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Sample records for i-like proviral genome

  1. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome.

  2. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, E P; Mettus, R V; DeFreitas, E; Wroblewska, Z; Cisco, M; Koprowski, H

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, we have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. We have cloned the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome. Images PMID:2897123

  3. Genome-wide Determinants of Proviral Targeting, Clonal Abundance and Expression in Natural HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Anat; Laydon, Daniel J.; Gillet, Nicolas A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of proviral latency is a central problem in retrovirology. We postulate that the genomic integration site of human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) determines the pattern of expression of the provirus, which in turn determines the abundance and pathogenic potential of infected T cell clones in vivo. We recently developed a high-throughput method for the genome-wide amplification, identification and quantification of proviral integration sites. Here, we used this protocol to test two hypotheses. First, that binding sites for transcription factors and chromatin remodelling factors in the genome flanking the proviral integration site of HTLV-1 are associated with integration targeting, spontaneous proviral expression, and in vivo clonal abundance. Second, that the transcriptional orientation of the HTLV-1 provirus relative to that of the nearest host gene determines spontaneous proviral expression and in vivo clonal abundance. Integration targeting was strongly associated with the presence of a binding site for specific host transcription factors, especially STAT1 and p53. The presence of the chromatin remodelling factors BRG1 and INI1 and certain host transcription factors either upstream or downstream of the provirus was associated respectively with silencing or spontaneous expression of the provirus. Cells expressing HTLV-1 Tax protein were significantly more frequent in clones of low abundance in vivo. We conclude that transcriptional interference and chromatin remodelling are critical determinants of proviral latency in natural HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23555266

  4. Epigenetic analysis of HIV-1 proviral genomes from infected individuals: predominance of unmethylated CpG's.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefanie; Weiser, Barbara; Kemal, Kimdar S; Burger, Harold; Ramirez, Christina M; Korn, Klaus; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-01-20

    Efforts to cure HIV-1 infections aim at eliminating proviral DNA. Integrated DNA from various viruses often becomes methylated de novo and transcriptionally inactivated. We therefore investigated CpG methylation profiles of 55 of 94 CpG's (58.5%) in HIV-1 proviral genomes including ten CpG's in each LTR and additional CpG's in portions of gag, env, nef, rev, and tat genes. We analyzed 33 DNA samples from PBMC's of 23 subjects representing a broad spectrum of HIV-1 disease. In 22 of 23 HIV-1-infected individuals, there were only unmethylated CpG's regardless of infection status. In one long term nonprogressor, however, methylation of proviral DNA varied between 0 and 75% over an 11-year period although the CD4+ counts remained stable. Hence levels of proviral DNA methylation can fluctuate. The preponderance of unmethylated CpG's suggests that proviral methylation is not a major factor in regulating HIV-1 proviral activity in PBMC's. Unmethylated CpG's may play a role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HTLV-1 integration into transcriptionally active genomic regions is associated with proviral expression and with HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Meekings, Kiran N; Leipzig, Jeremy; Bushman, Frederic D; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2008-03-21

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes leukaemia or chronic inflammatory disease in approximately 5% of infected hosts. The level of proviral expression of HTLV-1 differs significantly among infected people, even at the same proviral load (proportion of infected mononuclear cells in the circulation). A high level of expression of the HTLV-1 provirus is associated with a high proviral load and a high risk of the inflammatory disease of the central nervous system known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). But the factors that control the rate of HTLV-1 proviral expression remain unknown. Here we show that proviral integration sites of HTLV-1 in vivo are not randomly distributed within the human genome but are associated with transcriptionally active regions. Comparison of proviral integration sites between individuals with high and low levels of proviral expression, and between provirus-expressing and provirus non-expressing cells from within an individual, demonstrated that frequent integration into transcription units was associated with an increased rate of proviral expression. An increased frequency of integration sites in transcription units in individuals with high proviral expression was also associated with the inflammatory disease HAM/TSP. By comparing the distribution of integration sites in human lymphocytes infected in short-term cell culture with those from persistent infection in vivo, we infer the action of two selective forces that shape the distribution of integration sites in vivo: positive selection for cells containing proviral integration sites in transcriptionally active regions of the genome, and negative selection against cells with proviral integration sites within transcription units.

  6. Epigenetic analysis of HIV-1 proviral genomes from infected individuals: Predominance of unmethylated CpG’s

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Stefanie; Weiser, Barbara; Kemal, Kimdar S.; Burger, Harold; Ramirez, Christina M.; Korn, Klaus; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to cure HIV-1 infections aim at eliminating proviral DNA. Integrated DNA from various viruses often becomes methylated de novo and transcriptionally inactivated. We therefore investigated CpG methylation profiles of 55 of 94 CpG’s (58.5%) in HIV-1 proviral genomes including ten CpG’s in each LTR and additional CpG’s in portions of gag, env, nef, rev, and tat genes. We analyzed 33 DNA samples from PBMC’s of 23 subjects representing a broad spectrum of HIV-1 disease. In 22 of 23 HIV-1-infected individuals, there were only unmethylated CpG’s regardless of infection status. In one long term nonprogressor, however, methylation of proviral DNA varied between 0 and 75% over an 11-year period although the CD4+ counts remained stable. Hence levels of proviral DNA methylation can fluctuate. The preponderance of unmethylated CpG’s suggests that proviral methylation is not a major factor in regulating HIV-1 proviral activity in PBMC’s. Unmethylated CpG’s may play a role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. PMID:24418551

  7. Genome of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus: Characterization by Use of Cloned Proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Nancy R.; Hiebsch, Ronald R.; Gonda, Matthew A.; Bose, Henry R.; Gilden, Raymond V.

    1982-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus is an avian type C retrovirus that is capable of transforming fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells both in vivo and in vitro. This virus is highly related to the three other members of the reticuloendotheliosis virus group, including spleen necrosis virus, but it is apparently unrelated to the avian leukosis-sarcoma virus family. Previous studies have shown that it consists of a replication-competent helper virus (designated REV-A) and a defective component (designated REV) that is responsible for transformation. In this study we used restriction endonuclease mapping and heteroduplex analysis to characterize the proviral DNAs of REV-A and REV. Both producer and nonproducer transformed chicken spleen cells were used as sources of REV proviral DNA; this genome was mapped in detail, and fragments of it were cloned in λgtWES·λB. The infected canine thymus line Cf2Th(REV-A) was used as a source of REV-A proviral DNA. The restriction maps and heteroduplexes of the REV and REV-A genomes showed that (proceeding from 5′ to 3′) (i) REV contains a large fraction of the REV-A gag gene (assuming a gene order of gag-pol-env and gene sizes similar to those of other type C viruses), for the two genomes are very similar over a distance of 2.1 kilobases beginning at their 5′ termini; (ii) most or all of REV-A pol is deleted in REV; (iii) REV contains a 1.1 kilobase segment derived from the 3′ end of REV-A pol or the 5′ end of env or both; (iv) this env region in REV is followed by a 1.9-kilobase segment which is unrelated to REV-A; and (v) the helper-unrelated segment of REV extends essentially all of the way to the beginning of the 3′ long terminal repeat. Therefore, like avian myeloblastosis virus but unlike the other avian acute leukemia viruses and most mammalian and avian sarcoma viruses, REV appears to be an env gene recombinant. We also found that the REV-specific segment is derived from avian DNA, for a cloned REV fragment was able

  8. Specific Destruction of HIV Proviral p17 Gene in T Lymphoid Cells Achieved by the Genome Editing Technology.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Mazda, Osam

    2016-01-01

    Recent development in genome editing technologies has enabled site-directed deprivation of a nucleotide sequence in the chromosome in mammalian cells. Human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection causes integration of proviral DNA into the chromosome, which potentially leads to re-emergence of the virus, but conventional treatment cannot delete the proviral DNA sequence from the cells infected with HIV. In the present study, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) specific for the HIV p17 gene were constructed, and their activities to destroy the target sequence were evaluated. SSA assay showed a high activity of a pair of p17-specific TALENs. A human T lymphoid cell line, Jurkat, was infected with a lentivirus vector followed by transfection with the TALEN-HIV by electroporation. The target sequence was destructed in approximately 10-95% of the p17 polymerase chain reaction clones, and the efficiencies depended on the Jurkat-HIV clones. Because p17 plays essential roles for assembly and budding of HIV, and this gene has relatively low nucleotide sequence diversity, genome editing procedures targeting p17 may provide a therapeutic benefit for HIV infection.

  9. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  10. Massive depletion of bovine leukemia virus proviral clones located in genomic transcriptionally active sites during primary infection.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Nicolas A; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodriguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Renotte, Nathalie; Alvarez, Irene; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle) or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle). The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone). We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1) initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2) host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in transcribed

  11. Massive Depletion of Bovine Leukemia Virus Proviral Clones Located in Genomic Transcriptionally Active Sites during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Nicolas A.; Renotte, Nathalie; Alvarez, Irene; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle) or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle). The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone). We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1) initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2) host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in transcribed

  12. Structure and possible function of a G-quadruplex in the long terminal repeat of the proviral HIV-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Beatrice; Lech, Christopher J.; Heddi, Brahim; Regmi, Sagar; Frasson, Ilaria; Perrone, Rosalba; Richter, Sara N.; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the proviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genome is integral to virus transcription and host cell infection. The guanine-rich U3 region within the LTR promoter, previously shown to form G-quadruplex structures, represents an attractive target to inhibit HIV transcription and replication. In this work, we report the structure of a biologically relevant G-quadruplex within the LTR promoter region of HIV-1. The guanine-rich sequence designated LTR-IV forms a well-defined structure in physiological cationic solution. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of this sequence reveals a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex containing a single-nucleotide thymine bulge, which participates in a conserved stacking interaction with a neighboring single-nucleotide adenine loop. Transcription analysis in a HIV-1 replication competent cell indicates that the LTR-IV region may act as a modulator of G-quadruplex formation in the LTR promoter. Consequently, the LTR-IV G-quadruplex structure presented within this work could represent a valuable target for the design of HIV therapeutics. PMID:27298260

  13. Structure and possible function of a G-quadruplex in the long terminal repeat of the proviral HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Beatrice; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Regmi, Sagar; Frasson, Ilaria; Perrone, Rosalba; Richter, Sara N; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-07-27

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the proviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genome is integral to virus transcription and host cell infection. The guanine-rich U3 region within the LTR promoter, previously shown to form G-quadruplex structures, represents an attractive target to inhibit HIV transcription and replication. In this work, we report the structure of a biologically relevant G-quadruplex within the LTR promoter region of HIV-1. The guanine-rich sequence designated LTR-IV forms a well-defined structure in physiological cationic solution. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of this sequence reveals a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex containing a single-nucleotide thymine bulge, which participates in a conserved stacking interaction with a neighboring single-nucleotide adenine loop. Transcription analysis in a HIV-1 replication competent cell indicates that the LTR-IV region may act as a modulator of G-quadruplex formation in the LTR promoter. Consequently, the LTR-IV G-quadruplex structure presented within this work could represent a valuable target for the design of HIV therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of defective human T-cell leukemia virus type I proviral genomes in leukemic cells of patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Korber, B; Okayama, A; Donnelly, R; Tachibana, N; Essex, M

    1991-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia, and the clonally derived leukemic cells all contain proviral genomes. Polymerase chain reaction with a variety of primers which span the HTLV-I genome was used to determine that a significant fraction of patients (at least 32%) carry deleted viral genomes in their leukemic cells. The pX region of the HTLV-I genome encoding the regulatory genes tax and rex was preferentially retained. The fact that the tax coding region was retained provides supporting evidence that the tax protein contributes to leukemogenesis in vivo. The reasonably high fraction of patients with adult T-cell leukemia carrying deleted genomes in their tumor cells suggests that the deletions have a role in leukemogenesis. Images PMID:1895396

  15. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Christy L.; Guerra, Horacio P.; Mathew, Kiran R.; Roy, Nervik; Simpson, Lacy R.; Schiller, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR) of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication. PMID:25946221

  16. [HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral load: a simple method using quantitative real-time PCR].

    PubMed

    Tamegão-Lopes, Bruna Pedroso; Rezende, Priscila Rocha; Maradei-Pereira, Luciana Maria Cunha; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    When the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) is integrated with the host cell genome (provirus), its proviral DNA is a replication marker. Proviral load appears to be an important factor in the development of diseases related to these retroviruses. In this study, a methodology for absolute quantification of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral load using real-time PCR was developed. Fifty-three blood donor samples with positive ELISA test result were subjected to this methodology, which utilized the TaqMan system for three target sequences: HTLV-1, HTLV-2 and albumin. The absolute proviral load was quantified using the relative ratio between the HTLV genome and the host cell genome, taking into consideration the white blood cell count. The method presented is sensitive (215 copies/ml), practical and simple for proviral quantification, and is efficient and appropriate for confirming and discriminating infections according to viral type.

  17. Contribution of type W human endogenous retroviruses to the human genome: characterization of HERV-W proviral insertions and processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Nicole; Cadeddu, Marta; Blomberg, Jonas; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-09-09

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are ancient sequences integrated in the germ line cells and vertically transmitted through the offspring constituting about 8 % of our genome. In time, HERVs accumulated mutations that compromised their coding capacity. A prominent exception is HERV-W locus 7q21.2, producing a functional Env protein (Syncytin-1) coopted for placental syncytiotrophoblast formation. While expression of HERV-W sequences has been investigated for their correlation to disease, an exhaustive description of the group composition and characteristics is still not available and current HERV-W group information derive from studies published a few years ago that, of course, used the rough assemblies of the human genome available at that time. This hampers the comparison and correlation with current human genome assemblies. In the present work we identified and described in detail the distribution and genetic composition of 213 HERV-W elements. The bioinformatics analysis led to the characterization of several previously unreported features and provided a phylogenetic classification of two main subgroups with different age and structural characteristics. New facts on HERV-W genomic context of insertion and co-localization with sequences putatively involved in disease development are also reported. The present work is a detailed overview of the HERV-W contribution to the human genome and provides a robust genetic background useful to clarify HERV-W role in pathologies with poorly understood etiology, representing, to our knowledge, the most complete and exhaustive HERV-W dataset up to date.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine MHC region of Japanese Black cattle are associated with bovine leukemia virus proviral load.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Sasaki, Shinji; Meripet, Polat; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Aida, Yoko

    2017-04-04

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma that has spread worldwide and causes serious problems for the cattle industry. The BLV proviral load, which represents the BLV genome integrated into host genome, is a useful index for estimating disease progression and transmission risk. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BLV proviral load in Japanese Black cattle. The study examined 93 cattle with a high proviral load and 266 with a low proviral load. Three SNPs showed a significant association with proviral load. One SNP was detected in the CNTN3 gene on chromosome 22, and two (which were not in linkage disequilibrium) were detected in the bovine major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 23. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex region affect proviral load. This is the first report to detect SNPs associated with BLV proviral load in Japanese Black cattle using whole genome association study, and understanding host factors may provide important clues for controlling the spread of BLV in Japanese Black cattle.

  19. Analysis of co-receptor usage of circulating viral and proviral HIV genome quasispecies by ultra-deep pyrosequencing in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbate, I; Rozera, G; Tommasi, C; Bruselles, A; Bartolini, B; Chillemi, G; Nicastri, E; Narciso, P; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2011-05-01

    UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor usage may provide quantitative data about the tropism of each variant present in the viral quasispecies. The aim of the present study was to assess co-receptor usage by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS), in comparison with the reference phenotypic test (Trofile), in patients who are candidates for CCR5 antagonist treatment, in both circulating and proviral HIV-1. Seventeen patients who were tested by Trofile were enrolled. UDPS of the V3 loop region was carried out on both plasma RNA and proviral DNA. Genotypic prediction of co-receptor usage was established by position-specific score matrices (PSSM) and confirmed, in discordant cases, with geno2pheno. Genetic heterogeneity of the RNA and DNA quasispecies was assessed as well. A total of 196,729 V3 sequences were considered (mean coverage per site, 6346). Concordance between phenotypic test and UDPS with PSSM was 0.82. Geno2pheno results were in line with those obtained with PSSM. Proviral quasispecies were more heterogeneous than those found in circulating HIV. In most patients eligible for CCR5 antagonist treatment, X4 variants were detected in proviral DNA, ranging from 1.0% to 52.7%. UDPS combined with genotypic algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction highlighted the presence of minority variants, with a discordant tropism with respect to the predominant population, in both circulating viral and proviral HIV. In most patients treated with Maraviroc the virological response was independent of the presence of X4 in proviral DNA. The clinical impact of minority X4 variants present in patients who are candidates for anti-CCR5 antagonists remains a crucial point to be addressed.

  20. Partial molecular characterization of different proviral strains of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, Marcela A; Lendez, Pamela A; Gutierrez, Silvina E; Forletti, Agustina; Rensetti, Daniel E; Ceriani, Maria Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle were classified by their proviral load into low and high proviral load profiles (LPL and HPL, respectively). Blood from these animals was used to infect sheep to obtain multiple identical copies of integrated provirus. An env fragment of BLV was amplified from all infected sheep and sequenced. The sequences that were obtained were compared to already published BLV genome sequence, resulting in three clusters. Mutations could not be attributed to the passage of provirus from cattle to sheep and subsequent amplification and sequencing. The description of two different proviral load profiles, the association of the BoLA-DRB3.2 0902 allele with the LPL profile, the availability of complete BLV sequences, and the comparison of a variable region of the env gene from carefully characterized cattle are still not enough to explain the presence of animals in every herd that are resistant to BLV dissemination.

  1. Risk factors associated with increased bovine leukemia virus proviral load in infected cattle in Japan from 2012 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ayumu; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsumoto, Yuki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-02

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma. BLV has spread worldwide and causes serious problems. After infection, the BLV genome is integrated into the host DNA and can be amplified during periods of latency. We previously designed degenerate primers using the Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo) algorithm to establish a new quantitative real-time PCR method (BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2) of measuring the proviral load of both known and novel BLV variants. Here, we aimed to examine the correlation between proviral load and risk factors for BLV infection, such as breeding systems, parousity, and colostrum feeding. Blood and serum samples were collected from 83 BLV-positive farms in 22 prefectures of Japan, and the BLV proviral load and anti-BLV antibody levels were measured. BLV was detected in 73.3% (1039/1,417) of cattle by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and the provirus was detected in 93 of 1039 antibody-negative samples. The results showed that the proviral load increased with progression of lymphocytosis. Next, the risk factors associated with increasing BLV infection rate were examined along with any association with proviral load. The proviral load was higher in cattle with lymphocytosis than in healthy cattle, and higher in multiparous cows than in nulliparous cows. Finally, proviral loads were higher in contact breeding systems than in non-contact breeding systems. Taken together, these findings may help to formulate a plan for eliminating BLV from contaminated farms. This is the first nationwide study to estimate BLV proviral load in Japanese cattle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. HTLV-1 proviral integration sites differ between asymptomatic carriers and patients with HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Heather A; Laydon, Daniel J; Melamed, Anat; Elemans, Marjet; Asquith, Becca; Matsuoka, Masao; Bangham, Charles R M

    2014-09-30

    HTLV-1 causes proliferation of clonal populations of infected T cells in vivo, each clone defined by a unique proviral integration site in the host genome. The proviral load is strongly correlated with odds of the inflammatory disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). There is evidence that asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) have a more effective CD8 + T cell response, including a higher frequency of HLA class I alleles able to present peptides from a regulatory protein of HTLV-1, HBZ. We have previously shown that specific features of the host genome flanking the proviral integration site favour clone survival and spontaneous expression of the viral transactivator protein Tax in naturally infected PBMCs ex vivo. However, the previous studies were not designed or powered to detect differences in integration site characteristics between ACs and HAM/TSP patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the genomic environment of the provirus differs systematically between ACs and HAM/TSP patients, and between individuals with strong or weak HBZ presentation. We used our recently described high-throughput protocol to map and quantify integration sites in 95 HAM/TSP patients and 68 ACs from Kagoshima, Japan, and 75 ACs from Kumamoto, Japan. Individuals with 2 or more HLA class I alleles predicted to bind HBZ peptides were classified 'strong' HBZ binders; the remainder were classified 'weak binders'. The abundance of HTLV-1-infected T cell clones in vivo was correlated with proviral integration in genes and in areas with epigenetic marks associated with active regulatory elements. In clones of equivalent abundance, integration sites in genes and active regions were significantly more frequent in ACs than patients with HAM/TSP, irrespective of HBZ binding and proviral load. Integration sites in genes were also more frequent in strong HBZ binders than weak HBZ binders. Clonal abundance is correlated with integration in a

  3. Viral RNA detection by RIG-I-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Onomoto, Koji; Jogi, Michihiko; Akaboshi, Teppei; Fujita, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    In higher vertebrates, recognition of the non-self signature of invading viruses by genome-encoded pattern recognition receptors initiates antiviral innate immunity. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) detect viral RNA as a non-self pattern in the cytoplasm and activate downstream signaling. Detection of viral RNA also activates stress responses resulting in stress granule-like aggregates, which facilitate RLR-mediated antiviral immunity. Among the three RLR family members RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) recognize distinct viral RNA species with differential molecular machinery and activate signaling through mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS, also known as IPS-1/VISA/Cardif), which leads to the expression of cytokines including type I and III interferons (IFNs) to restrict viral propagation. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge regarding RNA recognition and signal transduction by RLRs and MAVS/IPS-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple proviral integration events after virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 spread

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Rebecca A.; Martin, Nicola; Mitar, Ivonne; Jones, Emma; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2013-08-15

    HIV-1 can move directly between T cells via virological synapses (VS). Although aspects of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this mode of spread have been elucidated, the outcomes for infection of the target cell remain incompletely understood. We set out to determine whether HIV-1 transfer via VS results in productive, high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 cell-to-cell spread resulted in nuclear import of multiple proviruses into target cells as seen by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Proviral integration into the target cell genome was significantly higher than that seen in a cell-free infection system, and consequent de novo viral DNA and RNA production in the target cell detected by quantitative PCR increased over time. Our data show efficient proviral integration across VS, implying the probability of multiple integration events in target cells that drive productive T cell infection. - Highlights: • Cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection delivers multiple vRNA copies to the target cell. • Cell-to-cell infection results in productive infection of the target cell. • Cell-to-cell transmission is more efficient than cell-free HIV-1 infection. • Suggests a mechanism for recombination in cells infected with multiple viral genomes.

  5. Failure to detect human T-lymphotropic virus type-I proviral DNA in cell lines and tissues from patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Vowels, B R; Benoit, B M; Rook, A H; Lessin, S R

    1996-09-01

    Previous molecular studies investigating the presence of HTLV-I proviral DNA in cell lines and tissue samples of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) have reported a detection rate ranging from 0-92%. Despite the lack of epidemiologic data linking HTLV-I infection with CTCL, the molecular data still invite speculation regarding the precise role of HTLV-I in the pathogenesis of CTCL. To determine the detection rate of HTLV-I proviral DNA among CTCL patients referred to our medical center, we analyzed Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell lines established from peripheral blood of seven CTCL patients and 43 tissue samples from 22 patients with different stages of disease. Genomic DNA was polymerase chain reaction-amplified with primers within the HTLV-I tax gene region. Amplification products were probed with nested oligonucleotide probes by Southern blot analysis. No HTLV-I proviral sequences were detected in the samples (0/50). Using HTLV-I/II pol primers, no HTLV-I pol gene sequences were detected. In tissues from one patient, HTLV-II pol and tax gene sequences were detected; however, HTLV-II proviral integration was not detected by Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA. Our data suggest: (i) HTLV-I does not appear to be a primary etiologic agent in CTCL; and (ii) HTLV-II pol and tax gene sequences can be detected in a minority of CTCL patients, but this does not necessarily imply an etiologic role.

  6. HIV Excision Utilizing CRISPR/Cas9 Technology: Attacking the Proviral Quasispecies in Reservoirs to Achieve a Cure.

    PubMed

    Dampier, Will; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Sullivan, Neil T; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-10-17

    Recently several gene-editing technologies developed are being explored for their potential utility in providing new and unique treatments for HIV. One of these technologies is the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas)9 system. This system is being explored for its utility against host genes important to HIV infection, namely the HIV coreceptor CCR5, and for excision of the integrated genome from infected cells by targeting selected genes or genomic regions, especially the HIV-1 promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR). One of the major hurdles with the development of this technology for use in patients is defining the LTR sequence spectrum within the viral quasispecies present in the integrated virus and how that effects the number of guide RNAs (gRNAs) required to completely excise all proviral genomes. In this study, the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort was utilized to demonstrate that [1] the predominant sequence of the integrated proviral LTR within the PBMC compartment shows a decrease in the amount of variation per year regardless of the type of therapy; [2] predominant HIV-1 LTR sequence undergoes continued genetic change with respect to the predominant genotype in these cells for at least 6 years while on effective suppressive ART; [3] using next generation sequencing (NGS), to demonstrate that 4 of the 8 patient samples examined could have a complete gRNA regimen designed to target all known quasispecies; and [4] length of HAART therapy may reduce the number of gRNA required to eradicate provirus as shown by NGS and gRNA design for longitudinal samples of patient A0017 in the CARES cohort. Overall, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of addressing at least one of the major technological challenges of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated HIV-1 proviral genome eradication involving the effective targeting of all viral quasispecies in a given patient sample.

  7. HIV Excision Utilizing CRISPR/Cas9 Technology: Attacking the Proviral Quasispecies in Reservoirs to Achieve a Cure

    PubMed Central

    Dampier, Will; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Sullivan, Neil T.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recently several gene-editing technologies developed are being explored for their potential utility in providing new and unique treatments for HIV. One of these technologies is the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas)9 system. This system is being explored for its utility against host genes important to HIV infection, namely the HIV coreceptor CCR5, and for excision of the integrated genome from infected cells by targeting selected genes or genomic regions, especially the HIV-1 promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR). One of the major hurdles with the development of this technology for use in patients is defining the LTR sequence spectrum within the viral quasispecies present in the integrated virus and how that effects the number of guide RNAs (gRNAs) required to completely excise all proviral genomes. In this study, the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort was utilized to demonstrate that [1] the predominant sequence of the integrated proviral LTR within the PBMC compartment shows a decrease in the amount of variation per year regardless of the type of therapy; [2] predominant HIV-1 LTR sequence undergoes continued genetic change with respect to the predominant genotype in these cells for at least 6 years while on effective suppressive ART; [3] using next generation sequencing (NGS), to demonstrate that 4 of the 8 patient samples examined could have a complete gRNA regimen designed to target all known quasispecies; and [4] length of HAART therapy may reduce the number of gRNA required to eradicate provirus as shown by NGS and gRNA design for longitudinal samples of patient A0017 in the CARES cohort. Overall, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of addressing at least one of the major technological challenges of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated HIV-1 proviral genome eradication involving the effective targeting of all viral quasispecies in a given patient sample. PMID:25893217

  8. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  9. Determination of proviral load in bovine leukemia virus-infected cattle with and without lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, Marcela A; Gutierrez, Silvina E; Ceriani, Carolina

    2007-11-01

    To determine proviral load in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle with and without persistent lymphocytosis to assess the potential of transmitting the virus. Cattle in 6 dairy herds. Blood samples from infected cows were evaluated 3 times at 6-month intervals for determination of proviral load via PCR assay, serologic results via ELISA, and hematologic status via differential cell counts. Infected cattle were classified into lymphocytotic and nonlymphocytotic groups. Lymphocytotic cattle consistently had > 100,000 copies of integrated provirus/mug of DNA (ie, high proviral load) in peripheral blood leukocytes. Titers of antibodies against BLVgp51 and BLVp24 indicated a strong immune response. Nonlymphocytotic cattle comprised 2 subgroups: a group with high proviral load and strong immune response, and a group with a weaker immune response, mostly against BLVp24, and a proviral load of < 100 copies/microg of DNA (ie, low proviral load). Results emphasized the importance of characterizing nonlymphocytotic BLV-infected cattle during eradication programs. The risk of transmitting BLV infection from nonlymphocytotic cattle may differ depending on the proviral load. Nonlymphocytotic cattle with high proviral load could be efficient transmitters (as efficient as lymphocytotic cattle), whereas nonlymphocytotic cattle with low proviral load could be inefficient transmitters under standard husbandry conditions. Because most cattle with low proviral load do not develop anti-BLVp24 antibodies, it appears that lack of an anti-BLVp24 antibody response may be a good marker of this condition.

  10. Detection of HTLV-I proviral DNA in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Yajima, A; Kawada, A; Aragane, Y; Tezuka, T

    2001-01-01

    'Sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome' is known as an association of sarcoidosis with malignant lymphoma. We report a 56-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis who was seropositive for antibody against human T cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). This patient showed integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA within cutaneous sarcoid nodules, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Neither atypical lymphocytes nor a T cell receptor beta1 gene rearrangement were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in cutaneous nodules, indicating that the patient did not have a smouldering type of adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia. Detection of integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA in cutaneous sarcoid nodules could suggest that the sarcoid nodules might have been generated as a protective response to chronic stimuli of HTLV-I.

  11. Characterization of a new ViI-like Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage phiEa2809.

    PubMed

    Lagonenko, Alexander L; Sadovskaya, Olga; Valentovich, Leonid N; Evtushenkov, Anatoly N

    2015-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria causing fire blight disease in many Rosaceae species. A novel E. amylovora bacteriophage, phiEa2809, was isolated from symptomless apple leaf sample collected in Belarus. This phage was also able to infect Pantoea agglomerans strains. The genome of phiEa2809 is a double-stranded linear DNA 162,160 bp in length, including 145 ORFs and one tRNA gene. The phiEa2809 genomic sequence is similar to the genomes of the Serratia plymutica phage MAM1, Shigella phage AG-3, Dickeya phage vB DsoM LIMEstone1 and Salmonella phage ViI and lacks similarity to described E. amylovora phage genomes. Based on virion morphology (an icosahedral head, long contractile tail) and genome structure, phiEa2809 was classified as a member of Myoviridae, ViI-like bacteriophages group. PhiEa2809 is the firstly characterized ViI-like bacteriophage able to lyse E. amylovora.

  12. No evidence of HTLV-I proviral integration in lymphoproliferative disorders associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wood, G S; Schaffer, J M; Boni, R; Dummer, R; Burg, G; Takeshita, M; Kikuchi, M

    1997-02-01

    Several recent studies have reported detection of HTLV-I genetic sequences in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HTLV-I was detectable in lesional tissues of patients suffering from diseases known to be associated with CTCL. Thirty-five cases were obtained from diverse geographical locations including Ohio, California, Switzerland, and Japan. Six of them had concurrent CTCL. Cases were analyzed using a combination of genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ Southern blot, dot blot, and Southern blot analyses. All assays were specific for HTLV-I provirus. Sensitivity ranged from approximately 10(-6) for PCR-based studies to 10(-2) for unamplified genomic blotting. Lesional DNA from patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (fourteen cases), Hodgkin's disease (twelve cases), and CD30+ large-cell lymphoma (nine cases) was tested for the HTLV-I proviral pX region using a genomic PCR assay followed by confirmatory Southern blot analysis with a nested oligonucleotide pX probe. All cases were uniformly negative. All of the Hodgkin's disease cases, eight of the large-cell lymphoma cases, and six of the lymphomatoid papulosis cases were then subjected to dot blot analysis of genomic DNA using a full-length HTLV-I proviral DNA probe that spans all regions of the HTLV-I genome. Again, all cases were negative. Finally, eleven of the Hodgkin's disease cases were also subjected to Southern blot analysis of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA using the same full-length HTLV-I probe. Once again, all cases were negative. These findings indicated that, despite utilization of a variety of sensitive and specific molecular biological methods, HTLV-I genetic sequences were not detectable in patients with CTCL-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These results strongly suggest that the HTLV-I retrovirus is not involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  13. Association of TNF-α gene promoter region polymorphisms in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle with different proviral loads.

    PubMed

    Lendez, Pamela Anahi; Passucci, Juan Antonio; Poli, Mario Andres; Gutierrez, Silvina Elena; Dolcini, Guillermina Laura; Ceriani, Maria Carolina

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in the immune response against viral and other infections. Its expression levels are affected by a polymorphism in the promoter region of the gene. Bovine leukemia virus is a retrovirus that infects cattle and develops two different infection profiles in the host. One profile is characterized by a high number of proviral copies integrated into the host genome and a strong immune response against the virus, while the most relevant property of the other profile is that the number of copies integrated into the host genome is almost undetectable and the immune response is very weak. We selected a population of cattle sufficiently large for statistical analysis and classified them according to whether they had a high or low proviral load (HPL or LPL). Polymorphisms in the promoter region were identified by PCR-RFLP. The results indicated that, in the HPL group, the three possible genotypes were normally distributed and that, in the LPL group, there was a significant association between the proviral load and a low frequency of the G/G genotype at position -824.

  14. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-05-09

    Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A genotypic HIV-1 proviral DNA coreceptor tropism assay: characterization in viremic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 coreceptor tropism testing is used to evaluate eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. However, HIV-1 RNA-based tests are not suitable for virologically suppressed patients, therefore the use of proviral DNA tropism testing has been investigated. We describe a novel proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism assay and compare its performance to that of a sensitive HIV-1 RNA-based genotypic test. Methods Tropism was determined using HIV-1 plasma RNA and proviral DNA from 42 paired samples from patients with plasma viral loads ≥1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Proviral DNA sample types included whole blood, separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline and peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in spun plasma. The HIV-1 envelope V3 region was PCR-amplified, sequenced in triplicate, and analyzed for tropism with the geno2pheno algorithm using a 10% false-positive rate (FPR). Results Amplicons were obtained from proviral DNA and plasma RNA in 41/42 samples. Tropism predictions were highly concordant (93%–98%) between proviral DNA and plasma RNA, regardless of the proviral DNA isolation method. Non-R5 proviral DNA results were obtained for 100% of patients with detectable non-R5 plasma HIV-1 RNA results. Geno2pheno FPRs for proviral DNA and plasma RNA were highly correlated (Spearman rho = 0.86). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that proviral DNA tropism determinations from whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were highly concordant with plasma HIV-1 RNA tropism determinations. This assay may be useful for screening virologically suppressed patients for CCR5-antagonist eligibility and for research purposes. PMID:24904682

  16. Development of a nested PCR assay to detect equine infectious anemia proviral DNA from peripheral blood of naturally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian-Bao; Zhu, Wei; Cook, Frank R; Goto, Yoshitaka; Horii, Yoichiro; Haga, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) has posed a major challenge and caused significant losses to the equine industry worldwide. PCR detection methods have considerable potential as an adjunct to conventional serological diagnostic techniques. However, most published PCR methods, including that recommended by the OIE, were designed using laboratory-adapted virus strains and do not function with field isolates of EIA virus (EIAV). In the present study, a nested PCR assay for detection of EIAV proviral DNA in peripheral blood cells of naturally infected horses was developed. Primer sets were designed based on conserved 5' regions of the viral genome extending from the LTR to the tat gene. Preliminary studies demonstrated that the method has a detection limit of 10 genomic copies and, when applied to a naturally EIAV-infected feral horse population, shows 100 % correlation with conventional serological diagnostic techniques. This assay provides a powerful new tool in the control of EIAV.

  17. Proviral load determination of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Casoli, Claudio; Pilotti, Elisabetta; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    TaqMan real-time PCR assays were developed to determine the proviral load (PVL) of human T-cell leukemia viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of infected subjects. In particular, separate single-plex assays for HTLV-1 tax-1, and HTLV-2 tax-2 and pol-2 genes were designed for quantitation of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 PVLs. The specificity of both tax-2 and pol-2 assays was verified by testing the DNA extracted from C10, a chronically HTLV-1-infected cell line, used as a negative control. As far as HTLV-2 assay, the specificity was checked by testing C344 cells which are stably infected by HTLV-2. Quantitative determination of HTLV PVLs was obtained by performing standard reference curves by a serial dilution of DNA extracted from C10 and C344 cells, assuming one proviral genome per C10 cell and two per C344 cell. The human albumin gene, of which there are 2 copies per cell, was quantified in the same reactions to normalize the results. Intra-assay reproducibility was checked by running 30 replicates of the same sample in a plate (coefficient of variance <6 %), while inter-assay reproducibility was measured by amplifying the same sample in three independent experiments (coefficient of variance <6 %).

  18. Quantification of HTLV-I proviral load in experimentally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong-Mao; Hague, Bishop; Caudell, David L; Simpson, R Mark; Kindt, Thomas J

    2005-05-23

    Levels of proviral load in HTLV-1 infected patients correlate with clinical outcome and are reasonably prognostic. Adaptation of proviral load measurement techniques is examined here for use in an experimental rabbit model of HTLV-1 infection. Initial efforts sought to correlate proviral load with route and dose of inoculation and with clinical outcome in this model. These methods contribute to our continuing goal of using the model to test treatments that alleviate virus infection. A real-time PCR assay was used to measure proviral load in blood and tissue samples from a series of rabbits infected using HTLV-1 inocula prepared as either cell-free virus particles, infected cells or blood, or by naked DNA injection. Proviral loads from asymptomatically infected rabbits showed levels corresponding to those reported for human patients with clinically silent HTLV-1 infections. Proviral load was comparably increased in 50% of experimentally infected rabbits that developed either spontaneous benign or malignant tumors while infected. Similarly elevated provirus was found in organs of rabbits with experimentally induced acute leukemia/lymphoma-like disease. Levels of provirus in organs taken at necropsy varied widely suggesting that reservoirs of infections exist in non-lymphoid organs not traditionally thought to be targets for HTLV-1. Proviral load measurement is a valuable enhancement to the rabbit model for HTLV-1 infection providing a metric to monitor clinical status of the infected animals as well as a means for the testing of treatment to combat infection. In some cases proviral load in blood did not reflect organ proviral levels, revealing a limitation of this method for monitoring health status of HTLV-1 infected individuals.

  19. Serum human T-lymphotropic virus 1 proviral load in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Reza; Gholami, Farhad; Ahmadnia, Hassan; Ahmadi, Mostafa; Hassannia, Tahere

    2013-03-01

    Patients on hemodialysis are a high-risk group for human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV1) infection and other viruses transmitted by blood or blood products. The Razavi and South Khorasan provinces in Iran are the endemic areas for this virus. This study compares proviral load of HTLV1 in patients on hemodialysis with otherwise healthy carriers of HTLV1. In this case-control study the proviral load of the HTLV1 virus was compared between 25 patients on long-term hemodialysis who were positive for HTLV1 and 25 healthy carriers of HTLV1, to determine The effect of uremia and chronic hemodialysis on the proviral load. virus proviral load was determined using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method. There was a significant difference in the proviral load between the hemodialysis patients and the control group (903 +/- 182 copies per mL versus 117 +/- 186 copies per mL, respectively; P = .008). No significant correlation was found between the proviral load and haematocrit or serum levels of urea, creatinine, parathyroid hormone, calcium , and phosphorus level in hemodialysis patients, but proviral load of HTLV1 was significantly correlated with leukocyte count (r = -0.46, P = .02), hemodialysis duration (r = 0.48, P = .02), and the numbers of blood transfusions (r = 0.71, P < .01). Conclusions. The immune deficiency related to end-stage renal disease and uremia is the probable cause of significantly higher HTLV1 proviral load in hemodialysis patients compared to healthy HTLV1 carriers. This high HTLV1 proviral load might be due to immune dysfunction in chronic hemodialysis patients.

  20. HIV-1 Tropism Determines Different Mutation Profiles in Proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Brito, Sieberth; Paulo Zukurov, Jean; Maricato, Juliana T; Volpini, Angela C; Salim, Anna Christina M; Araújo, Flávio M G; Coimbra, Roney S; Oliveira, Guilherme C; Antoneli, Fernando; Janini, Luiz Mário R

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish new infections HIV-1 particles need to attach to receptors expressed on the cellular surface. HIV-1 particles interact with a cell membrane receptor known as CD4 and subsequently with another cell membrane molecule known as a co-receptor. Two major different co-receptors have been identified: C-C chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-X-C chemokine Receptor type 4 (CXCR4) Previous reports have demonstrated cellular modifications upon HIV-1 binding to its co-receptors including gene expression modulations. Here we investigated the effect of viral binding to either CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptors on viral diversity after a single round of reverse transcription. CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped viruses were used to infect non-stimulated and stimulated PBMCs and purified CD4 positive cells. We adopted the SOLiD methodology to sequence virtually the entire proviral DNA from all experimental infections. Infections with CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped virus resulted in different patterns of genetic diversification. CCR5 virus infections produced extensive proviral diversity while in CXCR4 infections a more localized substitution process was observed. In addition, we present pioneering results of a recently developed method for the analysis of SOLiD generated sequencing data applicable to the study of viral quasi-species. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of viral quasi-species evaluation by NGS methodologies. We presented for the first time strong evidence for a host cell driving mechanism acting on the HIV-1 genetic variability under the control of co-receptor stimulation. Additional investigations are needed to further clarify this question, which is relevant to viral diversification process and consequent disease progression.

  1. Significance of HTLV-1 proviral load quantification by real-time PCR as a surrogate marker for HTLV-1-infected cell count.

    PubMed

    Kamihira, S; Dateki, N; Sugahara, K; Hayashi, T; Harasawa, H; Minami, S; Hirakata, Y; Yamada, Y

    2003-04-01

    We developed a real-time (RT) PCR quantitative assay to measure the level of the integrated viral genome of HTLV-1 in host peripheral blood-mononuclear cells (PB-MNC) from healthy carriers and patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). All of the clinical specimens were serologically and molecularly characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Southern blot hybridization (SBH) analyses. The assay system for quantifying the proviral copy level was sensitive, accurate, and reproducible over a wide range of density from 100 to 0.1% with a coefficient of variation (%) of 4.5 to 9.6. The proviral load of the healthy carriers and patients with ATL was 301 +/- 339 copies per 10(4) MNC (3 +/- 3.4%) on average and varied depending on the ATL cell number and the SBH band-status of single or multiple bands. In ATL cases with multiple bands detected by SBH analysis, their ATL cells were shown to harbor multiple copies within one ATL cell, so that the corrected copy number interpolated by the band number in SBH was closely equivalent to the expected ATL cell number in PB, corresponding to the virus-infected cell burden. The proviral load in healthy carriers ranged from 0.1 to 15% of PB-MNC, and, in combination with the fraction (%) of ATL-like flower cells defined by PB smear morphology, enabled carriers to be subgrouped into three categories. This result indicates that the detection of proviral load by(RT) PCR is sufficient and relevant to monitor the infected cell number in the PB and to evaluate the HTLV-1 pathologic status.

  2. Intracellular pathogen detection by RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Evelyn; Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLR) RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 trigger innate immune responses against viral infections that serve to limit virus replication and to stimulate adaptive immunity. RLRs are cytosolic sensors for virus-derived RNA and thus responsible for intracellular immune surveillance against infection. RLR signaling requires the adapter protein MAVS to induce type I interferon, interferon-stimulated genes and proinflammatory cytokines. This review focusses on the molecular and cell biological requirements for RLR signal transduction. PMID:23611287

  3. Rapid detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA for early infant diagnosis using recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; Lehman, Dara A; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-04-02

    Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes.

  4. Rapid Detection of HIV-1 Proviral DNA for Early Infant Diagnosis Using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, David S.; Lehman, Dara A.; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes. PMID:23549916

  5. Cutaneous disease resembling mycosis fungoides in HIV-infected patients whose skin and blood cells also harbor proviral HTLV type I.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D; Pancake, B A; Friedman-Kien, A E

    1994-09-01

    Two homosexual HIV-infected patients with lymphocyte counts of < 50 presented with intense pruritus, hyperpigmentation, and skin lesions clinically suggestive of the cutaneous T cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides. On light microscopy, the skin biopsies were difficult to interpret because of the sparseness of the lymphocytic infiltrates. However, electron microscopy revealed typical Sézary cells in the peripheral blood and skin. Cultures of blood mononuclear cells of one of the patients generated HTLV-I-like particles. Although both patients lacked antibodies to HTLV, their blood and skin specimens proved to harbor tax and pol HTLV-I proviral sequences as shown by the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Dual infection with HIV and HTLV should be considered in the diagnostic work-up of patients at risk, even in the absence of demonstrable antibodies. Dual infections could result in clinical manifestations and evolution of disease not anticipated in patients who harbor only one of these retroviruses.

  6. Proviral Features of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 in Carriers with Indeterminate Western Blot Analysis Results.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Madoka; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamochi, Tadanori; Firouzi, Sanaz; Sato, Tomoo; Umeki, Kazumi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kubota, Ryuji; Sobata, Rieko; Matsumoto, Chieko; Kaneko, Noriaki; Momose, Haruka; Araki, Kumiko; Saito, Masumichi; Nosaka, Kisato; Utsunomiya, Atae; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Ogata, Masao; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Iwanaga, Masako; Sagara, Yasuko; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Okayama, Akihiko; Miura, Kiyonori; Satake, Masahiro; Saito, Shigeru; Itabashi, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Kuroda, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki; Okuma, Kazu; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2017-09-01

    Western blotting (WB) for human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is performed to confirm anti-HTLV-1 antibodies detected at the initial screening of blood donors and in pregnant women. However, the frequent occurrence of indeterminate results is a problem with this test. We therefore assessed the cause of indeterminate WB results by analyzing HTLV-1 provirus genomic sequences. A quantitative PCR assay measuring HTLV-1 provirus in WB-indeterminate samples revealed that the median proviral load was approximately 100-fold lower than that of WB-positive samples (0.01 versus 0.71 copy/100 cells). Phylogenic analysis of the complete HTLV-1 genomes of WB-indeterminate samples did not identify any specific phylogenetic groups. When we analyzed the nucleotide changes in 19 HTLV-1 isolates from WB-indeterminate samples, we identified 135 single nucleotide substitutions, composed of four types, G to A (29%), C to T (19%), T to C (19%), and A to G (16%). In the most frequent G-to-A substitution, 64% occurred at GG dinucleotides, indicating that APOBEC3G is responsible for mutagenesis in WB-indeterminate samples. Moreover, interestingly, five WB-indeterminate isolates had nonsense mutations in Pol and/or Tax, Env, p12, and p30. These findings suggest that WB-indeterminate carriers have low production of viral antigens because of a combination of a low proviral load and mutations in the provirus, which may interfere with host recognition of HTLV-1 antigens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Comparative analysis of viral RNA signatures on different RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez David, Raul Y; Combredet, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Mura, Marie; Guerbois Galla, Mathilde; Despres, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Komarova, Anastassia V

    2016-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) play a major role in sensing RNA virus infection to initiate and modulate antiviral immunity. They interact with particular viral RNAs, most of them being still unknown. To decipher the viral RNA signature on RLRs during viral infection, we tagged RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5, LGP2) and applied tagged protein affinity purification followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of associated RNA molecules. Two viruses with negative- and positive-sense RNA genome were used: measles (MV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). NGS analysis revealed that distinct regions of MV genome were specifically recognized by distinct RLRs: RIG-I recognized defective interfering genomes, whereas MDA5 and LGP2 specifically bound MV nucleoprotein-coding region. During CHIKV infection, RIG-I associated specifically to the 3’ untranslated region of viral genome. This study provides the first comparative view of the viral RNA ligands for RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 in the presence of infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11275.001 PMID:27011352

  8. Adeno-associated virus general transduction vectors: analysis of proviral structures.

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, S K; Collis, P; Hermonat, P L; Muzyczka, N

    1988-01-01

    We used two kinds of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to transduce the neomycin resistance gene into human cells. The first of these (dl52-91) retains the AAV rep genes; the second (dl3-94) retains only the AAV terminal repeats and the AAV polyadenylation signal (428 base pairs). Both vectors could be packaged into AAV virions and produced proviral structures that were essentially the same. Thus, the AAV sequences that are required in cis for packaging (pac), integration (int), rescue (res), and replication (ori) of viral DNA are located within a 284-base-pair sequence that includes the terminal repeat. Most of the G418r cell lines (73%) contained proviruses which could be rescued (Res+) when the cells were superinfected with the appropriate helper viruses. Some produced high yields of viral DNA; other rescued at a 50-fold lower level. Most of the lines that were Res+ (79%) contained a tandem repeat of the AAV genome (2 to 20 copies) which was integrated randomly with respect to cellular DNA. Junctions between two consecutive AAV copies in a tandem array contained either one or two copies of the AAV terminal palindrome. Junctions between AAV and cellular sequences occurred predominantly at or within the AAV terminal repeat, but in some cases at internal AAV sequences. Two lines were seen that contained free episomal copies of AAV DNA. Res+ clones contained deleted proviruses or tandem repeats of a deleted genome. Occasionally, flanking cellular DNA was also amplified. There was no superinfection inhibition of AAV DNA integration. Our results suggest that AAV sequences are amplified by DNA replication either before or after integration and that the mechanism of replication is different from the one used during AAV lytic infections. In addition, we have described a new AAV general transduction vector, dl3-94, which provides the maximum amount of room for insertion of foreign DNA and integrates at a high frequency (80%). Images PMID:2835501

  9. Zinc finger nuclease: a new approach for excising HIV-1 proviral DNA from infected human T cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Ding, Donglin; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Gongmin; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaoli; Zeng, Hanxian; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-09-01

    A major reason that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cannot be completely cured is the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) provirus integrated into the human genome. Though existing therapies can inhibit replication of HIV-1, they cannot eradicate it. A molecular therapy gains popularity due to its specifically targeting to HIV-1 infected cells and effectively removing the HIV-1, regardless of viral genes being active or dormant. Now, we propose a new method which can excellently delete the HIV provirus from the infected human T cell genome. First, we designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target a sequence within the long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 region that is highly conserved in whole clade. Then, we screened out one pair of ZFN and named it as ZFN-U3. We discovered that ZFN-U3 can exactly target and eliminate the full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA after the infected human cell lines treated with it, and the frequency of its excision was about 30 % without cytotoxicity. These results prove that ZFN-U3 can efficiently excise integrated HIV-1 from the human genome in infected cells. This method to delete full length HIV-1 in human genome can therefore provide a novel approach to cure HIV-infected individuals in the future.

  10. Increased proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with rheumatoid arthritis or connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Yakova, Maria; Lézin, Agnès; Dantin, Fabienne; Lagathu, Gisèle; Olindo, Stéphane; Jean-Baptiste, Georges; Arfi, Serge; Césaire, Raymond

    2005-02-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load is related to the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and has also been shown to be elevated in the peripheral blood in HTLV-1-infected patients with uveitis or alveolitis. Increased proliferation of HTLV-1-infected cells in, or migration of such cells into, the central nervous system is also seen in HAM/TSP. In the present study, we evaluated the proviral load in a cohort of HTLV-1-infected patients with arthritic conditions. HTLV-1 proviral load in the peripheral blood from 12 patients with RA and 6 patients with connective tissue disease was significantly higher than that in matched asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers, but similar to that in matched HAM/TSP controls. HAM/TSP was seen in one-third of the HTLV-1-infected patients with RA or connective tissue disease, but did not account for the higher proviral load compared to the asymptomatic carrier group. The proviral load was increased in the synovial fluid and tissue from an HTLV-1-infected patient with RA, the values suggesting that the majority of infiltrated cells were HTLV-1-infected. In the peripheral blood from HTLV-1-infected patients with RA or connective tissue disease, HTLV-1 proviral load correlated with the percentages of memory CD4+ T cells and activated T cells, and these percentages were shown to be markedly higher in the synovial fluid than in the peripheral blood in an HTLV-1-infected patient with RA. These biological findings are consistent with a role of the retrovirus in the development of arthritis in HTLV-1-infected patients. A high level of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and their accumulation in situ might play a central role in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disorders. Alternatively, the autoimmune arthritis, its etiological factors or treatments might secondarily enhance HTLV-1 proviral load.

  11. The difficulty of detecting HTLV-1 proviral sequences in patients with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Pancake, B A; Zucker-Franklin, D

    1996-12-01

    Although most patients with cutaneous T cell lymphomas, including mycosis fungoides (MF) and its leukemic variant, the Sézary syndrome, are seronegative for antibodies to the human T cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV-I/II), it has recently been shown that > 95% of such patients harbor proviral DNA sequences related to the region of the HTLV genome that encodes the transregulatory/transforming gene, tax. However, the demonstration of HTLV sequences, even after amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has not been universally successful, and some investigators continue to question this observation. In an effort to resolve this controversy, we have compared published methodologies that have been less successful with techniques currently used in this laboratory. Major differences were found in (a) the nature of the cells used [freshly isolated versus cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] and (b) the methods used to prepare samples for PCR (whole cell lysates versus DNA extracts). PBMC from 10 different MF patients and the healthy daughter of 1 of the patients were subjected to comparative analyses. While all of the PBMC lysates were positive, the DNA extract from only one of these individuals revealed HTLV tax sequences. Studies were also conducted comparing cell lysates and DNA extracts of cultured cells derived from tax sequence-positive PBMC from seven different MF patients. The cells from four of the seven were shown to have retained tax sequences after varying times in culture, when whole-cell lysates were used as targets for PCR amplification and Southern analysis, whereas none of the DNA extracts were positive. It appears that the use of whole-cell lysates instead of DNA extracts and the use of fresh instead of cultured cells greatly enhance the ability to detect HTLV-1 tax sequences in specimens from MF patients.

  12. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR: Quantitation of bovine leukemia virus proviral load using the CoCoMo algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) and is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a disease characterized by a highly extended course that often involves persistent lymphocytosis and culminates in B-cell lymphomas. BLV provirus remains integrated in cellular genomes, even in the absence of detectable BLV antibodies. Therefore, to understand the mechanism of BLV-induced leukemogenesis and carry out the selection of BLV-infected animals, a detailed evaluation of changes in proviral load throughout the course of disease in BLV-infected cattle is required. The aim of this study was to develop a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo) primers to measure the proviral load of known and novel BLV variants in clinical animals. Results Degenerate primers were designed from 52 individual BLV long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences identified from 356 BLV sequences in GenBank using the CoCoMo algorithm, which has been developed specifically for the detection of multiple virus species. Among 72 primer sets from 49 candidate primers, the most specific primer set was selected for detection of BLV LTR by melting curve analysis after real-time PCR amplification. An internal BLV TaqMan probe was used to enhance the specificity and sensitivity of the assay, and a parallel amplification of a single-copy host gene (the bovine leukocyte antigen DRA gene) was used to normalize genomic DNA. The assay is highly specific, sensitive, quantitative and reproducible, and was able to detect BLV in a number of samples that were negative using the previously developed nested PCR assay. The assay was also highly effective in detecting BLV in cattle from a range of international locations. Finally, this assay enabled us to demonstrate that proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection capacity as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease

  13. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Yang, W.K.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenical acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of the ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-pb inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs on the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTF sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression.

  14. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miura, Saori; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with persistent leukosis. These results suggest that the detection of monoclonal integration of BLV provirus into the host genome may serve as a marker of monoclonal proliferation and malignancy in difficult to diagnose EBL cattle.

  15. Widespread Genome Reorganization of an Obligate Virus Mutualist

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gaelen R.; Walden, Kimberly K. O.; Whitfield, James B.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Strand, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The family Polydnaviridae is of interest because it provides the best example of viruses that have evolved a mutualistic association with their animal hosts. Polydnaviruses in the genus Bracovirus are strictly associated with parasitoid wasps in the family Braconidae, and evolved ∼100 million years ago from a nudivirus. Each wasp species relies on its associated bracovirus to parasitize hosts, while each bracovirus relies on its wasp for vertical transmission. Prior studies establish that bracovirus genomes consist of proviral segments and nudivirus-like replication genes, but how these components are organized in the genomes of wasps is unknown. Here, we sequenced the genome of the wasp Microplitis demolitor to characterize the proviral genome of M. demolitor bracovirus (MdBV). Unlike nudiviruses, bracoviruses produce virions that package multiple circular, double-stranded DNAs. DNA segments packaged into MdBV virions resided in eight dispersed loci in the M. demolitor genome. Each proviral segment was bounded by homologous motifs that guide processing to form mature viral DNAs. Rapid evolution of proviral segments obscured homology between other bracovirus-carrying wasps and MdBV. However, some domains flanking MdBV proviral loci were shared with other species. All MdBV genes previously identified to encode proteins required for replication were identified. Some of these genes resided in a multigene cluster but others, including subunits of the RNA polymerase that transcribes structural genes and integrases that process proviral segments, were widely dispersed in the M. demolitor genome. Overall, our results indicate that genome dispersal is a key feature in the evolution of bracoviruses into mutualists. PMID:25232843

  16. Electroporation of proviral RCAS DNA alters gene expression in the embryonic chick hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Petra M; Logan, C Cairine

    2003-11-01

    Gene transfer by means of electroporation is an effective method for delivering DNA into cells. Expression vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) are routinely used as a control for this technique and are also regularly used to indirectly or directly monitor the expression of introduced transgenes. However, recent studies suggest that GFP may have nonspecific and/or cytotoxic side effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of enhanced GFP (EGFP) expression delivered by means of electroporation of proviral RCASBP(B)-EGFP DNA on gene expression in the hindbrain of chick embryos. We examined, via whole-mount in situ hybridization, the expression of a number of transcription factors. We found that Tlx-1 was ectopically expressed following electroporation of proviral RCASBP(B)-EGFP DNA. In contrast, the number of cells expressing Tlx-3, Phox2a, and Phox2b were reduced. Intriguingly, these effects could be mimicked by electroporation of wild-type proviral RCASBP(B) DNA (i.e., lacking the GFP insert). However, neither delivery of the EGFP transgene by means of viral infection nor electroporation alone yielded aberrant expression patterns. Together our data indicate that alterations of gene expression patterns are not directly due to the expression of EGFP but instead reflect a confounding effect of electroporating proviral DNA.

  17. Usefulness of Integrase resistance testing in proviral HIV-1 DNA in patients with Raltegravir prior failure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; Álvarez, Marta; Mérida, María Dolores; López, Josefa; Sánchez, José Antonio; Vinuesa, David; Martínez, María Ángeles; Hernández, José; García, Federico

    2016-05-13

    In our study, we have hypothesized that proviral DNA may show the history of mutations that emerged at previous failures to a Raltegravir containing regimen, in patients who are currently undetectable and candidates to simplification to a Dolutegravir containing regimen, in order to decide on once a day or twice a day dosing. We have performed a pilot, observational, retrospective, non interventional study, including 7 patients infected by HIV-1, all with a history of previous failure to a RAL containing regimen, that were successfully salvaged and had reached viral suppression. A genotypic viral Integrase region study was available for each patient at the moment of RAL failure. After an average (IQR) time of 48 months (29-53) Integrase resistance mutations in proviral DNA were studied. All the patients were infected by HIV-1 B subtypes, with a mean age of 55 (range 43 to 56), originating from Spain, and 4 were women. Median viral load (log) and CD4 count at the moment of the study on proviral DNA was of 1.3 log cp/ml (range 0-1.47) and 765.5 cells/μL (range; 436.75-1023.75). The median time (IQR) between previous failure to RAL and the study on proviral DNA was 48 (29-53) months. At Raltegravir failure, N155H was detected in four patients, and other secondary mutations were detected in five patients (71.4 %). In proviral DNA, N155H was detected by population sequencing in three patients (42.8 %), and UDS demonstrated a 9.77 % relative abundance of N155H in the remaining patient. Sanger sequencing correctly identified all the secondary mutations. This is a pilot study that demonstrates the possibility of properly identifying N155H and some secondary mutations 29-53 months after failure.

  18. Proviral amplification of the Gypsy endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster involves env-independent invasion of the female germline.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, F; Teysset, L; Terzian, C; Prud'homme, N; Santamaria, P; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    1999-05-04

    Gypsy is an infectious endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. The gypsy proviruses replicate very efficiently in the genome of the progeny of females homozygous for permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. This replicative transposition is correlated with derepression of gypsy expression, specifically in the somatic cells of the ovaries of the permissive mothers. The determinism of this amplification was studied further by making chimeric mothers containing different permissive/restrictive and somatic/germinal lineages. We show here that the derepression of active proviruses in the permissive soma is necessary and sufficient to induce proviral insertions in the progeny, even if the F1 flies derive from restrictive germ cells devoid of active proviruses. Therefore, gypsy endogenous multiplication results from the transfer of some gypsy-encoded genetic material from the soma towards the germen of the mother and its subsequent insertion into the chromosomes of the progeny. This transfer, however, is not likely to result from retroviral infection of the germline. Indeed, we also show here that the insertion of a tagged gypsy element, mutant for the env gene, occurs at high frequency, independently of the production of gypsy Env proteins by any transcomplementing helper. The possible role of the env gene for horizontal transfer to new hosts is discussed.

  19. Low Plasma Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Viral Load Is Independent of Proviral Load: Low Virus Production In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Sarr, Abdoulaye Dieng; Guèye-Ndiaye, Aïssatou; Mboup, Souleymane; Essex, Myron E.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2000-01-01

    Levels of virus in the plasma are closely related to the pathogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HIV-2 is much less pathogenic than HIV-1, and infection with HIV-2 leads to significantly lower plasma viral load. To identify the source of this difference, we measured both viral RNA and proviral DNA in matched samples from 34 HIV-2-infected individuals. Nearly half had undetectable viral RNA loads (<100 copies/ml), but levels of proviral DNA were relatively high and confirmed that quantities of provirus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection were similar. Overall, HIV-2 proviral DNA load did not correlate with viral RNA load, and higher viral RNA load was associated with increased production of plasma virus from the proviral template. These results suggest that low viral load in HIV-2 infection is due to decreased rates of viral production, rather than differences in target cell infectivity. PMID:10627569

  20. Complete Summary of a Four-Part Research Project for the "I Like Me!" Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demoulin, Donald F.

    This report is a compilation of four different studies involving kindergartners (N=950) who participated in the "I LIKE ME!" program. I LIKE ME! is a 12-week program that uses a personalized reader with "I" statements as positive inducements for learning and achievement for kindergartners. The goals of the program are to bring home, school, and…

  1. "At First I Just Said 'I Like Girls'": Coming out with an Affinity, Not an Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guittar, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary youth are increasingly engaging in coming out prior to the formation of concrete sexual identities. They are coming out with an "affinity:" affirming to themselves and expressing to others that "I like girls" or "I like boys." This study centers on the experiences of 13 individuals who all came out with…

  2. Structural basis for ELL2 and AFF4 activation of HIV-1 proviral transcription.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shiqian; Li, Zichong; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Stjepanovic, Goran; Zhou, Qiang; Hurley, James H

    2017-01-30

    The intrinsically disordered scaffold proteins AFF1/4 and the transcription elongation factors ELL1/2 are core components of the super elongation complex required for HIV-1 proviral transcription. Here we report the 2.0-Å resolution crystal structure of the human ELL2 C-terminal domain bound to its 50-residue binding site on AFF4, the ELLBow. The ELL2 domain has the same arch-shaped fold as the tight junction protein occludin. The ELLBow consists of an N-terminal helix followed by an extended hairpin that we refer to as the elbow joint, and occupies most of the concave surface of ELL2. This surface is important for the ability of ELL2 to promote HIV-1 Tat-mediated proviral transcription. The AFF4-ELL2 interface is imperfectly packed, leaving a cavity suggestive of a potential binding site for transcription-promoting small molecules.

  3. Structural basis for ELL2 and AFF4 activation of HIV-1 proviral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shiqian; Li, Zichong; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Stjepanovic, Goran; Zhou, Qiang; Hurley, James H.

    2017-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered scaffold proteins AFF1/4 and the transcription elongation factors ELL1/2 are core components of the super elongation complex required for HIV-1 proviral transcription. Here we report the 2.0-Å resolution crystal structure of the human ELL2 C-terminal domain bound to its 50-residue binding site on AFF4, the ELLBow. The ELL2 domain has the same arch-shaped fold as the tight junction protein occludin. The ELLBow consists of an N-terminal helix followed by an extended hairpin that we refer to as the elbow joint, and occupies most of the concave surface of ELL2. This surface is important for the ability of ELL2 to promote HIV-1 Tat-mediated proviral transcription. The AFF4–ELL2 interface is imperfectly packed, leaving a cavity suggestive of a potential binding site for transcription-promoting small molecules. PMID:28134250

  4. Functional endogenous viral elements in the genome of the parasitoid wasp Cotesia congregata: insights into the evolutionary dynamics of bracoviruses.

    PubMed

    Bézier, Annie; Louis, Faustine; Jancek, Séverine; Periquet, Georges; Thézé, Julien; Gyapay, Gabor; Musset, Karine; Lesobre, Jérome; Lenoble, Patricia; Dupuy, Catherine; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn; Herniou, Elisabeth A; Drezen, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-19

    Bracoviruses represent the most complex endogenous viral elements (EVEs) described to date. Nudiviral genes have been hosted within parasitoid wasp genomes since approximately 100 Ma. They play a crucial role in the wasp life cycle as they produce bracovirus particles, which are injected into parasitized lepidopteran hosts during wasp oviposition. Bracovirus particles encapsidate multiple dsDNA circles encoding virulence genes. Their expression in parasitized caterpillars is essential for wasp parasitism success. Here, we report on the genomic organization of the proviral segments (i.e. master sequences used to produce the encapsidated dsDNA circles) present in the Cotesia congregata parasitoid wasp genome. The provirus is composed of a macrolocus, comprising two-thirds of the proviral segments and of seven dispersed loci, each containing one to three segments. Comparative genomic analyses with closely related species gave insights into the evolutionary dynamics of bracovirus genomes. Conserved synteny in the different wasp genomes showed the orthology of the proviral macrolocus across different species. The nudiviral gene odv-e66-like1 is conserved within the macrolocus, suggesting an ancient co-localization of the nudiviral genome and bracovirus proviral segments. By contrast, the evolution of proviral segments within the macrolocus has involved a series of lineage-specific duplications.

  5. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Lewis, G S; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M

    2009-10-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and sequence variants in CCR5 regulatory regions have been implicated in delayed progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Both ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), also known as maedi-visna, and HIV are macrophage-tropic lentiviruses, have similar genomic structures, and cause lifelong persistent host infection, suggesting CCR5 may have a role in regulating OPPV provirus levels. Therefore, the ovine CCR5 genomic sequence was determined, and sequence variants were obtained from the open reading frame and surrounding regulatory sites. One CCR5 variant contained a 4-base deletion within a binding site for octamer transcription factors in the promoter region. A test for differential transcription from each allele in heterozygous animals showed a 3.9-fold transcription difference (P < 0.0001). OPPV proviral levels were also measured in 351 naturally exposed Rambouillet, Polypay and Columbia sheep. Deletion homozygotes showed reduced OPPV proviral levels among these animals (P < 0.01). The association of this CCR5 promoter deletion with OPPV levels will need to be validated in additional populations before the deletion can be recommended for widespread use in marker-assisted selection. However, because of the large impact on transcription and because CCR5 has roles in inflammation, recruitment of effector cells, and cell-mediated immunity, this deletion may play a role in the control of infections of many diverse pathogens of sheep.

  6. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of the MHC class I-like Fc receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kandil, Eman; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kasahara, Masanori

    1995-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium of neonatal mice and rats expresses an Fc receptor that mediates selective uptake of IgG in mothers`milk. This receptor (FcRn), which helps newborn animals to acquire passive immunity, is an MHC class I-like heterodimer made up of a heavy chain and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. In the present study, we determined the genomic structure of a mouse gene (FcRn) encoding the heavy of FcRn. The overall exon-intron organization of the Fcrn gene was similar to that of the Fcrn gene, thus providing structural evidence that Fcrn os a bona fide class I gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the Fcrn gene contained the binding motifs for two cytokine-inducible transcription factors, NF-IL6 and NF1. However, regulatory elements found in MHC class I genes (enhancer A, enhancer B, and the IFN response element) were absent. Phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that, like the MICA, AZGP1, and CD1 genes, the Fcrn gene diverged form MHC class I genes after the emergence of amphibians but before the split of placental and marsupial mammals. Consistent with this result, Southern blot analysis with a mouse Fcrn cDNA probe detected cross-hybridizing bands in various mammalian species and chickens. Sequence analysis of the Fcrn gene isolated from eight mouse strains showed that the membrane-distal domain of FcRn has at least three amino acid variants. The fact that Fcrn is a single copy gene indicates that it is expressed in both the neonatal intestine and the fetal yolk sac. 74 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Helicobacter pylori HP0425 Targets the Nucleus with DNase I-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Min; Choe, Min-Ho; Asaithambi, Killivalavan; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Lee, Kon Ho; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins has a significant impact on host cell pathology. Helicobacter pylori have many nuclear targeting proteins that translocate into the nucleus of host cells. H. pylori HP0425, annotated as hypothetical, has a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, but its function has not been demonstrated. The aim of this experiment was to address the nuclear translocation of HP0425 and determine the effect of HP0425 pathology on host cells. To investigate the nuclear localization of HP0425, it was expressed in AGS and MKN-1 cells as a GFP fusion protein (pEGFP-HP0425), and its localization was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Recombinant HP0425 (rHP0425) protein was overproduced as a GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by glutathione-affinity column chromatography. Purified rHP0425 was examined for cytotoxicity and DNase activity. The pEGFP-HP0425 fluorescence was expressed in the nucleus and cytosol fraction of cells, while it was localized in the cytoplasm in the negative control. This protein exhibited DNase activity under various conditions, with the highest DNase activity in the presence of manganese. In addition, the rHP0425 protein efficiently decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that HP0425 carrying a nuclear localization signal sequence translocates into the nucleus of host cells and degrades genomic DNA by DNase I-like enzymatic activity, which is a new pathogenic strategy of H. pylori in the host. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  9. Administration of a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist decreases the proviral reservoir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Winckelmann, Anni A; Munk-Petersen, Lærke V; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Hjelholt, Thomas J; Montefiori, David; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S; Tolstrup, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can reactivate HIV from latently infected cells in vitro. We aimed to investigate the TLR-9 agonist, CPG 7909's in vivo effect on the proviral HIV reservoir and HIV-specific immunity. This was a post-hoc analysis of a double-blind randomized controlled vaccine trial. HIV-infected adults were randomized 1:1 to receive pneumococcal vaccines with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 as adjuvant at 0, 3 and 9 months. In patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy we quantified proviral DNA at 0, 3, 4, 9, and 10 months (31 subjects in the CPG group and 37 in the placebo-adjuvant group). Furthermore, we measured HIV-specific antibodies, characterized T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific T cell immunity. We observed a mean reduction in proviral DNA in the CPG group of 12.6% (95% CI: -23.6-0.0) following each immunization whereas proviral DNA in the placebo-adjuvant group remained largely unchanged (6.7% increase; 95% CI: -4.2-19.0 after each immunization, p = 0.02). Among participants with additional cryo-preserved PBMCs, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell immunity as indicated by increased expression of degranulation marker CD107a and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β) tended to be up-regulated following immunization with CPG 7909 compared with placebo as adjuvant. Further, increasing proportion of HIV-specific CD107a and MIP1β-expressing CD8+ T cells were strongly correlated with decreasing proviral load. No changes were observed in T cell phenotype distribution, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell immunity, or HIV-specific antibodies. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal vaccination decreased proviral load. Reductions in proviral load correlated with increasing levels of HIV specific CD8+ T cells. Further investigation into the potential effect of TLR9 agonists on HIV latency is warranted.

  10. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears).

    PubMed

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2011-03-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca(2+)-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction.

  11. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears)

    PubMed Central

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako

    2011-01-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca2+-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction. PMID:21866271

  12. Unusual varieties and duplication of Rig-I like receptors encoded in the marine mollusk, Crassostrea gigas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. H.; Jiao, C. Z.

    2017-07-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) play key roles in sensing non-self nucleic acids in cytoplasm and trigger antiviral innate immune response in vertebrates and human body. Here we carried out in silico analysis to identify and investigate the putative RLRs encoded in the genome of marine mollusk, Crassostrea gigas (cgRLRs), an invertebrate species. We found the unusual duplication and varieties on domain architecture of putative cgRLRs encoded in the genome of C. gigas. Three putative cgRLRs (accessions numbers are EKC24603, EKC31344.1 and EKC38304.1 on GenBank), have the similar domain architecture with that of human RIG-I or MDA5, and one protein (EKC34573.1) with that of human LGP2; The fifth putative cgRLRs (EKC38303.1) is somewhat similar with human RIG-I/MDA5 except that it has only one caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) in its N-terminal. Other nine proteins were identified to be partialy similar with RLRs while with the incomplete sequences, which maybe reflect the events of partial duplication of cgRLRs genes occurred in the oyster genome.

  13. Evolution of HTLV-1 proviral load in patients from Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, Viviana Nilla; Gomes, Alline do Nascimento; Kruschewsky, Ramon de Almeida; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2012-01-01

    Variations in human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load (PVL) in infected individuals over time are not well understood. To evaluate the evolution of proviral load in asymptomatic individuals and HAM/TSP patients in order to help determine periodicity for measuring proviral load. A group of 104 HTLV-1 infected patients, followed at the HTLV reference center in Salvador, Brazil, were included in the study (70 asymptomatic and 34 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients). HTLV-1 PVL was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at baseline and again at another point, either ≤ 12 months, between 12-24 months, or ≥ 24 months. HAM/TSP patients had higher PVL (ranging from 11,041 to 317,009 copies/10(6) PBMC) when compared to asymptomatic individuals (ranging from 0 to 68,228 copies/10(6) PBMC). No statistically significant differences were observed in the medians of PVL in HAM/TSP patients or asymptomatic individuals over time. However, in asymptomatic individuals with a PVL below 50,000 copies/10(6) PBMC, a statistically significant two-fold increase was observed over time. HTLV-1-PVL remained stable in both asymptomatic individuals and HAM/TSP patients over time. Frequent monitoring of asymptomatic individuals with low PVLs is recommended and further studies should be conducted to assess the course of PVL in these patients over extended periods of time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Cattle with the BoLA class II DRB3*0902 allele have significantly lower bovine leukemia proviral loads.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takumi; Mekata, Hirohisa; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kirino, Yumi; Mitoma, Shuya; Honkawa, Kazuyuki; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo

    2017-09-12

    The bovine MHC (BoLA) class II DRB3 alleles are associated with polyclonal expansion of lymphocytes caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in cattle. To examine whether the DRB3*0902 allele, one of the resistance-associated alleles, is associated with the proviral load, we measured BLV proviral load of BLV-infected cattle and clarified their DRB3 alleles. Fifty-seven animals with DRB3*0902 were identified out of 835 BLV-infected cattle and had significantly lower proviral load (P<0.000001) compared with the rest of the infected animals, in both Japanese Black and Holstein cattle. This result strongly indicates that the BoLA class II DRA/DRB3*0902 molecule plays an important immunological role in suppressing viral replication, resulting in resistance to the disease progression.

  15. Mutations in Ovis aries TMEM154 are associated with lower small ruminant lentivirus proviral concentration in one sheep flock.

    PubMed

    Alshanbari, F A; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Highland, M A; Lewis, G S; White, S N

    2014-08-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of US sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, SRLV is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The production impacts from SRLV are due to a range of disease symptoms, including pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, body condition wasting and encephalitis. There is no cure and no effective vaccine for preventing SRLV infection. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration indicate a genetic basis for susceptibility to SRLV. Animals with high blood proviral concentration show increased tissue lesion severity, so proviral concentration represents a live animal test for control post-infection in terms of proviral replication and disease severity. Recently, it was found that sheep with two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 (encoding lysine at position 35) had lower odds of SRLV infection. In this study, we examined the relationship between SRLV control post-infection and variants in two genes, TMEM154 and CCR5, in four flocks containing 1403 SRLV-positive sheep. We found two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 were associated with lower SRLV proviral concentration in one flock (P < 0.02). This identified the same favorable diplotype for SRLV control post-infection as for odds of infection. However, frequencies of haplotypes 2 and 3 were too low in the other three flocks to test. The CCR5 promoter deletion did not have consistent association with SRLV proviral concentration. Future work in flocks with more balanced allele frequencies is needed to confirm or refute TMEM154 association with control of SRLV post-infection. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Mutations in Ovis aries TMEM154 are associated with lower small ruminant lentivirus proviral concentration in one sheep flock

    PubMed Central

    Alshanbari, F A; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Highland, M A; Lewis, G S; White, S N

    2014-01-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of US sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, SRLV is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The production impacts from SRLV are due to a range of disease symptoms, including pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, body condition wasting and encephalitis. There is no cure and no effective vaccine for preventing SRLV infection. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration indicate a genetic basis for susceptibility to SRLV. Animals with high blood proviral concentration show increased tissue lesion severity, so proviral concentration represents a live animal test for control post-infection in terms of proviral replication and disease severity. Recently, it was found that sheep with two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 (encoding lysine at position 35) had lower odds of SRLV infection. In this study, we examined the relationship between SRLV control post-infection and variants in two genes, TMEM154 and CCR5, in four flocks containing 1403 SRLV-positive sheep. We found two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 were associated with lower SRLV proviral concentration in one flock (P < 0.02). This identified the same favorable diplotype for SRLV control post-infection as for odds of infection. However, frequencies of haplotypes 2 and 3 were too low in the other three flocks to test. The CCR5 promoter deletion did not have consistent association with SRLV proviral concentration. Future work in flocks with more balanced allele frequencies is needed to confirm or refute TMEM154 association with control of SRLV post-infection. PMID:24934128

  17. Association of Sicca Syndrome with Proviral Load and Proinflammatory Cytokines in HTLV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Lima, Clara Mônica; Santos, Silvane; Dourado, Adriana; Carvalho, Natália B; Bittencourt, Valéria; Lessa, Marcus Miranda; Siqueira, Isadora; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2016-01-01

    The Sjögren syndrome has been diagnosed in patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and dry mouth and dry eyes are documented in HTLV-1 carriers. However the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome in these subjects has been contested. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the role of immunological factors and proviral load, in sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 in patients without myelopathy. Subjects were recruited in the HTLV-1 Clinic, from 2009 to 2011. The proviral load and cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, and IL-10) were obtained from a database containing the values presented by the subjects at admission in the clinic. Of the 272 participants, 59 (21.7%) had sicca syndrome and in all of them anti-Sjögren syndrome related antigen A (SSA) and antigen B (SSB) were negatives. The production of TNF-α and IFN-γ was higher in the group with sicca syndrome (P < 0.05) than in HTLV-1 infected subjects without sicca syndrome. Our data indicates that patients with sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 do not have Sjögren syndrome. However the increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ in this group of patients may contribute to the pathogenesis of sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1.

  18. Severe strongyloidiasis complicated by meningitis and hydrocephalus in an HTLV-1 carrier with increased proviral load.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masao; Futami, Atsushi; Takahira, Kenichiro; Kodaira, Makoto; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Kuriki, Ken; Hori, Eitaro

    2003-12-01

    We report a 47-year-old Japanese man who was a human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carrier with strongyloidiasis, and who was born in an area endemic for both Strongyloides stercoralis ( S. stercoralis) and HTLV-1. He presented with edema of both legs. Laboratory examination on admission revealed hypoalbuminemia, and S. stercoralis rhabditiform larvae were found by stool microscopy. Purulent meningitis, which was suspected to be due to disseminated strongyloidiasis, developed during the first and second treatment for S. stercoralis infection. After the meningitis was alleviated, hydrocephalus with gait disturbance developed, and these features were attenuated by a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Impaired immunity and increased HTLV-1 proviral load, with an increased titer of HTLV-1 antibody, were observed in this patient. These results suggest that HTLV-1 proviral load and/or antibody titer of HTLV-1 can be used for the identification of carriers who are at increased risk of developing severe strongyloidiasis among those patients who are infected with both S. stercoralis and HTLV-1.

  19. Association of Sicca Syndrome with Proviral Load and Proinflammatory Cytokines in HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Clara Mônica; Santos, Silvane; Dourado, Adriana; Carvalho, Natália B.; Bittencourt, Valéria; Lessa, Marcus Miranda; Siqueira, Isadora; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    The Sjögren syndrome has been diagnosed in patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and dry mouth and dry eyes are documented in HTLV-1 carriers. However the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome in these subjects has been contested. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the role of immunological factors and proviral load, in sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 in patients without myelopathy. Subjects were recruited in the HTLV-1 Clinic, from 2009 to 2011. The proviral load and cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, and IL-10) were obtained from a database containing the values presented by the subjects at admission in the clinic. Of the 272 participants, 59 (21.7%) had sicca syndrome and in all of them anti-Sjögren syndrome related antigen A (SSA) and antigen B (SSB) were negatives. The production of TNF-α and IFN-γ was higher in the group with sicca syndrome (P < 0.05) than in HTLV-1 infected subjects without sicca syndrome. Our data indicates that patients with sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 do not have Sjögren syndrome. However the increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ in this group of patients may contribute to the pathogenesis of sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1. PMID:26904697

  20. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  1. Why I Like to Read--Statistical Analysis of Questionnaire Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allerup, Peter

    Approximately 1200 Danish school children aged 8, 11, and 14 participated in a questionnaire study under the caption, "Why I like to read." Data from Denmark formed part of an international study, in which 12 other countries used the same questionnaire to explore various functions of reading and to compare them over different countries.…

  2. Characterization of a ViI-like phage specific to Escherichia coli O157:H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phage vB_EcoM_CBA120 (CBA120) isolated against Escherichia coli O157:H7 from a cattle feedlot is morphologically very similar to the classic phage ViI of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Until recently, little was known genetically or physiologically about the ViI-like phages, and non targeting E...

  3. A universal real-time PCR assay for the quantification of group-M HIV-1 proviral load.

    PubMed

    Malnati, Mauro S; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Gatto, Francesca; Salvatori, Francesca; Cassina, Giulia; Rutigliano, Teresa; Volpi, Rosy; Lusso, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA is increasingly used to measure the HIV-1 cellular reservoirs, a helpful marker to evaluate the efficacy of antiretroviral therapeutic regimens in HIV-1-infected individuals. Furthermore, the proviral DNA load represents a specific marker for the early diagnosis of perinatal HIV-1 infection and might be predictive of HIV-1 disease progression independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and CD4(+) T-cell counts. The high degree of genetic variability of HIV-1 poses a serious challenge for the design of a universal quantitative assay capable of detecting all the genetic subtypes within the main (M) HIV-1 group with similar efficiency. Here, we describe a highly sensitive real-time PCR protocol that allows for the correct quantification of virtually all group-M HIV-1 strains with a higher degree of accuracy compared with other methods. The protocol involves three stages, namely DNA extraction/lysis, cellular DNA quantification and HIV-1 proviral load assessment. Owing to the robustness of the PCR design, this assay can be performed on crude cellular extracts, and therefore it may be suitable for the routine analysis of clinical samples even in developing countries. An accurate quantification of the HIV-1 proviral load can be achieved within 1 d from blood withdrawal.

  4. Administration of a Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Decreases the Proviral Reservoir in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Winckelmann, Anni A.; Munk-Petersen, Lærke V.; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Hjelholt, Thomas J.; Montefiori, David; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.; Tolstrup, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can reactivate HIV from latently infected cells in vitro. We aimed to investigate the TLR-9 agonist, CPG 7909's in vivo effect on the proviral HIV reservoir and HIV-specific immunity. This was a post-hoc analysis of a double-blind randomized controlled vaccine trial. HIV-infected adults were randomized 1∶1 to receive pneumococcal vaccines with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 as adjuvant at 0, 3 and 9 months. In patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy we quantified proviral DNA at 0, 3, 4, 9, and 10 months (31 subjects in the CPG group and 37 in the placebo-adjuvant group). Furthermore, we measured HIV-specific antibodies, characterized T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific T cell immunity. We observed a mean reduction in proviral DNA in the CPG group of 12.6% (95% CI: −23.6–0.0) following each immunization whereas proviral DNA in the placebo-adjuvant group remained largely unchanged (6.7% increase; 95% CI: −4.2–19.0 after each immunization, p = 0.02). Among participants with additional cryo-preserved PBMCs, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell immunity as indicated by increased expression of degranulation marker CD107a and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β) tended to be up-regulated following immunization with CPG 7909 compared with placebo as adjuvant. Further, increasing proportion of HIV-specific CD107a and MIP1β-expressing CD8+ T cells were strongly correlated with decreasing proviral load. No changes were observed in T cell phenotype distribution, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell immunity, or HIV-specific antibodies. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal vaccination decreased proviral load. Reductions in proviral load correlated with increasing levels of HIV specific CD8+ T cells. Further investigation into the potential effect of TLR9 agonists on HIV latency is warranted. PMID:23637967

  5. Immunologic response and proviral load in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infected individuals with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tannus, Matheus; Costa, Davi T; Castro, Néviton M; Oliveira, Paulo; Carvalho, Natália; Andrade, Rosana; Santos, Silvane; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the immune response and proviral load in individuals with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and erectile dysfunction (ED) compared with those in the controls. We performed a cross-sectional study of 102 men aged 18-70 years with positive serology for HTLV-1, who were interviewed from 2004 to 2010. The study sample was divided into 2 groups: group 1, 42 HTLV-1-infected men with ED, as determined by the International Index of Erectile Function-5 score; and group 2, 60 HTLV-1-infected men without ED. The cytokines interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the proviral load were analyzed between the 2 groups. Compared with those without ED, the men with ED had greater levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (545.37 ± 877.06 vs 509.39 ± 724.70 pg/mL) and interferon-γ (1154.35 ± 1282.98 vs 1122.78 ± 1573.16 pg/mL), but this difference was not significant (P = .69 and P = .57, respectively). The proviral load was 135,695 ± 190,113 copies/10(5) cells in the ED group and 47,607 ± 83,129 copies/10(5) cells in the non-ED patients, with a statistically significant difference (P = .02). When ED was stratified as mild, moderate, and severe, no difference was found in the proviral load among the ED groups (P = .09); however, the levels were greater in the severe forms. The association of a greater proviral load in men with ED with HTLV-1 gives support to the idea that ED is part of the autonomic syndrome related to viral infection and should be investigated for early identification of the syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Bovine Leukaemia Virus Antibodies and Proviral DNA in Colostrum Replacers.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, B; Finnegan, C; Phillips, A; Horigan, M; Pollard, T; Steinbach, F

    2015-10-01

    Great Britain has been bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) disease free since 1999. We recently reported three separate incidents of BLV seropositivity on farms with home-reared cattle due to the use of colostrum replacer rather than infection with BLV (Emerg. Infect. Dis., 19, 2013, 1027). These cases were all linked via the use of the same brand of colostrum replacer. Here, we investigate further by examining multiple brands of colostrum replacer for proviral DNA and BLV antibodies. BLV antibodies were detected in 7 of the colostrum replacers tested, with PCR concurring in two cases. Thus, the use of these BLV antibody-positive colostrum replacers may also lead to false-positive serological diagnostics. © 2013 Crown copyright. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO/Queen's Printer for Scotland and Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency.

  7. Telomere Length, Proviral Load and Neurologic Impairment in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Usadi, Benjamin; Bruhn, Roberta; Lin, Jue; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Murphy, Edward L

    2016-08-11

    Short or damaged telomeres have been implicated in degenerative conditions. We hypothesized that analysis of telomere length (TL) in human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection and HTLV-associated neuropathy might provide clues to the etiology of HTLV-associated disease and viral dynamics. A subset of 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), and 45 seronegative subjects was selected from the larger HTLV Outcomes Study (HOST) cohort, matched on age, sex and race/ethnicity. Telomere-to-single-copy gene (T/S) ratio (a measure of TL) and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral loads were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Vibration sensation measured by tuning fork during neurologic examinations performed as part of the HOST study allowed for an assessment of peripheral neuropathy. TL was compared between groups using t-tests, linear and logistic regression. Mean T/S ratio was 1.02 ± 0.16 in HTLV-1, 1.03 ± 0.17 in HTLV-2 and 0.99 ± 0.18 in HTLV seronegative subjects (p = 0.322). TL was not associated with HTLV-1 or -2 proviral load. Shorter TL was significantly associated with impaired vibration sense in the HTLV-2 positive group only. Overall, we found no evidence that telomere length was affected by chronic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection. That TL was only associated with peripheral neuropathy in the HTLV-2-positive group is intriguing, but should be interpreted cautiously. Studies with larger sample size and telomere length measurement in lymphocyte subsets may clarify the relationship between TL and HTLV-infection.

  8. Telomere Length, Proviral Load and Neurologic Impairment in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Usadi, Benjamin; Bruhn, Roberta; Lin, Jue; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Murphy, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Short or damaged telomeres have been implicated in degenerative conditions. We hypothesized that analysis of telomere length (TL) in human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection and HTLV-associated neuropathy might provide clues to the etiology of HTLV-associated disease and viral dynamics. A subset of 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), and 45 seronegative subjects was selected from the larger HTLV Outcomes Study (HOST) cohort, matched on age, sex and race/ethnicity. Telomere-to-single-copy gene (T/S) ratio (a measure of TL) and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral loads were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Vibration sensation measured by tuning fork during neurologic examinations performed as part of the HOST study allowed for an assessment of peripheral neuropathy. TL was compared between groups using t-tests, linear and logistic regression. Mean T/S ratio was 1.02 ± 0.16 in HTLV-1, 1.03 ± 0.17 in HTLV-2 and 0.99 ± 0.18 in HTLV seronegative subjects (p = 0.322). TL was not associated with HTLV-1 or -2 proviral load. Shorter TL was significantly associated with impaired vibration sense in the HTLV-2 positive group only. Overall, we found no evidence that telomere length was affected by chronic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection. That TL was only associated with peripheral neuropathy in the HTLV-2-positive group is intriguing, but should be interpreted cautiously. Studies with larger sample size and telomere length measurement in lymphocyte subsets may clarify the relationship between TL and HTLV-infection. PMID:27529270

  9. HIV-1 Proviral DNA Loads (as Determined by Quantitative PCR) in Patients Subjected to Structured Treatment Interruption after Antiretroviral Therapy Failure

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Domingos E. M.; Santos, Carlos; Oliveros, Márcia P. R.; Sanabani, Sabri; Diaz, Ricardo S.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of Structured Treatment Interruption (STI) in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral reservoirs in 41 highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated viremic individuals at baseline and 12 weeks after STI was determined using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Viral load increased 0.7 log10 and CD4 decreased 97.5 cells/mm3 after 12 weeks. A total of 28 of the 41 individuals showed an increased proviral load, 19 with a statistically significant increase above 10%. An increase in active viral replication is an important factor in the replenishment of the proviral reservoir even for short time periods. PMID:22422851

  10. Molecular characterisation of RIG-I-like helicases in the black flying fox, Pteropus alecto.

    PubMed

    Cowled, Christopher; Baker, Michelle L; Zhou, Peng; Tachedjian, Mary; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-04-01

    The RIG-I like helicases, RIG-I, mda5 and LGP2 are an evolutionarily conserved family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors important in the recognition of viral RNA, and responsible for the innate induction of interferons and proinflammatory cytokines upon viral infection. Bats are natural reservoir hosts to a variety of RNA viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality in other species; however the mechanisms responsible for the control of viral replication in bats are not understood. This report describes the molecular cloning and expression analysis of RIG-I, mda5 and LGP2 genes in the fruit bat Pteropus alecto, and is the first description of RIG-I like helicases from any species of bat. Our results demonstrate that P. alecto RIG-I, mda5 and LGP2 have similar primary structures and tissue expression patterns to their counterparts in humans and other mammals. Stimulation of bat kidney cells with synthetic dsRNA (poly I:C) induced high levels of interferon β and rapid upregulation of all three helicases. These findings reveal that the cytoplasmic virus sensing machinery is present and intact in P. alecto. This study provides the foundation for further investigations into the interactions between bat RIG-I-like helicases and viruses to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the asymptomatic nature of viral infections in bats. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential regulation of NF-κB-mediated proviral and antiviral host gene expression by primate lentiviral Nef and Vpu proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel; Hotter, Dominik; Van Driessche, Benoît; Stürzel, Christina M; Kluge, Silvia F; Wildum, Steffen; Yu, Hangxing; Baumann, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Leoz, Marie; Hahn, Beatrice H; Van Lint, Carine; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2015-02-03

    NF-κB is essential for effective transcription of primate lentiviral genomes and also activates antiviral host genes. Here, we show that the early protein Nef of most primate lentiviruses enhances NF-κB activation. In contrast, the late protein Vpu of HIV-1 and its simian precursors inhibits activation of NF-κB, even in the presence of Nef. Although this effect of Vpu did not correlate with its ability to interact with β-TrCP, it involved the stabilization of IκB and reduced nuclear translocation of p65. Interestingly, however, Vpu did not affect casein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of p65. Lack of Vpu was associated with increased NF-κB activation and induction of interferon and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in HIV-1-infected T cells. Thus, HIV-1 and its simian precursors employ Nef to boost NF-κB activation early during the viral life cycle to initiate proviral transcription, while Vpu is used to downmodulate NF-κB-dependent expression of ISGs at later stages. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HTLV-1 proviral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells quantified in 100 HAM/TSP patients: a marker of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Olindo, Stéphane; Lézin, Agnès; Cabre, Philippe; Merle, Harold; Saint-Vil, Martine; Edimonana Kaptue, Mireille; Signate, Aïssatou; Césaire, Raymond; Smadja, Didier

    2005-10-15

    A high proviral load of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been reported in patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HTLV-1 proviral load in PBMCs (expressed as the number of copies per 10(6) PBMCs) in HAM/TSP disease course. One hundred consecutive HAM/TSP patients were recruited and assigned on the basis of the disability score and disease duration to either a rapid (n=38) or a slow (n=62) progression group. Thirty-four asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers were also included. HTLV-1 proviral load was quantified in all HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic subjects. The mean HTLV-1 proviral load was 6-fold lower in asymptomatic carriers than in HAM/TSP patients (18,224+/-24,811 vs. 107,905+/-96,651, p<0.0001) and significantly higher in rapid progression patients than in slow progression patients (146,469+/-98,943 vs. 84,270+/-87,912, p=0.0002). HTLV-1 proviral load in HAM/TSP patients was independent of age at the time of study, age at onset, and disease duration, and was not related to ophthalmological-associated disease or Chisholm grade. A high level of pulmonary lymphocytosis correlated with high HTLV-1 proviral load level (p=0.01). Our results suggest that the level of HTLV-1 proviral load in PBMCs parallels the course of HTLV-1 infection, being low in asymptomatic carriers and high and very high, respectively, in slow and rapid progression HAM/TSP patients. The magnitude of the HTLV-1 proviral load in PBMCs can be used as a biological marker of disease progression and could be a useful marker of disease activity in the monitoring of therapeutic trials.

  14. Discrimination of Cytosolic Self and Non-Self RNA by RIG-I-like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Laessig, Charlotte; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2017-04-14

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) are cytosolic innate immune sensors that detect pathogenic RNA and induce a systemic antiviral response. During the last decade many studies focused on their molecular characterization and the identification of RNA agonists. Thereby it became more and more clear that RLR activation needs to be carefully regulated, since constitutive signalling or detection of endogenous RNA through loss of specificity is detrimental. Here, we review the current understanding of RLR activation and selectivity. We specifically focus upon recent findings on the function of the helicase domain in discriminating between different RNAs, and whose malfunctioning causes serious autoimmune diseases.

  15. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  16. Validation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for HTLV-1 proviral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Rosadas, Carolina; Cabral-Castro, Mauro Jorge; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo; Peralta, José Mauro; Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a TaqMan real-time PCR assay for HTLV-1 proviral load detection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. TARL-2 cells were used to generate a standard curve. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell gDNA from 27 seropositive and 23 seronegative samples was analyzed. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, dynamic range of the standard curve and qPCR efficiency were evaluated. All of the positive samples amplified the target gene. All of the negative samples amplified only the control gene (β-actin). The assay presented 100% specificity and sensibility. The intra- and inter-assay variability was 2.4% and 2.2%, respectively. The qPCR efficiency, slope and correlation coefficients (r2) were all acceptable. The limit of detection was 1 copy/rxn. This assay can reliably quantify HTLV-1 proviral load. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral load harbored by lymphocyte subpopulations in BLV-infected cattle at the subclinical stage of enzootic bovine leucosis using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infection may remain clinically silent at the aleukemic (AL) stage, cause persistent lymphocytosis (PL), or, more rarely, B cell lymphoma. BLV has been identified in B cells, CD2+ T cells, CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, γ/δ T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes in infected cattle that do not have tumors, although the most consistently infected cell is the CD5+ B cell. The mechanism by which BLV causes uncontrolled CD5+ B cell proliferation is unknown. Recently, we developed a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR, which enabled us to demonstrate that the proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection, as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease progression. The present study reports the distribution of BLV provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations isolated from BLV-infected cows at the subclinical stage of EBL as examined by cell sorting and BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR. Results Phenotypic characterization of five BLV-infected but clinically normal cattle with a proviral load of > 100 copies per 1 × 105 cells identified a high percentage of CD5+ IgM+ cells (but not CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+T cells). These lymphocyte subpopulations were purified from three out of five cattle by cell sorting or using magnetic beads, and the BLV proviral load was estimated using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR. The CD5+ IgM+ B cell population in all animals harbored a higher BLV proviral load than the other cell populations. The copy number of proviruses infecting CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ cells, and CD8+ T cells (per 1 ml of blood) was 1/34 to 1/4, 1/22 to 1/3, and 1/31 to 1/3, respectively, compared with that in CD5+ IgM+ B cells. Moreover, the BLV provirus remained integrated into the genomic DNA of CD5+ IgM+ B cells, CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ T

  18. Estimation of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral load harbored by lymphocyte subpopulations in BLV-infected cattle at the subclinical stage of enzootic bovine leucosis using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Omori, Takashi; Nunoya, Tetsuo; Davis, William C; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Matoba, Kazuhiro; Aida, Yoko

    2013-05-04

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infection may remain clinically silent at the aleukemic (AL) stage, cause persistent lymphocytosis (PL), or, more rarely, B cell lymphoma. BLV has been identified in B cells, CD2+ T cells, CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, γ/δ T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes in infected cattle that do not have tumors, although the most consistently infected cell is the CD5+ B cell. The mechanism by which BLV causes uncontrolled CD5+ B cell proliferation is unknown. Recently, we developed a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR, which enabled us to demonstrate that the proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection, as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease progression. The present study reports the distribution of BLV provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations isolated from BLV-infected cows at the subclinical stage of EBL as examined by cell sorting and BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR. Phenotypic characterization of five BLV-infected but clinically normal cattle with a proviral load of > 100 copies per 1 × 105 cells identified a high percentage of CD5+ IgM+ cells (but not CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+T cells). These lymphocyte subpopulations were purified from three out of five cattle by cell sorting or using magnetic beads, and the BLV proviral load was estimated using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR. The CD5+ IgM+ B cell population in all animals harbored a higher BLV proviral load than the other cell populations. The copy number of proviruses infecting CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ cells, and CD8+ T cells (per 1 ml of blood) was 1/34 to 1/4, 1/22 to 1/3, and 1/31 to 1/3, respectively, compared with that in CD5+ IgM+ B cells. Moreover, the BLV provirus remained integrated into the genomic DNA of CD5+ IgM+ B cells, CD5- IgM+ B cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells

  19. Performance of genotypic tropism testing on proviral DNA in clinical practice: results from the DIVA study group.

    PubMed

    Svicher, Valentina; Alteri, Claudia; Montano, Marco; D'Arrigo, Roberta; Andreoni, Massimo; Angarano, Gioacchino; Antinori, Andrea; Antonelli, Guido; Allice, Tiziano; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Baldanti, Fausto; Bertoli, Ada; Borderi, Marco; Boeri, Enzo; Bon, Isabella; Bruzzone, Bianca; Callegaro, Anna Paola; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Carosi, Giampiero; Cauda, Roberto; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Clementi, Massimo; Chirianni, Antonio; Colafigli, Manuela; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; De Luca, Andrea; Di Biagio, Antonio; Di Nicuolo, Giuseppe; Di Perri, Giovanni; Di Pietro, Massimo; Di Santo, Fabiola; Fabeni, Lavinia; Fadda, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Gennari, William; Ghisetti, Valeria; Giacometti, Andrea; Gori, Caterina; Gori, Andrea; Gulminetti, Roberto; Leoncini, Francesco; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Maggiolo, Franco; Manca, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Franco; Martinelli, Canio; Maserati, Renato; Mazzotta, Francesco; Meini, Genny; Micheli, Valeria; Monno, Laura; Mussini, Cristina; Narciso, Pasquale; Nozza, Silvia; Paolucci, Stefania; Pal, Giorgio; Parisi, Saverio; Parruti, Giustino; Pignataro, Angela Rosa; Pollicita, Michela; Quirino, Tiziana; Re, Maria Carla; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Santangelo, Rosaria; Scaggiante, Renzo; Sterrantino, Gaetana; Turriziani, Ombretta; Vatteroni, Maria Linda; Vecchi, Laura; Viscoli, Claudio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lazzarini, Adriano; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2012-01-01

    The DIVA study is aimed at setting up a standardized genotypic tropism-testing on proviral-DNA for the routine clinical diagnostic-laboratory. Twelve local centres and 5 reference centres (previously cross-validated) were identified. For inter-center validation-procedure, 60 peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) aliquots from 45 HAART-treated patients were randomly chosen for population V3 sequencing on proviral-DNA at local HIV centre and at reference-laboratory. Viral tropism was predicted by Geno2Pheno algorithm (False Positive Rate [FPR] = 20%) as proposed by the European-Guidelines. Quantification of total HIV-1 DNA was based on a method described by Viard (2004). Quantification of HIV-1 DNA was available for 35/45 (77.8%) samples, and gave a median value of 598 (IQR:252- 1,203) copies/10 PBMCs. A total of 56/60 (93.3%) samples were successfully amplified by both the reference and the local virological centers. The overall concordance of tropism prediction between local and reference centers was 54/56 (96.4%). Results of tropism prediction by local centers were: 33/54 (61.1%) R5 and 21/54 (38.9%) X4/DM. There was high concordance in the genotypic tropism prediction based on proviral DNA among different virological centers throughout Italy. Our results are in line with other European studies, and support the use of genotypic tropism testing on proviral DNA in patients with suppressed plasma HIV-1 RNA candidate to CCR5-antagonist treatment.

  20. Maternal proviral load and vertical transmission of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    van Tienen, Carla; McConkey, Samuel J; de Silva, Thushan I; Cotten, Matthew; Kaye, Steve; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; da Costa, Carlos; Gonçalves, Nato; Parker, Julia; Vincent, Tim; Jaye, Assan; Aaby, Peter; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten

    2012-06-01

    The relative importance of routes of transmission of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in Guinea-Bissau is largely unknown; vertical transmission is thought to be important, but there are very few existing data. We aimed to examine factors associated with transmission in mothers and children in Guinea-Bissau, where HTLV-1 is endemic (prevalence of 5% in the adult population). A cross-sectional survey was performed among mothers and their children (aged <15 years) in a rural community in Guinea-Bissau. A questionnaire to identify risk factors for infection and a blood sample were obtained. HTLV-1 proviral load in peripheral blood was determined and PCR was performed to compare long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences in mother-child pairs. Fourteen out of 55 children (25%) of 31 HTLV-1-infected mothers were infected versus none of 70 children of 30 uninfected mothers. The only factor significantly associated with HTLV-1 infection in the child was the proviral load of the mother; the risk of infection increased significantly with the log(10) proviral load in the mother's peripheral blood (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2.1-14.6, per quartile), adjusted for weaning age and maternal income. HTLV-1 sequences of the LTR region obtained from mother-child pairs were identical within pairs but differed between the pairs. Vertical transmission plays an important role in HTLV-1 transmission in this community in Guinea-Bissau. The risk of transmission increases with the mother's proviral load in the peripheral blood. Identical sequences in mother-child pairs give additional support to the maternal source of the children's infection.

  1. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Cohn, Lillian B.; Kreider, Edward F.; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1–infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4+ T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones. PMID:27872306

  2. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Julio C C; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Cohn, Lillian B; Kreider, Edward F; Barton, John P; Learn, Gerald H; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L; Horwitz, Joshua A; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S; Chakraborty, Arup K; Hahn, Beatrice H; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-12-06

    HIV-1-infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4(+) T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones.

  3. Identification of a novel common proviral integration site, flit-1, in feline leukemia virus induced thymic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Liao, Chun-Peng; Zhao, Yan Shi; Pan, Judong; Mathes, Lawrence E; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    2009-03-30

    A new proviral integration site for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), termed flit-1, was identified from feline thymic lymphoma. Among 35 FeLV-related tumors examined, 5 of 25 thymic lymphomas demonstrated proviral insertion within flit-1 locus whereas none of four alimentary and five multicentric lymphomas and one T-lymphoid leukemia examined had rearrangement in this region. Extensive sequence analysis has shown that flit-1, which is noncoding, is conserved on human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15. The human and murine homologs of flit-1 are positioned approximately 30-kb upstream to activin-A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) gene. Expression of ACVRL1 mRNA was examined in two of five lymphomas with flit-1 rearrangement and detected in both of the two whereas normal thymuses and seven lymphoid tumors without flit-1 rearrangement had no detectable expression. Therefore, flit-1 appears to represent a novel FeLV proviral common integration domain that may influence lymphomagenesis as insertional mutagenesis.

  4. Cullin4 Is Pro-Viral during West Nile Virus Infection of Culex Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, Prasad N.; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Trinidad, Lee; Walker, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Although mosquitoes serve as vectors of many pathogens of public health importance, their response to viral infection is poorly understood. It also remains to be investigated whether viruses deploy some mechanism to be able to overcome this immune response. Here, we have used an RNA-Seq approach to identify differentially regulated genes in Culex quinquefasciatus cells following West Nile virus (WNV) infection, identifying 265 transcripts from various cellular pathways that were either upregulated or downregulated. Ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway genes, comprising 12% of total differentially regulated genes, were selected for further validation by real time RT-qPCR and functional analysis. It was found that treatment of infected cells with proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132, decreased WNV titers, indicating importance of this pathway during infection process. In infection models, the Culex ortholog of mammalian Cul4A/B (cullin RING ubiquitin ligase) was found to be upregulated in vitro as well as in vivo, especially in midguts of mosquitoes. Gene knockdown using dsRNA and overexpression studies indicated that Culex Cul4 acts as a pro-viral protein by degradation of CxSTAT via ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway. We also show that gene knockdown of Culex Cul4 leads to activation of the Jak-STAT pathway in mosquitoes leading to decrease viral replication in the body as well as saliva. Our results suggest a novel mechanism adopted by WNV to overcome mosquito immune response and increase viral replication. PMID:26325027

  5. Monitoring the HTLV-1 proviral load in the peripheral blood of asymptomatic carriers and patients with HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis from a Brazilian cohort: ROC curve analysis to establish the threshold for risk disease.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Marina dos Santos Brito Silva; Andrade, Rafaela Gomes; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio Ferreira; Ribeiro, Maisa Aparecida; Ribas, João Gabriel; Torres, Elídio Barbosa; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro; Martins, Marina Lobato

    2012-04-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), which affects approximately 5% of carriers. High proviral load is a risk marker for HAM/TSP, although there is an overlap of proviral load levels in peripheral blood between asymptomatic carriers and HAM/TSP patients. In this study, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to define a set point of HTLV-1 proviral load that better indicates an increased risk for HAM/TSP. Proviral load was quantified in 75 asymptomatic carriers and 78 HAM/TSP patients in a Brazilian cohort. The cut-off of proviral load was defined as 114 copies/10(4)  cells, with 78.2% sensitivity to identify true HAM/TSP patients. The mean proviral load levels were not significantly different between males and females with the same clinical status, and there was no significant correlation between proviral load and age at blood sampling, age at the onset of illness, or duration of disease. In HAM/TSP patients, proviral load was significantly higher in wheelchair-bound patients than in individuals able to walk without support and in those with the worst spinal cord injuries. Follow-up of HTLV-1-infected individuals showed that proviral load was more stable in asymptomatic carriers than in HAM/TSP patients. In a cohort study, periodically quantifying proviral load in asymptomatic carriers is necessary to identify those at risk for developing neurological disease, and it is necessary for HAM/TSP patients to monitor spinal injury and progression to walking disability. The measure of proviral load in clinical practice implicates the definition of the cut-off of proviral load and its validation during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The SKIV2L RNA exosome limits activation of the RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eckard, Sterling C.; Rice, Gillian I.; Fabre, Alexandre; Badens, Catherine; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Hartley, Jane L.; Crow, Yanick J.; Stetson, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune sensors of intracellular nucleic acids must be regulated to prevent inappropriate activation by endogenous DNA and RNA. The exonuclease Trex1 regulates the DNA sensing pathway by metabolizing potential DNA ligands that trigger it. However, an analogous mechanism for regulating the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) that detect RNA remains unknown. We show that the SKIV2L RNA exosome potently limits the activation of RLRs. We find that the unfolded protein response (UPR), which generates endogenous RLR ligands through IRE-1 endonuclease cleavage of cellular RNAs, triggers type I interferon (IFN) production in SKIV2L-depleted cells. Humans with SKIV2L deficiency have a type I IFN signature in their peripheral blood. Our findings reveal a mechanism for intracellular metabolism of immunostimulatory RNA, with implications for specific autoimmune disorders. PMID:25064072

  7. Sensing viral RNAs by Dicer/RIG-I like ATPases across species

    PubMed Central

    Paro, Simona; Imler, Jean-Luc; Meignin, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Induction of antiviral immunity in vertebrates and invertebrates relies on members of the RIG-I-like receptor and Dicer families, respectively. Although these proteins have different size and domain composition, members of both families share a conserved DECH-box helicase domain. This helicase, also known as a duplex RNA activated ATPase, or DRA domain, plays an important role in viral RNA sensing. Crystallographic and electron microscopy studies of the RIG-I and Dicer DRA domains indicate a common structure and that similar conformational changes are induced by dsRNA binding. Genetic and biochemical studies on the function and regulation of DRAs reveal similarities, but also some differences, between viral RNA sensing mechanisms in nematodes, flies and mammals. PMID:25658360

  8. The Z Proteins of Pathogenic but Not Nonpathogenic Arenaviruses Inhibit RIG-i-Like Receptor-Dependent Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junji; Ly, Hinh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus pathogens cause a wide spectrum of diseases in humans ranging from central nervous system disease to lethal hemorrhagic fevers with few treatment options. The reason why some arenaviruses can cause severe human diseases while others cannot is unknown. We find that the Z proteins of all known pathogenic arenaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, Guanarito, Chapare, Dandenong, and Lujo viruses, can inhibit retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-i) and Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5), in sharp contrast to those of 14 other nonpathogenic arenaviruses. Inhibition of the RIG-i-like receptors (RLRs) by pathogenic Z proteins is mediated by the protein-protein interactions of Z and RLRs, which lead to the disruption of the interactions between RLRs and mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS). The Z-RLR interactive interfaces are located within the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the Z protein and the N-terminal CARD domains of RLRs. Swapping of the LCMV Z NTD into the nonpathogenic Pichinde virus (PICV) genome does not affect virus growth in Vero cells but significantly inhibits the type I interferon (IFN) responses and increases viral replication in human primary macrophages. In summary, our results show for the first time an innate immune-system-suppressive mechanism shared by the diverse pathogenic arenaviruses and thus shed important light on the pathogenic mechanism of human arenavirus pathogens. IMPORTANCE We show that all known human-pathogenic arenaviruses share an innate immune suppression mechanism that is based on viral Z protein-mediated RLR inhibition. Our report offers important insights into the potential mechanism of arenavirus pathogenesis, provides a convenient way to evaluate the pathogenic potential of known and/or emerging arenaviruses, and reveals a novel target for the development of broad-spectrum therapies to treat this group of diverse pathogens. More broadly, our

  9. MHC class I-like genes in cattle, MHCLA, with similarity to genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands.

    PubMed

    Larson, Joshua H; Rebeiz, Mark J; Stiening, Chad M; Windish, Ryan L; Beever, Jonathan E; Lewin, Harris A

    2003-04-01

    A comparative genomics approach for mining databases of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was used to identify two members of a novel MHC class I gene family in cattle. These paralogous genes, named MHC class I-like gene family A1 ( MHCLA1) and MHCLA2, were shown by phylogenetic analysis to be related to human and mouse genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands, ULBP, RAET, H60 and Raet-1. Radiation hybrid mapping placed cattle MHCLA1 on BTA9, which, on the basis of existing comparative mapping data, identified the ULBP, RAET1, H60 and Raet1 genes as homologues of the cattle MHCLA genes. However, the human and mouse orthologues of MHCLA1 and MHCLA2 could not be defined due to extensive sequence divergence from all known members of the ULBP1/ RAET1/H60/Raet1 gene family. The cattle MHCLA1 molecule is predicted to be missing an alpha(3) domain, similar to the human and mouse homologues. Like the human ULBP genes, MHCLA1 was found to be transcribed constitutively in a variety of fetal and adult tissues by RT-PCR. The patterns of hybridization obtained by Southern blotting using MHCLA1 as a probe and DNA from 14 species representing five mammalian orders suggests that the MHCLA genes evolved rapidly in the Cetartiodactyla. Previous findings demonstrating that ULBPs serve as ligands for the NK cell NKG2D stimulatory receptor, and that this interaction can be blocked by a human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein that binds to ULBPs, suggests that the extensive divergence found among the cattle, human and mouse MHCLA homologues is due to selection exerted by viral pathogens.

  10. Positive Evolutionary Selection On the RIG-I-Like Receptor Genes in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lemos de Matos, Ana; McFadden, Grant; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian RIG-I-like receptors, RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2, are a family of DExD/H box RNA helicases responsible for the cytoplasmic detection of viral RNA. These receptors detect a variety of RNA viruses, or DNA viruses that express unusual RNA species, many of which are responsible for a great number of severe and lethal diseases. Host innate sentinel proteins involved in pathogen recognition must rapidly evolve in a dynamic arms race with pathogens, and thus are subjected to long-term positive selection pressures to avoid potential infections. Using six codon-based Maximum Likelihood methods, we were able to identify specific codons under positive selection in each of these three genes. The highest number of positively selected codons was detected in MDA5, but a great percentage of these codons were located outside of the currently defined protein domains for MDA5, which likely reflects the imposition of both functional and structural constraints. Additionally, our results support LGP2 as being the least prone to evolutionary change, since the lowest number of codons under selection was observed for this gene. On the other hand, the preponderance of positively selected codons for RIG-I were detected in known protein functional domains, suggesting that pressure has been imposed by the vast number of viruses that are recognized by this RNA helicase. Furthermore, the RIG-I repressor domain, the region responsible for recognizing and binding to its RNA substrates, exhibited the strongest evidence of selective pressures. Branch-site analyses were performed and several species branches on the three receptor gene trees showed evidence of episodic positive selection. In conclusion, by looking for evidence of positive evolutionary selection on mammalian RIG-I-like receptor genes, we propose that a multitude of viruses have crafted the receptors biological function in host defense, specifically for the RIG-I gene, contributing to the innate species-specific resistance

  11. NtPolI-like1 and NtPolI-like2, bacterial DNA polymerase I homologs isolated from BY-2 cultured tobacco cells, encode DNA polymerases engaged in DNA replication in both plastids and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuriko; Sakai, Atsushi; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takio, Susumu; Takusagawa, Mari; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Two cDNAs encoding homologs of bacterial DNA polymerase I were isolated from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells, and the corresponding genes were named NtPolI-like1 and NtPolI-like2. High sequence similarity suggested that they are orthologous genes each derived from respective parental species of N. tabacum, an allotetraploid plant. Each of the NtPolI-like1/2 gene products had a putative transit peptide for plastid localization at the N-terminus, followed by a 3'-5' exonuclease domain in the internal region, and a DNA polymerase domain in the C-terminal region. Among family A DNA polymerases, NtPolI-like proteins formed, together with other plant DNA polymerase I homologs, a phylogenetic group distinct from mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma in animals and fungi, as well as eukaryotic cell nuclear-localized repair enzymes. In contrast to computer predictions, experiments with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein and Western blotting analysis suggested dual targeting of the gene products to both plastids and mitochondria. The recombinant NtPolI-like2 protein exhibited DNA polymerase activity in vitro. Their biochemical character roughly coincided with those of the 116 kDa DNA polymerases found in the plastid and mitochondrial nuclei (nucleoids) isolated from BY-2 cells. Pre-treatment of the organelle nuclear extracts with anti-NtPolI-like antibody removed most of the DNA polymerase activity. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses demonstrated transient activation of NtPolI-like gene expression in the initial phase of cell proliferation, exactly when the 116 kDa DNA polymerases in the isolated organelle nuclei were activated and preferential synthesis of organelle DNAs occurred. Taken together, our results suggest that NtPolI-like1/2 genes encode DNA polymerases engaged in DNA replication in both plastids and mitochondria.

  12. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infected individuals is associated with high levels of HTLV-1 proviral load.

    PubMed

    Castro-Lima Vargens, Cristina; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Rathsam-Pinheiro, Regina Helena; Olavarria, Viviana Nilla; de Almeida Kruschewsky, Ramon; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo

    2011-11-01

    A high HTLV-1 proviral load is found in HTLV-1-associated diseases, mainly HAM/TSP. However, the association between proviral load and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) has not been well established. To verify the association between KCS and HTLV-1 proviral load. 104 HTLV-1 infected patients (51 asymptomatic and 52 with HAM/TSP) from the HTLV reference center in Salvador, Brazil were followed from June 2008 to May 2010. Evaluation of tear secretion was performed by BUT (break-up time), Rose Bengal and Schirmer I tests. The diagnosis of KCS was based upon the presence of symptoms and when at least two of three tests were positive. HTLV-1 proviral load was determined using real-time PCR. The prevalence of KCS was 44.2%. KCS was more frequent among HAM/TSP patients (p = 0.022). Patients with KCS had higher proviral load (mean 134,672 ± 150,393copies/10(6) PBMC) than patients without the disease (mean 66,880 ± 109,525copies/10(6) PBMC) (p = 0.001). HTLV-1 proviral load>100,000copies/10(6) PBMC increased significantly the risk of developing KCS (OR = 4.05 and 95% CI = 1.40-11.76). After age>45 years and HAM/TSP status were excluded in stepway reward analysis, the variables PVL>100,000 (OR = 4.77 and 95% CI = 1.83-12.44) still remained statistically significant. HTLV-1 proviral loads are higher in patients with KCS and may represent a relevant biological marker of disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of HTLV-1 activity in HAM/TSP patients using proviral load and Tax mRNA expression after In Vitro lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Yari, Atefeh; Rezaee, Seyyed Abdolrahim; Valizadeh, Narges; Rajaee, Taraneh; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Soltani, Mojdeh; Norouzi, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    HTLV-1 is the first human retrovirus that has been recognized and is associated with HAM/TSP and ATLL. Studies have shown that less than five percent of HTLV-1 infected carriers develop HAM/TSP or ATLL and about ninety-five percent remain asymptomatic. Therefore, the proviral load with Tax may affect cellular genes such as cytokines and oncogenes, as well as involve in pathogenicity. Thirty HAM/TSP patients, thirty HTLV-1 healthy carriers, and MT-2 cell line were evaluated for HTLV-1 activity. PBMCs were isolated and activated using PMA and ionomycine. Real-time PCR and TaqMan methods were performed using specific primers and fluorescence probes for Tax expression and proviral load assessment. B2microglobulin (β2m) and albumin were used as controls in Tax expression and in proviral load, respectively. An insignificant increase in Tax expression was observed in rest PBMCs of HAM/TSP patients compared to healthy carriers. However, after lymphocyte activation there was a significant increase in Tax expression in HAM/TSP patients (P=0.042). The Proviral load in patients was significantly higher than in carriers. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between Tax mRNA expression in activated PBMCs and proviral load (R=0.37, P=0.012). Although proviral load had been addressed as a valuable index for monitoring HTLV-1 infected subjects, the results of this study demonstrated that Tax expression in activated PBMCs along with proviral load assessment in HAM/TSP patients are a more reliable factor for determining the prognosis and monitoring healthy carriers and HAM/TSP patients.

  14. Specific sequence deletions in two classes of murine leukemia virus-related proviruses in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Koh, C K; Boone, L R

    1989-02-01

    Characteristic long terminal repeats (LTR) of approximately 700 and 750 bp were found, respectively, in the two classes (polytropic and modified polytropic) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related nonecotropic nonxenotropic proviral sequences in eight individual molecular clones of RFM/Un mouse chromosomal DNA fragments. Three proviral clones, two polytropic and one modified polytropic, contained sequence deletions in the viral structural genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that 7-bp direct repeats occur at both ends of deleted sequences in intact structures and one of the repeats remains in genomes with the deletion. Specifically, the deleted sequences were a 1487-bp gag-pol sequence with ACTGCCC repeat, a 113-bp mid-pol sequence with CAGGCAA repeat, and a 1811-bp env sequence with GGTCCAG repeat. The same specific sequence deletions were found in both classes of MuLV-related proviral structures. Examination of chromosomal DNA from eight inbred laboratory mouse strains and six wild mouse species showed that a minor population of proviruses with these specific deletions were present in Mus musculus and Mus spretus, all of which contain prominent 700-bp LTR polytropic proviral structures. The 750-bp LTR modified polytropic proviral structures were phylogenetically more restricted, being equally predominant in Mus musculus domesticus mice, but minor to undetectable in Mus spretus subspecies, and absent in other wild mouse populations.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA load in purified CD4+ cells by LightCycler® Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kabamba-Mukadi, Benoît; Henrivaux, Philippe; Ruelle, Jean; Delferrière, Nicole; Bodéus, Monique; Goubau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA persists in infected cells, even after prolonged successful HAART. In the present study, a relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA by LightCycler® real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I detection was developed in comparison to the number of purified CD4+ cells as estimated by the quantification of the β-globin gene. Methods The ability of the designed gag primers to quantify HIV-1 Group M and the PCR efficiency were assessed on HIV-1 reference isolate subtypes A, B, C and D. The 8E5 cell line containing a single defective copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA was used as a standard for both the HIV-1 target gene and the β-globin reference gene. The assay was applied on thirty consecutive patient samples received for RNA viral load determinations and on retrospective samples from fifteen patients undergoing 2 years of structured treatment interruption (STI). Results The lower limit of quantification was 50 HIV-1 DNA proviral copies per CD4+ cell sample. The dynamic range was from 50 to 106 HIV-1 DNA copies per CD4+ cell sample with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variability ranging from 3.1% to 37.1%. The β-globin reference gene was quantified down to a limit of 1.5 pg of DNA/μl (approximately 5 cells) with intra- and interassay coefficients of variability ranging from 1.8% to 21%. DNA proviral load varies widely among HIV-1 infected patients. Proviral load and plasma viral load rebound were high in STI patients who took longer to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load under therapy. A statistically significant correlation was observed between DNA proviral load and RNA steady state viral load in STI patients (p-value = 0,012). Conclusion We have developed a fast, sensitive and specific relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA in purified CD4+ cells. The assay enables the monitoring of HIV-1 proviral load, which may be useful to monitor therapy efficacy especially in

  16. New insights into prevalence, genetic diversity, and proviral load of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2 in pregnant women in Gabon in equatorial central Africa.

    PubMed

    Etenna, Sonia Lekana-Douki; Caron, Mélanie; Besson, Guillaume; Makuwa, Maria; Gessain, Antoine; Mahé, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2008-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is highly endemic in areas of central Africa; mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission are considered to be the predominant routes. To determine the prevalence and subtypes of HTLV-1/2 in pregnant women in Gabon, we conducted an epidemiological survey in the five main cities of the country. In 907 samples, the HTLV-1 seroprevalence was 2.1%, which is lower than that previously reported. Only one case of HTLV-2 infection was found. The HTLV-1 seroprevalence increased with age and differed between regions (P proviral loads was observed among the infected women. The level of the proviral load was correlated with a high HTLV-1 antibody titer (P genomes within geographical regions of the country. Some strains were closely related to simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 strains of great apes, suggesting that in these areas some HTLV-1 strains could arise from relatively recent interspecies transmission. The sole HTLV-2 strain belonged to subtype B. In this study we showed that the prevalence of HTLV-1 in the southeast is one of the highest in the world for pregnant women.

  17. Full genome sequences of two reticuloendotheliosis viruses contaminating commercial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinfang; Zhao, Jixun; Su, Jingliang; Pu, Juan; Zhang, Guozhong; Liu, Jinhua

    2009-09-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) fragments are a common contaminant in some commercial vaccines such as fowl poxvirus (FPV) and Marek's disease virus. However, only those strains integrating or containing a near-intact REV provirus are more likely to cause problems in the field. We confirm here, by PCR assays and animal experiments, that vaccines against FPV and herpes virus of turkeys were contaminated with full genome sequences of REV. Further, we determined the complete proviral sequence of two REV isolates from contaminated vaccines. Two REV isolates (REV-99 and REV-06) present in the vaccines were both replication competent, and their proviral genome was 8286 nucleotides in length with two identical long terminal repeats (LTR). The complete genome in these two REV isolates shared 99.8% identity to APC-566 and fowl poxvirus REV proviral inserts (FPV-REV). REV-99 and REV-06 LTR showed over 99% identity to chicken syncytial virus (CSV), but an identity of only 75.8% and 78.0%, respectively, to SNV. Alignments with other available REV gag, pol, and env sequences revealed high similarity at the nucleotide level. The results further indicated that the prototype CSV may be the most-important REV contaminant in the commercial vaccines, and distinct genotypes of REVs may cocirculate in chicken flocks of China at the present time.

  18. Regulated expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral genes in cells of the B lineage

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral (MMTV) transcripts during B cell ontogeny and compared levels of RNA in B lymphocytes and B cell lines with levels in other cells of the hematopoietic lineage and in a mammary cell line. We demonstrate that MMTV transcripts are expressed as early as the pro-B cell stage in ontogeny and are expressed at basal constitutive levels throughout most of the B cell developmental pathway. The level of MMTV expression in B cells is similar to constitutive levels in mammary tissues and two to three orders of magnitude greater than in activated T cells. Levels of MMTV transcripts in B cells are not solely due to positional effects. Transient transfection assays showed that MMTV upregulation resulted from transcriptional activation of the viral LTR, indicating that there are specific and inducible transcription factors that regulate MMTV expression in B cells. MMTV transcripts could not be upregulated in pre- B cell lines but could be induced in some mature B cell lines. There was a correlation between the ability to stimulate B cells to secrete antibody and the ability to induce upregulated MMTV expression. Evidence is presented that suggests that the principal transcription factors involved in MMTV expression do not include the B cell factors OTF-2 or NF-kappa B, but rather are likely to be novel factors that are induced during differentiation to antibody secretion. A hypothesis for why mammary tumor viruses are well adapted for expression in cells of the B lineage is proposed, and the implications of this for the documented influence of MMTV gene products on the T cell repertoire are discussed. PMID:1660524

  19. Development and validation of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous genotyping and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, 2, and 3 proviral load determination.

    PubMed

    Moens, Britta; López, Giovanni; Adaui, Vanessa; González, Elsa; Kerremans, Lien; Clark, Daniel; Verdonck, Kristien; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vanham, Guido; Cassar, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2009-11-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) proviral load remains the best surrogate marker for disease progression. Real-time PCR techniques have been developed for detection and quantification of cosmopolitan HTLV type 1a (HTLV-1a) and HTLV-2. Since a growing level of diversity in subtypes and genotypes is observed, we developed a multiplex quantitative PCR for simultaneous detection, genotyping, and quantification of proviral loads of HTLV-1, 2, and 3. Our assay uses tax type-specific primers and dually labeled probes and has a dynamic range of 10(5) to 10 HTLV copies. One hundred sixty-three samples were analyzed, among which all of the different subtypes within each HTLV genotype could be detected. The performance of proviral load determination of our multiplex assay was compared with that of a previously published HTLV-1 singleplex quantitative PCR based on SYBR green detection, developed at a different institute. Linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) and strong (r(2) = 0.87) correlation between proviral load values measured with the two distinct real-time PCR assays. In conclusion, our novel assay offers an accurate molecular diagnosis and genotyping, together with the determination of the proviral load of HTLV-infected individuals, in a single amplification reaction. Moreover, our molecular assay could offer an alternative when current available serological assays are insufficient.

  20. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) proviral load and disease progression in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers: a nationwide prospective study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki; Utsunomiya, Atae; Okayama, Akihiko; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Ogata, Masao; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sagara, Yasuko; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Mochizuki, Manabu; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Saburi, Yoshio; Yamamura, Masaomi; Tanaka, Junji; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Hino, Shigeo; Kamihira, Shimeru; Yamaguchi, Kazunari

    2010-08-26

    Definitive risk factors for the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) among asymptomatic human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) carriers remain unclear. Recently, HTLV-1 proviral loads have been evaluated as important predictors of ATL, but a few small prospective studies have been conducted. We prospectively evaluated 1218 asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (426 males and 792 females) who were enrolled during 2002 to 2008. The proviral load at enrollment was significantly higher in males than females (median, 2.10 vs 1.39 copies/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]; P < .001), in those 40 to 49 and 50 to 59 years of age than that of those 40 years of age and younger (P = .02 and .007, respectively), and in those with a family history of ATL than those without the history (median, 2.32 vs 1.33 copies/100 PBMCs; P = .005). During follow-up, 14 participants progressed to overt ATL. Their baseline proviral load was high (range, 4.17-28.58 copies/100 PBMCs). None developed ATL among those with a baseline proviral load lower than approximately 4 copies. Multivariate Cox analyses indicated that not only a higher proviral load, advanced age, family history of ATL, and first opportunity for HTLV-1 testing during treatment for other diseases were independent risk factors for progression of ATL.

  1. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for a novel HTLV-1 tax sequence detection and proviral load quantitation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Gonzalo M; Balangero, Marcos C; Maturano, Eduardo; Mangeaud, Arnaldo; Gallego, Sandra V

    2013-05-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using SYBR Green dye was established in order to detect and quantify the proviral DNA of HTLV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Primers were designed, and the assay was standardized to amplify a novel, conserved HTLV-1 tax region. Proviral load was normalized to the amount of cellular DNA by quantitation of the human albumin gene. Firstly, the qPCR was assessed determining the specificity, sensitivity, dynamic range and intra- and inter-assay reproducibility of the technique. The limit of detection as determined by PROBIT analysis using dilutions of the standard was 2.97 copies. The assay had an excellent dynamic range from 10⁵ to 10¹ copies per reaction and good intra- and inter-assay reproducibility, CVs less than 2%. Secondly, the performance of the qPCR was tested on 40 HTLV-1 seropositive individuals. Proviral load for HTLV-1 carriers ranged from 2.2×10² to more than 8.3×10⁴ copies/10⁶ PBMCs. The high sensitivity and wide dynamic range allowed the determination of a broad range of HTLV-1 proviral loads in infected individuals. This assay is a valuable alternative diagnostic tool when current available serological assays are insufficient. In addition, it will facilitate the study of the relationship between proviral load and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of HIV-1 CTL epitopes recognized by HLA I alleles in HIV-infected individuals at times near primary infection: the Provir/Latitude45 study.

    PubMed

    Papuchon, Jennifer; Pinson, Patricia; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Bellecave, Pantxika; Thomas, Réjean; LeBlanc, Roger; Reigadas, Sandrine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Baril, Jean Guy; Routy, Jean Pierre; Wainberg, Mark; Fleury, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    In patients responding successfully to ART, the next therapeutic step is viral cure. An interesting strategy is antiviral vaccination, particularly involving CD8 T cell epitopes. However, attempts at vaccination are dependent on the immunogenetic background of individuals. The Provir/Latitude 45 project aims to investigate which CTL epitopes in proviral HIV-1 will be recognized by the immune system when HLA alleles are taken into consideration. A prior study (Papuchon et al, PLoS ONE 2013) showed that chronically-infected patients under successful ART exhibited variations of proviral CTL epitopes compared to a reference viral strain (HXB2) and that a generic vaccine may not be efficient. Here, we investigated viral and/or proviral CTL epitopes at different time points in recently infected individuals of the Canadian primary HIV infection cohort and assessed the affinity of these epitopes for HLA alleles during the study period. An analysis of the results confirms that it is not possible to fully predict which epitopes will be recognized by the HLA alleles of the patients if the reference sequences and epitopes are taken as the basis of simulation. Epitopes may be seen to vary in circulating RNA and proviral DNA. Despite this confirmation, the overall variability of the epitopes was low in these patients who are temporally close to primary infection.

  3. The study of two barley Type I-like MADS-box genes as potential targets of epigenetic regulation during seed development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MADS-box genes constitute a large family of transcription factors functioning as key regulators of many processes during plant vegetative and reproductive development. Type II MADS-box genes have been intensively investigated and are mostly involved in vegetative and flowering development. A growing number of studies of Type I MADS-box genes in Arabidopsis, have assigned crucial roles for these genes in gamete and seed development and have demonstrated that a number of Type I MADS-box genes are epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications. However, reports on agronomically important cereals such as barley and wheat are scarce. Results Here we report the identification and characterization of two Type I-like MADS-box genes, from barley (Hordeum vulgare), a monocot cereal crop of high agronomic importance. Protein sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the putative proteins are related to Type I MADS-box proteins, and classified them in a distinct cereal clade. Significant differences in gene expression among seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size were revealed for both genes. One of these genes was shown to be induced by the seed development- and stress-related hormones ABA and JA whereas in situ hybridizations localized the other gene to specific endosperm sub-compartments. The genomic organization of the latter has high conservation with the cereal Type I-like MADS-box homologues and the chromosomal position of both genes is close to markers associated with seed quality traits. DNA methylation differences are present in the upstream and downstream regulatory regions of the barley Type I-like MADS-box genes in two different developmental stages and in response to ABA treatment which may be associated with gene expression differences. Conclusions Two barley MADS-box genes were studied that are related to Type I MADS-box genes. Differential expression in different seed developmental

  4. The study of two barley type I-like MADS-box genes as potential targets of epigenetic regulation during seed development.

    PubMed

    Kapazoglou, Aliki; Engineer, Cawas; Drosou, Vicky; Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tani, Eleni; Tsaballa, Aphrodite; Kouri, Evangelia D; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Tsaftaris, Athanasios S

    2012-09-17

    MADS-box genes constitute a large family of transcription factors functioning as key regulators of many processes during plant vegetative and reproductive development. Type II MADS-box genes have been intensively investigated and are mostly involved in vegetative and flowering development. A growing number of studies of Type I MADS-box genes in Arabidopsis, have assigned crucial roles for these genes in gamete and seed development and have demonstrated that a number of Type I MADS-box genes are epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications. However, reports on agronomically important cereals such as barley and wheat are scarce. Here we report the identification and characterization of two Type I-like MADS-box genes, from barley (Hordeum vulgare), a monocot cereal crop of high agronomic importance. Protein sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the putative proteins are related to Type I MADS-box proteins, and classified them in a distinct cereal clade. Significant differences in gene expression among seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size were revealed for both genes. One of these genes was shown to be induced by the seed development- and stress-related hormones ABA and JA whereas in situ hybridizations localized the other gene to specific endosperm sub-compartments. The genomic organization of the latter has high conservation with the cereal Type I-like MADS-box homologues and the chromosomal position of both genes is close to markers associated with seed quality traits. DNA methylation differences are present in the upstream and downstream regulatory regions of the barley Type I-like MADS-box genes in two different developmental stages and in response to ABA treatment which may be associated with gene expression differences. Two barley MADS-box genes were studied that are related to Type I MADS-box genes. Differential expression in different seed developmental stages as well as in barley

  5. Evidence for a Fel d I-like molecule in the "big cats" (Felidae species).

    PubMed

    de Groot, H; van Swieten, P; Aalberse, R C

    1990-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the cross-reactivity pattern of IgE and IgG4 antibodies to the major feline allergen, Fel d I. We studied the IgE and IgG4 response of 11 cat-allergic patients against Fel d I-like structures in eight members of the Felidae family: ocelot, puma, serval, siberian tiger, lion, jaguar, snow leopard, and caracal. Hair from these "big cats" was collected, extracted, and used in a RAST system and histamine-release test. By means of a RAST-inhibition assay with affinity-purified Fel d I from cat dander, it was established that, in the Felidae species, a Fel d I equivalent is present that reacts with IgE and IgG4 antibodies. We found that all patients had cross-reacting IgE antibodies to seven of the Felidae tested; no IgE antibodies reactive with the caracal were found. Eight of 10 patients with IgG4 antibodies directed to cat dander also had IgG4 antibodies directed to several Felidae species, including the caracal. However, the correlation between the IgE and the IgG4 antibody specificity was low, indicating that, in the case of Fel d I IgE and IgG4, antibodies do not necessarily have the same specificity.

  6. USP3 inhibits type I interferon signaling by deubiquitinating RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Song, Yanxia; Li, Yinyin; Zhu, Qingyuan; Tan, Peng; Qin, Yunfei; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Lysine 63 (K63)-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I plays a critical role in the activation of type I interferon pathway, yet the molecular mechanism responsible for its deubiquitination is still poorly understood. Here we report that the deubiquitination enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 3 (USP3) negatively regulates the activation of type I interferon signaling by targeting RIG-I. Knockdown of USP3 specifically enhanced K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I, upregulated the phosphorylation of IRF3 and augmented the production of type I interferon cytokines and antiviral immunity. We further show that there is no interaction between USP3 and RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) in unstimulated or uninfected cells, but upon viral infection or ligand stimulation, USP3 binds to the caspase activation recruitment domain of RLRs and then cleaves polyubiquitin chains through cooperation of its zinc-finger Ub-binding domain and USP catalytic domains. Mutation analysis reveals that binding of USP3 to polyubiquitin chains on RIG-I is a prerequisite step for its cleavage of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings identify a previously unrecognized role of USP3 in RIG-I activation and provide insights into the mechanisms by which USP3 inhibits RIG-I signaling and antiviral immunity. PMID:24366338

  7. Analysis of the Prevalence of HTLV-1 Proviral DNA in Cervical Smears and Carcinomas from HIV Positive and Negative Kenyan Women.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaotong; Maranga, Innocent O; Oliver, Anthony W; Gichangi, Peter; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2016-09-05

    The oncogenic retrovirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in some countries although its prevalence and relationship with other sexually transmitted infections in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. A novel endpoint PCR method was used to analyse the prevalence of HTLV-1 proviral DNA in genomic DNA extracted from liquid based cytology (LBC) cervical smears and invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs) obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+ve) and HIV-negative (HIV-ve) Kenyan women. Patient sociodemographic details were recorded by structured questionnaire and these data analysed with respect to HIV status, human papillomavirus (HPV) type (Papilocheck(®)) and cytology. This showed 22/113 (19.5%) of LBC's from HIV+ve patients were positive for HTLV-1 compared to 4/111 (3.6%) of those from HIV-ve women (p = 0.0002; odds ratio (OR) = 6.42 (2.07-26.56)). Only 1/37 (2.7%) of HIV+ve and none of the 44 HIV-ve ICC samples were positive for HTLV-1. There was also a significant correlation between HTLV-1 infection, numbers of sexual partners (p < 0.05) and smoking (p < 0.01). Using this unique method, these data suggest an unexpectedly high prevalence of HTLV-1 DNA in HIV+ve women in this geographical location. However, the low level of HTLV-1 detected in HIV+ve ICC samples was unexpected and the reasons for this are unclear.

  8. Analysis of the Prevalence of HTLV-1 Proviral DNA in Cervical Smears and Carcinomas from HIV Positive and Negative Kenyan Women

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaotong; Maranga, Innocent O.; Oliver, Anthony W.; Gichangi, Peter; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic retrovirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in some countries although its prevalence and relationship with other sexually transmitted infections in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. A novel endpoint PCR method was used to analyse the prevalence of HTLV-1 proviral DNA in genomic DNA extracted from liquid based cytology (LBC) cervical smears and invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs) obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+ve) and HIV-negative (HIV−ve) Kenyan women. Patient sociodemographic details were recorded by structured questionnaire and these data analysed with respect to HIV status, human papillomavirus (HPV) type (Papilocheck®) and cytology. This showed 22/113 (19.5%) of LBC’s from HIV+ve patients were positive for HTLV-1 compared to 4/111 (3.6%) of those from HIV−ve women (p = 0.0002; odds ratio (OR) = 6.42 (2.07–26.56)). Only 1/37 (2.7%) of HIV+ve and none of the 44 HIV−ve ICC samples were positive for HTLV-1. There was also a significant correlation between HTLV-1 infection, numbers of sexual partners (p < 0.05) and smoking (p < 0.01). Using this unique method, these data suggest an unexpectedly high prevalence of HTLV-1 DNA in HIV+ve women in this geographical location. However, the low level of HTLV-1 detected in HIV+ve ICC samples was unexpected and the reasons for this are unclear. PMID:27608036

  9. Transcriptional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats (LTR) of endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Koh, C.K.; Yang, W.K.

    1987-05-01

    Mouse genome harbors 2 families of MuLV-related proviral sequences, which do not directly produce infectious virus, but may express RNA transcripts in a tissue-specific manner. The LTRS of MuLV-related sequences contain a mid-U3 inserted segment (IS) of approx. 200 bp not found in the LTR of infectious MuLVs. To test for the LTR promoter and enhancer activities, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, alone or carrying SV40 promoter, was linked to various LTR sequences of 2 MuLV and 6 representative MuLV-related DNA clones and the recombinant genes were examined for transient CAT expression in mouse NIH-3T3, mink CCL64 and human HT1080 cells by DNA transfection. While the CAT expression was high with the 2 ecotropic MuLV LTRs, very little to undetectable activities were obtained with all MuLV-related LTRs. To determine the basis for the very low activity of the MuLV-related LTRs, series of experiments were performed, which indicate that the TATA- and CCAAC-containing domain, downstream of the IS, is functionally intact as a promoter and that the IS sequences, while inactive as a promoter by itself, could provide a bi-directional enhancer-like activity to its own or MuLV LTR or SV40 promoter. Further studies suggest the presence of a cis-acting negative regulatory element in sequences upstream of the IS in both the 2 subfamilies of MuLV-related LTRs.

  10. Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing data for characterization of CTL epitopes in archived HIV-1 proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Tumiotto, Camille; Riviere, Lionel; Bellecave, Pantxika; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Vilain-Parce, Alice; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Fleury, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    One of the strategies for curing viral HIV-1 is a therapeutic vaccine involving the stimulation of cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells (CTL) that are Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-restricted. The lack of efficiency of previous vaccination strategies may have been due to the immunogenic peptides used, which could be different from a patient's virus epitopes and lead to a poor CTL response. To counteract this lack of specificity, conserved epitopes must be targeted. One alternative is to gather as many data as possible from a large number of patients on their HIV-1 proviral archived epitope variants, taking into account their genetic background to select the best presented CTL epitopes. In order to process big data generated by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the DNA of HIV-infected patients, we have developed a software package called TutuGenetics. This tool combines an alignment derived either from Sanger or NGS files, HLA typing, target gene and a CTL epitope list as input files. It allows automatic translation after correction of the alignment obtained between the HxB2 reference and the reads, followed by automatic calculation of the MHC IC50 value for each epitope variant and the HLA allele of the patient by using NetMHCpan 3.0, resulting in a csv file as output result. We validated this new tool by comparing Sanger and NGS (454, Roche) sequences obtained from the proviral DNA of patients at success of ART included in the Provir Latitude 45 study and showed a 90% correlation between the quantitative results of NGS and Sanger. This automated analysis combined with complementary samples should yield more data regarding the archived CTL epitopes according to the patients' HLA alleles and will be useful for screening epitopes that in theory are presented efficiently to the HLA groove, thus constituting promising immunogenic peptides for a therapeutic vaccine.

  11. Fucoidan therapy decreases the proviral load in patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type-1-associated neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Araya, Natsumi; Takahashi, Katsunori; Sato, Tomoo; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Sawa, Chika; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Ando, Hitoshi; Aratani, Satoko; Yagishita, Naoko; Fujii, Ryoji; Oka, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Mori, Naoki; Yamano, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus that causes HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL). A higher viral load in individuals with HTLV-1 infection increases their risk of developing HAM/TSP and ATL. Moreover, the high proviral load is associated with the clinical progression of HAM/TSP. Reduction of the number of HTLV-1-infected cells is therefore crucial for preventing and treating HTLV-1-associated diseases. Recently, fucoidan, a complex sulphated polysaccharide derived from marine seaweed, has been demonstrated to exert inhibitory effects on HTLV-1 infection in vitro. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of fucoidan on HTLV-1 infection. In this single-centre open-label trial, 13 patients with HAM/TSP were treated with 6 g fucoidan daily for 6-13 months. The HTLV-1 proviral DNA load and frequencies of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cells, natural killer cells, invariant natural killer T-cells and dendritic cells in the peripheral blood were analysed. Furthermore, the in vitro inhibitory effect of fucoidan on cell-to-cell HTLV-1 infection was examined by using luciferase reporter cell assays. Fucoidan inhibited the cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 in vitro. Furthermore, fucoidan therapy resulted in a 42.4% decrease in the HTLV-1 proviral load without affecting the host immune cells. During the treatment, no exacerbation was observed. Four patients with HAM/TSP developed diarrhoea, which improved immediately after stopping fucoidan administration. Fucoidan is a new potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  12. HTLV-1-associated inflammatory myopathies: low proviral load and moderate inflammation in 13 patients from West Indies and West Africa.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Marion; Cassar, Olivier; Maisonobe, Thierry; Desrames, Alexandra; Aouba, Achille; Hermine, Olivier; Mikol, Jacqueline; Polivka, Marc; Penisson-Besnier, Isabelle; Marcorelles, Pascale; Zagnoli, Fabien; Papo, Thomas; Lacour, Arnaud; Amoura, Zahir; Haroche, Julien; Cherin, Patrick; Teixeira, Antonio; Benveniste, Olivier; Herson, Serge; Morin, Anne-Sophie; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Huerre, Michel; Cumont, Marie-Christine; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Gout, Olivier; Taylor, Graham; Gessain, Antoine; Ozden, Simona; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    The Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of several inflammatory diseases, including HTLV-1-associated inflammatory myopathies (HAIM). Little is known about the virological and immunological characteristics of this viral disease. To characterize the histological and virological features of HAIM patients, in order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms and unravel new biological markers of this disease. We conducted a retrospective study on 13 patients with HAIM, based on blood and muscle samples. We included blood samples from HTLV-1-infected individuals without myopathy as controls. Muscle biopsies were used for a broad immunohistological evaluation of tissue damage and inflammation, as well as identification of infected cells through in situ hybridization. DNA extracted from patients' PBMC was used to identify the virus genotype by sequencing and to assess the proviral load by quantitative PCR. Anti-viral antibodies in plasma samples were titrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Patients originate from HTLV-1 endemic areas, the West Indies and West Africa. Histological alterations and inflammation in patients muscles were mostly moderate, with classical features of idiopathic myositis and rare HTLV-1-infected infiltrating cells. In all patients, HTLV-1 belonged to the A subtype, transcontinental subgroup. Anti-HTLV-1 antibodies titers were high, but the proviral load was not elevated compared to asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. We show here that muscle inflammation is moderate in HAIM, and accompanied by a low HTLV-1 proviral load, suggesting that the pathogenetic events do not exactly mirror those of other HTLV-1-associated inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Proviral loads of human T-lymphotropic virus Type 1 in asymptomatic carriers with different infection routes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Shiro; Umeki, Kazumi; Takajo, Ichiro; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Kusumoto, Norio; Umekita, Kunihiko; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Okayama, Akihiko

    2012-05-15

    High human T-lymphotropic virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral DNA load (PVL) has been reported to be one risk factor for the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). ATL is also believed to develop in HTLV-1 carriers who acquire infection perinatally. ATL cells have been reported to frequently harbor defective provirus. In our study, PVLs for three different regions of HTLV-1 provirus (5'LTR-gag, gag and pX) were measured in 309 asymptomatic carriers with different infection routes. PVLs for the pX region in 21 asymptomatic carriers with maternal infection was significantly higher than in 24 carriers with spousal infection. Among 161 carriers with relatively high pX PVLs (equal to or greater than 1 copy per 100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells), 26 carriers (16%) had low gag PVL/pX PVL (less than 0.5) and four (2%) had low 5'LTR-gag PVL/pX PVL (less than 0.5). Low gag PVL/pX PVL ratio, which reflects deficiency and/or polymorphism of HTLV-1 proviral DNA sequences for the gag region, was also associated with maternal infection. These data suggest that HTLV-1 carriers with maternal infection tend to have high PVLs, which may be related to provirus with deficiency and/or the polymorphism of proviral DNA sequences. In addition, there is a possibility that this ratio may be used as a tool to differentiate the infection routes of asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers, which supports the need for a large scale study. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  14. Genetic determinants of feline leukemia virus-induced lymphoid tumors: patterns of proviral insertion and gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tsatsanis, C; Fulton, R; Nishigaki, K; Tsujimoto, H; Levy, L; Terry, A; Spandidos, D; Onions, D; Neil, J C

    1994-12-01

    The genetic basis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-induced lymphoma was investigated in a series of 63 lymphoid tumors and tumor cell lines of presumptive T-cell origin. These were examined for virus-induced rearrangements of the c-myc, flvi-2 (bmi-1), fit-1, and pim-1 loci, for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, and for the presence of env recombinant FeLV (FeLV-B). The myc locus was most frequently affected in naturally occurring lymphomas (32%; n = 38) either by transduction (21%) or by proviral insertion (11%). Proviral insertions were also common at flvi-2 (24%). The two other loci were occupied in a smaller number of the naturally occurring tumors (fit-1, 8%; pim-1, 5%). Examination of the entire set of tumors showed that significant numbers were affected at two (19%) or three (5%) of the loci. Occupation of the fit-1 locus was observed most frequently in tumors induced by FeLV-myc strains, while flvi-2 insertions occurred with similar frequency in the presence or absence of obvious c-myc activation. These results suggest a hierarchy of mutational events in the genesis of feline T-cell lymphomas by FeLV and implicate insertion at fit-1 as a late progression step. The strongest links observed were with T-cell development, as monitored by rearrangement status of the TCR beta-chain gene, which was positively associated with activation of myc (P < 0.001), and with proviral insertion at flvi-2 (P = 0.02). This analysis also revealed a genetically distinct subset of thymic lymphomas with unrearranged TCR beta-chain genes in which the known target loci were involved very infrequently. The presence of env recombinant FeLV (FeLV-B) showed a negative correlation with proviral insertion at fit-1, possibly due to the rapid onset of these tumors. These results shed further light on the multistep process of FeLV leukemogenesis and the relationships between lymphoid cell maturation and susceptibility to FeLV transformation.

  15. Reduction of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral loads in rats orally infected with HTLV-1 by reimmunization with HTLV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Honda, Takayuki; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2006-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persistently infects humans, and the proviral loads that persist in vivo vary widely among individuals. Elevation in the proviral load is associated with serious HTLV-1-mediated diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. However, it remains controversial whether HTLV-1-specific T-cell immunity can control HTLV-1 in vivo. We previously reported that orally HTLV-1-infected rats showed insufficient HTLV-1-specific T-cell immunity that coincided with elevated levels of the HTLV-1 proviral load. In the present study, we found that individual HTLV-1 proviral loads established in low-responding hosts could be reduced by the restoration of HTLV-1-specific T-cell responses. Despite the T-cell unresponsiveness for HTLV-1 in orally infected rats, an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction in the splenocytes and a contact hypersensitivity response in the skin of these rats were comparable with those of naive rats. HTLV-1-specific T-cell response in orally HTLV-1-infected rats could be restored by subcutaneous reimmunization with mitomycin C (MMC)-treated syngeneic HTLV-1-transformed cells. The reimmunized rats exhibited lower proviral loads than untreated orally infected rats. We also confirmed that the proviral loads in orally infected rats decreased after reimmunization in the same hosts. Similar T-cell immune conversion could be reproduced in orally HTLV-1-infected rats by subcutaneous inoculation with MMC-treated primary T cells from syngeneic orally HTLV-1-infected rats. The present results indicate that, although HTLV-1-specific T-cell unresponsiveness is an underlying risk factor for the propagation of HTLV-1-infected cells in vivo, the risk may potentially be reduced by reimmunization, for which autologous HTLV-1-infected cells are a candidate immunogen.

  16. Cancer therapies activate RIG-I-like receptor pathway through endogenous non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E.; Parekh, Akash D.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Huang, Xiaona; Darga, Thomas; Wong, Anthony C.; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Staley, Jonathan P.; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy activate Type I interferon (IFN) signaling in tumor and host cells. However, the mechanism of induction is poorly understood. We identified a novel radioprotective role for the DEXH box RNA helicase LGP2 (DHX58) through its suppression of IR-induced cytotoxic IFN-beta [1]. LGP2 inhibits activation of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) pathway upon binding of viral RNA to the cytoplasmic sensors RIG-I (DDX58) and MDA5 (IFIH1) and subsequent IFN signaling via the mitochondrial adaptor protein MAVS (IPS1). Here we show that MAVS is necessary for IFN-beta induction and interferon-stimulated gene expression in the response to IR. Suppression of MAVS conferred radioresistance in normal and cancer cells. Germline deletion of RIG-I, but not MDA5, protected mice from death following total body irradiation, while deletion of LGP2 accelerated the death of irradiated animals. In human tumors depletion of RIG-I conferred resistance to IR and different classes of chemotherapy drugs. Mechanistically, IR stimulated the binding of cytoplasmic RIG-I with small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), which triggered IFN-beta activity. We demonstrate that the small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 translocate to the cytoplasm after IR treatment, thus stimulating the formation of RIG-I: RNA complexes and initiating downstream signaling events. Taken together, these findings suggest that the physiologic responses to radio-/chemo-therapy converge on an antiviral program in recruitment of the RLR pathway by a sncRNA-dependent activation of RIG-I which commences cytotoxic IFN signaling. Importantly, activation of interferon genes by radiation or chemotherapy is associated with a favorable outcome in patients undergoing treatment for cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a cell-intrinsic response to clinically relevant genotoxic treatments mediated by an RNA-dependent mechanism. PMID:27034163

  17. The selective footprints of viral pressures at the human RIG-I-like receptor family.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Estelle; Patin, Etienne; Laval, Guillaume; Pajon, Sandra; Fornarino, Simona; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2011-11-15

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs)--RIG-I, IFIH1 (or MDA5) and LGP2--are thought to be key actors in the innate immune system, as they play a major role in sensing RNA viruses in the cytosol of host cells. Despite the increasingly recognized importance of the RLR family in antiviral immunity, no population genetic studies have yet attempted to compare the evolutionary history of its different members in humans. Here, we characterized the levels of naturally occurring genetic variation in the RLRs in a panel of individuals of different ethnic origins, to assess to what extent natural selection has acted on this family of microbial sensors. Our results show that amino acid-altering variation at RIG-I, particularly in the helicase domain, has been under stronger evolutionary constraint than that at IFIH1 and LGP2, reflecting an important role for RIG-I in sensing numerous RNA viruses and/or functional constraints related to the binding of viral substrates. Such evolutionary constraints have been much more relaxed at IFIH1 and LGP2, which appear to have evolved adaptively in specific human populations. Notably, we identified several mutations showing signatures of positive selection, including two non-synonymous polymorphisms in IFIH1 (R460H and R843H) and one in LGP2 (Q425R), suggesting a selective advantage related to the sensing of RNA viruses by IFIH and to the regulatory functions of LGP2. In light of the fact that some of these mutations have been associated with altered risks of developing autoimmune disorders, our study provides an additional example of the evolutionary conflict between infection and autoimmunity.

  18. Identification of bovine leukocyte antigen class II haplotypes associated with variations in bovine leukemia virus proviral load in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, T; Takeshima, S-n; Jimba, M; Matsumoto, Y; Kobayashi, N; Matsuhashi, T; Sentsui, H; Aida, Y

    2013-02-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. Bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) is strongly involved in the subclinical progression of BLV infections. Recent studies show that the BoLA-DRB3 gene might play a direct role in controlling the number of BLV-infected peripheral B lymphocytes in vivo in Holstein cattle. However, the specific BoLA class II allele and DRB3-DQA1 haplotypes determining the BLV proviral load in Japanese Black cattle are yet to be identified. In this study, we focused on the association of BLV proviral load and polymorphism of BoLA class II in Japanese Black cattle. We genotyped 186 BLV-infected, clinically normal cattle for BoLA-DRB3 and BoLA-DQA1 using a polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing method. BoLA-DRB3*0902 and BoLA-DRB3*1101 were associated with a low proviral load (LPVL), and BoLA-DRB3*1601 was associated with a high proviral load (HPVL). Furthermore, BoLA-DQA1*0204 and BoLA-DQA1*10012 were related to LPVL and HPVL, respectively. Furthermore, we confirmed the correlation between the DRB3-DQA1 haplotype and BLV proviral load. Two haplotypes, namely 0902B or C (DRB3*0902-DQA1*0204) and 1101A (DRB3*1101-DQA1*10011), were associated with a low BLV proviral load, whereas one haplotype 1601B (DRB3*1601-DQA1*10012) was associated with a high BLV proviral load. We conclude that resistance is a dominant trait and susceptibility is a recessive trait. Additionally, resistant alleles were common between Japanese Black and Holstein cattle, and susceptible alleles differed. This is the first report to identify an association between the DRB3-DQA1 haplotype and variations in BLV proviral load. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Determination of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism using proviral DNA in women before and after viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Russell E; Rogers, Amy A; Hamdan, Hasnah B; Burger, Harold; Weiser, Barbara; Gao, Wei; Anastos, Kathryn; Young, Mary; Meyer, William A; Pesano, Rick L; Kagan, Ron M

    2015-01-01

    An HIV-1 tropism test is recommended prior to CCR5 antagonist administration to exclude patients harboring non-R5 virus from treatment with this class of antiretrovirals. HIV-1 tropism determination based on proviral DNA (pvDNA) may be useful in individuals with plasma viral RNA suppression. We developed a genotypic tropism assay for pvDNA and assessed its performance in a retrospective analysis of samples collected longitudinally. We randomly selected paired plasma/PBMC samples from the Women's Interagency HIV Study with plasma viral load ≥5,000 cp/mL at time 1 (T1), undetectable viral load maintained for ≥1 year and CD4+ >200 cells/μL at time 2 (T2). pvDNA was isolated from cryopreserved PBMCs. Sequences were analyzed in triplicate from 49/50 women, with tropism assigned using the geno2pheno (g2p) algorithm. The median time between T1 and T2 was 4.1 years. CXCR4-using virus was detected in 24% of the RNA samples and 33% of the pvDNA samples at T1, compared to 37% of the pvDNA samples at T2. Concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA tropism was 88% at T1 and 80% at T2. The g2p scores for RNA (T1) vs DNA (T1, T2) were strongly correlated (Spearman rho: 0.85 (T1); 0.78 (T2)). In women with evidence of tropism switch at T2 (either R5 to non-R5 or non-R5 to R5), there was a correlation between change in tropism and time. Mean pvDNA viral load decreased by 0.4 log10 copies/106 cells between T1 and T2 (p < 0.0001), but this decrease was not significantly associated with tropism status. We demonstrated that pvDNA tropism in women with HIV-1 suppression is concordant with prior RNA tropism results, even after a median time of >4 years. pvDNA tropism testing may be useful to determine eligibility of patients with viral suppression to switch to a CCR5-antagonist based regimen as well as for research purposes.

  20. Identification of full-length proviral DNA of porcine endogenous retrovirus from Chinese Wuzhishan miniature pigs inbred.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuyuan; Lv, Maomin; Xu, Shu; Wu, Jianmin; Tian, Kegong; Zhang, Jingang

    2010-07-01

    Existence of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) hinders pigs to be used in clinical xenotransplantation to alleviate the shortage of human transplants. Chinese miniature pigs are potential organ donors for xenotransplantation in China. However, so far, an adequate level of information on the molecular characteristics of PERV from Chinese miniature pigs has not been available. We described here the cloning and characterization of full-length proviral DNA of PERV from Chinese Wuzhishan miniature pigs inbred (WZSP). Full-length nucleotide sequences of PERV-WZSP and other PERVs were aligned and phylogenetic tree was constructed from deduced amino-acid sequences of env. The results demonstrated that the full-length proviral DNA of PERV-WZSP belongs to gammaretrovirus and shares high similarity with other PERVs. Sequence analysis also suggested that different patterns of LTR existed in the same porcine germ line and partial PERV-C sequence may recombine with PERV-A sequence in LTR. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Nxsm Recombinant Inbred Strains of Mice: Genetic Profile for 58 Loci Including the Mtv Proviral Loci

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, E. M.; Lee, B. K.

    1990-01-01

    We report the construction of 17 recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice derived from the progenitor strains NZB/BINRe and SM/J and the typing of this RI strain set, designated NXSM, for 58 loci distributed on 16 autosomes and the X chromosome. Two backcrosses involving NZB/BINJ and SM/J were constructed to confirm chromosomal assignments and determine gene orders suggested from NXSM RI strain data. From these results we recommend that chromosomal assignments and gene orders suggested from analyses of RI strain sets be confirmed using data obtained by other means. We also typed NZB/BINJ and SM/J for mammary tumor proviral (Mtv) loci. Both strains share three previously described Mtv loci: Mtv-7, Mtv-14 and Mtv-17. In addition, NZB/BINJ contains the previously described Mtv-3 and Mtv-9 loci and two new Mtv proviral loci: Mtv-27 located on chromosome (Chr) 1 and Mtv-28 located on the X chromosome. SM/J contains the previously described loci Mtv-6 and Mtv-8. Four LTR, mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia viral loci were identified and mapped: Ltrm-1 on Chr 12, Ltrm-2 on Chr 16, Ltrm-3 on Chr 5, and Ltrm-4 on Chr 13. The Tgn locus was positioned proximal to the Ly-6 locus on Chr 15. PMID:2165966

  2. SYBR Green-based quantitation of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 proviral load in Peruvian patients with neurological disease and asymptomatic carriers: influence of clinical status, sex, and familial relatedness.

    PubMed

    Adaui, Vanessa; Verdonck, Kristien; Best, Iván; González, Elsa; Tipismana, Martín; Arévalo, Jorge; Vanham, Guido; Campos, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral DNA load in patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers, a SYBR Green-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed. HTLV-1 proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was quantified using primers targeting the pX region and the HTLV-1 copy number normalized to the amount of ERV-3 (Endogenous Retrovirus 3) cellular DNA. Thirty-three asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) and 39 patients with HAM/TSP were enrolled. Some participants were relatives of HAM/TSP cases (16 ACs and 7 patients with HAM/TSP). On multiple linear regression analysis, the authors found a significant association between clinical status and HTLV-1 proviral load (P < .01), but only among women. ACs showed a median proviral load of 561 copies per 104 PBMCs (interquartile range: 251-1623). In HAM/TSP patients, the median proviral load was 1783 (1385-2914). ACs related to HAM/TSP patients presented a relatively high proviral load (median 1152); however, the association between relatedness to a HAM/TSP patient and proviral load was not significant (P = .1). In HAM/TSP patients, no association was found between proviral load and disease duration, progression or severity. The fact that the effect of HAM/TSP upon the HTLV-1 proviral load differed between sexes and the finding of a high proviral load among asymptomatic relatives of HAM/TSP patients suggest that not yet identified genetic or environmental factors influence the pathogenesis of HTLV-1 infection.

  3. Evolution of innate-like T cells and their selection by MHC class I-like molecules.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Banach, Maureen; Robert, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like-restricted innate-like αβT (iT) cells expressing an invariant or semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire were thought to be a recent evolutionary acquisition restricted to mammals. However, molecular and functional studies in Xenopus laevis have demonstrated that iT cells, defined as MHC class I-like-restricted innate-like αβT cells with a semi-invariant TCR, are evolutionarily conserved and prominent from early development in amphibians. As these iT cells lack the specificity conferred by conventional αβ TCRs, it is generally considered that they are specialized to recognize conserved antigens equivalent to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Thus, one advantage offered by the MHC class I-like iT cell-based recognition system is that it can be adapted to a common pathogen and function on the basis of a relatively small number of T cells. Although iT cells have only been functionally described in mammals and amphibians, the identification of non-classical MHC/MHC class I-like genes in other groups of endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates suggests that iT cells have a broader phylogenetic distribution than previously envisioned. In this review, we discuss the possible role of iT cells during the emergence of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune system.

  4. Locking the beta3 integrin I-like domain into high and low affinity conformations with disulfides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Takagi, Junichi; Springer, Timothy A

    2004-03-12

    Although integrin alpha subunit I domains exist in multiple conformations, it is controversial whether integrin beta subunit I-like domains undergo structurally analogous movements of the alpha7-helix that are linked to affinity for ligand. Disulfide bonds were introduced into the beta(3) integrin I-like domain to lock its beta6-alpha7 loop and alpha7-helix in two distinct conformations. Soluble ligand binding, ligand mimetic mAb binding and cell adhesion studies showed that disulfide-bonded receptor alpha(IIb)beta(3)(T329C/A347C) was locked in a low affinity state, and dithiothreitol treatment restored the capability of being activated to high affinity binding; by contrast, disulfide-bonded alpha(IIb)beta(3)(V332C/M335C) was locked in a high affinity state. The results suggest that activation of the beta subunit I-like domain is analogous to that of the alpha subunit I domain, i.e. that axial movement in the C-terminal direction of the alpha7-helix is linked to rearrangement of the I-like domain metal ion-dependent adhesion site into a high affinity conformation.

  5. Getting beyond "I Like the Book": Creating Space for Critical Literacy in K-6 Classrooms. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    "Getting Beyond "I Like the Book": Creating Space for Critical Literacy in K-6 Classrooms" (second edition) draws you into life in classrooms where students and teachers together use critical literacy as a framework for taking on local and global issues like racism and gender using books and everyday texts such as school posters and…

  6. Proviral load and immune markers associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in Peru.

    PubMed

    Best, I; Adaui, V; Verdonck, K; González, E; Tipismana, M; Clark, D; Gotuzzo, E; Vanham, G

    2006-11-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the aetiological agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The objective of this study is to identify which ex vivo and in vivo markers are associated independently with HAM/TSP in a Peruvian population. Eighty-one subjects (33 men/48 women) were enrolled: 35 presented with HAM/TSP, 33 were asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) and 13 were HTLV-1-seronegative controls (SCs). Ex vivo markers included T cell proliferation and Th1 [interferon (IFN)-gamma], Th2 [interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5], proinflammatory [tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine production in non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures. In vivo CD4(+) T cell count, markers of Th1 [interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10] and Th2 (sCD30) activity in plasma and HTLV-1 proviral load in PBMCs were also evaluated. In univariate analysis, several markers, including T cell proliferation, IFN-gamma, IP-10, sCD30 and proviral load were associated with HAM/TSP, but in a multiple logistic regression analysis only the proviral load remained associated significantly with disease manifestation [adjusted OR 9.10 (1.24-66.91)]. Our findings suggest that HAM/TSP is associated primarily with proviral load, whereas the observed association with some immune markers seems secondary.

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for controlling HIV-1 infection and preventing AIDS progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or “sterile” cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including ZFNs, TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:25716921

  8. The role of CTLs in persistent viral infection: cytolytic gene expression in CD8+ lymphocytes distinguishes between individuals with a high or low proviral load of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Vine, Alison M; Heaps, Adrian G; Kaftantzi, Lambrini; Mosley, Angelina; Asquith, Becca; Witkover, Aviva; Thompson, Gillian; Saito, Mineki; Goon, Peter K C; Carr, Laura; Martinez-Murillo, Francisco; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2004-10-15

    The proviral load in human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is typically constant in each infected host, but varies by >1000-fold between hosts and is strongly correlated with the risk of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease. However, the factors that determine an individual's HTLV-1 proviral load remain uncertain. Experimental evidence from studies of host genetics, viral genetics, and lymphocyte function and theoretical considerations suggest that a major determinant of the equilibrium proviral load is the CD8+ T cell response to HTLV-1. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the gene expression profile in circulating CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes distinguishes between individuals with a low proviral load of HTLV-1 and those with a high proviral load. We show that circulating CD8+ lymphocytes from individuals with a low HTLV-1 proviral load overexpressed a core group of nine genes with strong functional coherence: eight of the nine genes encode granzymes or other proteins involved in cell-mediated lysis or Ag recognition. We conclude that successful suppression of the HTLV-1 proviral load is associated with strong cytotoxic CD8+ lymphocyte activity in the peripheral blood.

  9. Oral health profile in patients infected with HTLV-1: clinical findings, proviral load, and molecular analysis from HTLV-1 in saliva.

    PubMed

    Lins, Liliane; de Carvalho, Victor José Uchoa; de Almeida Rego, Filipe Ferreira; Azevedo, Rochele; Kashima, Simone; Gallazi, Viviana Nilla Olavarria; Xavier, Marcia Tosta; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and has also been implicated in several disorders, including periodontal disease. The proviral load is an important biological marker for understanding HTLV-1 pathogenesis and elucidating whether or not the virus is related to the clinical manifestation of the disease. This study describes the oral health profile of HTLV-1 carriers and HAM/TSP patients in order to investigate the association between the proviral load in saliva and the severity of the periodontal disease and to examine virus intra-host variations from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and saliva cells. It is a cross-sectional analytical study of 90 individuals carried out from November 2006 to May 2008. Of the patients, 60 were HTLV-1 positive and 30 were negative. Individuals from the HTLV-1 positive and negative groups had similar mean age and social-economic status. Data were analyzed using two available statistical software packages, STATA 8.0 and SPSS 11.0 to conduct frequency analysis. Differences of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. HTLV-1 patients had poorer oral health status when compared to seronegative individuals. A weak positive correlation between blood and saliva proviral loads was observed. The mean values of proviral load in blood and saliva in patients with HAM/TSP was greater than those in HTLV-1 carriers. The HTLV-1 molecular analysis from PBMC and saliva specimens suggests that HTLV-1 in saliva is due to lymphocyte infiltration from peripheral blood. A direct relationship between the proviral load in saliva and oral manifestations was observed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Provirus-anchored long-range (PAL) mapping of mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdi-Haidar, B.; Levine, F.; Roemer, K.; LaPorte, P.; Friedman, T. )

    1993-02-01

    To design a strategy for more efficient long-range physical mapping of large mammalian genomes, we have developed a method for directional mapping from anchor points of randomly integrated retroviral proviruses containing sequences that provide unique cleavage sites in the genome. Using this method, we have determined a physical map of approximately 1.6 Mb flanking an Mo MLV-proviral integration site in mouse NIH/3T3 cells. Our results indicate that this provirus-anchored long-range (PAL) mapping strategy, which uses only two proviral sequences as univeral hybridization probes, can potentially allow rapid construction of physical maps for chromosomal regions devoid of other genetic markers. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mutations in the Primer Grip of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Impair Proviral DNA Synthesis and Virion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Ottmann, Michele; Pechoux, Christine; Le Grice, Stuart; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the effects of mutating highly conserved residues in the primer grip domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) on virus formation and infectivity. Among a series of RT mutant viruses, three (M230A, L234D, and W239A) were found to be noninfectious or very poorly infectious. Our data indicate that these mutations in RT caused severe defects in proviral DNA synthesis. Interestingly, assembly and maturation of mutant virus M230A were similar to those of the wild type, while mutants L234D and W239A showed impaired maturation. The immature morphology of RT mutants L234D and W239A is due at least in part to premature cleavage of the gag-pol precursor, prior to virion budding, indicating that intracellular stability of Pr160gag-pol is of key importance during virus assembly. PMID:9696874

  12. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 gag proviral sequences in dermato-immunological disorders with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Marschalkó, Márta; Kemény, B; Horváth, A

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development of eosinophilia were investigated in 65 patients with immunodermatological disorders, including the role of eosinophilotactic cytokines and the possible involvement of human T-cell leukemia virus, HTLV. HTLV-1 gag proviral sequences were revealed in two cases of lymphoproliferative disorders such as angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) and CD4+ cutaneous lymphoma, respectively. Increased level of GM-CSF was detected in 33% of disorders studied. Elevated level of IL-5 and eotaxin was detected in 27% and 30%, respectively, of patients with bullous diseases. Elevated level of GM-CSF and eotaxin was found in 33% and 46%, respectively, of patients with inflammatory diseases. Neither of the four cytokines, however proved to be responsible alone or together for the induction of eosinophilia. The possible indirect role of human retroviruses through induction of eosinophilic chemotactic cytokines is hypothesized.

  13. Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load induces activation of T-lymphocytes in asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Raimundo; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios; Korngold, Ana Beatriz; Olavarria, Viviana Nilla; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Mascarenhas, Rita Elizabeth

    2014-08-22

    High HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) is mainly found in infected individuals with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). However one third of asymptomatic carriers may have high PVL. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of PVL in the activation of T lymphocytes of asymptomatic individuals infected with HTLV-1. Membrane activation markers (CD25+, CD28+, CD45RO+, CD69+, CD62L+, HLA-DR+), FoxP3+ and intracellular IFN-γ expression were evaluated on both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes from asymptomatic carriers with PVL ≥ and < 1% of infected cells, using flow cytometry. HTLV-1 proviral load was determined using real-time PCR. Asymptomatic carriers with PVL ≥ 1% presented a higher frequency of CD4+CD25+CD45RO+ (13.2% vs. 4%, p = 0.02), CD4+HLA-DR+ (18% vs. 8.3%, p = 0.01) and CD4+IFN-γ+ (4.5%; 1%, p = 0.01) T-cells, than healthy donors. HTLV-1 PVL was directly correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD45RO+ T-cells (R = 0.7, p = 0.003). Moreover, a significant increase in the proportion of CD4 + FoxP3+ T-cells was observed in HTLV-1-infected individuals, compared to healthy donors. HTLV-1 PVL is associated with activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in asymptomatic individuals. Prospective studies should be conducted to evaluate whether asymptomatic individuals with higher PVL and high immune activation are more prone to developing HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  14. An mRNA is capped by a 2', 5' lariat catalyzed by a group I-like ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik; Westhof, Eric; Johansen, Steinar

    2005-09-02

    Twin-ribozyme introns are formed by two ribozymes belonging to the group I family and occur in some ribosomal RNA transcripts. The group I-like ribozyme, GIR1, liberates the 5' end of a homing endonuclease messenger RNA in the slime mold Didymium iridis. We demonstrate that this cleavage occurs by a transesterification reaction with the joining of the first and the third nucleotide of the messenger by a 2',5'-phosphodiester linkage. Thus, a group I-like ribozyme catalyzes an RNA branching reaction similar to the first step of splicing in group II introns and spliceosomal introns. The resulting short lariat, by forming a protective 5' cap, might have been useful in a primitive RNA world.

  15. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients according to new diagnostic criteria of HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios; Olavarria, Viviana Nilla; Kruschewsky, Ramon de Almeida; Mascarenhas, Rita Elizabeth; Dourado, Inês; Correia, Luis C L; de Castro-Costa, Carlos Maurício; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo

    2011-07-01

    A high human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load is described in HTLV-1-associated diseases, especially HAM/TSP. However, the cut-off value to define high levels of HTLV-1 proviral load is not well established. 281 HTLV-1-infected patients from the HTLV reference center in Salvador, Brazil, were followed from 2005 to 2008. Patients were classified as asymptomatic, possible-, probable-, and definite-HAM/TSP, in accordance with diagnostic criteria proposed by De Castro-Costa et al. (2006): AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 22:931-935. HTLV-1 proviral load was determined using real-time PCR. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed using only asymptomatic individuals and definite-HAM/TSP patients. The ROC curve was used to predict the proviral load level that differentiates these two groups. Out of 281 patients, 189 were asymptomatic and 92 were diagnosed with HAM/TSP (22 possible, 23 probable, 47 definite). The mean HTLV-1 proviral load was higher in possible- (89,104 ± 93,006 copies/106 PBMC), -probable (175,854 ± 128,083 copies/106 PBMC), and definite-HAM/TSP patients (150,667 ± 122,320 copies/106 PBMC),when compared to asymptomatic individuals (27,178 ± 41,155 copies/106 PBMC) (P < 0.0001). A comparison of all HAM/TSP groups showed the highest proviral loads in probable-HAM/TSP patients, yet the differences in mean values were not statistically significant. The ROC curve suggested a value of 49,865 copies/106 PBMC, with 87% sensitivity (95% CI ¼ 74-95) and 81% specificity (95% CI ¼ 75-86), as the best proviral load cut-off point to differentiate definite HAM/TSP patients from asymptomatic individuals. HTLV-1 proviral loads are higher in groups of infected patients with eurological symptoms and may represent a relevant biological marker of disease progression.

  16. Genotypic tropism testing in proviral DNA to guide maraviroc initiation in aviremic subjects: 48-week analysis of the PROTEST study

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Federico; Poveda, Eva; Jesús Pérez-Elías, Maria; Hernández Quero, José; Àngels Ribas, Maria; Martínez-Madrid, Onofre J; Flores, Juan; Crespo, Manel; Gutiérrez, Félix; García-Deltoro, Miguel; Imaz, Arkaitz; Ocampo, Antonio; Artero, Arturo; Blanco, Francisco; Bernal, Enrique; Pasquau, Juan; Mínguez-Gallego, Carlos; Pérez, Núria; Aiestarán, Aintzane; Paredes, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In a previous interim 24-week virological safety analysis of the PROTEST study [1], initiation of Maraviroc (MVC) plus 2 nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in aviremic subjects based on genotypic tropism testing of proviral HIV-1 DNA was associated with low rates of virological failure. Here we present the final 48-week analysis of the study. Methods PROTEST was a phase 4, prospective, single-arm clinical trial (ID: NCT01378910) carried on in 24 HIV care centres in Spain. Maraviroc-naïve HIV-1-positive adults with HIV-1 RNA (VL) <50 c/mL on stable ART during the previous 6 months, requiring an ART change due to toxicity, with no antiretroviral resistance to the ART started, and R5 HIV by proviral DNA genotypic tropism testing (defined as a G2P FPR >10% in a singleton), initiated MVC with 2 NRTIs and were followed for 48 weeks. Virological failure was defined as two consecutive VL>50 c/mL. Recent adherence was calculated as: (# pills taken/# pills prescribed during the previous week)*100. Results Tropism results were available from 141/175 (80.6%) subjects screened: 87/141 (60%) were R5 and 74/87 (85%) were finally included in the study. Their median age was 48 years, 16% were women, 31% were MSM, 36% had CDC category C at study entry, 62% were HCV+ and 10% were HBV+. Median CD4+ counts were 616 cells/mm3 at screening, and median nadir CD4+ counts were 143 cells/mm3. Previous ART included PIs in 46 (62%) subjects, NNRTIs in 27 (36%) and integrase inhibitors (INIs) in 1 (2%). The main reasons for treatment change were dyslipidemia (42%), gastrointestinal symptoms (22%), and liver toxicity (15%). MVC was given alongside TDF/FTC in 40 (54%) subjects, ABC/3TC in 30 (40%), AZT/3TC in 2 (3%) and ABC/TDF in 2 (3%). Sixty-two (84%) subjects maintained VL<50 c/mL through week 48, whereas 12 (16%) discontinued treatment: two (3%) withdrew informed consent, one (1%) had a R5→X4 shift in HIV tropism between the screening and baseline visits, one

  17. Toll-like receptors, IFN-γ and IL-12 expression in bovine leukemia virus-infected animals with low or high proviral load.

    PubMed

    Farias, María Victoria Nieto; Lendez, Pamela Anahí; Marin, Maia; Quintana, Silvina; Martínez-Cuesta, Lucía; Ceriani, María Carolina; Dolcini, Guillermina Laura

    2016-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is widespread mainly in dairy cattle and 5-10% of infected animals will die due to lymphosarcoma; most cattle remain asymptomatic but 30% develop persistent lymphocytosis (PL). BLV transmission depends on infected cell exchange and thus, proviral load is determinant. Understanding the mechanisms which govern the control of viral dissemination will be desirable for the design of effective therapeutic or preventive strategies for BLV. The development of high proviral load (HPL) or low proviral load (LPL) might be associated to genetic factors and humoral immune responses, however cellular responses are not fully described. We aimed to characterize cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) expression related to the proviral load profiles. IFN-γ and IL-12 mRNA expression level was significantly higher in PBMC from infected cattle (LPL n=6 and HPL n=7) compared to uninfected animals (n=5). While no significant differences were observed in IL-12 expression between LPL and HPL group, IFN-γ expression was significantly higher in LPL animals. Infected cattle exhibited higher expression levels of TLR3, 7-9. Animals with HPL had significantly higher expression of TLR7/8 than uninfected cattle. TLR8 and TLR9 were up-regulated in HPL group, and TLR3 was up-regulated in LPL group. This is the first report related to TLR gene expression in BLV infected cattle and represents evidence of the involvement of these receptors in BLV recognition. Further studies on different subpopulations of immune cells may help clarify their role in response to BLV and its consequences on viral dissemination. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. High HTLV-1 proviral load, a marker for HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, is also detected in patients with infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Primo, J; Siqueira, I; Nascimento, M C F; Oliveira, M F; Farre, L; Carvalho, E M; Bittencourt, A L

    2009-08-01

    Salvador (BA, Brazil) is an endemic area for human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The overall prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in the general population has been estimated to be 1.76%. HTLV-1 carriers may develop a variety of diseases such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH). IDH is a chronic and severe form of childhood exudative and infective dermatitis involving mainly the scalp, neck and ears. It has recently been observed that 30% of patients with IDH develop juvenile HAM/TSP. The replication of HTLV-1 has been reported to be greater in adult HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. In the current study, the proviral load of 28 children and adolescents with IDH not associated with HAM/TSP was determined and the results were compared to those obtained in 28 HTLV-1 adult carriers and 28 adult patients with HAM/TSP. The proviral load in IDH patients was similar to that of patients with HAM/TSP and much higher than that found in HTLV-1 carriers. The high levels of proviral load in IDH patients were not associated with age, duration of illness, duration of breast-feeding, or activity status of the skin disease. Since proviral load is associated with neurological disability, these data support the view that IDH patients are at high risk of developing HAM/TSP.

  19. Anti-HTLV-1 tax antibody and tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte are associated with a reduction in HTLV-1 proviral load in asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Masaki; Kozako, Tomohiro; Sawada, Takashi; Matsushita, Kakushi; Ozaki, Atsuo; Hamada, Heiichiro; Kawada, Hideaki; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Tokunaga, Masahito; Haraguchi, Koichi; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Arima, Naomichi; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that higher anti-human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) antibody titer and lower anti-HTLV-1 Tax antibody reactivity are risk factors for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. In the present study, we analyzed the relationships between these factors and clarified their significance. Forty-five carriers were examined for anti-HTLV-1 and anti-Tax antibody by ELISA. In addition, 43 of the 45 carriers with HLA-A*0201 and/or A*2402 were examined for frequency of Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) using HTLV-1/HLA tetramers, and 44 were examined for proviral load by real-time PCR. The relationships between these factors were analyzed statistically. The frequencies of Tax11-19 and Tax301-309-specific CTLs were significantly higher in the anti-Tax antibody-positive group as compared with the antibody-negative group (P = 0.002 and 0.033, respectively). Anti-HTLV-1 antibody titer had a positive correlation with proviral load (P = 0.019), whereas anti-Tax antibody did not show a significant correlation. Higher frequencies of both Tax11-19 and Tax301-309-specific CTLs are related to a reduction in proviral load (P = 0.017 and 0.015, respectively). Synergistic interactions of humoral and cellular immunity against Tax protein were demonstrated in HTLV-1 carriers. Tax-specific CTL may reduce HTLV-1 proviral load to prevent asymptomatic carriers from developing adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

  20. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I proviral loads in patients with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: Comparison between cutaneous type and other subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Kentaro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Seto, Masao; Takatsuka, Yoshifusa; Takeuchi, Shogo; Tokunaga, Masahito; Kubota, Ayumu; Takeda, Koichiro; Kanzaki, Tamotsu; Uchida, Youhei; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2015-12-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), characterized by various clinicopathological features, is divided into four clinical subtypes, namely, acute, lymphoma, chronic and smoldering types, and the treatment strategy differs according to the clinical subtype. The designation cutaneous type ATL has been proposed to describe a peculiar subgroup of smoldering type ATL in which the skin is predominantly affected. However, diagnostic criteria and prognostic factors for cutaneous type ATL remain to be determined. Therefore, we performed a retrospective study to obtain a precise method for subtype classification and to clearly define cutaneous type ATL. A total of 87 ATL patients (acute, n = 31; lymphoma, n = 6; chronic, n = 24; smoldering, n = 26) were enrolled. The human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) proviral load in peripheral blood and the serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) level were evaluated with respect to the clinical features of the different types of ATL. The HTLV-1 proviral load was significantly increased in the acute and chronic type and the serum sIL-2R level was increased in the acute and lymphoma type. The HTLV-1 proviral load was significantly lower in cutaneous than other smoldering types of ATL without skin lesions. The clinical findings of cutaneous type ATL were also different from other subtypes. These results indicate that, in combination, determination of the HTLV-1 proviral load and the serum sIL-2R level is useful for distinguishing among the different types of ATL, and strongly suggest that cutaneous type ATL is a distinct clinical entity. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) Proviral Reservoirs Decay Continuously Under Sustained Virologic Control in HIV-1–Infected Children Who Received Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luzuriaga, Katherine; Tabak, Barbara; Garber, Manuel; Chen, Ya Hui; Ziemniak, Carrie; McManus, Margaret M.; Murray, Danielle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality. Methods. Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection, <2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1–specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1–infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth. Results. Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1–specific immune responses. Conclusions. Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:24850788

  2. Human T lymphotropic virus types I and II proviral sequences in Argentinian blood donors with indeterminate Western blot patterns.

    PubMed

    Mangano, A M; Remesar, M; del Pozo, A; Sen, Luisa

    2004-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) seroindeterminate blood donors have been reported worldwide including Argentina. To investigate the significance of HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot (WB) patterns, we conducted an 8-year cross-sectional study. Of 86,238 Argentinian blood donors, 146 sera were reactive by screening tests. The WB results indicated that 20% were HTLV-I reactive, 8% HTLV-II reactive, 61% indeterminate, and 11% negative. The overall seroprevalence was 0.034% for HTLV-I, 0.014% for HTLV-II, and 0.103% for indeterminate. In 57 reactive specimens, HTLV-I/II provirus could be examined by type specific PCR for tax, pol, and env regions. When at least two gene fragments were amplified HTLV-I/II infection was considered confirmed. PCR results confirmed all WB seropositive samples for HTLV-I (n = 15), and HTLV-II (n = 7), and the only WB negative case was also PCR negative, showing a complete concordance between PCR and WB. However, of 34 WB seroindeterminate sera studied by PCR, in 5 was proviral DNA amplified. According to our criteria PCR confirmed one to be HTLV-I, and one HTLV-II, 3 remained indeterminate since only tax sequences were amplified. Among WB indeterminate samples tested by PCR, most of their serological profile showed reactivity to gag codified proteins but lacked env reactivities (70%). One sample with a WB gag pattern showed proviral tax sequences, but of the four samples with reactivity to env proteins GD21 (n = 3) or rgp46II (n = 1) PCR results indicated that one was HTLV-I, one was HTLV-II, and two were indeterminate (only tax sequences). In conclusion, the majority of HTLV-seroindeterminate WB donors exhibited a gag indeterminate profile lacking HTLV provirus, and were thus considered uninfected. However, seroreactivity to env proteins, in particular to GD21, may indicate infection and a follow-up study of each seroreactive blood donor should be considered.

  3. BCA2/Rabring7 Interferes with HIV-1 Proviral Transcription by Enhancing the SUMOylation of IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BCA2/Rabring7 is a BST2 cofactor that promotes the lysosomal degradation of trapped HIV-1 virions but also functions as a BST2-independent anti-HIV factor by targeting Gag for lysosomal degradation. Since many antiviral factors regulate the NF-κB innate signaling pathway, we investigated whether BCA2 is also connected to this proinflammatory cascade. Here, we show for the first time that BCA2 is induced by NF-κB-activating proinflammatory cytokines and that upregulation of BCA2 provides regulatory negative feedback on NF-κB. Specifically, BCA2 serves as an E3 SUMO ligase in the SUMOylation of IκBα, which in turn enhances the sequestration of NF-κB components in the cytoplasm. Since HIV-1 utilizes NF-κB to promote proviral transcription, the BCA2-mediated inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreases the transcriptional activity of HIV-1 (up to 4.4-fold in CD4+ T cells). Therefore, our findings indicate that BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 infection: not only does BCA2 prevent assembly and release of nascent virions, it also significantly restricts HIV-1 transcription by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. IMPORTANCE Understanding the interactions between HIV-1 and its host cells is highly relevant to the design of new drugs aimed at eliminating HIV-1 from infected individuals. We have previously shown that BCA2, a cofactor of BST2 in the restriction of HIV-1, also prevents virion assembly in a BST2-independent manner. In this study, we found that BCA2 negatively regulates the NF-κB pathway—a signaling cascade necessary for HIV-1 replication and infectivity—which in turn detrimentally affects proviral transcription and virus propagation. Thus, our results indicate that, besides its previously described functions as an antiviral factor, BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 replication at the transcriptional level. PMID:28122985

  4. The Icsbp locus is a common proviral insertion site in mature B-cell lymphomas/plasmacytomas induced by exogenous murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Shiliang; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Kunder, Sandra; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Morris, David W.; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2006-09-01

    ICSBP (interferon consensus sequence binding protein)/IRF8 (interferon regulatory factor 8) is an interferon gamma-inducible transcription factor expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cells, and down-regulation of this factor has been observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in man. By screening about 1200 murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced lymphomas, we found proviral insertions at the Icsbp locus in 14 tumors, 13 of which were mature B-cell lymphomas or plasmacytomas. Only one was a T-cell lymphoma, although such tumors constituted about half of the samples screened. This indicates that the Icsbp locus can play a specific role in the development of mature B-lineage malignancies. Two proviral insertions in the last Icsbp exon were found to act by a poly(A)-insertion mechanism. The remaining insertions were found within or outside Icsbp. Since our results showed expression of Icsbp RNA and protein in all end-stage tumor samples, a simple tumor suppressor function of ICSBP is not likely. Interestingly, proviral insertions at Icsbp have not been reported from previous extensive screenings of mature B-cell lymphomas induced by endogenous MLVs. We propose that ICSBP might be involved in an early modulation of an immune response to exogenous MLVs that might also play a role in proliferation of the mature B-cell lymphomas.

  5. Characterization of pal-1, a common proviral insertion site in murine leukemia virus-induced lymphomas of c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Scheijen, B; Jonkers, J; Acton, D; Berns, A

    1997-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) in c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice permits the identification of oncogenes that collaborate with the transgenes in lymphomagenesis. The recently identified common insertion site pal-1, in MoMLV-induced lymphomas, is located in a region in which several independent integration clusters are found: eis-1, gfi-1, and evi-5. Proviral insertions of MoMLV in the different integration clusters upregulate the transcriptional activity of the Gfi-1 gene, which is located within the pal-1 locus. The eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus serves as a target for MoMLV proviral insertions in pre-B-cell lymphomas of Emu-myc transgenic mice (20%) and in T-cell lymphomas of H-2K-myc (75%) and Emu-pim-1 (93%) transgenic mice. Many tumors overexpress both Gfi-1 as well as Myc and Pim gene family members, indicating that Gfi-1 collaborates with Myc and Pim in lymphomagenesis. Proviral integrations in the previously identified insertion site bmi-1 are, however, mutually exclusive with integrations in the eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus. This finding suggests that Bmi-1 and Gfi-1 belong to the same complementation group in lymphoid transformation. PMID:8985317

  6. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  7. An in vitro study on the risk of non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity to Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Sagkan, Rahsan Ilikci

    2013-10-26

    Momordica charantia (MC) is a tropical plant that is extensively used in folk medicine. However, the knowledge about side effects of this plant is relatively little according to knowledge about its therapeutic effects. The aim of this study is to reveal the effects of non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity to MC by an experiment which was designed in vitro. In the present study, the expression of CD63 and CD203c on peripheral blood basophils against different dilutions of MC extracts was measured using flow cytometry and compared with one another. In addition to this, intra-assay CV's of testing extracts were calculated for precision on reproducibility of test results. It was observed that the fruit extract of MC at 1/100 and 1/1000 dilutions significantly increased active basophils compared to same extract at 1/10000 dilution. In conclusion, Momordica charantia may elicit a non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity reaction in especially susceptible individuals.

  8. An in vitro study on the risk of non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity to Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Momordica charantia (MC) is a tropical plant that is extensively used in folk medicine. However, the knowledge about side effects of this plant is relatively little according to knowledge about its therapeutic effects. The aim of this study is to reveal the effects of non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity to MC by an experiment which was designed in vitro. Methods In the present study, the expression of CD63 and CD203c on peripheral blood basophils against different dilutions of MC extracts was measured using flow cytometry and compared with one another. In addition to this, intra-assay CV’s of testing extracts were calculated for precision on reproducibility of test results. Results It was observed that the fruit extract of MC at 1/100 and 1/1000 dilutions significantly increased active basophils compared to same extract at 1/10000 dilution. Conclusions In conclusion, Momordica charantia may elicit a non-allergic type-I like hypersensitivity reaction in especially susceptible individuals. PMID:24160670

  9. A family of MHC class I-like genes located in the vicinity of the mouse leukocyte receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Masanori; Watanabe, Yutaka; Sumasu, Motoko; Nagata, Taeko

    2002-01-01

    Some members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene family are encoded outside the MHC. Here we describe a family of mouse class I-like genes mapping to the vicinity of the leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) on chromosome 7. This family, which we call Mill (MHC class I-like located near the LRC), has two members designated Mill1 and Mill2. Both genes are predicted to encode membrane glycoproteins with domain organization essentially similar to that of MHC class I heavy chains. The following features of Mill are noteworthy. (i) The deduced MILL proteins lack most of the residues known to be involved in the docking of peptides in classical MHC class I molecules. (ii) Among the known members of the class I gene family, MILL1 and MILL2 are related most closely to MICA/MICB encoded in the human MHC. (iii) Unlike all other known members of the class I gene family, Mill1 and Mill2 have an exon between those coding for the signal peptide and the α1 domain. (iv) Mill1 has a more restricted expression profile than Mill2. (v) The gene orthologous to Mill1 or Mill2 apparently is absent in the human. (vi) Mill1 and Mill2 show a limited degree of polymorphism in laboratory mice. The observation that the Mill family is related most closely to the MIC family, together with its apparent absence in the human, suggests its involvement in innate immunity. PMID:12370446

  10. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of a Chiari I-like malformation in an African lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie; Souza, Marcy; Ramsay, Ed; Schumacher, Juergen; Hecht, Silke; Thomas, William

    2008-09-01

    A 13-mo-old intact male African lion (Panthera leo) presented with a 3-mo history of lethargy, ventral flexion of the neck, abnormal vocalization, and ataxia. Hemogram and serum biochemistries were within normal limits except for the presence of hypokalemia (2.7 mEq/L) and hypochloridemia (108 mEq/L). When no improvement was noted with oral potassium gluconate supplementation, a computed tomography scan of the brain and skull was performed, and no abnormalities were noted. However, magnetic resonance imaging detected occipital bone thickening, crowding of the caudal cranial fossa with cerebellar compression and herniation, and cervical syringohydromyelia, which was consistent with a Chiari I-like malformation. Foramen magnum decompression was performed to relieve the compression of the cerebellum. The animal recovered well with subsequent resolution of clinical signs. Hypovitaminosis A has been proposed previously as the underlying etiology for this malformation in lions with similar clinical presentations. This lion's serum and liver vitamin A concentrations were low (100 ng/ml and 25.31 microg/g, respectively) compared to concentrations reported for domestic carnivores and support hypovitaminosis A as the underlying cause of this animal's Chiari I-like malformation.

  11. Hybridization capture reveals evolution and conservation across the entire Koala retrovirus genome.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Siracusa, Matthew C; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin.

  12. Hybridization Capture Reveals Evolution and Conservation across the Entire Koala Retrovirus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin. PMID:24752422

  13. Quantification of HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a high throughput four-competitor competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Comandini, U V; Sönnerborg, A; Vahlne, A; Yun, Z

    1997-12-01

    A multiple competitor PCR (mcPCR) was developed to quantify HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DNA extracted from a mixture of HIV infected PBMC and four size-mutated DNA competitors were co-amplified. The Cy5-fluorescence labelled PCR products were denatured by heating, separated using an automated DNA sequencer and quantified by a fragment analysis computer software. An internal standard was generated by plotting the peak areas of the four competitors against their inputs. Based on the internal standard, HIV sample DNA was quantified by extrapolating the corresponding signal. The linear range of the mcPCR was three log wide and the quantitation limit was about 20 copies of HIV DNA/10(6) PBMC. Using the mcPCR, HIV DNA was quantified from 14 long-term non progressors (LTNP) and 14 patients with advanced disease. A significantly lower copy number of HIV DNA was obtained in the LTNP (p = 0.018). These data suggest that the mcPCR is sensitive, reliable and especially useful for HIV DNA quantification of a large number of clinical samples.

  14. Proviral load and the balance of serum cytokines in HTLV-1-asymptomatic infection and in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    PubMed

    Starling, Ana Lúcia Borges; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Labanca, Ludimila; de Souza Pereira, Silvio Roberto; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins, Marina Lobato; Ribas, João Gabriel; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the proviral load and the plasma cytokine profiles (interleukin-IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ) in 87 HTLV-1-infected individuals, including 28 with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), 32 with possible pHAM/TSP and 27 asymptomatic carriers (AC). The control group was composed by 21 HTLV-1-seronegative individuals. Our finding demonstrated that HAM/TSP group presented higher proviral load as compared to all other HTLV-1 groups (p<0.0001). The HAM/TSP group showed higher serum concentration of IL-6 (p=0.0009) as compared to all other groups. Moreover, higher serum concentration of IFN-γ (p=0.0118) and IL-4 (p=0.0166) were observed in HAM/TSP group as compared to the healthy controls. Additionally, the HAM/TSP group also showed higher serum concentration of TNF-α (p=0.0239) and IFN-γ (p=0.0118) as compared to AC. No differences in the serum concentration of IL-2 and IL-10 were observed among the groups. The analysis of cytokine balance demonstrated that HAM/TSP presented higher pro-inflammatory profile with enhanced IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio as compared to AC and pHAM/TSP. Further analysis pointed out to a positive correlation between the IFN-γ response and the proviral load in AC. Conversely, a negative association between TNF-α and IL-2 with the proviral load was the hallmark of HAM/TSP group. These findings suggested that the proviral load and the pro-inflammatory cytokine profile may be independent events in the peripheral blood of HAM/TSP individuals. The knowledge about the existence of individual virological/immunological behavior upon HTLV-1 infection, may guide to the establishment of more effective therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-Tax antibody levels in asymptomatic carriers, oligosymptomatic carriers, patients with rheumatologic disease or with HAM/TSP do not correlate with HTLV-1 proviral load.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jaqueline Gontijo; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Martins, Marina Lobato; Martins, Camila Pacheco Silveira; de Carvalho, Luciana Debortoli; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara Freitas; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo

    2011-01-01

    HTLV-1 infects millions of people around the world and induces myelopathy (HAM/TSP), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or other inflammatory or rheumatologic diseases. The host-virus interaction causes asymptomatic carriers to develop HAM/TSP. Biomarkers are needed to predict patients who are at risk for HAM/TSP. Tax is highly immunogenic and is a major target protein recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Anti-Tax antibodies are involved in HAM/TSP pathogenesis. To assess anti-Tax IgG reactivity with a flow cytometry assay (FCA) using an infection/transfection system with Vaccinia virus and pLW44/Tax-expressing Tax and to correlate the anti-Tax response and the HTLV-1 proviral load. : We enrolled 81 individuals: 9 HTLV-1 seronegative (NP) and 72 HTLV-1 positive (23 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (AC), 12 oligosymptomatic patients (OL), 7 with rheumatologic diseases (DR) and 30 with HAM/TSP (HT)). Anti-Tax reactivity was assessed by FCA, and HTLV-1 proviral load was measured with real time PCR. The HT and DR groups showed greater anti-Tax IgG reactivity (p<0.001 and p<0.05 comparing HT to the OL and AC group, respectively; p<0.05 comparing DR to the OL group), and the reactivity in the DR+HT group was significantly different when compared to the AC group (p<0.05) and to the OL group (p<0.001). The proviral load was higher in the HT group compared to the OL (p<0.001) and in the HT+DR group compared to OL (p<0.001). There was no correlation between anti-Tax IgG reactivity and proviral load in any of the HTLV-1-infected groups. These findings suggest that although anti-Tax IgG reactivity and the HTLV-1 proviral load are important markers of the development of HTLV-1-associated diseases, their levels are not correlated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. "I like Art Because..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leishear, Christina Chiddo

    2012-01-01

    There is a lot of creative energy between students and their art materials. In this lesson, the author discusses materials an artist may use to create a work of art--paint, a paintbrush, a palette, crayons, markers, pastels, and so on. Each student sketched a picture of themselves holding some tools that can be used in art. The objectives of this…

  17. "I like Art Because..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leishear, Christina Chiddo

    2012-01-01

    There is a lot of creative energy between students and their art materials. In this lesson, the author discusses materials an artist may use to create a work of art--paint, a paintbrush, a palette, crayons, markers, pastels, and so on. Each student sketched a picture of themselves holding some tools that can be used in art. The objectives of this…

  18. The role of HIV integration in viral persistence: no more whistling past the proviral graveyard

    PubMed Central

    Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A substantial research effort has been directed to identifying strategies to eradicate or control HIV infection without a requirement for combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). A number of obstacles prevent HIV eradication, including low-level viral persistence during cART, long-term persistence of HIV-infected cells, and latent infection of resting CD4+ T cells. Mechanisms of persistence remain uncertain, but integration of the provirus into the host genome represents a central event in replication and pathogenesis of all retroviruses, including HIV. Analysis of HIV proviruses in CD4+ lymphocytes from individuals after prolonged cART revealed that a substantial proportion of the infected cells that persist have undergone clonal expansion and frequently have proviruses integrated in genes associated with regulation of cell growth. These data suggest that integration may influence persistence and clonal expansion of HIV-infected cells after cART is introduced, and these processes may represent key mechanisms for HIV persistence. Determining the diversity of host genes with integrants in HIV-infected cells that persist for prolonged periods may yield useful information regarding pathways by which infected cells persist for prolonged periods. Moreover, many integrants are defective, and new studies are required to characterize the role of clonal expansion in the persistence of replication-competent HIV. PMID:26829624

  19. The diversity of the structure and genomic integration sites of HTLV-1 provirus in MT-2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hashikura, Yuuki; Umeki, Kazumi; Umekita, Kunihiko; Nomura, Hajime; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Okayama, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    A human T-lymphotropic virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) positive cell line, MT-2, derived from human cord leukocytes co-culturing with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells is commonly used in HTLV-1 research; however, the details of provirus integrated in MT-2 genome have not yet been characterized. In this study, five types of HTLV-1 proviral sequences were detected in 11 different sites of the genome in a reference MT-2 cell line. The five types of HTLV-1 proviral sequences were one complete proviral genome, two types of proviruses with deletion of large internal viral sequences (5.3 and 3.9 kB), one provirus with a large deletion (6.2 kB) from 5'LTR to position 6257, and one provirus of LTR only. The provirus with identical deletion of large internal viral sequence (5.3 kB) was found to be integrated into six different sites (chromosomes). A complete provirus and three of four types of defective provirus were consistently detected in two other MT-2 cell lines cultured in different laboratories. Not only Tax/Rex RNA and HBZ RNA, but also the transcriptional product for a specific defective provirus, were detectable in all three MT-2 cell lines. Because it has been reported that defective provirus is frequently detected in ATL cells, these results may be important in understanding the mechanism of HTLV-1 proviral polymorphism, which may be related to leukemogenesis. In addition, the large variation in integrated HTLV-1 proviruses makes it important for researchers to exercise caution in their assessment and interpretation of results using MT-2 cell lines.

  20. Evaluation of the role of TAX, HBZ, and HTLV-1 proviral load on the survival of ATLL patients.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Shirdel, Abbas; Bari, Alireza; Mohaddes, Seyedeh Tahereh; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Karimani, Ehsan Ghayour; Etminani, Kobra; Golabpour, Amin; Torshizi, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy with very poor prognosis and short survival, caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The HTLV-1 biomarkers trans-activator x (TAX) and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) are main oncogenes and life-threatening elements. This study aimed to assess the role of the TAX and HBZ genes and HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) in the survival of patients with ATLL. Forty-three HTLV-1-infected individuals, including 18 asymptomatic carriers (AC) and 25 ATLL patients (ATLL), were evaluated between 2011 and 2015. The mRNA expression of TAX and HBZ and the HTLV-1 PVL were measured by quantitative PCR. Significant differences in the mean expression levels of TAX and HBZ were observed between the two study groups (ATLL and AC, P=0.014 and P=0.000, respectively). In addition, the ATLL group showed a significantly higher PVL than AC (P=0.000). There was a significant negative relationship between PVL and survival among all study groups (P=0.047). The HTLV-1 PVL and expression of TAX and HBZ were higher in the ATLL group than in the AC group. Moreover, a higher PVL was associated with shorter survival time among all ATLL subjects. Therefore, measurement of PVL, TAX, and HBZ may be beneficial for monitoring and predicting HTLV-1-infection outcomes, and PVL may be useful for prognosis assessment of ATLL patients. This research demonstrates the possible correlation between these virological markers and survival in ATLL patients.

  1. Genotypic Tropism Testing in HIV-1 Proviral DNA Can Provide Useful Information at Low-Level Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Fabeni, Lavinia; Berno, Giulia; Svicher, Valentina; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Gori, Caterina; Bertoli, Ada; Mussini, Cristina; Lichtner, Miriam; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Ammassari, Adriana; Pinnetti, Carmela; Cicalini, Stefania; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Andreoni, Massimo; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of performing genotypic tropism testing (GTT) with proviral DNA (pvDNA) even during suppressed viremia would facilitate the use of CCR5 inhibitors as part of switching, simplification, or intensification strategies. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the tropism concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA samples and to assess which factors could affect possible discrepancies between the two compartments. GTT was performed using both plasma RNA and pvDNA from 55 sample pairs from drug-experienced patients. Potential differences between the two compartments were evaluated by analyzing coreceptor usage and genetic variability. Paired samples were also stratified in three levels of viremia (<50, 51 to 500, and >500 copies/ml). Overall, Geno2Pheno comparisons of false-positive rates in the two compartments showed good correlation (r = 0.72). A high level of concordance in tropism predictions for the two compartments was found (46/55 sample pairs [83.6%]). Among the 9 sample pairs with discordant tropisms, a larger proportion of pvDNA samples harboring CXCR4/dual-mixed-tropic viruses was found, in comparison with plasma RNA samples (88.9% versus 11.1%; P = 0.0034). Discordant samples were characterized by greater genetic variability than were concordant samples. With stratification of the paired samples according to viremia levels, the prevalence of discordant samples decreased with increasing viremia (<50 copies/ml, 21.4%; 51 to 500 copies/ml, 15.4%; >500 copies/ml, 6.7%; P = 0.2). Our findings confirm that prediction of viral tropism using pvDNA is feasible even in low-level viremia and provides useful information for therapy optimization for patients with low or suppressed viremia. PMID:26135872

  2. Genetic Modeling of PIM Proteins in Cancer: Proviral Tagging and Cooperation with Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Enara; Renner, Oliver; Narlik-Grassow, Maja; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney-murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anti-cancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim, and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1) as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate, and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all three isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis. PMID:24860787

  3. The FAS-670 AA genotype is associated with high proviral load in peruvian HAM/TSP patients.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Jason; Morales, Sandra; López, Giovanni; Clark, Daniel; Verdonck, Kristien; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Van Camp, Guy; Talledo, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Apoptosis is a mechanism of defense elicited by many triggers, including cross-linking of the FAS receptor expressed in viruses-infected cells, and the ligand FASL presented by T-cytotoxic cells. As HAM/TSP has been associated with high levels of proviral load (PVL), we hypothesized that certain genotypes of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a decreased protein expression of FAS and FASL could be risk factors for this disease. Three SNPs: FAS-670A/G (rs1800682), FAS-1377G/A (rs2234767), and FASL-844C/T (rs763110) were analyzed in 73 HAM/TSP patients and 143 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers. Ancestry informative markers were used to adjust for ethnicity through a principal component analysis. Gender, age, PVL, and the first three principal components were used as covariates. The FAS/FASL genotype distribution was not associated with HAM/TSP presence (P-> 0.05). The FAS-670 AA genotype was associated with high PVL in comparison to FAS-670 GG in HAM/TSP patients (P = 0.015), while in asymptomatic carriers low levels of PVL were observed (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest that rs1800682, rs2234767, and rs763110 genotypes are not associated with the presence of HAM/TSP, but that the FAS-670 AA genotype can promote higher PVL values in HAM/TSP patients. J. Med. Virol. 89:726-731, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Higher HTLV-1c proviral loads are associated with blood stream infections in an Indigenous Australian population.

    PubMed

    Einsiedel, Lloyd; Cassar, Olivier; Spelman, Tim; Joseph, Sheela; Gessain, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    An association between blood stream infections (BSI) and HTLV-1 seropositivity in Indigenous Australians might result from HTLV-1 mediated inflammation and parasite coinfections that provide portals of entry for bacteria. To determine whether BSI risk increases with HTLV-1c proviral load (PVL) and to identify the pathogens responsible in the context of HTLV-1 related conditions. Indigenous adults admitted to Alice Springs Hospital, central Australia, were recruited as cases or controls according to whether they had a BSI. Clinical data were extracted from case notes and the hospital pathology database. HTLV-1 serology and PVL assays were then performed and risk factors for BSI were determined for HTLV-1 infected subjects. Risk factors were compared between 44 cases and 30 controls who were HTLV-1 Western blot positive. In a multivariable model, high HTLV-1c PVL was predictive of BSI during the study period (OR, 9.10; 95% CI, 2.40-34.4). Median (IQR) HTLV-1c PVL (copies per 100 PBL) was 39-fold higher for patients recording any BSI (0.116 (0.009, 0.277)) relative to those who had no BSI (0.003 (0.000, 0.067))(p=0.0007). Mean (SD) PVL for subjects with no BSI (n=27), 1 BSI (n=37) and ≥2 BSI (n=10) during the study period were 0.120 (0.301), 0.271 (0.622) and 0.500 (0.654) copies per 100 PBL, respectively (p=0.0007). Five BSI were associated with possible complications of HTLV-1; strongyloidiasis (3), infective dermatitis (1), HTLV-1 associated bronchiectasis (1). Higher HTLV-1c PVL predicts BSI risk; however; most BSI were not associated with recognised complications of HTLV-1 infection. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A selective contribution of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway to type I interferon responses activated by cytosolic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myoung Kwon; Wang, ZhiChao; Ban, Tatsuma; Yanai, Hideyuki; Lu, Yan; Koshiba, Ryuji; Nakaima, Yukana; Hangai, Sho; Savitsky, David; Nakasato, Makoto; Negishi, Hideo; Takeuchi, Osamu; Honda, Kenya; Akira, Shizuo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2009-01-01

    The activation of the innate immune responses by DNA exposed within the cytosol has gained much attention and, in this context, several cytosolic DNA sensors have been identified. However, previous studies revealed the operation of redundant and complex mechanisms and it still remains to be clarified how the DNA-mediated evocation of diverse innate immune responses can be achieved. Here we show that two RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), RIG-I and MDA5, known as cytosolic RNA receptors, nonredundantly function as cytosolic DNA receptors that lead to the selective activation of type I IFN genes. We demonstrate that overexpression of otherwise IFN-inducible RIG-I or MDA5 in IFN signal-deficient cells results in a marked enhancement of type I IFN gene induction upon cytosolic DNA stimulation, while in their absence the induction is impaired. Interestingly, the DNA-mediated induction of other cytokine genes was barely affected by the absence of RLRs. Indeed, unlike the RNA-RLR pathway that activates the transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB, the DNA-RLR pathway is primarily responsible for the IRF3 activation critical for type I IFN gene transcription, illustrating a deliberate divergence of the DNA signaling pathways. Expectedly, the RLR pathway also contributes to intricate innate immune responses against infection by a DNA virus. Our study may provide insights into the complexity of host defense mechanisms that thwart immune evasion by DNA-containing pathogens. PMID:19805092

  6. A selective contribution of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway to type I interferon responses activated by cytosolic DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myoung Kwon; Wang, ZhiChao; Ban, Tatsuma; Yanai, Hideyuki; Lu, Yan; Koshiba, Ryuji; Nakaima, Yukana; Hangai, Sho; Savitsky, David; Nakasato, Makoto; Negishi, Hideo; Takeuchi, Osamu; Honda, Kenya; Akira, Shizuo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2009-10-20

    The activation of the innate immune responses by DNA exposed within the cytosol has gained much attention and, in this context, several cytosolic DNA sensors have been identified. However, previous studies revealed the operation of redundant and complex mechanisms and it still remains to be clarified how the DNA-mediated evocation of diverse innate immune responses can be achieved. Here we show that two RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), RIG-I and MDA5, known as cytosolic RNA receptors, nonredundantly function as cytosolic DNA receptors that lead to the selective activation of type I IFN genes. We demonstrate that overexpression of otherwise IFN-inducible RIG-I or MDA5 in IFN signal-deficient cells results in a marked enhancement of type I IFN gene induction upon cytosolic DNA stimulation, while in their absence the induction is impaired. Interestingly, the DNA-mediated induction of other cytokine genes was barely affected by the absence of RLRs. Indeed, unlike the RNA-RLR pathway that activates the transcription factors IRF3 and NF-kappaB, the DNA-RLR pathway is primarily responsible for the IRF3 activation critical for type I IFN gene transcription, illustrating a deliberate divergence of the DNA signaling pathways. Expectedly, the RLR pathway also contributes to intricate innate immune responses against infection by a DNA virus. Our study may provide insights into the complexity of host defense mechanisms that thwart immune evasion by DNA-containing pathogens.

  7. Flanking sequences with an essential role in hydrolysis of a self-cleaving group I-like ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Einvik, Christer; Nielsen, Henrik; Nour, Reza; Johansen, Steinar

    2000-01-01

    DiGIR1 is a group I-like ribozyme derived from the mobile twin ribozyme group I intron DiSSU1 in the nuclear ribosomal DNA of the myxomycete Didymium iridis. This ribozyme is responsible for intron RNA processing in vitro and in vivo at two internal sites close to the 5′-end of the intron endonuclease open reading frame and is a unique example of a group I ribozyme with an evolved biological function. DiGIR1 is the smallest functional group I ribozyme known from nature and has an unusual core organization including the 6 bp P15 pseudoknot. Here we report results of functional and structural analyses that identify RNA elements critical for hydrolysis outside the DiGIR1 ribozyme core moiety. Results from deletion analysis, disruption/compensation mutagenesis and RNA structure probing analysis all support the existence of two new segments, named P2 and P2.1, involved in the hydrolysis of DiGIR1. Significant decreases in the hydrolysis rate, kobs, were observed in disruption mutants involving both segments. These effects were restored by compensatory base pairing mutants. The possible role of P2 is to tether the ribozyme core, whereas P2.1 appears to be more directly involved in catalysis. PMID:10773091

  8. Invertebrate Iridescent Virus 6, a DNA Virus, Stimulates a Mammalian Innate Immune Response through RIG-I-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ahlers, Laura R. H.; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; Hiroyasu, Aoi

    2016-01-01

    Insects are not only major vectors of mammalian viruses, but are also host to insect-restricted viruses that can potentially be transmitted to mammals. While mammalian innate immune responses to arboviruses are well studied, less is known about how mammalian cells respond to viruses that are restricted to infect only invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that IIV-6, a DNA virus of the family Iridoviridae, is able to induce a type I interferon-dependent antiviral immune response in mammalian cells. Although IIV-6 is a DNA virus, we demonstrate that the immune response activated during IIV-6 infection is mediated by the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) pathway, and not the canonical DNA sensing pathway via cGAS/STING. We further show that RNA polymerase III is required for maximal IFN-β secretion, suggesting that viral DNA is transcribed by this enzyme into an RNA species capable of activating the RLR pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that the RLR-driven mammalian innate immune response to IIV-6 is functionally capable of protecting cells from subsequent infection with the arboviruses Vesicular Stomatitis virus and Kunjin virus. These results represent a novel example of an invertebrate DNA virus activating a canonically RNA sensing pathway in the mammalian innate immune response, which reduces viral load of ensuing arboviral infection. PMID:27824940

  9. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  10. Cellular expression and crystal structure of the murine cytomegalovirus major histocompatibility complex class I-like glycoprotein, m153.

    PubMed

    Mans, Janet; Natarajan, Kannan; Balbo, Andrea; Schuck, Peter; Eikel, Daniel; Hess, Sonja; Robinson, Howard; Simic, Hrvoje; Jonjic, Stipan; Tiemessen, Caroline T; Margulies, David H

    2007-11-30

    Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), a beta-herpesvirus that establishes latent and persistent infections in mice, is a valuable model for studying complex virus-host interactions. MCMV encodes the m145 family of putative immunoevasins with predicted major histocompatibility complex, class I (MHC-I) structure. Functions attributed to some family members include down-regulation of host MHC-I (m152) and NKG2D ligands (m145, m152, and m155) and interaction with inhibitory or activating NK receptors (m157). We present the cellular, biochemical, and structural characterization of m153, which is a heavily glycosylated homodimer, that does not require beta2m or peptide and is expressed at the surface of MCMV-infected cells. Its 2.4-A crystal structure confirms that this compact molecule preserves an MHC-I-like fold and reveals a novel mode of dimerization, confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, and a distinctive disulfide-stabilized extended N terminus. The structure provides a useful framework for comparative analysis of the divergent members of the m145 family.

  11. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Kamel; Kaminski, Rafal; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-06-01

    Current therapy for controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and preventing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells, which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or "sterile" cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS.

  12. Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load in asymptomatic carriers, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, and other neurological abnormalities associated with HTLV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcus Tulius T; Harab, Ramza Cabral; Leite, Ana Cláudia; Schor, Doris; Araújo, Abelardo; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José

    2007-03-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with other neurological abnormalities in addition to HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). It has been well established that high HTLV-1 proviral loads are associated with the development of HAM/TSP. We now demonstrate, for the first time, to our knowledge, that HTLV-1 proviral loads in patients with other neurological abnormalities are also significantly higher than in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers.

  13. Evaluation of HTLV-1 HBZ and proviral load, together with host IFN λ3, in pathogenesis of HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Mozhgani, Sayed-Hamidreza; Jaberi, Najmeh; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim; Bustani, Reza; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad; Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Milani, Saeideh; Tarokhian, Hanieh; Norouzi, Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with two progressive diseases: HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Although HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) has been introduced as a risk factor for these diseases' progression, it is not sufficient on its own to yield an accurate estimation of the outcome of the infection. In the present study, PVL and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) expression level as viral factors, and IFN λ3 as a host factor, were evaluated in HAM/TSP patients and HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (ACs). During 2014-2015, 12 HAM/TSP patients and 18 ACs who had been referred to the HTLV-1 Clinic, Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran, were enrolled in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and the DNA and mRNA were extracted for quantification of HBZ, IFN λ3 expression, and PVL using real-time PCR (TaqMan method). Although the PVL was higher in the HAM/TSP group, with a 94% confidence interval, there were no considerable differences in terms of HBZ mRNA and PVL between ACs and HAM patients. IFN λ3 expression in the HAM/TSP group was significantly higher than in the ACs (P = 0.02). To the best of our knowledge, no study has evaluated the expression level of IFN λ3 in HTLV-1 positive patients. The immune response against HTLV-1 viral antigens and virulent factors will therefore further refine our knowledge of interactions between the virus and host in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-related disorders. The virus PVL and the host IFN λ3 can be used as pathogenic factors of HTLV-1 infected patients at risk of HAM/TSP manifestation. J. Med. Virol. 89:1102-1107, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Results of External Quality Assessment for Proviral DNA Testing of HIV Tropism in the Maraviroc Switch Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp 41 mutations in proviral DNA among antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals from India.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sourav; Tripathy, S P; Sahni, A K; Gupta, R M; Kapila, K; Chopra, G S; Chimanpure, Vaishali M; Patil, Ajit A; Paranjape, R S

    2009-05-01

    The HIV-1 gp41 has been identified as an important target for the immune response, for the development of antiviral and vaccine strategies, and for epidemiologic studies. This study describes the HIV-1 env gp41 region mutations, associated with enfuvirtide (ENF) resistance, in proviral DNA from PBMCs in antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals from Pune, India. Twenty-one antiretroviral drug-naive chronically HIV-1-infected individuals were enrolled. The study sequences belonged to subtype C (n = 17), subtype A1 (n = 2), and CRF_AE (n = 2). In subtype B-infected individuals, the various HR1 region substitutions in env gp41 that have been associated with ENF resistance include A30V, L33S/T/V, L34M, G36D/E/S/V, I37T/K/V, V38A/M/E/G, Q39R, Q40H, N42T/D, N43D/K/S, L44M, L45M, R46M, L54M, and Q56K/R as well as N126K and S138A in the HR2 region. The study sequences did not reveal any ENF resistance-associated mutations at env gp41 amino acid positions: 36 to 45. The presence of L54M and Q56K in combination is associated with 5-fold reduced sensitivity to inhibition by ENF. The mutation L54M was seen in seven subtype C and two CRF_AE study sequences. Q56K was observed in a subtype A1 sequence. All the study sequences harbored N42S, a natural polymorphism associated with increased susceptibility to ENF. Of the mutations V38A and N140I, known to provide immunologic gain, the latter was observed in four subtype C sequences. This is the first study from India highlighting the presence of certain mutations in Indian subtype C env gp41, which may play a role in the evolution of subtype-specific variations in the resistance to ENF and associated immune response.

  16. Results of external quality assessment for proviral DNA testing of HIV tropism in the Maraviroc Switch collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Elise; Swenson, Luke C; Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  17. Evolution of viral sensing RIG-I-like receptor genes in Leporidae genera Oryctolagus, Sylvilagus, and Lepus.

    PubMed

    Lemos de Matos, Ana; McFadden, Grant; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) pathogens is myxoma virus (MYXV), a rabbit-specific leporipoxvirus that causes the highly lethal disease myxomatosis. Other leporid genera, Sylvilagus and Lepus, encompass species with variable susceptibilities to MYXV, but these do not develop the lethal form of the disease. The protective role of the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I/DDX58) in sensing MYXV in nonpermissive human myeloid cells prompted the study of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family evolution in the three leporid genera. This viral-sensor family also includes the melanoma differentiation-associated factor 5 (MDA5/IFIH1), and the laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2/DHX58). Considering specifically the MYXV susceptible host (European rabbit) and one of the virus natural long-term hosts (Sylvilagus bachmani, brush rabbit), the amino acid differences of positively selected sites in RIG-I between the two species were located in the protein region responsible for viral RNA recognition and binding, the repressor domain. Such differences might play a determinant role in how MYXV is sensed. When looking for episodic selection on MDA5 and LGP2 of the eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus), we also uncovered evidence of selective pressures that might be exerted by a species-specific leporipoxvirus, the Shope fibroma virus. Finally, a putative alternative splicing case was identified in Oryctolagus and Lepus MDA5 isoforms, corresponding to the deletion of one specific exon. This study provided the first insights into the evolution of the leporid RLR gene family that helps illuminate the origins of the species-specific innate responses to pathogens and more specifically to MYXV.

  18. A simple and rapid DNA extraction method from whole blood for highly sensitive detection and quantitation of HIV-1 proviral DNA by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    McFall, Sally M; Wagner, Robin L; Jangam, Sujit R; Yamada, Douglas H; Hardie, Diana; Kelso, David M

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis and access to treatment for infants with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is critical to reduce infant mortality. The lack of simple point-of-care tests impedes the timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The development of FINA, filtration isolation of nucleic acids, a novel DNA extraction method that can be performed by clinic personnel in less than 2 min has been reported previously. In this report, significant improvements in the DNA extraction and amplification methods are detailed that allow sensitive quantitation of as little as 10 copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA and detection of 3 copies extracted from 100 μl of whole blood. An internal control to detect PCR inhibition was also incorporated. In a preliminary field evaluation of 61 South African infants, the FINA test demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. The proviral copy number of the infant specimens was quantified, and it was established that 100 microliters of whole blood is required for sensitive diagnosis of infants.

  19. Small molecule integrin antagonists that bind to the beta2 subunit I-like domain and activate signals in one direction and block them in the other.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Motomu; Salas, Azucena; Yang, Wei; Weitz-Schmidt, Gabriele; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-09-01

    Leukocyte integrins contain an inserted (I) domain in their alpha subunits and an I-like domain in their beta(2) subunit, which directly bind ligand and regulate ligand binding, respectively. We describe a novel mechanistic class of integrin inhibitors that bind to the metal ion-dependent adhesion site of the beta(2) I-like domain and prevent its interaction with and activation of the alpha(L) I domain. The inhibitors do not bind to the alpha(L) I domain but stabilize alpha/beta subunit association and can show selectivity for alpha(L)beta(2) compared to alpha(M)beta(2). The inhibitors reveal a crucial intersection for relaying conformational signals within integrin extracellular domains. While blocking signals in one direction to the I domain, the antagonists induce the active conformation of the I-like domain and stalk domains, and thus transmit conformational signals in the other direction toward the transmembrane domains.

  20. Possible involvement of distinct phylogenetic clusters of HIV-1 variants in the discrepancies between coreceptor tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomohisa; Iketani, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kato, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The coreceptor tropism testing should be conducted prior to commencing a regimen containing a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV-1 infection. For aviremic patients on long antiretroviral therapy, proviral DNA is often used instead of viral RNA in genotypic tropism testing. However, the tropism predictions from RNA and DNA are sometimes different. We examined the cause of the discrepancies between HIV-1 tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the env C2V3C3 region was determined using pair samples of plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 50 HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals using population-based sequencing. The samples with discrepant tropism assessments between RNA and DNA were further analyzed using deep sequencing, followed by phylogenetic analysis. The tropism was assessed using the algorithm geno2pheno with a false-positive rate cutoff of 10 %. In population-based sequencing, five of 50 subjects showed discrepant tropism predictions between their RNA and DNA samples: four exhibited R5 tropism in RNA and X4 tropism in DNA, while one exhibited the opposite pattern. In the deep sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, three subjects had single clusters comprising of RNA- and DNA-derived sequences that were a mixture of R5 and X4 sequences. The other two subjects had two and three distinct phylogenetic clusters of sequences, respectively, each of which was dominated by R5 or X4 sequences; sequences of the R5-dominated cluster were mostly found in RNA, while sequences of the X4-dominated cluster were mostly in DNA. Some of HIV-1 tropism discrepancies between viral RNA and proviral DNA seem to be caused by phylogenetically distinct clusters which resides in plasma and cells in different frequencies. Our findings suggest that the tropism testing using PBMC DNA or deep sequencing may be required when the viral load is not suppressed or rebounds in the course of a CCR5 antagonist-containing regimen.

  1. No detection of HTLV-I proviral DNA in lesional skin biopsies from Swiss and German patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Böni, R; Davis-Daneshfar, A; Burg, G; Fuchs, D; Wood, G S

    1996-02-01

    The search for an infective agent linked to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) has also included the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Using sensitive techniques such as Southern blotting under low stringency conditions of hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primer sets designed to match pol, env and pX sequences of HTLV-I, we have screened lesional skin biopsies of 50 Swiss and German patients suffering from CTCL. No evidence of proviral integration of HTLV-I could be demonstrated in any of our patients. Our results, as well as a review of the literature, indicate that at least for European patients, HTLV-I does not seem to play a role in the aetiology of CTCL.

  2. Comparative analysis of polymorphisms in the HIV type 1 pol gene in the proviral DNA and viral RNA in the peripheral compartment.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Héctor R; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabro, Ronna; Fernández, Diana; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Martínez, Nahir; Pujol, Flor H

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of mutations and polymorphisms associated with drug resistance among HIV-1-infected patients in proviral DNA and viral RNA extracted from PBMCs and plasma, respectively, in 34 HIV-1-infected patients (11 naive and 23 receiving HAART). Additional drug resistance mutations were found in only one compartment in 14 of 23 treated patients. Mutations conferring resistance to an additional drug were found in plasma in only 7 of 23 patients. A greater number of differences was found in strains in patients infected for at least more than 9 years, compared to naive patients and patients for whom the time since the first diagnosis was lower (p < 0.02). This study confirms the usefulness of simultaneous testing of different compartments for assessing drug resistance in the pol region and suggests that the heterogeneity observed in different compartments might be increased with time of infection and treatment experience.

  3. RetroTector online, a rational tool for analysis of retroviral elements in small and medium size vertebrate genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Göran; Lövgren, Anders; Eriksson, Nils-Einar; Benachenhou, Farid; Blomberg, Jonas

    2009-06-16

    The rapid accumulation of genomic information in databases necessitates rapid and specific algorithms for extracting biologically meaningful information. More or less complete retroviral sequences, also called proviral or endogenous retroviral sequences; ERVs, constitutes at least 5% of vertebrate genomes. After infecting the host, these retroviruses have integrated in germ line cells, and have then been carried in genomes for at least several 100 million years. A better understanding of structure and function of these sequences can have profound biological and medical consequences. RetroTector (ReTe) is a platform-independent Java program for identification and characterization of proviral sequences in vertebrate genomes. The full ReTe requires a local installation with a MySQL database. Although not overly complicated, the installation may take some time. A "light" version of ReTe, (RetroTector online; ROL) which does not require specific installation procedures is provided, via the World Wide Web. ROL http://www.fysiologi.neuro.uu.se/jbgs/ was implemented under the Batchelor web interface (A Lövgren et al). It allows both GenBank accession number, file and FASTA cut-and-paste admission of sequences (5 to 10,000 kilobases). Up to ten submissions can be done simultaneously, allowing batch analysis of genome specific "brooms", which increase specificity. Proviral sequences can be hard to recognize

  4. HLA-G 3'-untranslated region polymorphisms are associated with HTLV-1 infection, proviral load and HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis development.

    PubMed

    Cilião Alves, Daiani Cristina; Haddad, Rodrigo; Rocha-Júnior, Maurício Cristiano; de Deus Wagatsuma, Virgínia Mara; Martelli-Palomino, Gustavo; Marques, Adriana Aparecida; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kashima, Simone; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio

    2016-10-01

    Most human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected patients remain asymptomatic throughout life. The factors associated with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) development have not been fully elucidated; immunological and genetic factors may be involved. The association of 14 bp INS/DEL HLA-G polymorphism with HTLV-1 infection susceptibility has been reported previously. Here, other polymorphic sites at the HLA-G 3'-UTR (14-bp D/I, +3003C/T, +3010C/G, +3027A/C, +3035C/T, +3142C/G, +3187A/G and +3196C/G) were evaluated in 37 HTLV-1-infected individuals exhibiting HAM/TSP, 45 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (HAC) and 153 uninfected individuals, followed up at University Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Brazil. It was observed that: (i) 14bpDI genotype is a risk factor for HTLV-1 infection, while the 14bpDD and +3142CC genotypes were associated with protection against infection; (ii) the +3142C allele and the +3003CT and +3142CC genotypes were associated with susceptibility, while 14bpII and +3003TT genotypes were associated with protection against HAM/TSP development; and (iii) the 14bpII, +3010CC, +3142GG and +3187AA genotypes were associated with lower HTLV-1 proviral load compared to respective counterpart genotypes. Findings that HLA-G has a well-recognized immunomodulatory role and that the genetic variability at HLA-G 3'-UTR may post-transcriptionally modify HLA-G production indicate a differential genetic susceptibility to: (i) the development of HTLV-1 infection, (ii) the magnitude of HTLV-1 proviral load and (iii) HAM/TSP development.

  5. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) prevalence and quantitative detection of DNA proviral load in individuals with indeterminate/positive serological results.

    PubMed

    Vitone, Francesca; Gibellini, Davide; Schiavone, Pasqua; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Gianni, Lorenzo; Bon, Isabella; Re, Maria Carla

    2006-03-02

    HTLV-1 infection is currently restricted to endemic areas. To define the prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in patients living in Italy, we first carried out a retrospective serological analysis in a group of people originating from African countries referred to our hospital from January 2003 to February 2005. We subsequently applied a real time PCR on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects with positive or indeterminate serological results. All the sera were first analysed by serological methods (ELISA and/or Western Blotting) and then the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects with positive or inconclusive serological results were analyzed for the presence of proviral DNA by a sensitive SYBR Green real time PCR. In addition, twenty HTLV-I ELISA negative samples were assayed by real time PCR approach as negative controls. Serological results disclosed serum reactivity by ELISA (absorbance values equal or greater than the cut-off value) in 9 out of 3408 individuals attending the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic and/or Oncology Department, and 2 out 534 blood donors enrolled as a control population. Irrespective of positive or inconclusive serological results, all these subjects were analyzed for the presence of proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by SYBR real time PCR. A clear-cut positive result for the presence of HTLV-1 DNA was obtained in two subjects from endemic areas. SYBR real time PCR cut short inconclusive serological results. This rapid and inexpensive assay showed an excellent linear dynamic range, specificity and reproducibility readily revealing and quantifying the presence of virus in PBMCs. Our results highlight the need to monitor the presence of HTLV-1 in countries which have seen a large influx of immigrants in recent years. Epidemiological surveillance and correct diagnosis are recommended to verify the prevalence and incidence of a new undesirable phenomenon.

  6. Interleukin-18 and interferon-gamma polymorphisms are implicated on proviral load and susceptibility to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Júnior, M C; Haddad, R; Cilião Alves, D C; de Deus Wagatsuma, V M; Mendes-Junior, C T; Deghaide, N H S; Takayanagui, O M; Covas, D T; Donadi, E A; Kashima, S

    2012-08-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) exert important functions in both innate and adaptive immune responses against intracellular pathogens and viruses. Previous studies suggested that host genetic factors, including cytokines gene polymorphisms, could be involved in the pathogenesis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Thus, we analyzed -137C/G and -607A/C of the IL-18 promoter and +874T/A of the IFN-γ in DNA samples from 98 HTLV-1-infected individuals exhibiting or not clinical symptoms and 150 healthy control individuals. The IL-18 promoter -607CC genotype was significantly lower in HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (HAC) and HTLV-1-infected individuals (HAC + HAM/TSP) than healthy control group. In contrast, the -607AC genotype was significantly higher in HAC and HTLV-1-infected individuals group compared to the healthy control group. The -137G/-607A IL-18 haplotype was higher in infected group than healthy control group, and the -137C/-607C IL-18 haplotype was increased in the healthy control group compared to the others. Finally, the IFN-γ polymorphism analysis showed that the HTLV-1-infected individuals with +874AT genotype presented higher proviral load than +874AA genotype. These data indicate that the IL-18-607AC genotype and -137G/-607A haplotype could be a risk factor for HTLV-1 infection, whereas the protective effect could be conferred by -607CC genotype and -137C/-607C haplotype. Also, the IFN-γ could be implicated on the proviral load levels. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Gabriel J.; Luengas, Elizabeth M.; McCann, Jennifer L.; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A.; Love, Robin P.; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B.; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of ‘APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer. PMID:27650891

  8. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Starrett, Gabriel J; Luengas, Elizabeth M; McCann, Jennifer L; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A; Love, Robin P; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K; Carpenter, Michael A; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-09-21

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of 'APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer.

  9. Endogenous Retroviruses in Fish Genomes: From Relics of Past Infections to Evolutionary Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of fish genome sequences has allowed to gain new insights into the diversity and host distribution of retroviruses in fish and other vertebrates. This distribution can be assessed through the identification and analysis of endogenous retroviruses, which are proviral remnants of past infections integrated in genomes. Retroviral sequences are probably important for evolution through their ability to induce rearrangements and to contribute regulatory and coding sequences; they may also protect their host against new infections. We argue that the current mass of genome sequences will soon strongly improve our understanding of retrovirus diversity and evolution in aquatic animals, with the identification of new/re-emerging elements and host resistance genes that restrict their infectivity. PMID:27555838

  10. Zidovudine and interferon-alpha treatment induces a high response rate and reduces HTLV-1 proviral load and VEGF plasma levels in patients with adult T-cell leukemia from North East Iran.

    PubMed

    Kchour, Ghada; Makhoul, Nadine J; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Kooshyar, Mohamad-Mehdi; Shirdel, Abbas; Rastin, Maryam; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Tarhini, Mahdi; Zalloua, Pierre A; Hermine, Olivier; Farid, Reza; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2007-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is endemic in southern Japan, the Caribbean, intertropical Africa, and Brazil. Recently north east Iran, particularly the region of Mashhad, has been recognized as a new endemic region. ATLL is an aggressive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Patients with ATLL have high plasma levels of VEGF that induce angiogenesis. Prognosis of ATLL remains poor because of immunosuppression and intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy. Important advances in the treatment of ATLL were reported with the combination of zidovudine (AZT) and interferon-alpha. We investigated the effect of AZT/IFN treatment on vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) plasma levels and HTLV-I proviral load in ATLL patients from the region of Mashhad. We confirmed that AZT/IFN treatment induces a high response rate and prolonged survival with minimal side effects. We also confirmed that VEGF plasma levels and HTLV-I proviral load are higher in ATLL patients than in asymptomatic carriers. We finally showed that AZT/IFN treatment reduced both HTLV-I proviral load and importantly VEGF plasma levels, suggesting a potential antiangiogenic effect of this therapy. These results provide further evidence for the efficacy and the mechanism of action of AZT/IFN therapy for ATLL in a developing country.

  11. New entity, definition and diagnostic criteria of cutaneous adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 proviral DNA load can distinguish between cutaneous and smoldering types.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Motoki; Ogata, Katsumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Setoyama, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) has been divided into four subtypes up to now: (i) acute; (ii) lymphoma; (iii) chronic; and (iv) smoldering. Skin lesion(s) may be present and the cases showing less than 5% abnormal T-lymphocytes in peripheral blood without involvement of other organs, have been classified as smoldering ATLL. However, this type of ATLL with skin manifestations had a worse prognosis than that without skin lesions. This study aimed to define and distinguish cutaneous ATLL lacking nodal lymphoma and leukemic change from smoldering ATLL. We propose an entity of cutaneous ATLL, which has less than 5% abnormal T lymphocyte in peripheral blood, a normal lymphocyte count (i.e. <4 x 10(9)/L), no hypercalcemia and lactate dehydrogenase values of up to 1.5 times the normal upper limit. At least one of the histologically proven skin lesions should be present accompanying monoclonal integration of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral DNA in the skin lesion. Blood samples were collected from 41 HTLV-1-infected patients, 21 asymptomatic carriers, 16 patients with cutaneous ATLL and four patients with smoldering ATLL. HTLV-1 proviral loads, soluble interleukin-2 receptors and other parameters were examined in each case. HTLV-1 proviral DNA loads in smoldering ATLL group are significantly higher than those in asymptomatic carrier and cutaneous ATLL group. Cutaneous ATLL may be a distinct entity that should be separated from smoldering ATLL clinically and virologically.

  12. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times. PMID:25641657

  13. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-02-02

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times.

  14. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Immune Related Genes and the RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway in the Freshwater Planarian (Dugesia japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hongkuan; Zhang, Yichao; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhu, Guangzhong; Liu, Baohua; Zhao, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica (D. japonica) possesses extraordinary ability to regenerate lost organs or body parts. Interestingly, in the process of regeneration, there is little wound infection, suggesting that D. japonica has a formidable innate immune system. The importance of immune system prompted us to search for immune-related genes and RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways. Results Transcriptome sequencing of D. japonica was performed on an IlluminaHiSeq2000 platform. A total of 27,180 transcripts were obtained by Trinity assembler. CEGMA analysis and mapping of all trimmed reads back to the assembly result showed that our transcriptome assembly covered most of the whole transcriptome. 23,888 out of 27,180 transcripts contained ORF (open reading fragment), and were highly similar to those in Schistosoma mansoni using BLASTX analysis. 8,079 transcripts (29.7%) and 8,668 (31.9%) were annotated by Blast2GO and KEGG respectively. A DYNLRB-like gene was cloned to verify its roles in the immune response. Finally, the expression patterns of 4 genes (RIG-I, TRAF3, TRAF6, P38) in the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were detected, and the results showed they are very likely to be involved in planarian immune response. Conclusion RNA-Seq analysis based on the next-generation sequencing technology was an efficient approach to discover critical genes and to understand their corresponding biological functions. Through GO and KEGG analysis, several critical and conserved signaling pathways and genes related to RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were identified. Four candidate genes were selected to identify their expression dynamics in the process of pathogen stimulation. These annotated transcripts of D. japonica provide a useful resource for subsequent investigation of other important pathways. PMID:26986572

  15. Hot topic: Bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cows with low proviral load are not a source of infection for BLV-free cattle.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, Marcela A; Barrios, Clarisa N; Ceriani, M Carolina; Esteban, Eduardo N

    2016-06-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) causes leukemia or lymphoma in cattle. Although most BLV-infected animals do not develop the disease, they maintain the transmission chain of BLV at the herd level. As a feasible approach to control the virus, selection of cattle carrying the BoLA-DRB3*0902 allele has been proposed, as this allele is strongly associated with a BLV infection profile or the low proviral load (LPL) phenotype. To test whether these cattle affect the BLV transmission chain under natural conditions, selected BLV-infected LPL-BoLA-DRB3*0902 heterozygous cows were incorporated into a BLV-negative dairy herd. An average ratio of 5.4 (range 4.17-6.37) BLV-negative cows per BLV-infected cow was maintained during the 20mo of the experiment, and no BLV-negative cattle became infected. The BLV incidence rate in this herd was thus zero, whereas BLV incidence rates in different local herds varied from 0.06 to 0.17 cases per 100 cattle-days. This finding strongly suggests that LPL-BoLA-DRB3*0902 cattle disrupted the BLV-transmission chain in the study period. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proviral Loads and Clonal Expansion of HTLV-1-Infected Cells following Vertical Transmission: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Children in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Kazumi; Hisada, Michie; Maloney, Elizabeth M.; Hanchard, Barrie; Okayama, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective Few studies have specifically examined proviral load (PVL) and clonal evolution of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells in vertically infected children. Methods Sequential samples (from ages 1 to 16 years) from 3 HTLV-1-infected children (cases A, B and C) in the Jamaica Mother Infant Cohort Study were analyzed for their PVL and clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by inverse-long PCR. Results The baseline PVL (per 100,000 PBMCs) of case A was 260 (at 1 year of age) and of case B it was 1,867 (at 3 years of age), and they remained constant for more than 10 years. Stochastic patterns of clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells were predominately detected. In contrast, case C, who had lymphadenopathy, seborrheic dermatitis and hyperreflexia, showed an increase in PVL from 2,819 at 1.9 years to 13,358 at 13 years of age, and expansion of 2 dominant clones. Conclusion The clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells is induced in early childhood after infection acquired from their mothers. Youths with high PVL and any signs and symptoms associated with HTLV-1 infection should be closely monitored. PMID:19468234

  17. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Serves as a Pro-Viral Factor by Regulating Viral RNA Synthesis and Nuclear Export of Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complex upon Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Jin; Pritzl, Curtis J.; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Bomb, Kavita; McClain, Mariah E.; Alexander, Stephen; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2013-01-01

    Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK) 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3), a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection. PMID:24137500

  18. Interlaboratory concordance of DNA sequence analysis to detect reverse transcriptase mutations in HIV-1 proviral DNA. ACTG Sequencing Working Group. AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Demeter, L M; D'Aquila, R; Weislow, O; Lorenzo, E; Erice, A; Fitzgibbon, J; Shafer, R; Richman, D; Howard, T M; Zhao, Y; Fisher, E; Huang, D; Mayers, D; Sylvester, S; Arens, M; Sannerud, K; Rasheed, S; Johnson, V; Kuritzkes, D; Reichelderfer, P; Japour, A

    1998-11-01

    Thirteen laboratories evaluated the reproducibility of sequencing methods to detect drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Blinded, cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell pellets were distributed to each laboratory. Each laboratory used its preferred method for sequencing proviral DNA. Differences in protocols included: DNA purification; number of PCR amplifications; PCR product purification; sequence/location of PCR/sequencing primers; sequencing template; sequencing reaction label; sequencing polymerase; and use of manual versus automated methods to resolve sequencing reaction products. Five unknowns were evaluated. Thirteen laboratories submitted 39043 nucleotide assignments spanning codons 10-256 of HIV-1 RT. A consensus nucleotide assignment (defined as agreement among > or = 75% of laboratories) could be made in over 99% of nucleotide positions, and was more frequent in the three laboratory isolates. The overall rate of discrepant nucleotide assignments was 0.29%. A consensus nucleotide assignment could not be made at RT codon 41 in the clinical isolate tested. Clonal analysis revealed that this was due to the presence of a mixture of wild-type and mutant genotypes. These observations suggest that sequencing methodologies currently in use in ACTG laboratories to sequence HIV-1 RT yield highly concordant results for laboratory strains; however, more discrepancies among laboratories may occur when clinical isolates are tested.

  19. Insights into HIV-1 proviral transcription from integrative structure and dynamics of the Tat:AFF4:P-TEFb:TAR complex

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Echeverria, Ignacia; Stjepanovic, Goran; Bai, Yun; Lu, Huasong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Doudna, Jennifer A; Zhou, Qiang; Sali, Andrej; Hurley, James H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat hijacks the human superelongation complex (SEC) to promote proviral transcription. Here we report the 5.9 Å structure of HIV-1 TAR in complex with HIV-1 Tat and human AFF4, CDK9, and CycT1. The TAR central loop contacts the CycT1 Tat-TAR recognition motif (TRM) and the second Tat Zn2+-binding loop. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) shows that AFF4 helix 2 is stabilized in the TAR complex despite not touching the RNA, explaining how it enhances TAR binding to the SEC 50-fold. RNA SHAPE and SAXS data were used to help model the extended (Tat Arginine-Rich Motif) ARM, which enters the TAR major groove between the bulge and the central loop. The structure and functional assays collectively support an integrative structure and a bipartite binding model, wherein the TAR central loop engages the CycT1 TRM and compact core of Tat, while the TAR major groove interacts with the extended Tat ARM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15910.001 PMID:27731797

  20. Proviral loads and clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells following vertical transmission: a 10-year follow-up of children in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Kazumi; Hisada, Michie; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Hanchard, Barrie; Okayama, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have specifically examined proviral load (PVL) and clonal evolution of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells in vertically infected children. Sequential samples (from ages 1 to 16 years) from 3 HTLV-1-infected children (cases A, B and C) in the Jamaica Mother Infant Cohort Study were analyzed for their PVL and clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by inverse-long PCR. The baseline PVL (per 100,000 PBMCs) of case A was 260 (at 1 year of age) and of case B it was 1,867 (at 3 years of age), and they remained constant for more than 10 years. Stochastic patterns of clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells were predominately detected. In contrast, case C, who had lymphadenopathy, seborrheic dermatitis and hyperreflexia, showed an increase in PVL from 2,819 at 1.9 years to 13,358 at 13 years of age, and expansion of 2 dominant clones. The clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected cells is induced in early childhood after infection acquired from their mothers. Youths with high PVL and any signs and symptoms associated with HTLV-1 infection should be closely monitored. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Lack of evidence to support the association of a single IL28B genotype SNP rs12979860 with the HTLV-1 clinical outcomes and proviral load.

    PubMed

    Sanabani, Sabri Saeed; Nukui, Youko; Pereira, Juliana; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; de Oliveira, Ana Carolina Soares; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Leal, Fabio Eudes; Segurado, Aluisio C; Kallas, Esper Georges; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2012-12-23

    The Interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs12979860 polymorphisms was recently reported to be associated with the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load (PvL) and the development of the HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). In an attempt to examine this hypothesis, we assessed the association of the rs12979860 genotypes with HTLV-1 PvL levels and clinical status in 112 unrelated Brazilian subjects (81 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers, 24 individuals with HAM/TSP and 7 with Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL)). All 112 samples were successfully genotyped and their PvLs compared. Neither the homozygote TT nor the heterozygote CT mutations nor the combination genotypes (TT/CT) were associated with a greater PvL. We also observed no significant difference in allele distribution between asymptomatic carriers and patients with HTLV-1 associated HAM/TSP. Our study failed to support the previously reported positive association between the IL28B rs12979860 polymorphisms and an increased risk of developing HAM/TSP in the Brazilian population.

  2. Effects of an oral superoxide dismutase enzyme supplementation on indices of oxidative stress, proviral load, and CD4:CD8 ratios in asymptomatic FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig B; Lehman, Tracy L; McCord, Kelly W

    2008-10-01

    This study was designed to test the effect of antioxidant supplementation on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected felines. Six acutely FIV-infected cats (> or =16 weeks post-inoculation) were given a propriety oral superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplement (Oxstrin; Nutramax Laboratories) for 30 days. Following supplementation, the erythrocyte SOD enzyme concentration was significantly greater in the supplemented FIV-infected group than the uninfected control group or the unsupplemented FIV-infected group. The CD4+ to CD8+ ratio increased significantly (0.66-0.88) in the SOD supplemented FIV-infected cats but not in the unsupplemented FIV-infected cats. Proviral load and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in leukocyte cell types did not change significantly following supplementation. Antioxidant supplementation resulted in an increase in SOD levels, confirming the oral bioavailability of the compound in FIV-infected cats. This result warrants further investigation with trials of antioxidant therapy in FIV-infected cats that are showing clinical manifestations of their disease, as well as in other feline patients where oxidative stress likely contributes to disease pathogenesis, such as diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure.

  3. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  4. A large-scale zebrafish gene knockout resource for the genome-wide study of gene function.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Gaurav K; Lu, Jing; Gildea, Derek E; Huang, Haigen; Pei, Wuhong; Yang, Zhongan; Huang, Sunny C; Schoenfeld, David; Pho, Nam H; Casero, David; Hirase, Takashi; Mosbrook-Davis, Deborah; Zhang, Suiyuan; Jao, Li-En; Zhang, Bo; Woods, Ian G; Zimmerman, Steven; Schier, Alexander F; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; Pellegrini, Matteo; Burgess, Shawn M; Lin, Shuo

    2013-04-01

    With the completion of the zebrafish genome sequencing project, it becomes possible to analyze the function of zebrafish genes in a systematic way. The first step in such an analysis is to inactivate each protein-coding gene by targeted or random mutation. Here we describe a streamlined pipeline using proviral insertions coupled with high-throughput sequencing and mapping technologies to widely mutagenize genes in the zebrafish genome. We also report the first 6144 mutagenized and archived F1's predicted to carry up to 3776 mutations in annotated genes. Using in vitro fertilization, we have rescued and characterized ~0.5% of the predicted mutations, showing mutation efficacy and a variety of phenotypes relevant to both developmental processes and human genetic diseases. Mutagenized fish lines are being made freely available to the public through the Zebrafish International Resource Center. These fish lines establish an important milestone for zebrafish genetics research and should greatly facilitate systematic functional studies of the vertebrate genome.

  5. Toll-like Receptor 3, RIG-I-like Receptors and the NLRP3 Inflammasome: Key Modulators of Innate Immune Responses to Double-stranded RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Levine, Stewart J.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), the genetic material for many RNA viruses, induces robust host immune responses via pattern recognition receptors, which include Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs) and the multi-protein NLRP3 inflammasome complex. The engagement of dsRNA receptors or inflammasome activation by viral dsRNA initiates complex intracellular signaling cascades that play essential roles in inflammation and innate immune responses, as well as the resultant development of adaptive immunity. This review focuses on signaling pathways mediated by TLR3, RLRs and the NLRP3 inflammasome, as well as the potential use of agonists and antagonists that target these pathways to treat disease. PMID:21466970

  6. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state.

  7. TBK1-associated Protein in Endolysosomes (TAPE)/CC2D1A Is a Key Regulator Linking RIG-I-like Receptors to Antiviral Immunity*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Ru; Chang, Chun-Hung; Huang, Ching-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yang; Lin, Wan-Ying; Lo, Yin-Chiu; Yang, Chia-Yu; Hsing, En-Wei; Chen, Lin-Fang; Shih, Shin-Ru; Shiau, Ai-Li; Lei, Huan-Yao; Tan, Tse-Hua; Ling, Pin

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) are key RNA viral sensors for triggering antiviral immunity. The underlying mechanisms for RLRs to trigger antiviral immunity have yet to be explored. Here we report the identification of TAPE (TBK1-associated protein in endolysosomes) as a novel regulator of the RLR pathways. TAPE functionally and physically interacts with RIG-I, MDA5, and IPS-1 to activate the IFN-β promoter. TAPE knockdown impairs IFN-β activation induced by RLRs but not IPS-1. TAPE-deficient cells are defective in cytokine production upon RLR ligand stimulation. During RNA virus infection, TAPE knockdown or deficiency diminishes cytokine production and antiviral responses. Our data demonstrate a critical role for TAPE in linking RLRs to antiviral immunity. PMID:22833682

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Shows That SAV-3 Infection Upregulates Pattern Recognition Receptors of the Endosomal Toll-Like and RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways in Macrophage/Dendritic Like TO-Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Evensen, Øystein; Munang'andu, Hetron

    2016-04-21

    A fundamental step in cellular defense mechanisms is the recognition of "danger signals" made of conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed by invading pathogens, by host cell germ line coded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this study, we used RNA-seq and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) to identify PRRs together with the network pathway of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that recognize salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3) infection in macrophage/dendritic like TO-cells derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) headkidney leukocytes. Our findings show that recognition of SAV-3 in TO-cells was restricted to endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8 together with RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and not the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors NOD-like receptor (NLRs) genes. Among the RLRs, upregulated genes included the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation association 5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2). The study points to possible involvement of the tripartite motif containing 25 (TRIM25) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) in modulating RIG-I signaling being the first report that links these genes to the RLR pathway in SAV-3 infection in TO-cells. Downstream signaling suggests that both the TLR and RLR pathways use interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 to produce IFN-a2. The validity of RNA-seq data generated in this study was confirmed by quantitative real time qRT-PCR showing that genes up- or downregulated by RNA-seq were also up- or downregulated by RT-PCR. Overall, this study shows that de novo transcriptome assembly identify key receptors of the TLR and RLR sensors engaged in host pathogen interaction at cellular level. We envisage that data presented here can open a road map for future intervention strategies in SAV infection of salmon.

  9. Assessment of HTLV-1 proviral load, LAT, BIM, c-FOS and RAD51 gene expression in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Samaneh; Shirdel, Abbas; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarokhian, Hanieh; Rahimi, Hossein; Bari, Alireza; Jahantigh, Hamid Reza; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim

    2017-08-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a life-threatening malignancy of HTLV-1 infected Th lymphocytes. In the present study host-virus interactions were investigated by assessment of HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) and host gene expression. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 18 ATLL, 10 HAM/TSP patients and 18 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (ACs). DNA and mRNA of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were extracted for PVL and LAT, BIM, c-FOS and RAD51 gene expression measurement using qRT-PCR. The mean PVL in ATLL patients was 11,430 ± 3770 copies/10(4) which was statistically higher than ACs, 530 ± 119 copies/10(4), (p < 0.001). The expression of BIM, and c-FOS in ATLL patients were higher than HTLV-1 ACs; however, there were no statistically significant differences. The expression of RAD51 as an essential player on DNA repair showed around 160 times increase in ATLL group (166 ± 95) compared to ACs (1.04 ± 0.34) which is statistically significant (p < 0.001). Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between RAD51 expression and HTLV-PVL. The expression of LAT as a central adaptor in TCR signaling interestingly was around 36 times higher in ATLL group than ACs (ATLL; 41.33 ± 19.91 vs. ACs; 1.15 ± 0.22, p < 0.001). This finding showed that TCR signaling pathway mainly provides the growth factors for transformed cells. Furthermore, the overexpression of RAD51 which has been induced in HTLV-1 infected cells as a consequence of virus replication is not able to overcome the DNA damage toward cell transformation.

  10. HTLV-1 Tax-Specific CTL Epitope-Pulsed Dendritic Cell Therapy Reduces Proviral Load in Infected Rats with Immune Tolerance against Tax.

    PubMed

    Ando, Satomi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Murakami, Yuji; Zeng, Na; Takatsuka, Natsuko; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Takao; Suehiro, Youko; Kannagi, Mari

    2017-02-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), a CD4(+) T cell malignancy with a poor prognosis, is caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. High proviral load (PVL) is a risk factor for the progression to ATL. We previously reported that some asymptomatic carriers had severely reduced functions of CTLs against HTLV-1 Tax, the major target Ag. Furthermore, the CTL responses tended to be inversely correlated with PVL, suggesting that weak HTLV-1-specific CTL responses may be involved in the elevation of PVL. Our previous animal studies indicated that oral HTLV-1 infection, the major route of infection, caused persistent infection with higher PVL in rats compared with other routes. In this study, we found that Tax-specific CD8(+) T cells were present, but not functional, in orally infected rats as observed in some human asymptomatic carriers. Even in the infected rats with immune unresponsiveness against Tax, Tax-specific CTL epitope-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) therapy reduced the PVL and induced Tax-specific CD8(+) T cells capable of proliferating and producing IFN-γ. Furthermore, we found that monocyte-derived DCs from most infected individuals still had the capacity to stimulate CMV-specific autologous CTLs in vitro, indicating that DC therapy may be applicable to most infected individuals. These data suggest that peptide-pulsed DC immunotherapy will be useful to induce functional HTLV-1-specific CTLs and decrease PVL in infected individuals with high PVL and impaired HTLV-1-specific CTL responses, thereby reducing the risk of the development of ATL. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Low Proviral Load is Associated with Indeterminate Western Blot Patterns in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infected Individuals: Could Punctual Mutations be Related?

    PubMed Central

    Cánepa, Camila; Salido, Jimena; Ruggieri, Matías; Fraile, Sindy; Pataccini, Gabriela; Berini, Carolina; Biglione, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Background: indeterminate Western blot (WB) patterns are a major concern for diagnosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection, even in non-endemic areas. Objectives: (a) to define the prevalence of indeterminate WB among different populations from Argentina; (b) to evaluate if low proviral load (PVL) is associated with indeterminate WB profiles; and (c) to describe mutations in LTR and tax sequence of these cases. Results: Among 2031 samples, 294 were reactive by screening. Of them, 48 (16.3%) were WB indeterminate and of those 15 (31.3%) were PCR+. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to 52 HTLV-1+ samples, classified as Group 1 (G1): 25 WB+ samples from individuals with pathologies; Group 2 (G2): 18 WB+ samples from asymptomatic carriers (AC); and Group 3 (G3): 9 seroindeterminate samples from AC. Median PVL was 4.78, 2.38, and 0.15 HTLV-1 copies/100 PBMCs, respectively; a significant difference (p=0.003) was observed. Age and sex were associated with PVL in G1 and G2, respectively. Mutations in the distal and central regions of Tax Responsive Elements (TRE) 1 and 2 of G3 were observed, though not associated with PVL.The 8403A>G mutation of the distal region, previously related to high PVL, was absent in G3 but present in 50% of WB+ samples (p = 0.03). Conclusions: indeterminate WB results confirmed later as HTLV-1 positive may be associated with low PVL levels. Mutations in LTR and tax are described;  their functional relevance remains to be determined. PMID:26516904

  12. Low Proviral Load is Associated with Indeterminate Western Blot Patterns in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infected Individuals: Could Punctual Mutations be Related?

    PubMed

    Cánepa, Camila; Salido, Jimena; Ruggieri, Matías; Fraile, Sindy; Pataccini, Gabriela; Berini, Carolina; Biglione, Mirna

    2015-10-28

    indeterminate Western blot (WB) patterns are a major concern for diagnosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection, even in non-endemic areas. (a) to define the prevalence of indeterminate WB among different populations from Argentina; (b) to evaluate if low proviral load (PVL) is associated with indeterminate WB profiles; and (c) to describe mutations in LTR and tax sequence of these cases. Among 2031 samples, 294 were reactive by screening. Of them, 48 (16.3%) were WB indeterminate and of those 15 (31.3%) were PCR+. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to 52 HTLV-1+ samples, classified as Group 1 (G1): 25 WB+ samples from individuals with pathologies; Group 2 (G2): 18 WB+ samples from asymptomatic carriers (AC); and Group 3 (G3): 9 seroindeterminate samples from AC. Median PVL was 4.78, 2.38, and 0.15 HTLV-1 copies/100 PBMCs, respectively; a significant difference (p=0.003) was observed. Age and sex were associated with PVL in G1 and G2, respectively. Mutations in the distal and central regions of Tax Responsive Elements (TRE) 1 and 2 of G3 were observed, though not associated with PVL.The 8403A>G mutation of the distal region, previously related to high PVL, was absent in G3 but present in 50% of WB+ samples (p = 0.03). indeterminate WB results confirmed later as HTLV-1 positive may be associated with low PVL levels. Mutations in LTR and tax are described; their functional relevance remains to be determined.

  13. Functional screening of guide RNAs targeting the regulatory and structural HIV-1 viral genome for a cure of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Fan; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui; Zhang, Yonggang

    2016-05-15

    There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that lead to a permanent cure for HIV-1/AIDS. We previously reported that four guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) effectively eradicated the entire HIV-1 genome. In this study, we sought to identify the best gRNAs targeting HIV-1 LTR and viral structural region and optimize gRNA pairing that can efficiently eradicate the HIV-1 genome. Highly specific gRNAs were designed using bioinformatics tools, and their capacity of guiding CRISPR-associated system 9 to cleave HIV-1 proviral DNA was evaluated using high-throughput HIV-1 luciferase reporter assay and rapid Direct-PCR genotyping. The target seed sequences for each gRNA were cloned into lentiviral vectors. HEK293T cells were cotransfected with a pEcoHIV-NL4-3-firefly-luciferase reporter vector (1 : 20) over lentiviral vectors carrying CRISPR-associated system 9 and single gRNA or various combinations of gRNAs. The EcoHIV DNA cleaving efficiency was evaluated by Direct-PCR genotyping, and the EcoHIV transcription/replication activity was examined by a luciferase reporter assay. Most of the designed gRNAs are effective to eliminate the predicted HIV-1 genome sequence between the selected two target sites. This is evidenced by the presence of PCR genotypic deletion/insertion and the decrease of luciferase reporter activity. In particular, a combination of viral structural gRNAs with LTR gRNAs provided a higher efficiency of genome eradication and an easier approach for PCR genotyping. Our screening strategy can specifically and effectively identify gRNAs targeting HIV-1 LTR and structural region to excise proviral HIV-1 from the host genome.

  14. The host genomic environment of the provirus determines the abundance of HTLV-1–infected T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Malani, Nirav; Melamed, Anat; Gormley, Niall; Carter, Richard; Bentley, David; Berry, Charles; Bushman, Frederic D.; Taylor, Graham P.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persists by driving clonal proliferation of infected T lymphocytes. A high proviral load predisposes to HTLV-1–associated diseases. Yet the reasons for the variation within and between persons in the abundance of HTLV-1–infected clones remain unknown. We devised a high-throughput protocol to map the genomic location and quantify the abundance of > 91 000 unique insertion sites of the provirus from 61 HTLV-1+ persons and > 2100 sites from in vitro infection. We show that a typical HTLV-1–infected host carries between 500 and 5000 unique insertion sites. We demonstrate that negative selection dominates during chronic infection, favoring establishment of proviruses integrated in transcriptionally silenced DNA: this selection is significantly stronger in asymptomatic carriers. We define a parameter, the oligoclonality index, to quantify clonality. The high proviral load characteristic of HTLV-1–associated inflammatory disease results from a larger number of unique insertion sites than in asymptomatic carriers and not, as previously thought, from a difference in clonality. The abundance of established HTLV-1 clones is determined by genomic features of the host DNA flanking the provirus. HTLV-1 clonal expansion in vivo is favored by orientation of the provirus in the same sense as the nearest host gene. PMID:21228324

  15. A systematic evaluation of expression of HERV-W elements; influence of genomic context, viral structure and orientation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One member of the W family of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) appears to have been functionally adopted by the human host. Nevertheless, a highly diversified and regulated transcription from a range of HERV-W elements has been observed in human tissues and cells. Aberrant expression of members of this family has also been associated with human disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia. It is not known whether this broad expression of HERV-W elements represents transcriptional leakage or specific transcription initiated from the retroviral promoter in the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. Therefore, potential influences of genomic context, structure and orientation on the expression levels of individual HERV-W elements in normal human tissues were systematically investigated. Results Whereas intronic HERV-W elements with a pseudogene structure exhibited a strong anti-sense orientation bias, intronic elements with a proviral structure and solo LTRs did not. Although a highly variable expression across tissues and elements was observed, systematic effects of context, structure and orientation were also observed. Elements located in intronic regions appeared to be expressed at higher levels than elements located in intergenic regions. Intronic elements with proviral structures were expressed at higher levels than those elements bearing hallmarks of processed pseudogenes or solo LTRs. Relative to their corresponding genes, intronic elements integrated on the sense strand appeared to be transcribed at higher levels than those integrated on the anti-sense strand. Moreover, the expression of proviral elements appeared to be independent from that of their corresponding genes. Conclusions Intronic HERV-W provirus integrations on the sense strand appear to have elicited a weaker negative selection than pseudogene integrations of transcripts from such elements. Our current findings suggest that the previously observed diversified and tissue

  16. Apoptosis, Toll-like, RIG-I-like and NOD-like Receptors Are Pathways Jointly Induced by Diverse Respiratory Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Isidoro; Oliveros, Juan C.; Cuesta, Isabel; de la Barrera, Jorge; Ausina, Vicente; Casals, Cristina; de Lorenzo, Alba; García, Ernesto; García-Fojeda, Belén; Garmendia, Junkal; González-Nicolau, Mar; Lacoma, Alicia; Menéndez, Margarita; Moranta, David; Nieto, Amelia; Ortín, Juan; Pérez-González, Alicia; Prat, Cristina; Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Regueiro, Verónica; Rodriguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Solís, Dolores; Yuste, José; Bengoechea, José A.; Melero, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are among the top five leading causes of human death. Fighting these infections is therefore a world health priority. Searching for induced alterations in host gene expression shared by several relevant respiratory pathogens represents an alternative to identify new targets for wide-range host-oriented therapeutics. With this aim, alveolar macrophages were independently infected with three unrelated bacterial (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus) and two dissimilar viral (respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus) respiratory pathogens, all of them highly relevant for human health. Cells were also activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a prototypical pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Patterns of differentially expressed cellular genes shared by the indicated pathogens were searched by microarray analysis. Most of the commonly up-regulated host genes were related to the innate immune response and/or apoptosis, with Toll-like, RIG-I-like and NOD-like receptors among the top 10 signaling pathways with over-expressed genes. These results identify new potential broad-spectrum targets to fight the important human infections caused by the bacteria and viruses studied here. PMID:28298903

  17. Cyclin I-like (CCNI2) is a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yanfei; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to conventional cyclin-dependent kinases that are important for mitotic cell division, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is predominantly activated in post-mitotic cells and is involved in various cellular events. The kinase activity of CDK5 is tightly regulated by specific activators including p35, p39, and cyclin I (CCNI). Here we show that cyclin I-like (CCNI2), a homolog of CCNI, interacts with CDK5 and activates the kinase activity of CDK5. Different from CCNI, which colocalizes with CDK5 in the nuclei in transfected cells, CCNI2 mainly retains CDK5 in the cytoplasm as well as on the cell membrane. Furthermore, although the expression level of CCNI2 mRNA and CCNI2 protein do not change significantly during cell cycle, depletion of CCNI2 with siRNA affects cell cycle progression as well as cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that CCNI2 is a novel CDK5 activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation. PMID:28112194

  18. Apoptosis, Toll-like, RIG-I-like and NOD-like Receptors Are Pathways Jointly Induced by Diverse Respiratory Bacterial and Viral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Isidoro; Oliveros, Juan C; Cuesta, Isabel; de la Barrera, Jorge; Ausina, Vicente; Casals, Cristina; de Lorenzo, Alba; García, Ernesto; García-Fojeda, Belén; Garmendia, Junkal; González-Nicolau, Mar; Lacoma, Alicia; Menéndez, Margarita; Moranta, David; Nieto, Amelia; Ortín, Juan; Pérez-González, Alicia; Prat, Cristina; Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Regueiro, Verónica; Rodriguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Solís, Dolores; Yuste, José; Bengoechea, José A; Melero, José A

    2017-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are among the top five leading causes of human death. Fighting these infections is therefore a world health priority. Searching for induced alterations in host gene expression shared by several relevant respiratory pathogens represents an alternative to identify new targets for wide-range host-oriented therapeutics. With this aim, alveolar macrophages were independently infected with three unrelated bacterial (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus) and two dissimilar viral (respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus) respiratory pathogens, all of them highly relevant for human health. Cells were also activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a prototypical pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Patterns of differentially expressed cellular genes shared by the indicated pathogens were searched by microarray analysis. Most of the commonly up-regulated host genes were related to the innate immune response and/or apoptosis, with Toll-like, RIG-I-like and NOD-like receptors among the top 10 signaling pathways with over-expressed genes. These results identify new potential broad-spectrum targets to fight the important human infections caused by the bacteria and viruses studied here.

  19. Creation of Bt rice expressing a fusion protein of Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like using a green tissue-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Yi; Mei, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Zhicheng; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The insecticidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) have long been successfully used for development of insect-resistant rice. However, commercial planting of Bt rice has been delayed by the concern over food safety, although no scientific evidence is ever found to justify the concern. To address this safety concern, we developed a transgenic insect-resistant rice line using a green tissue promoter to minimize the Bt protein expression in the rice seeds. The Bt protein expressed in the rice was a fusion protein of two different Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like protein. The fusion of the two toxins may be helpful to delay the development of insect resistance to Bt rice. Laboratory and field bioassays demonstrated that the transgenic rice plants created by this study were highly active against the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) and the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker). Western analysis indicated that the fusion protein was specifically expressed in green tissues but not in seeds. Therefore, the transgenic rice created in this study should be useful to mitigate the food safety concern and to delay the development of insect resistance.

  20. Effects of PU.1-induced mouse calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase I-like kinase (CKLiK) on apoptosis of murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Satoh, Hitoshi; Kihara-Negishi, Fumiko; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Oikawa, Tsuneyuki

    2004-03-10

    PU.1, a hematopoietic cell-specific Ets family transcription factor, is involved in the generation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL). To identify the target gene(s) of PU.1 in MEL cells, we carried out differential display (DD) analysis and isolated a novel gene whose expression was up-regulated after overexpression of PU.1 in MEL cells. Because the gene exhibited about 90% homology with the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase I-like kinase (CKLiK) gene, it was identified as a mouse homologue of human CKLiK. The mCKLiK gene was mapped to the mouse chromosome 2A1-A3 region and shown to be expressed predominantly in T cells lymphoma and embryonal carcinoma cell lines and primary thymus and brain. Two types of transcripts were present showing a difference in the 3' portion of the coding region and CREB-activating ability. Overexpression of each isoform of mCKLiK in MEL cells revealed that one of them induces, while the other inhibits apoptosis under low serum condition. Differentiation inhibition and lineage switch to myelomonocytes, which were previously observed in MEL cells overexpressing PU.1, were not provoked in the cells overexpressing mCKLiK. These results suggest that mCKLiK is up-regulated by PU.1 in MEL cells and involved in apoptosis of the cells.

  1. The effect of HTLV-1 virulence factors (HBZ, Tax, proviral load), HLA class I and plasma neopterin on manifestation of HTLV-1 associated myelopathy tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Tarokhian, Hanieh; Taghadosi, Mahdi; Rafatpanah, Hushang; Rajaei, Taraneh; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Valizadeh, Narges; Rezaee, S A Rahim

    2017-01-15

    Previous studies have suggested debatable roles of Tax and HBZ gene expression in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). In this study, HTLV-1 and host interactions in the manifestation of HAM/TSP were evaluated. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 33 HAM/TSP patients and 38 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (ACs). HTLV-1-Tax, HBZ gene expression, and proviral load (PVL) were assessed using the quantitative real-time PCR (TaqMan), host plasma neopterin level, and HLA-I, and the clinical manifestation were evaluated. The HTLV-1 PVLs in HAM/TSP and ACs were 306±360.741 copies/10(4) PBMCs and 250.98±629.94 copies/10(4) PBMCs, respectively; the PVL was higher in HAM/TSP than that in ACs (p=0.004). HTLV-1 Tax and HBZ expression in HAM/TSP was higher than that in ACs, wherein only the Tax expression was statistically significant (p=0.039). In contrast to Japanese HTLV-1-infected subjects, HLA-A*02, HLA-A*24, HLA-Cw*08, and HLA-B*5401 did not exhibit preventive effects for HAM/TSP manifestation. The plasma neopterin level was significantly higher in HAM/TSPs than that in ACs; furthermore, there was a strong significant correlation between plasma neopterin and PVL (R=0.76, p=0.001). Moreover, there were significant correlation between urinary disturbances and haematological indices, including the RBC count (R=-0.61, p=0.01) and Hematocrit (Ht) index (R=-0.75, p=0.002), and between mobility disturbances with Tax expression (R=-0.58, p=0.02) and WBC counts (R=-0.54, p=0.04), and finally, a significant association was found between the sensory disturbances and PVL (p=0.05). Overall, HTLV-1 PVL and Tax may be the valid predictors of disease development, and the neopterin level may be a valid predictor of disease progression. In addition, Tax and neopterin are more helpful than PVL for the monitoring of HTLV-1-infected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytokine profile and proviral load among Japanese immigrants and non-Japanese infected with HTLV-1 in a non-endemic area of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, João Américo; Soares, Luana Silva; Bandeira, Larissa M; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Vicente, Ana C P; Zanella, Louise; Puga, Marco Antonio Moreira; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio

    2017-01-01

    The lifetime risk of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) development differs among ethnic groups. To better understand these differences, this prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the cytokine profile and the HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) in Japanese and non-Japanese populations with HAM/TSP and asymptomatic carriers (ACs). The serum IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels were quantified using the Cytometric Bead Array in 40 HTLV-1-infected patients (11 HAM/TSP and 29 ACs) and 18 healthy controls (HCs) in Brazil. Among ACs, 15 were Japanese descendants and 14 were non-Japanese. Of 11 patients with HAM/TSP, only one was a Japanese descendant. The HTLV-1 PVL was quantified by real-time PCR. The HTLV-1 PVL was 2.7-fold higher in HAM/TSP patients than ACs. Regardless of the clinical outcome, the PVL was significantly higher in patients younger than 60 years than older patients. The HAM/TSP and ACs had higher IL-10 serum concentrations than that of HCs. The ACs also showed higher IL-6 serum levels than those of HCs. According to age, the IL-10 and IL-6 levels were higher in ACs non-Japanese patients older than 60 years. HAM/TSP patients showed a positive correlation between IL-6 and IL-17 and a negative correlation between the PVL and IL-17 and IFN-γ. In the all ACs, a significant positive correlation was observed between IL-2 and IL-17 and a negative correlation was detected between IL-10 and TNF-α. Only 6.25% of the Japanese patients were symptomatic carriers, compared with 41.67% of the non-Japanese patients. In conclusion, this study showed that high levels of HTLV-1 PVL was intrinsicaly associated with the development of HAM/TSP. A higher HTLV-1 PVL and IL10 levels found in non-Japanese ACs over 60 years old, which compared with the Japanese group depicts that the ethnic background may interfere in the host immune status. More researches also need to be undertaken regarding the host genetic

  3. Cytomegalovirus Replication in Semen Is Associated with Higher Levels of Proviral HIV DNA and CD4+ T Cell Activation during Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Spina, Celsa A.; Vargas, Milenka V.; Lada, Steven M.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard H.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Smith, Davey M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asymptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication occurs frequently in the genital tract in untreated HIV-infected men and is associated with increased immune activation and HIV disease progression. To determine the connections between CMV-associated immune activation and the size of the viral reservoir, we evaluated the interactions between (i) asymptomatic seminal CMV replication, (ii) levels of T cell activation and proliferation in blood, and (iii) the size and transcriptional activity of the HIV DNA reservoir in blood from 53 HIV-infected men on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) with suppressed HIV RNA in blood plasma. We found that asymptomatic CMV shedding in semen was associated with significantly higher levels of proliferating and activated CD4+ T cells in blood (P < 0.01). Subjects with detectable CMV in semen had approximately five times higher average levels of HIV DNA in blood CD4+ T cells than subjects with no CMV. There was also a trend for CMV shedders to have increased cellular (multiply spliced) HIV RNA transcription (P = 0.068) compared to participants without CMV, but it is unclear if this transcription pattern is associated with residual HIV replication. In multivariate analysis, the presence of seminal plasma CMV (P = 0.04), detectable 2-long terminal repeat (2-LTR), and lower nadir CD4+ (P < 0.01) were independent predictors of higher levels of proviral HIV DNA in blood. Interventions aimed at reducing seminal CMV and associated immune activation may be important for HIV curative strategies. Future studies of anti-CMV therapeutics will help to establish causality and determine the mechanisms underlying these described associations. IMPORTANCE Almost all individuals infected with HIV are also infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV), and the replication dynamics of the two viruses likely influence each other. This study investigated interactions between asymptomatic CMV replication within the male genital tract, levels of inflammation in

  4. Correlation between LTR point mutations and proviral load levels among human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Neto, Walter K; Da-Costa, Antonio C; de Oliveira, Ana Carolina S; Martinez, Vanessa P; Nukui, Youko; Sabino, Ester C; Sanabani, Sabri S

    2011-12-13

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that deletions and point mutations introduced into each 21 bp imperfect repeat of Tax-responsive element (TRE) of the genuine human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) viral promoter abolishes Tax induction. Given these data, we hypothesized that similar mutations may affect the proliferation of HTLV-1-infected cells and alter the proviral load (PvL). To test this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional genetic analysis to compare the near-complete LTR nucleotide sequences that cover the TRE1 region in a sample of HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers with different PvL burden. A total of 94 asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers with both sequence from the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) and a PvL for Tax DNA measured using a sensitive SYBR Green real-time PCR were studied. The 94 subjects were divided into three groups based on PvL measurement: 31 low, 29 intermediate, and 34 high. In addition, each group was compared based on sex, age, and viral genotypes. In another analysis, the median PvLs between individuals infected with mutant and wild-type viruses were compared. Using a categorical analysis, a G232A substitution, located in domain A of the TRE-1 motif, was detected in 38.7% (12/31), 27.5% (8/29), and 61.8% (21/34) of subjects with low, intermediate, or high PvLs, respectively. A significant difference in the detection of this mutation was found between subjects with a high or low PvL and between those with a high or intermediate PvL (both p < 0.05), but not between subjects with a low or intermediate PvL (p > 0.05). This result was confirmed by a non-parametric analysis that showed strong evidence for higher PvLs among HTLV-1 positive individuals with the G232A mutation than those without this mutation (p < 0.03). No significant difference was found between the groups in relation to age, sex or viral subtypes (p > 0. 05). The data described here show that changes in domain A of the HTLV-1 TRE-1 motif resulting in the G232A mutation may

  5. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  6. Cytomegalovirus replication in semen is associated with higher levels of proviral HIV DNA and CD4+ T cell activation during antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Massanella, Marta; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Spina, Celsa A; Vargas, Milenka V; Lada, Steven M; Daar, Eric S; Dube, Michael P; Haubrich, Richard H; Morris, Sheldon R; Smith, Davey M

    2014-07-01

    Asymptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication occurs frequently in the genital tract in untreated HIV-infected men and is associated with increased immune activation and HIV disease progression. To determine the connections between CMV-associated immune activation and the size of the viral reservoir, we evaluated the interactions between (i) asymptomatic seminal CMV replication, (ii) levels of T cell activation and proliferation in blood, and (iii) the size and transcriptional activity of the HIV DNA reservoir in blood from 53 HIV-infected men on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) with suppressed HIV RNA in blood plasma. We found that asymptomatic CMV shedding in semen was associated with significantly higher levels of proliferating and activated CD4(+) T cells in blood (P < 0.01). Subjects with detectable CMV in semen had approximately five times higher average levels of HIV DNA in blood CD4(+) T cells than subjects with no CMV. There was also a trend for CMV shedders to have increased cellular (multiply spliced) HIV RNA transcription (P = 0.068) compared to participants without CMV, but it is unclear if this transcription pattern is associated with residual HIV replication. In multivariate analysis, the presence of seminal plasma CMV (P = 0.04), detectable 2-long terminal repeat (2-LTR), and lower nadir CD4(+) (P < 0.01) were independent predictors of higher levels of proviral HIV DNA in blood. Interventions aimed at reducing seminal CMV and associated immune activation may be important for HIV curative strategies. Future studies of anti-CMV therapeutics will help to establish causality and determine the mechanisms underlying these described associations. Importance: Almost all individuals infected with HIV are also infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV), and the replication dynamics of the two viruses likely influence each other. This study investigated interactions between asymptomatic CMV replication within the male genital tract, levels of inflammation in

  7. Characterization of the Promoter Motif Regulated by PSPTO_1209 a FecI-like ECF Sigma Factor of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomanads are renowned for their capacity to adapt to diverse environments, a fact that is reflected in the fraction of their genomes dedicated to encoding transcription regulators. Members of the Pseudomonas genus include species that are adapted to pathogenic and symbiotic lifestyles in associ...

  8. Analysis of HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) and antibody detected with various kinds of tests in Japanese blood donors to understand the relationship between PVL and antibody level and to gain insights toward better antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Chieko; Sagara, Yasuko; Sobata, Rieko; Inoue, Yukiko; Morita, Maiko; Uchida, Shigeharu; Kiyokawa, Hiroyuki; Satake, Masahiro; Tadokoro, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) occurs in approximately 5% of individuals infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). A high proviral load (PVL; more than four copies per 100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or 1.6 copies per 100 blood leukocytes) and being male are risk factors for ATL development. Whether anti-HTLV-1 antibody level is related to such risk is unknown. Here, PVL and antibody levels were examined using real-time PCR and other tests in 600 HTLV-1 positive screened Japanese blood donors to understand the relationship between PVL and antibody level in asymptomatic carriers and to gain insights toward better antibody testing for HTLV-1 infection. The 430 donors in whom proviral DNA was detected were considered as true positives for HTLV-1 infection. Among donors aged 40 years or older, more males than females had a PVL corresponding to more than 1.6% infected leukocytes, and an antibody titer below the median (P = 0.0018). In antibody tests using an HTLV-1 positive cell line or Env antigens there was a large discrepancy in antibody titer among 13 provirus-positive samples, probably suggesting that antibody-based screening tests should incorporate multiple HTLV-1 antigens, such as Gag and Env antigens. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Whole genome sequencing of 51 breast cancers reveals that tumors are devoid of bovine leukemia virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Nicolas A; Willems, Luc

    2016-11-04

    Controversy exists regarding the association of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and breast cancer. PCR-based experimental evidence indicates that BLV DNA is present in breast tissue and that as many as 37% of cancer cases may be attributable to viral exposure. Since this association might have major consequences for human health, we evaluated 51 whole genomes of breast cancer samples for the presence of BLV DNA. Among 32 billion sequencing reads retrieved from the NCBI database of genotype and phenotype, none mapped on different strains of the BLV genome. Controls for sequence divergence and proviral loads further validated the approach. This unbiased analysis thus excludes a clonal insertion of BLV in breast tumor cells and strongly argues against an association between BLV and breast cancer.

  10. RIG-I-like helicases induce immunogenic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells and sensitize tumors toward killing by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Duewell, P; Steger, A; Lohr, H; Bourhis, H; Hoelz, H; Kirchleitner, S V; Stieg, M R; Grassmann, S; Kobold, S; Siveke, J T; Endres, S; Schnurr, M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a microenvironment suppressing immune responses. RIG-I-like helicases (RLH) are immunoreceptors for viral RNA that induce an antiviral response program via the production of type I interferons (IFN) and apoptosis in susceptible cells. We recently identified RLH as therapeutic targets of pancreatic cancer for counteracting immunosuppressive mechanisms and apoptosis induction. Here, we investigated immunogenic consequences of RLH-induced tumor cell death. Treatment of murine pancreatic cancer cell lines with RLH ligands induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, tumor cells died via intrinsic apoptosis and displayed features of immunogenic cell death, such as release of HMGB1 and translocation of calreticulin to the outer cell membrane. RLH-activated tumor cells led to activation of dendritic cells (DCs), which was mediated by tumor-derived type I IFN, whereas TLR, RAGE or inflammasome signaling was dispensable. Importantly, CD8α+ DCs effectively engulfed apoptotic tumor material and cross-presented tumor-associated antigen to naive CD8+ T cells. In comparison, tumor cell death mediated by oxaliplatin, staurosporine or mechanical disruption failed to induce DC activation and antigen presentation. Tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of RLH ligands upregulated Fas and MHC-I expression and were effectively sensitized towards Fas-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. Vaccination of mice with RLH-activated tumor cells induced protective antitumor immunity in vivo. In addition, MDA5-based immunotherapy led to effective tumor control of established pancreatic tumors. In summary, RLH ligands induce a highly immunogenic form of tumor cell death linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25012502

  11. The miiuy croaker microRNA transcriptome and microRNA regulation of RIG-I like receptor signaling pathway after poly(I:C) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingjing; Xu, Guoliang; Xu, Tianjun

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) as endogenous small non-coding RNAs play key regulatory roles in diverse biological processes via degrading the target mRNAs or inhibiting protein translation. Previously many researchers have reported the identification, characteristic of miRNAs and the interaction with its target gene. But, the study on the regulation of miRNAs to biological processes via regulatory the key signaling pathway was still limited. In order to comprehend the regulatory mechanism of miRNAs, two small RNA libraries from the spleen of miiuy croaker individuals with or without poly(I:C) infection were constructed. The 197 conserved miRNAs and 75 novel miRNAs were identified, and 14 conserved and 8 novel miRNAs appeared significant variations. Those differently expressed miRNAs relate to immune regulation of miiuy croaker. Furthermore, expressions of four differently expressed miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR, and the result was consistent with sequencing data. The target genes of the differently expressed miRNAs in the two libraries were predicted, and some candidate target genes were involved in the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. The negative regulation of miRNAs to target genes were confirmed by comparing the expression pattern of miRNAs and their target genes. The results of regulating target genes were that firstly directly or indirectly activating the downstream signaling cascades and subsequent inducting the type I interferon, inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. These studies could help us to deeper understand the roles of miRNAs played in the fish immune system, and provide a new way to investigate the defense mechanism of fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The virion-associated incoming HIV-1 RNA genome is not targeted by RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Westerhout, Ellen M; ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2006-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a powerful tool to suppress gene expression and can be used as a therapeutic strategy against human pathogenic viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Theoretically, RNAi-mediated inhibition can occur at two points in the replication cycle, upon viral entry before reverse transcription of the RNA genome, and on the newly transcribed viral RNA transcripts. There have been conflicting results on whether RNAi can target the RNA genome of infecting HIV-1 particles. We have addressed this issue with HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors. Results We determined the transduction efficiency of a lentiviral vector, as measured by GFP expressing cells, which reflects the number of successful integration events in a cell line stably expressing shNef. We did not observe a difference in the transduction efficiency comparing lentiviral vectors with or without the Nef target sequence in their genome. The results were similar with particles pseudotyped with either the VSV-G or HIV-1 envelope. Additionally, no reduced transduction efficiencies were observed with multiple other shRNAs targeting the vector genome or with synthetic siNef when transiently transfected prior to transduction. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the incoming HIV-1 RNA genome is not targeted by RNAi, probably due to inaccessibility to the RNAi machinery. Thus, therapeutic RNAi strategies aimed at preventing proviral integration should be targeting cellular receptors or co-factors involved in pre-integration events. PMID:16948865

  13. Prophage Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Canchaya, Carlos; Proux, Caroline; Fournous, Ghislain; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The majority of the bacterial genome sequences deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database contain prophage sequences. Analysis of the prophages suggested that after being integrated into bacterial genomes, they undergo a complex decay process consisting of inactivating point mutations, genome rearrangements, modular exchanges, invasion by further mobile DNA elements, and massive DNA deletion. We review the technical difficulties in defining such altered prophage sequences in bacterial genomes and discuss theoretical frameworks for the phage-bacterium interaction at the genomic level. The published genome sequences from three groups of eubacteria (low- and high-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria) were screened for prophage sequences. The prophages from Streptococcus pyogenes served as test case for theoretical predictions of the role of prophages in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. The genomes from further human, animal, and plant pathogens, as well as commensal and free-living bacteria, were included in the analysis to see whether the same principles of prophage genomics apply for bacteria living in different ecological niches and coming from distinct phylogenetical affinities. The effect of selection pressure on the host bacterium is apparently an important force shaping the prophage genomes in low-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria. PMID:12794192

  14. Rhinovirus and dsRNA Induce RIG-I-Like Receptors and Expression of Interferon β and λ1 in Human Bronchial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calvén, Jenny; Yudina, Yuliana; Uller, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) infections cause exacerbations and development of severe asthma highlighting the importance of antiviral interferon (IFN) defence by airway cells. Little is known about bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) production of IFNs and whether BSMCs have dsRNA-sensing receptors besides TLR3. dsRNA is a rhinoviral replication intermediate and necrotic cell effect mimic that mediates innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. We have explored dsRNA-evoked IFN-β and IFN-λ1 production in human BSMCs and potential involvement of TLR3 and RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Primary BSMCs were stimulated with 0.1–10 µg/ml dsRNA, 0.1–1 µg/ml dsRNA in complex with the transfection agent LyoVec (dsRNA/LyoVec; selectively activating cytosolic RLRs) or infected with 0.05–0.5 MOI RV1B. Both dsRNA stimuli evoked early (3 h), concentration-dependent IFN-β and IFN-λ1 mRNA expression, which with dsRNA/LyoVec was much greater, and with dsRNA was much less, after 24 h. The effects were inhibited by dexamethasone. Further, dsRNA and dsRNA/LyoVec concentration-dependently upregulated RIG-I and MDA5 mRNA and protein. dsRNA and particularly dsRNA/LyoVec caused IFN-β and IFN-λ1 protein production (24 h). dsRNA- but not dsRNA/LyoVec-induced IFN expression was partly inhibited by chloroquine that suppresses endosomal TLR3 activation. RV1B dose-dependently increased BSMC expression of RIG-I, MDA5, IFN-β, and IFN-λ1 mRNA. We suggest that BSMCs express functional RLRs and that both RLRs and TLR3 are involved in viral stimulus-induced BSMC expression of IFN-β and IFN-λ1. PMID:23658644

  15. Efficient intracellular retrotransposition of an exogenous primate retrovirus genome

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, Martin; Pietschmann, Thomas; Jármy, Gergely; Dressler, Marco; Imrich, Horst; Thurow, Jana; Lindemann, Dirk; Bock, Michael; Moebes, Astrid; Roy, Jacqueline; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Rethwilm, Axel

    2000-01-01

    The foamy virus (FV) subgroup of Retroviridae reverse transcribe their RNA (pre-)genome late in the replication cycle before leaving an infected cell. We studied whether a marker gene-transducing FV vector is able to shuttle to the nucleus and integrate into host cell genomic DNA. While a potential intracellular retrotransposition of vectors derived from other retroviruses was below the detection limit of our assay, we found that up to 5% of cells transfected with the FV vector were stably transduced, harboring 1 to ∼10 vector integrants. Generation of the integrants depended on expression of functional capsid, reverse transcriptase and integrase proteins, and did not involve an extracellular step. PCR analysis of the U3 region of the 5′ long terminal repeat and determination of proviral integration sites showed that a reverse transcription step had taken place to generate the integrants. Co-expression of a mutated envelope allowing particle egress and avoiding extracellular infection resulted in a significantly increased rescue of cells harboring integrants, suggesting that accumulation of proviruses via intracellular retrotransposition represents an integral part of the FV replication strategy. PMID:10880456

  16. Aquaculture Genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomics chapter covers the basics of genome mapping and sequencing and the current status of several relevant species. The chapter briefly describes the development and use of (cDNA, BAC, etc.) libraries for mapping and obtaining specific sequence information. Other topics include comparative ...

  17. Antarctic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Cockell, Charles S.; Convey, Peter; Detrich III, H. William; Fraser, Keiron P. P.; Johnston, Ian A.; Methe, Barbara A.; Murray, Alison E.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Römisch, Karin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2004-01-01

    With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies. PMID:18629155

  18. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Multiple Genomic Regions Associated with Susceptibility to and Control of Ovine Lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephen N.; Mousel, Michelle R.; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M.; Reynolds, James O.; Leymaster, Kreg A.; Neibergs, Holly L.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ovine lentivirus (OvLV) is macrophage-tropic and causes lifelong infection. OvLV infects one quarter of U.S. sheep and induces pneumonia and body condition wasting. There is no vaccine to prevent OvLV infection and no cost-effective treatment for infected animals. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration have indicated a genetic basis for susceptibility to OvLV. A recent study identified TMEM154 variants in OvLV susceptibility. The objective here was to identify additional loci associated with odds and/or control of OvLV infection. Methodology/Principal Findings This genome-wide association study (GWAS) included 964 sheep from Rambouillet, Polypay, and Columbia breeds with serological status and proviral concentration phenotypes. Analytic models accounted for breed and age, as well as genotype. This approach identified TMEM154 (nominal P = 9.2×10−7; empirical P = 0.13), provided 12 additional genomic regions associated with odds of infection, and provided 13 regions associated with control of infection (all nominal P<1×10−5). Rapid decline of linkage disequilibrium with distance suggested many regions included few genes each. Genes in regions associated with odds of infection included DPPA2/DPPA4 (empirical P = 0.006), and SYTL3 (P = 0.051). Genes in regions associated with control of infection included a zinc finger cluster (ZNF192, ZSCAN16, ZNF389, and ZNF165; P = 0.001), C19orf42/TMEM38A (P = 0.047), and DLGAP1 (P = 0.092). Conclusions/Significance These associations provide targets for mutation discovery in sheep susceptibility to OvLV. Aside from TMEM154, these genes have not been associated previously with lentiviral infection in any species, to our knowledge. Further, data from other species suggest functional hypotheses for future testing of these genes in OvLV and other lentiviral infections. Specifically, SYTL3 binds and may regulate RAB27A

  19. The genome landscape of the african green monkey kidney-derived vero cell line.

    PubMed

    Osada, Naoki; Kohara, Arihiro; Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hirayama, Noriko; Kasai, Fumio; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    Continuous cell lines that originate from mammalian tissues serve as not only invaluable tools for life sciences, but also important animal cell substrates for the production of various types of biological pharmaceuticals. Vero cells are susceptible to various types of microbes and toxins and have widely contributed to not only microbiology, but also the production of vaccines for human use. We here showed the genome landscape of a Vero cell line, in which 25,877 putative protein-coding genes were identified in the 2.97-Gb genome sequence. A homozygous ∼9-Mb deletion on chromosome 12 caused the loss of the type I interferon gene cluster and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes in Vero cells. In addition, an ∼59-Mb loss of heterozygosity around this deleted region suggested that the homozygosity of the deletion was established by a large-scale conversion. Moreover, a genomic analysis of Vero cells revealed a female Chlorocebus sabaeus origin and proviral variations of the endogenous simian type D retrovirus. These results revealed the genomic basis for the non-tumourigenic permanent Vero cell lineage susceptible to various pathogens and will be useful for generating new sub-lines and developing new tools in the quality control of Vero cells.

  20. Imaging HIV-1 Genomic DNA from Entry through Productive Infection.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Ryan D; Cenker, Jennifer J; McDonald, David

    2017-05-01

    In order to track the fate of HIV-1 particles from early entry events through productive infection, we developed a method to visualize HIV-1 DNA reverse transcription complexes by the incorporation and fluorescent labeling of the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into nascent viral DNA during cellular entry. Monocyte-derived macrophages were chosen as natural targets of HIV-1, as they do not divide and therefore do not incorporate EdU into chromosomal DNA, which would obscure the detection of intranuclear HIV-1 genomes. Using this approach, we observed distinct EdU puncta in the cytoplasm of infected cells within 12 h postinfection and subsequent accumulation of puncta in the nucleus, which remained stable through 5 days. The depletion of the restriction factor SAMHD1 resulted in a markedly increased number of EdU puncta, allowing efficient quantification of HIV-1 reverse transcription events. Analysis of HIV-1 isolates bearing defined mutations in the capsid protein revealed differences in their cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation, and data from quantitative PCR analysis closely recapitulated the EdU results. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization identified actively transcribing, EdU-labeled HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that CDK9, phosphorylated at serine 175, was recruited to RNA-positive HIV-1 DNA, providing a means to directly observe transcriptionally active HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells. Overall, this system allows stable labeling and monitoring of HIV genomic DNA within infected cells during cytoplasmic transit, nuclear import, and mRNA synthesis.IMPORTANCE The fates of HIV-1 reverse transcription products within infected cells are not well understood. Although previous imaging approaches identified HIV-1 intermediates during early stages of infection, few have connected these events with the later stages that ultimately lead to proviral transcription and the

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence of a new filamentous phage, Xf109, which integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Xanthomonas oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ting Y

    2017-02-01

    Unlike Ff-like coliphages, certain filamentous Inoviridae phages integrate their genomes into the host chromosome and enter a prophage state in their infectious cycle. This lysogenic life cycle was first reported for Xanthomonas citri Cf phage. However, except for the X. citri phages Cf and XacF1, complete genome sequence information about lysogenic Xanthomonas phages is not available to date. A proviral sequence of Xf109 phage was identified in the genome of Xanthomonas oryzae, the rice bacterial blight pathogen, and revived as infectious virions to lysogenize its host de novo. The genome of Xf109 phage is 7190 nucleotides in size and contains 12 predicted open reading frames in an organization similar to that of the Cf phage genome. Seven of the Xf109 proteins show significant sequence similarity to Cf and XacF1 phage proteins, while its ORF4 shares 92 % identity with the major coat protein of X. phage oryzae Xf. Integration of Xf109 phage DNA into the host genome is site-specific, and the attP/attB sequence contains the dif core sequence 5'-TATACATTATGCGAA-3', which is identical to that of Cf, XacF1, and Xanthomonas campestris phage ϕLf. To my knowledge, this is the first complete genome sequence of a filamentous bacteriophage that infects X. oryzae.

  2. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  3. Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Kulshrestha, Samarth; Puri, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing is an important step toward correlating genotypes with phenotypic characters. Sequencing technologies are important in many fields in the life sciences, including functional genomics, transcriptomics, oncology, evolutionary biology, forensic sciences, and many more. The era of sequencing has been divided into three generations. First generation sequencing involved sequencing by synthesis (Sanger sequencing) and sequencing by cleavage (Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Sanger sequencing led to the completion of various genome sequences (including human) and provided the foundation for development of other sequencing technologies. Since then, various techniques have been developed which can overcome some of the limitations of Sanger sequencing. These techniques are collectively known as "Next-generation sequencing" (NGS), and are further classified into second and third generation technologies. Although NGS methods have many advantages in terms of speed, cost, and parallelism, the accuracy and read length of Sanger sequencing is still superior and has confined the use of NGS mainly to resequencing genomes. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop improved real time sequencing techniques. This chapter reviews some of the options currently available and provides a generic workflow for sequencing a genome.

  4. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  5. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  6. Pan-vertebrate comparative genomics unmasks retrovirus macroevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Alexander; Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Jern, Patric

    2015-01-01

    Although extensive research has demonstrated host-retrovirus microevolutionary dynamics, it has been difficult to gain a deeper understanding of the macroevolutionary patterns of host–retrovirus interactions. Here we use recent technological advances to infer broad patterns in retroviral diversity, evolution, and host–virus relationships by using a large-scale phylogenomic approach using endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Retroviruses insert a proviral DNA copy into the host cell genome to produce new viruses. ERVs are provirus insertions in germline cells that are inherited down the host lineage and consequently present a record of past host–viral associations. By mining ERVs from 65 host genomes sampled across vertebrate diversity, we uncover a great diversity of ERVs, indicating that retroviral sequences are much more prevalent and widespread across vertebrates than previously appreciated. The majority of ERV clades that we recover do not contain known retroviruses, implying either that retroviral lineages are highly transient over evolutionary time or that a considerable number of retroviruses remain to be identified. By characterizing the distribution of ERVs, we show that no major vertebrate lineage has escaped retroviral activity and that retroviruses are extreme host generalists, having an unprecedented ability for rampant host switching among distantly related vertebrates. In addition, we examine whether the distribution of ERVs can be explained by host factors predicted to influence viral transmission and find that internal fertilization has a pronounced effect on retroviral colonization of host genomes. By capturing the mode and pattern of retroviral evolution and contrasting ERV diversity with known retroviral diversity, our study provides a cohesive framework to understand host–virus coevolution better. PMID:25535393

  7. Pan-vertebrate comparative genomics unmasks retrovirus macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Alexander; Cornwallis, Charlie K; Jern, Patric

    2015-01-13

    Although extensive research has demonstrated host-retrovirus microevolutionary dynamics, it has been difficult to gain a deeper understanding of the macroevolutionary patterns of host-retrovirus interactions. Here we use recent technological advances to infer broad patterns in retroviral diversity, evolution, and host-virus relationships by using a large-scale phylogenomic approach using endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Retroviruses insert a proviral DNA copy into the host cell genome to produce new viruses. ERVs are provirus insertions in germline cells that are inherited down the host lineage and consequently present a record of past host-viral associations. By mining ERVs from 65 host genomes sampled across vertebrate diversity, we uncover a great diversity of ERVs, indicating that retroviral sequences are much more prevalent and widespread across vertebrates than previously appreciated. The majority of ERV clades that we recover do not contain known retroviruses, implying either that retroviral lineages are highly transient over evolutionary time or that a considerable number of retroviruses remain to be identified. By characterizing the distribution of ERVs, we show that no major vertebrate lineage has escaped retroviral activity and that retroviruses are extreme host generalists, having an unprecedented ability for rampant host switching among distantly related vertebrates. In addition, we examine whether the distribution of ERVs can be explained by host factors predicted to influence viral transmission and find that internal fertilization has a pronounced effect on retroviral colonization of host genomes. By capturing the mode and pattern of retroviral evolution and contrasting ERV diversity with known retroviral diversity, our study provides a cohesive framework to understand host-virus coevolution better.

  8. HIV-1 Vpr N-terminal tagging affects alternative splicing of the viral genome

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Ann; Naessens, Evelien; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Weening, Karin E.; Reilly, Anne-Marie; Claeys, Eva; Trypsteen, Wim; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Eyckerman, Sven; Gevaert, Kris; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate studies on Vpr function in replicating HIV-1, we aimed to tag the protein in an infectious virus. First we showed that N-, but not C-terminal HA/FLAG tagging of Vpr protein preserves Vpr cytopathicity. Cloning the tags into proviral DNA however ablated viral production and replication. By construction of additional viral variants we could show this defect was not protein- but RNA-dependent and sequence specific, and characterized by oversplicing of the genomic RNA. Simulation of genomic RNA folding suggested that introduction of the tag sequence induced an alternative folding structure in a region enriched in splice sites and splicing regulatory sequences. In silico predictions identified the HA/His6-Vpr tagging in HIV-1 to affect mRNA folding less than HA/FLAG-Vpr tagging. In vitro infectivity and mRNA splice pattern improved but did not reach wild-type values. Thus, sequence-specific insertions may interfere with mRNA splicing, possibly due to altered RNA folding. Our results point to the complexity of viral RNA genome sequence interactions. This should be taken into consideration when designing viral manipulation strategies, for both research as for biological interventions. PMID:27721439

  9. Retrovirus Integration Database (RID): a public database for retroviral insertion sites into host genomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Shan, Jigui; Kearney, Mary F; Wu, Xiaolin; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Luke, Brian; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H

    2016-07-04

    The NCI Retrovirus Integration Database is a MySql-based relational database created for storing and retrieving comprehensive information about retroviral integration sites, primarily, but not exclusively, HIV-1. The database is accessible to the public for submission or extraction of data originating from experiments aimed at collecting information related to retroviral integration sites including: the site of integration into the host genome, the virus family and subtype, the origin of the sample, gene exons/introns associated with integration, and proviral orientation. Information about the references from which the data were collected is also stored in the database. Tools are built into the website that can be used to map the integration sites to UCSC genome browser, to plot the integration site patterns on a chromosome, and to display provirus LTRs in their inserted genome sequence. The website is robust, user friendly, and allows users to query the database and analyze the data dynamically. https://rid.ncifcrf.gov ; or http://home.ncifcrf.gov/hivdrp/resources.htm .

  10. Genomic rearrangements of retroviral vectors carrying two genes in F9 EC cells.

    PubMed

    Breuer, B; Steuer, B; Alonso, A

    1993-02-01

    We have used two classes of double-expression retroviral vectors for the expression of foreign genetic information in embryonal carcinoma cell lines. The splice-vector pM5neo takes advantage of mutated sequences that mediate an LTR-driven expression in F9 EC cells. The second vector (pXT1 type) uses an internal HSV-tk promoter as the control element for the transcription of the second gene. Genomic analysis of DNA from infected F9 cell lines revealed that most of the proviruses have rearranged upon integration into the host genome. This reorganization always included the nonselected gene and is sequence independent, but depends on the selective pressure applied. No retroviral genomic rearrangements were observed in F9 cells infected with pM5 proviruses carrying only the neo resistance gene. On the contrary, gross rearrangements were found in cells infected with parental pXT1 retroviruses. In both vectors the transcriptional activity was very low. A direct correlation between selective pressure, proviral reorganization, and transcription was observed.

  11. Genome mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome maps can be thought of much like road maps except that, instead of traversing across land, they traverse across the chromosomes of an organism. Genetic markers serve as landmarks along the chromosome and provide researchers information as to how close they may be to a gene or region of inter...

  12. Personal genomics services: whose genomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David; Bregman-Eschet, Yael

    2009-01-01

    New companies offering personal whole-genome information services over the internet are dynamic and highly visible players in the personal genomics field. For fees currently ranging from US$399 to US$2500 and a vial of saliva, individuals can now purchase online access to their individual genetic information regarding susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases and phenotypic traits based on a genome-wide SNP scan. Most of the companies offering such services are based in the United States, but their clients may come from nearly anywhere in the world. Although the scientific validity, clinical utility and potential future implications of such services are being hotly debated, several ethical and regulatory questions related to direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing strategies of genetic tests have not yet received sufficient attention. For example, how can we minimize the risk of unauthorized third parties from submitting other people's DNA for testing? Another pressing question concerns the ownership of (genotypic and phenotypic) information, as well as the unclear legal status of customers regarding their own personal information. Current legislation in the US and Europe falls short of providing clear answers to these questions. Until the regulation of personal genomics services catches up with the technology, we call upon commercial providers to self-regulate and coordinate their activities to minimize potential risks to individual privacy. We also point out some specific steps, along the trustee model, that providers of DTC personal genomics services as well as regulators and policy makers could consider for addressing some of the concerns raised below. PMID:19259127

  13. Single step detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA and housekeeping β-actin gene from dried blood spots by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ipsita; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Patil, Ajit; Mukhopadhyaya, Robin; Paranjape, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for developing a simple, rapid, reliable and cost effective method for detection of HIV-1 for early diagnosis of the infection especially in developing countries and in resource limited settings. A method for simultaneous detection of the HIV-1 p17 gene and the house keeping human β-actin gene from dried blood spots (DBS) by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. Genomic DNA was extracted from 40 HIV-1 positive and 40 HIV-1 negative DBS and used as templates to amplify both the HIV-1 p17 and β-actin genes simultaneously under the same cycling condition by a single round PCR. This method of detection of HIV-1 may provide a simple, rapid and cost effective alternative in resource limited settings; however, it would require testing a larger number of samples before widespread use.

  14. Citrus Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter Jr., Fred G.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The historical developments of linkage mapping, markers and breeding, EST projects, physical mapping, an international citrus genome sequencing project, and critical functional analysis are described. Despite the challenges of working with citrus, there has been substantial progress. Citrus researchers engaged in international collaborations provide optimism about future productivity and contributions to the benefit of citrus industries worldwide and to the human population who can rely on future widespread availability of this health-promoting and aesthetically pleasing fruit crop. PMID:18509486

  15. Imaging genomics.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ahmad R; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2003-01-01

    The recent completion of a working draft of the human genome sequence promises to provide unprecedented opportunities to explore the genetic basis of individual differences in complex behaviours and vulnerability to neuropsychiatric illness. Functional neuroimaging, because of its unique ability to assay information processing at the level of brain within individuals, provides a powerful approach to such functional genomics. Recent fMRI studies have established important physiological links between functional genetic polymorphisms and robust differences in information processing within distinct brain regions and circuits that have been linked to the manifestation of various disease states such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. Importantly, all of these biological relationships have been revealed in relatively small samples of healthy volunteers and in the absence of observable differences at the level of behaviour, underscoring the power of a direct assay of brain physiology like fMRI in exploring the functional impact of genetic variation.

  16. Lentivirus Gene Transfer in Murine Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Is Compromised by a Delay in Proviral Integration and Results in Transduction Mosaicism and Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Progeny Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikkola, Hanna; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Sjögren, Marketa; Helgadottir, Hildur; Hamaguchi, Isao; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik; Trono, Didier; Karlsson, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based lentivirus vectors containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were used to transduce murine Lin− c-kit+ Sca1+ primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Following transduction, the cells were plated into hematopoietic progenitor cell assays in methylcellulose and the colonies were scored for GFP positivity. After incubation for 20 h, lentivirus vectors transduced 27.3% ± 6.7% of the colonies derived from unstimulated target cells, but transduction was more efficient when the cells were supported with stem cell factor (SCF) alone (42.0% ± 5.5%) or SCF, interleukin-3 (IL-3), and IL-6 (53.3 ± 1.8%) during transduction. The, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped MGIN oncoretrovirus control vector required IL-3, IL-6, and SCF for significant transduction (39.3 ± 9.4%). Interestingly, only a portion of the progeny cells within the lentivirus-transduced methylcellulose colonies expressed GFP, in contrast to the homogeneous expression in oncoretrovirus-transduced colonies. Secondary plating of the primary GFP+ lentivirus vector-transduced colonies revealed vector PCR+ GFP+ (42%), vector PCR− GFP− (46%), and vector PCR+ GFP− (13%) secondary colonies, indicating true genetic mosaicism with respect to the viral genome in the progeny cells. The degree of vector mosaicism in individual colonies could be reduced by extending the culture time after transduction and before plating into the clonal progenitor cell assay, indicating a delay in the lentiviral integration process. Furthermore, supplementation with exogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphates during transduction decreased mosaicism within the colonies. Although cytokine stimulation during transduction correlates with higher transduction efficiency, rapid cell division after transduction may result in loss of the viral genome in the progeny cells. Therefore, optimal transduction may require activation without promoting intense cell proliferation prior

  17. Neither molecular diversity of the envelope, immunosuppression status, nor proviral load causes indeterminate HTLV western blot profiles in samples from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2)-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Olah, Ingrid; Fukumori, Ligia M I; Smid, Jerusa; de Oliveira, Augusto César Penalva; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Although human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is considered of low pathogenicity, serological diagnosis is important for counseling and monitoring. The confirmatory tests most used are Western blot (WB) and PCR. However, in high-risk populations, about 50% of the indeterminate WB were HTLV-2 positives by PCR. The insensitivity of the WB might be due to the use of recombinant proteins of strains that do not circulate in our country. Another possibility may be a high level of immunosuppression, which could lead to low production of virus, resulting in low stimulation of antibody. We found one mutation, proline to serine in the envelope region in the position 184, presented at least 1/3 of the samples, independent the indeterminate WB profile. In conclusion, we found no correlation of immune state, HTLV-2 proviral load, or env diversity in the K55 region and WB indeterminate results. We believe that the only WB kit available in the market is probably more accurate to detect HTLV-1 antibodies, and some improvement for HTLV-2 detection should be done in the future, especially among high-risk population.

  18. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the precise quantification of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 proviral loads in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients and identification of viral mutations.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Giovanna S; Massoud, Raya; Leibovitch, Emily C; Caruso, Breanna; Johnson, Kory; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Cortese, Irene; Jacobson, Steven

    2014-08-01

    An elevated human T cell lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV)-1 proviral load (PVL) is the main risk factor for developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 infected subjects, and a high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) PVL ratio may be diagnostic of the condition. However, the standard method for quantification of HTLV-1 PVL-real-time PCR-has multiple limitations, including increased inter-assay variability in compartments with low cell numbers, such as CSF. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated a novel technique for HTVL-1 PVL quantification, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). In ddPCR, PCR samples are partitioned into thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets, amplified on a thermocycler, and queried for fluorescent signal. Due to the high number of independent events (droplets), Poisson algorithms are used to determine absolute copy numbers independently of a standard curve, which enables highly precise quantitation. This assay has low intra-assay variability allowing for reliable PVL measurement in PBMC and CSF compartments of both asymptomatic carriers (AC) and HAM/TSP patients. It is also useful for HTLV-1-related clinical applications, such as longitudinal monitoring of PVL and identification of viral mutations within the region targeted by the primers and probe.

  19. Discontinuous sequence change of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 env sequences in plasma viral and lymphocyte-associated proviral populations in vivo: implications for models of HIV pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, P; Zhang, L Q; McOmish, F; Balfe, P; Ludlam, C A; Brown, A J

    1991-01-01

    Sequence change in different hypervariable regions of the external membrane glycoprotein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was studied. Viral RNA associated with cell-free virus particles circulating in plasma and proviral DNA present in HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were extracted from blood samples of two currently asymptomatic hemophiliac patients over a 5-year period. HIV sequences were amplified by polymerase chain reaction to allow analysis in the V3, V4, and V5 hypervariable regions of gp120. Rapid sequence change, consisting of regular replacements by a succession of distinct viral populations, was found in both plasma virus and PBMC provirus populations. Significant differences between the frequencies of sequence variants in DNA and RNA populations within the same sample were observed, indicating that at any one time point, the predominant plasma virus variants were antigenically distinct from viruses encoded by HIV DNA sequences in PBMCs. How these findings contribute to current models of HIV pathogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:1920632

  20. Ancient genomics

    PubMed Central

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E.; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F.; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J.; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D.; Moreno-Mayar, J. Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past. PMID:25487338

  1. Ancient genomics.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-19

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past.

  2. Stress granule components G3BP1 and G3BP2 play a proviral role early in Chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Scholte, Florine E M; Tas, Ali; Albulescu, Irina C; Žusinaite, Eva; Merits, Andres; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2015-04-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are protein-mRNA aggregates that are formed in response to environmental stresses, resulting in translational inhibition. SGs are generally believed to play an antiviral role and are manipulated by many viruses, including various alphaviruses. GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain)-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) is a key component and commonly used marker of SGs. Its homolog G3BP2 is a less extensively studied SG component. Here, we demonstrate that Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection induces cytoplasmic G3BP1- and G3BP2-containing granules that differ from bona fide SGs in terms of morphology, composition, and behavior. For several Old World alphaviruses it has been shown that nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) interacts with G3BPs, presumably to inhibit SG formation, and we have confirmed this interaction in CHIKV-infected cells. Surprisingly, CHIKV also relied on G3BPs for efficient replication, as simultaneous depletion of G3BP1 and G3BP2 reduced viral RNA levels, CHIKV protein expression, and viral progeny titers. The G3BPs colocalized with CHIKV nsP2 and nsP3 in cytoplasmic foci, but no colocalization with nsP1, nsP4, or dsRNA was observed. Furthermore, G3BPs could not be detected in a cellular fraction enriched for CHIKV replication/transcription complexes, suggesting that they are not directly involved in CHIKV RNA synthesis. Depletion of G3BPs did not affect viral entry, translation of incoming genomes, or nonstructural polyprotein processing but resulted in severely reduced levels of negative-stranded (and consequently also positive-stranded) RNA. This suggests a role for the G3BPs in the switch from translation to genome amplification, although the exact mechanism by which they act remains to be explored. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes a severe polyarthritis that has affected millions of people since its reemergence in 2004. The lack of approved vaccines or therapeutic options and the ongoing explosive outbreak in the Caribbean underline

  3. Stress Granule Components G3BP1 and G3BP2 Play a Proviral Role Early in Chikungunya Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Scholte, Florine E. M.; Tas, Ali; Albulescu, Irina C.; Žusinaite, Eva; Merits, Andres; Snijder, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are protein-mRNA aggregates that are formed in response to environmental stresses, resulting in translational inhibition. SGs are generally believed to play an antiviral role and are manipulated by many viruses, including various alphaviruses. GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain)-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) is a key component and commonly used marker of SGs. Its homolog G3BP2 is a less extensively studied SG component. Here, we demonstrate that Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection induces cytoplasmic G3BP1- and G3BP2-containing granules that differ from bona fide SGs in terms of morphology, composition, and behavior. For several Old World alphaviruses it has been shown that nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) interacts with G3BPs, presumably to inhibit SG formation, and we have confirmed this interaction in CHIKV-infected cells. Surprisingly, CHIKV also relied on G3BPs for efficient replication, as simultaneous depletion of G3BP1 and G3BP2 reduced viral RNA levels, CHIKV protein expression, and viral progeny titers. The G3BPs colocalized with CHIKV nsP2 and nsP3 in cytoplasmic foci, but no colocalization with nsP1, nsP4, or dsRNA was observed. Furthermore, G3BPs could not be detected in a cellular fraction enriched for CHIKV replication/transcription complexes, suggesting that they are not directly involved in CHIKV RNA synthesis. Depletion of G3BPs did not affect viral entry, translation of incoming genomes, or nonstructural polyprotein processing but resulted in severely reduced levels of negative-stranded (and consequently also positive-stranded) RNA. This suggests a role for the G3BPs in the switch from translation to genome amplification, although the exact mechanism by which they act remains to be explored. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes a severe polyarthritis that has affected millions of people since its reemergence in 2004. The lack of approved vaccines or therapeutic options and the ongoing explosive outbreak in the

  4. Nucleotide sequencing of an apparent proviral copy of env mRNA defines determinants of expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Majors, J E; Varmus, H E

    1983-01-01

    To extend our understanding of the organization and expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome, we determined the nucleotide sequence of large regions of a cloned mouse mammary tumor virus strain C3H provirus that appears to be a DNA copy of env mRNA. In conjunction with analysis of several additional clones of integrated and unintegrated mouse mammary tumor virus DNAs, we came to the following conclusions: (i) the mRNA for env is generated by splicing mechanisms that recognize conventional eucaryotic signals at donor and acceptor sites with a leader of at least 289 bases in length; (ii) the first of three possible initiation codons for translation of env follows the splice junction by a single nucleotide and produces a signal peptide of 98 amino acids; (iii) the amino terminal sequence of the major virion glycoprotein gp52env is confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and is encoded by a sequence beginning 584 nucleotides from the 5' end of env mRNA; (iv) the final 17 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the primary product of env are encoded within the long terminal repeat by the 51 bases at the 5' end of the U3 domain; and (v) bases 2 through 4 at the 5' end of the long terminal repeat constitute an initiation codon that commences an open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 36-kilodalton protein. PMID:6312081

  5. Detection and direct genomic sequencing of multiple rare unknown flanking DNA in highly complex samples.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Hoffmann, G; Wissler, M; Lemke, N; Müssig, A; Glimm, H; Williams, D A; Ragg, S; Hesemann, C U; von Kalle, C

    2001-05-01

    By identifying the sequence of retro- and lentiviral integration sites in peripheral blood leukocytes, the clonal composition and fate of genetically modified hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells could be mapped in vitro and in vivo. Previously available methods have been limited to the analysis of mono- or oligoclonal integration sites present in high copy numbers. Here, we perform characterization of multiple rare retroviral and lentiviral integration sites in highly complex DNA samples. The reliability of this method results from nontarget DNA removal via magnetic extension primer tag selection (EPTS) preceding solid-phase ligation-mediated PCR. EPTS/LM-PCR allowed the simultaneous direct genomic sequencing of multiple proviral LTR-flanking sequences of retro- and lentiviral vectors even if only 1 per 100 to 1000 cells contained the provirus. A primer walking "around" the integration locus demonstrated the adaptability of EPTS/LM-PCR to study unknown flanking DNA regions unrelated to proviruses. The technique is fast, inexpensive, and sensitive in minimal samples. It enables studies of retro- and lentiviral integration, viral vector tracking in gene therapy, insertional mutagenesis, transgene integration, and direct genomic sequencing that until now have been difficult or impossible to perform.

  6. A Kinome-Wide Small Interfering RNA Screen Identifies Proviral and Antiviral Host Factors in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication, Including Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Protein Kinase and Early Secretory Pathway Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Wilde, Adriaan H.; Wannee, Kazimier F.; Scholte, Florine E. M.; Goeman, Jelle J.; ten Dijke, Peter; Snijder, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify host factors relevant for severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) replication, we performed a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screen targeting the human kinome. Protein kinases are key regulators of many cellular functions, and the systematic knockdown of their expression should provide a broad perspective on factors and pathways promoting or antagonizing coronavirus replication. In addition to 40 proteins that promote SARS-CoV replication, our study identified 90 factors exhibiting an antiviral effect. Pathway analysis grouped subsets of these factors in specific cellular processes, including the innate immune response and the metabolism of complex lipids, which appear to play a role in SARS-CoV infection. Several factors were selected for in-depth validation in follow-up experiments. In cells depleted for the β2 subunit of the coatomer protein complex (COPB2), the strongest proviral hit, we observed reduced SARS-CoV protein expression and a >2-log reduction in virus yield. Knockdown of the COPB2-related proteins COPB1 and Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF1) also suggested that COPI-coated vesicles and/or the early secretory pathway are important for SARS-CoV replication. Depletion of the antiviral double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) enhanced virus replication in the primary screen, and validation experiments confirmed increased SARS-CoV protein expression and virus production upon PKR depletion. In addition, cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) was identified as a novel antiviral host factor in SARS-CoV replication. The inventory of pro- and antiviral host factors and pathways described here substantiates and expands our understanding of SARS-CoV replication and may contribute to the identification of novel targets for antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Replication of all viruses, including SARS-CoV, depends on and is influenced by cellular pathways. Although

  7. Evaluation of total white blood cell count as a marker for proviral load of bovine leukemia virus in dairy cattle from herds with a high seroprevalence of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Irene; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Gammella, Mariela; Martínez, Cecilia; Politzki, Romina; González, Cintia; Caviglia, Luciana; Carignano, Hugo; Fondevila, Norberto; Poli, Mario; Trono, Karina

    2013-05-01

    To determine the reference interval for WBC counts in Holstein dairy cows from herds with high seroprevalence for anti-bovine leukemia virus (BLV) antibodies, analyze the correlation of total WBC counts and blood proviral load (bPVL) in BLV-infected animals, and determine whether total WBC count can be used a hematologic marker for in vivo infection. 307 lactating cows from 16 dairy herds with high BLV seroprevalence. Blood samples were collected for assessment of plasma anti-BLV p24 antibody concentration (all cows), manual determination of WBC count (161 BLV-seronegative cows from 15 herds), and evaluation of bPVL (146 cows from another herd). The WBC count reference interval (ie, mean ± 2 SD) for BLV-seronegative dairy cows was 2,153 to 11,493 cells/μL. Of the 146 cows used to analyze the correlation between WBC count and bPVL, 107 (73%) had WBC counts within the reference interval; of those cows, only 21 (19.6%) had high bPVL. Most cows with high WBC counts (35/39) had high bPVL. Mean WBC count for cows with high bPVL was significantly higher than values for cows with low or undetectable bPVL. White blood cell counts and bPVL were significantly (ρ = 0.71) correlated. These data have provided an updated reference interval for WBC counts in Holstein cows from herds with high BLV seroprevalence. In dairy cattle under natural conditions, WBC count was correlated with bPVL; thus, WBC count determination could be a potential tool for monitoring BLV infection levels in attempts to control transmission.

  8. Long-term follow-up of HTLV-1 proviral load in asymptomatic carriers and in incident cases of HAM/TSP: what is its relevance as a prognostic marker for neurologic disease?

    PubMed

    Martins, Marina Lobato; Guimarães, Jacqueline Cronemberger; Ribas, João Gabriel; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio Ferreira; de Freitas Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara

    2017-02-01

    HTLV-1 proviral load (pvl) is an important risk marker for HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), but its value as prognostic marker is not well defined. Long-term prospective cohort studies are necessary to clarify this question. Here, we analyzed HTLV-1 pvl in the peripheral blood of 82 asymptomatic carriers (AC; 351 samples), 12 HAM/TSP patients (HAM; 46 samples), and six incident cases of HAM/TSP (iHAM), with serial samples collected before (n = 10) and after (n = 20) the disease onset. The mean interval of follow-up was 10 years in the AC group and 8 years in HAM and iHAM groups. pvl was not significantly different between the first and last measurements in the three groups, but there was a trend to decrease over time. Coefficient of variation of pvl was significantly lower in the AC group than in HAM (p = 0.015) and iHAM (p = 0.022) patients. AC and HAM individuals showed a significant and strong positive correlation between the first and last measurements of pvl, but not iHAM subjects. All individuals who developed HAM/TSP during the follow-up had high pvl level (>1 %) before the onset of disease, but a typical increase in pvl was not observed in that period. The data suggest that there is a trend to reach an equilibrium plateau of pvl over time, characteristic of each individual. A significant rate of AC keeps high pvl levels for a long time without developing clinical symptoms associated to HTLV-1 infection. Thus, serial quantification of pvl in the peripheral blood does not seem to be a good prognostic marker for HAM/TSP.

  9. Intra- and inter-laboratory variability in human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 proviral load quantification using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays: a multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Kamihira, Shimeru; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Iwanaga, Masako; Sasaki, Daisuke; Satake, Masahiro; Okayama, Akihiko; Umeki, Kazumi; Kubota, Ryuji; Izumo, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2010-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) proviral load (VL) is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis and malignant evolution. Although VL has been quantified by in-house real-time quantifiable polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technology, little is known about the harmonization among different VL assay systems. We evaluated intra- and inter-laboratory variability of VL measured at six laboratories using the same DNA samples seropositive for HTLV-1 in a two-step manner. The first study measured 60 samples by original in-house assays, finding that the median intra- and inter-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) was 44.9% (range, 25.4-71.8%) and 59.9% (34.2-93.4%), respectively. The inter-laboratory correlation coefficients ranged from 0.760 to 0.875, indicating that VL were measured with good precision in each laboratory, but inter-laboratory regression slopes differed from 0.399 to 2.206, indicating that VL were measured with a wide variation between laboratories. To examine the effect of standardization of reference materials (RM) on the VL variability, we performed a second study using only 20 samples by substituting RM for plasmid including the HTLV-1 pX region. The median inter-laboratory CV for raw pX copy number was reduced significantly from 66.9% to 35.7%, whereas the median CV for the internal control remained almost unchanged, resulting in no improvement in inter-laboratory CV for VL. This indicates that each in-house assay system worked well with good precision, but standardizing RM alone was insufficient for harmonization. The relevant choice of not only RM, but also internal control genes for data normalization is expected to be realistic to standardize HTLV-1 VL measurement. © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Chromatin structure of recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus proviral DNAs that contain tax-responsive sequences from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II in the presence and absence of tax.

    PubMed Central

    Kitado, H; Fan, H

    1989-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I and HTLV-II) are replication-competent retroviruses which contain two additional regulatory proteins, tax and rex. tax is a transcriptional transactivator of the HTLV-I or HTLV-II long terminal repeat (LTR) and also of some heterologous promoters. To investigate the mechanism of tax transactivation, we used chimeric Moloney murine leukemia viruses (M-MuLVs) with LTRs containing tax-responsive sequences from the HTLV-II LTR (nucleotides -273 to -32). Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV contained the HTLV II sequences inserted into the wild-type M-MuLV LTR at nucleotide -150, whereas delta Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV contained the same sequences inserted into an M-MuLV LTR lacking its own enhancer region. HTLV-II tax (tax II)-positive mouse cells (15S-5a) infected with Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV or delta Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV showed higher rates of viral transcription in nuclear run-on assays than did infected tax-negative NIH 3T3 cells. The chromatin structure of these viruses was investigated by high-resolution mapping of DNase I-hypersensitive (HS) sites. Three prominent HS sites were associated with HTLV-II sequences in proviral chromatin both in tax-positive and in tax-negative cells. The spacing resembled that of the 21-base-pair (bp) repeats, but the HS sites were displaced approximately 50 bp upstream of the 21-bp repeats. This suggested that cellular proteins bound to the HTLV-II sequences in the presence or absence of tax. No direct effect of tax on chromatin structure was found. These in vivo results were consistent with results of in vitro DNase footprinting studies performed by other investigators. Images PMID:2786092

  11. A Live Attenuated Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Proviral Vaccine with a Modified S2 Gene Provides Protection from Detectable Infection by Intravenous Virulent Virus Challenge of Experimentally Inoculated Horses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Craigo, Jodi K.; Howe, Laryssa; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Cook, Sheila; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Previous evaluations of inactivated whole-virus and envelope subunit vaccines to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have revealed a broad spectrum of efficacy ranging from highly type-specific protection to severe enhancement of viral replication and disease in experimentally immunized equids. Among experimental animal lentivirus vaccines, immunizations with live attenuated viral strains have proven most effective, but the vaccine efficacy has been shown to be highly dependent on the nature and severity of the vaccine virus attenuation. We describe here for the first time the characterization of an experimental attenuated proviral vaccine, EIAVUKΔS2, based on inactivation of the S2 accessory gene to down regulate in vivo replication without affecting in vitro growth properties. The results of these studies demonstrated that immunization with EIAVUKΔS2 elicited mature virus-specific immune responses by 6 months and that this vaccine immunity provided protection from disease and detectable infection by intravenous challenge with a reference virulent biological clone, EIAVPV. This level of protection was observed in each of the six experimental horses challenged with the reference virulent EIAVPV by using a low-dose multiple-exposure protocol (three administrations of 10 median horse infectious doses [HID50], intravenous) designed to mimic field exposures and in all three experimentally immunized ponies challenged intravenously with a single inoculation of 3,000 HID50. In contrast, naïve equids subjected to the low- or high-dose challenge develop a detectable infection of challenge virus and acute disease within several weeks. Thus, these data demonstrate that the EIAV S2 gene provides an optimal site for modification to achieve the necessary balance between attenuation to suppress virulence and replication potential to sufficiently drive host immune responses to produce vaccine immunity to viral exposure. PMID:12805423

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  13. The platypus genome unraveled.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-06-13

    The genome of the platypus has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated by an international genomics team. Like the animal itself the platypus genome contains an amalgam of mammal, reptile, and bird-like features.

  14. Elimination of HIV-1 Genomes from Human T-lymphoid Cells by CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Fischer, Tracy; Tedaldi, Ellen; Napoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Yonggang; Karn, Jonathan; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    We employed an RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 DNA editing system to precisely remove the entire HIV-1 genome spanning between 5′ and 3′ LTRs of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA copies from latently infected human CD4+ T-cells. Comprehensive assessment of whole-genome sequencing of HIV-1 eradicated cells ruled out any off-target effects by our CRISPR/Cas9 technology that might compromise the integrity of the host genome and further showed no effect on several cell health indices including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis. Persistent co-expression of Cas9 and the specific targeting guide RNAs in HIV-1-eradicated T-cells protected them against new infection by HIV-1. Lentivirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 significantly diminished HIV-1 replication in infected primary CD4+ T-cell cultures and drastically reduced viral load in ex vivo culture of CD4+ T-cells obtained from HIV-1 infected patients. Thus, gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 may provide a new therapeutic path for eliminating HIV-1 DNA from CD4+ T-cells and potentially serve as a novel and effective platform toward curing AIDS. PMID:26939770

  15. Elimination of HIV-1 Genomes from Human T-lymphoid Cells by CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Fischer, Tracy; Tedaldi, Ellen; Napoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Yonggang; Karn, Jonathan; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-03-04

    We employed an RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 DNA editing system to precisely remove the entire HIV-1 genome spanning between 5' and 3' LTRs of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA copies from latently infected human CD4+ T-cells. Comprehensive assessment of whole-genome sequencing of HIV-1 eradicated cells ruled out any off-target effects by our CRISPR/Cas9 technology that might compromise the integrity of the host genome and further showed no effect on several cell health indices including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis. Persistent co-expression of Cas9 and the specific targeting guide RNAs in HIV-1-eradicated T-cells protected them against new infection by HIV-1. Lentivirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 significantly diminished HIV-1 replication in infected primary CD4+ T-cell cultures and drastically reduced viral load in ex vivo culture of CD4+ T-cells obtained from HIV-1 infected patients. Thus, gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 may provide a new therapeutic path for eliminating HIV-1 DNA from CD4+ T-cells and potentially serve as a novel and effective platform toward curing AIDS.

  16. A large-scale zebrafish gene knockout resource for the genome-wide study of gene function

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Lu, Jing; Gildea, Derek E.; Huang, Haigen; Pei, Wuhong; Yang, Zhongan; Huang, Sunny C.; Schoenfeld, David; Pho, Nam H.; Casero, David; Hirase, Takashi; Mosbrook-Davis, Deborah; Zhang, Suiyuan; Jao, Li-En; Zhang, Bo; Woods, Ian G.; Zimmerman, Steven; Schier, Alexander F.; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Burgess, Shawn M.; Lin, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    With the completion of the zebrafish genome sequencing project, it becomes possible to analyze the function of zebrafish genes in a systematic way. The first step in such an analysis is to inactivate each protein-coding gene by targeted or random mutation. Here we describe a streamlined pipeline using proviral insertions coupled with high-throughput sequencing and mapping technologies to widely mutagenize genes in the zebrafish genome. We also report the first 6144 mutagenized and archived F1's predicted to carry up to 3776 mutations in annotated genes. Using in vitro fertilization, we have rescued and characterized ∼0.5% of the predicted mutations, showing mutation efficacy and a variety of phenotypes relevant to both developmental processes and human genetic diseases. Mutagenized fish lines are being made freely available to the public through the Zebrafish International Resource Center. These fish lines establish an important milestone for zebrafish genetics research and should greatly facilitate systematic functional studies of the vertebrate genome. PMID:23382537

  17. Characterization of AKR murine leukemia virus sequences in AKR mouse substrains and structure of integrated recombinant genomes in tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Quint, W; Quax, W; van der Putten, H; Berns, A

    1981-01-01

    A specific cDNA probe of AKR murine leukemia virus (AKR-MLV) was prepared to detect AKR-MLV sequences in normal and tumor tissues in a variety of AKR mouse substrains. AKR strains contained up to six endogenous AKR-MLV genomes. All substrains tested had one AKR-MLV locus in common, and closely related substrains had several proviruses integrated in an identical site. Virus-induced tumors in the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS strains showed a reintegration pattern of AKR-MLV sequences unique for the individual animal, suggesting a monoclonal origin for the outgrown tumors. An analysis of tumor DNAs from the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS substrains with restriction enzymes cleaving within the proviral genome revealed a new EcoRI restriction site and BamHI restriction site not present in normal tissues. The positions of these sites corresponded both with cleavage sites of EcoRI and BamHI in integrated Moloney recombinants and with the structure of isolated AKR mink cell focus-forming viruses. All tumors analyzed to data contain nearly identical integrated recombinant genomes, suggesting a causal relationship between the formation of recombinants and the leukemogenic process. Images PMID:6268802

  18. Genome evolution: the dynamics of static genomes.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Alexandra

    2004-06-22

    A random survey of a microsporidian genome has revealed some striking features. Although the genomes of microsporidians are among the smallest known for eukaryotes, their organisation appears to be well conserved.

  19. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genomic selection requires genomic control of inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Anna K; Woolliams, John A; Meuwissen, Theo H E

    2012-08-16

    In the past, pedigree relationships were used to control and monitor inbreeding because genomic relationships among selection candidates were not available until recently. The aim of this study was to understand the consequences for genetic variability across the genome when genomic information is used to estimate breeding values and in managing the inbreeding generated in the course of selection on genome-enhanced estimated breeding values. These consequences were measured by genetic gain, pedigree- and genome-based rates of inbreeding, and local inbreeding across the genome. Breeding schemes were compared by simulating truncation selection or optimum contribution selection with a restriction on pedigree- or genome-based inbreeding, and with selection using estimated breeding values based on genome- or pedigree-based BLUP. Trait information was recorded on full-sibs of the candidates. When the information used to estimate breeding values and to constrain rates of inbreeding were either both pedigree-based or both genome-based, rates of genomic inbreeding were close to the desired values and the identical-by-descent profiles were reasonably uniform across the genome. However, with a pedigree-based inbreeding constraint and genome-based estimated breeding values, genomic rates of inbreeding were much higher than expected. With pedigree-instead of genome-based estimated breeding values, the impact of the largest QTL on the breeding values was much smaller, resulting in a more uniform genome-wide identical-by-descent profile but genomic rates of inbreeding were still higher than expected based on pedigree relationships, because they measure the inbreeding at a neutral locus not linked to any QTL. Neutral loci did not exist here, where there were 100 QTL on each chromosome. With a pedigree-based inbreeding constraint and genome-based estimated breeding values, genomic rates of inbreeding substantially exceeded the value of its constraint. In contrast, with a genome

  1. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  2. Ensembl genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent...

  3. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello-Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M; Howe, Kevin L; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M

    2016-01-04

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces.

  4. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E.; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J.; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J.; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K.; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D.; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello–Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M.; Howe, Kevin L.; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces. PMID:26578574

  5. The retrovirus HTLV-1 inserts an ectopic CTCF-binding site into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Satou, Yorifumi; Miyazato, Paola; Ishihara, Ko; Yaguchi, Hiroko; Melamed, Anat; Miura, Michi; Fukuda, Asami; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Takehisa; Rowan, Aileen G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-03-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes malignant and inflammatory diseases in ∼10% of infected people. A typical host has between 10(4) and 10(5) clones of HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes, each clone distinguished by the genomic integration site of the single-copy HTLV-1 provirus. The HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ) factor gene is constitutively expressed from the minus strand of the provirus, whereas plus-strand expression, required for viral propagation to uninfected cells, is suppressed or intermittent in vivo, allowing escape from host immune surveillance. It remains unknown what regulates this pattern of proviral transcription and latency. Here, we show that CTCF, a key regulator of chromatin structure and function, binds to the provirus at a sharp border in epigenetic modifications in the pX region of the HTLV-1 provirus in T cells naturally infected with HTLV-1. CTCF is a zinc-finger protein that binds to an insulator region in genomic DNA and plays a fundamental role in controlling higher order chromatin structure and gene expression in vertebrate cells. We show that CTCF bound to HTLV-1 acts as an enhancer blocker, regulates HTLV-1 mRNA splicing, and forms long-distance interactions with flanking host chromatin. CTCF-binding sites (CTCF-BSs) have been propagated throughout the genome by transposons in certain primate lineages, but CTCF binding has not previously been described in present-day exogenous retroviruses. The presence of an ectopic CTCF-BS introduced by the retrovirus in tens of thousands of genomic locations has the potential to cause widespread abnormalities in host cell chromatin structure and gene expression.

  6. Genomic location and characterisation of MIC genes in cattle.

    PubMed

    Birch, James; De Juan Sanjuan, Cristina; Guzman, Efrain; Ellis, Shirley A

    2008-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related (MIC) genes have been previously identified and characterised in human. They encode polymorphic class I-like molecules that are stress-inducible, and constitute one of the ligands of the activating natural killer cell receptor NKG2D. We have identified three MIC genes within the cattle genome, located close to three non-classical MHC class I genes. The genomic position relative to other genes is very similar to the arrangement reported in the pig MHC region. Analysis of MIC cDNA sequences derived from a range of cattle cell lines suggest there may be four MIC genes in total. We have investigated the presence of the genes in distinct and well-defined MHC haplotypes, and show that one gene is consistently present, while configuration of the other three genes appears variable.

  7. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  8. Ontology for Genome Comparison and Genomic Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Keith; Stevens, Robert; Pocock, Matthew; Lee, Pete

    2004-01-01

    We present an ontology for describing genomes, genome comparisons, their evolution and biological function. This ontology will support the development of novel genome comparison algorithms and aid the community in discussing genomic evolution. It provides a framework for communication about comparative genomics, and a basis upon which further automated analysis can be built. The nomenclature defined by the ontology will foster clearer communication between biologists, and also standardize terms used by data publishers in the results of analysis programs. The overriding aim of this ontology is the facilitation of consistent annotation of genomes through computational methods, rather than human annotators. To this end, the ontology includes definitions that support computer analysis and automated transfer of annotations between genomes, rather than relying upon human mediation. PMID:18629137

  9. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-10-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. © 2015 Hilton and Gersbach; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Isaac B.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  11. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Culex genome is not just another genome for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Labbé, Pierrick; Corbel, Vincent

    2012-03-30

    Formal publication of the Culex genome sequence has closed the human disease vector triangle by meeting the Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti genome sequences. Compared to these other mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus possesses many specific hallmark characteristics, and may thus provide different angles for research which ultimately leads to a practical solution for controlling the ever increasing burden of insect-vector-borne diseases around the globe. We argue the special importance of the cosmopolitan species- Culex genome sequence by invoking many interesting questions and the possible of potential of the Culex genome to answer those.

  13. Culex genome is not just another genome for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Formal publication of the Culex genome sequence has closed the human disease vector triangle by meeting the Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti genome sequences. Compared to these other mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus possesses many specific hallmark characteristics, and may thus provide different angles for research which ultimately leads to a practical solution for controlling the ever increasing burden of insect-vector-borne diseases around the globe. We argue the special importance of the cosmopolitan species- Culex genome sequence by invoking many interesting questions and the possible of potential of the Culex genome to answer those. PMID:22463777

  14. GenomeFingerprinter: the genome fingerprint and the universal genome fingerprint analysis for systematic comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yuncan; Ai, Hannan; Meng, Fanmei; Zhao, Lei

    2013-01-01

    No attention has been paid on comparing a set of genome sequences crossing genetic components and biological categories with far divergence over large size range. We define it as the systematic comparative genomics and aim to develop the methodology. First, we create a method, GenomeFingerprinter, to unambiguously produce a set of three-dimensional coordinates from a sequence, followed by one three-dimensional plot and six two-dimensional trajectory projections, to illustrate the genome fingerprint of a given genome sequence. Second, we develop a set of concepts and tools, and thereby establish a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis (UGFA). Particularly, we define the total genetic component configuration (TGCC) (including chromosome, plasmid, and phage) for describing a strain as a systematic unit, the universal genome fingerprint map (UGFM) of TGCC for differentiating strains as a universal system, and the systematic comparative genomics (SCG) for comparing a set of genomes crossing genetic components and biological categories. Third, we construct a method of quantitative analysis to compare two genomes by using the outcome dataset of genome fingerprint analysis. Specifically, we define the geometric center and its geometric mean for a given genome fingerprint map, followed by the Euclidean distance, the differentiate rate, and the weighted differentiate rate to quantitatively describe the difference between two genomes of comparison. Moreover, we demonstrate the applications through case studies on various genome sequences, giving tremendous insights into the critical issues in microbial genomics and taxonomy. We have created a method, GenomeFingerprinter, for rapidly computing, geometrically visualizing, intuitively comparing a set of genomes at genome fingerprint level, and hence established a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis, as well as developed a method of quantitative analysis of the outcome dataset. These have set

  15. GenomeFingerprinter: The Genome Fingerprint and the Universal Genome Fingerprint Analysis for Systematic Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yuncan; Ai, Hannan; Meng, Fanmei; Zhao, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Background No attention has been paid on comparing a set of genome sequences crossing genetic components and biological categories with far divergence over large size range. We define it as the systematic comparative genomics and aim to develop the methodology. Results First, we create a method, GenomeFingerprinter, to unambiguously produce a set of three-dimensional coordinates from a sequence, followed by one three-dimensional plot and six two-dimensional trajectory projections, to illustrate the genome fingerprint of a given genome sequence. Second, we develop a set of concepts and tools, and thereby establish a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis (UGFA). Particularly, we define the total genetic component configuration (TGCC) (including chromosome, plasmid, and phage) for describing a strain as a systematic unit, the universal genome fingerprint map (UGFM) of TGCC for differentiating strains as a universal system, and the systematic comparative genomics (SCG) for comparing a set of genomes crossing genetic components and biological categories. Third, we construct a method of quantitative analysis to compare two genomes by using the outcome dataset of genome fingerprint analysis. Specifically, we define the geometric center and its geometric mean for a given genome fingerprint map, followed by the Euclidean distance, the differentiate rate, and the weighted differentiate rate to quantitatively describe the difference between two genomes of comparison. Moreover, we demonstrate the applications through case studies on various genome sequences, giving tremendous insights into the critical issues in microbial genomics and taxonomy. Conclusions We have created a method, GenomeFingerprinter, for rapidly computing, geometrically visualizing, intuitively comparing a set of genomes at genome fingerprint level, and hence established a method called the universal genome fingerprint analysis, as well as developed a method of quantitative analysis of the

  16. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  17. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  18. Exploiting the Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-11

    complete human genome sequence . 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY...goal of the project is to ob- tain the complete sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. The genome contains approximately 3.3 Gb (billion base...and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the "post- genomic " era, following acquisition of the complete human genome

  19. The kangaroo genome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  20. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  1. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    PubMed

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  2. Evolutionary Conservation of Orthoretroviral Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs) and ab initio Detection of Single LTRs in Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Benachenhou, Farid; Jern, Patric; Oja, Merja; Sperber, Göran; Blikstad, Vidar; Somervuo, Panu; Kaski, Samuel; Blomberg, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Background Retroviral LTRs, paired or single, influence the transcription of both retroviral and non-retroviral genomic sequences. Vertebrate genomes contain many thousand endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and their LTRs. Single LTRs are difficult to detect from genomic sequences without recourse to repetitiveness or presence in a proviral structure. Understanding of LTR structure increases understanding of LTR function, and of functional genomics. Here we develop models of orthoretroviral LTRs useful for detection in genomes and for structural analysis. Principal Findings Although mutated, ERV LTRs are more numerous and diverse than exogenous retroviral (XRV) LTRs. Hidden Markov models (HMMs), and alignments based on them, were created for HML- (human MMTV-like), general-beta-, gamma- and lentiretroviruslike LTRs, plus a general-vertebrate LTR model. Training sets were XRV LTRs and RepBase LTR consensuses. The HML HMM was most sensitive and detected 87% of the HML LTRs in human chromosome 19 at 96% specificity. By combining all HMMs with a low cutoff, for screening, 71% of all LTRs found by RepeatMasker in chromosome 19 were found. HMM consensus sequences had a conserved modular LTR structure. Target site duplications (TG-CA), TATA (occasionally absent), an AATAAA box and a T-rich region were prominent features. Most of the conservation was located in, or adjacent to, R and U5, with evidence for stem loops. Several of the long HML LTRs contained long ORFs inserted after the second A rich module. HMM consensus alignment allowed comparison of functional features like transcriptional start sites (sense and antisense) between XRVs and ERVs. Conclusion The modular conserved and redundant orthoretroviral LTR structure with three A-rich regions is reminiscent of structurally relaxed Giardia promoters. The five HMMs provided a novel broad range, repeat-independent, ab initio LTR detection, with prospects for greater generalisation, and insight into LTR structure, which may

  3. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  4. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  5. Plant genomics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Campos-de Quiroz, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Recent technological advancements have substantially expanded our ability to analyze and understand plant genomes and to reduce the gap existing between genotype and phenotype. The fast evolving field of genomics allows scientists to analyze thousand of genes in parallel, to understand the genetic architecture of plant genomes and also to isolate the genes responsible for mutations. Furthermore, whole genomes can now be sequenced. This review addresses these issues and also discusses ways to extract biological meaning from DNA data. Although genomic issuesare addressed from a plant perspective, this review provides insights into the genomic analyses of other organisms.

  6. Seroprevalence and Genomic Divergence of Circulating Strains of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae Species†

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E.; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A.; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today. PMID:15956574

  7. Seroprevalence and genomic divergence of circulating strains of feline immunodeficiency virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae species.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today.

  8. Genomic comparison between attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus vaccine strains and their parental virulent strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2011-02-01

    A lentiviral vaccine, live attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, was developed in the 1970s, and this has made tremendous contributions to the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. Four key virus strains were generated during the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine: the original Liao-Ning strain (EIAV(LN40)), a donkey-adapted virulent strain (EIAV(DV117)), a donkey-leukocyte-attenuated vaccine strain (EIAV(DLV121)), and a fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-adapted vaccine strain (EIAV(FDDV13)). In this study, we analyzed the proviral genomes of these four EIAV strains and found a series of consensus substitutions among these strains. These mutations provide useful information for understanding the genetic basis of EIAV attenuation. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in a variety of genes in our attenuated EIAV vaccines not only provide a basis for virulence attenuation and induction of protective immunity but also greatly reduce the risk of reversion to virulence.

  9. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  10. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  11. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  12. GENOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of recently developed and emerging genomics technologies on environmental sciences has significant implications for human and ecological risk assessment issues. The linkage of data generated from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabalomics, and ecology can be ...

  13. GENOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of recently developed and emerging genomics technologies on environmental sciences has significant implications for human and ecological risk assessment issues. The linkage of data generated from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabalomics, and ecology can be ...

  14. Exploiting the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Koonin, S.; Lewis, N.; Schwitters, R.

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  15. National Plant Genome Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    JAN 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE National Plant Genome Initiative. Progress Report 5a...refl ected in future Administration budgets. Cover Photo: National Plant Genome Initiative Progress Report January 2005 National Science and...Technology Council Committee on Science Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes [Blank Page] Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes Committee on

  16. GENESIS: genome evolution scenarios.

    PubMed

    Gog, Simon; Bader, Martin; Ohlebusch, Enno

    2008-03-01

    We implemented a software tool called GENESIS for three different genome rearrangement problems: Sorting a unichromosomal genome by weighted reversals and transpositions (SwRT), sorting a multichromosomal genome by reversals, translocations, fusions and fissions (SRTl), and sorting a multichromosomal genome by weighted reversals, translocations, fusions, fissions and transpositions (SwRTTl). Source code can be obtained by the authors, or use the web interface http://www.uni-ulm.de/in/theo/research/genesis.html.

  17. Whole-genome patenting.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Maureen A; Bostanci, Adam; Calvert, Jane

    2005-06-01

    Gene patenting is now a familiar commercial practice, but there is little awareness that several patents claim ownership of the complete genome sequence of a prokaryote or virus. When these patents are analysed and compared to those for other biological entities, it becomes clear that genome patents seek to exploit the genome as an information base and are part of a broader shift towards intangible intellectual property in genomics.

  18. Office of Cancer Genomics |

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) is to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance and accelerate genomics science and technology development, and efficiently translate the genomics data to improve cancer research, prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment.

  19. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  20. Office of Cancer Genomics |

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) is to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance and accelerate genomics science and technology development, and efficiently translate the genomics data to improve cancer research, prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ravi; Blom, Jochen; Palva, Airi; Siezen, Roland J.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The genus Lactobacillus includes a diverse group of bacteria consisting of many species that are associated with fermentations of plants, meat or milk. In addition, various lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. Finally, several Lactobacillus strains are marketed as probiotics as their consumption can confer a health benefit to host. Presently, 154 Lactobacillus species are known and a growing fraction of these are subject to draft genome sequencing. However, complete genome sequences are needed to provide a platform for detailed genomic comparisons. Therefore, we selected a total of 20 genomes of various Lactobacillus strains for which complete genomic sequences have been reported. These genomes had sizes varying from 1.8 to 3.3 Mb and other characteristic features, such as G+C content that ranged from 33% to 51%. The Lactobacillus pan genome was found to consist of approximately 14 000 protein‐encoding genes while all 20 genomes shared a total of 383 sets of orthologous genes that defined the Lactobacillus core genome (LCG). Based on advanced phylogeny of the proteins encoded by this LCG, we grouped the 20 strains into three main groups and defined core group genes present in all genomes of a single group, signature group genes shared in all genomes of one group but absent in all other Lactobacillus genomes, and Group‐specific ORFans present in core group genes of one group and absent in all other complete genomes. The latter are of specific value in defining the different groups of genomes. The study provides a platform for present individual comparisons as well as future analysis of new Lactobacillus genomes. PMID:21375712

  2. A genome blogger manifesto.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Manuel

    2012-10-26

    Cheap prices for genomic testing have revolutionized consumers' access to personal genomics. Exploration of personal genomes poses significant challenges for customers wishing to learn beyond provider customer reports. A vibrant community has spontaneously appeared blogging experiences and data as a way to learn about their personal genomes. No set of values has publicly been described to date encapsulating ideals and code of conduct for this community. Here I present a first attempt to address this vacuum based on my own personal experiences as genome blogger.

  3. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  4. The Genomic Medicine Game.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elvis; de Andrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Benitez, Sonia; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H

    2016-01-01

    With advancements in genomics technology, health care has been improving and new paradigms of medicine such as genomic medicine have evolved. The education of clinicians, researchers and students to face the challenges posed by these new approaches, however, has been often lagging behind. From this the Genomic Medicine Game, an educational tool, was created for the purpose of conceptualizing the key components of Genomic Medicine. A number of phenotype-genotype associations were found through a literature review, which was used to be a base for the concepts the Genomic Medicine Game would focus on. Built in Java, the game was successfully tested with promising results.

  5. Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild.

    PubMed

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; McCracken, Carrie L; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue; Roelke, Melody; Sondgeroth, Kerry; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-02-05

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) naturally infects multiple species of cat and is related to human immunodeficiency virus in humans. FIV infection causes AIDS-like disease and mortality in the domestic cat (Felis catus) and serves as a natural model for HIV infection in humans. In African lions (Panthera leo) and other exotic felid species, disease etiology introduced by FIV infection are less clear, but recent studies indicate that FIV causes moderate to severe CD4 depletion. In this study, comparative genomic methods are used to evaluate the full proviral genome of two geographically distinct FIV subtypes isolated from free-ranging lions. Genome organization of FIVPle subtype B (9891 bp) from lions in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and FIVPle subtype E (9899 bp) isolated from lions in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, both resemble FIV genome sequence from puma, Pallas cat and domestic cat across 5' LTR, gag, pol, vif, orfA, env, rev and 3'LTR regions. Comparative analyses of available full-length FIV consisting of subtypes A, B and C from FIVFca, Pallas cat FIVOma and two puma FIVPco subtypes A and B recapitulate the species-specific monophyly of FIV marked by high levels of genetic diversity both within and between species. Across all FIVPle gene regions except env, lion subtypes B and E are monophyletic, and marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIVOma than to other FIV. Sequence analyses indicate the SU and TM regions of env vary substantially between subtypes, with FIVPle subtype E more related to domestic cat FIVFca than to FIVPle subtype B and FIVOma likely reflecting recombination between strains in the wild. This study demonstrates the necessity of whole-genome analysis to complement population/gene-based studies, which are of limited utility in uncovering complex events such as recombination that may lead to functional differences in virulence and pathogenicity. These full-length lion lentiviruses are integral to the advancement of comparative

  6. Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; McCracken, Carrie L; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue; Roelke, Melody; Sondgeroth, Kerry; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) naturally infects multiple species of cat and is related to human immunodeficiency virus in humans. FIV infection causes AIDS-like disease and mortality in the domestic cat (Felis catus) and serves as a natural model for HIV infection in humans. In African lions (Panthera leo) and other exotic felid species, disease etiology introduced by FIV infection are less clear, but recent studies indicate that FIV causes moderate to severe CD4 depletion. Results In this study, comparative genomic methods are used to evaluate the full proviral genome of two geographically distinct FIV subtypes isolated from free-ranging lions. Genome organization of FIVPle subtype B (9891 bp) from lions in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and FIVPle subtype E (9899 bp) isolated from lions in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, both resemble FIV genome sequence from puma, Pallas cat and domestic cat across 5' LTR, gag, pol, vif, orfA, env, rev and 3'LTR regions. Comparative analyses of available full-length FIV consisting of subtypes A, B and C from FIVFca, Pallas cat FIVOma and two puma FIVPco subtypes A and B recapitulate the species-specific monophyly of FIV marked by high levels of genetic diversity both within and between species. Across all FIVPle gene regions except env, lion subtypes B and E are monophyletic, and marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIVOma than to other FIV. Sequence analyses indicate the SU and TM regions of env vary substantially between subtypes, with FIVPle subtype E more related to domestic cat FIVFca than to FIVPle subtype B and FIVOma likely reflecting recombination between strains in the wild. Conclusion This study demonstrates the necessity of whole-genome analysis to complement population/gene-based studies, which are of limited utility in uncovering complex events such as recombination that may lead to functional differences in virulence and pathogenicity. These full-length lion lentiviruses are integral to

  7. The Bluejay genome browser.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jung; Gordon, Paul M K; Sensen, Christoph W

    2012-03-01

    The Bluejay genome browser is a stand-alone visualization tool for the multi-scale viewing of annotated genomes and other genomic elements. Bluejay allows users to customize display features to suit their needs, and produces publication-quality graphics. Bluejay provides a multitude of ways to interrelate biological data at the genome scale. Users can load gene expression data into a genome display for expression visualization in context. Multiple genomes can be compared concurrently, including time series expression data, based on Gene Ontology labels. External, context-sensitive biological Web Services are linked to the displayed genomic elements ad hoc for in-depth genomic data analysis and interpretation. Users can mark multiple points of interest in a genome by creating waypoints, and exploit them for easy navigation of single or multiple genomes. Using this comprehensive visual environment, users can study a gene not just in relation to its genome, but also its transcriptome and evolutionary origins. Written in Java, Bluejay is platform-independent and is freely available from http://bluejay.ucalgary.ca.

  8. Microbial genomic taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A need for a genomic species definition is emerging from several independent studies worldwide. In this commentary paper, we discuss recent studies on the genomic taxonomy of diverse microbial groups and a unified species definition based on genomics. Accordingly, strains from the same microbial species share >95% Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI), >95% identity based on multiple alignment genes, <10 in Karlin genomic signature, and > 70% in silico Genome-to-Genome Hybridization similarity (GGDH). Species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and supertree analysis. In addition to the established requirements for species descriptions, we propose that new taxa descriptions should also include at least a draft genome sequence of the type strain in order to obtain a clear outlook on the genomic landscape of the novel microbe. The application of the new genomic species definition put forward here will allow researchers to use genome sequences to define simultaneously coherent phenotypic and genomic groups. PMID:24365132

  9. UCSC genome browser tutorial.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2008-08-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics website consists of a suite of free, open-source, on-line tools that can be used to browse, analyze, and query genomic data. These tools are available to anyone who has an Internet browser and an interest in genomics. The website provides a quick and easy-to-use visual display of genomic data. It places annotation tracks beneath genome coordinate positions, allowing rapid visual correlation of different types of information. Many of the annotation tracks are submitted by scientists worldwide; the others are computed by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics group from publicly available sequence data. It also allows users to upload and display their own experimental results or annotation sets by creating a custom track. The suite of tools, downloadable data files, and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

  10. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  11. Whole-genome alignment.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Colin N

    2012-01-01

    Whole-genome alignment (WGA) is the prediction of evolutionary relationships at the nucleotide level between two or more genomes. It combines aspects of both colinear sequence alignment and gene orthology prediction, and is typically more challenging to address than either of these tasks due to the size and complexity of whole genomes. Despite the difficulty of this problem, numerous methods have been developed for its solution because WGAs are valuable for genome-wide analyses, such as phylogenetic inference, genome annotation, and function prediction. In this chapter, we discuss the meaning and significance of WGA and present an overview of the methods that address it. We also examine the problem of evaluating whole-genome aligners and offer a set of methodological challenges that need to be tackled in order to make the most effective use of our rapidly growing databases of whole genomes.

  12. Genomic Sequencing in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Musaffe; Amos, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic sequencing has provided critical insights into the etiology of both simple and complex diseases. The enormous reductions in cost for whole genome sequencing have allowed this technology to gain increasing use. Whole genome analysis has impacted research of complex diseases including cancer by allowing the systematic analysis of entire genomes in a single experiment, thereby facilitating the discovery of somatic and germline mutations, and identification of the function and impact of the insertions, deletions, and structural rearrangements, including translocations and inversions, in novel disease genes. Whole-genome sequencing can be used to provide the most comprehensive characterization of the cancer genome, the complexity of which we are only beginning to understand. Hence in this review, we focus on whole-genome sequencing in cancer. PMID:23178448

  13. Enabling responsible public genomics.

    PubMed

    Conley, John M; Doerr, Adam K; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    As scientific understandings of genetics advance, researchers require increasingly rich datasets that combine genomic data from large numbers of individuals with medical and other personal information. Linking individuals' genetic data and personal information precludes anonymity and produces medically significant information--a result not contemplated by the established legal and ethical conventions governing human genomic research. To pursue the next generation of human genomic research and commerce in a responsible fashion, scientists, lawyers, and regulators must address substantial new issues, including researchers' duties with respect to clinically significant data, the challenges to privacy presented by genomic data, the boundary between genomic research and commerce, and the practice of medicine. This Article presents a new model for understanding and addressing these new challenges--a "public genomics" premised on the idea that ethically, legally, and socially responsible genomics research requires openness, not privacy, as its organizing principle. Responsible public genomics combines the data contributed by informed and fully consenting information altruists and the research potential of rich datasets in a genomic commons that is freely and globally available. This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project. This Article also (i) demonstrates that large-scale genomic projects are desirable, (ii) evaluates the risks and challenges presented by public genomics research, and (iii) determines that the current legal and regulatory regimes restrict beneficial and responsible scientific inquiry while failing to adequately protect participants. The Article concludes by proposing a modified normative and legal framework that embraces and enables a future of responsible public genomics.

  14. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    PubMed

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  15. GTF2IRD2 is located in the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region 7q11.23 and encodes a protein with two TFII-I-like helix-loop-helix repeats.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Aleksandr V; Erdenechimeg, Lkhamsuren; Mungunsukh, Ognoon; Roth, Jutta J; Enkhmandakh, Badam; Ruddle, Frank H; Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2004-07-27

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (also known as Williams syndrome) is caused by a deletion of a 1.55- to 1.84-megabase region from chromosome band 7q11.23. GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I, located within this critical region, encode proteins of the TFII-I family with multiple helix-loop-helix domains known as I repeats. In the present work, we characterize a third member, GTF2IRD2, which has sequence and structural similarity to the GTF2I and GTF2IRD1 paralogs. The ORF encodes a protein with several features characteristic of regulatory factors, including two I repeats, two leucine zippers, and a single Cys-2/His-2 zinc finger. The genomic organization of human, baboon, rat, and mouse genes is well conserved. Our exon-by-exon comparison has revealed that GTF2IRD2 is more closely related to GTF2I than to GTF2IRD1 and apparently is derived from the GTF2I sequence. The comparison of GTF2I and GTF2IRD2 genes revealed two distinct regions of homology, indicating that the helix-loop-helix domain structure of the GTF2IRD2 gene has been generated by two independent genomic duplications. We speculate that GTF2I is derived from GTF2IRD1 as a result of local duplication and the further evolution of its structure was associated with its functional specialization. Comparison of genomic sequences surrounding GTF2IRD2 genes in mice and humans allows refinement of the centromeric breakpoint position of the primate-specific inversion within the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region.

  16. GTF2IRD2 is located in the Williams–Beuren syndrome critical region 7q11.23 and encodes a protein with two TFII-I-like helix–loop–helix repeats

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Aleksandr V.; Erdenechimeg, Lkhamsuren; Mungunsukh, Ognoon; Roth, Jutta J.; Enkhmandakh, Badam; Ruddle, Frank H.; Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2004-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (also known as Williams syndrome) is caused by a deletion of a 1.55- to 1.84-megabase region from chromosome band 7q11.23. GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I, located within this critical region, encode proteins of the TFII-I family with multiple helix–loop–helix domains known as I repeats. In the present work, we characterize a third member, GTF2IRD2, which has sequence and structural similarity to the GTF2I and GTF2IRD1 paralogs. The ORF encodes a protein with several features characteristic of regulatory factors, including two I repeats, two leucine zippers, and a single Cys-2/His-2 zinc finger. The genomic organization of human, baboon, rat, and mouse genes is well conserved. Our exon-by-exon comparison has revealed that GTF2IRD2 is more closely related to GTF2I than to GTF2IRD1 and apparently is derived from the GTF2I sequence. The comparison of GTF2I and GTF2IRD2 genes revealed two distinct regions of homology, indicating that the helix–loop–helix domain structure of the GTF2IRD2 gene has been generated by two independent genomic duplications. We speculate that GTF2I is derived from GTF2IRD1 as a result of local duplication and the further evolution of its structure was associated with its functional specialization. Comparison of genomic sequences surrounding GTF2IRD2 genes in mice and humans allows refinement of the centromeric breakpoint position of the primate-specific inversion within the Williams–Beuren syndrome critical region. PMID:15243160

  17. HeteroGenome: database of genome periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Chaley, Maria; Kutyrkin, Vladimir; Tulbasheva, Gayane; Teplukhina, Elena; Nazipova, Nafisa

    2014-01-01

    We present the first release of the HeteroGenome database collecting latent periodicity regions in genomes. Tandem repeats and highly divergent tandem repeats along with the regions of a new type of periodicity, known as profile periodicity, have been collected for the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We obtained data with the aid of a spectral-statistical approach to search for reliable latent periodicity regions (with periods up to 2000 bp) in DNA sequences. The original two-level mode of data presentation (a broad view of the region of latent periodicity and a second level indicating conservative fragments of its structure) was further developed to enable us to obtain the estimate, without redundancy, that latent periodicity regions make up ∼10% of the analyzed genomes. Analysis of the quantitative and qualitative content of located periodicity regions on all chromosomes of the analyzed organisms revealed dominant characteristic types of periodicity in the genomes. The pattern of density distribution of latent periodicity regions on chromosome unambiguously characterizes each chromosome in genome. Database URL: http://www.jcbi.ru/lp_baze/ PMID:24857969

  18. Transcriptional start site heterogeneity modulates the structure and function of the HIV-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; Monti, Sarah; Smaldino, Philip J.; Van, Verna; Bolden, Nicholas C.; Brown, Joshua D.; Russo, Emily; Swanson, Canessa; Shuey, Alex; Telesnitsky, Alice; Summers, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The promoter in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA contains three sequential guanosines at the U3–R boundary that have been proposed to function as sites for transcription initiation. Here we show that all three sites are used in cells infected with HIV-1 and that viral RNAs containing a single 5′ capped guanosine (Cap1G) are specifically selected for packaging in virions, consistent with a recent report [Masuda et al. (2015) Sci Rep 5:17680]. In addition, we now show that transcripts that begin with two or three capped guanosines (Cap2G or Cap3G) are enriched on polysomes, indicating that RNAs synthesized from different transcription start sites have different functions in viral replication. Because genomes are selected for packaging as dimers, we examined the in vitro monomer–dimer equilibrium properties of Cap1G, Cap2G, and Cap3G 5′-leader RNAs in the NL4-3 strain of HIV-1. Strikingly, under physiological-like ionic conditions in which the Cap1G 5′-leader RNA adopts a dimeric structure, the Cap2G and Cap3G 5′-leader RNAs exist predominantly as monomers. Mutagenesis studies designed to probe for base-pairing interactions suggest that the additional guanosines of the 2G and 3G RNAs remodel the base of the PolyA hairpin, resulting in enhanced sequestration of dimer-promoting residues and stabilization of the monomer. Our studies suggest a mechanism through which the structure, function, and fate of the viral genome can be modulated by the transcriptionally controlled presence or absence of a single 5′ guanosine. PMID:27834211

  19. State of cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  20. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  1. Querying genomic databases

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

    1991-09-01

    A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

  2. Nucleic Acid Binding by Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus CA Promotes Virus Assembly and Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Füzik, Tibor; Píchalová, Růžena; Schur, Florian K. M.; Strohalmová, Karolína; Křížová, Ivana; Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Briggs, John A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gag polyprotein of retroviruses drives immature virus assembly by forming hexameric protein lattices. The assembly is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions between capsid (CA) domains and by interactions between nucleocapsid (NC) domains and RNA. Specific interactions between NC and the viral RNA are required for genome packaging. Previously reported cryoelectron microscopy analysis of immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) particles suggested that a basic region (residues RKK) in CA may serve as an additional binding site for nucleic acids. Here, we have introduced mutations into the RKK region in both bacterial and proviral M-PMV vectors and have assessed their impact on M-PMV assembly, structure, RNA binding, budding/release, nuclear trafficking, and infectivity using in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data indicate that the RKK region binds and structures nucleic acid that serves to promote virus particle assembly in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RKK region appears to be important for recruitment of viral genomic RNA into Gag particles, and this function could be linked to changes in nuclear trafficking. Together these observations suggest that in M-PMV, direct interactions between CA and nucleic acid play important functions in the late stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Assembly of retrovirus particles is driven by the Gag polyprotein, which can self-assemble to form virus particles and interact with RNA to recruit the viral genome into the particles. Generally, the capsid domains of Gag contribute to essential protein-protein interactions during assembly, while the nucleocapsid domain interacts with RNA. The interactions between the nucleocapsid domain and RNA are important both for identifying the genome and for self-assembly of Gag molecules. Here, we show that a region of basic residues in the capsid protein of the betaretrovirus Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) contributes to interaction of Gag with nucleic acid. This

  3. Genomes by design

    PubMed Central

    Haimovich, Adrian D.; Muir, Paul; Isaacs, Farren J.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing has revealed the complete genome sequences of numerous organisms, establishing a fundamental and growing understanding of genetic variation and phenotypic diversity. Engineering at the gene, network and whole-genome scale aims to introduce targeted genetic changes both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Expansion of these approaches into massively parallel platforms establishes the ability to generate targeted genome modifications, elucidating causal links between genotype and phenotype, as well as the ability to design and reprogramme organisms. In this Review, we explore techniques and applications in genome engineering, outlining key advances and defining challenges. PMID:26260262

  4. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  5. Filarial and Wolbachia genomics

    PubMed Central

    SCOTT, A. L.; GHEDIN, E.; NUTMAN, T. B.; McREYNOLDS, L. A.; POOLE, C. B.; SLATKO, B. E.; FOSTER, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents for a spectrum of acute and chronic diseases including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness, threaten the well-being and livelihood of hundreds of millions of people in the developing regions of the world. The 2007 publication on a draft assembly of the 95-Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi – representing the first helminth parasite genome to be sequenced – has been followed in rapid succession by projects that have resulted in the genome sequencing of six additional filarial species, seven nonfilarial nematode parasites of animals and nearly 30 plant parasitic and free-living species. Parallel to the genomic sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic projects have facilitated genome annotation, expanded our understanding of stage-associated gene expression and provided a first look at the role of epigenetic regulation of filarial genomes through microRNAs. The expansion in filarial genomics will also provide a significant enrichment in our knowledge of the diversity and variability in the genomes of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia leading to a better understanding of the genetic principles that govern filarial–Wolbachia mutualism. The goal here is to provide an overview of the trends and advances in filarial and Wolbachia genomics. PMID:22098559

  6. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  7. Between Two Fern Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves. PMID:25324969

  8. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    PubMed

    Tetushkin, E Ia

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment.

  9. Between two fern genomes.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Emily B; Banks, Jo Ann; Barker, Michael S; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Graham, Sean W; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Langdale, Jane; Li, Fay-Wei; Marchant, D Blaine; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J; Roux, Stanley J; Salmi, Mari L; Sigel, Erin M; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Wolf, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves.

  10. MIPS plant genome information resources.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Ernst, Rebecca; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2007-01-01

    The Munich Institute for Protein Sequences (MIPS) has been involved in maintaining plant genome databases since the Arabidopsis thaliana genome project. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable data sets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, for example from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and evaluated. In addition, model genomes also form a scaffold for comparative genomics, and much can be learned from genome-wide evolutionary studies.

  11. Home - The Cancer Genome Atlas - Cancer Genome - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of genome analysis technologies, including large-scale genome sequencing.

  12. Automated Microbial Genome Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam

    2009-05-29

    Miriam Land of the DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk on the current state and future challenges of moving toward automated microbial genome annotation at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  13. Phanerochaete chrysosporium genomics

    Treesearch

    Luis F. Larrondo; Rafael Vicuna; Dan Cullen

    2005-01-01

    A high quality draft genome sequence has been generated for the lignocellulose-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Martinez et al. 2004). Analysis of the genome in the context of previously established genetics and physiology is presented. Transposable elements and their potential relationship to genes involved in lignin degradation are systematically...

  14. Unlocking the bovine genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  15. Genomics for Weed Science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and ...

  16. The cybernetic genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    We propose a new picture of the genome as an adaptive cybernetic unit with self-awareness. We further propose that under colonial stress bacteria employ genetic communication which leads to the emergence of creative genomic web or “global brain”.

  17. Genetics and Genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  18. Breeding-assisted genomics.

    PubMed

    Poland, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The revolution of inexpensive sequencing has ushered in an unprecedented age of genomics. The promise of using this technology to accelerate plant breeding is being realized with a vision of genomics-assisted breeding that will lead to rapid genetic gain for expensive and difficult traits. The reality is now that robust phenotypic data is an increasing limiting resource to complement the current wealth of genomic information. While genomics has been hailed as the discipline to fundamentally change the scope of plant breeding, a more symbiotic relationship is likely to emerge. In the context of developing and evaluating large populations needed for functional genomics, none excel in this area more than plant breeders. While genetic studies have long relied on dedicated, well-structured populations, the resources dedicated to these populations in the context of readily available, inexpensive genotyping is making this philosophy less tractable relative to directly focusing functional genomics on material in breeding programs. Through shifting effort for basic genomic studies from dedicated structured populations, to capturing the entire scope of genetic determinants in breeding lines, we can move towards not only furthering our understanding of functional genomics in plants, but also rapidly improving crops for increased food security, availability and nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomics of Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This edited book represents the 23rd symposium in the Stadler Genetics Symposia series, and the general theme of this conference was "The Genomics of Disease." The 24 national and international speakers were invited to discuss their world-class research into the advances that genomics has made on c...

  20. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos

    2010-06-02

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  1. AutoGenomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Vairavan, Ram

    2004-07-01

    AutoGenomics has created an automated multiplexing microarray platform to make genomic and proteomic analyses routine and efficient for clinical and research laboratories. While the emergence of microarrays has advanced genomic analyses, a number of underlying issues, such as cross-hybridization, poor spot morphology and intrinsic fluorescence of the solid substrate, have yet to be fully resolved. Current methods use discrete instrumentation, are manual and require highly skilled labor, which leads to inconsistent results. AutoGenomics' automated platform uses a three-dimensional BioFilmChip microarray to circumvent these issues, providing optimal spot morphology and utilizing solution-based hybridization with allele-specific primer extension to improve single-base discrimination. AutoGenomics is developing applications for the early detection and management of complex disease states in oncology, cardiology, and mental disorders. Customers include clinical reference laboratories, hospitals, academic institutions, and pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Founded in 1999, the company is headquartered in Carlsbad, California, USA.

  2. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  3. The UCSC Genome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Kent, W. James

    2011-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser is a popular Web-based tool for quickly displaying a requested portion of a genome at any scale, accompanied by a series of aligned annotation “tracks.” The annotations generated by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics Group and external collaborators include gene predictions, mRNA and expressed sequence tag alignments, simple nucleotide polymorphisms, expression and regulatory data, phenotype and variation data, and pairwise and multiple-species comparative genomics data. All information relevant to a region is presented in one window, facilitating biological analysis and interpretation. The database tables underlying the Genome Browser tracks can be viewed, downloaded, and manipulated using another Web-based application, the UCSC Table Browser. Users can upload personal datasets in a wide variety of formats as custom annotation tracks in both browsers for research or educational purposes. PMID:21975940

  4. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  5. Comparative genomics of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mitreva, Makedonka; Blaxter, Mark L; Bird, David M; McCarter, James P

    2005-10-01

    Recent transcriptome and genome projects have dramatically expanded the biological data available across the phylum Nematoda. Here we summarize analyses of these sequences, which have revealed multiple unexpected results. Despite a uniform body plan, nematodes are more diverse at the molecular level than was previously recognized, with many species- and group-specific novel genes. In the genus Caenorhabditis, changes in chromosome arrangement, particularly local inversions, are also rapid, with breakpoints occurring at 50-fold the rate in vertebrates. Tylenchid plant parasitic nematode genomes contain several genes closely related to genes in bacteria, implicating horizontal gene transfer events in the origins of plant parasitism. Functional genomics techniques are also moving from Caenorhabditis elegans to application throughout the phylum. Soon, eight more draft nematode genome sequences will be available. This unique resource will underpin both molecular understanding of these most abundant metazoan organisms and aid in the examination of the dynamics of genome evolution in animals.

  6. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  7. Evolution of Genome Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Charles Darwin believed that all traits of organisms have been honed to near perfection by natural selection. The empirical basis underlying Darwin’s conclusions consisted of numerous observations made by him and other naturalists on the exquisite adaptations of animals and plants to their natural habitats and on the impressive results of artificial selection. Darwin fully appreciated the importance of heredity but was unaware of the nature and, in fact, the very existence of genomes. A century and a half after the publication of the “Origin”, we have the opportunity to draw conclusions from the comparisons of hundreds of genome sequences from all walks of life. These comparisons suggest that the dominant mode of genome evolution is quite different from that of the phenotypic evolution. The genomes of vertebrates, those purported paragons of biological perfection, turned out to be veritable junkyards of selfish genetic elements where only a small fraction of the genetic material is dedicated to encoding biologically relevant information. In sharp contrast, genomes of microbes and viruses are incomparably more compact, with most of the genetic material assigned to distinct biological functions. However, even in these genomes, the specific genome organization (gene order) is poorly conserved. The results of comparative genomics lead to the conclusion that the genome architecture is not a straightforward result of continuous adaptation but rather is determined by the balance between the selection pressure, that is itself dependent on the effective population size and mutation rate, the level of recombination, and the activity of selfish elements. Although genes and, in many cases, multigene regions of genomes possess elaborate architectures that ensure regulation of expression, these arrangements are evolutionarily volatile and typically change substantially even on short evolutionary scales when gene sequences diverge minimally. Thus, the observed genome

  8. The banana genome hub.

    PubMed

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D'Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world's favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/

  9. The Banana Genome Hub

    PubMed Central

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D’Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world’s favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/ PMID:23707967

  10. Genomic Insights into Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the discovery in 1899 of bifidobacteria as numerically dominant microbes in the feces of breast-fed infants, there have been numerous studies addressing their role in modulating gut microflora as well as their other potential health benefits. Because of this, they are frequently incorporated into foods as probiotic cultures. An understanding of their full interactions with intestinal microbes and the host is needed to scientifically validate any health benefits they may afford. Recently, the genome sequences of nine strains representing four species of Bifidobacterium became available. A comparative genome analysis of these genomes reveals a likely efficient capacity to adapt to their habitats, with B. longum subsp. infantis exhibiting more genomic potential to utilize human milk oligosaccharides, consistent with its habitat in the infant gut. Conversely, B. longum subsp. longum exhibits a higher genomic potential for utilization of plant-derived complex carbohydrates and polyols, consistent with its habitat in an adult gut. An intriguing observation is the loss of much of this genome potential when strains are adapted to pure culture environments, as highlighted by the genomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, which exhibit the least potential for a gut habitat and are believed to have evolved from the B. animalis species during adaptation to dairy fermentation environments. PMID:20805404

  11. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. NCBI Viral Genomes Resource

    PubMed Central

    Brister, J. Rodney; Ako-adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets. PMID:25428358

  13. Ensembl comparative genomics resources

    PubMed Central

    Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J.; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26896847

  14. Toward 959 nematode genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Kaur, Gaganjot; Blaxter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The sequencing of the complete genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was a landmark achievement and ushered in a new era of whole-organism, systems analyses of the biology of this powerful model organism. The success of the C. elegans genome sequencing project also inspired communities working on other organisms to approach genome sequencing of their species. The phylum Nematoda is rich and diverse and of interest to a wide range of research fields from basic biology through ecology and parasitic disease. For all these communities, it is now clear that access to genome scale data will be key to advancing understanding, and in the case of parasites, developing new ways to control or cure diseases. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies, improvements in computing algorithms and infrastructure and growth in bioinformatics and genomics literacy is making the addition of genome sequencing to the research goals of any nematode research program a less daunting prospect. To inspire, promote and coordinate genomic sequencing across the diversity of the phylum, we have launched a community wiki and the 959 Nematode Genomes initiative (www.nematodegenomes.org/). Just as the deciphering of the developmental lineage of the 959 cells of the adult hermaphrodite C. elegans was the gateway to broad advances in biomedical science, we hope that a nematode phylogeny with (at least) 959 sequenced species will underpin further advances in understanding the origins of parasitism, the dynamics of genomic change and the adaptations that have made Nematoda one of the most successful animal phyla. PMID:24058822

  15. Ensembl comparative genomics resources.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Javier; Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J; Searle, Stephen M J; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Traditional medicine and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    ‘Omics’ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics. PMID:21829298

  17. Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  18. Genetics and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Kali; Johnson, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases, and the expansion of genetics into health care has generated the field of genomic medicine. Health care delivery is shifting away from general diagnostic evaluation toward a generation of therapeutics based on a patient's genetic makeup. Meanwhile, the scientific community debates how best to incorporate genetics and genomic medicine into practice. While obstacles remain, the ultimate goal is to use information generated from the study of human genetics to improve disease treatment, cure and prevention. As the use of genetics in medical diagnosis and treatment increases, health care workers will require an understanding of genetics and genomic medicine.

  19. Genomic variation in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have endeavored to learn to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in F1 hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants.

  20. What Is a Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron David; Landweber, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The genome is often described as the information repository of an organism. Whether millions or billions of letters of DNA, its transmission across generations confers the principal medium for inheritance of organismal traits. Several emerging areas of research demonstrate that this definition is an oversimplification. Here, we explore ways in which a deeper understanding of genomic diversity and cell physiology is challenging the concepts of physical permanence attached to the genome as well as its role as the sole information source for an organism. PMID:27442251

  1. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  2. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing app

  3. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for various primate species, and analyses of several others are underway. Whole-genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other non-human primates offer valuable insights into genetic similarities and differences among species that are used as models for disease-related research. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics, and proposes a series of goals for the near future.

  4. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for several primates, with analyses of several others underway. Whole genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other nonhuman primates provide valuable insight into genetic similarities and differences among species used as models for disease-related research. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics and offers a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  5. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M.; Unni, Deepak R.; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  6. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  7. Human genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Disotell, Todd R

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion and assembly of the first draft of the human genome, which combines samples from several ethnically diverse males and females, provides preliminary data on the extent of human genetic variation. PMID:11178257

  8. The rise of genomics.

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics.

  9. Rubicon Genomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Langmore, John P

    2002-07-01

    Rubicon Genomics, Inc. is a leader in development and application of effective methods to analyze human DNA for genome-wide genotyping and haplotyping. The company is developing its proprietary OmniPlex technology as an integrated platform for archiving, amplifying and analyzing patient DNA for drug target discovery, pharmacogenomics and diagnostics. Single-site, multiple-site or whole genome amplification can be done using small samples of DNA that have been archived as OmniPlex DNA. Rubicon technology will make genome-wide SNP scoring faster, more accurate, more robust and less expensive. Rubicon will partner with pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies, as well as the makers of instruments and reagents to bring OmniPlex technology to the widest market - increasing the pipeline of more effective and safer drugs and ushering in the practice of gene-based medicine.

  10. The genomics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  11. The genomics of Colletotrichum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Colletotrichum are devastating fungal pathogens of major crop plants worldwide. This book chapter provides an overview of the genomics and transcriptomics of Colletotrichum. Included is an overview of the agricultural relevance of the genus Colletotrichum, the taxonomic position, information about ...

  12. Genomics of Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Abe, Keietsu; Asai, Kiyoshi; Gomi, Katsuya; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Kato, Masashi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Michio; Machida, Masayuki

    2007-03-01

    The genome sequence of Aspergillus oryzae, a fungus used in the production of the traditional Japanese fermentation foods sake (rice wine), shoyu (soy sauce), and miso (soybean paste), has revealed prominent features in its gene composition as compared to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. The A. oryzae genome is extremely enriched with genes involved in biomass degradation, primary and secondary metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and cell signaling. Even compared to the related species A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, an abundance of metabolic genes is apparent, with acquisition of more than 6 Mb of sequence in the A. oryzae lineage, interspersed throughout the A. oryzae genome. Besides the various already established merits of A. oryzae for industrial uses, the genome sequence and the abundance of metabolic genes should significantly accelerate the biotechnological use of A. oryzae in industry.

  13. Genomic imprinting and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Swales, A K E; Spears, N

    2005-10-01

    Genomic imprinting is the parent-of-origin specific gene expression which is a vital mechanism through both development and adult life. One of the key elements of the imprinting mechanism is DNA methylation, controlled by DNA methyltransferase enzymes. Germ cells undergo reprogramming to ensure that sex-specific genomic imprinting is initiated, thus allowing normal embryo development to progress after fertilisation. In some cases, errors in genomic imprinting are embryo lethal while in others they lead to developmental disorders and disease. Recent studies have suggested a link between the use of assisted reproductive techniques and an increase in normally rare imprinting disorders. A greater understanding of the mechanisms of genomic imprinting and the factors that influence them are important in assessing the safety of these techniques.

  14. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  15. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  17. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  18. Biobanks for Genomics and Genomics for Biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Ducournau, Pascal; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Pontille, David

    2003-01-01

    Biobanks include biological samples and attached databases. Human biobanks occur in research, technological development and medical activities. Population genomics is highly dependent on the availability of large biobanks. Ethical issues must be considered: protecting the rights of those people whose samples or data are in biobanks (information, autonomy, confidentiality, protection of private life), assuring the non-commercial use of human body elements and the optimal use of samples and data. They balance other issues, such as protecting the rights of researchers and companies, allowing long-term use of biobanks while detailed information on future uses is not available. At the level of populations, the traditional form of informed consent is challenged. Other dimensions relate to the rights of a group as such, in addition to individual rights. Conditions of return of results and/or benefit to a population need to be defined. With ‘large-scale biobanking’ a marked trend in genomics, new societal dimensions appear, regarding communication, debate, regulation, societal control and valorization of such large biobanks. Exploring how genomics can help health sector biobanks to become more rationally constituted and exploited is an interesting perspective. For example, evaluating how genomic approaches can help in optimizing haematopoietic stem cell donor registries using new markers and high-throughput techniques to increase immunogenetic variability in such registries is a challenge currently being addressed. Ethical issues in such contexts are important, as not only individual decisions or projects are concerned, but also national policies in the international arena and organization of democratic debate about science, medicine and society. PMID:18629026

  19. Bacteriophage T4 genome.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric S; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the "cell-puncturing device," combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the complex

  20. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  1. An Introduction to Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-17

    Genome projects have evolved from large international undertakings to tractable endeavors for a single lab. Accurate genome annotation is critical for successful genomic, genetic, and molecular biology experiments. These annotations can be generated using a number of approaches and available software tools. This unit describes methods for genome annotation and a number of software tools commonly used in gene annotation.

  2. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DOE PAGES

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; ...

    2015-07-14

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. We examine the dynamics of this genome, comparing more than one hundred currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus, and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of themore » same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP), and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. In conclusion, this information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies.« less

  3. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  4. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  5. Genomic Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Tarek; Keaton, Mignon A.; Dutta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the cell is to accurately copy its genetic material to daughter cells. When this process goes awry, genomic instability ensues in which genetic alterations ranging from nucleotide changes to chromosomal translocations and aneuploidy occur. Organisms have developed multiple mechanisms that can be classified into two major classes to ensure the fidelity of DNA replication. The first class includes mechanisms that prevent premature initiation of DNA replication and ensure that the genome is fully replicated once and only once during each division cycle. These include cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-dependent mechanisms and CDK-independent mechanisms. Although CDK-dependent mechanisms are largely conserved in eukaryotes, higher eukaryotes have evolved additional mechanisms that seem to play a larger role in preventing aberrant DNA replication and genome instability. The second class ensures that cells are able to respond to various cues that continuously threaten the integrity of the genome by initiating DNA-damage-dependent “checkpoints” and coordinating DNA damage repair mechanisms. Defects in the ability to safeguard against aberrant DNA replication and to respond to DNA damage contribute to genomic instability and the development of human malignancy. In this article, we summarize our current knowledge of how genomic instability arises, with a particular emphasis on how the DNA replication process can give rise to such instability. PMID:23335075

  6. An archaeal genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Graham, D E; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    2000-03-28

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  7. An archaeal genomic signature

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David E.; Overbeek, Ross; Olsen, Gary J.; Woese, Carl R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal “design fabric.” Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org). PMID:10716711

  8. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  9. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  10. Human Genome Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, Mark

    A central problem for 21st century science is annotating the human genome and making this annotation useful for the interpretation of personal genomes. My talk will focus on annotating the 99% of the genome that does not code for canonical genes, concentrating on intergenic features such as structural variants (SVs), pseudogenes (protein fossils), binding sites, and novel transcribed RNAs (ncRNAs). In particular, I will describe how we identify regulatory sites and variable blocks (SVs) based on processing next-generation sequencing experiments. I will further explain how we cluster together groups of sites to create larger annotations. Next, I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline, which has enabled us to identify >10K pseudogenes in the genome and analyze their distribution with respect to age, protein family, and chromosomal location. Throughout, I will try to introduce some of the computational algorithms and approaches that are required for genome annotation. Much of this work has been carried out in the framework of the ENCODE, modENCODE, and 1000 genomes projects.

  11. Functional and structural analyses of mouse genomic regions screened by the morphological specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-05-01

    Genetic analyses of certain classes of mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) have characterized arrays of deletions, overlapping at the marked loci. Complementation maps, generated for several of the regions, have identified a number of functional units surrounding each marked locus and have ordered the mutations into complementation groups. Molecular entry to all but one of the marked regions has been achieved by (1) identifying proviral integrations in, or close to, the specific loci (d, se, a, c); (2) mapping random anonymous clones from appropriately enriched libraries to the longest deleted segments, then submapping to more limited segments on the basis of complementation and deletion-breakpoint maps (c, p); (3) similarly mapping known clones thought to be located in pertinent chromosomal regions (p, c, d); and (4) cloning specific genes that reside in regions corresponding to the deletions (b, c, p). The molecular analyses have confirmed that genetically-inferred deletions are structural deletions of DNA. The emerging physical maps are concordant with the complementation maps, and in several cases have discriminated among members of a complementation group with respect to breakpoint positions. Deletion-breakpoint-fusion fragments have prove to be highly useful for making large chromosomal jumps to facilitate physical mapping. The recent advances toward correlating physical and functional maps of specific regions of the mouse genome owe much to the existence of arrays of mutations involving loci marked in the SLT. In turn, the characterizations of these regions have made it possible to demonstrate qualitative differences among mutations resulting from different treatments. This new capability for qualitative analysis, which will increase as the molecular studies proceed, further enhances the value of the SLT, which has been extensively used for quantitative studies in germ-cell mutagenesis.

  12. The Sinbad retrotransposon from the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, and the distribution of related Pao-like elements.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Claudia S; Mann, Victoria H; Morales, Maria E; Kalinna, Bernd H; Brindley, Paul J

    2005-02-23

    Of the major families of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, the Pao/BEL family is probably the least well studied. It is becoming apparent that numerous LTR retrotransposons and other mobile genetic elements have colonized the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. A proviral form of Sinbad, a new LTR retrotransposon, was identified in the genome of S. mansoni. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sinbad belongs to one of five discreet subfamilies of Pao/BEL like elements. BLAST searches of whole genomes and EST databases indicated that members of this clade occurred in species of the Insecta, Nematoda, Echinodermata and Chordata, as well as Platyhelminthes, but were absent from all plants, fungi and lower eukaryotes examined. Among the deuterostomes examined, only aquatic species harbored these types of elements. All four species of nematode examined were positive for Sinbad sequences, although among insect and vertebrate genomes, some were positive and some negative. The full length, consensus Sinbad retrotransposon was 6,287 bp long and was flanked at its 5'- and 3'-ends by identical LTRs of 386 bp. Sinbad displayed a triple Cys-His RNA binding motif characteristic of Gag of Pao/BEL-like elements, followed by the enzymatic domains of protease, reverse transcriptase (RT), RNAseH, and integrase, in that order. A phylogenetic tree of deduced RT sequences from 26 elements revealed that Sinbad was most closely related to an unnamed element from the zebrafish Danio rerio and to Saci-1, also from S. mansoni. It was also closely related to Pao from Bombyx mori and to Ninja of Drosophila simulans. Sinbad was only distantly related to the other schistosome LTR retrotransposons Boudicca, Gulliver, Saci-2, Saci-3, and Fugitive, which are gypsy-like. Southern hybridization and bioinformatics analyses indicated that there were about 50 copies of Sinbad in the S. mansoni genome. The presence of ESTs representing transcripts of Sinbad in numerous

  13. The Sinbad retrotransposon from the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, and the distribution of related Pao-like elements

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Claudia S; Mann, Victoria H; Morales, Maria E; Kalinna, Bernd H; Brindley, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Background Of the major families of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, the Pao/BEL family is probably the least well studied. It is becoming apparent that numerous LTR retrotransposons and other mobile genetic elements have colonized the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. Results A proviral form of Sinbad, a new LTR retrotransposon, was identified in the genome of S. mansoni. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sinbad belongs to one of five discreet subfamilies of Pao/BEL like elements. BLAST searches of whole genomes and EST databases indicated that members of this clade occurred in species of the Insecta, Nematoda, Echinodermata and Chordata, as well as Platyhelminthes, but were absent from all plants, fungi and lower eukaryotes examined. Among the deuterostomes examined, only aquatic species harbored these types of elements. All four species of nematode examined were positive for Sinbad sequences, although among insect and vertebrate genomes, some were positive and some negative. The full length, consensus Sinbad retrotransposon was 6,287 bp long and was flanked at its 5'- and 3'-ends by identical LTRs of 386 bp. Sinbad displayed a triple Cys-His RNA binding motif characteristic of Gag of Pao/BEL-like elements, followed by the enzymatic domains of protease, reverse transcriptase (RT), RNAseH, and integrase, in that order. A phylogenetic tree of deduced RT sequences from 26 elements revealed that Sinbad was most closely related to an unnamed element from the zebrafish Danio rerio and to Saci-1, also from S. mansoni. It was also closely related to Pao from Bombyx mori and to Ninja of Drosophila simulans. Sinbad was only distantly related to the other schistosome LTR retrotransposons Boudicca, Gulliver, Saci-2, Saci-3, and Fugitive, which are gypsy-like. Southern hybridization and bioinformatics analyses indicated that there were about 50 copies of Sinbad in the S. mansoni genome. The presence of ESTs representing transcripts of Sinbad

  14. WheatGenome.info: A Resource for Wheat Genomics Resource.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kaitao

    2016-01-01

    An integrated database with a variety of Web-based systems named WheatGenome.info hosting wheat genome and genomic data has been developed to support wheat research and crop improvement. The resource includes multiple Web-based applications, which are implemented as a variety of Web-based systems. These include a GBrowse2-based wheat genome viewer with BLAST search portal, TAGdb for searching wheat second generation genome sequence data, wheat autoSNPdb, links to wheat genetic maps using CMap and CMap3D, and a wheat genome Wiki to allow interaction between diverse wheat genome sequencing activities. This portal provides links to a variety of wheat genome resources hosted at other research organizations. This integrated database aims to accelerate wheat genome research and is freely accessible via the web interface at http://www.wheatgenome.info/ .

  15. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Sílvia; Ramos, Ana Paula; Pires, Ana Sofia; Azinheira, Helena G; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Link, Tobias; Abranches, Rita; Silva, Maria do Céu; Voegele, Ralf T; Loureiro, João; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales) are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 225.3 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi). In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp). Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94%). The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  16. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  17. Genomics and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Haseltine, W A

    2001-09-01

    Genomics, the systematic study of all the genes of an organism, offers a new and much-needed source of systematic productivity for the pharmaceutical industry. The isolation of the majority of human genes in their most useful form is leading to the creation of new drugs based on human proteins, antibodies, peptides, and genes. Human Genome Sciences, Inc, was the first company to use the systematic, genomics approach to discovering drugs, and we have placed 4 of these in clinical trials. Two are described: repifermin (keratinocyte growth factor-2, KGF-2) for wound healing and treatment of mucositis caused by cancer therapy, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) for stimulation of the immune system. An anti-BLyS antibody drug is in advanced preclinical development for treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Calibrating the genome.

    PubMed

    Markward, Nathan J; Fisher, William P

    2004-01-01

    This project demonstrates how to calibrate different samples and scales of genomic information to a common scale of genomic measurement. 1,113 persons were genotyped at the 13 Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) short tandem repeat (STR) marker loci used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for human identity testing. A measurement model of form ln[(P(nik))/(1-P(nik))] = B(n)-D(i)-L(k) is used to construct person measures and locus calibrations from information contained in the CODIS database. Winsteps (Wright and Linacre, 2003) is employed to maximize initial estimates and to investigate the necessity and sufficiency of different rating classification schema. Model fit is satisfactory in all analyses. Study outcomes are found in Tables 1-6. Additive, divisible, and interchangeable measures and calibrations can be created from raw genomic information that transcend sample- and scale-dependencies associated with racial and ethnic descent, chromosomal location, and locus-specific allele expansion structures.

  19. Genomics of Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Muglia, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling human birth timing at term, or resulting in preterm birth, have been the focus of considerable investigation, but limited insights have been gained over the past 50 years. In part, these processes have remained elusive because of divergence in reproductive strategies and physiology shown by model organisms, making extrapolation to humans uncertain. Here, we summarize the evolution of progesterone signaling and variation in pregnancy maintenance and termination. We use this comparative physiology to support the hypothesis that selective pressure on genomic loci involved in the timing of parturition have shaped human birth timing, and that these loci can be identified with comparative genomic strategies. Previous limitations imposed by divergence of mechanisms provide an important new opportunity to elucidate fundamental pathways of parturition control through increasing availability of sequenced genomes and associated reproductive physiology characteristics across diverse organisms. PMID:25646385

  20. Genes, genome and Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2005-03-31

    According to Gestalt thinking, biological systems cannot be viewed as the sum of their elements, but as processes of the whole. To understand organisms we must start from the whole, observing how the various parts are related. In genetics, we must observe the genome over and above the sum of its genes. Either loss or addition of one gene in a genome can change the function of the organism. Genomes are organized in networks of genes, which need to be well integrated. In the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), for example, soybeans, rats, Anopheles mosquitoes, and pigs, the insertion of an exogenous gene into a receptive organism generally causes disturbance in the networks, resulting in the breakdown of gene interactions. In these cases, genetic modification increased the genetic load of the GMO and consequently decreased its adaptability (fitness). Therefore, it is hard to claim that the production of such organisms with an increased genetic load does not have ethical implications.

  1. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  2. Genomic Imprinting in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Denise P.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation. PMID:24492710

  3. Genomics for weed science.

    PubMed

    Horvath, David

    2010-03-01

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and evolutionary processes of weedy plants. Genomics-based tools such as extensive EST databases and microarrays have been developed for a limited number of weedy species, although application of information and resources developed for model plants and crops are possible and have been exploited. These tools have just begun to provide insights into the response of these weeds to herbivore and pathogen attack, survival of extreme environmental conditions, and interaction with crops. The potential of these tools to illuminate mechanisms controlling the traits that allow weeds to invade novel habitats, survive extreme environments, and that make weeds difficult to eradicate have potential for both improving crops and developing novel methods to control weeds.

  4. Genomics of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Muglia, Louis J

    2015-02-02

    The molecular mechanisms controlling human birth timing at term, or resulting in preterm birth, have been the focus of considerable investigation, but limited insights have been gained over the past 50 years. In part, these processes have remained elusive because of divergence in reproductive strategies and physiology shown by model organisms, making extrapolation to humans uncertain. Here, we summarize the evolution of progesterone signaling and variation in pregnancy maintenance and termination. We use this comparative physiology to support the hypothesis that selective pressure on genomic loci involved in the timing of parturition have shaped human birth timing, and that these loci can be identified with comparative genomic strategies. Previous limitations imposed by divergence of mechanisms provide an important new opportunity to elucidate fundamental pathways of parturition control through increasing availability of sequenced genomes and associated reproductive physiology characteristics across diverse organisms. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Genomics for Weed Science

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, David

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and evolutionary processes of weedy plants. Genomics-based tools such as extensive EST databases and microarrays have been developed for a limited number of weedy species, although application of information and resources developed for model plants and crops are possible and have been exploited. These tools have just begun to provide insights into the response of these weeds to herbivore and pathogen attack, survival of extreme environmental conditions, and interaction with crops. The potential of these tools to illuminate mechanisms controlling the traits that allow weeds to invade novel habitats, survive extreme environments, and that make weeds difficult to eradicate have potential for both improving crops and developing novel methods to control weeds. PMID:20808523

  6. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  7. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buzard, Gregory S.; Pedersen, Thomas D.; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Ussery, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of the same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. This information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan). PMID:26175035

  8. Ebolavirus comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buzard, Gregory S; Pedersen, Thomas D; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2015-09-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of the same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. This information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies.This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan).

  9. The cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Futreal, P. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    All cancers arise as a result of changes that have occurred in the DNA sequence of the genomes of cancer cells. Over the past quarter of a century much has been learnt about these mutations and the abnormal genes that operate in human cancers. We are now, however, moving into an era in which it will be possible to obtain the complete DNA sequence of large numbers of cancer genomes. These studies will provide us with a detailed and comprehensive perspective on how individual cancers have developed. PMID:19360079

  10. The genomics of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Viale, M N; Zumárraga, M J; Araújo, F R; Zarraga, A M; Cataldi, A A; Romano, M I; Bigi, F

    2016-04-01

    The species Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis are the causal agents, respectively, of tuberculosis and paratuberculosis in animals. Both mycobacteria, especially M. bovis, are also important to public health because they can infect humans. In recent years, this and the impact of tuberculosis and paratuberculosis on animal production have led to significant advances in knowledge about both pathogens and their host interactions. This article describes the contribution of genomics and functional genomics to studies of the evolution, virulence, epidemiology and diagnosis of both these pathogenic mycobacteria.

  11. Landscape evolutionary genomics.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David B

    2010-08-23

    Tremendous advances in genetic and genomic techniques have resulted in the capacity to identify genes involved in adaptive evolution across numerous biological systems. One of the next major steps in evolutionary biology will be to determine how landscape-level geographical and environmental features are involved in the distribution of this functional adaptive genetic variation. Here, I outline how an emerging synthesis of multiple disciplines has and will continue to facilitate a deeper understanding of the ways in which heterogeneity of the natural landscapes mould the genomes of organisms.

  12. Methanococcus jannaschii genome: revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Olsen, G. J.; Klenk, H. P.; White, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of genomic sequences is necessarily an ongoing process. Initial gene assignments tend (wisely) to be on the conservative side (Venter, 1996). The analysis of the genome then grows in an iterative fashion as additional data and more sophisticated algorithms are brought to bear on the data. The present report is an emendation of the original gene list of Methanococcus jannaschii (Bult et al., 1996). By using a somewhat more updated database and more relaxed (and operator-intensive) pattern matching methods, we were able to add significantly to, and in a few cases amend, the gene identification table originally published by Bult et al. (1996).

  13. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities.

  14. Methanococcus jannaschii genome: revisited.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, N C; Olsen, G J; Klenk, H P; White, O; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of genomic sequences is necessarily an ongoing process. Initial gene assignments tend (wisely) to be on the conservative side (Venter, 1996). The analysis of the genome then grows in an iterative fashion as additional data and more sophisticated algorithms are brought to bear on the data. The present report is an emendation of the original gene list of Methanococcus jannaschii (Bult et al., 1996). By using a somewhat more updated database and more relaxed (and operator-intensive) pattern matching methods, we were able to add significantly to, and in a few cases amend, the gene identification table originally published by Bult et al. (1996).

  15. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... guía de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the ... and lead to a disease such as cancer. DNA Sequencing Sequencing simply means determining the exact order ...

  16. Haemonchus contortus: Genome Structure, Organization and Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Laing, R; Martinelli, A; Tracey, A; Holroyd, N; Gilleard, J S; Cotton, J A

    2016-01-01

    One of the first genome sequencing projects for a parasitic nematode was that for Haemonchus contortus. The open access data from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute provided a valuable early resource for the research community, particularly for the identification of specific genes and genetic markers. Later, a second sequencing project was initiated by the University of Melbourne, and the two draft genome sequences for H. contortus were published back-to-back in 2013. There is a pressing need for long-range genomic information for genetic mapping, population genetics and functional genomic studies, so we are continuing to improve the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute assembly to provide a finished reference genome for H. contortus. This review describes this process, compares the H. contortus genome assemblies with draft genomes from other members of the strongylid group and discusses future directions for parasite genomics using the H. contortus model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualizing Genomic Annotations with the UCSC Genome Browser.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2016-11-01

    Genomic data and annotations are rapidly accumulating in databases such as the UCSC Genome Browser, NCBI, and Ensembl. Given the massive scale of these genomic databases, it is important to be able to easily retrieve known data and annotations of a specified genomic locus. For example, for a newly identified cis-regulatory element bound by a transcription factor, questions that immediately come to mind include whether the element is near a transcriptional start site and, if so, the name of the corresponding gene, and whether the histones or DNA at the locus are modified. The UCSC Genome Browser organizes data and annotations (called tracks) around the reference sequences or draft assemblies of many eukaryotic genomes and presents them using a powerful web-based graphical interface. This protocol describes how to use the UCSC Genome Browser to visualize selected tracks at specified genomic regions, download the data and annotations for further analysis, and retrieve multiple sequence alignments and their conservation scores.

  18. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approaches, CCG aims to accelerate structural, functional and computational research to explore cancer mechanisms, discover new cancer targets, and develop new therapeutics.

  19. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium.

    PubMed

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur, amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan- and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity could be traced to the smaller chromosome and plasmids. Several of the physiological traits studied in the genus did not correlate with phylogenetic data. Since horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is often suggested as a source of genetic diversity and a potential driver of genomic evolution in bacterial species, we looked into evidence of such in Photobacterium genomes. Genomic islands were the source of genomic differences between strains of the same species. Also, we found transposase genes and CRISPR arrays that suggest multiple encounters with foreign DNA. Presence of genomic exchange traits was widespread and abundant in the genus, suggesting a role in genomic evolution. The high genetic variability and indications of genetic exchange make it difficult to elucidate genome evolutionary paths and raise the awareness of the roles of foreign DNA in the genomic evolution of environmental organisms.

  20. Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (Genomics and Bioenergy)

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhsar, Daniel

    2008-02-11

    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

  1. Dynamic evolution of genomes and the concept of genome space.

    PubMed

    Bellgard, M I; Itoh, T; Watanabe, H; Imanishi, T; Gojobori, T

    1999-05-18

    A new era in the elucidation of genome evolution has been heralded with the availability of numerous genome sequences. With these data, it has been possible to study evolutionary processes at a greater level of detail in order to characterize features such as gene shuffling, genome rearrangements, base bias composition, and horizontal gene transfer. In this paper, we discuss the evolutionary implications of significant rearrangements within genomes as well as characteristic genomic regions that have been conserved across genomes. This is based on our analysis of orthologous and paralogous genes. We argue that genome plasticity has most likely contributed substantially to the dynamic evolution of genomes. We also describe the characteristic mosaic features of an archaea genome that is comprised of both bacterial and eukaryal elements. Here we investigate base compositional differences as well as the similarity of this species' genes to either bacteria or eukarya. We conclude that these features can be largely explained by the mechanism of horizontal gene transfer. Finally, we introduce the concept of genome space which is defined as the entire set of genomes of all living organisms. We explain its usefulness to describe as well as to gain deeper insight into the general features of the dynamic genomic evolutionary process.

  2. The tomato genome: implications for plant breeding, genomics and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), one of the most important vegetable crops, has recently been decoded. We address implications of the tomato genome for plant breeding, genomics and evolutionary studies, and its potential to fuel future crop biology research. PMID:22943138

  3. The Brachypodium genome sequence: a resource for oat genomics research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oat (Avena sativa) is an important cereal crop used as both an animal feed and for human consumption. Genetic and genomic research on oat is hindered because it is hexaploid and possesses a large (13 Gb) genome. Diploid Avena relatives have been employed for genetic and genomic studies, but only mod...

  4. Genomic Data Commons launches - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  5. On genomics, kin, and privacy

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, Amalio; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The storage of greater numbers of exomes or genomes raises the question of loss of privacy for the individual and for families if genomic data are not properly protected. Access to genome data may result from a personal decision to disclose, or from gaps in protection. In either case, revealing genome data has consequences beyond the individual, as it compromises the privacy of family members. Increasing availability of genome data linked or linkable to metadata through online social networks and services adds one additional layer of complexity to the protection of genome privacy.  The field of computer science and information technology offers solutions to secure genomic data so that individuals, medical personnel or researchers can access only the subset of genomic information required for healthcare or dedicated studies. PMID:25254097

  6. Sixty years of genome biology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sixty years after Watson and Crick published the double helix model of DNA's structure, thirteen members of Genome Biology's Editorial Board select key advances in the field of genome biology subsequent to that discovery. PMID:23651518

  7. Better chocolate through genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Theobroma cacao, the cacao or chocolate tree, is a tropical understory tree whose seeds are used to make chocolate. And like any important crop, cacao is the subject of much research. On September 15, 2010, scientists publicly released a preliminary sequence of the cacao genome--which contains all o...

  8. The Nostoc punctiforme Genome

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Meeks

    2001-12-31

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium with extensive phenotypic characteristics and a relatively large genome, approaching 10 Mb. The phenotypic characteristics include a photoautotrophic, diazotrophic mode of growth, but N. punctiforme is also facultatively heterotrophic; its vegetative cells have multiple development alternatives, including terminal differentiation into nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and transient differentiation into spore-like akinetes or motile filaments called hormogonia; and N. punctiforme has broad symbiotic competence with fungi and terrestrial plants, including bryophytes, gymnosperms and an angiosperm. The shotgun-sequencing phase of the N. punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 genome has been completed by the Joint Genome Institute. Annotation of an 8.9 Mb database yielded 7432 open reading frames, 45% of which encode proteins with known or probable known function and 29% of which are unique to N. punctiforme. Comparative analysis of the sequence indicates a genome that is highly plastic and in a state of flux, with numerous insertion sequences and multilocus repeats, as well as genes encoding transposases and DNA modification enzymes. The sequence also reveals the presence of genes encoding putative proteins that collectively define almost all characteristics of cyanobacteria as a group. N. punctiforme has an extensive potential to sense and respond to environmental signals as reflected by the presence of more than 400 genes encoding sensor protein kinases, response regulators and other transcriptional factors. The signal transduction systems and any of the large number of unique genes may play essential roles in the cell differentiation and symbiotic interaction properties of N. punctiforme.

  9. The G4 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Nancy; Gray, Lucas T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments provide fascinating examples of how G4 DNA and G4 RNA structures—aka quadruplexes—may contribute to normal biology and to genomic pathologies. Quadruplexes are transient and therefore difficult to identify directly in living cells, which initially caused skepticism regarding not only their biological relevance but even their existence. There is now compelling evidence for functions of some G4 motifs and the corresponding quadruplexes in essential processes, including initiation of DNA replication, telomere maintenance, regulated recombination in immune evasion and the immune response, control of gene expression, and genetic and epigenetic instability. Recognition and resolution of quadruplex structures is therefore an essential component of genome biology. We propose that G4 motifs and structures that participate in key processes compose the G4 genome, analogous to the transcriptome, proteome, or metabolome. This is a new view of the genome, which sees DNA as not only a simple alphabet but also a more complex geography. The challenge for the future is to systematically identify the G4 motifs that form quadruplexes in living cells and the features that confer on specific G4 motifs the ability to function as structural elements. PMID:23637633

  10. [Genomic instability in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaiozishvili, M N; Kakauridze, N G; Lezhava, T A

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study of the level of genomic instability, parameters of quantitative and structural mutations of chromosomes (aberration, aneuploidy, polyploidy) in lymphocyte cultures from patients with atherosclerosis of age 80 years and older (control group - 30-35 years old) was conducted. The possibility of correction of disturbed genomic indicators by peptide bioregulators - Livagen (Lys-Glu-Asp-Ala) and cobalt ions with separate application or in combination was also studied. Control was lymphocyte culture of two healthy respective age groups. It was also shown that patients with atherosclerosis exhibit high level of genomic instability in all studied parameters, regardless of age, which may suggest that there is marked increase in chromatin condensation in atherosclerosis. It was also shown that Livagen (characterized by modifying influence on chromatin) separately and in combination with cobalt ions, promotes normalization of altered genomic indicators of atherosclerosis in both age groups. The results show that Livagen separately and in combination with cobalt ions has impact on chromatin of patients with atherosclerosis. The identified protective action of Livagen proves its efficacy in prevention of atherosclerosis.

  11. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors.

  12. The tomato genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tomato genome sequence was undertaken at a time when state-of-the-art sequencing methodologies were undergoing a transition to co-called next generation methodologies. The result was an international consortium undertaking a strategy merging both old and new approaches. Because biologists were...

  13. Ascaris suum draft genome.

    PubMed

    Jex, Aaron R; Liu, Shiping; Li, Bo; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Linfeng; Zeng, Na; Xu, Xun; Xiong, Zijun; Chen, Fangyuan; Wu, Xuan; Zhang, Guojie; Fang, Xiaodong; Kang, Yi; Anderson, Garry A; Harris, Todd W; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Vlaminck, Johnny; Wang, Tao; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Schwarz, Erich M; Ranganathan, Shoba; Geldhof, Peter; Nejsum, Peter; Sternberg, Paul W; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-10-26

    Parasitic diseases have a devastating, long-term impact on human health, welfare and food production worldwide. More than two billion people are infected with geohelminths, including the roundworms Ascaris (common roundworm), Necator and Ancylostoma (hookworms), and Trichuris (whipworm), mainly in developing or impoverished nations of Asia, Africa and Latin America. In humans, the diseases caused by these parasites result in about 135,000 deaths annually, with a global burden comparable with that of malaria or tuberculosis in disability-adjusted life years. Ascaris alone infects around 1.2 billion people and, in children, causes nutritional deficiency, impaired physical and cognitive development and, in severe cases, death. Ascaris also causes major production losses in pigs owing to reduced growth, failure to thrive and mortality. The Ascaris-swine model makes it possible to study the parasite, its relationship with the host, and ascariasis at the molecular level. To enable such molecular studies, we report the 273 megabase draft genome of Ascaris suum and compare it with other nematode genomes. This genome has low repeat content (4.4%) and encodes about 18,500 protein-coding genes. Notably, the A. suum secretome (about 750 molecules) is rich in peptidases linked to the penetration and degradation of host tissues, and an assemblage of molecules likely to modulate or evade host immune responses. This genome provides a comprehensive resource to the scientific community and underpins the development of new and urgently needed interventions (drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tests) against ascariasis and other nematodiases.

  14. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  15. The genomics of LUCA.

    PubMed

    Mat, Wai-Kin; Xue, Hong; Wong, Jeffrey Tze-Fei

    2008-05-01

    To understand the nature and evolution of LUCA, or Last Universal Common Ancestor, the minimum genome of LUCA has been identified based on the genes common to the eight primitive Euryarchaea and Crenarchaea species Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicum, Methanococcus jannaschii, Pyrococcus abyssi, Pyrococcus furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Aeropyrum pernix and Pyrobaculum aerophilum, together with the methanogenesis genes of the primitive methanogens. The 424 protein encoding genes in the minimum LUCA genome exceed significantly the 150-340 genes estimated to be present in a minimal proteome compatible with life. Thus LUCA was not a minimal organism but the first modern organism equipped with a DNA genome and the universal genetic code. The hyperthermophilic, Methanopyrus-proximal LUCA is consistent with a Hot Cross Origin of life which proposes that early heterotrophic life forms in the cooler temperature zones invented methanogenesis and a DNA genome upon their adaptation to the hydrothermal vents, where life flourished massively on lithoautotrophy supported by carbon dioxide and hydrogen, thereby leading to the rise of LUCA.

  16. (Genomic variation in maize)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  17. Dairy genomics in application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Implementation of genomic evaluation has caused profound changes in dairy cattle breeding. All young bulls bought by major artificial-insemination organizations now are selected based on these evaluation. Evaluation reliability can reach ~75% for yield traits, which is adequate for marketing semen o...

  18. Prenatal Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Donley, Greer; Hull, Sara Chandros; Berkman, Benjamin E.

    2014-01-01

    With whole genome sequencing set to become the preferred method of prenatal screening, we need to pay more attention to the massive amount of information it will deliver to parents—and the fact that we don't yet understand what most of it means. PMID:22777977

  19. [RadGenomics project].

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Harada, Yoshinobu; Ban, Sadayuki; Michikawa, Yu-ichi; Saegusa, Kumiko; Sagara, Masasi; Tsuji, Atsushi; Noda, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Atsuko

    2002-08-01

    Human health conditions are largely determined by a complex interplay among genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and aging. The RadGenomics project, which began in April 2001, promotes analysis of genes in response to irradiation, identification of their allelic variants in the human population, development of an effective procedure for quantitating individual radio-sensitivity, and analysis of the interrelationship between genetic heterogeneity and susceptibility to irradiation. Major groups of genes with which the project will concern itself include DNA repair genes, cell cycle genes, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genes for programmed cell death, genes for signal transduction, and genes for oxidative processes. The outcome of the RadGenomics project should lead to improved protocols for personalized radiotherapy and reduce the possible side effects of treatment. The project will contribute to future research on the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in humans and stimulate the development of new high-throughput technology for a broader application of the biological and medical sciences. Identification of functionally important polymorphisms in the radiation response genes may determine individual differences in sensitivity to radiation exposure. The staff members, who are specialists in a variety of fields including genome science, radiation biology, medical science, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, have come to the RadGenomics project from various universities, companies, and research institutes.

  20. The human genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M V

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project in the United States is now well underway. Its programmatic direction was largely set by a National Research Council report issued in 1988. The broad framework supplied by this report has survived almost unchanged despite an upheaval in the technology of genome analysis. This upheaval has primarily affected physical and genetic mapping, the two dominant activities in the present phase of the project. Advances in mapping techniques have allowed good progress toward the specific goals of the project and are also providing strong corollary benefits throughout biomedical research. Actual DNA sequencing of the genomes of the human and model organisms is still at an early stage. There has been little progress in the intrinsic efficiency of DNA-sequence determination. However, refinements in experimental protocols, instrumentation, and project management have made it practical to acquire sequence data on an enlarged scale. It is also increasingly apparent that DNA-sequence data provide a potent means of relating knowledge gained from the study of model organisms to human biology. There is as yet little indication that the infusion of technology from outside biology into the Human Genome Project has been effectively stimulated. Opportunities in this area remain large, posing substantial technical and policy challenges. PMID:8506271

  1. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequen