media particle nucleation field dependence on particle shape, particle aspect ratio, ferromagnetic exchange energy and external magnetic field angle. Results on the discretization necessary to accurately model a particle will also be provided. The reversal mode of a particle will be simulated and analyzed. Simulated longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops will be presented. Results will also be presented on particulate media coercivity and squareness dependence on volumetric packing fraction. Simulated recorded transition results will be given as well as total power spectra results for AC and DC erased particulate media. Numerical results will be compared to experimental data and analytical theories. Advice is provided on how to build a personal supercomputer like the one used in the numerical experiments of this dissertation.

  16. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  17. Modeling of hysteresis loops by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehme, Z.; Labaye, Y.; Sayed Hassan, R.; Yaacoub, N.; Greneche, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in MC simulations of magnetic properties are rather devoted to non-interacting systems or ultrafast phenomena, while the modeling of quasi-static hysteresis loops of an assembly of spins with strong internal exchange interactions remains limited to specific cases. In the case of any assembly of magnetic moments, we propose MC simulations on the basis of a three dimensional classical Heisenberg model applied to an isolated magnetic slab involving first nearest neighbors exchange interactions and uniaxial anisotropy. Three different algorithms were successively implemented in order to simulate hysteresis loops: the classical free algorithm, the cone algorithm and a mixed one consisting of adding some global rotations. We focus particularly our study on the impact of varying the anisotropic constant parameter on the coercive field for different temperatures and algorithms. A study of the angular acceptation move distribution allows the dynamics of our simulations to be characterized. The results reveal that the coercive field is linearly related to the anisotropy providing that the algorithm and the numeric conditions are carefully chosen. In a general tendency, it is found that the efficiency of the simulation can be greatly enhanced by using the mixed algorithm that mimic the physics of collective behavior. Consequently, this study lead as to better quantified coercive fields measurements resulting from physical phenomena of complex magnetic (nano)architectures with different anisotropy contributions.

  18. Magnetic hysteresis measurements of thin films under isotropic stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Patrick; Dubey, Archana; Geerts, Wilhelmus

    2000-10-01

    Nowadays, ferromagnetic thin films are widely applied in devices for information technology (credit cards, video recorder tapes, floppies, hard disks) and sensors (air bags, anti-breaking systems, navigation systems). Thus, with the increase in the use of magnetic media continued investigation of magnetic properties of materials is necessary to help in determining the useful properties of materials for new or improved applications. We are currently interested in studying the effect of applied external stress on Kerr hysteresis curves of thin magnetic films. The Ni and NiFe films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with Ar as the sputter gas (pAr=4 mTorr; Tsub=55-190 C). Seed and cap layers of Ti were used on all films for adhesion and oxidation protection, respectively. A brass membrane pressure cell was designed to apply in-plane isotropic stress to thin films. In this pressure cell, gas pressure is used to deform a flexible substrate onto which a thin magnetic film has been sputtered. The curvature of the samples could be controlled by changing the gas pressure to the cell. Magneto-Optical in-plane hysteresis curves at different values of strain were measured. The results obtained show that the stress sensitivity is dependent on the film thickness. For the 500nm NiFe films, the coercivity strongly decreased as a function of the applied stress.

  19. Hysteresis in magnetic shape memory composites: Modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Lenz, Martin; Rumpf, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between the reorientation of structural variants and the rearrangement of magnetic domains. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the reorientation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the twin boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimality condition. We illustrate and discuss the influence of the particle geometry (volume fraction, shape, arrangement) and the polymer elastic parameters on the observed hysteresis and compare with recent experimental results.

  20. Transport, hysteresis and avalanches in artificial spin ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the hopping dynamics of an artificial spin ice system constructed from colloids on a kagome optical trap array where each trap has two possible states. By applying an external drive from an electric field which is analogous to a biasing applied magnetic field for real spin systems, we can create polarized states that obey the spin-ice rules of two spins in and one spin out at each vertex. We demonstrate that when we sweep the external drive and measure the fraction of the system that has been polarized, we can generate a hysteresis loop analogous to the hysteretic magnetization versus external magnetic field curves for real spin systems. The disorder in our system can be readily controlled by changing the barrier that must be overcome before a colloid can hop from one side of a trap to the other. For systems with no disorder, the effective spins all flip simultaneously as the biasing field is changed, while for strong disorder the hysteresis curves show a series of discontinuous jumps or avalanches similar to Barkhausen noise.

  1. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  2. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  3. Adsorption hysteresis, capillary condensation, and melting in multilayer methane films on graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lysek, M.J.; LaMadrid, M.; Day, P.; Goodstein, D. )

    1992-03-01

    We have studied adsorption hysteresis in the system multilayer methane adsorbed on graphite foam by measuring heat capacities on each branch of the hysteresis curve. We are able to show that, on the stable branch, capillary condensation begins, surprisingly, at 1.1 layers. These observations call into question previous conclusions about this and other multilayer adsorbed systems. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  4. High-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators using an ellipse-based hysteresis model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guoying; Zhu, Limin

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, an ellipse-based mathematic model is developed to characterize the rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the proposed model, an expanded input space is constructed to describe the multivalued hysteresis function H[u](t) by a multiple input single output (MISO) mapping Gamma:R(2)-->R. Subsequently, the inverse MISO mapping Gamma(-1)(H[u](t),H[u](t);u(t)) is proposed for real-time hysteresis compensation. In controller design, a hybrid control strategy combining a model-based feedforward controller and a proportional integral differential (PID) feedback loop is used for high-accuracy and high-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators. The real-time feedforward controller is developed to cancel the rate-dependent hysteresis based on the inverse hysteresis model, while the PID controller is used to compensate for the creep, modeling errors, and parameter uncertainties. Finally, experiments with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted and the experimental results are compared. The experimental results show that the hysteresis compensation in the feedforward path can reduce the hysteresis-caused error by up to 88% and the tracking performance of the hybrid controller is greatly improved in high-speed tracking control applications, e.g., the root-mean-square tracking error is reduced to only 0.34% of the displacement range under the input frequency of 100 Hz.

  5. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  6. Tendon-Driven Continuum Robot for Neuroendoscopy: Validation of Extended Kinematic Mapping for Hysteresis Operation

    PubMed Central

    Takahisa, Kato; Okumura, Ichiro; Kose, Hidekazu; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The hysteresis operation is an outstanding issue in tendon-driven actuation—which is used in robot-assisted surgery—as it is incompatible with kinematic mapping for control and trajectory planning. Here, a new tendon-driven continuum robot, designed to fit existing neuroendoscopes, is presented with kinematic mapping for hysteresis operation. Methods With attention to tension in tendons as a salient factor of the hysteresis operation, extended forward kinematic mapping (FKM) has been developed. In the experiment, the significance of every component in the robot for the hysteresis operation has been investigated. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of postures by the extended FKM has been determined experimentally and compared with piecewise constant curvature assumption (PCCA). Results The tendons were the most predominant factor affecting the hysteresis operation of the robot. The extended FKM including friction in tendons predicted the postures in the hysteresis operation with improved accuracy (2.89 mm and 3.87 mm for the single and the antagonistic tendons layouts, respectively). The measured accuracy was within the target value of 5 mm for planning of neuroendoscopic resection of intraventricle tumors. Conclusion The friction in tendons was the most predominant factor for the hysteresis operation in the robot. The extended FKM including this factor can improve prediction accuracy of the postures in the hysteresis operation. The trajectory of the new robot can be planned within target value for the neuroendoscopic procedure by using the extended FKM. PMID:26476639

  7. Large melting point hysteresis of Ge nanocrystals embedded inSiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Sharp, I.D.; Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Glaeser,A.M.; Minor, A.M.; Beeman, J.W.; Ridgway, M.C.; Kluth, P.; Ager III,J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-05-04

    The melting behavior of Ge nanocrystals embedded within SiO{sub 2} is evaluated using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The observed melting point hysteresis is large ({+-} 17%) and nearly symmetric about the bulk melting point. This hysteresis is modeled successfully using classical nucleation theory without the need to invoke epitaxy.

  8. The intrinsic origin of hysteresis in MoS2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Jiapei; Wu, Gongtao; Guo, Yao; Liu, Bo; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the hysteresis and gate voltage stress effect in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs). We observe that both the suspended and the SiO2-supported FETs have large hysteresis in their transfer curves under vacuum which cannot be attributed to the traps at the interface between the MoS2 and the SiO2 or in the SiO2 substrate or the gas adsorption/desorption effect. Our findings indicate that the hysteresis we observe comes from the MoS2 itself, revealing an intrinsic origin of the hysteresis besides some extrinsic factors. The fact that the FETs based on thinner MoS2 have larger hysteresis than that with thicker MoS2 suggests that the surface of MoS2 plays a key role in the hysteresis. The gate voltage sweep range, sweep direction, sweep time and loading history all affect the hysteresis observed in the transfer curves.We investigate the hysteresis and gate voltage stress effect in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs). We observe that both the suspended and the SiO2-supported FETs have large hysteresis in their transfer curves under vacuum which cannot be attributed to the traps at the interface between the MoS2 and the SiO2 or in the SiO2 substrate or the gas adsorption/desorption effect. Our findings indicate that the hysteresis we observe comes from the MoS2 itself, revealing an intrinsic origin of the hysteresis besides some extrinsic factors. The fact that the FETs based on thinner MoS2 have larger hysteresis than that with thicker MoS2 suggests that the surface of MoS2 plays a key role in the hysteresis. The gate voltage sweep range, sweep direction, sweep time and loading history all affect the hysteresis observed in the transfer curves. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07336g

  9. Quantification of hysteresis effects on a soil subjected to drying and wetting cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafraf, Samia; Guellouz, Lamia; Guiras, Houda; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative description of soil hysteretic response during drying-wetting cycles is required to improve prediction of the soil water retention model. The objective of the study is to quantify the degree of hysteresis, which is helpful to evaluate the precision of soil water flow calculation. A new procedure to quantify the degree of hysteresis is presented. The Arya-Paris model allows assessment of hysteresis effects from initial drying curves, dynamic contact angles, degree of hysteresis value, and maximum difference value between drying and subsequent wetting curves. The experimental results show that the degree of hysteresis varies with the particle size, bulk density, void ratio, initial water content, and contact angle of the soil. The new findings can be very useful in modelling soil water flows.

  10. A discussion on the origin and solutions of hysteresis in perovskite hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dae Ho; Hyeok Jang, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Hyuck Heo, Jin; Park, Jin Kyoung; Sung, Shi-Joon; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Hong, Ki-Ha; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2016-11-01

    Although the record efficiencies of perovskite hybrid solar cells are gradually reaching the efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells, perovskite hybrid solar cells often exhibit significant current density-voltage (J-V) hysteresis with respect to the forward and reverse scan direction and scan rate. The origin of the J-V hysteresis of perovskite hybrid solar cells has not, to date, been clearly elucidated. Dielectric polarization by the ferroelectric properties of perovskite (i), the ionic motion/migration of perovskite materials (ii), and charge trapping and detrapping at trap sites by the unbalanced electron and hole flux (iii) are considered the possible origins of J-V hysteresis. Here, we reviewed the origin of the J-V hysteresis of perovskite solar cells from the above three points of view and we then suggest how one may reduce the J-V hysteresis with respect to the scan direction and scan rate.

  11. Asymmetric Hysteresis for Probing Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Soo; Kim, Nam-Hui; Kim, June-Seo; Yin, Yuxiang; Koo, Jung-Woo; Cho, Jaehun; Lee, Sukmock; Kläui, Mathias; Swagten, Henk J M; Koopmans, Bert; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-07-13

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is intimately related to the prospect of superior domain-wall dynamics and the formation of magnetic skyrmions. Although some experimental efforts have been recently proposed to quantify these interactions and the underlying physics, it is still far from trivial to address the interfacial DMI. Inspired by the reported tilt of the magnetization of the side edge of a thin film structure, we here present a quasi-static, straightforward measurement tool. By using laterally asymmetric triangular-shaped microstructures, it is demonstrated that interfacial DMI combined with an in-plane magnetic field yields a unique and significant shift in magnetic hysteresis. By systematic variation of the shape of the triangular objects combined with a droplet model for domain nucleation, a robust value for the strength and sign of interfacial DMI is obtained. This method gives immediate and quantitative access to DMI, enabling a much faster exploration of new DMI systems for future nanotechnology.

  12. Origin of the constricted hysteresis loop in cobalt ferrites revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-guo; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Weng-Hong; Wu, Guang-Heng

    2011-08-01

    A series of Co ferrites (Co xFe 3- xO 4 ( x=0-1)) were prepared using solid-state method in this work. The aging effect of their structures and constrictions of hysteresis loops under low magnetic field were investigated. It was found that during the aging process, the migration of trivalent (bivalent) ions between tetrahedral (A-site) and octahedral (B-site) coordination induced a shrinking of the lattice, which would expand again due to the precipitation of Fe 3+ after a much longer aging time. The first process caused a pronounced constriction of the loops, due to the uniaxial anisotropy led by this migration. The depression of constriction could attribute to both the expansion of lattice and the change of ionic ratios as a result of the second-phase-precipitation. The impacts of Co content, aging time and temperature upon the constriction were also discussed.

  13. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  14. Hysteresis of unsaturated hydromechanical properties of a silty soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Collins, Brian D.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests to examine hysteresis in the hydrologic and mechanical properties of partially saturated soils were conducted on six intact specimens collected from a landslide-prone area of Alameda County, California. The results reveal that the pore-size distribution parameter remains statistically unchanged between the wetting and drying paths; however, the wetting or drying state has a pronounced influence on the water-entry pressure, the water-filled porosity at zero suction, and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The suction stress values obtained from the shear-strength tests under both natural moisture and resaturated conditions were mostly bounded by the suction stress characteristic curves (SSCCs) obtained from the hydrologic tests. This finding experimentally confirms that the soil-water retention curve, hydraulic conductivity function, and SSCC are intrinsically related.

  15. The thermodynamic origin of hysteresis in insertion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Jamnik, Janko; Guhlke, Clemens; Huth, Robert; Moskon, Joze; Gaberscek, Miran

    2010-05-01

    Lithium batteries are considered the key storage devices for most emerging green technologies such as wind and solar technologies or hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles. Despite the tremendous recent advances in battery research, surprisingly, several fundamental issues of increasing practical importance have not been adequately tackled. One such issue concerns the energy efficiency. Generally, charging of 10(10)-10(17) electrode particles constituting a modern battery electrode proceeds at (much) higher voltages than discharging. Most importantly, the hysteresis between the charge and discharge voltage seems not to disappear as the charging/discharging current vanishes. Herein we present, for the first time, a general explanation of the occurrence of inherent hysteretic behaviour in insertion storage systems containing multiple particles. In a broader sense, the model also predicts the existence of apparent equilibria in battery electrodes, the sequential particle-by-particle charging/discharging mechanism and the disappearance of two-phase behaviour at special experimental conditions.

  16. Hysteresis in coral reefs under macroalgal toxicity and overfishing.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Joydeb; Pal, Samares

    2015-03-01

    Macroalgae and corals compete for the available space in coral reef ecosystems.While herbivorous reef fish play a beneficial role in decreasing the growth of macroalgae, macroalgal toxicity and overfishing of herbivores leads to proliferation of macroalgae. The abundance of macroalgae changes the community structure towards a macroalgae-dominated reef ecosystem. We investigate coral-macroalgal phase shifts by means of a continuous time model in a food chain. Conditions for local asymptotic stability of steady states are derived. It is observed that in the presence of macroalgal toxicity and overfishing, the system exhibits hysteresis through saddle-node bifurcation and transcritical bifurcation. We examine the effects of time lags in the liberation of toxins by macroalgae and the recovery of algal turf in response to grazing of herbivores on macroalgae by performing equilibrium and stability analyses of delay-differential forms of the ODE model. Computer simulations have been carried out to illustrate the different analytical results.

  17. Thermal hysteresis of Morin transition in hematite particles.

    PubMed

    Suber, L; Imperatori, P; Mari, A; Marchegiani, G; Mansilla, M Vasquez; Fiorani, D; Plunkett, W R; Rinaldi, D; Cannas, C; Ennas, G; Peddis, D

    2010-07-14

    Rhombohedral shaped, single crystal hematite particles with narrow size distribution (D(TEM) = 93 +/- 2 nm) were prepared by hydrolysis of iron chloride and polymerisation in water. The results of field dependent magnetization measurements at different warming-cooling rates and ac susceptibility measurements at varying frequencies are reported and discussed. Thermal hysteresis (DeltaT(M)) associated with the Morin transition and field dependence of the Morin temperature (T(M)) are observed in warming-cooling cycles (DeltaT(M) = 25 and 13 K for H = 0.1 and 3 T, respectively) due to the first order phase transition. A frequency dependence of ac susceptibility is observed above T(M), as a result of the relaxation of the magnetic moment of hematite particles in the weak-ferromagnetic phase.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of the hysteresis phenomena on ferromagnetic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Enríquez, C D; Restrepo, J; Restrepo-Parra, E

    2012-06-01

    In this work the hysteretic properties of single wall ferromagnetic nanotubes were studied. Hysteresis loops were computed on the basis of a classical Heisenberg model involving nearest neighbor interactions and using a Monte Carlo method implemented with a single spin movement Metropolis dynamics. Nanotubes with square and hexagonal unit cells were studied varying their diameter, temperature and magneto-crystalline anisotropy. Effects of the diameter were found stronger in the square unit cell magnetic nanotubes (SMNTs) than in the hexagonal unit cell magnetic nanotubes (HMNTs). The ferromagnetic behavior was observed in SMNTs at higher temperature than in HMNTs. Moreover in both cases, SMNTs and HMNTs, the magneto-crystalline anisotropy in the longitudinal direction showed a linear correspondence with the coercive field.

  19. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistor using gate insulator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Eriko; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2005-04-01

    An organic field-effect transistor based on a copper-phthalocyanine and cyanoethylpullulan gate insulator showed ambipolar operation using gate insulator hysteresis, which appeared at less than 1mHz. The gate insulator possesses spontaneous polarization of 1.6μC/cm2 and a coercive electric field of 50kV/cm. After poling in an effort to obtain a large amount of accumulated charge, the field-effect mobilities of the hole and electron were 4.1×10-3 and 3.5×10-6cm2/Vs, respectively. The on/off ratio at VSG=±10V was 6×104 for the p type and 70 for the n type.

  20. Hysteresis in an Ising model with mobile bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čapeta, D.; Sunko, D. K.

    2005-04-01

    Hysteresis is studied in a disordered Ising model in which diffusion of antiferromagnetic bonds is allowed in addition to spin flips. Saturation behavior changes to a figure-eight loop when diffusion is introduced. The upper and lower fields delimiting the figure-eight are determined by the Hamiltonian, while its surface and the crossing point depend on the temperature and details of the dynamics. The main avalanche is associated with the disappearance of hidden order. Some experimental observations of figure-eight anomalies are discussed. It is argued they are a signal of a transient rearrangement of domain couplings, characteristic of amorphous and/or magnetically soft samples, and similar to evolution of kinetic glasses.

  1. Phase transition and hysteresis in scale-free network traffic.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song; Wu, Yong-Hong

    2007-03-01

    We model information traffic on scale-free networks by introducing the node queue length L proportional to the node degree and its delivering ability C proportional to L . The simulation gives the overall capacity of the traffic system, which is quantified by a phase transition from free flow to congestion. It is found that the maximal capacity of the system results from the case of the local routing coefficient phi slightly larger than zero, and we provide an analysis for the optimal value of phi. In addition, we report for the first time the fundamental diagram of flow against density, in which hysteresis is found, and thus we can classify the traffic flow with four states: free flow, saturated flow, bistable, and jammed.

  2. Atrazine sorption-desorption hysteresis by sugarcane mulch residue.

    PubMed

    Selim, H M; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    Sorption and desorption kinetics are essential components for modeling the movement and retention of applied agricultural chemicals in soils and the fraction of chemicals susceptible to runoff. In this study, we investigated the retention characteristics of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) mulch residue for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) based on studies of sorption-desorption kinetics. A sorption kinetic batch method was used to quantify retention of the mulch residue for a wide range of atrazine concentrations and reaction times. Desorption was performed following 504 h of sorption using successive dilutions, followed by methanol extraction. Atrazine retention by the mulch residue was well described using a linear model where the partitioning coefficient (K(d)) increased with reaction time from 10.40 to 23.4 cm3 g(-1) after 2 and 504 h, respectively. Values for mulch residue K(d) were an order of magnitude higher than those found for Commerce silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Fluvaquentic Endoaquepts) where the sugarcane crop was grown. A kinetic multireaction model was successful in describing sorption behavior with reaction time. The model was equally successful in describing observed hysteretic atrazine behavior during desorption for all input concentrations. The model was concentration independent where one set of model parameters, which was derived from all batch results, was valid for the entire atrazine concentration range. Average atrazine recovery following six successive desorption steps were 63.67 +/- 4.38% of the amount adsorbed. Moreover, a hysteresis coefficient based on the difference in the area between sorption and desorption isotherms was capable of quantifying hysteresis of desorption isotherms.

  3. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1 μm) and microorganisms (coliphage φX174 and E. coli D21g) under various transient solution chemistry conditions, and 360 μm Ottawa sand that was subject to different levels of cleaning, namely, a salt cleaning procedure that removed clay particles, and a salt+acid cleaning procedure that removed clay and reduced microscopic heterogeneities due to metal oxides and surface roughness. Comparison of results from the salt and salt+acid treated sand indicated that microscopic heterogeneity was a major contributor to colloid retention hysteresis. The influence of this heterogeneity increased with IS and decreasing colloid/microbe size on salt treated sand. These trends were not consistent with calculated mean interaction energies (the secondary minima), but could be explained by the size of the electrostatic zone of influence (ZOI) near microscopic heterogeneities. In particular, the depth of local minima in the interaction energy has been predicted to increase with a decrease in the ZOI when the colloid size and/or the Debye length decreased (IS increased). The adhesive interaction was therefore largely irreversible for smaller sized 0.1 μm CML colloids, whereas it was reversible for larger 1.1 μm CML colloids. Similarly, the larger E. coli D21g exhibited greater reversibility in retention than φX174. However, direct comparison of CML colloids and microbes was not possible due to differences in size, shape, and surface properties. Retention and release behavior of CML colloids on salt+acid treated sand was much more consistent with mean interaction energies due to reduction in microscopic heterogeneities.

  4. Finite element analysis of hysteresis effects in piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkovics, Reinhard; Landes, Hermann; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Hoffelner, Johann; Lerch, Reinhard

    2000-06-01

    The design of ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, e.g. in medical therapy or production engineering, asks for effective computer aided design tools to analyze the occurring nonlinear effects. In this paper the finite-element-boundary-element package CAPA is presented that allows to model different types of electromechanical sensors and actuators. These transducers are based on various physical coupling effects, such as piezoelectricity or magneto- mechanical interactions. Their computer modeling requires the numerical solution of a multifield problem, such as coupled electric-mechanical fields or magnetic-mechanical fields as well as coupled mechanical-acoustic fields. With the reported software environment we are able to compute the dynamic behavior of electromechanical sensors and actuators by taking into account geometric nonlinearities, nonlinear wave propagation and ferroelectric as well as magnetic material nonlinearities. After a short introduction to the basic theory of the numerical calculation schemes, two practical examples will demonstrate the applicability of the numerical simulation tool. As a first example an ultrasonic thickness mode transducer consisting of a piezoceramic material used for high power ultrasound production is examined. Due to ferroelectric hysteresis, higher order harmonics can be detected in the actuators input current. Also in case of electrical and mechanical prestressing a resonance frequency shift occurs, caused by ferroelectric hysteresis and nonlinear dependencies of the material coefficients on electric field and mechanical stresses. As a second example, a power ultrasound transducer used in HIFU-therapy (high intensity focused ultrasound) is presented. Due to the compressibility and losses in the propagating fluid a nonlinear shock wave generation can be observed. For both examples a good agreement between numerical simulation and experimental data has been achieved.

  5. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1 μm) and microorganisms (coliphage φX174 and E. coli D21g) under various transient solution chemistry conditions, and 360 μm Ottawa sand that was subject to different levels of cleaning, namely, a salt cleaning procedure that removed clay particles, and a salt + acid cleaning procedure that removed clay and reduced microscopic heterogeneities due to metal oxides and surface roughness. Comparison of results from the salt and salt + acid treated sand indicated that microscopic heterogeneity was a major contributor to colloid retention hysteresis. The influence of this heterogeneity increased with IS and decreasing colloid/microbe size on salt treated sand. These trends were not consistent with calculated mean interaction energies (the secondary minima), but could be explained by the size of the electrostatic zone of influence (ZOI) near microscopic heterogeneities. In particular, the depth of local minima in the interaction energy has been predicted to increase with a decrease in the ZOI when the colloid size and/or the Debye length decreased (IS increased). The adhesive interaction was therefore largely irreversible for smaller sized 0.1 μm CML colloids, whereas it was reversible for larger 1.1 μm CML colloids. Similarly, the larger E. coli D21g exhibited greater reversibility in retention than φX174. However, direct comparison of CML colloids and microbes was not possible due to differences in size, shape, and surface properties. Retention and release behavior of CML colloids on salt + acid treated sand was much more consistent with mean interaction energies due to reduction in microscopic heterogeneities.

  6. Research on the Dynamic Hysteresis Loop Model of the Residence Times Difference (RTD)-Fluxgate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhang; Wu, Shujun; Zhou, Zhijian; Cheng, Defu; Pang, Na; Wan, Yunxia

    2013-01-01

    Based on the core hysteresis features, the RTD-fluxgate core, while working, is repeatedly saturated with excitation field. When the fluxgate simulates, the accurate characteristic model of the core may provide a precise simulation result. As the shape of the ideal hysteresis loop model is fixed, it cannot accurately reflect the actual dynamic changing rules of the hysteresis loop. In order to improve the fluxgate simulation accuracy, a dynamic hysteresis loop model containing the parameters which have actual physical meanings is proposed based on the changing rule of the permeability parameter when the fluxgate is working. Compared with the ideal hysteresis loop model, this model has considered the dynamic features of the hysteresis loop, which makes the simulation results closer to the actual output. In addition, other hysteresis loops of different magnetic materials can be explained utilizing the described model for an example of amorphous magnetic material in this manuscript. The model has been validated by the output response comparison between experiment results and fitting results using the model. PMID:24002230

  7. The intrinsic origin of hysteresis in MoS2 field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiapei; Wu, Gongtao; Guo, Yao; Liu, Bo; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-02-07

    We investigate the hysteresis and gate voltage stress effect in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs). We observe that both the suspended and the SiO2-supported FETs have large hysteresis in their transfer curves under vacuum which cannot be attributed to the traps at the interface between the MoS2 and the SiO2 or in the SiO2 substrate or the gas adsorption/desorption effect. Our findings indicate that the hysteresis we observe comes from the MoS2 itself, revealing an intrinsic origin of the hysteresis besides some extrinsic factors. The fact that the FETs based on thinner MoS2 have larger hysteresis than that with thicker MoS2 suggests that the surface of MoS2 plays a key role in the hysteresis. The gate voltage sweep range, sweep direction, sweep time and loading history all affect the hysteresis observed in the transfer curves.

  8. Research on the dynamic hysteresis loop model of the residence times difference (RTD)-fluxgate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanzhang; Wu, Shujun; Zhou, Zhijian; Cheng, Defu; Pang, Na; Wan, Yunxia

    2013-09-02

    Based on the core hysteresis features, the RTD-fluxgate core, while working, is repeatedly saturated with excitation field. When the fluxgate simulates, the accurate characteristic model of the core may provide a precise simulation result. As the shape of the ideal hysteresis loop model is fixed, it cannot accurately reflect the actual dynamic changing rules of the hysteresis loop. In order to improve the fluxgate simulation accuracy, a dynamic hysteresis loop model containing the parameters which have actual physical meanings is proposed based on the changing rule of the permeability parameter when the fluxgate is working. Compared with the ideal hysteresis loop model, this model has considered the dynamic features of the hysteresis loop, which makes the simulation results closer to the actual output. In addition, other hysteresis loops of different magnetic materials can be explained utilizing the described model for an example of amorphous magnetic material in this manuscript. The model has been validated by the output response comparison between experiment results and fitting results using the model.

  9. VIIRS day-night band (DNB) electronic hysteresis: characterization and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) offers measurements over a dynamic range from full daylight to the dimmest nighttime. This makes radiometric calibration difficult because effects that are otherwise negligible become significant for the DNB. One of these effects is electronic hysteresis and this paper evaluates this effect and its impact on calibration. It also considers possible correction algorithms. The cause of this hysteresis is uncertain, but since the DNB uses a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array, it is likely the result of residual charge or charge depletion. The effects of hysteresis are evident in DNB imagery. Steaks are visible in the cross-track direction around very bright objects such as gas flares. Dark streaks are also visible after lightning flashes. Each VIIRS scan is a sequence of 4 sectors: space view (SV); Earth-view (EV); blackbody (BB) view; and solar diffuser (SD) view. There are differences among these sectors in offset that can only be explained as being the result of hysteresis from one sector to the next. The most dramatic hysteresis effect is when the sun illuminates the SD and hysteresis is then observed in the SV and EV. Previously this was hypothesized to be due to stray light leaking from the SD chamber, but more careful evaluation shows that this can only be the result of hysteresis. There is a stray light correction algorithm that treats this as stray light, but there are problems with this that could be remedied by instead using the characterization presented here.

  10. Impact of cycle-hysteresis interactions on the performance of giant magnetocaloric effect refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. D.; Karaman, I.; Shamberger, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration technology based on the giant magnetocaloric effect in solid-state refrigerants is known qualitatively to be limited by dissipative mechanisms accompanying hysteresis in the magneto-structural solid-solid phase transition. In this paper, we quantitatively explore the dependence of cycle performance metrics (cooling power, temperature span, work input, and fractional Carnot efficiency) on hysteresis properties (thermal hysteresis, one-way transition width) of the magneto-structural phase transition in a Ni45Co5Mn36.6In13.4 alloy system. We investigate a variety of Ericsson-type magnetic refrigeration cycles, using a Preisach-based non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework to model the evolution of the alloy's magnetic and thermal properties. Performance metrics are found to depend strongly on hysteresis parameters, regardless of the cycle chosen. However, for a given hysteresis parameter set, the material's transformation temperatures determine a unique cycle that maximizes efficiency. For the model system used undergoing Ericsson cycles with 5 and 1.5 {{T}} maximum field constraint, fractional Carnot efficiencies in excess of 0.9 require thermal hysteresis below 1.5 {{K}} and 0.5 {{K}}, respectively. We conclude briefly with some general materials considerations for mitigating these hysteresis inefficiencies through microstructure design and other materials processing strategies.

  11. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet motion and collisions on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    The effect of varying the contact angle hysteresis of a superhydrophobic surface on the characteristics and dynamics of water droplet motion and their subsequent collision are investigated using a high-speed camera. The surfaces are created by imparting random roughness to Teflon through sanding. With this technique, it is possible to create surfaces with similar advancing contact angles near 150 degrees, but with varying contact angle hysteresis. This talk will focus on a number of interesting experimental observations pertaining to drop dynamics along a surface with uniform hysteresis, drop motion along surfaces with transition zones from one hysteresis to another, and the collision of droplets on surfaces of uniform hysteresis. For single drop studies, gravity is used as the driving force, while the collision studies use pressurized air to propel one drop into the other. For the case of droplet collision, the effect of hysteresis, Weber number, and impact number on the maximum deformation of the drops, and the post-collision dynamics will be discussed. For the single droplet measurements, the resistance to motion will be characterized as well as the transition from rolling to sliding as a function of drop size, inclination angle, and hysteresis. Additionally, we will quantify the effect of surface transitions on the resulting motion, mixing, and deflection of the drops.

  12. Flexible, low-voltage, and low-hysteresis PbSe nanowire field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, David K; Lai, Yuming; Vemulkar, Tarun R; Kagan, Cherie R

    2011-12-27

    We report low-hysteresis, ambipolar bottom gold contact, colloidal PbSe nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs) by chemically modifying the silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) gate dielectric surface to overcome carrier trapping at the NW-gate dielectric interface. While water bound to silanol groups at the SiO(2) surface are believed to give rise to hysteresis in FETs of a wide range of nanoscale materials, we show that dehydration and silanization are insufficient in reducing PbSe NW FET hysteresis. Encapsulating PbSe NW FETs in cured poly(methyl) methacrylate (PMMA), dehydrates and uniquely passivates the SiO(2) surface, to form low-hysteresis FETs. Annealing predominantly p-type ambipolar PbSe NW FETs switches the FET behavior to predominantly n-type ambipolar, both with and without PMMA passivation. Heating the PbSe NW devices desorbs surface bound oxygen, even present in the atmosphere of an inert glovebox. Upon cooling, overtime oxygen readsorption switches the FET polarity to predominantly p-type ambipolar behavior, but PMMA encapsulation maintains low hysteresis. Unfortunately PMMA is sensitive to most solvents and heat treatments and therefore its application for nanostructured material deposition and doping is limited. Seeking a robust, general platform for low-hysteresis FETs we explored a variety of hydroxyl-free substrate surfaces, including silicon nitride, polyimide, and parylene, which show reduced electron trapping, but still large hysteresis. We identified a robust dielectric stack by assembling octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) on aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) to form low-hysteresis FETs. We further integrated the ODPA/Al(2)O(3) gate dielectric stack on flexible substrates to demonstrate low-hysteresis, low-voltage FETs, and the promise of these nanostructured materials in flexible, electronic circuitry.

  13. Origin of plate tectonics: Grain-damage, inheritance and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of plate tectonics is enigmatic because of the lack of observations in the early Archean as well as the challenge of understanding how plates form. The damage theory of lithospheric weakening by grain-reduction provides a physical framework for plate generation. This model builds on grain-scale physics to describe planetary-scale processes, and is consistent with lab and field observations of polycrystalline rocks and lithospheric mylonites. Grain-damage accounts for the evolution of damage and healing by grain growth, hence predicts plate boundary formation and longevity, and how they depend on surface conditions. The establishment of global plate tectonics likely started between >4Ga and 2.7Ga, and may have taken over a billion years to develop. Under Earth-like conditions, grain-damage combined with intermittent Archean protosubduction produces persistent weak zones that accumulate into well developed plates by 3Ga. However, Venus' hotter surface promotes healing, suppresses damage and inhibits weak zone accumulation, which suggests why plate tectonics failed to spread on our sister planet. New work posits that interface damage is possibly suppressed at moderate grain-size; this induces a hysteresis loop wherein three equilibrium deformation branches coexist. These branches include a stable large-grain, weakly-deforming state in dislocation creep, a stable small-grain rapidly-deforming state in diffusion creep analogous to mylonites, and an unstable intermediate-grain state. At the right conditions, a lithosphere can acquire two stable deformation states characteristic of plate tectonics; i.e., both slowly deforming plate interiors and rapidly deforming plate boundaries can co-exist. Earth currently sits inside the hysteresis loop and can have coexisting deformation states, while Venus sits at the end of the loop where only the weakly deforming branch dominates. The hot post-Hadean Earth might have had peak deformation only on the weakly

  14. Grain-damage hysteresis and plate tectonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2016-04-01

    Shear localization in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The theoretical model for grain-damage and pinning in two-phase polycrystalline rocks provides a frame-work for understanding lithospheric shear weakening and plate-generation, and is consistent with laboratory and field observations of mylonites. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, and damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between crystalline phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary positive self-weakening feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. However, the suppression of interface damage at low interface curvature (wherein inter-grain mixing is inefficient and other energy sinks of deformational work are potentially more facile) causes a hysteresis effect, in which three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress coexist: (1) a stable, large-grain, weakly-deforming state, (2) a stable, small-grain, rapidly-deforming state analogous to ultramylonites, and (3) an unstable, intermediate grain-size state perhaps comparable to protomylonites. A comparison of the model to field data suggests that shear-localized zones of small-grain mylonites and ultra-mylonites exist at a lower stress than the co-existing large-grain porphyroclasts, rather than, as predicted by paleopiezometers or paleowattmeters, at a much higher stress; this interpretation of field data thus allows localization to relieve instead of accumulate stress. The model also predicts that a lithosphere that

  15. Implementation and analysis of an innovative digital charge amplifier for hysteresis reduction in piezoelectric stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bazghaleh, Mohsen Grainger, Steven; Cazzolato, Ben; Lu, Tien-Fu; Oskouei, Reza

    2014-04-15

    Smart actuators are the key components in a variety of nanopositioning applications, such as scanning probe microscopes and atomic force microscopes. Piezoelectric actuators are the most common smart actuators due to their high resolution, low power consumption, and wide operating frequency but they suffer hysteresis which affects linearity. In this paper, an innovative digital charge amplifier is presented to reduce hysteresis in piezoelectric stack actuators. Compared to traditional analog charge drives, experimental results show that the piezoelectric stack actuator driven by the digital charge amplifier has less hysteresis. It is also shown that the voltage drop of the digital charge amplifier is significantly less than the voltage drop of conventional analog charge amplifiers.

  16. Feedback/feedforward control of hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuators for high-speed scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfang; Shan, Jinjun; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the control system design for a piezoelectric actuator (PEA) for a high-speed trajectory scanning application. First nonlinear hysteresis is compensated for by using the Maxwell resistive capacitor model. Then the linear dynamics of the hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuator are identified. A proportional plus integral (PI) controller is designed based on the linear system, enhanced by feedforward hysteresis compensation. It is found that the feedback controller does not always improve tracking accuracy. When the input frequency exceeds a certain value, feedforward control only may result in better control performance. Experiments are conducted, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of 1D iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers with hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang; Lochenie, Charles; Weber, Birgit

    2014-02-07

    Purposeful ligand design was used for the synthesis of eight new 1D iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers aiming for cooperative spin transitions with hysteresis. The results from magnetic measurements and X-ray structure analysis show that the combination of rigid linkers and a hydrogen bond network between the 1D chains is a promising tool to reach this goal. Five of the eight new samples show a cooperative spin transition with hysteresis with up to 43 K wide hysteresis loops.

  18. Sufficient conditions for rate-independent hysteresis in autoregressive identified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Samir Angelo Milani; Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    2016-06-01

    This paper shows how hysteresis can be described using polynomial models and what are the sufficient conditions to be met by the model in order to have hysteresis. Such conditions are related to the model equilibria, to the forcing function and to certain term clusters in the polynomial models. The main results of the paper are used in the identification and analysis of nonlinear models estimated from data produced by a magneto-rheological damper (MRD) model with Bouc-Wen rate-independent hysteresis. A striking feature of the identified model is its simplicity and this could turn out to be a key factor in controller design.

  19. Effect of Tabor parameter on hysteresis losses during adhesive contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, M.; Greenwood, J. A.; Barber, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Tabor parameter μ is conventionally assumed to determine the range of applicability of the classical 'JKR' solution for adhesive elastic contact of a sphere and a plane, with the variation of the contact area and approach with load, and in particular the maximum tensile force (the pull-off force) being well predicted for μ > 5 . Here we show that the hysteretic energy loss during a contact separation cycle is significantly overestimated by the JKR theory, even at quite large values of μ. This stems from the absence of long-range tensile forces in the JKR theory, which implies that jump into contact is delayed until the separation α = 0 . We develop an approximate solution based on the use of Wu's solution with van der Waals interactions for jump-in, and the JKR theory for jump out of contact, and show that for μ > 5 , the predicted hysteresis loss is then close to that found by direct numerical solutions using the Lennard-Jones force law. We also show how the same method can be adapted to allow for contact between bodies with finite support stiffness.

  20. The Dynamic Characteristic and Hysteresis Effect of an Air Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löcken, F.; Welsch, M.

    2015-02-01

    In many applications of vibration technology, especially in chassis, air springs present a common alternative to steel spring concepts. A design-independent and therefore universal approach is presented to describe the dynamic characteristic of such springs. Differential and constitutive equations based on energy balances of the enclosed volume and the mountings are given to describe the nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Therefore all parameters can be estimated directly from physical and geometrical properties, without parameter fitting. The numerically solved equations fit very well to measurements of a passenger car air spring. In a second step a simplification of this model leads to a pure mechanical equation. While in principle the same parameters are used, just an empirical correction of the effective heat transfer coefficient is needed to handle some simplification on this topic. Finally, a linearization of this equation leads to an analogous mechanical model that can be assembled from two common spring- and one dashpot elements in a specific arrangement. This transfer into "mechanical language" enables a system description with a simple force-displacement law and a consideration of the nonobvious hysteresis and stiffness increase of an air spring from a mechanical point of view.

  1. Digital signaling and hysteresis characterize Ras activation in lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit; Ho, Mary; Zikherman, Julie; Govern, Christopher; Yang, Ming; Weiss, Arthur; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Ras proteins underlies functional decisions in diverse cell types. Two molecules, RasGRP and SOS, catalyze Ras activation in lymphocytes. Binding of active Ras to SOS′ allosteric pocket markedly increases SOS′ activity establishing a positive feedback loop for SOS-mediated Ras activation. Integrating in silico and in vitro studies, we demonstrate that digital signaling in lymphocytes (cells are “on” or “off”) is predicated upon feedback regulation of SOS. SOS′ feedback loop leads to hysteresis in the dose-response curve, which can enable a capacity to sustain Ras activation as stimuli are withdrawn and exhibit “memory” of past encounters with antigen. Ras activation via RasGRP alone is analog (graded increase in amplitude with stimulus). We describe how complementary analog (RasGRP) and digital (SOS) pathways act on Ras to efficiently convert analog input to digital output. Numerous predictions regarding the impact of our findings on lymphocyte function and development are noted. PMID:19167334

  2. Magnetization and Hysteresis of Dilute Magnetic-Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-structure imperfections in dilute magnetic oxides tend to create small concentrations of local magnetic moments that are coupled by fairly long-range exchange interactions, mediated by p-electrons. The robustness of these interactions is caused by the strong overlap of the p orbitals, as contrasted to the much weaker interatomic exchange involving iron-series 3d electrons. The net exchange between defect moments can be positive or negative, which gives rise to spin structures with very small net moments. Similarly, the moments exhibit magnetocrystalline anisotropy, reinforced by electron hopping to and from 3d states and generally undergoing some random-anuisotropy averaging. Since the coercivity scales as 2K1/M and M is small, this creates pronounced and -- in thin films -- strongly anisotropic hysteresis loops. In finite systems with N moments, both K1 and M are reduced by a factor of order N1/2 due to random anisotropy and moment compensation, respectively, so that that typical coercivities are comparable to bulk magnets. Thermal activation readily randomizes the net moment of small oxide particles, so that the moment is easier to measure in compacted or aggregated particle ensembles. This research is supported by DOE (BES).

  3. Quantum Phase Transitions with Parity-Symmetry Breaking and Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, A; Spagnolli, G; Semeghini, G; Coop, S; Landini, M; Castilho, P; Pezzè, L; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M; Smerzi, A; Fattori, M

    2016-09-01

    Symmetry-breaking quantum phase transitions play a key role in several condensed matter, cosmology and nuclear physics theoretical models1-3. Its observation in real systems is often hampered by finite temperatures and limited control of the system parameters. In this work we report for the first time the experimental observation of the full quantum phase diagram across a transition where the spatial parity symmetry is broken. Our system is made of an ultra-cold gas with tunable attractive interactions trapped in a spatially symmetric double-well potential. At a critical value of the interaction strength, we observe a continuous quantum phase transition where the gas spontaneously localizes in one well or the other, thus breaking the underlying symmetry of the system. Furthermore, we show the robustness of the asymmetric state against controlled energy mismatch between the two wells. This is the result of hysteresis associated with an additional discontinuous quantum phase transition that we fully characterize. Our results pave the way to the study of quantum critical phenomena at finite temperature4, the investigation of macroscopic quantum tunneling of the order parameter in the hysteretic regime and the production of strongly quantum entangled states at critical points5.

  4. Quantum Phase Transitions with Parity-Symmetry Breaking and Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Trenkwalder, A.; Spagnolli, G.; Semeghini, G.; Coop, S.; Landini, M.; Castilho, P.; Pezzè, L.; Modugno, G.; Inguscio, M.; Smerzi, A.; Fattori, M.

    2016-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking quantum phase transitions play a key role in several condensed matter, cosmology and nuclear physics theoretical models1–3. Its observation in real systems is often hampered by finite temperatures and limited control of the system parameters. In this work we report for the first time the experimental observation of the full quantum phase diagram across a transition where the spatial parity symmetry is broken. Our system is made of an ultra-cold gas with tunable attractive interactions trapped in a spatially symmetric double-well potential. At a critical value of the interaction strength, we observe a continuous quantum phase transition where the gas spontaneously localizes in one well or the other, thus breaking the underlying symmetry of the system. Furthermore, we show the robustness of the asymmetric state against controlled energy mismatch between the two wells. This is the result of hysteresis associated with an additional discontinuous quantum phase transition that we fully characterize. Our results pave the way to the study of quantum critical phenomena at finite temperature4, the investigation of macroscopic quantum tunneling of the order parameter in the hysteretic regime and the production of strongly quantum entangled states at critical points5. PMID:27610189

  5. Droplet evaporation dynamics on a superhydrophobic surface with negligible hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-08-27

    We report on experiments of droplet evaporation on a structured superhydrophobic surface that displays very high contact angle (CA ∼ 160 deg), and negligible contact angle hysteresis (<1 deg). The droplet evaporation is observed to occur in a constant-contact-angle mode, with contact radius shrinking for almost the entire duration of evaporation. Experiments conducted on Teflon-coated smooth surface (CA ∼ 120 deg) as a baseline also support an evaporation process that is dominated by a constant-contact-angle mode. The experimental results are compared with an isothermal diffusion model for droplet evaporation from the literature. Good agreement is observed for the Teflon-coated smooth surface between the analytical expression and experimental results in terms of the total time for evaporation, transient volume, contact angle, and contact radius. However, for the structured superhydrophobic surface, the experiments indicate that the time taken for complete evaporation of the droplet is greater than the predicted time, across all droplet volumes. This disparity is attributed primarily to the evaporative cooling at the droplet interface due to the high aspect ratio of the droplet and also the lower effective thermal conductivity of the substrate due to the presence of air gaps. This hypothesis is verified by numerically evaluating the temperature distribution along the droplet interface. We propose a generalized relation for predicting the instantaneous volume of droplets with initial CA > 90 deg, irrespective of the mode of evaporation.

  6. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T =0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support.

  7. On the flow structures and hysteresis of laminar swirling jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogus, G.; Baelmans, M.; Vanierschot, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper different flow patterns of an annular jet with a stepped-conical nozzle as well as the transition between these patterns are numerically investigated as a function of the swirl number S which is the ratio of tangential momentum flux to axial momentum flux. The Reynolds number of the jet based on the axial velocity and the nozzle hydraulic diameter is 180. The 3D Navier Stokes equations are solved using the direct numerical simulation. Four different flow patterns are identified and their associated flow structures are discussed. Starting from an annular jet at zero swirl, spinning vortices around the central axis originate with increasing swirl. As the swirl is further increased, the onset of vortex breakdown occurs, followed by jet attachment to the nozzle. Decreasing the swirl number back from this flow pattern, the Coanda effect near the nozzle outlet creates a wall jet. This wall jet remains till the decreasing swirl number equals to zero, showing hysteresis in flow patterns between an increase and a subsequent decrease in swirl. The determined flow states are experimentally validated. Potential applications related to these flow patterns and their hysteretic behavior are also briefly discussed.

  8. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  9. Hysteresis of ligand binding in CNGA2 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Benndorf, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate receptor potentials in olfaction and vision. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain embedded in the C terminus of each subunit. Here using a fluorescent cGMP derivative (fcGMP), we show for homotetrameric CNGA2 channels that ligand unbinding is ~50 times faster at saturating than at subsaturating fcGMP. Analysis with complex Markovian models reveals two pathways for ligand unbinding; the partially liganded open channel unbinds its ligands from closed states only, whereas the fully liganded channel reaches a different open state from which it unbinds all four ligands rapidly. Consequently, the transition pathways for ligand binding and activation of a fully liganded CNGA2 channel differ from that of ligand unbinding and deactivation, resulting in pronounced hysteresis of the gating mechanism. This concentration-dependent gating mechanism allows the channels to respond to changes in the cyclic nucleotide concentration with different kinetics. PMID:24287615

  10. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T=0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support.

  11. Modeling liquid bridge between surfaces with contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Amirfazli, A; Tang, T

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents the behaviors of a liquid bridge when being compressed and stretched in a quasi-static fashion between two solid surfaces that have contact angle hysteresis (CAH). A theoretical model is developed to obtain the profiles of the liquid bridge given a specific separation between the surfaces. Different from previous models, both contact lines in the upper and lower surfaces were allowed to move when the contact angles reach their advancing or receding values. When the contact angles are between their advancing and receding values, the contact lines are pinned while the contact angles adjust to accommodate the changes in separation. Effects of CAH on both asymmetric and symmetric liquid bridges were analyzed. The model was shown to be able to correctly predict the behavior of the liquid bridge during a quasi-static compression/stretching loading cycle in experiments. Because of CAH, the liquid bridge can have two different profiles at the same separation during one loading and unloading cycle, and more profiles can be obtained during multiple cycles. The maximum adhesion force generated by the liquid bridge is found to be influenced by the CAH of surfaces. CAH also leads to energy cost during a loading cycle of the liquid bridge. In addition, the minimum separation between the two solid surfaces is shown to affect how the contact radii and angles change on the two surfaces as the liquid bridge is stretched.

  12. Hysteresis and avalanches in two-dimensional foam rheology simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Swart, Pieter J.; Saxena, Avadh; Asipauskas, Marius; Glazier, James A.

    1999-05-01

    Foams have unique rheological properties that range from solidlike to fluidlike. We study two-dimensional noncoarsening foams of different disorder under shear in a Monte Carlo simulation, using a driven large-Q Potts model. Simulations of periodic shear on an ordered foam show several different response regimes. At small strain amplitudes, bubbles deform and recover their shapes elastically, and the macroscopic response is that of a linear elastic cellular material. For increasing strain amplitude, the energy-strain curve starts to exhibit hysteresis before any topological rearrangements occur, indicating a macroscopic viscoelastic response. When the applied strain amplitude exceeds a critical value, the yield strain, topological rearrangements occur, the foam starts to flow, and we observe macroscopic irreversibility. We find that the dynamics of topological rearrangements depend sensitively on the structural disorder. Structural disorder decreases the yield strain; sufficiently high disorder changes the macroscopic response of a foam from a viscoelastic solid to a viscoelastic fluid. This wide-ranging dynamical response and the associated history effects of foams result from avalanchelike rearrangement events. The spatiotemporal statistics of rearrangement events do not display long-range correlations for ordered foams or at low shear rates, consistent with experimental observations. As the shear rate or structural disorder increases, the topological events become more correlated and their power spectra change from that of white noise toward 1/f noise. Intriguingly, the power spectra of the total stored energy also exhibit this 1/f trend.

  13. On growth rate hysteresis and catastrophic crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Cecília; Rocha, Fernando A.; Damas, Ana M.; Martins, Pedro M.

    2013-04-01

    Different crystal growth rates as supersaturation is increasing or decreasing in impure media is a phenomenon called growth rate hysteresis (GRH) that has been observed in varied systems and applications, such as protein crystallization or during biomineralization. We have recently shown that the transient adsorption of impurities onto newly formed active sites for growth (or kinks) is sensitive to the direction and rate of supersaturation variation, thus providing a possible explanation for GRH [6]. In the present contribution, we expand on this concept by deriving the analytical expressions for transient crystal growth based on the energetics of growth hillock formation and kink occupation by impurities. Two types of GRH results are described according to the variation of kink density with supersaturation: for nearly constant density, decreasing or increasing supersaturation induce, respectively, growth promoting or inhibiting effects relative to equilibrium conditions. This is the type of GRH measured by us during the crystallization of egg-white lysozyme. For variable kink density, slight changes in the supersaturation level may induce abrupt variations in the crystal growth rate. Different literature examples of this so-called 'catastrophic' crystal growth are discussed in terms of their fundamental consequences.

  14. Light regulated I-V hysteresis loop of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lujun; Sun, Bai; Zhao, Wenxi; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A hysteresis loop of current-voltage characteristics based multiferroic BiFeO3 nanoribbons memory device is observed. Moreover, the white-light can greatly regulate both the current-voltage hysteresis loop and the ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The stored space charges within the electrodes/BiFeO3 interface can lead to hysteresis-type I-V characteristics of Ag/BiFeO3/FTO devices. The white-light controlled I-V loop and ferroelectric loop result from photon-generated carries. Since the I-V hysteresis loop and ferroelectric hysteresis loop have a potential application prospect to the memory devices, these two white-light controlled the hysteresis loops curves are likely to provide promising opportunity for developing the multi-functional memory devices.

  15. Investigation of the Temperature Hysteresis Phenomenon of a Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaya, Tarik; Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem; Cheung, Mark K.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature hysteresis phenomenon of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was experimentally investigated. The temperature hysteresis was identified by the fact that the operating temperature depends upon not only the imposed power but also the previous history of the power variation. The temperature hysteresis could impose limitations on the LHP applications since the LHP may exhibit different steady-state operating temperatures at a given power input even when the condenser sink temperature remains unchanged. In order to obtain insight to this phenomenon, a LHP was tested at different elevations and tilts by using an elaborated power profile. A hypothesis was suggested to explain the temperature hysteresis. This hypothesis explains well the experimental observations. Results of this study provide a better understanding of the performance characteristics of the LHPS.

  16. Hysteresis Compensation of Piezoresistive Carbon Nanotube/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite-Based Force Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Sik; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the hysteresis compensation of a piezoresistive silicon-based polymer composite, poly(dimethylsiloxane) dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), to demonstrate its feasibility as a conductive composite (i.e., a force-sensitive resistor) for force sensors. In this study, the potential use of the nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane (CNT/PDMS) as a force sensor is evaluated for the first time. The experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the CNT/PDMS composite changes in response to sinusoidal loading and static compressive load. The compensated output based on the Duhem hysteresis model shows a linear relationship. This simple hysteresis model can compensate for the nonlinear frequency-dependent hysteresis phenomenon when a dynamic sinusoidal force input is applied. PMID:28125046

  17. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  18. Hysteresis and compensation behaviors of spin-3/2 cylindrical Ising nanotube system

    SciTech Connect

    Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa

    2014-09-07

    The hysteresis and compensation behaviors of the spin-3/2 cylindrical Ising nanotube system are studied within the framework of the effective-field theory with correlations. The effects of the Hamiltonian parameters are investigated on the magnetic and thermodynamic quantities, such as the total magnetization, hysteresis curves, and compensation behaviors of the system. Depending on the Hamiltonian parameters, some characteristic hysteresis behaviors are found, such as the existence of double and triple hysteresis loops. According to Néel classification nomenclature, the system displays Q-, R-, P-, N-, M-, and S- types of compensation behaviors for the appropriate values of the system parameters. We also compare our results with some recently published theoretical and experimental works and find a qualitatively good agreement.

  19. Hysteresis Compensation of Piezoresistive Carbon Nanotube/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite-Based Force Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sik; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2017-01-24

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the hysteresis compensation of a piezoresistive silicon-based polymer composite, poly(dimethylsiloxane) dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), to demonstrate its feasibility as a conductive composite (i.e., a force-sensitive resistor) for force sensors. In this study, the potential use of the nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane (CNT/PDMS) as a force sensor is evaluated for the first time. The experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the CNT/PDMS composite changes in response to sinusoidal loading and static compressive load. The compensated output based on the Duhem hysteresis model shows a linear relationship. This simple hysteresis model can compensate for the nonlinear frequency-dependent hysteresis phenomenon when a dynamic sinusoidal force input is applied.

  20. Modeling of the interleaved hysteresis loop in the measurements of rotational core losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Pillay, Pragasen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of core losses in machine laminations reveals a fundamental difference between rotational and pulsating types. Rotational core losses under rotating fields decrease at high flux density, while pulsating losses keep increasing steadily. Experimental analyses of loss components Px and Py in x and y directions with rotating fields show that the loss decreases in one loss component and sometimes attains negative values. Tracking the evolution of hysteresis loops along this loss component discloses a peculiar behavior of magnetic hysteresis, where the loop changes its path from counterclockwise to clockwise within a cycle of magnetization process, the so called interleaved hysteresis loop. This paper highlights a successful procedure for modeling the interleaved hysteresis loop in the measurement of rotational core losses in electrical machine laminations using the generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model. The efficiency of the proposed model is compared to Preisach model. Results and conclusion of this work are of importance toward building an accurate model of rotational core losses.

  1. Hysteresis in a light bulb: connecting electricity and thermodynamics with simple experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauss, D. A.; Ralich, R. M.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2001-07-01

    A method for integrating energy conversion phenomena, nonlinear circuit behaviour and hysteresis into a simple laboratory activity is demonstrated. Current-voltage data for a flashlight bulb driven at various frequencies and amplitudes are measured and simulated. Non-ohmic behaviour and hysteresis are observed experimentally and reproduced numerically with a model that includes the temperature-dependent specific heat capacity and electrical resistivity of the filament. The phenomenological model and simple experimental design could be modified for a variety of audiences.

  2. Mercury Porosimetry: Contact Angle Hysteresis of Materials with Controlled Pore Structure.

    PubMed

    Salmas, Constantinos; Androutsopoulos, George

    2001-07-01

    Mercury Porosimetry (MP) hysteresis is a commonly observed phenomenon in which mercury retention disguises further the overall hysteresis picture. This article introduces a new interpretation of the MP hysteresis based on the combined effect of pore structure networking and mercury contact angle variation occurring between the mercury penetration and retraction operations. To distinguish the contribution of each factor the following investigations were carried out. Nitrogen sorption (NP) and MP experiments were performed on samples of an anodic aluminum membrane and the results were interpreted in terms of the Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM), i.e., CPSM-Nitrogen and CPSM-Mercury models, respectively. The simulation of the observed hysteresis data using the CPSM model enabled the evaluation of an identical for the two methods intrinsic pore size distribution (PSD) and cumulative surface area in perfect agreement with the respective BET value. Additionally, the CPSM analysis of data resulted in the evaluation of mercury contact angles, i.e., θ(p)=143 degrees and θ(r)=101.7 degrees for the MP penetration and retraction branches of the hysteresis loop, respectively. Moreover, CPSM-Mercury simulations of literature MP hysteresis data, valid for controlled-pore glasses and nuclepore membranes, led to the evaluation of contact angles, i.e., glasses: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=100.5-107.5 degrees and nuclepore: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=118- 121 degrees. The latter values are comparable with relevant literature data and approximate those determined for the anodic aluminum membrane. The CPSM model employed herein proved to be a flexible and reliable model for simulating the pertinent hysteresis loops by combining pore networking and contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Ac magnetorestriction hysteresis and magnetization direction in grain oriented silicon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, Hisashi; Matsuo, Yukio; Kumano, Tomoji

    1999-09-01

    A hysteresis curve of ac magnetostriction was measured, magnetizing a grain oriented silicon steel in the direction deviated from rolling direction of a sample. The ac magnetostriction ({lambda} ac) curves were analyzed as harmonics in the interest of noise spectrum of such as a power transformer. The domain structure model in this magnetostriction process was proposed. The hysteresis was large in the magnetization direction inclined at 30 and 90{degree} from the rolling direction.

  4. Hysteresis responses of evapotranspiration to meteorological factors at a diel timescale: patterns and causes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhu, Xianjin; Li, Yingnian; Yu, Guirui

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the water cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding the ways in which ET changes with meteorological factors is central to a better understanding of ecological and hydrological processes. In this study, we used eddy covariance measurements of ET from a typical alpine shrubland meadow ecosystem in China to investigate the hysteresis response of ET to environmental variables including air temperature (Ta), vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and net radiation (Rn) at a diel timescale. Meanwhile, the simulated ET by Priestly-Taylor equation was used to interpret the measured ET under well-watered conditions. Pronounced hysteresis was observed in both Ta and VPD response curves of ET. At a similar Ta and VPD, ET was always significantly depressed in the afternoon compared with the morning. But the hysteresis response of ET to Rn was not evident. Similar hysteresis patterns were also observed in the Ta/VPD response curves of simulated ET. The magnitudes of the measured and simulated hysteresis loops showed similar seasonal variation, with relatively smaller values occurring from May to September, which agreed well with the lifetime of plants and the period of rainy season at this site. About 62% and 23% of changes in the strength of measured ET-Ta and ET-VPD loops could be explained by the changes in the strength of simulated loops, respectively. Thus, the time lag between Rn and Ta/VPD is the most important factor generating and modulating the ET-Ta/VPD hysteresis, but plants and water status also contribute to the hysteresis response of ET. Our research confirmed the different hysteresis in the responses of ET to meteorological factors and proved the vital role of Rn in driving the diel course of ET.

  5. Calculation of Hysteresis Losses for Ferroelectric Soft Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Mahmoud A.

    2014-02-01

    The phenomenological Hamad model was modified to enable retracing of the hysteresis loop of ferroelectric soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Comparison with experimental results revealed the modified model can retrace polarization versus electric field for different electric field amplitudes and temperatures. Hysteresis loss per unit volume per cycle for soft PZT was predicted and estimated. The results revealed that energy loss increased with decreasing temperature and with increasing electric field amplitude.

  6. Hysteresis of bedload transport during glaciermelting floods in a small Andean stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Mao, L.; Carrillo, R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying bedload transport in mountain stream is of the highest importance for predicting morphodynamics and risks during flood events, and for planning river management practices. At the scale of single flood event, the relationship between water discharge and bedload transport rate often reveals hysteretic loops. When sediment transport peaks before water discharge the hysteresis is clockwise, and this has been related to unlimited sediment supply conditions such as loose sediments left by previous floods on the channel. On the contrary, counterclockwise hysteresis has also been observed and mainly related to limited sediment supply conditions, such as consolidated grains on the bed surface due to long low-flows periods. Understanding the direction and magnitude of hysteresis at the single flood event can thus reveal the sediment availability. Also, interpreting temporal trend of hysteresis could be used to infer the dynamics of sediment sources. This work is focused in the temporal trend of hysteresis pattern of bedload transport in a small (27 km2) glaciarized catchment in the Andes of central Chile (Estero Morales) during the ablation season from October 2014 to March 2015. Bedload was measured indirectly using a Japanese acoustic pipe sensor which detects the acoustic vibrations induced by particles hitting the device. A preliminary analysis of the collected data reveals that hysteresis of single floods due to snow- and glacier-melting index follow patterns according to the season. Clockwise hysteresis is typical in events occurring in late spring and early summer, while counterclockwise appears mostly in the summer season. The hysteresis index tends to decrease from spring to late summer, indicating a progressive shift from clockwise to counterclockwise loops. This pattern suggest that sediment availability decreases overtime probably due to the progressive exhaustion of sediments stored in the channel bed. This research is being developed within the

  7. Hysteresis of indices of solar and ionospheric activity during 11-year cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruevich, E. A.; Kazachevskaya, T. V.; Katyushina, V. V.; Nusinov, A. A.; Yakunina, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of hysteresis, which is a manifestation of ambiguous relationships between different solar activity indices during the rising and declining phases of solar cycles, are analyzed. The paper addresses the indices characterizing radiation from the solar photosphere, chromosphere, and corona, and the ionospheric indices. The 21st, 22nd, and 23rd solar cycles, which significantly differ from each other in amplitude, exhibit different extents of hysteresis.

  8. The hysteresis-free negative capacitance field effect transistors using non-linear poly capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S.-T.; Yan, J.-Y.; Lai, D.-C.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-08-01

    A gate structure design for negative capacitance field effect transistors (NCFETs) is proposed. The hysteresis loop in current-voltage performances is eliminated by the nonlinear C-V dependence of polysilicon in the gate dielectrics. Design considerations and optimizations to achieve the low SS and hysteresis-free transfer were elaborated. The effects of gate-to-source/drain overlap, channel length scaling, interface trap states and temperature impact on SS are also investigated.

  9. Evidence for ion migration in hybrid perovskite solar cells with minimal hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Philip; Telford, Andrew M.; Bryant, Daniel; Li, Xiaoe; Nelson, Jenny; O'Regan, Brian C.; Barnes, Piers R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Ion migration has been proposed as a possible cause of photovoltaic current–voltage hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells. A major objection to this hypothesis is that hysteresis can be reduced by changing the interfacial contact materials; however, this is unlikely to significantly influence the behaviour of mobile ionic charge within the perovskite phase. Here, we show that the primary effects of ion migration can be observed regardless of whether the contacts were changed to give devices with or without significant hysteresis. Transient optoelectronic measurements combined with device simulations indicate that electric-field screening, consistent with ion migration, is similar in both high and low hysteresis CH3NH3PbI3 cells. Simulation of the photovoltage and photocurrent transients shows that hysteresis requires the combination of both mobile ionic charge and recombination near the perovskite-contact interfaces. Passivating contact recombination results in higher photogenerated charge concentrations at forward bias which screen the ionic charge, reducing hysteresis. PMID:28004653

  10. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Michael A; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2011-11-15

    In this work, droplet coalescence and the subsequent mixing in superhydrophobic surfaces is studied over a range of impact velocities and impact angles. Sanded Teflon surfaces are used as a novel two-dimensional microfluidics platform. These superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit a constant advancing contact angle of θ(A)=150° over a broad range of contact angle hysteresis. As a result, the effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing can be studied. Based on the observed characteristics of coalescence, three different regimes of coalescence are identified as a function of both Weber number and impact angle. These regimes include oscillation dominated, rotation dominated, and mixed dynamics. It is shown that within Weber number ranges achievable in this experiment, hysteresis greatly reduces the deformation of the droplet coalescence process and the subsequent mixing. In head-on collisions, higher hysteresis is found to decrease the frequency at which the resulting dr oscillates. In the case of glancing collisions, where the resulting droplet is found to rotate, higher hysteresis increases the rate of rotation although the overall angular momentum is found to be independent of contact angle hysteresis.

  11. High-Precision Hysteresis Sensing of the Quartz Crystal Inductance-to-Frequency Converter.

    PubMed

    Matko, Vojko; Milanović, Miro

    2016-06-28

    A new method for the automated measurement of the hysteresis of the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal is proposed. The new idea behind this method is a converter with two programmable analog switches enabling the automated measurement of the converter hysteresis, as well as the temperature compensation of the quartz crystal and any other circuit element. Also used is the programmable timing control device that allows the selection of different oscillating frequencies. In the proposed programmable method two different inductances connected in series to the quartz crystal are switched in a short time sequence, compensating the crystal's natural temperature characteristics (in the temperature range between 0 and 50 °C). The procedure allows for the measurement of the converter hysteresis at various values of capacitance connected in parallel with the quartz crystal for the converter sensitivity setting at selected inductance. It, furthermore, enables the measurement of hysteresis at various values of inductance at selected parallel capacitance (sensitivity) connected to the quartz crystal. The article shows that the proposed hysteresis measurement of the converter, which converts the inductance in the range between 95 and 100 μH to a frequency in the range between 1 and 200 kHz, has only 7 × 10(-13) frequency instability (during the temperature change between 0 and 50 °C) with a maximum 1 × 10(-11) hysteresis frequency difference.

  12. Thermal Hysteresis of MEMS Packaged Capacitive Pressure Sensor (CPS) Based 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsi, N.; Majlis, B. Y.; Mohd-Yasin, F.; Hamzah, A. A.; Mohd Rus, A. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Presented herein are the effects of thermal hysteresis analyses of the MEMS packaged capacitive pressure sensor (CPS). The MEMS CPS was employed on Si-on-3C-SiC wafer that was performed using the hot wall low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) reactors at the Queensland Micro and Nanotechnology Center (QMNC), Griffith University and fabricated using the bulk-micromachining process. The MEMS CPS was operated at an extreme temperature up to 500°C and high external pressure at 5.0 MPa. The thermal hysteresis phenomenon that causes the deflection, strain and stress on the 3C-SiC diaphragm spontaneously influence the MEMS CPS performances. The differences of temperature, hysteresis, and repeatability test were presented to demonstrate the functionality of the MEMS packaged CPS. As expected, the output hysteresis has a low hysteresis (less than 0.05%) which has the hardness greater than the traditional silicon. By utilizing this low hysteresis, it was revealed that the MEMS packaged CPS has high repeatability and stability of the sensor.

  13. Hysteresis from Multiscale Porosity: Modeling Water Sorption and Shrinkage in Cement Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinson, Matthew B.; Masoero, Enrico; Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Manzano, Hegoi; Ji, Qing; Yip, Sidney; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2015-06-01

    Cement paste has a complex distribution of pores and molecular-scale spaces. This distribution controls the hysteresis of water sorption isotherms and associated bulk dimensional changes (shrinkage). We focus on two locations of evaporable water within the fine structure of pastes, each having unique properties, and we present applied physics models that capture the hysteresis by dividing drying and rewetting into two related regimes based on relative humidity (RH). We show that a continuum model, incorporating a pore-blocking mechanism for desorption and equilibrium thermodynamics for adsorption, explains well the sorption hysteresis for a paste that remains above approximately 20% RH. In addition, we show with molecular models and experiments that water in spaces of ≲1 nm width evaporates below approximately 20% RH but reenters throughout the entire RH range. This water is responsible for a drying shrinkage hysteresis similar to that of clays but opposite in direction to typical mesoporous glass. Combining the models of these two regimes allows the entire drying and rewetting hysteresis to be reproduced accurately and provides parameters to predict the corresponding dimensional changes. The resulting model can improve the engineering predictions of long-term drying shrinkage accounting also for the history dependence of strain induced by hysteresis. Alternative strategies for quantitative analyses of the microstructure of cement paste based on this mesoscale physical model of water content within porous spaces are discussed.

  14. Dynamic hysteresis modelling of entangled cross-linked fibres in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piollet, Elsa; Poquillon, Dominique; Michon, Guilhem

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize and model the vibration behaviour of entangled carbon fibres cross-linked with epoxy resin. The material is tested in shear, in a double lap configuration. Experimental testing is carried out for frequencies varying from 1 Hz to 80 Hz and for shear strain amplitudes ranging from 5 ·10-4 to 1 ·10-2. Measured shear stress-strain hysteresis loops show a nonlinear behaviour with a low frequency dependency. The hysteresis loops are decomposed in a linear part and three nonlinear parts: a dry friction hysteresis, a stiffening term and a stiction-like overshoot term. The Generalized Dahl Model is used in conjunction with other hysteresis models to develop an appropriate description of the measured hysteresis loops, based on the three nonlinear parts. In particular, a new one-state formulation of the Bliman-Sorine model is developed. A new identification procedure is also introduced for the Dahl model, based on the so-called backbone curve. The model is shown to capture well the complex shapes of the measured hysteresis loops at all amplitudes.

  15. Hysteresis Effects and Strain-Induced Homogeneity Effects in Base Metal Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Elliott, C. J.; Pearce, J. V.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.; Koval, M.; Machin, G.

    2015-03-01

    Thermocouples are used in a wide variety of industrial applications in which they play an important role for temperature control and monitoring. Wire inhomogeneity and hysteresis effects are major sources of uncertainty in thermocouple measurements. To efficiently mitigate these effects, it is first necessary to explore the impact of strain-induced inhomogeneities and hysteresis, and their contribution to the uncertainty. This article investigates homogeneity and hysteresis effects in Types N and K mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouples. Homogeneity of thermocouple wires is known to change when mechanical strain is experienced by the thermoelements. To test this influence, bends of increasingly small radii, typical in industrial applications, were made to a number of thermocouples with different sheath diameters. The change in homogeneity was determined through controlled immersion of the thermocouple into an isothermal liquid oil bath at and was found to be very small at for Type K thermocouples, with no measureable change in Type N thermocouples found. An experiment to determine the hysteresis effect in thermocouples was performed on swaged, MIMS Type N and Type K thermocouples, in the temperature range from to . The hysteresis measurements presented simulate the conditions that thermocouples may be exposed to in industrial applications through continuous cycling over 136 h. During this exposure, a characteristic drift from the reference function has been observed but no considerable difference between the heating and cooling measurements was measureable. The measured differences were within the measurement uncertainties; therefore, no hysteresis was observed.

  16. High-Precision Hysteresis Sensing of the Quartz Crystal Inductance-to-Frequency Converter

    PubMed Central

    Matko, Vojko; Milanović, Miro

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the automated measurement of the hysteresis of the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal is proposed. The new idea behind this method is a converter with two programmable analog switches enabling the automated measurement of the converter hysteresis, as well as the temperature compensation of the quartz crystal and any other circuit element. Also used is the programmable timing control device that allows the selection of different oscillating frequencies. In the proposed programmable method two different inductances connected in series to the quartz crystal are switched in a short time sequence, compensating the crystal’s natural temperature characteristics (in the temperature range between 0 and 50 °C). The procedure allows for the measurement of the converter hysteresis at various values of capacitance connected in parallel with the quartz crystal for the converter sensitivity setting at selected inductance. It, furthermore, enables the measurement of hysteresis at various values of inductance at selected parallel capacitance (sensitivity) connected to the quartz crystal. The article shows that the proposed hysteresis measurement of the converter, which converts the inductance in the range between 95 and 100 μH to a frequency in the range between 1 and 200 kHz, has only 7 × 10−13 frequency instability (during the temperature change between 0 and 50 °C) with a maximum 1 × 10−11 hysteresis frequency difference. PMID:27367688

  17. Solute concentration-dependent contact angle hysteresis and evaporation stains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-07-08

    The presence of nonvolatile solutes in a liquid drop on a solid surface can affect the wetting properties. Depending on the surface-activity of the solutes, the extent of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can vary with their concentration and the pattern of the evaporation stain is altered accordingly. In this work, four types of concentration-dependent CAH and evaporation stains are identified for a water drop containing polymeric additives on polycarbonate. For polymers without surface-activity such as dextran, advancing and receding contact angles (θa and θr) are independent of solute concentrations, and a concentrated stain is observed in the vicinity of the drop center after complete evaporation. For polymers with weak surface-activity such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), both θa and θr are decreased by solute addition, and the stain pattern varies with increasing PEG concentration, including a concentrated stain and a mountain-like island. For polymers with intermediate surface-activity such as sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS), θa descends slightly, but θr decreases significantly after the addition of a substantial amount of NaPSS, and a ring-like stain pattern is observed. Moreover, the size of the ring stain can be controlled by NaPSS concentration. For polymers with strong surface-activity such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), θa remains essentially a constant, but θr is significantly lowered after the addition of a small amount of PVP, and the typical ring-like stain is seen.

  18. On the hysteresis of argon adsorption in a uniform closed end slit pore.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2013-09-01

    We present a molecular simulation study of adsorption and desorption in slit mesopores of uniform width with one end closed and explore the effects of pore dimensions (width and length), temperature and surface affinity on the hysteresis loop: its position, lower and upper closure points, area and shape. Our results show that the metastability, brought about by structural change in the adsorbate, is the reason for the existence of hysteresis, and contrast with reports suggesting that reversibility invariably prevails for adsorption in closed end pores. The shape, area and position of the hysteresis loop are complex functions of pore width, length and temperature. We establish a parametric map of the boundary separating reversible and hysteretic regions. Our simulation results also show a number of interesting observations that have not been previously reported or generally recognised: (1) the fluid within the core of the pore behaves like a bulk liquid as the pore is progressively filled, via the movement of the meniscus from the closed end to the pore mouth, but as the pore fills, the fluid in the core becomes structured, (2) the shape of the meniscus changes as adsorption progresses but is constant during desorption because of the constant thickness of the adsorbed layer in the two-phase region, (3) the hysteresis loop is larger for a longer pore, (4) the area of the hysteresis loop increases with pore width up to a certain width, beyond which it decreases and finally disappears, (5) as temperature approaches the critical hysteresis temperature, the hysteresis loop area decreases, but it retains its Type H1 character.

  19. The hysteresis response of soil respiration and soil CO2 concentration to soil temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q., Sr.; Katul, G. G.; Oren, R.; Daly, E.; Manzoni, S.; Yang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Diurnal hysteresis between soil temperature (Ts) and both CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and soil respiration rate (Rs) were reported across different field experiments. However, the causes of these hysteresis patterns remain a subject of debate, with biotic and abiotic factors both invoked as explanations. To address these issues, a CO2 gas transport model is developed by combining layer-wise mass conservation for subsurface gas-phase CO2, Fickian diffusion for gas transfer, and a CO2 source term that depends on soil temperature, moisture, and photosynthetic rate. Using this model, a hierarchy of numerical experiments were employed to disentangle the causes of the hysteretic [CO2]-Ts and CO2 flux-Ts (i.e., F -Ts) relations. Model results show that gas transport alone can introduce both [CO2]-Ts and F-Ts hysteresis, and also confirm prior findings that heat flow in soils lead to [CO2] and F(z) being out of phase with Ts, thereby providing another reason for the occurrence of both hysteresis. The area (Ahys) of the [CO2]-Ts hysteresis near the surface increases, while the Ahys of the Rs-Ts hysteresis decreases as soils become wetter. Moreover, a time-lagged carbon input from photosynthesis deformed the [CO2]-Ts and Rs-Ts patterns, causing a change in the loop direction from counterclockwise to clockwise with decreasing time lag. An asymmetric 8-shaped pattern emerged as the transition state between the two loop directions. Tracing the pattern and direction of the hysteretic [CO2]-Ts and Rs-Ts relations can provide new ways to fingerprint the effects of photosynthesis stimulation on soil microbial activity and detect the corresponding time lags. Key words: Hysteresis; Photosynthesis; Soil CO2 concentration; Soil respiration; Soil temperature; Soil moisture

  20. Power laws in the dynamic hysteresis of quantum nonlinear photonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteels, W.; Storme, F.; Le Boité, A.; Ciuti, C.

    2016-03-01

    We explore theoretically the physics of dynamic hysteresis for driven-dissipative nonlinear photonic resonators. In the regime where the semiclassical mean-field theory predicts bistability, the exact steady-state density matrix is known to be unique, being a statistical mixture of two states; in particular, no static hysteresis cycle of the excited population occurs as a function of the driving intensity. Here, we predict that in the quantum regime a dynamic hysteresis with a rich phenomenology does appear when sweeping the driving amplitude in a finite time. The hysteresis area as a function of the sweep time reveals a double power-law decay, with a behavior qualitatively different from the mean-field predictions. The dynamic hysteresis power-law in the slow sweep limit defines a characteristic time, which depends dramatically on the size of the nonlinearity and on the frequency detuning between the driving and the resonator. In the strong nonlinearity regime, the characteristic time oscillates as a function of the intrinsic system parameters due to multiphotonic resonances. We show that the dynamic hysteresis for the considered class of driven-dissipative systems is due to a nonadiabatic response region with connections to the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for quenched phase transitions. We also consider the case of two coupled driven-dissipative nonlinear resonators, showing that dynamic hysteresis and power-law behavior occur also in the presence of correlations between resonators. Our theoretical predictions can be explored in a broad variety of physical systems, e.g., circuit QED superconducting resonators and semiconductor optical microcavities.

  1. Climate Hysteresis for Planets Orbiting Stars of Different Spectral Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, V.; Bitz, C.; Pierrehumbert, R.; Joshi, M.; Robinson, T.; Planetary Laboratory, Virtual

    2013-10-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. We have explored this effect with a hierarchy of models. Results from both one-dimensional (1-D) radiative transfer and energy balance models and a three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model indicate that terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent is much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G- or M-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Earth). The surface ice-albedo feedback effect becomes less important at the outer edge of the habitable zone for main-sequence stars, where the maintenance of surface liquid water requires high atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We show that ˜3-10 bar of CO2 will entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow, leaving the outer limits of the habitable zone unaffected by the spectral dependence of water ice and snow albedo. However, less CO2 is needed to maintain open water for a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star than would be the case for hotter main-sequence stars. Both entrance into and exit out of a snowball state are sensitive to host star spectral energy distribution. Our simulations indicate a smaller climate hysteresis on M-dwarf planets, as measured by the range of instellation that permits multiple stable ice line latitudes. While M-dwarf planets appear less susceptible to snowball episodes than G- or F-dwarf planets over the course of their evolution, any snowball planets that are found orbiting M-dwarf stars may more easily melt out of these states as stellar luminosity increases over time. This effect is due to the lower-albedo ice on M-dwarf planets which, compounded with near-IR absorption by atmospheric gases, reduces the amount of increased stellar insolation, or

  2. Interactive effect of hysteresis and surface chemistry on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Paska, Yair; Haick, Hossam

    2012-05-01

    Gated silicon nanowire gas sensors have emerged as promising devices for chemical and biological sensing applications. Nevertheless, the performance of these devices is usually accompanied by a "hysteresis" phenomenon that limits their performance under real-world conditions. In this paper, we use a series of systematically changed trichlorosilane-based organic monolayers to study the interactive effect of hysteresis and surface chemistry on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors. The results show that the density of the exposed or unpassivated Si-OH groups (trap states) on the silicon nanowire surface play by far a crucial effect on the hysteresis characteristics of the gated silicon nanowire sensors, relative to the effect of hydrophobicity or molecular density of the organic monolayer. Based on these findings, we provide a tentative model-based understanding of (i) the relation between the adsorbed organic molecules, the hysteresis, and the related fundamental parameters of gated silicon nanowire characteristics and of (ii) the relation between the hysteresis drift and possible screening effect on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors upon exposure to different analytes at real-world conditions. The findings reported in this paper could be considered as a launching pad for extending the use of the gated silicon nanowire gas sensors for discriminations between polar and nonpolar analytes in complex, real-world gas mixtures.

  3. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  4. Comparison of contact angle hysteresis of different probe liquids on the same solid surface.

    PubMed

    Chibowski, Emil; Jurak, Malgorzata

    2013-02-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide and diiodomethane were measured on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) layers deposited on three different solid supports-glass, mica and poly(methyl methacrylate). Up to five statistical monolayers were deposited on the surfaces by spreading DPPC solution. It was found that even on five statistical DPPC monolayers, the hysteresis of a given liquid depends on the kind of solid support. Also on the same solid support the contact angle hysteresis is different for each probe liquid used. The AFM images show that the heights of roughness of the DPPC films cannot be the primary cause of the observed hysteresis because the heights are too small to cause the observed hystereses. It is believed that the hysteresis is due to the liquid film present right behind the three-phase solid surface/liquid drop/gas (vapour) contact line and the presence of Derjaguin pressure. The value of contact angle hysteresis depends on both the solid surface and liquid properties as well as on intermolecular interactions between them.

  5. Material Data Representation of Hysteresis Loops for Hastelloy X Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, Javed; Berke, Laszlo; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN) model proposed by Rumelhart, Hinton, and Williams is applied to develop a functional approximation of material data in the form of hysteresis loops from a nickel-base superalloy, Hastelloy X. Several different ANN configurations are used to model hysteresis loops at different cycles for this alloy. The ANN models were successful in reproducing the hysteresis loops used for its training. However, because of sharp bends at the two ends of hysteresis loops, a drift occurs at the corners of the loops where loading changes to unloading and vice versa (the sharp bends occurred when the stress-strain curves were reproduced by adding stress increments to the preceding values of the stresses). Therefore, it is possible only to reproduce half of the loading path. The generalization capability of the network was tested by using additional data for two other hysteresis loops at different cycles. The results were in good agreement. Also, the use of ANN led to a data compression ratio of approximately 22:1.

  6. A Review of the Phenomenon of Hysteresis in the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis.

    PubMed

    Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a phase of prolonged suppression of TSH despite normalization of serum thyroid hormones over a variable period of time during the recovery of thyrotoxicosis has been documented in literature. Conversely, a temporary elevation of TSH despite attainment of euthyroid levels of serum thyroid hormones following extreme hypothyroidism has also been observed. This rate-independent lag time in TSH recovery is an evidence of a "persistent memory" of the history of dysthyroid states the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis has encountered after the thyroid hormone perturbations have faded out, a phenomenon termed "hysteresis." Notwithstanding its perplexing nature, hysteresis impacts upon the interpretation of thyroid function tests with sufficient regularity that clinicians risk misdiagnosing and implementing erroneous treatment out of ignorance of this aspect of thyrotropic biology. Mathematical modeling of this phenomenon is complicated but may allow the euthyroid set point to be predicted from thyroid function data exhibiting strong hysteresis effects. Such model predictions are potentially useful for clinical management. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating hysteresis remain elusive, epigenetics, such as histone modifications, are probably involved. However, attempts to reverse the process to hasten the resolution of the hysteretic process may not necessarily translate into improved physiology or optimal health benefits. This is not unexpected from teleological considerations, since hysteresis probably represents an adaptive endocrinological response with survival advantages evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates with a HPT system.

  7. Unzipping DNA by a periodic force: hysteresis loop area and its scaling.

    PubMed

    Kapri, Rajeev

    2014-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the hysteresis in the unzipping of double-stranded DNA whose ends are subjected to a time-dependent periodic force with frequency (ω) and amplitude (G). For the static force, i.e., ω→0, the DNA is in equilibrium with no hysteresis. On increasing ω, the area of the hysteresis loop initially increases and becomes maximum at frequency ω*(G), which depends on the force amplitude G. If the frequency is increased further, we find that for lower amplitudes the loop area decreases monotonically to zero, but for higher amplitudes it has an oscillatory component. The height of subsequent peaks decreases, and finally the loop area becomes zero at very high frequencies. The number of peaks depends on the length of the DNA. We give a simple analysis to estimate the frequencies at which maxima and minima occur in the loop area. We find that the area of the hysteresis loop scales as 1/ω in the high-frequency regime, whereas it scales as G(α)ω(β) with exponents α=1 and β=5/4 at low frequencies. The values of the exponents α and β are different from the exponents reported earlier based on the hysteresis of small hairpins.

  8. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  9. Compaction properties of powders: the relationship between compression cycle hysteresis areas and maximally applied punch pressures.

    PubMed

    Khossravi, D

    1999-08-01

    The consolidation behaviors of various pharmaceutical solids were characterized by investigating the relationship between the calculated hysteresis areas and the maximally applied punch pressures. An Instron universal testing apparatus and an instrumented die were used to generate compression cycle profiles at various maximally applied punch pressures for the materials studied. Based on the profiles obtained, hysteresis areas were calculated for the materials studied as a function of maximally applied punch pressures. Furthermore, model profiles describing the plastic and brittle fracture processes were utilized to derive mathematical relationships between the calculated hysteresis cycle areas and the maximally applied punch pressures. The mathematical relationships derived indicate that a linear relationship between hysteresis areas and maximally applied punch pressures exists for plastic materials, whereas for brittle materials the hysteresis areas are related to the square of the maximally applied punch pressures. Experimental data obtained support the mathematical relationships derived. The goodness of fit to the models derived is used to rank order the consolidation mechanism of various drugs and pharmaceutical excipients.

  10. Sorption-desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene--effect of nanopores, solute concentration, and salinity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenling; Sun, Hongwen

    2010-11-01

    Phenanthrene sorption and desorption from sediment/soil in fresh and saline water were measured, and effects of nanopores, solute concentration, and salinity on sorption-desorption hysteresis were discussed. The extent and kinetics of sorption-desorption hysteresis depend much on the pore distribution of the sorbents, and greater but slower-developed hysteresis occurred on the sorbent with higher specific surface area and more nanopores. In saline water, phenanthrene sorption was enhanced as compared to freshwater, with logKF increasing from 2.84 and 3.08 to 2.96 and 3.33 for the two sorbents, respectively; however, the sorption-desorption hysteresis was weakened, as indicated by the lower hysteresis index in saline water as compared to those in freshwater. In successive desorption, the irreversible sorbed amount of phenanthrene increased with increasing phenanthrene concentration until a maximum (Qmaxirr) was achieved, and the subsequent sorption became reversible. In saline water, Qmaxirr is much lower (10 mg kg(-1)) as compared to freshwater (36 mg kg(-1)), and phenanthrene sorption was almost reversible, especially at high concentrations. N2 sorption illustrated that soil organic matter had changed to a more condensed conformation in saline water, as indicted by the reduced surface area (from 9.6 to 7.3 m2 g(-1)), which is unfavorable for irreversible sorption.

  11. Hysteresis model and statistical interpretation of energy losses in non-oriented steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mănescu (Păltânea), Veronica; Păltânea, Gheorghe; Gavrilă, Horia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the hysteresis energy losses in two non-oriented industrial steels (M400-65A and M800-65A) were determined, by means of an efficient classical Preisach model, which is based on the Pescetti-Biorci method for the identification of the Preisach density. The excess and the total energy losses were also determined, using a statistical framework, based on magnetic object theory. The hysteresis energy losses, in a non-oriented steel alloy, depend on the peak magnetic polarization and they can be computed using a Preisach model, due to the fact that in these materials there is a direct link between the elementary rectangular loops and the discontinuous character of the magnetization process (Barkhausen jumps). To determine the Preisach density it was necessary to measure the normal magnetization curve and the saturation hysteresis cycle. A system of equations was deduced and the Preisach density was calculated for a magnetic polarization of 1.5 T; then the hysteresis cycle was reconstructed. Using the same pattern for the Preisach distribution, it was computed the hysteresis cycle for 1 T. The classical losses were calculated using a well known formula and the excess energy losses were determined by means of the magnetic object theory. The total energy losses were mathematically reconstructed and compared with those, measured experimentally.

  12. Hysteresis loop behaviors of ferroelectric thin films: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Bedoya-Hincapié, C.; H. Ortiz-Álvarez, H.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; J. Olaya-Flórez, J.; E. Alfonso, J.

    2015-11-01

    The ferroelectric response of bismuth titanate Bi4Ti3O12 (BIT) thin film is studied through a Monte Carlo simulation of hysteresis loops. The ferroelectric system is described by using a Diffour Hamiltonian with three terms: the electric field applied in the z direction, the nearest dipole-dipole interaction in the transversal (x-y) direction, and the nearest dipole-dipole interaction in the direction perpendicular to the thin film (the z axis). In the sample construction, we take into consideration the dipole orientations of the monoclinic and orthorhombic structures that can appear in BIT at low temperature in the ferroelectric state. The effects of temperature, stress, and the concentration of pinned dipole defects are assessed by using the hysteresis loops. The results indicate the changes in the hysteresis area with temperature and stress, and the asymmetric hysteresis loops exhibit evidence of the imprint failure mechanism with the emergence of pinned dipolar defects. The simulated shift in the hysteresis loops conforms to the experimental ferroelectric response. Project sponsored by the research departments of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia DIMA and DIB under Project 201010018227-“Crecimiento y caracterización eléctrica y estructural de películas delgadas de BixTiyOz producidas mediante Magnetrón Sputtering” and Project 12920-“Desarrollo teóricoexperimental de nanoestructuras basadas en Bismuto y materiales similares” and “Bisnano Project.”

  13. A Review of the Phenomenon of Hysteresis in the Hypothalamus–Pituitary–Thyroid Axis

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a phase of prolonged suppression of TSH despite normalization of serum thyroid hormones over a variable period of time during the recovery of thyrotoxicosis has been documented in literature. Conversely, a temporary elevation of TSH despite attainment of euthyroid levels of serum thyroid hormones following extreme hypothyroidism has also been observed. This rate-independent lag time in TSH recovery is an evidence of a “persistent memory” of the history of dysthyroid states the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis has encountered after the thyroid hormone perturbations have faded out, a phenomenon termed “hysteresis.” Notwithstanding its perplexing nature, hysteresis impacts upon the interpretation of thyroid function tests with sufficient regularity that clinicians risk misdiagnosing and implementing erroneous treatment out of ignorance of this aspect of thyrotropic biology. Mathematical modeling of this phenomenon is complicated but may allow the euthyroid set point to be predicted from thyroid function data exhibiting strong hysteresis effects. Such model predictions are potentially useful for clinical management. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating hysteresis remain elusive, epigenetics, such as histone modifications, are probably involved. However, attempts to reverse the process to hasten the resolution of the hysteretic process may not necessarily translate into improved physiology or optimal health benefits. This is not unexpected from teleological considerations, since hysteresis probably represents an adaptive endocrinological response with survival advantages evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates with a HPT system. PMID:27379016

  14. Direct hysteresis measurements on ferroelectret films by means of a modified Sawyer-Tower circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xunlin; Holländer, Lars; Wirges, Werner; Gerhard, Reimund; Cury Basso, Heitor

    2013-06-01

    Ferro- and piezo-electrets are non-polar polymer foams or film systems with internally charged cavities. Since their invention more than two decades ago, ferroelectrets have become a welcome addition to the range of piezo-, pyro-, and ferro-electric materials available for device applications. A polarization-versus-electric-field hysteresis is an essential feature of a ferroelectric material and may also be used for determining some of its main properties. Here, a modified Sawyer-Tower circuit and a combination of unipolar and bipolar voltage waveforms are employed to record hysteresis curves on cellular-foam polypropylene ferroelectret films and on tubular-channel fluoroethylenepropylene copolymer ferroelectret film systems. Internal dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are required for depositing the internal charges in ferroelectrets. The true amount of charge transferred during the internal DBDs is obtained from voltage measurements on a standard capacitor connected in series with the sample, but with a much larger capacitance than the sample. Another standard capacitor with a much smaller capacitance—which is, however, still considerably larger than the sample capacitance—is also connected in series as a high-voltage divider protecting the electrometer against destructive breakdown. It is shown how the DBDs inside the polymer cavities lead to phenomenological hysteresis curves that cannot be distinguished from the hysteresis loops found on other ferroic materials. The physical mechanisms behind the hysteresis behavior are described and discussed.

  15. Conditions necessary for capillary hysteresis in porous media: Tests of grain-size and surface tension influences

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-03-12

    Hysteresis in the relation between water saturation and matric potential is generally regarded as a basic aspect of unsaturated porous media. However, the nature of an upper length scale limit for saturation hysteresis has not been previously addressed. Since hysteresis depends on whether or not capillary rise occurs at the grain scale, this criterion was used to predict required combinations of grain size, surface tension, fluid-fluid density differences, and acceleration in monodisperse systems. The Haines number (Ha), composed of the aforementioned variables, is proposed as a dimensionless number useful for separating hysteretic (Ha < 15) versus nonhysteretic (Ha > 15) behavior. Vanishing of hysteresis was predicted to occur for grain sizes greater than 10.4 +- 0.5 mm, for water-air systems under the acceleration of ordinary gravity, based on Miller-Miller scaling and Haines' original model for hysteresis. Disappearance of hysteresis was tested through measurements of drainage and wetting curves of sands and gravels and occurs between grain sizes of 10 and 14 mm (standard conditions). The influence of surface tension was tested through measurements of moisture retention in 7 mm gravel, without and with a surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS)). The ordinary water system (Ha = 7) exhibited hysteresis, while the SDBS system (Ha = 18) did not. The experiments completed in this study indicate that hysteresis in moisture retention relations has an upper limit at Ha = 16 +- 2 and show that hysteresis is not a fundamental feature of unsaturated porous media.

  16. A two-state hysteresis model from high-dimensional friction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    In prior work (Biswas & Chatterjee 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A 470, 20130817 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0817)), we developed a six-state hysteresis model from a high-dimensional frictional system. Here, we use a more intuitively appealing frictional system that resembles one studied earlier by Iwan. The basis functions now have simple analytical description. The number of states required decreases further, from six to the theoretical minimum of two. The number of fitted parameters is reduced by an order of magnitude, to just six. An explicit and faster numerical solution method is developed. Parameter fitting to match different specified hysteresis loops is demonstrated. In summary, a new two-state model of hysteresis is presented that is ready for practical implementation. Essential Matlab code is provided. PMID:26587279

  17. Hysteresis in the anomalous Hall effect of MnAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Felix T.; Stintz, Andreas; El-Emawy, Abdel-Rahman A.; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2008-03-01

    We report detailed measurements of the Hall effect in MBE-grown MnAs thin films on (001)-GaAs as a function of temperature. Hysteresis of the Hall resistivity is observed for temperatures between 300 and 355 K. Non-linear behavior of the Hall resistivity persists up to 390 K. The appearance of hysteresis at low temperatures can be explained by the emergence of stable, out-of-plane domains due to the shape anisotropy of the contracting α-phase. However, the persistence of the hysteresis and the anomalous Hall effect at temperatures significantly above 318 K is not consistent with the complete transformation of the α-phase and introduces new questions about the magnetic properties of the β-phase.

  18. Contact angle hysteresis on polymer substrates established with various experimental techniques, its interpretation, and quantitative characterization.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Musin, Albina; Jager, Rachel; Barkay, Zahava

    2008-04-15

    The effect of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) was studied on various polymer substrates with traditional and new experimental techniques. The new experimental technique presented in the article is based on the slow deformation of the droplet, thus CAH is studied under the constant volume of the drop in contrast to existing techniques when the volume of the drop is changed under the measurement. The energy of hysteresis was calculated in the framework of the improved Extrand approach. The advancing contact angle established with a new technique is in a good agreement with that measured with the needle-syringe method. The receding angles measured with three experimental techniques demonstrated a very significant discrepancy. The force pinning the triple line responsible for hysteresis was calculated.

  19. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as `weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  20. Diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillating force.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer

    2014-06-17

    We suggest a simple quantitative model for the diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillatory force invoked by thermal fluctuations, substrate vibrations, acoustic waves, or oscillating electric fields. Employing force balance rather than the usual description of contact angle hysteresis in terms of Gibbs energy, we highlight that a wetting system, such as a sessile drop or a bubble adhered to a solid substrate, appears at long times to be partially or fully independent of contact angle hysteresis and thus independent of static friction forces, as a result of contact line pinning. We verify this theory by studying several well-known experimental observations such as the approach of an arbitrary contact angle toward the Young contact angle and the apparent decrease (or increase) in an advancing (or a receding) contact angle under the influence of an external oscillating force.

  1. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces.

    PubMed

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-12-21

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as 'weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  2. Modulating contact angle hysteresis to direct fluid droplets along a homogenous surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mingxiang; Gupta, Rohini; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-02-01

    The shape and motion of drops on surfaces is governed by the balance between the driving and the pinning forces. Here we demonstrate control over the motion of droplets on an inclined surface by exerting control over the contact angle hysteresis. The external modulation of contact angle hysteresis is achieved through a voltage-induced local molecular reorganization within the surface film at the solid-liquid interface. We show that tuning contact angle hysteresis alone is sufficient to direct and deform drops when subjected to a constant external driving force, here gravity, in the absence of a pre-defined surface energy gradient or pattern. We also show that the observed stretching and contraction of the drops mimic the motion of an inchworm. Such reversible manipulation of the pinning forces could be an attractive means to direct drops, especially with the dominance of surface forces at micro-/nanoscale.

  3. Relationship between Wetting Hysteresis and Contact Time of a Bouncing Droplet on Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yizhou; Tao, Jie; Tao, Haijun; Chen, Shanlong; Pan, Lei; Wang, Tao

    2015-09-23

    The contact time of impacting water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces directly reflects the extent of thermal and energy conversions between the water droplet and the surface, which is also considered to be crucial to the practical applications. The purpose of this study was to reveal the relationship between the contact time and the wetting hysteresis. We designed and fabricated six classes of surfaces with different extent of hydrophobicity through modifying the microscale/nanoscale hierarchical textured titanium surfaces with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane, and we filmed the contact process of the water droplet impacting on these surfaces using a high-speed camera. It can be concluded that wetting hysteresis played a significant role in determining how long the impacting water droplet can bounce off the surface, based on the interfacial wetting mechanism and the work done against the resistance force generated by contact angle hysteresis during the dynamic process.

  4. Microscopic Charge Transport and Recombination Processes behind the Photoelectric Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiangjian; Zhang, Huiyin; Xu, Xin; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo

    2016-10-01

    The microscopic charge transport and recombination processes behind the widely concerned photoelectric hysteresis in the perovskite solar cell have been investigated with both in situ transient photovoltage/photocurrent measurements and the semiconductor device simulation. Time-dependent behaviors of intensity and direction of the photocurrent and photovoltage are observed under the steady-state bias voltages and open-circuit conditions. These charge processes reveal the electric properties of the cell, demonstrating evolutions of both strength and direction of the internal electric field during the hysteresis. Further calculation indicates that this behavior is mainly attributed to both the interfacial doping and defect effects induced by the ion accumulation, which may be the origins for the general hysteresis in this cell.

  5. A two-state hysteresis model from high-dimensional friction.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2015-07-01

    In prior work (Biswas & Chatterjee 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A 470, 20130817 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0817)), we developed a six-state hysteresis model from a high-dimensional frictional system. Here, we use a more intuitively appealing frictional system that resembles one studied earlier by Iwan. The basis functions now have simple analytical description. The number of states required decreases further, from six to the theoretical minimum of two. The number of fitted parameters is reduced by an order of magnitude, to just six. An explicit and faster numerical solution method is developed. Parameter fitting to match different specified hysteresis loops is demonstrated. In summary, a new two-state model of hysteresis is presented that is ready for practical implementation. Essential Matlab code is provided.

  6. Study of the fast photoswitching of spin crossover nanoparticles outside and inside their thermal hysteresis loop

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, G.; Degert, J.; Freysz, E.; Etrillard, C.; Letard, J.-F.; Guillaume, F.

    2013-02-11

    We have studied the low spin to high spin phase transition induced by nanosecond laser pulses outside and within the thermal hysteresis loop of the [Fe(Htrz){sub 2} trz](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spin crossover nanoparticles. We demonstrate that, whatever the temperature of the compound, the photo-switching is achieved in less than 12.5 ns. Outside the hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains up to 100 {mu}s and then relaxes. Within the thermal hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains as long as the temperature of the sample is kept within the thermal loop. A Raman study indicates that the photo-switching can be completed using single laser pulse excitation.

  7. A Model for Rate-Dependent Hysteresis in Piezoceramic Materials Operating at Low Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wieman, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of certain rate-dependent mechanisms which contribute to hysteresis inherent to piezoelectric materials operating at low frequencies. While quasistatic models are suitable for initial material characterization in some applications, the reduction in coercive field and polarization values which occur as frequencies increase must be accommodated to achieve the full capabilities of the materials. The model employed here quantifies the hysteresis in two steps. In the first, anhysteretic polarization switching is modeled through the application of Boltzmann principles to balance the electrostatic and thermal energy. Hysteresis is then incorporated through the quantification of energy required to translate and bend domain walls pinned at inclusions inherent to the materials. The performance of the model is illustrated through a fit to low frequency data (0.1 Hz - 1 Hz) from a PZT5A wafer.

  8. Combinatorial search of thermoelastic shape-memory alloys with extremely small hysteresis width.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Chu, Yong S; Famodu, Olugbenga O; Furuya, Yasubumi; Hattrick-Simpers, Jae; James, Richard D; Ludwig, Alfred; Thienhaus, Sigurd; Wuttig, Manfred; Zhang, Zhiyong; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2006-04-01

    Reversibility of structural phase transformations has profound technological implications in a wide range of applications from fatigue life in shape-memory alloys (SMAs) to magnetism in multiferroic oxides. The geometric nonlinear theory of martensite universally applicable to all structural transitions has been developed. It predicts the reversibility of the transitions as manifested in the hysteresis behaviour based solely on crystal symmetry and geometric compatibilities between phases. In this article, we report on the verification of the theory using the high-throughput approach. The thin-film composition-spread technique was devised to rapidly map the lattice parameters and the thermal hysteresis of ternary alloy systems. A clear relationship between the hysteresis and the middle eigenvalue of the transformation stretch tensor as predicted by the theory was observed for the first time. We have also identified a new composition region of titanium-rich SMAs with potential for improved control of SMA properties.

  9. Magnetostrictive and Kinematic Model Considering the Dynamic Hysteresis and Energy Loss for GMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Huifang; SUN, Xingwei; GAO, Yifei; WANG, Hanyu; GAO, Zijin

    2017-03-01

    Due to the influence of magnetic hysteresis and energy loss inherent in giant magnetostrictive materials (GMM), output displacement accuracy of giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) can not meet the precision and ultra precision machining. Using a GMM rod as the core driving element, a GMA which may be used in the field of precision and ultra precision drive engineering is designed through modular design method. Based on the Armstrong theory and elastic Gibbs free energy theory, a nonlinear magnetostriction model which considers magnetic hysteresis and energy loss characteristics is established. Moreover, the mechanical system differential equation model for GMA is established by utilizing D'Alembert's principle. Experimental results show that the model can preferably predict magnetization property, magnetic potential orientation, energy loss for GMM. It is also able to describe magnetostrictive elongation and output displacement of GMA. Research results will provide a theoretical basis for solving the dynamic magnetic hysteresis, energy loss and working precision for GMA fundamentally.

  10. Magnetic hysteresis, compensation behaviors, and phase diagrams of bilayer honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersin, Kantar

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic behaviors of the Ising system with bilayer honeycomb lattice (BHL) structure are studied by using the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations. The effects of the interaction parameters on the magnetic properties of the system such as the hysteresis and compensation behaviors as well as phase diagrams are investigated. Moreover, when the hysteresis behaviors of the system are examined, single and double hysteresis loops are observed for various values of the interaction parameters. We obtain the L-, Q-, P-, and S-type compensation behaviors in the system. We also observe that the phase diagrams only exhibit the second-order phase transition. Hence, the system does not show the tricritical point (TCP).

  11. Surface Polarization Model for the Dynamic Hysteresis of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Sandheep; Almora, Osbel; Echeverría-Arrondo, Carlos; Ghahremanirad, Elnaz; Aranda, Clara; Guerrero, Antonio; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Zaban, Arie; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Bisquert, Juan

    2017-02-10

    The dynamic hysteresis of perovskite solar cells consists of the occurrence of significant deviations of the current density-voltage curve shapes depending on the specific conditions of measurement such as starting voltage, waiting time, scan rate, and other factors. Dynamic hysteresis is a serious impediment to stabilized and reliable measurement and operation of the perovskite solar cells. In this Letter, we formulate a model for the dynamic hysteresis based on the idea that the cell accumulates a huge quantity of surface electronic charge at forward bias that is released on voltage sweeping, causing extra current over the normal response. The charge shows a retarded dynamics due to the slow relaxation of the accompanying ionic charge, that produces variable shapes depending on scan rate or poling value and time. We show that the quantitative model provides a consistent description of experimental results and allows us to determine significant parameters of the perovskite solar cell for both the transient and steady-state performance.

  12. Scaling Behavior of Barkhausen Avalanches along the Hysteresis loop in Nucleation-Mediated Magnetization Reversal Process

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, D.-H.; Shin, S.-C.

    2008-10-14

    We report the scaling behavior of Barkhausen avalanches for every small field step along the hysteresis loop in CoCrPt alloy film having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Individual Barkhausen avalanche is directly observed utilizing a high-resolution soft X-ray microscopy that provides real space images with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. Barkhausen avalanches are found to exhibit power-law scaling behavior at all field steps along the hysteresis loop, despite their different patterns for each field step. Surprisingly, the scaling exponent of the power-law distribution of Barkhausen avalanches is abruptly altered from 1 {+-} 0.04 to 1.47 {+-} 0.03 as the field step is close to the coercive field. The contribution of coupling among adjacent domains to Barkhausen avalanche process affects the sudden change of the scaling behavior observed at the coercivity-field region on the hysteresis loop of CoCrPt alloy film.

  13. A Ni-Cd battery model considering state of charge and hysteresis effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Plaza, M.; Serrano-Jiménez, D.; Eloy-García Carrasco, J.; Alonso-Martínez, J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces an electrical battery model. Based on a Thévenin circuit with two RC parallel branches, it includes an ampère-hour counting method to estimate the state of charge (SOC) and a novel model for the hysteresis. The presented model can consider variations in its parameters under changes in all of its internal and external variables, although only SOC and hysteresis are considered. Hysteresis consideration does not only allow distinguishing the parameters during charging and discharging, but also during transients between them. The model was designed to be capable of being implemented in online and offline systems. Finally the proposed model was validated for a single Ni-Cd cell, characterized by current interruption method, in an offline system. The validation was also extended to a stack of 210 cells of the same technology.

  14. Stroke maximizing and high efficient hysteresis hybrid modeling for a rhombic piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shubao; Xu, Minglong; Zhang, Shuwen; Xie, Shilin

    2016-06-01

    Rhombic piezoelectric actuator (RPA), which employs a rhombic mechanism to amplify the small stroke of PZT stack, has been widely used in many micro-positioning machineries due to its remarkable properties such as high displacement resolution and compact structure. In order to achieve large actuation range along with high accuracy, the stroke maximizing and compensation for the hysteresis are two concerns in the use of RPA. However, existing maximization methods based on theoretical model can hardly accurately predict the maximum stroke of RPA because of approximation errors that are caused by the simplifications that must be made in the analysis. Moreover, despite the high hysteresis modeling accuracy of Preisach model, its modeling procedure is trivial and time-consuming since a large set of experimental data is required to determine the model parameters. In our research, to improve the accuracy of theoretical model of RPA, the approximation theory is employed in which the approximation errors can be compensated by two dimensionless coefficients. To simplify the hysteresis modeling procedure, a hybrid modeling method is proposed in which the parameters of Preisach model can be identified from only a small set of experimental data by using the combination of discrete Preisach model (DPM) with particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed novel hybrid modeling method can not only model the hysteresis with considerable accuracy but also significantly simplified the modeling procedure. Finally, the inversion of hysteresis is introduced to compensate for the hysteresis non-linearity of RPA, and consequently a pseudo-linear system can be obtained.

  15. Hysteresis effects in suspended sediment concentration of an allogenic river channel in a very arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guo-An; Disse, Markus; Yu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment dynamics of the Tarim River, an allogenic and perennial river flowing in a very arid environment in China, are analyzed to examine the hysteresis effects based on data of flow discharge (Q) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from two hydrologic gauging stations in the river in the last five decades (1960-2011). Strong hysteresis effects existed in the sediment rating curves of the Tarim River. Under similar flow conditions, the first flood event in a year quite often causes higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC value), and form a rating curve visibly different from later flood processes. The successive flood events often form rating curves gradually from left to right progressively with time on the SSC-Q plot, indicating that higher flow intensity is needed for later flood events to reach the same SSC value of the earlier flood events. Three hysteresis loop forms, i.e., clockwise, anti-clockwise and Figure-eight existed with occurrence frequency of 57%, 27.3% and 15.6% respectively, showing that clockwise loop is the major hysteresis form and sediment load is generally derived from the channel bed. The very weak banks due to composition of quite homogeneous noncohesive particles (fine sand, silt and almost no clay content) often induce bank failure, which complicates suspended sediment dynamics and causes to shape different hysteresis loops. Somehow random but occurrence of bank collapse with higher possibility near the peak and at the falling limb of a flood hydrograph is probably the major reason causing anti-clockwise and figure-eight hysteresis loops.

  16. Hysteresis and the length dependence of calcium sensitivity in chemically skinned rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, S M; Lamont, C; Miller, D J

    1988-01-01

    1. The relationship between pCa (-log10[Ca2+]) and steady-state isometric tension has been investigated in saponin- or Triton-treated (chemically 'skinned') cardiac muscle of rat. 2. Hysteresis exists in the relationship such that the muscle is less sensitive to Ca2+ during increasing activation (as [Ca2+] is stepped upward) than during reducing activation (as [Ca2+] is stepped downward). 3. The extent of the hysteresis is insensitive to interventions that increase overall calcium sensitivity by chemical means, such as caffeine, carnosine or increased pH. 4. The extent of the hysteresis is sensitive to sarcomere length. The phenomenon is virtually absent above sarcomere lengths of about 2.2-2.3 microns but becomes progressively greater at shorter sarcomere lengths. 5. The effect of sarcomere length on calcium sensitivity is restricted to the upward-going (increasing activation) part of the pCa-tension loop below 2.2 microns. The downward-going (decreasing activation) part of the hysteretic relationship is virtually unaffected by sarcomere length up to 2.2 microns. 6. Significant alterations in sarcomere length do not occur during tension development in the experiments described here: the phenomenon is not attributable to experimental artifacts of this kind. 7. Hysteresis develops sufficiently rapidly to be consistent with a physiological relevance during the normal heart beat. 8. The effects of sarcomere length show that the phenomenon is not due to force per se since, for example, greater peak force produces less hysteresis as sarcomere length is increased towards 2.2 microns. 9. Tonicity increase (by high-molecular-weight dextran), which shrinks the myofilament lattice, increases calcium sensitivity but reduces the effect of sarcomere length on calcium sensitivity. 10. The results suggest that lattice shrinkage is the mechanism which accounts for hysteresis in, and the sarcomere length dependence of, calcium sensitivity in cardiac muscle. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 11

  17. Influence of hysteresis on groundwater wave dynamics in an unconfined aquifer with a sloping boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Jazayeri; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre; Nielsen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of hysteresis on water table dynamics in an unconfined aquifer was examined using a numerical model to solve Richards' unsaturated flow equation. The model was subject to simple harmonic forcing across a sloping boundary with a seepage face boundary condition. Time series from both hysteretic and non-hysteretic models were subject to harmonic analysis to extract the amplitude and phase profiles for comparison with existing sand flume data (Cartwright et al., 2004). The results from both model types show good agreement with the data indicating no influence of hysteresis at the oscillation period examined (T = 348 s). The models were then used to perform a parametric study to examine the relationship between oscillation period and hysteresis effects with periods ranging from 3 min to 180 min. At short oscillation periods, (T ≈ 180 s) the effects of hysteresis were negligible with both models providing similar results. As the oscillation period increased, the hysteretic model showed less amplitude damping than the non-hysteretic model. For periods greater than T = 60 min, the phase lag in the non-hysteretic model is greater than for the hysteretic one. For periods less than T = 60 min this trend is reversed and the hysteretic model produced a greater phase lag than the non-hysteretic model. These findings suggest that consideration of hysteresis dynamics in Richards' equation models has no influence on water table wave dispersion for short period forcing such as waves (T ≈ 10 s) whereas for long period forcing such as tides (T ≈ 12.25 h) or storm surges (T ≈ days) hysteresis dynamics should be taken into account.

  18. Stability Limits of Capillary Bridges: How Contact Angle Hysteresis Affects Morphology Transitions of Liquid Microstructures.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Riëlle; Semprebon, Ciro; van Gorcum, Mathijs; Duits, Michèl H G; Brinkmann, Martin; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-06-12

    The equilibrium shape of a drop in contact with solid surfaces can undergo continuous or discontinuous transitions upon changes in either drop volume or surface energies. In many instances, such transitions involve the motion of the three-phase contact line and are thus sensitive to contact angle hysteresis. Using a combination of electrowetting-based experiments and numerical calculations, we demonstrate for a generic sphere-plate confinement geometry how contact angle hysteresis affects the mechanical stability of competing axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric drop conformations and qualitatively changes the character of transitions between them.

  19. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of contact angle hysteresis on a patterned solid/air composite surface.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bin; Yang, Xiaozhen

    2006-02-28

    We have studied two types of topological substrates--the continuous solid substrates (CSS) and the discontinuous solid substrates (DSS)--by using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for a better understanding of the contact angle hysteresis on two such substrates. After the validation of DPD in the system, we found that DSS has a different distribution of the metastable states from that of CSS and that DSS has relatively larger contact angle hysteresis at lower temperature. Obtained results also show that CSS is more suitable for making an ultrahydrophobic or ultralyophobic surface than DSS from the point of view of dynamic wettability.

  20. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  1. Hysteresis effects in instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation on 20 and 30 GHz satellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Pratt, T.; Bostian, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    It has been observed with 20/30 GHz satellite beacon measurements that the ratio of 30 GHz to 20 GHz attenuation changes during some fade events. This ratio displays a hysteresis effect. This effect can be explained by a change in the drop size distribution (DSD) during the event. However, it appears only above approximately 6-8 dB of attenuation at 20 GHz. Instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation is being proposed as part of an algorithm for uplink power control (ULPC) and the dynamic range of such an algorithm must be appropriately limited to avoid the hysteresis.

  2. Extension of hysteresis operators of Preisach-type to real, Lebesgue measurable functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, R.; Ekanayake, D.

    2008-02-01

    Functions in Llocp[0,∞) where 1⩽p⩽∞ can be considered as inputs to linear systems. However, hysteresis operators of Preisach type have only been defined on much smaller space of regulated (or Baire) functions. In this paper, we re-define Play operators so that they are well defined for real valued measurable functions. We show that this definition coincides with the older definition for continuous and regulated functions on an interval. Domain extension of hysteresis operators of Preisach type to real, Lebesgue measurable functions is then obtained in the standard manner using the re-defined Play operators.

  3. A neural model of hysteresis in amorphous materials and piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lianwei; Shen, Yu

    2014-08-01

    A new approach to constructing hysteretic operator (HO) is proposed in this paper. Based on the HO, the input space of neural networks is expanded from one-dimension to two-dimension and the multi-value mapping of hysteresis is transformed into a continuous mapping comprised of one-to-one mapping and multiple-to-one mapping. Based on the expanded input space, a neural network is employed to approximate hysteresis. The results of experimental examples suggest the proposed approach is effective.

  4. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  5. Allowing for hysteresis in the calculation of fields in the elements of accelerator magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Serednyakov, S. S.; Shcheglov, M. A.; Royak, M. E.; Stupakov, I. M.; Kondratyeva, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    Iron magnetic circuit residual magnetization may contribute as much as several Gs to the magnetic field in charged-particle accelerators. This contribution depends on the magnetization "history." It is not taken into account in most of the existing software that uses the main magnetization curve. Therefore, an error in field calculations usually exceeds 1%, which is unacceptable for accelerators. In this article, a simple phenomenological magnetic-hysteresis model that is suitable for numerical computations is suggested. Approximations based on the proposed model are compared to the results of measurements on partial hysteresis cycles in a steel ring.

  6. Transport hysteresis of core plasma, isotope effect, and H-mode physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2017-02-01

    This article assesses the understanding of and impact by the hysteresis in transport relation. The rapid changes of fluxes compared to slow changes of plasma parameters are overviewed for both edge barrier and core plasmas. The theoretical approaches to understanding the direct influence of heating power on turbulent transport are addressed. Based on this new theoretical framework, the ‘isotope effect’ of plasma confinement time is discussed. A trial explanation is given for this unresolved mystery in plasma confinement. The advanced data analysis method to research the hysteresis in gradient-flux relation is explained.

  7. A model of hysteresis arising from social interaction within a firm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Luis A.; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Cross, Rod

    2017-02-01

    This paper subscribes to the view that a key distinguishing feature of a firm is its social nature. We present a model in which hysteresis arises from the social interactions between employees. Employees have a simple response to incentives in the form of the pay available outside the firm relative to that available within the firm. Allowing for social interaction, whereby employees are influenced by the effort levels of fellow employees, leads to the distinctive effects, such as lazy relay responses to incentives, associated with hysteresis.

  8. Research on transient hysteresis current control strategy of DC-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zu-liang; Zhao, Yu-kai

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the dynamic performance of DC-DC converter, transient hysteresis current control strategy is proposed which is based on parallel computing and combinational logic. By making a comparison between the real-time inductor current and the threshold inductor current, the switch is controlled more accurately. Under the Matlab/Simulink environment, the process of the Buck-Boost converter was simulated. The simulation results show that the transient hysteresis current control strategy can effectively overcome the disadvantages when load changes or input voltage disturbance occurs, it posses high load regulation and short dynamic response time, and it verifies the feasibility of the proposed strategy.

  9. Intrinsic limits of channel transport hysteresis in graphene-SiO2 interface and its dependence on graphene defect density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bharadwaj, B.; Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Nath, Digbijoy; Pratap, Rudra; Raghavan, Srinivasan

    2016-07-01

    Hysteresis in channel conductance is commonly observed on graphene field effect transistors. Although consistent and repeatable hysteresis could possibly be attractive for memory based applications, it is detrimental to the deployment of graphene in high speed electronic switches. While the origin of such hysteresis has been variously attributed to graphene-insulator interface traps, adsorbed molecules and bulk charges in the dielectric, its dependence on the quality of the graphene has been largely unexplored. Since, CVD is the most promising synthesis route for large area graphene and defects in such a growth process are inevitable, it is important to understand the influence of the quality of graphene on hysteresis. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the effect of graphene growth defect density on device hysteresis. By intentionally tailoring the defect densities in the growth phase, we demonstrate a linear correlation between the film defect density and conductance hysteresis. The trap charge density calculated from the observed hysteresis in the electrical transfer characteristics was found to both follow the same qualitative trend, and give reasonable quantitative agreement with the defect density as extracted from Raman spectroscopy. Most importantly, by extrapolation from the observed behavior, we identify the intrinsic limits of hysteresis in graphene-SiO2 system, demonstrating that the defects in graphene contribute to traps over and above the baseline set by the SiO2 surface trap charge density.

  10. A comparison of analytic and bayesian approaches for characterizing thermal hysteresis in cattle using algebraic and geometric distances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high ambient temperature poses a serious threat to cattle. Above a certain threshold, an animal’s body temperature (Tb) appears to be driven by the hot cyclic air temperature (Ta) and hysteresis occurs. Elliptical hysteresis describes the output of a process in response to a simple harmonic input,...

  11. Contrasting diel hysteresis between soil autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a desert ecosystem under different rainfall scenarios.

    PubMed

    Song, Weimin; Chen, Shiping; Zhou, Yadan; Wu, Bo; Zhu, Yajuan; Lu, Qi; Lin, Guanghui

    2015-11-30

    Diel hysteresis occurs often between soil CO2 efflux (R(S)) and temperature, yet, little is known if diel hysteresis occurs in the two components of R(S), i.e., autotrophic respiration (R(A)) and heterotrophic respiration (R(H)), and how diel hysteresis will respond to future rainfall change. We conducted a field experiment in a desert ecosystem in northern China simulating five different scenarios of future rain regimes. Diel variations of soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature were measured on Day 6 and Day 16 following the rain addition treatments each month during the growing season. We found contrasting responses in the diel hysteresis of R(A) and R(H) to soil temperature, with a clockwise hysteresis loop for R(H) but a counter-clockwise hysteresis loop for R(A). Rain addition significantly increased the magnitude of diel hysteresis for both R(H) and R(A) on Day 6, but had no influence on either on Day 16 when soil moisture was much lower. These findings underline the different roles of biological (i.e. plant and microbial activities) and physical-chemical (e.g. heat transport and inorganic CO2 exchange) processes in regulating the diel hysteresis of R(A) and R(H), which should be considered when estimating soil CO2 efflux in desert regions under future rainfall regime.

  12. Strain accommodation and potential hysteresis of LiFePO 4 cathodes during lithium ion insertion/extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yujie; Wang, Chunsheng

    Equilibrium potential hysteresis of electrode materials refers to the phenomenon that discharge equilibrium potential is lower than charge equilibrium potential. It is induced by the strain accommodation energy of phase transformation. Taking LiFePO 4 as an example, the equilibrium potential hysteresis and accommodation energy of two LiFePO 4 with different particle sizes were characterized using galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. The LiFePO 4 sample with 40 nm particle size has lower accommodation energy than that of 100 nm LiFePO 4, which is due to a narrower miscibility gap and smaller potential hysteresis of 40 nm LiFePO 4 comparing to 100 nm LiFePO 4. The phase transformation of LiFePO 4 occurs only at potential levels above delithiation (charge) equilibrium potential and below lithiation (discharge) equilibrium potential. No phase transformation occurs when charge/discharge is limited in the potential hysteresis range, i.e. LiFePO 4 behaves like a solid solution in the potential hysteresis range. A reliable EIS can only be obtained when it is performed at the center of potential hysteresis and the potential amplitude does not exceed the range of equilibrium potential hysteresis. The analysis on strain accommodation and potential hysteresis of LiFePO 4 cathodes during Li ion insertion/extraction is also suitable for other phase transformation electrodes.

  13. Mathematical modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis and energy loss of FeBSiC amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka; Mitrovic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel mathematical model of frequency-dependent magnetic hysteresis. The major hysteresis loop in this model is represented by the ascending and descending curve over an arctangent function. The parameters of the hysteresis model have been calculated from a measured hysteresis loop of the FeBSiC amorphous alloy sample. A number of measurements have been performed with this sample at different frequencies of the sinusoidal excitation magnetic field. A variation of the coercive magnetic field with the frequency has been observed and used in the modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis with the proposed model. A comparison between measured and modelled hysteresis loops has been presented. Additionally, the areas of the obtained hysteresis loops, representing the energy loss per unit volume, have been calculated and the dependence of the energy loss on the frequency is shown. Furthermore, two models of the frequency dependence of the coercivity and two models of the energy loss separation have been used for fitting the experimental and simulation results. The relations between these models and their parameters have been observed and analysed. Also, the relations between parameters of the hysteresis model and the parameters of the energy loss separation models have been analysed and discussed.

  14. Steady state performance, photo-induced performance degradation and their relation to transient hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ajay Kumar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is a serious concern as it creates confusions about actual cell performance and raises questions on its reliability. Although a lot of effort has been made to understand the origin of hysteresis, knowing whether hysteresis affects the cell performance while they are in practical use (operated constantly at maximum power point) is not yet examined. In the present study, we investigate steady state performance and performance stability of perovskite solar cells (planar architecture with varying perovskite film thickness and TiO2 mesoscopic structure with different TiO2 compact layer thickness exhibiting hysteresis of different magnitudes) operating across an external load in relation to hysteresis. The planar cells with larger hysteresis exhibit a steady state current that closely matches the value determined on forward voltage scan. Cyclic photocurrent-dark current measurements on cells with hysteresis of different magnitudes reveal that photo-induced electrical instability (not material degradation), which might be originated from ion migration or photo-induced traps formation, is not related to hysteresis. Performance of the cells is recovered partially or fully, depending on the device structure, on storage in dark. TiO2 meso-structure cells tend to show complete recovery while the planar cells recover partially.

  15. Contrasting diel hysteresis between soil autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a desert ecosystem under different rainfall scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weimin; Chen, Shiping; Zhou, Yadan; Wu, Bo; Zhu, Yajuan; Lu, Qi; Lin, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Diel hysteresis occurs often between soil CO2 efflux (RS) and temperature, yet, little is known if diel hysteresis occurs in the two components of RS, i.e., autotrophic respiration (RA) and heterotrophic respiration (RH), and how diel hysteresis will respond to future rainfall change. We conducted a field experiment in a desert ecosystem in northern China simulating five different scenarios of future rain regimes. Diel variations of soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature were measured on Day 6 and Day 16 following the rain addition treatments each month during the growing season. We found contrasting responses in the diel hysteresis of RA and RH to soil temperature, with a clockwise hysteresis loop for RH but a counter-clockwise hysteresis loop for RA. Rain addition significantly increased the magnitude of diel hysteresis for both RH and RA on Day 6, but had no influence on either on Day 16 when soil moisture was much lower. These findings underline the different roles of biological (i.e. plant and microbial activities) and physical-chemical (e.g. heat transport and inorganic CO2 exchange) processes in regulating the diel hysteresis of RA and RH, which should be considered when estimating soil CO2 efflux in desert regions under future rainfall regime. PMID:26615895

  16. Discontinuity of mode transition and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma via a fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Fei, Gao; Yu-Ru, Zhang; Xue-Chun, Li; You-Nian, Wang

    2015-11-01

    A new type of two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples an equivalent circuit module is used to investigate the mode transition characteristics and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasmas at different pressures, by varying the series capacitance of the matching box. The variations of the electron density, temperature, and the circuit electrical properties are presented. As cycling the matching capacitance, at high pressure both the discontinuity and hysteresis appear for the plasma parameters and the transferred impedances of both the inductive and capacitive discharge components, while at low pressure only the discontinuity is seen. The simulations predict that the sheath plays a determinative role on the presence of discontinuity and hysteresis at high pressure, by influencing the inductive coupling efficiency of applied power. Moreover, the values of the plasma transferred impedances at different pressures are compared, and the larger plasma inductance at low pressure due to less collision frequency, as analyzed, is the reason why the hysteresis is not seen at low pressure, even with a wider sheath. Besides, the behaviors of the coil voltage and current parameters during the mode transitions are investigated. They both increase (decrease) at the E to H (H to E) mode transition, indicating an improved (worsened) inductive power coupling efficiency. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175034, 11205025, 11305023, and 11075029).

  17. Scheme for contact angle and its hysteresis in a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Hai-bo; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme for specifying contact angle and its hysteresis is incorporated into a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The scheme is validated through investigations of the dynamic behaviors of a droplet sliding along two kinds of walls: a smooth (ideal) wall and a rough or chemically inhomogeneous (nonideal) wall. For an ideal wall, the wettability of solid substrates is able to be prescribed. For a nonideal wall, arbitrary contact angle hysteresis can be obtained through adjusting advancing and receding angles. Significantly different phenomena can be recovered for the two kinds of walls. For instance, a droplet on an inclined ideal wall under gravity is impossible to stay stationary. However, the droplet on a nonideal wall may be pinned due to contact angle hysteresis. The steady interface shapes of the droplet on an inclined nonideal wall under gravity or in a shear flow quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical studies. Besides, the complex motion of a droplet creeping like an inchworm could be simulated. The scheme is found suitable for the study of contact line problems with and without contact angle hysteresis.

  18. Molecular hysteresis: residual effects of hormones and glucose on genes during aging.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, C V

    1994-01-01

    The basic concept of molecular hysteresis may be succintly summarized as follows in the following Limerick:. Hormones behave like Don Juan: They show up, do their thing, then they're gone. But when genes have been kissed Some effects may persist, And the melody still lingers on.

  19. Hysteresis phenomena in perovskite solar cells: the many and varied effects of ionic accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Daniel A; Wu, Yiliang; Shen, Heping; Barugkin, Chog; Beck, Fiona J; White, Thomas P; Weber, Klaus; Catchpole, Kylie R

    2017-01-25

    The issue of hysteresis in perovskite solar cells has now been convincingly linked to the presence of mobile ions within the perovskite layer. Here we test the limits of the ionic theory by attempting to account for a number of exotic characterization results using a detailed numerical device model that incorporates ionic charge accumulation at the perovskite interfaces. Our experimental observations include a temporary enhancement in open-circuit voltage following prolonged periods of negative bias, dramatically S-shaped current-voltage sweeps, decreased current extraction following positive biasing or "inverted hysteresis", and non-monotonic transient behaviours in the dark and the light. Each one of these phenomena can be reproduced and ultimately explained by our models, providing further evidence for the ionic theory of hysteresis as well as valuable physical insight into the factors that coincide to bring these phenomena about. In particular we find that both interfacial recombination and carrier injection from the selective contacts are heavily affected by ionic accumulation, and are essential to explaining the non-monotonic voltage transients and S-shaped J-V curves. Inverted hysteresis is attributed to the occurrence of "positive" ionic accumulation, which may also be responsible for enhancing the stabilized open-circuit voltage in some perovskite cells.

  20. Scaling behavior of hysteresis in multilayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Du, Gang; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2014-09-01

    Extrinsic hysteresis effects are often observed in MoS{sub 2} field effect devices due to adsorption of gas molecules on the surface of MoS{sub 2} channel. Scaling is a common method used in ferroics to quantitatively study the hysteresis. Here, the scaling behavior of hysteresis in multilayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors with a back-gated configuration was investigated. The power-law scaling relations were obtained for hysteresis area (〈A〉) and memory window (ΔV) with varying the region of back-gate voltage (V{sub bg,max}). It is interesting to find that the transition voltage in the forward sweep (V{sub FW}) and in the backward sweep (V{sub BW}) shifted to the opposite directions of back-gate voltage (V{sub bg}) with increasing V{sub bg,max}. However, when decreasing V{sub bg,max}, V{sub FW} shifted to positive and reversibly recovered, but V{sub BW} almost kept unchanged. The evolution of 〈A〉, ΔV, V{sub FW,} and V{sub BW} with V{sub bg,max} were discussed by the electrons transferring process between the adsorbate and MoS{sub 2} channel.

  1. Calculation of the magnetic field in the active zone of a hysteresis clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ermilov, M. A.; Glukhov, O. M.

    1977-01-01

    The initial distribution of magnetic induction in the armature stationary was calculated relative to the polar system of a hysteresis clutch. Using several assumptions, the problem is reduced to calculating the static magnetic field in the ferromagnetic plate with finite and continuous magnetic permeability placed in the air gap between two identical, parallel semiconductors with rack fixed relative to the tooth or slot position.

  2. Untangling perceptual memory: hysteresis and adaptation map into separate cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M; Ruff, Christian C; Lazar, Andreea; Leitner, Frauke C; Singer, Wolf; Melloni, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Perception is an active inferential process in which prior knowledge is combined with sensory input, the result of which determines the contents of awareness. Accordingly, previous experience is known to help the brain "decide" what to perceive. However, a critical aspect that has not been addressed is that previous experience can exert 2 opposing effects on perception: An attractive effect, sensitizing the brain to perceive the same again (hysteresis), or a repulsive effect, making it more likely to perceive something else (adaptation). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to elucidate how the brain entertains these 2 opposing processes, and what determines the direction of such experience-dependent perceptual effects. We found that although affecting our perception concurrently, hysteresis and adaptation map into distinct cortical networks: a widespread network of higher-order visual and fronto-parietal areas was involved in perceptual stabilization, while adaptation was confined to early visual areas. This areal and hierarchical segregation may explain how the brain maintains the balance between exploiting redundancies and staying sensitive to new information. We provide a Bayesian model that accounts for the coexistence of hysteresis and adaptation by separating their causes into 2 distinct terms: Hysteresis alters the prior, whereas adaptation changes the sensory evidence (the likelihood function).

  3. Reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp yielding transition of a colloidal glass under oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Dang, M T; Denisov, D; Struth, B; Zaccone, A; Schall, P

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical response of glasses remains challenging to understand. Recent results indicate that the oscillatory rheology of soft glasses is accompanied by a sharp non-equilibrium transition in the microscopic dynamics. Here, we use simultaneous x-ray scattering and rheology to investigate the reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp symmetry change from anisotropic solid to isotropic liquid dynamics observed in the oscillatory shear of colloidal glasses (D. Denisov, M.T. Dang, B. Struth, A. Zaccone, P. Schall, Sci. Rep. 5 14359 (2015)). We use strain sweeps with increasing and decreasing strain amplitude to show that, in analogy with equilibrium transitions, this sharp symmetry change is reversible and exhibits systematic frequency-dependent hysteresis. Using the non-affine response formalism of amorphous solids, we show that these hysteresis effects arise from frequency-dependent non-affine structural cage rearrangements at large strain. These results consolidate the first-order-like nature of the oscillatory shear transition and quantify related hysteresis effects both via measurements and theoretical modelling.

  4. Apparent elastic modulus and hysteresis of skeletal muscle cells throughout differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinsworth, Amy M.; Zhang, Sarah; Kraus, William E.; Truskey, George A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of differentiation on the transverse mechanical properties of mammalian myocytes was determined by using atomic force microscopy. The apparent elastic modulus increased from 11.5 +/- 1.3 kPa for undifferentiated myoblasts to 45.3 +/- 4.0 kPa after 8 days of differentiation (P < 0.05). The relative contribution of viscosity, as determined from the normalized hysteresis area, ranged from 0.13 +/- 0.02 to 0.21 +/- 0.03 and did not change throughout differentiation. Myosin expression correlated with the apparent elastic modulus, but neither myosin nor beta-tubulin were associated with hysteresis. Microtubules did not affect mechanical properties because treatment with colchicine did not alter the apparent elastic modulus or hysteresis. Treatment with cytochalasin D or 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime led to a significant reduction in the apparent elastic modulus but no change in hysteresis. In summary, skeletal muscle cells exhibited viscoelastic behavior that changed during differentiation, yielding an increase in the transverse elastic modulus. Major contributors to changes in the transverse elastic modulus during differentiation were actin and myosin.

  5. Highly Stretchable, Hysteresis-Free Ionic Liquid-Based Strain Sensor for Precise Human Motion Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Yun; Kim, Min Hyeong; Oh, Yong Suk; Jung, Soo-Ho; Jung, Jae Hee; Sung, Hyung Jin; Lee, Hyung Woo; Lee, Hye Moon

    2017-01-18

    A highly stretchable, low-cost strain sensor was successfully prepared using an extremely cost-effective ionic liquid of ethylene glycol/sodium chloride. The hysteresis performance of the ionic-liquid-based sensor was able to be improved by introducing a wavy-shaped fluidic channel diminishing the hysteresis by the viscoelastic relaxation of elastomers. From the simulations on visco-hyperelastic behavior of the elastomeric channel, we demonstrated that the wavy structure can offer lower energy dissipation compared to a flat structure under a given deformation. The resistance response of the ionic-liquid-based wavy (ILBW) sensor was fairly deterministic with no hysteresis, and it was well-matched to the theoretically estimated curves. The ILBW sensors exhibited a low degree of hysteresis (0.15% at 250%), low overshoot (1.7% at 150% strain), and outstanding durability (3000 cycles at 300% strain). The ILBW sensor has excellent potential for use in precise and quantitative strain detections in various areas, such as human motion monitoring, healthcare, virtual reality, and smart clothes.

  6. Modeling of micromagnetic Barkhausen activity using a stochastic process extension to the theory of hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, D.C. ); Sipahi, L.B. ); Williams, G. )

    1993-05-15

    Recent work by Bertotti [IEEE Trans. Magn. [bold MAG]-[bold 24], 621 (1988)] and others has shown that it is possible to model the micromagnetic Barkhausen discontinuities at the coercive point using a two-parameter stochastic model. However, the present formulation of the model is restricted to limited regions of the hysteresis curve over which [ital dM]/[ital dH] is approximately constant and when [ital dH]/[ital dt] is held at a constant rate. A natural extension of this model is to take the basic result, in which the level of Barkhausen activity in one time period is related to the activity in the previous time period, and increment it by a small amount which is dependent on the differential permeability. The extension of the model proposed here uses the theory of ferromagnetic hysteresis to determine the differential permeability at any point of the hysteresis loop. The Barkhausen activity is then assumed to vary in proportion to the differential permeability. The resulting model allows the Barkhausen sum of discontinuous changes in magnetization to be modelled around the entire hysteresis loop, leading to an important generalization of the basic model.

  7. Unusual hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility of cubic hexaboride KB6.

    PubMed

    Etourneau, J; Ammar, A; Villesuzanne, A; Villeneuve, G; Chevalier, B; Whangbo, M-H

    2003-07-14

    Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were carried out for cubic hexaboride KB(6), which is one electron short of completely filling its conduction band. It is found that KB(6) is not metallic and has localized spins. KB(6) exhibits a highly unusual hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility below 100 K, which suggests that it undergoes a slow relaxation process.

  8. Creep-Fatigue Evaluation by Hysteresis Energy in Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagae, Yuji; Takaya, Shigeru; Asayama, Tai

    Researchers proposed the methods of creep-fatigue evaluation, such as time fraction rules or ductility exhaustion rules. However, the microstructure change during creep-fatigue should not be directly considered in these methods. The hysteresis energy contributes to the microstructure change before the crack initiation and the crack initiation and propagation. The creep-fatigue has evaluated by the hysteresis energy in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel which is a candidate for structural material in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) plant. Creep-fatigue and fatigue tests were carried out at 723-873K in air. The hysteresis energy per hour at the middle of life (Nf / 2, Nf is the number of cycles to failure) has been evaluated. It is clear that the relationship between this parameter and the time to failure can be expressed by the power-law function. The creep-fatigue life can be evaluated based on the hysteresis energy an hour at Nf / 2 using this relation.

  9. A stability-based mechanism for hysteresis in the walk–trot transition in quadruped locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Shinya; Katayama, Daiki; Fujiki, Soichiro; Tomita, Nozomi; Funato, Tetsuro; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupeds vary their gaits in accordance with their locomotion speed. Such gait transitions exhibit hysteresis. However, the underlying mechanism for this hysteresis remains largely unclear. It has been suggested that gaits correspond to attractors in their dynamics and that gait transitions are non-equilibrium phase transitions that are accompanied by a loss in stability. In the present study, we used a robotic platform to investigate the dynamic stability of gaits and to clarify the hysteresis mechanism in the walk–trot transition of quadrupeds. Specifically, we used a quadruped robot as the body mechanical model and an oscillator network for the nervous system model to emulate dynamic locomotion of a quadruped. Experiments using this robot revealed that dynamic interactions among the robot mechanical system, the oscillator network, and the environment generate walk and trot gaits depending on the locomotion speed. In addition, a walk–trot transition that exhibited hysteresis was observed when the locomotion speed was changed. We evaluated the gait changes of the robot by measuring the locomotion of dogs. Furthermore, we investigated the stability structure during the gait transition of the robot by constructing a potential function from the return map of the relative phase of the legs and clarified the physical characteristics inherent to the gait transition in terms of the dynamics. PMID:23389894

  10. High-precision control of piezoelectric nanopositioning stages using hysteresis compensator and disturbance observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Li-Min; Su, Chun-Yi

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel high-performance control scheme with hysteresis compensator and disturbance observer for high-precision motion control of a nanopositioning stage driven by a piezoelectric stack actuator (PSA). In the developed control scheme, a real-time inverse hysteresis compensator (IHC) with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is firstly designed to compensate for the asymmetric hysteresis nonlinearity of the PSA. Due to the imperfect compensation, the dynamics behaviors of the PSA-actuated stage with the IHC can be treated as a linear dynamic system plus a lumped disturbance term. Owing to the unknown nature of this lumped disturbance term, a disturbance observer (DOB) is used as a means for disturbance rejection. With the DOB, a tracking controller is finally designed and implemented to stabilize the position error. To verify the proposed control scheme, a real-time experimental platform with a PSA-actuated nanopositioning stage is built, and extensive experimental tests are performed. The comparative experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and improved performance of the developed control approach in terms of the maximum-value errors, root-mean-square-value errors and hysteresis compensation.

  11. In-plane hysteresis of permalloy nanorings: a study of micromagnetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic hysteresis of isotropic permalloy nanorings with outer diameter 200 nm and thickness 20 nm has been studied. The inner diameter is varied from 0 to 190 nm to accommodate wide range of samples from nanodisk to thin nanorings. Micromagnetic simulation of in-plane hysteresis curve of these nanorings reveals that the magnetic properties change gradually with the change of inner diameter. The hysteresis loss indicated by the area of the hysteresis loop, increases gradually with the increase in inner radius up to d in = 174 nm. For inner diameter of 176 nm, the loop area decreases drastically and remains so for up to d in = 180 nm. After that, a small increment of d in results in a large increment of loop area. The remanent states are found to be vortex states for d in = 0-180 nm and onion states for d in > 180 nm. The changes are attributed to two parameters mainly: exchange energy and demagnetization energy. These two parameters depend on inner curvature of the ring, which is treated as a variable in this simulation work. The changes in loop area have been discussed in light of variation of these parameters.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect with low magnetic hysteresis loss in ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-Sb-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruochen; Qian, Mingfang; Zhang, Xuexi; Qin, Faxiang; Wei, Longsha; Xing, Dawei; Cui, Xiping; Sun, Jianfei; Geng, Lin; Peng, Huaxin

    2017-04-01

    Giant magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-X (X=In, Sn, Sb) Heusler alloys has been revealed due to the significant shift of the martensite transformation temperatures under a bias magnetic field. However, the magnetic hysteresis during the magnetization and demagnetization cycles creates a large hysteresis loss and reduces the refrigeration capacity. Here we demonstrated that the magnetic hysteresis loss in Ni-Mn-Sb alloys was effectively reduced by Si-doping. The quaternary Ni49.0Mn38.4Sb11.7Si0.9 alloy exhibited martensite and magnetic transitions around room temperature. Maximum magnetic entropy change ΔSm 9.4 J/kg K and working temperature interval 7.0 K were achieved attributed to the martensite transformation under a magnetic field of 5 T. Meanwhile, the average magnetic hysteresis loss for Ni49.0Mn38.4Sb11.7Si0.9 alloy was 2.1 J/kg, much smaller than that for Ni49.0Mn38.5Sb12.5 alloy, 11.4 J/kg. As a result, a refrigeration capacity of 50.2 J/kg was obtained in the Ni49.0Mn38.4Sb11.7Si0.9 alloy. This result shows that Si-doped Ni-Mn-Sb alloys may act as a potential material system for magnetic refrigeration.

  13. Perspective: Is there a hysteresis during reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strijckmans, K.; Moens, F.; Depla, D.

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses a few mechanisms that can assist to answer the title question. The initial approach is to use an established model for DC magnetron sputter deposition, i.e., RSD2013. Based on this model, the impact on the hysteresis behaviour of some typical HiPIMS conditions is investigated. From this first study, it becomes clear that the probability to observe hysteresis is much lower as compared to DC magnetron sputtering. The high current pulses cannot explain the hysteresis reduction. Total pressure and material choice make the abrupt changes less pronounced, but the implantation of ionized metal atoms that return to the target seems to be the major cause. To further substantiate these results, the analytical reactive sputtering model is coupled with a published global plasma model. The effect of metal ion implantation is confirmed. Another suggested mechanism, i.e., gas rarefaction, can be ruled out to explain the hysteresis reduction. But perhaps the major conclusion is that at present, there are too little experimental data available to make fully sound conclusions.

  14. Untangling Perceptual Memory: Hysteresis and Adaptation Map into Separate Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M.; Ruff, Christian C.; Lazar, Andreea; Leitner, Frauke C.; Singer, Wolf; Melloni, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Perception is an active inferential process in which prior knowledge is combined with sensory input, the result of which determines the contents of awareness. Accordingly, previous experience is known to help the brain “decide” what to perceive. However, a critical aspect that has not been addressed is that previous experience can exert 2 opposing effects on perception: An attractive effect, sensitizing the brain to perceive the same again (hysteresis), or a repulsive effect, making it more likely to perceive something else (adaptation). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to elucidate how the brain entertains these 2 opposing processes, and what determines the direction of such experience-dependent perceptual effects. We found that although affecting our perception concurrently, hysteresis and adaptation map into distinct cortical networks: a widespread network of higher-order visual and fronto-parietal areas was involved in perceptual stabilization, while adaptation was confined to early visual areas. This areal and hierarchical segregation may explain how the brain maintains the balance between exploiting redundancies and staying sensitive to new information. We provide a Bayesian model that accounts for the coexistence of hysteresis and adaptation by separating their causes into 2 distinct terms: Hysteresis alters the prior, whereas adaptation changes the sensory evidence (the likelihood function). PMID:23236204

  15. Correlation between piezoresponse nonlinearity and hysteresis in ferroelectric crystals at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linglong; Yang, Yaodong; Liu, Zhengchun; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear response of a ferroic to external fields has been studied for decades, garnering interest for both understanding fundamental physics, as well as technological applications such as memory devices. Yet, the behavior of ferroelectrics at mesoscopic regimes remains poorly understood, and the scale limits of theories developed for macroscopic regimes are not well tested experimentally. Here, we test the link between piezo-nonlinearity and local piezoelectric strain hysteresis, via AC-field dependent measurements in conjunction with hysteresis measurements with varying voltage windows on (K,Na)NbO3 crystals with band-excitation piezoelectric force microscopy. The correlation coefficient between nonlinearity amplitude and the amplitude during hysteresis loop acquisition shows a clear decrease with increasing AC bias. Further, correlation of polynomial fitting terms from the nonlinear measurements with the hysteresis loop area reveals that the largest correlations are reserved for the quadratic terms, which is expected for irreversible domain wall motion contributions that impact both piezoelectric behavior as well as minor loop formation. This study suggests applicability at local length scales of fundamental principles of Rayleigh behavior, with associated implications for future nanoscale ferroic devices.

  16. Lift hysteresis at stall as an unsteady boundary-layer phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Franklin K

    1956-01-01

    Analysis of rotating stall of compressor blade rows requires specification of a dynamic lift curve for the airfoil section at or near stall, presumably including the effect of lift hysteresis. Consideration of the magnus lift of a rotating cylinder suggests performing an unsteady boundary-layer calculation to find the movement of the separation points of an airfoil fixed in a stream of variable incidence. The consideration of the shedding of vorticity into the wake should yield an estimate of lift increment proportional to time rate of change of angle of attack. This increment is the amplitude of the hysteresis loop. An approximate analysis is carried out according to the foregoing ideas for a 6:1 elliptic airfoil at the angle of attack for maximum lift. The assumptions of small perturbations from maximum lift are made, permitting neglect of distributed vorticity in the wake. The calculated hysteresis loop is counterclockwise. Finally, a discussion of the forms of hysteresis loops is presented; and, for small reduced frequency of oscillation, it is concluded that the concept of a viscous "time lag" is appropriate only for harmonic variations of angle of attack with time at mean conditions other than maximum lift.

  17. Hysteresis and calcium set-point for the calcium parathyroid hormone relationship in healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Toribio, Ramiro E; Kohn, Catherine W; Sams, Richard A; Capen, Charles C; Rosol, Thomas J

    2003-02-15

    Abnormalities in calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis are reported in horses with several pathological conditions; however, there is little information on Ca(2+) regulation in horses. The objectives of the present study were to determine the Ca(2+) set-point in healthy horses, to determine whether the Ca(2+)/parathyroid hormone (PTH) response curves were characterized by hysteresis, and to determine if the order of experimentally induced hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia had an effect on PTH secretion. The Ca(2+) set-point and hysteresis were determined in 12 healthy horses by infusing Na(2)EDTA and calcium gluconate. The Ca(2+) set-point was 1.37 +/- 0.05 mmol/L, which is higher than values reported for humans and dogs (1.0-1.2 mmol/L). Hysteresis was present during hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia. Horses in which hypocalcemia was followed by hypercalcemia secreted more PTH (7440 +/- 740 pmol min/L) than horses in which hypercalcemia was followed by hypocalcemia (5990 +/- 570 pmol min/L). This study has demonstrated that the Ca(2+) set-point in the horse is higher than in other domestic animals and man. We have shown that the Ca(2+)/PTH relationship in horses is sigmoidal and displays hysteresis during both hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia, and that extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations may affect the response of the parathyroid gland to hypocalcemia.

  18. Hysteresis of Current in Noninteracting Atomic Fermi Gases in Optical Ring Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chien, Chih-Chun; Lai, Chen-Yen

    Hysteresis is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which can be found in magnets, superfluids, and other many-body systems. Although interactions are present in most systems exhibiting hysteresis, here we show the current of a non-interacting Fermi gas in an optical ring potential produces hysteresis behavior when driven by a time-dependent artificial gauge field and subject to dissipation. Fermions in a ring potential threaded with flux can exhibit a persistent current when the system is in thermal equilibrium, but cold-atoms are clean and dissipation for reaching thermal equilibrium may be introduced by an external, thermal bath. We use the standard relaxation approximation to model the dynamics of cold-atoms driven periodically by an artificial gauge field. A competition of the driven time and the relaxation time leads to hysteresis of the mass current, and work done on the system, as a function of the relaxation time, exhibits similar behavior as Kramers transition rate in chemical reaction and one-dimensional thermal transport.

  19. Performance Calculation of High Temperature Superconducting Hysteresis Motor Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, G.; Chakraborty, N.; Das, J.

    Hysteresis motors being capable of producing a steady torque at low speeds and providing good starting properties at loaded condition became popular among different fractional horse power electrical motors. High temperature superconducting materials being intrinsically hysteretic are suitable for this type of motor. In the present work, performance study of a 2-pole, 50 Hz HTS hysteresis motor with conventional stator and HTS rotor has been carried out numerically using finite element method. The simulation results confirm the ability of the segmented HTS rotor with glued circular sectors to trap the magnetic field as high as possible compared to the ferromagnetic rotor. Also the magnetization loops in the HTS hysteresis motor are obtained and the corresponding torque and AC losses are calculated. The motor torque thus obtained is linearly proportional to the current which is the common feature of any hysteresis motor. Calculations of torques, current densities etc are done using MATLAB program developed in-house and validated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulation result shows reasonable agreement with the published results.

  20. [Mathematical models of hysteresis]. Progress report No. 4, [January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1991-12-31

    The research described in this proposal is currently being supported by the US Department of Energy under the contract ``Mathematical Models of Hysteresis``. Thus, before discussing the proposed research in detail, it is worthwhile to describe and summarize the main results achieved in the course of our work under the above contract. Our ongoing research has largely been focused on the development of mathematical models of hysteretic nonlinearities with ``nonlocal memories``. The distinct feature of these nonlinearities is that their current states depend on past histories of input variations. It turns out that memories of hysteretic nonlinearities are quite selective. Indeed, experiments show that only some past input extrema leave their marks upon future states of hysteretic nonlinearities. Thus special mathematical tools are needed in order to describe nonlocal selective memories of hysteretic nonlinearities. Our research has been primarily concerned with Preisach-type models of hysteresis. All these models have a common generic feature; they are constructed as superpositions of simplest hysteretic nonlinearities-rectangular loops. Our study has by and large been centered around the following topics: various generalizations and extensions of the classical Preisach model, finding of necessary and sufficient conditions for the representation of actual hysteretic nonlinearities by various Preisach type models, solution of identification problems for these models, numerical implementation and experimental testing of Preisach type models. Although the study of Preisach type models has constituted the main direction of the research, some effort has also been made to establish some interesting connections between these models and such topics as: the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis, the classical Stoner-Wohlfarth model of vector magnetic hysteresis, thermal activation type models for viscosity, magnetostrictive hysteresis and neural networks.

  1. Negative hysteresis effect observed during calibration of the US Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Ganow, H.C.

    1985-08-01

    The US Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauge (BMG) was designed in the early 1960`s to allow rock stress measurements by the overcoring method. Since that time it has become a de facto standard against which the performance of other borehole deformation gauges is often judged. However, during recent in situ stress studies in the Climax Stock at the Nevada Test Site a strange "negative hysteresis" in the order of 300 to 500 microstrains was observed in standard calibration data. Here, the relaxation curve lies below the indentation (compression) curves as if the system were to somehow respond with an energy release. Therefore, a precision micro-indentation apparatus has been designed and used to perform a series of tests allowing a better understanding of the BMG button to cantilever interaction. Results indicate that the hysteresis effect is caused by differential motion between the button base and the cantilever resulting from the geometric motion inherent in the cantilever. The very large apparent hysteresis is mainly caused by cycling opposing cantilevers through the instrument`s entire dynamic range, and the fundamental imprecision inherent in use of the standard micrometers to calibrate the BMG. Laboratory mean hysteresis magnitudes for a polished cantilever typically range from 3 to 25 microstrain for 100 and 1000 microstrain relaxations on 1000 microstrain deflection loops intended to simulate typical field data. The error percentage is thought to remain fairly constant with deformation loop size, and is sufficiently small such that it can be safely ignored. The hysteresis effect can probably be reduced, and instrument stability improved by machining a small 90 degree cone in the cantilever in which a slightly larger mating cone on the base of the indentation button would reside. 5 refs. 26 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Various causes behind the desorption hysteresis of carboxylic acids on mudstones.

    PubMed

    Rasamimanana, S; Lefèvre, G; Dagnelie, R V H

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption desorption is a key factor for leaching, migration and (bio)degradation of organic pollutants in soils and sediments. Desorption hysteresis of apolar organic compounds is known to be correlated with adsorption/diffusion into soil organic matter. This work focuses on the desorption hysteresis of polar organic compounds on a natural mudstone sample. Acetic, citric and ortho-phthalic acids displayed adsorption-desorption hysteresis on Callovo-Oxfordian mudstone. The non-reversible behaviours resulted from three different mechanisms. Adsorption and desorption kinetics were evaluated using 14C- and 3H-labelled tracers and an isotopic exchange method. The solid-liquid distribution ratio of acetate decreased using a NaN3 bactericide, indicating a rapid bacterial consumption compared with negligible adsorption. The desorption hysteresis of phthalate was apparent and suppressed by the equilibration of renewal pore water with mudstone. This confirms the significant and reversible adsorption of phthalate. Finally, persistent desorption hysteresis was evidenced for citrate. In this case, a third mechanism should be considered, such as the incorporation of citrate in the solid or a chemical perturbation, leading to strong desorption resilience. The results highlighted the different pathways that polar organic pollutants might encounter in a similar environment. Data on phthalic acid is useful to predict the retarded transport of phthalate esters and amines degradation products in sediments. The behaviour of citric acid is representative of polydentate chelating agents used in ore and remediation industries. The impact of irreversible adsorption on solid/solution partitioning and transport deserves further investigation.

  3. A study of freezing-melting hysteresis of water in different porous materials. Part II: surfactant-templated silicas.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Oleg; Furó, István

    2011-09-28

    The freezing-melting hysteresis of water in mesoporous silicas MCM-48, MCM-41 and SBA-16 has been studied by NMR cryoporometry. The hysteresis in MCM-48 was found to exhibit nearly parallel branches, matching type H1 hysteresis that had been observed earlier in controlled pore glass. The same type of hysteresis is observed in two of three different-sized MCM-41 under study (a pore diameter of 3.6 and 3 nm), superimposed with a secondary, extremely broad, type H3 hysteresis. No hysteresis was found in the smallest MCM-41 with a pore diameter < 3 nm. Finally, water in SBA-16 exhibits type H2 hysteresis with the freezing branch being essentially steeper than the melting one, which is attributed to a pore blockage upon freezing, similar to what we observed earlier in Vycor porous glass. The data were analyzed using the model of curvature-dependent metastability of a solid phase upon melting; the validity of this model has been discussed.

  4. Relationship Between Hysteresis Dissipated Energy and Temperature Rising in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between hysteresis dissipated energy and temperature rising of the external surface in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) during the application of cyclic loading has been analyzed. The temperature rise, which is caused by frictional slip of fibers within the composite, is related to the hysteresis dissipated energy. Based on the fatigue hysteresis theories considering fibers failure, the hysteresis dissipated energy and a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter changing with the increase of cycle number have been investigated. The relationship between the hysteresis dissipated energy, a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter and a temperature rise-based damage parameter have been established. The experimental temperature rise-based damage parameter of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2D woven CMCs corresponding to different fatigue peak stresses and cycle numbers have been predicted. It was found that the temperature rise-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  5. Incorporating hysteresis in a multi-phase multi-component NAPL modelling framework; a multi-component LNAPL gasoline example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Davis, Greg B.; Johnston, Colin D.

    2016-10-01

    The longevity of chemicals in subsurface NAPL releases is a function of their partitioning into different phases. Hysteresis can affect distribution and partitioning of compounds in the vadose zone. We separated and modified hysteresis code from NAPL Simulator (which include hysteresis caused by fluid entrapment and capillary effects) and embedded it into TMVOC. For the first time, the resulting framework is used to model multi-component and multi-phase NAPL release, partitioning and transport. We then applied the verified framework to model effects of hysteresis on partitioning of BTEX, TMB and short and long chain alkanes from a typical gasoline spill. Excluding hysteresis resulted in an expanded LNAPL plume and underestimated the compounds longevity. Hysteresis altered the spatial distribution of LNAPL molar fractions as well as gas flow path and contaminants distribution compared to the non-hysteretic case. The amplifying effect of hysteresis on the longevity of mixtures (and associated risks) should be considered if non-hysteretic relationships are applied.

  6. Anisotropy and hysteresis of transport critical currents in high temperature Ln-Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Noto, K.; Morita, H.; Fujimori, H.; Mizuno, K.; Aomine, T.; Ni, B.; Matsushita, T.; Yamafuji, K.; Muto, Y.

    1989-03-01

    Following the measurements of anisotropy and hysteresis in transport critical currents with changing temperature and polarity of magnetic field, a.c. magnetic measurements by the Campbell method were performed for sintered Ln-Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. The information derived from them indicated that hysteresis does not occur in the intragrain current but in the intergrain one. The results are interpreted in terms of flux pinning, where the anisotropy originates from the texture structure and hysteresis is associated with the superconducting weak links of the sintered oxide pellets.

  7. Hysteresis of thin film IPRTs in the range 100 °C to 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvizdić, D.; Šestan, D.

    2013-09-01

    As opposed to SPRTs, the IPRTs succumb to hysteresis when submitted to change of temperature. This uncertainty component, although acknowledged as omnipresent at many other types of sensors (pressure, electrical, magnetic, humidity, etc.) has often been disregarded in their calibration certificates' uncertainty budgets in the past, its determination being costly, time-consuming and not appreciated by customers and manufacturers. In general, hysteresis is a phenomenon that results in a difference in an item's behavior when approached from a different path. Thermal hysteresis results in a difference in resistance at a given temperature based on the thermal history to which the PRTs were exposed. The most prominent factor that contributes to the hysteresis error in an IPRT is a strain within the sensing element caused by the thermal expansion and contraction. The strains that cause hysteresis error are closely related to the strains that cause repeatability error. Therefore, it is typical that PRTs that exhibit small hysteresis also exhibit small repeatability error, and PRTs that exhibit large hysteresis have poor repeatability. Aim of this paper is to provide hysteresis characterization of a batch of IPRTs using the same type of thin-film sensor, encapsulated by same procedure and same company and to estimate to what extent the thermal hysteresis obtained by testing one single thermometer (or few thermometers) can serve as representative of other thermometers of the same type and manufacturer. This investigation should also indicate the range of hysteresis departure between IPRTs of the same type. Hysteresis was determined by cycling IPRTs temperature from 100 °C through intermediate points up to 600 °C and subsequently back to 100 °C. Within that range several typical sub-ranges are investigated: 100 °C to 400 °C, 100 °C to 500 °C, 100 °C to 600 °C, 300 °C to 500 °C and 300 °C to 600 °C . The hysteresis was determined at various temperatures by

  8. Hysteresis Phenomenon in Heat-Voltage Curves of Polypyrrole-Coated Electrospun Nanofibrous and Regular Fibrous Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroumei, Azam; Tavanai, Hossein; Morshed, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This article verifies the hysteresis phenomenon in heat-voltage curves of polypyrrole-coated electrospun nanofibrous and regular fibrous mats. A third-order polynomial model fits the heat-voltage data better than a second-order polynomial model. It was also observed that the hysteresis loop area of nanofibrous and regular fibrous mats increases with decreasing fiber diameter. Moreover, the curvature of the hysteresis loops is significantly affected by the fiber diameter. In fact, the slope of the curvatures increases with decreasing fiber diameter.

  9. Deformation of a super-elastic NiTiNb alloy with controllable stress hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.; Wang, L.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature deformation of a Ni46.7Ti42.8Nb10.5 alloy was studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Compared to binary NiTi alloy, the Nb dissolved in the matrix significantly increased the onset stress for Stress-Induced Martensite Transformation (SIMT). The secondary phase, effectively a Nb-nanowire dispersion in a NiTi-Nb matrix, increased the elastic stiffness of the bulk material, reduced the strain anisotropy in austenite families by load sharing during SIMT, and increased the stress hysteresis by resisting reverse phase transformation during unloading. The stress hysteresis can be controlled over a wide range by heat treatment through its influences on the residual stress of the Nb-nanowire dispersion and the stability of the austenite.

  10. Robust adaptive tracking control of MIMO nonlinear systems in the presence of actuator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guiyuan; Ou, Linlin; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    Adaptive tracking control of a class of MIMO nonlinear system preceded by unknown hysteresis is investigated. Based on dynamic surface control, an adaptive robust control law is developed and compensators are designed to mitigate the influences of both the unknown bounded external uncertainties and the unknown Prandtl-Islinskii hysteresis. By adopting the low-pass filters, the explosion of complexity caused by tedious computation of the time derivatives of the virtual control laws is overcome. With the proposed control scheme, the closed-loop system is proved to be semi-globally ultimately bounded by the Lyapunov stability theory, and the output of the controlled system can track the desired trajectories with an arbitrarily small error. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Zero-error tracking control of uncertain nonlinear systems in the presence of actuator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengqiang; Shen, Hao; Li, Ze; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive tracking control is addressed for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown constant parameters and unknown actuator nonlinearity. The actuator nonlinearity is modelled as the backlash-like hysteresis, which is described by a differential model. The prior knowledge on the control gain sign is not required, and only the assumption on the reference signal is made. By combining the adaptive backstepping technique with the Nussbaum gain approach, an adaptive compensation controller design approach is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded, and the tracking error can converge to zero asymptotically despite the presence of the actuator hysteresis. Two simulation examples are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Random crystal field effect on the magnetic and hysteresis behaviors of a spin-1 cylindrical nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, N.; Zaim, A.; Kerouad, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the magnetic behavior of the cylindrical nanowire, consisting of a ferromagnetic core of spin-1 atoms surrounded by a ferromagnetic shell of spin-1 atoms is studied in the presence of a random crystal field interaction. Based on Metropolis algorithm, the Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate the effects of the concentration of the random crystal field p, the crystal field D and the shell exchange interaction Js on the phase diagrams and the hysteresis behavior of the system. Some characteristic behaviors have been found, such as the first and second-order phase transitions joined by tricritical point for appropriate values of the system parameters, triple and isolated critical points can be also found. Depending on the Hamiltonian parameters, single, double and para hysteresis regions are explicitly determined.

  13. Molecular dynamics investigation of the grain boundary migration hysteresis of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Xinhua; Peng, Di

    2017-02-01

    The deformation behavior and grain boundary (GB) response of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The GB migration hysteresis phenomenon, in which the GB migration displacement lags behind the change in nominal shear strain, is observed in the symmetric tilt GBs for the first time. The elementary structure transformation occurring at the two end segments of the observed GB during GB migration produces a disordered and irreversible state, while the transformation in the middle segment is reversible. Both dislocation retraction and nucleation occur during unloading. Relatively large cyclic strain amplitudes lead to disordered GB segments of greater length, such that the residual GB migration displacement increases with increasing cyclic amplitude. GB migration hysteresis vanishes after the GB becomes immobile owing to a cyclic shear induced transition to a disordered state along its entire length.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis of non-flattened-top micro/nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Sona; Englezos, Peter; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2014-03-25

    A two-dimensional (2D) thermodynamic model is proposed to predict the contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of different types of surface geometries, particularly those with asperities having nonflattened tops. The model is evaluated by micro/nano sinusoidal and parabolic patterns fabricated by laser ablation. These microstructures are analyzed thermodynamically through the use of the Gibbs free energy to obtain the equilibrium contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH). The effects of the geometrical details of two types of microstructures on maximizing the superhydrophobicity of the nanopatterned surface are also discussed in an attempt to design surfaces with desired and/or optimum wetting characteristics. The analysis of the various surfaces reveals the important geometrical parameters that may lead to the lotus effect (high CA > 150° and low CAH < 10°) or petal effect (high CA > 150° and high CAH ≫ 10°).

  15. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on the measurement of capillary forces.

    PubMed

    De Souza, E J; Gao, L; McCarthy, T J; Arzt, E; Crosby, A J

    2008-02-19

    We conduct experimental investigations of macroscopic capillary forces between two flat rigid substrates characterized by their advancing and receding contact angles with water. Our results exhibit excellent agreement with theoretical predictions obtained by the numerical solution of the capillary equation. On the basis of this comparison, we use the measurements of the capillary force to investigate the phenomenon of contact angle hysteresis. We present examples of force measurements for surfaces that display low, moderate, and high contact angle hysteresis and compare results for a larger variety of substrates. Finally, we show that for the case of water, the role of viscosity is insignificant within the range of force and velocity measured in the present work.

  16. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  17. Noise in Neural Networks: Thresholds, Hysteresis, and Neuromodulation of Signal-To-Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, James D.; Pichler, Elgar E.; Ross, John

    1989-03-01

    We study a neural-network model including Gaussian noise, higher-order neuronal interactions, and neuromodulation. For a first-order network, there is a threshold in the noise level (phase transition) above which the network displays only disorganized behavior and critical slowing down near the noise threshold. The network can tolerate more noise if it has higher-order feedback interactions, which also lead to hysteresis and multistability in the network dynamics. The signal-to-noise ratio can be adjusted in a biological neural network by neuromodulators such as norepinephrine. Comparisons are made to experimental results and further investigations are suggested to test the effects of hysteresis and neuromodulation in pattern recognition and learning. We propose that norepinephrine may ``quench'' the neural patterns of activity to enhance the ability to learn details.

  18. Characterizing piezoscanner hysteresis and creep using optical levers and a reference nanopositioning stage

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, H.; Regnier, S.

    2009-04-15

    A method using atomic force microscope (AFM) optical levers and a reference nanopositioning stage has been developed to characterize piezoscanner hysteresis and creep. The piezoscanner is fixed on a closed-loop nanopositioning stage, both of which have the same arrangement on each axis of the three spatial directions inside the AFM-based nanomanipulation system. In order to achieve characterization, the optical lever is used as a displacement sensor to measure the relative movement between the nanopositioning stage and the piezoscanner by lateral tracking a well-defined slope with the tapping mode of the AFM cantilever. This setup can be used to estimate a piezoscanner's voltage input with a reference displacement from the nanopositioning stage. The hysteresis and creep were accurately calibrated by the method presented, which use the current setup of the AFM-based nanomanipulation system without any modification or additional devices.

  19. An implicit method for the nonlinear modelling and simulation of piezoceramic actuators displaying hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Timothy D.; Zimmerman, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have shown that piezoceramic materials display a nonlinear relationship between the applied electric field and the actuation strain. This relationship also displays a substantial hysteresis upon reversal of the applied field. In this paper, piezoceramic actuator models are incorporated into the structural equations of motion to arrive at a set of nonlinear actively controlled structural equations of motion. A new implicit algorithm for determining the time history of the actively controlled structure is presented. The algorithm employs the trapezoidal rule for stepping the equations forward in time. The algorithm is compared to an explicit algorithm and is shown to provide greater numerical accuracy. In addition, the numerical stability and convergence characteristics are presented via example. The new algorithm displays convergence and stability properties that are comparable to the standard trapezoidal rule used for dynamic systems without hysteresis.

  20. Observation of complete inversion of the hysteresis loop in a bimodal magnetic thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Tuhin; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Schmidt, Michael; Ramasse, Quentin; Roy, Saibal

    2017-03-01

    The existence of inverted hysteresis loops (IHLs) in magnetic materials is still in debate due to the lack of direct evidence and convincing theoretical explanations. Here we report the direct observation and physical interpretation of complete IHL in N i45F e55 films with 1 to 2 nm thin N i3Fe secondary phases at the grain boundaries. The origin of the inverted loop, however, is shown to be due to the exchange bias coupling between N i45F e55 and N i3Fe , which can be broken by the application of a high magnetic field. A large positive exchange bias (HE B=14 ×HC) is observed in the NiFe composite material giving novel insight into the formation of a noninverted hysteresis loop (non-IHL) and IHL, which depend on the loop tracing field range (HR). The crossover from non-IHL to IHL is found to be at 688 Oe.

  1. The influence of laminar separation and transition on low Reynolds number airfoil hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of the Lissaman 7769 and Miley MO6-13-128 airfoils at low chord Reynolds numbers is presented. Although both airfoils perform well near their design Reynolds number of about 600,000, they each produce a different type of hysteresis loop in the lift and drag forces when operated below chord Reynolds numbers of 300,000. The type of hysteresis loop was found to depend upon the relative location of laminar separation and transition. The influence of disturbance environment and experimental procedure on the low Reynolds number airfoil boundary layer behavior is also presented. The use of potential flow solutions to help predict how a given airfoil will behave at low Reynolds numbers is also discussed.

  2. Development and calibration of a MFM-based system for local hysteresis loops measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement technique derived from a field-dependent magnetic force microscope (MFM) is presented for the measurement of local hysteresis loops on patterned micrometric and sub-micrometric magnetic structures. The technique exploits the synchronisation of the applied field variations with the end-of-line signal of the microscope, while keeping the slow scan axis disabled. In this way, a single MFM image contains the whole field evolution of the magnetisation processes in the sample along a user-defined profile. An analysis procedure is presented for the subsequent determination of local hysteresis loops on magnetic dots. The system has been calibrated for what concerns the applied field values. No significant artifacts induced in the measurements by the applied field have been observed up to applied fields of ≈ 1000 Oe.

  3. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  4. Stress-induced magnetic hysteresis in amorphous microwires probed by microwave giant magnetoimpedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Berzhansky, V. N.; Gomonay, H. V.; Qin, F. X.

    2013-05-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of the effects of tensile and torsional stresses on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) characteristics of vanishing-magnetostrictive Co-rich microwires at microwave frequency. A complex stress-induced hysteresis behaviour is identified in the GMI response in the presence of tensile and torsional stresses. It is also revealed that there exists a competition between these two kinds of stresses on the critical field via the interactions with the intrinsic anisotropy. An "enhanced core-shell" model is proposed here to resolve the physical origin of the low-field hysteresis and the dependence of induced anisotropy field on the applied tensile and/or torsional stress. Our results are of both technical importance to the design of non-contact stress sensors exploiting the GMI of microwires and fundamental significance to the understanding of the microwave GMI characteristics of soft magnetic microwires in the presence of external stresses.

  5. Damping measurements of laminated composite materials and aluminum using the hysteresis loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The damping characteristics of composite laminates made of Hexply 8552 AGP 280-5H (fabric), used for structural elements in aeronautical vehicles, have been investigated in depth using the hysteresis loop method and compared to the results for aluminum specimens (2024 T351). It was found that the loss factor, η, obtained by the hysteresis loop method is linearly dependent only on the applied excitation frequency and is independent of the preloading and the stress amplitudes. For the test specimens used in the present tests series, it was found that the damping of the aluminum specimens is higher than the composite ones for longitudinal direction damping, while for bending vibrations the laminates exhibited higher damping values.

  6. Optical bistability and hysteresis of a hybrid metal-semiconductor nanodimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, A. V.; Malyshev, V. A.

    2011-07-01

    Optical response of an artificial composite nanodimer comprising a semiconductor quantum dot and a metal nanosphere is analyzed theoretically. We show that internal degrees of freedom of the system can manifest bistability and optical hysteresis as functions of the incident field intensity. We argue that these effects can be observed for real-world systems, such as a CdSe quantum dot and an Au nanoparticle hybrid. These properties can be revealed by measuring the optical hysteresis of Rayleigh scattering. We also show that the total dipole moment of the system can be switched abruptly between its two stable states by small changes in the excitation intensity. The latter promises various applications in the field of all-optical processing at the nanoscale, the most basic of them being the volatile optical memory.

  7. Polarization-electric field hysteresis of ferroelectric PVDF films: comparison of different measurement regimes.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Polarization-electric field hysteresis is an important property of ferroelectric materials. Different experimental procedures and measurement regimes are demonstrated and frequently used in order to determine this hysteresis behavior. For the characterization of the poling behavior of ferroelectric polymers it is common to analyze the poling current and separate current contributions, which are based on charging the sample capacitance as well as on conductivity. Experimentally this can be realized with two different measurement regimes, either poling of the sample with bipolar cycles or with a sequence of bipolar and unipolar cycles of the applied electric field. Here, we demonstrate the comparison of both measurement routines by performing poling experiments on the same ferroelectric PVDF sample.

  8. Deformation of a super-elastic NiTiNb alloy with controllable stress hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.; Wang, L.

    2016-06-27

    Room temperature deformation of a Ni46.7Ti42.8Nb10.5 alloy was studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Compared to binary NiTi alloy, the Nb dissolved in the matrix significantly increased the onset stress for Stress-Induced Martensite Transformation (SIMT). The secondary phase, effectively a Nb-nanowire dispersion in a NiTi-Nb matrix, increased the elastic stiffness of the bulk material, reduced the strain anisotropy in austenite families by loading sharing during SIMT, and increased the stress hysteresis by resisting reverse phase transformation during unloading. The stress hysteresis can be controlled over a wide range by changing the heat treatment temperature through its influences on the residual stress-strain state of the Nb-nanowire dispersion.

  9. Magnetic Study of Martensitic Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel by Low Field Hysteresis Loops Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lefu; Takahashi, Seiki; Kamada, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiroaki; Mumtaz, Khalid; Ara, Katsuyuki; Sato, Masaya

    2005-04-09

    Magnetic method has been used to evaluate the volume percentage of {alpha}' martensitic phase in austenitic stainless steels by measuring saturation magnetization, and it is said to be a candidate NDE method. However, nondestructive detection of saturation magnetization without high magnetic field is difficult. In the current work, we present a NDE method for evaluating the magnetic properties of strain induced {alpha}' martensitic phase. Low field hysteresis loops of an austenitic stainless steels type SUS 304 after cold rolling were measured by using a yoke sensor. The results show that the initial permeability {mu}i and the relative coercive field Hcl calculated by low field hysteresis loop analysis keep monotonic relation with saturation magnetization and coercive force measured by VSM, respectively. By this method, it is possible to characterize the volume content and particle properties of {alpha}' martensitic phase in stainless steels.

  10. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leao, Juscelino B; Chang, Sung C; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  11. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    PubMed

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  12. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William A.; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leão, Juscelino B.; Chang, Sung; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We interpret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid–liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved. PMID:21746898

  13. The adhesion and hysteresis effect in friction skin with artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhi, K. A.; Tudor, A.; Hussein, E. K.; Wahad, H. S.

    2017-02-01

    Human skin is a soft biomaterial with a complex anatomical structure and it has a complex material behavior during the mechanical contact with objects and surfaces. The friction adhesion component is defined by means of the theories of Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR), Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov (DMT) and Maugis – Dugdale (MD). We shall consider the human skin entering into contact with a rigid surface. The deformation (hysteresis) component of the skin friction is evaluated with Voigt rheological model for the spherical contact, with the original model, developed in MATHCAD software. The adhesive component of the skin friction is greater than the hysteresis component for all friction parameters (load, velocity, the strength of interface between skin and the artificial material).

  14. Hysteresis analysis in dye-sensitized solar cells based on external bias field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Li, Xiaoyi; Tong, Yanhua; Zhang, Tiansheng

    2017-02-01

    The current density-voltage (J-V) hysteresis phenomenon occurs in perovskite solar cells as well as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs); however, it has received little attention in DSCs. We consider that the trapping-detrapping-induced variation of the charge collection efficiency might cause J-V hysteresis. Therefore, we conduct a systematic study on the influence of an external bias field during and before J-V measurements in typical DSCs. We find that the J-V performance of DSCs significantly depends on the scan bias direction and the external bias field before and during measurements. Our results indicate that the external-bias-field-modulated charge injection, trapping-detrapping, and accumulation processes in DSCs are possible causes for the anomalous J-V behavior.

  15. Precision beam pointing control with jitter attenuation by optical deflector exhibiting dynamic hysteresis in COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Zeng-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Qin; He, Xin; Shi, Wen-Bo; Mao, Jian-Qin; Jin, Yu-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Due to the existence of various disturbances during the lasing process of the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL), the optical beam pointing performance is severely degraded. In this paper, an adaptive control methodology is proposed for the precise pointing control of the optical beam with active beam jitter rejection using a giant magnetostrictive optical deflector (GMOD) which exhibits severe dynamic hysteresis nonlinearity. In particular, a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) based fast compensator is employed to eliminate the dynamic hysteresis without the inverse model construction. Then an improved feedforward adaptive filter is developed to deal with jitter attenuation when the full-coherent reference signal is unavailable. To improve the stability and overall robustness of the controller, especially when a large initial bias exists, a PI controller is placed in parallel with the adaptive filter. Experimental results validate the precise pointing ability of the proposed control method.

  16. Fatigue Hysteresis Behavior of Unidirectional SiC/Si3N4 Composite at Elevated Temperature under Tension-Tension Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the fatigue hysteresis behavior of unidirectional SiC/Si3N4 ceramic-matrix composite at elevated temperature has been investigated. The hysteresis loops models considering interface friction between fibers and the matrix have been developed to establish the relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loops, fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy and the interface frictional coefficient. Using the experimental fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy, the interface frictional coefficient of SiC/Si3N4 composite at 1000 °C were obtained for different cycle numbers and fatigue peak stresses. The effects of fatigue peak stress, test temperature and cycle number on the evolution of fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy and interface frictional coefficient have been analyzed. It was found that the fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy can be used to monitor the interface debonding and damage evolution inside of the composite.

  17. Color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating droplet motion with contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Zheng, Rongye

    2013-10-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an effective tool for simulating the contact-line motion due to the nature of its microscopic dynamics. In contact-line motion, contact-angle hysteresis is an inherent phenomenon, but it is neglected in most existing color-gradient based LBMs. In this paper, a color-gradient based multiphase LBM is developed to simulate the contact-line motion, particularly with the hysteresis of contact angle involved. In this model, the perturbation operator based on the continuum surface force concept is introduced to model the interfacial tension, and the recoloring operator proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is used to produce phase segregation and resolve the lattice pinning problem. At the solid surface, the color-conserving wetting boundary condition [Hollis et al., IMA J. Appl. Math. 76, 726 (2011)] is applied to improve the accuracy of simulations and suppress spurious currents at the contact line. In particular, we present a numerical algorithm to allow for the effect of the contact-angle hysteresis, in which an iterative procedure is used to determine the dynamic contact angle. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the developed model, including the droplet partial wetting process and droplet dynamical behavior in a simple shear flow. The obtained results are compared with theoretical solutions and experimental data, indicating that the model is able to predict the equilibrium droplet shape as well as the dynamic process of partial wetting and thus permits accurate prediction of contact-line motion with the consideration of contact-angle hysteresis.

  18. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  19. Investigation of the hysteresis phenomena in steady shock reflection using kinetic and continuum methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M.; Zeitoun, D.; Vuillon, J.; Gimelshein, S.; Markelov, G.

    1996-05-01

    The problem of transition of planar shock waves over straight wedges in steady flows from regular to Mach reflection and back was numerically studied by the DSMC method for solving the Boltzmann equation and finite difference method with FCT algorithm for solving the Euler equations. It is shown that the transition from regular to Mach reflection takes place in accordance with detachment criterion while the opposite transition occurs at smaller angles. The hysteresis effect was observed at increasing and decreasing shock wave angle.

  20. The hysteresis response of soil CO2 concentration and soil respiration to soil temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Katul, Gabriel G.; Oren, Ram; Daly, Edoardo; Manzoni, Stefano; Yang, Dawen

    2015-08-01

    Diurnal hysteresis between soil temperature (Ts) and both CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and soil respiration rate (Rs) were reported across different field experiments. However, the causes of these hysteresis patterns remain a subject of debate, with biotic and abiotic factors both invoked as explanations. To address these issues, a CO2 gas transport model is developed by combining a layer-wise mass conservation equation for subsurface gas phase CO2, Fickian diffusion for gas transfer, and a CO2 source term that depends on soil temperature, moisture, and photosynthetic rate. Using this model, a hierarchy of numerical experiments were employed to disentangle the causes of the hysteretic [CO2]-Ts and CO2 flux Ts (i.e., F-Ts) relations. Model results show that gas transport alone can introduce both [CO2]-Ts and F-Ts hystereses and also confirm prior findings that heat flow in soils lead to [CO2] and F being out of phase with Ts, thereby providing another reason for the occurrence of both hystereses. The area (Ahys) of the [CO2]-Ts hysteresis near the surface increases, while the Ahys of the Rs-Ts hysteresis decreases as soils become wetter. Moreover, a time-lagged carbon input from photosynthesis deformed the [CO2]-Ts and Rs-Ts patterns, causing a change in the loop direction from counterclockwise to clockwise with decreasing time lag. An asymmetric 8-shaped pattern emerged as the transition state between the two loop directions. Tracing the pattern and direction of the hysteretic [CO2]-Ts and Rs-Ts relations can provide new ways to fingerprint the effects of photosynthesis stimulation on soil microbial activity and detect time lags between rhizospheric respiration and photosynthesis.

  1. Thermally induced all-optical inverter and dynamic hysteresis loops in graphene oxide dispersions.

    PubMed

    Melle, Sonia; Calderón, Oscar G; Egatz-Gómez, Ana; Cabrera-Granado, E; Carreño, F; Antón, M A

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally study the temporal dynamics of amplitude-modulated laser beams propagating through a water dispersion of graphene oxide sheets in a fiber-to-fiber U-bench. Nonlinear refraction induced in the sample by thermal effects leads to both phase reversing of the transmitted signals and dynamic hysteresis in the input-output power curves. A theoretical model including beam propagation and thermal lensing dynamics reproduces the experimental findings.

  2. 4D-CT lung motion estimation with deformable registration: quantification of motion nonlinearity and hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Boldea, Vlad; Sharp, Gregory C; Jiang, Steve B; Sarrut, David

    2008-03-01

    In this article, our goal is twofold. First, we propose and compare two methods which process deformable registration to estimate patient specific lung and tumor displacements and deformation during free breathing from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) data. Second, we propose techniques to quantify the physiological parameters of motion nonlinearity and hysteresis. A Fréchet distance-based criterion is introduced to measure the motion hysteresis. Experiments were conducted with 4D-CT data of five patients treated in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. The accuracy of deformation fields assessed against expert-selected landmarks was found to be within image voxel tolerance. The second method gave slightly better results in terms of accuracy and consistency, although the differences were not statistically significant between the two methods. Lung motion nonlinearity and hysteresis are patient specific, and vary across regions within the lung during respiration. For all patients, motion between end-exhale and end-inhale was well approximated with a straight line trajectory for the majority of lung points. Hysteresis was found to be globally correlated with trajectory length. The main limitation to the proposed method is that intensity-based deformable registration is dependent on image quality and image resolution. Another limitation is the absence of gold standard which makes the validation of the computed motion difficult. However, the proposed tools provide patient specific motion information which, in radiotherapy for example, can ease the definition of precise internal margins. In the future, the integration of physiological information from multiple patients could help to create a general lung atlas with different clinical applications.

  3. Magnetic characterization using a three-dimensional hysteresis projection, illustrated with a study of limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Lagroix, France

    2000-04-01

    Limestones provide an important source of palaeomagnetic information despite their low content of submicroscopic remanence-bearing minerals. The chief sources of these minerals are thought to be clastic volcanic magnetite and titanomagnetite, and organic magnetite, the latter mostly from bacterial sources. Chemically remagnetized limestones carry magnetite or pyrrhotite. Three hysteresis properties prove useful in identifying and characterizing these mineralogical influences on limestones: the ratio of zero-field maximum remanence to saturation remanence (Mr/Ms) in an applied field, coercivity of remanence (Bcr) and coercivity (Bc). To a lesser extent Kf/Ms may be useful, where Kf is the ferrimagnetic susceptibility. Traditionally, these have been plotted on a combination of 2-D graphs that of necessity only preserve two variables (Day et al. 1977; Wasilewski 1973). However, we found that magnetic discrimination and characterization of the limestones was much easier on a three-axis hysteresis projection that preserves the values of Bcr, Bc and Mr/Ms as independent variables. Using logarithmic scales, the regression surfaces through the data become almost planar and distinguish pelagic, shallow marine, shelf and remagnetized limestones on the basis of the slope and intercept of the associated regression surface. Clearly, there are sensitive sedimentological, geochemical or organic influences that dictate the magnetic mineralogy through sedimentary environment. Moreover, the 3-D plot of hysteresis criteria affords easy recognition of remagnetized limestones and may permit the rejection of material unsuitable for palaeomagnetic study. The 3-D hysteresis projection may be useful for the characterization of other rocks and magnetic materials

  4. Dynamic characterization of hysteresis elements in mechanical systems. I. Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bender, F.; Symens, W.

    2005-03-01

    The pre-sliding-pre-rolling phase of friction behavior is dominated by rate-independent hysteresis. Many machine elements in common engineering use exhibit, therefore, the characteristic of "hysteresis springs," for small displacements at least. Plain and rolling element bearings that are widely used in motion guidance of machine tools are typical examples. While the presence of a hysteresis element may mark the character of the resulting dynamics, little is to be found about this topic in the literature. The study of the nonlinear dynamics caused by such elements becomes imperative if we wish to achieve accurate control of such machines. In this Part I of the investigation, we examine a single-degree-of-freedom mass-hysteresis-spring system and show that, while the free response case is amenable to an exact solution, the more important case of forced response has no closed form solution and requires other methods of treatment. We consider harmonic-balance analysis methods (which are common analysis tools in engineering) suitable for frequency-domain treatment, in particular the approximate describing function (DF) method, and compare those results with "exact" numerical simulations. The DF method yields basically a linear equation with amplitude-dependent modal parameters. We find that agreement in the frequency response function, between DF and exact solution, is good for small excitation amplitudes and for very large amplitudes. Intermediate values, however, show high sensitivity to amplitude variations and, consequently, no regular solution is obtainable by either approach. This appears to be an inherent property of the system pointing to the need for developing further analysis methods. Experimental verification of the analysis outlined in this Part I is given in Part II of the paper.

  5. Effect of Hysteresis on Measurements of Thin-Film Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.; del Cueto, J.

    2011-03-01

    Transient or hysteresis effects in polycrystalline thin film CdS/CdTe cells are a function of pre-measurement voltage bias and whether Cu is introduced as an intentional dopant during back contact fabrication. When Cu is added, the current-density (J) vs. voltage (V) measurements performed in a reverse-to-forward voltage direction will yield higher open-circuit voltage (Voc), up to 10 mV, and smaller short-circuit current density (Jsc), by up to 2 mA/cm2, relative to scanning voltage in a forward-to-reverse direction. The variation at the maximum power point, Pmax, is however small. The resulting variation in FF can be as large as 3%. When Cu is not added, hysteresis in both Voc and Jsc is negligible however Pmax hysteresis is considerably greater. This behavior corroborates observed changes in depletion width, Wd, derived from capacitance (C) vs voltage (V) scans. Measured values of Wd are always smaller in reverse-to-forward voltage scans, and conversely, larger in the forward-to-reverse voltage direction. Transient ion drift (TID) measurements performed on Cu-containing cells do not show ionic behavior suggesting that capacitance transients are more likely due to electronic capture-emission processes. J-V curve simulation using Pspice shows that increased transient capacitance during light-soak stress at 100 degrees C correlates with increased space-charge recombination. Voltage-dependent collection however was not observed to increase with stress in these cells.

  6. Observations of hysteresis in solar cycle variations among seven solar activity indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.; White, Oran R.

    1994-01-01

    We show that smoothed time series of 7 indices of solar activity exhibit significant solar cycle dependent differences in their relative variations during the past 20 years. In some cases these observed hysteresis patterns start to repeat over more than one solar cycle, giving evidence that this is a normal feature of solar variability. Among the indices we study, we find that the hysteresis effects are approximately simple phase shifts, and we quantify these phase shifts in terms of lag times behind the leading index, the International Sunspot Number. Our measured lag times range from less than one month to greater than four months and can be much larger than lag times estimated from short-term variations of these same activity indices during the emergence and decay of major active regions. We argue that hysteresis represents a real delay in the onset and decline of solar activity and is an important clue in the search for physical processes responsible for changing solar emission at various wavelengths.

  7. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene–early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals. PMID:27389499

  8. Modeling of galfenol bending actuator considering nonlinear hysteresis and dynamic real-time control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Liang; Wu, Guichu; Chen, Dingfang; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-03-01

    On active bending structures, the actuation direction and the excitation field direction are not the same. Simple lumped parameter models are inadequate to describe the relationship between output displacement and input field. In this paper, a dynamic distributed parameter model is presented to describe the system dynamics of a galfenol bending actuator. To consider nonlinearities and hysteresis in bending, a nonlinear magnetomechanical model is developed to characterize the hysteretic magnetostriction generated by the galfenol layer. A dynamic real-time control strategy is proposed to compensate for hysteresis. A nonlinear inverse filter is constructed to linearize the hysteresis based on the proposed distributed parameter model. In order to increase the calculation efficiency, a new iteration method is proposed to calculate the filter. The iteration stepsize of the input field can be adaptively updated according to the inverting error. Simulation results show that significant enhancement of convergence efficiency can be achieved by using the proposed method compared with the existing fixed step size method. Experiments have been conducted to verify the real-time control strategy.

  9. A reduced-order model from high-dimensional frictional hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2014-06-08

    Hysteresis in material behaviour includes both signum nonlinearities as well as high dimensionality. Available models for component-level hysteretic behaviour are empirical. Here, we derive a low-order model for rate-independent hysteresis from a high-dimensional massless frictional system. The original system, being given in terms of signs of velocities, is first solved incrementally using a linear complementarity problem formulation. From this numerical solution, to develop a reduced-order model, basis vectors are chosen using the singular value decomposition. The slip direction in generalized coordinates is identified as the minimizer of a dissipation-related function. That function includes terms for frictional dissipation through signum nonlinearities at many friction sites. Luckily, it allows a convenient analytical approximation. Upon solution of the approximated minimization problem, the slip direction is found. A final evolution equation for a few states is then obtained that gives a good match with the full solution. The model obtained here may lead to new insights into hysteresis as well as better empirical modelling thereof.

  10. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1-0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012)LANGD50743-746310.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  11. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, J.; Billingham, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  12. Anomalous contact angle hysteresis of a captive bubble: advancing contact line pinning.

    PubMed

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chang, Feng-Ming; Chou, Tung-He; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2011-06-07

    Contact angle hysteresis of a sessile drop on a substrate consists of continuous invasion of liquid phase with the advancing angle (θ(a)) and contact line pinning of liquid phase retreat until the receding angle (θ(r)) is reached. Receding pinning is generally attributed to localized defects that are more wettable than the rest of the surface. However, the defect model cannot explain advancing pinning of liquid phase invasion driven by a deflating bubble and continuous retreat of liquid phase driven by the inflating bubble. A simple thermodynamic model based on adhesion hysteresis is proposed to explain anomalous contact angle hysteresis of a captive bubble quantitatively. The adhesion model involves two solid–liquid interfacial tensions (γ(sl) > γ(sl)′). Young’s equation with γ(sl) gives the advancing angle θ(a) while that with γ(sl)′ due to surface rearrangement yields the receding angle θ(r). Our analytical analysis indicates that contact line pinning represents frustration in surface free energy, and the equilibrium shape corresponds to a nondifferential minimum instead of a local minimum. On the basis of our thermodynamic model, Surface Evolver simulations are performed to reproduce both advancing and receding behavior associated with a captive bubble on the acrylic glass.

  13. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J; Billingham, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  14. Inkjet printing of precisely defined features using contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Soltman, Dan; Smith, Ben; Morris, S J S; Subramanian, Vivek

    2013-06-15

    Motivated by the process of inkjet printing of electronics, we study experimentally and theoretically the processes limiting the printing of sharply defined, equilibrium corners. Using a non-volatile ionic liquid, we inkjet print squares with rounded corners on a substrate of roughened, display-grade glass. We show experimentally that with increasing roughness, corner radius decreases, allowing more precisely defined features to be printed. To interpret these results in terms of contact-angle hysteresis (difference between the advancing and retreating contact angles θA and θR), we implement the following model with the Surface Evolver program. With drop volume fixed, we minimize drop surface energy subject to a prescribed contact line. We identify θA and θR as the minimum and maximum contact angles around the drop perimeter. We find that with decreasing corner fidelity, contact-angle hysteresis also decreases. We are thus able to infer θR from the corner radius of printed features. We conclude that increasing contact-angle hysteresis allows the printing of more precisely defined features.

  15. Mode transition and hysteresis in inductively coupled radio frequency argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th.; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution presents experimental results about the mode transition of an inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) argon discharge at different total gas pressures. In particular, the positive ion saturation current and the line integrated electron density are measured by Langmuir probe and 160 GHz microwave interferometer, respectively. The mode transition strongly depends on the total gas pressure and can appear stepwise or continuously. The space resolved positive ion saturation current is separately shown for the E- and H-mode at different total gas pressures. Therewith, the pressure dependency of the RF sheath thickness indicates a collisional sheath. The hysteresis phenomenon during the E-H and the inverse H-E transition is discussed within the framework of the matching situation for different total gas pressures. The hysteresis width is analyzed using the absorbed power as well as the coil voltage and current. As a result, the width strongly increases with pressure regarding the power and the coil voltage in the E-mode and remains constant in the H-mode. In addition, the phase shift between the coil voltage and current shows a hysteresis effect, too.

  16. Sorption hysteresis of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on natural zeolite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Kalbasi, Mahmoud; Afyuni, Majid; Shariatmadari, Hossein; Holm, Peter E; Hansen, Hans Christian Brunn

    2010-09-15

    Sorption hysteresis in natural sorbents has important environmental implications for pollutant transport and bioavailability. We examined sorption reversibility of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on zeolite and bentonite. Sorption isotherms were derived by sorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from solutions containing a range of the metal concentrations corresponding to 10-100% maximum sorption capacity (SCmax) of the sorbents. The desorption experiments were performed immediately following the completion of sorption experiments. Sorption and desorption isotherms of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were well described by the Freundlich model. The results revealed that the desorption isotherms of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from zeolite significantly deviated from the sorption isotherms indicating irreversible or very slowly reversible sorption. For bentonite sorption/desorption isotherms were similar indicating reversible sorption. The extent of hysteresis was evaluated from sorption and desorption Freundlich parameters (K(f) and n) through the apparent hysteresis index (HI = n(desorb)/n(sorb); n is the exponent in the Freundlich equation) and differences in Freundlich K(f) parameters. Higher sorption irreversibility was obtained for Pb(II) as compared to Cd(II). The amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) desorbed from bentonite were more than from zeolite, indicating that zeolite was a more effective sorbent for water and wastewater treatment.

  17. Temperature-Salinity Oscillations, Sudden Transitions, and Hysteresis in Laboratory Experiments and Layered Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Te Raa, L.; Tozuka, T.

    2002-12-01

    Simplified box models of the cooling of a salt-stratified ocean have been constructed in the laboratory. A large isothermal basin of water has two layers with differing salinity. Beside this is a small basin connected to the large basin by horizontal tubes at the top, middle and bottom. Calculations indicate that there is a sudden transition and hysteresis between a shallow and a deep convection state if there is a relaxation temperature boundary condition and also if one tube has large flow resistance. Our laboratory studies to date do not clearly show hysteresis but have relatively sudden changes in properties for some parameters. The shallow state is frequently found as an oscillation, and the deep convection state is steady, although thermals produce small rapid fluctuations. Numerical models of the experiments produce qualitative agreement, but quantitative differences are large. In contrast, experiments with a cavity at the bottom of a fresh water reservoir, subjected to steady heating from below and steady salt-water inflow has two distinct states, and exhibits a hysteresis range. Oscillations and transitions like those seen in these experiments may exist in natural bodies with a layer of fresh water cooled from above such as fjords, polar bays, or larger polar regions. The oscillation periods are much greater than either the fresh water or the thermal time scale, making the oscillation mechanism a candidate for climate oscillations. (Much of this work was done at the GFD summer program).

  18. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene–early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals.

  19. Suppression of noise in SEM images using weighted local hysteresis smoothing filter.

    PubMed

    Mazhari, Mohadeseh; Hasanzadeh, Reza P R

    2016-11-01

    It has been proven that Hysteresis Smoothing (HS) has several advantages for Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image noise reduction. HS uses hysteresis thresholding to remove noise besides preserving important details of images. Determination of optimal threshold values (cursor width) plays an effective role in improving the performance of HS based filters. Recently, a novel local technique, named Local Adaptive Hysteresis Smoothing (LAHS), has been proposed to compute an optimal cursor width. In this paper, a new method is proposed to improve the performance of LAHS in noise reduction and detail preservation. In the proposed approach which is based on weighted averaging, local statistical characteristics of the image are used in order to modify the final values of estimated pixels by LAHS method. Proposed method is applied to SEM images corrupted by different levels of noise. Noise reduction and detail preservation performance of the proposed method is compared in both objective and subjective manners with other HS based filters. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is successful in improving the performance of LAHS and also it achieves better performance in noise reduction besides detail preservation of SEM images in comparison with other HS based filters. SCANNING 38:634-643, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hysteresis Analysis Based on the Ferroelectric Effect in Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Heng; Li, Guobao; Pan, Jinlong; Xu, Dongsheng; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Dapeng

    2014-11-06

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) perovskite solar cells has been developed rapidly from 6.5 to 18% within 3 years. However, the anomalous hysteresis found in I-V measurements can cause an inaccurate estimation of the efficiency. We attribute the phenomena to the ferroelectric effect and build a model based on the ferroelectric diode to explain it. The ferroelectric effect of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx is strongly suggested by characterization methods and the E-P (electrical field-polarization) loop. The hysteresis in I-V curves is found to greatly depend on the scan range as well as the velocity, which is well explained by the ferroelectric diode model. We also find that the current signals show exponential decay in ∼10 s under prolonged stepwise measurements, and the anomalous hysteresis disappears using these stabilized current values. The experimental results accord well with the model based on ferroelectric properties and prove that prolonged stepwise measurement is an effective way to evaluate the real efficiency of perovskite solar cells. Most importantly, this work provides a meaningful perspective that the ferroelectric effect (if it really exists) should be paid special attention in the optimization of perovskite solar cells.

  1. Emergence of Hysteresis and Transient Ferroelectric Response in Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Sakai, Nobuya; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-02

    Although there has been rapid progress in the efficiency of perovskite-based solar cells, hysteresis in the current-voltage performance is not yet completely understood. Owing to its complex structure, it is not easy to attribute the hysteretic behavior to any one of different components, such as the bulk of the perovskite or different heterojunction interfaces. Among organo-lead halide perovskites, methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) is known to have a ferroelectric property. The present investigation reveals a strong correlation between transient ferroelectric polarization of CH3NH3PbI3 induced by an external bias in the dark and hysteresis enhancement in photovoltaic characteristics. Our results demonstrate that the reverse bias poling (-0.3 to -1.1 V) of CH3NH3PbI3 photovoltaic layers prior to the photocurrent-voltage measurement generates stronger hysteresis whose extent changes significantly by the cell architecture. The phenomenon is interpreted as the effect of remanent polarization in the perovskite film on the photocurrent, which is most enhanced in planar perovskite structures without mesoporous scaffolds.

  2. Hysteresis in DNA compaction by Dps is described by an Ising model.

    PubMed

    Vtyurina, Natalia N; Dulin, David; Docter, Margreet W; Meyer, Anne S; Dekker, Nynke H; Abbondanzieri, Elio A

    2016-05-03

    In all organisms, DNA molecules are tightly compacted into a dynamic 3D nucleoprotein complex. In bacteria, this compaction is governed by the family of nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs). Under conditions of stress and starvation, an NAP called Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells) becomes highly up-regulated and can massively reorganize the bacterial chromosome. Although static structures of Dps-DNA complexes have been documented, little is known about the dynamics of their assembly. Here, we use fluorescence microscopy and magnetic-tweezers measurements to resolve the process of DNA compaction by Dps. Real-time in vitro studies demonstrated a highly cooperative process of Dps binding characterized by an abrupt collapse of the DNA extension, even under applied tension. Surprisingly, we also discovered a reproducible hysteresis in the process of compaction and decompaction of the Dps-DNA complex. This hysteresis is extremely stable over hour-long timescales despite the rapid binding and dissociation rates of Dps. A modified Ising model is successfully applied to fit these kinetic features. We find that long-lived hysteresis arises naturally as a consequence of protein cooperativity in large complexes and provides a useful mechanism for cells to adopt unique epigenetic states.

  3. Significance of conservative asparagine residues in the thermal hysteresis activity of carrot antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dang-Quan; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; He, Yan-Ming; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 24-amino-acid leucine-rich tandem repeat motif (PXXXXXLXXLXXLXLSXNXLXGXI) of carrot antifreeze protein comprises most of the processed protein and should contribute at least partly to the ice-binding site. Structural predictions using publicly available online sources indicated that the theoretical three-dimensional model of this plant protein includes a 10-loop beta-helix containing the approximately 24-amino-acid tandem repeat. This theoretical model indicated that conservative asparagine residues create putative ice-binding sites with surface complementarity to the 1010 prism plane of ice. We used site-specific mutagenesis to test the importance of these residues, and observed a distinct loss of thermal hysteresis activity when conservative asparagines were replaced with valine or glutamine, whereas a large increase in thermal hysteresis was observed when phenylalanine or threonine residues were replaced with asparagine, putatively resulting in the formation of an ice-binding site. These results confirmed that the ice-binding site of carrot antifreeze protein consists of conservative asparagine residues in each beta-loop. We also found that its thermal hysteresis activity is directly correlated with the length of its asparagine-rich binding site, and hence with the size of its ice-binding face. PMID:14531728

  4. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene-early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-07-08

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals.

  5. Hysteresis in DNA compaction by Dps is described by an Ising model

    PubMed Central

    Vtyurina, Natalia N.; Dulin, David; Docter, Margreet W.; Meyer, Anne S.; Dekker, Nynke H.; Abbondanzieri, Elio A.

    2016-01-01

    In all organisms, DNA molecules are tightly compacted into a dynamic 3D nucleoprotein complex. In bacteria, this compaction is governed by the family of nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs). Under conditions of stress and starvation, an NAP called Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells) becomes highly up-regulated and can massively reorganize the bacterial chromosome. Although static structures of Dps–DNA complexes have been documented, little is known about the dynamics of their assembly. Here, we use fluorescence microscopy and magnetic-tweezers measurements to resolve the process of DNA compaction by Dps. Real-time in vitro studies demonstrated a highly cooperative process of Dps binding characterized by an abrupt collapse of the DNA extension, even under applied tension. Surprisingly, we also discovered a reproducible hysteresis in the process of compaction and decompaction of the Dps–DNA complex. This hysteresis is extremely stable over hour-long timescales despite the rapid binding and dissociation rates of Dps. A modified Ising model is successfully applied to fit these kinetic features. We find that long-lived hysteresis arises naturally as a consequence of protein cooperativity in large complexes and provides a useful mechanism for cells to adopt unique epigenetic states. PMID:27091987

  6. Multifractal analysis of Barkhausen noise reveals the dynamic nature of criticality at hysteresis loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, Bosiljka

    2016-06-01

    The field-driven magnetisation reversal processes in disordered systems exhibit a collective behaviour that is manifested in the scale-invariance of avalanches, closely related to underlying dynamical mechanisms. Using the multifractal time series analysis, we study the structure of fluctuations at different scales in the accompanying Barkhausen noise. The stochastic signal represents the magnetisation discontinuities along the hysteresis loop of a three-dimensional random field Ising model simulated for varied disorder strength and driving rates. The analysis of the spectrum of the generalised Hurst exponents reveals that the dominant segments of the signal with large fluctuations represent two distinct classes of stochastic processes in weak and strong pinning regimes. Furthermore, in the weak pinning regime, the part of the signal originating from the beginning of the hysteresis loop has a different multifractal spectrum than the signal near the coercive field. The enhanced fluctuations (primarily in the central part of the hysteresis loop) for increased driving rate and larger system size, lead to a further broadening of the spectrum. The analysed Barkhausen signals are also shown to exhibit temporal correlations and power-law distributions of the magnetisation discontinuity and avalanche sizes, in agreement with previous studies. The multifractal properties of Barkhausen noise describe the dynamical state of domains and precisely discriminate the weak pinning, permitting the motion of individual walls, from the mechanisms occurring in strongly disordered systems.

  7. Effect of hysteresis on measurements of thin-film cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, D. S.; del Cueto, J. A.

    2010-08-01

    Transient or hysteresis effects in polycrystalline thin film CdS/CdTe cells are a function of pre-measurement voltage bias and whether Cu is introduced as an intentional dopant during back contact fabrication. When Cu is added, the current-density (J) vs. voltage (V) measurements performed in a reverse-to-forward voltage direction will yield higher open-circuit voltage (Voc), up to 10 mV, and smaller short-circuit current density (Jsc), by up to 2 mA/cm2, relative to scanning voltage in a forward-to-reverse direction. The variation at the maximum power point, Pmax, is however small. The resulting variation in FF can be as large as 3%. When Cu is not added, hysteresis in both Voc and Jsc is negligible however Pmax hysteresis is considerably greater. This behavior corroborates observed changes in depletion width, Wd, derived from capacitance (C) vs voltage (V) scans. Measured values of Wd are always smaller in reverse-to-forward voltage scans, and conversely, larger in the forward-to-reverse voltage direction. Transient ion drift (TID) measurements performed on Cu-containing cells do not show ionic behavior suggesting that capacitance transients are more likely due to electronic capture-emission processes. J-V curve simulation using Pspice shows that increased transient capacitance during light-soak stress at 100 °C correlates with increased space-charge recombination. Voltagedependent collection however was not observed to increase with stress in these cells.

  8. Hysteresis and the Cholesterol Dependent Phase Transition in Binary Lipid Mixtures with the Martini Model.

    PubMed

    Arnarez, Clement; Webb, Alexis; Rouvière, Eric; Lyman, Edward

    2016-12-29

    Extensive Martini simulation data, totaling 5 ms, is presented for binary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol. Using simulation initiated from both gel (so) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, significant and strongly cholesterol-dependent hysteresis in the enthalpy as a function of temperature is observed for cholesterol mole fractions from 0 to 20 mol %. Although the precise phase transition temperature cannot be determined due to the hysteresis, the data are consistent with a first order gel to fluid transition, which increases in temperature with cholesterol. At 30 mol % cholesterol, no hysteresis is observed, and there is no evidence for a continuous transition, in either structural parameters like the area per lipid or in the heat capacity as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with a single uniform phase above a critical cholesterol composition between 20 and 30 mol % in Martini, while highlighting the importance and difficulty of obtaining the equilibrium averages to locate phase boundaries precisely in computational models of lipid bilayers.

  9. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. PMID:27328764

  10. Hysteresis Analysis and Positioning Control for a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys (MSM alloys), a new kind of smart materials, have become a potential candidate in many engineering fields. MSMs have the advantage of bearing a huge strain, much larger than other materials. In addition, they also have fast response. These characteristics make MSM a good choice in micro engineering. However, MSMs display the obvious hysteresis phenomenon of nonlinear behavior. Thus the difficulty in using the MSM element as a positioning actuator is increased due to the hysteresis. In this paper, the hysteresis phenomenon of the MSM actuator is analyzed, and the closed-loop positioning control is also implemented experimentally. For that, a modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) is proposed. The MFSMC and the PID control are used to design the controllers for realizing the positioning control. The experimental results are compared under different experimental conditions, such as different frequency, amplitude, and loading. The experimental results show that the precise positioning control of MFSMC can be achieved satisfactorily. PMID:25853405

  11. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-06-22

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis.

  12. Magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen noise emission analysis of magnetic materials and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, Neelam

    specialchapt{ABSTRACT}. Barkhausen emission studies have been used to analyze the effect of residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials. The stresses generated due to mechanical wear and tear, abrasion and prolonged use can also lead to phase changes within the material. These phase changes can cause damage to the structural parts and should be prevented. In this study we analyze the magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen noise profile of materials with more than one ferromagnetic phase. The correlation between the hysteresis and Barkhausen noise profiles for such materials is studied. Secondary Barkhausen emission peaks can be simulated for such materials. Experimental observations are compared with simulation measurements. Drawing a correlation between the secondary emergent peaks and the composition of each secondary phase should lead to an improved technique for non-destructive characterization of ferromagnetic materials. . Improved sensor-to-specimen coupling is also essential for conducting Barkhausen noise measurements of multiphase materials which may also have different surface geometries. A finite element study was conducted to optimize the design parameters of the magnetizing core in a Barkhausen noise sensor. Several sensor parameters inclusive of core material, core-tip curvature, core length and pole spacing were studied. A procedure for developing a high sensitivity Barkhausen noise sensor by design optimization based on finite element simulations has been demonstrated. The study also shows the applicability of Barkhausen emission and magnetic hysteresis analysis as advanced tools of non-destructive characterization of ferromagnetic materials.

  13. Modeling of Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Using a GPO-Based Adaptive Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Yaopeng

    2016-02-06

    A novel generalized play operator-based (GPO-based) nonlinear adaptive filter is proposed to model rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity for smart actuators. In the proposed filter, the input signal vector consists of the output of a tapped delay line. GPOs with various thresholds are used to construct a nonlinear network and connected with the input signals. The output signal of the filter is composed of a linear combination of signals from the output of GPOs. The least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is used to adjust the weights of the nonlinear filter. The modeling results of four adaptive filter methods are compared: GPO-based adaptive filter, Volterra filter, backlash filter and linear adaptive filter. Moreover, a phenomenological operator-based model, the rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (RDGPI) model, is compared to the proposed adaptive filter. The various rate-dependent modeling methods are applied to model the rate-dependent hysteresis of a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA). It is shown from the modeling results that the GPO-based adaptive filter can describe the rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinear of the GMA more accurately and effectively.

  14. Hysteresis modeling of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miaolei; Wang, Shoubin; Gao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA) has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP) model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator.

  15. Design of High Temperature Ti-Pd-Cr Shape Memory Alloys with Small Thermal Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Xue, Dezhen; Lookman, Turab; Zhang, Guojun; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The large thermal hysteresis (ΔT) during the temperature induced martensitic transformation is a major obstacle to the functional stability of shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially for high temperature applications. We propose a design strategy for finding SMAs with small thermal hysteresis. That is, a small ΔT can be achieved in the compositional crossover region between two different martensitic transformations with opposite positive and negative changes in electrical resistance at the transformation temperature. We demonstrate this for a high temperature ternary Ti-Pd-Cr SMA by achieving both a small ΔT and high transformation temperature. We propose two possible underlying physics governing the reduction in ΔT. One is that the interfacial strain is accommodated at the austenite/martensite interface via coexistence of B19 and 9R martensites. The other is that one of transformation eigenvalues equal to 1, i.e., λ2 = 1, indicating a perfect coherent interface between austenite and martensite. Our results are not limited to Ti-Pd-Cr SMAs but potentially provide a strategy for searching for SMAs with small thermal hysteresis.

  16. Hysteresis and reluctance electric machines with bulk HTS elements. Recent results and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, L. K.; Ilushin, K. V.; Penkin, V. T.; Kovalev, K. L.; M-A Koneev, S.; Poltavets, V. N.; Larionoff, A. E.; Modestov, K. A.; Larionoff, S. A.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.; Oswald, B.; Best, K.-J.; Strasser, T.

    2000-05-01

    Two new types of HTS electric machine are considered. The first type is hysteresis motors and generators with cylindrical and disc rotors containing bulk HTS elements. The second type is reluctance motors with compound HTS-ferromagnetic rotors. The compound HTS-ferromagnetic rotors, consisting of joined alternating bulk HTS (YBCO) and ferromagnetic (iron) plates, provide a new active material for electromechanical purposes. Such rotors have anisotropic properties (ferromagnetic in one direction and diamagnetic in the perpendicular one). Theoretical and experimental results for HTS hysteresis and reluctance motors are presented. A series of hysteresis HTS motors with output power rating from 1 kW (at 50 Hz) up to 4 kW (at 400 Hz) and a series of reluctance HTS motors with output power 2-18.5 kW (at 50 Hz) were constructed and successfully tested. It was shown that HTS reluctance motors could reach two to five times better overall dimensions and specific power than conventional asynchronous motors of the same size and will have higher values of power factor (cos ϕ≥0.7 to 0.8).

  17. Restricted access: on the nature of adsorption/desorption hysteresis in amorphous, microporous polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Jeromenok, Jekaterina; Weber, Jens

    2013-10-22

    The phenomenon of low-pressure adsorption/desorption hysteresis, which is commonly observed in microporous polymers, is investigated by detailed gas adsorption studies. Diffusional limitations by pore blocking effects, which arise as a consequence of the micropore morphology and connectivity, are discussed as the origin of the hysteresis rather than swelling effects, which have been suggested previously. Micropores with narrow openings, which cannot be filled easily, are expected to be present next to open pores. Those pores are termed restricted-access pores and are only filled in the course of the adsorption process as a consequence of the increasing solvation pressure exhibited from already filled micropores. As a consequence of the results presented here, it is suggested to use the desorption branch in addition to the adsorption branch for the extraction of the porosity characteristics, such as specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution. The magnitude of the low-pressure hysteresis might hence give an idea of the micropore connectivity, which is important information for potential applications.

  18. Scanning of Adsorption Hysteresis In Situ with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Athanasios Ch.; Favvas, Evangelos P.; Stefanopoulos, Konstantinos L.; Vansant, Etienne F.

    2016-01-01

    Everett’s theorem-6 of the domain theory was examined by conducting adsorption in situ with small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) supplemented by the contrast matching technique. The study focuses on the spectrum differences of a point to which the system arrives from different scanning paths. It is noted that according to this theorem at a common point the system has similar macroscopic properties. Furthermore it was examined the memory string of the system. We concluded that opposite to theorem-6: a) at a common point the system can reach in a finite (not an infinite) number of ways, b) a correction for the thickness of the adsorbed film prior to capillary condensation is necessary, and c) the scattering curves although at high-Q values coincide, at low-Q values are different indicating different microscopic states. That is, at a common point the system holds different metastable states sustained by hysteresis effects. These metastable states are the ones which highlight the way of a system back to a return point memory (RPM). Entering the hysteresis loop from different RPMs different histories are implanted to the paths toward the common point. Although in general the memory points refer to relaxation phenomena, they also constitute a characteristic feature of capillary condensation. Analogies of the no-passing rule and the adiabaticity assumption in the frame of adsorption hysteresis are discussed. PMID:27741263

  19. A reduced-order model from high-dimensional frictional hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis in material behaviour includes both signum nonlinearities as well as high dimensionality. Available models for component-level hysteretic behaviour are empirical. Here, we derive a low-order model for rate-independent hysteresis from a high-dimensional massless frictional system. The original system, being given in terms of signs of velocities, is first solved incrementally using a linear complementarity problem formulation. From this numerical solution, to develop a reduced-order model, basis vectors are chosen using the singular value decomposition. The slip direction in generalized coordinates is identified as the minimizer of a dissipation-related function. That function includes terms for frictional dissipation through signum nonlinearities at many friction sites. Luckily, it allows a convenient analytical approximation. Upon solution of the approximated minimization problem, the slip direction is found. A final evolution equation for a few states is then obtained that gives a good match with the full solution. The model obtained here may lead to new insights into hysteresis as well as better empirical modelling thereof. PMID:24910522

  20. Thermal Hysteresis in Resistivity and Magnetization of PrCa(Sr)MnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollah, S.

    Thermal hysteresis in resistivity and magnetization of Pr0.65Ca0.35-xSrxMnO3 (x = 0-0.35) manganites has been systematically studied to establish the interplay of their charge and spin-ordering. The increasing Sr concentration (x) transforms the charge-ordered (CO)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating system (for x = 0) into a mixed-phased one (for x = 0.1) with sharp metal-insulator (MI) transition and finally leads to a ferromagnetic (FM) metallic (for x = 0.35) system. It has been found that the interplay of charge and spin-ordering is higher in mixed-phased state and the thermal hysteresis loop area is bigger. It increases with the increase of sharpness of MI transition. Interplay of charge and spin-ordering decreases with the increase of either CO/AFM insulating or FM metallic phase and is almost absent in completely CO/AFM insulating (with x = 0) or FM metallic (with x = 0.35) states bringing about zero thermal hysteresis loop.

  1. Hysteresis of mode transition in a dual-struts based scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Shaohua, Zhu; Bing, Chen; Xu, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Tests and numerical simulations were performed to investigate the combustion performance of a dual-staged scramjet combustor. High enthalpy vitiated inflow at a total temperature of 1231 K was supplied using a hydrogen-combustion heater. The inlet Mach number was 2.0. Liquid kerosene was injected into the combustor using the dual crossed struts. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged reacting flow was solved using a two-equation k-ω SST turbulence model to calculate the effect of turbulent stress, and a partial-premixed flamelet model to model the effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The discrete phase model was utilized to simulate the fuel atomization and vaporization. For simplicity, the n-decane was chosen as the surrogate fuel with a reaction mechanism of 40 species and 141 steps. The predicted wall pressure profiles at three fuel injection schemes basically captured the axial varying trend of the experimental data. With the downstream equivalence ratio held constant, the upstream equivalence ratio was numerically increased from 0.1 to 0.4 until a steady combustion was obtained. Subsequently, the upstream equivalence ratio was decreased from 0.4 to 0.1 once again. Two ramjet modes with different wall pressure profiles and corresponding flow structures were captured under the identical upstream equivalence ratio of 0.1, illustrating an obvious hysteresis phenomenon. The mechanism of this hysteresis was explained by the transition hysteresis of the pre-combustion shock train in the isolator.

  2. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH.

  3. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible.

  4. Nonequilibrium hysteresis and Wien effect water dissociation at a bipolar membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, D. T.; Craster, R. V.; Matar, O. K.; Cheng, L.-J.; Chang, H.-C.

    2012-11-01

    As in electrochemical cyclic voltammetry, time-periodic reverse voltage bias across a bipolar membrane is shown to exhibit hysteresis due to transient effects. This is due to the incomplete depletion of mobile ions, at the junction between the membranes, within two adjoining polarized layers; the layer thickness depends on the applied voltage and the surface charge densities. Experiments show that the hysteresis consists of an Ohmic linear rise in the total current with respect to the voltage, followed by a decay of the current. A limiting current is established for a long period when all the mobile ions are depleted from the polarized layer. If the resulting high field within the two polarized layers is sufficiently large, water dissociation occurs to produce proton and hydroxyl traveling wave fronts which contribute to another large jump in the current. We use numerical simulation and asymptotic analysis to interpret the experimental results and to estimate the amplitude of the transient hysteresis and the water-dissociation current.

  5. Environmental Effects on Hysteresis of Transfer Characteristics in Molybdenum Disulfide Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Yoshihiro; Tashiro, Mitsuki; Sonobe, Satoshi; Takahashi, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently received much attention for nanoscale electronic and photonic applications. To explore the intrinsic properties and enhance the performance of MoS2-based field-effect transistors, thorough understanding of extrinsic effects such as environmental gas and contact resistance of the electrodes is required. Here, we report the effects of environmental gases on the transport properties of back-gated multilayered MoS2 field-effect transistors. Comparisons between different gases (oxygen, nitrogen, and air and nitrogen with varying relative humidities) revealed that water molecules acting as charge-trapping centers are the main cause of hysteresis in the transfer characteristics. While the hysteresis persisted even after pumping out the environmental gas for longer than 10 h at room temperature, it disappeared when the device was cooled to 240 K, suggesting a considerable increase in the time constant of the charge trapping/detrapping at these modestly low temperatures. The suppression of the hysteresis or instability in the easily attainable temperature range without surface passivation is highly advantageous for the device application of this system. The humidity dependence of the threshold voltages in the transfer curves indicates that the water molecules dominantly act as hole-trapping centers. A strong dependence of the on-state current on oxygen pressure was also observed.

  6. Hysteresis effects in a motor task with cotton-top tamarins (Sanguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J; Wark, Jason

    2009-07-01

    The way human adults grasp an object is influenced by their recent history of motor actions. Previously executed grasps are often more likely to reoccur on subsequent grasps. This type of hysteresis effect has been incorporated into cognitive models of motor planning, suggesting that when planning movements, individuals tend to reuse recently used plans rather than generating new plans from scratch. To the best of our knowledge, the phylogenetic roots of this phenomenon have not been investigated. Here, the authors asked whether 6 cotton-top tamarin monkeys (Saguinus oedipus) would demonstrate a hysteresis effect on a reaching task. The authors tested the monkeys by placing marshmallow pieces within grasping distance of a hole through which the monkeys could reach. On subsequent trials, the marshmallow position changed such that it progressed in an arc in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction. The authors asked whether the transition point in right- versus left-handed reaches would differ depending on the direction of the progression. The data supported this hysteresis prediction. The outcome provides additional support for the notion that human motor planning strategies may have a lengthy evolutionary history.

  7. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1 -0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012), 10.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  8. Interface Defect Hydrogen Depassivation and Capacitance-Voltage Hysteresis of Al2O3/InGaAs Gate Stacks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kechao; Palumbo, Felix Roberto; Zhang, Liangliang; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul C

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of pre- and postatomic layer deposition (ALD) defect passivation with hydrogen on the trap density and reliability of Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks. Reliability is characterized by capacitance-voltage hysteresis measurements on samples prepared using different fabrication procedures and having different initial trap densities. Despite its beneficial capability to passivate both interface and border traps, a final forming gas (H2/N2) anneal (FGA) step is correlated with a significant hysteresis. This appears to be caused by hydrogen depassivation of defects in the gate stack under bias stress, supported by the observed bias stress-induced increase of interface trap density, and strong hydrogen isotope effects on the measured hysteresis. On the other hand, intentional air exposure of the InGaAs surface prior to Al2O3 ALD increases the initial interface trap density (Dit) but considerably lowers the hysteresis.

  9. Correct Determination of Hysteresis of Nonlinear Current-Voltage Characteristics of Spin Valves, Magnetic Tunnel Junctions, or Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    Until now, significant progress has been made in synthesizing the current-switched structure of spin valves and magnetic tunnel junctions with hysteresis dependences of the resistance on the current. These structures are of interest for creation of small-size electronic memory. However, hysteresis of resistance, which is usually presented in publications, does not correspond to physical principles. In this paper, we show how the hysteresis dependence of the resistance on the current, or the conductance on the voltage, which does not contradict the energy conservation law, and the corresponding current-voltage characteristic should look like. As an example, we present the experimental current-voltage characteristic of the CO2MnSi/MgO/Co2MnSi magnetic tunnel junction, which agrees with the model hysteresis dependences.

  10. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  11. Mixed self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on ultrasmooth gold do not exhibit contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Ulman, Abraham; Fanfan, Stephanie; Korniakov, Alexander; Loos, Katja

    2005-01-12

    We present the first study of mixed alkanethiolate SAMs on ultrasmooth gold surfaces. By eliminating surface roughness, it became possible, for the first time, to investigate wetting properties as a function of surface chemical composition. In three different surface compositions, it was found that contact-angle hysteresis apparently vanished. This suggests that surface chemical heterogeneity does not contribute to contact-angle hysteresis in mixed SAMs on ultrasmooth gold surfaces.

  12. Effects of Control Hysteresis on the Space Shuttle Orbiter's Entry. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    There are six degree-of-freedom simulations of the space shuttle orbiter entry with aerodynamic control hysteresis conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center interactive simulator known as the Automatic Reentry Flight Dynamics Simulator. These were performed to determine if the presence of aerodynamic control hysteresis would endanger the mission, either by making the vehicle unable to maintain proper attitude for a safe entry, or by increasing the amount of the reaction control system's fuel consumption beyond that carried.

  13. Non-linear control of a hydraulic piezo-valve using a generalised Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanski, Frederik; Minorowicz, Bartosz; Persson, Johan; Plummer, Andrew; Bowen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The potential to actuate proportional flow control valves using piezoelectric ceramics or other smart materials has been investigated for a number of years. Although performance advantages compared to electromagnetic actuation have been demonstrated, a major obstacle has proven to be ferroelectric hysteresis, which is typically 20% for a piezoelectric actuator. In this paper, a detailed study of valve control methods incorporating hysteresis compensation is made for the first time. Experimental results are obtained from a novel spool valve actuated by a multi-layer piezoelectric ring bender. A generalised Prandtl-Ishlinskii model, fitted to experimental training data from the prototype valve, is used to model hysteresis empirically. This form of model is analytically invertible and is used to compensate for hysteresis in the prototype valve both open loop, and in several configurations of closed loop real time control system. The closed loop control configurations use PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) control with either the inverse hysteresis model in the forward path or in a command feedforward path. Performance is compared to both open and closed loop control without hysteresis compensation via step and frequency response results. Results show a significant improvement in accuracy and dynamic performance using hysteresis compensation in open loop, but where valve position feedback is available for closed loop control the improvements are smaller, and so conventional PID control may well be sufficient. It is concluded that the ability to combine state-of-the-art multi-layer piezoelectric bending actuators with either sophisticated hysteresis compensation or closed loop control provides a route for the creation of a new generation of high performance piezoelectric valves.

  14. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  15. Investigating the mechanism of hysteresis effect in graphene electrical field device fabricated on SiO₂ substrates using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Haoli

    2012-09-24

    The hysteresis effect is a common problem in graphene field-effect transistors (FETs). Usually, the external doping to graphene is considered to be responsible for the hysteresis behavior, but is not yet clearly understood. By monitoring the doping of graphene and the hysteresis in graphene FETs under different atmospheres using in situ Raman spectroscopy, it is confirmed that the electrochemical doping of O(2) /H(2) O redox couple to graphene is responsible for the hysteresis effect. In addition, Raman spectra of graphene on SiO(2) substrate show stronger doping than that suspended, which indicates that SiO(2) substrate plays an important role in the doping of graphene. Herein it is proposed that the doping species (H(2) O and O(2) ) are bounded at the interface of graphene/SiO(2) substrate by hydrogen-bonds with the silanol groups on SiO(2) substrate. The dynamic equilibrium process of the charge-transfer between H(2) O/O(2) redox couple and graphene under electrical field modulation is carefully analyzed using Marcus-Gerischer theory. This work provides a clear view to the mechanism of the hysteresis effect, and is of benefit to a reliable design to suppress the hysteresis in graphene FETs.

  16. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  17. The presence of long spinal muscles increases stiffness and hysteresis of the caprine spine in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Valentin, S; Grösel, M; Licka, T

    2012-10-11

    Long muscle-tendon-units are known to contribute to spinal stiffness and hysteresis in-vivo, yet their contribution as a passive structure in-vitro is less well defined. Twelve full length caprine spines including the head, pelvis and all spinal muscles were tested during displacement in Flexion-Extension (FE) and coupled Lateral and Rotational (LR) motion in a material testing machine. Hysteresis and modified stiffness (modST), i.e. mean force divided by the total displacement, were calculated. This was repeated following removal of dorsal muscles (longissimus dorsi and gluteus) and ventral muscles (iliopsoas), in a random order. ModST and hysteresis in the different dissection stages were identified. Correlations between modST, hysteresis, body mass, spine length and longissimus muscle thickness were calculated. Removal of dorsal musculature reduced extension modST significantly by 23%, and flexion modST by 40%. Ventral muscle removal reduced extension modST by 1% and flexion modSt by 13%. Hysteresis was reduced by 27% after dorsal and 2% after ventral muscle removal in FE hysteresis. Out of 105 correlation coefficients, five values were significantly correlated (p<0.05, range r(2): 0.61-0.71) and 10 values were highly significantly correlated (p<0.01, range r(2): 0.75-0.97). Strongest correlations were between hysteresis and modST for the same movement direction and dissection state. The results of this study demonstrate that the presence of muscles stiffens the spine with dorsal muscles showing more effect. This supports the concept that muscle volume even in a non-contractile state provides a stabilising function to the spine.

  18. Comparative solute-discharge hysteresis analysis for an urbanized and a 'control basin' in the Georgia (USA) Piedmont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Seth

    2003-12-01

    Solute-discharge hysteresis ( C/ Q) relationships were investigated in an urbanized (Peachtree Creek) and a less-urbanized 'control' basin (Sweetwater Creek, SWC) within the Atlanta metropolitan region of the Georgia Piedmont. C/ Q hysteresis loops for the nine parameters (pH, specific conductance, dissolved silica, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate and chloride) representative of urban storm flow were almost exclusively characterized by clockwise rotation and concave curvature ('C3' type hysteresis of Evans and Davies, 1998). The most straight forward interpretation of this hysteresis is that it is the result of two-component mixing in which the concentration of a given component in 'pre-event' water (ground water) is greater than 'event' water (storm runoff). Simple binary mixing calculations confirm that C3 hysteresis loops result where the more dilute storm runoff dominates both the rising and falling limbs of the storm hydrograph. The two-component mixing model is consistent with the very short recession (24-48 h) periods for this urban stream and the high regression constants ( r2 values>0.85) for many pairs of the geochemical parameters. The hysteresis dynamics for the less-urbanized control basin (SWC) are more complicated; however, the dominance of anticlockwise-concave C/ Q loops ('A3' type of Evans and Davies, 1998) for two of the three storm events suggests that three-component mixing may be occurring, particularly during lower flow events. A3 hysteresis loops can be produced where event and soil water dominate the rising limb and soil and ground water dominate the falling limb of the hydrograph. Three-component mixing is consistent with the low regression coefficients ( r2<0.45) for most pairs of geochemical parameters and with the characteristically long recession periods (4 days or more) associated with SWC that might allow more time for soil water to contribute to stream flow.

  19. A suite of user-friendly global climate models: Hysteresis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraedrich, K.

    2012-05-01

    A hierarchy of global spectral circulation models is introduced ranging from the shallow-water system via the primitive-equation dynamical core of the atmosphere to the Planet Simulator as a Global Climate Model (GCM) of Intermediate Complexity (MIC) which can be used to run climate and paleo-climate simulations for time scales up to ten thousand years or more in an acceptable real time. The priorities in development are set to speed, easy handling and portability with a modular structure suitable for problem-dependent configuration. Adaptions exist for the planetary atmospheres of Mars and of Saturn's moon Titan and are being extended. Common coupling interfaces enable the addition of ocean, ice, vegetation models and more. An interactive mode with a Model Starter and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) is available to select a configuration from the available model suite, to set its parameters and inspect atmospheric fields while changing the models' parameters on the fly. This is especially useful for teaching, debugging and tuning of parameterizations. An updated overview of the model suite's features is presented based on the Earth-like climate model Planet Simulator with mixed-layer ocean introducing static and memory hysteresis in terms of a parameter sweep of the solar constant and CO2 concentrations. The static hysteresis experiment demonstrates that the solar constant varying by 20% reveals warm and snowball Earth climate regimes depending on the history of the system. This hysteresis subjected to a thermodynamic analysis shows the following features: i) Both climate regimes are characterized by global mean surface temperature and entropy growing with increasing solar constant. ii) The climate system's efficiency decreases (increases) with increasing solar constant in present-day warm (snowball) climate conditions. iii) Climate transitions near bifurcation points are characterized by high efficiency associated with the system's large distance from the stable

  20. The design, hysteresis modeling and control of a novel SMA-fishing-line actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chaoqun; Yang, Hui; Sun, Zhiyong; Xue, Bangcan; Hao, Lina; Asadur Rahoman, M. D.; Davis, Steve

    2017-03-01

    Fishing line can be combined with shape memory alloy (SMA) to form novel artificial muscle actuators which have low cost, are lightweight and soft. They can be applied in bionic, wearable and rehabilitation robots, and can reduce system weight and cost, increase power-to-weight ratio and offer safer physical human-robot interaction. However, these actuators possess several disadvantages, for example fishing line based actuators possess low strength and are complex to drive, and SMA possesses a low percentage contraction and has high hysteresis. This paper presents a novel artificial actuator (known as an SMA-fishing-line) made of fishing line and SMA twisted then coiled together, which can be driven directly by an electrical voltage. Its output force can reach 2.65 N at 7.4 V drive voltage, and the percentage contraction at 4 V driven voltage with a 3 N load is 7.53%. An antagonistic bionic joint driven by the novel SMA-fishing-line actuators is presented, and based on an extended unparallel Prandtl-Ishlinskii (EUPI) model, its hysteresis behavior is established, and the error ratio of the EUPI model is determined to be 6.3%. A Joule heat model of the SMA-fishing-line is also presented, and the maximum error of the established model is 0.510 mm. Based on this accurate hysteresis model, a composite PID controller consisting of PID and an integral inverse (I-I) compensator is proposed and its performance is compared with a traditional PID controller through simulations and experimentation. These results show that the composite PID controller possesses higher control precision than basic PID, and is feasible for implementation in an SMA-fishing-line driven antagonistic bionic joint.

  1. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  2. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-05

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces.

  3. Hysteresis of heart rate and heat exchange of fasting and postprandial savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus).

    PubMed

    Zaar, Morten; Larsen, Einer; Wang, Tobias

    2004-04-01

    Reptiles are ectothermic, but regulate body temperatures (T(b)) by behavioural and physiological means. Body temperature has profound effects on virtually all physiological functions. It is well known that heating occurs faster than cooling, which seems to correlate with changes in cutaneous perfusion. Increased cutaneous perfusion, and hence elevated cardiac output, during heating is reflected in an increased heart rate (f(H)), and f(H), at a given T(b), is normally higher during heating compared to cooling ('hysteresis of heart rate'). Digestion is associated with an increased metabolic rate. This is associated with an elevated f(H) and many species of reptiles also exhibited a behavioural selection of higher T(b) during digestion. Here, we examine whether digestion affects the rate of heating and cooling as well as the hysteresis of heart rate in savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus). Fasting lizards were studied after 5 days of food deprivation while digesting lizards were studied approximately 24 h after ingesting dead mice that equalled 10% of their body mass. Heart rate was measured while T(b) increased from 28 to 38 degrees C under a heat lamp and while T(b) decreased during a subsequent cooling phase. The lizards exhibited hysteresis of heart rate, and heating occurred faster than cooling. Feeding led to an increased f(H) (approximately 20 min(-1) irrespective of T(b)), but did not affect the rate of temperature change during heating or cooling. Therefore, it is likely that the increased blood flows during digestion are distributed exclusively to visceral organs and that the thermal conductance remains unaffected by the elevated metabolic rate during digestion.

  4. Hysteresis effects in the formation of a neutralizing beam plasma at low ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the PEGASES II thruster prototype is used as an ion source generating low-energy (<300\\ \\text{eV}) positive Ar ion beam, extracted without an external neutralizer. The ions are extracted and accelerated from the source using a two-grid system. The extracted positive ion beam current is measured on a large beam target that can be translated along the acceleration axis. The ion beam current shows a stepwise transition from a low-current to a high-current extraction regime with hysteresis. The hysteresis region depends strongly upon the beam target position. Langmuir probe measurements in the plume show high plasma potentials and low plasma densities in the low-current mode, while the plasma potential drops and the density increases in the high-current mode. The ion energy distribution functions of the beam are measured for different regimes of ion extraction. The ion beam extracted in the high-current mode is indicated by the presence of an additional low-energy peak corresponding to ions from an ion-beam plasma created in the downstream chamber, as well as 10-20 times higher intensity of the primary ion beam peak. The hysteresis behavior is explained by the formation of a downstream neutralizing beam plasma, that depends on the target position and pressure in agreement with a Paschen-like breakdown by secondary electrons. The obtained results are of high relevance for further development of the PEGASES thruster, as well as for improving existing neutralizer-free concepts of the broad-beam ion sources.

  5. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  6. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-09-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC˜T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a dataset of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009-2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 µm). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC˜T relations. Changes of only 5 µm in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC˜T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC˜T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  7. Effect of rapid delayed rectifier current on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration in swine.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anuj; Jing, Linyuan; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stability in the heart depends on two important factors; restitution of action potential duration (APD) and memory. Repolarization currents play an important role in determining APD and also affect memory. We determined the effects of blocking the rapid component of the delayed rectifier (I(Kr)) on a quantifiable measure of memory, i.e. hysteresis in restitution of APD, in swine. Transmembrane potentials were recorded from right ventricular endocardial tissues. Two pacing protocols with explicit control of diastolic interval (DI) were used to change DIs in a sequential and sinusoidal pattern to quantify hysteresis in restitution of APD. E-4031 (5 µM/L) was used to block I(Kr). Measures of memory and restitution were quantified by calculating hysteresis loop thickness, area, overall tilt, and maximum and minimum delays between DIs and APDs. Blocking I(Kr) with E-4031 increased the baseline APD, loop thickness, area, and tilt (p<0.05). However, loop thickness did not increase beyond what could be predicted by the increase in baseline APD after block of I(Kr). The substantial change in APD after blocking I(Kr) suggests that this current plays a major role in repolarization in the swine. Loop thickness is a measure of memory, an increase in which is predicted by theory to reduce instability in activation. In our study, the substantial increase in loop thickness could be accounted for by an equally substantial increase in APD and therefore does not necessarily indicate increased memory after blocking I(Kr). Our results also suggest that factors based on restitution and memory need to be considered in the context of operating point, i.e. baseline APD, when they are used to explore mechanisms that affect electrical stability in the heart.

  8. Hysteresis, thermomagnetic, and low-temperature magnetic properties of Southwestern U.S. obsidians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, R. S.; Jackson, M. J.; Shackley, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical signatures of Southwestern U.S. obsidians have been intensively studied, in part to use as a provenance method for archaeological obsidians (Shackley, 2005). We reported (Sternberg et al. 2010) examined magnetic properties of 50 unoriented samples from 10 geologic obsidian sources in Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico; here we provide additional results measured at the Institute for Rock magnetism. Room-temperature hysteresis curves were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer on 58 specimens from all 50 samples. The Quantum Designs Magnetic Properties Measurement System was used to measure low temperature cycling of the natural remanence and/or of a room-temperature saturation isothermal remanence for 10 specimens, and frequency dependence of susceptibility for 7 specimens. A Princeton VSM was used to measure hysteresis curves and thermomagnetic curves for 19 specimens from 17 samples. Eleven of the thermomagnetic curves show Curie temperatures close to that for magnetite, and most of them are almost perfectly reversible. Many of the specimens also show a less well-defined Curie point around 150-200°C; for a few specimens the thermomagnetic behavior is dominated by paramagnetic iron and no ferromagnetic phases can be identified. The low-temperature remanence and susceptibility measurements show the magnetite Verwey transition in almost all specimens, and a significant superparamagnetic presence in only a few cases. Hysteresis parameters plot mainly in the lower half of the PSD domain on a Day plot, and saturation magnetization values indicate magnetite concentrations of about 0.2% to 0.5% for most specimens. The coercivity of remanence decreased considerably for one specimen after surface cleaning, although for 5 other comparisons there was no change.

  9. ac dynamics of ferroelectric domains from an investigation of the frequency dependence of hysteresis loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. M.; Jo, J. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Yoon, J.-G.; Song, T. K.; Lee, H. N.; Marton, Z.; Park, S.; Jo, Y.; Noh, T. W.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the pinning dominated domain-wall dynamics under an ac field by studying the frequency (f) dependence of hysteresis loops of a uniaxial ferroelectric (FE) system. We measured the fully saturated polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops of high-quality epitaxial 100-nm-thick PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 capacitors at various f (5-2000 Hz) and temperatures T (10-300 K). We observed that the coercive field EC is proportional to fβ with two scaling regions, which was also reported earlier in magnetic systems [T. A. Moore and J. A. C. Bland, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, R1369 (2004), 10.1088/0953-8984/16/46/R03and references therein]. In addition, we observed that the two scaling regions of EC vs f exist at all measured T . We found that the existence of the two scaling regions should come from a dynamic crossover between the creep and flow regimes of the FE domain-wall motions. By extending the theory of Nattermann , which was originally proposed for impure magnet systems [T. Nattermann, V. Pokrovsky, and V. M. Vinokur, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 197005 (2001)10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.197005], to the disordered FE systems, we obtained analytical expressions for the dynamic crossovers between the relaxation and creep, and between the creep and flow regimes. By comparing with the experimental data from our fully saturated P-E hysteresis loop measurements, we could construct a T-E dynamic phase diagram with f as a parameter for hysteretic FE domain dynamics in the presence of an ac field.

  10. Insolation-driven 100,000-year glacial cycles and hysteresis of ice-sheet volume.

    PubMed

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Saito, Fuyuki; Kawamura, Kenji; Raymo, Maureen E; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Takahashi, Kunio; Blatter, Heinz

    2013-08-08

    The growth and reduction of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past million years is dominated by an approximately 100,000-year periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests have demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. Yet insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100,000-year cycle, suggesting that internal climatic feedbacks may also be at work. Earlier conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms underpinning the 100,000-year cycle remain unclear. Here we show, using comprehensive climate and ice-sheet models, that insolation and internal feedbacks between the climate, the ice sheets and the lithosphere-asthenosphere system explain the 100,000-year periodicity. The responses of equilibrium states of ice sheets to summer insolation show hysteresis, with the shape and position of the hysteresis loop playing a key part in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that after inception of the ice sheet, its mass balance remains mostly positive through several precession cycles, whose amplitudes decrease towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to make the mass balance negative. Therefore, once a large ice sheet is established, a moderate increase in insolation is sufficient to trigger a negative mass balance, leading to an almost complete retreat of the ice sheet within several thousand years. This fast retreat is governed mainly by rapid ablation due to the lowered surface elevation resulting from delayed isostatic rebound, which is the lithosphere

  11. Enhancement of the transversal magnetic optic Kerr effect: Lock-in vs. hysteresis method.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Jorge Nicolás; Herreño-Fierro, César A; Patiño, Edgar J

    2016-10-01

    The lock-in amplifier is often used to study the enhancement of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) in the presence of plasmon resonances. In the present work we show that it is possible to investigate such effect replacing the lock-in amplifier by a compensator, filter, and differential amplifier. This allows us to extract the full hysteresis loop in and out of the resonance without the need of a lock-in amplifier. Our results demonstrate these two setups are equivalent to study the enhancement of the transversal MOKE (T-MOKE) in magnetoplasmonic systems.

  12. Force of adhesion upon loss of contact angle hysteresis: when a liquid behaves like a solid.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan V; Castillo, Rolando

    2013-11-27

    The theoretically predicted vanishment of the macroscopic contact angle hysteresis is found experimentally along with a small but finite force of adhesion (F(Ad)≈-0.5 μN) that, unexpectedly, is independent of the history of the preload. Our results agree with the prediction of a model in which the surface tension of the liquid provides the counterpart of the restoring force of an elastic solid, evidencing that the dewetting of a liquid in the absence of strong pinning points is equivalent to the detachment of an elastic solid.

  13. Photovoltaic hysteresis and its ramifications for concentrator solar cell design and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Katz, Eugene A.; Tassew, Wondesen; Feuermann, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    We report the observation of a photovoltaic effect with pronounced hysteresis. The phenomenon derives from the sharp transition in the dominant mode of electron transport in the tunnel diodes that regulate multijunction solar cells, and is only observable at high flux. These results emerged from measurements of cell current-voltage characteristics performed with miniature fiber-optic solar concentrators that can deliver flux levels up to 10 000 times that of ambient sunlight in a highly localized fashion. The ramifications of our findings for photovoltaic design, diagnostics, and performance are addressed, and a nondestructive determination of the peak and valley threshold current densities of tunnel diodes is presented.

  14. Freeze-thaw hysteresis effects in terahertz imaging of biomedical tissues

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuezhi; Ung, Benjamin S.-Y.; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Ahuja, Anil T.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    There have recently been several studies published involving terahertz (THz) imaging of frozen biomedical samples. In this paper, we investigate the effects of the freeze-thaw cycle on THz properties of porcine muscle and fat samples. For ordinary freezing, there was a significant change in the THz properties after thawing for muscle tissue but not for fat tissue. However, if snap-freezing was combined with fast-thawing instead of ordinary freezing and ordinary thawing, then the freeze-thaw hysteresis was removed. PMID:27896010

  15. The Wave Processes in the Media Having Inelastic Hysteresis with Saturation of The Nonlinear Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. E.; Kiyashko, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We study theoretically the nonlinear wave processes during excitation of a longitudinal harmonic wave in an unbounded medium and the rod resonator with inelastic hysteresis and saturation of the amplitude-dependent loss. The nonlinear-wave characteristics in such systems, namely, the amplitude-dependent loss, variation in the wave-propagation velocity, the resonant-frequency shift, and the higher-harmonic amplitudes are determined. The results of the theoretical and experimental studies of nonlinear effects in the rod resonator of annealed polycrystalline copper are compared. The effective parameters of the hysteretic nonlinearity of this metal are evaluated.

  16. Enhancement of the transversal magnetic optic Kerr effect: Lock-in vs. hysteresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Jorge Nicolás; Herreño-Fierro, César A.; Patiño, Edgar J.

    2016-10-01

    The lock-in amplifier is often used to study the enhancement of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) in the presence of plasmon resonances. In the present work we show that it is possible to investigate such effect replacing the lock-in amplifier by a compensator, filter, and differential amplifier. This allows us to extract the full hysteresis loop in and out of the resonance without the need of a lock-in amplifier. Our results demonstrate these two setups are equivalent to study the enhancement of the transversal MOKE (T-MOKE) in magnetoplasmonic systems.

  17. Input-Output Stability Analysis with Magnetic Hysteresis Non-Linearity - A Class of Multipliers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-08

    Circuit Theory, Vol. CT-17. that the same properties hold for yl(t). i.e.. p. 564. Nov. 1970. YI(t)ELa, is continuous, and go to zero as t--. [12] Desoer ...inductor (trans- former), but from circuit analysis point of view. zero as t . the input and output of the model replaced for N U as shown in Fig. (2...output [I. I],"Lumped- Circuit Models for Non-linearcof Industors Exhibiting Hysteresis Loop.’therefore, eEL., and el(t)- 0 as t- . imply IEEE Trans. on

  18. Gas flow across a wet screen - Analogy to a relief valve with hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachman, A.; Dodge, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The flow of gas through a wet fine-mesh screen is analyzed in terms of the capillary forces of the liquid wetting the screen and the pressure difference across the screen thickness driving the gas flow. Several different types of time-dependent flow are shown to be possible. The most interesting type is one in which the pressure difference opens small channels in the liquid, which are then closed rapidly by the wetting action of the liquid. The opening and closing exhibit hysteresis, and the flow is highly oscillatory.

  19. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrmann, Andrea; Blachowicz, Tomasz

    2014-08-15

    The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  20. Stability of dithered non-linear systems with backlash or hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Shahruz, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    A study is conducted of the effect of dither on the nonlinear element of a single-input single-outout feedback system. Nonlinearities are considered with memory (backlash, hysteresis), in the feedforward loop; a dither of a given amplitude is injected at the input of the nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is followed by a linear element with low-pass characteristic. The stability of the dithered system and an approximate equivalent system (in which the nonlinearity is a smooth function) are compared. Conditions on the input and on the dither frequency are obtained so that the approximate-system stability guarantees that of the given hysteretic system.