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Sample records for ic recombinant-methionyl human

  1. Cloning and characterization of human IC53-2, a novel CDK5 activator binding protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi Hu; He, Xiang Huo; Tang, Yun Tian; Li, Jin Jun; Pan, Zhi Mei; Qin, Wen Xin; Wan, Da Fang; Gu, Jian Ren

    2003-04-01

    We have identified IC53-2, a human homologue of the rat C53 gene from a human placenta cDNA library (GeneBank Accession No.AF217982). IC53-2 can bind to the CDK5 activator p35 by in vitro association assay. IC53-2 is mapped to human chromosome 17q21.31. The IC53-2 transcript is highly expressed in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and placenta. It is abundantly expressed in SMMC-7721, C-33A, 3AO, A431 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines by RT-PCR assay. Stable transfection of IC53-2 cDNA into the hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cell remarkably stimulates its growth in vitro. The above results indicate that IC53-2 is a novel human gene, which may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  2. Influence of the electric charge of the antigen and the immune complex (IC) lattice on the IC activation of human complement

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, M A; Crott, L S P; Assis-pandochi, A I; Coimbra, T M; Teixeira, J E; Barbosa, J E

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of complement (C) activation by immune complexes (ICs), the anti-complementary effect of ICs containing cationized antigens was compared in vitro to that using ICs formed by native antigens. ICs were prepared with affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal IgG antibovine serum albumin (BSA) antibody and either native BSA (isoelectric point 4.2) or BSA rendered cationic by treatment with ethylenediamine (isoelectric point 9.4). Native and cationized antigens were characterized by isoelectric focusing. ICs containing anti-BSA IgG or F(ab′)2, formed either at equivalence or in excess of native or cationized antigen, were submitted to ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient for mesh size determination. The anti-complementary effect of ICs was evaluated by kinetic determination of haemolytic activity of human serum on haemolysin-sensitized sheep red blood cells. In conditions of antigen excess, the ICs formed by cationized BSA were significantly more efficient in activating human complement than those formed by native antigen. This higher activity was dependent on cationized antigen complexed with complete antibody molecules, as non-complexed cationized BSA or ICs prepared with F(ab′)2 fragments were inactive under the same experimental conditions. Furthermore, this difference did not depend on the mesh size of the immune complexes. Our results suggest that the balance between antigen, antibody and C may be of importance in vivo for the onset and course of infections and other pathological processes involving IC formation. ICs containing cationized antigens should be proven of value in experimental models for studies on the regulation of C activation. PMID:12084047

  3. Human platelets express Toll-like receptor 3 and respond to poly I:C.

    PubMed

    Anabel, Antonio-Santos; Eduardo, Pérez-Campos; Pedro Antonio, Hernández-Cruz; Carlos, Solórzano-Mata; Juana, Narváez-Morales; Honorio, Torres-Aguilar; Nicolás, Villegas-Sepúlveda; Sergio Roberto, Aguilar-Ruiz

    2014-12-01

    Platelets functions in hemostasis have been widely studied. Currently, growing evidence shows that platelets have also a role in the immune innate response. Recently, protein expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR's) 2, 4, 7, 8, and 9, and the presence of TLRs 1 and 6 mRNA in human platelets was described. Up to now the functionality of TLR-2, 4 and 9 in human platelets has been demonstrated. Due to the relevance of TLRs functions to PAMPS (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) recognizing, we evaluated the presence of TLR3 in human platelets founding low percentages of platelets expressing surface or intracellular TLR3 protein. The activation with thrombin induced an increase in the percentage of platelets expressing surface TLR3 and higher levels of TLR3 expression in the whole population. Human platelets responded to poly I:C by increasing [Ca(2+)]i, the percentages of cells expressing TLR4 and CD62P, and by releasing CXCL4 and IL-1β in comparison to unstimulated platelets. These results demonstrate that human platelets express TLR3 and are capable of responding to poly I:C, suggesting that these cells might influence the immune innate response when detecting viral dsRNA.

  4. Category-Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex Follows Cortical Topology: A Grouped icEEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Christopher Richard; Whaley, Meagan Lee; Baboyan, Vatche George; Tandon, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that category-selective regions in higher-order visual cortex are topologically organized around specific anatomical landmarks: the mid-fusiform sulcus (MFS) in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and lateral occipital sulcus (LOS) in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC). To derive precise structure-function maps from direct neural signals, we collected intracranial EEG (icEEG) recordings in a large human cohort (n = 26) undergoing implantation of subdural electrodes. A surface-based approach to grouped icEEG analysis was used to overcome challenges from sparse electrode coverage within subjects and variable cortical anatomy across subjects. The topology of category-selectivity in bilateral VTC and LOC was assessed for five classes of visual stimuli—faces, animate non-face (animals/body-parts), places, tools, and words—using correlational and linear mixed effects analyses. In the LOC, selectivity for living (faces and animate non-face) and non-living (places and tools) classes was arranged in a ventral-to-dorsal axis along the LOS. In the VTC, selectivity for living and non-living stimuli was arranged in a latero-medial axis along the MFS. Written word-selectivity was reliably localized to the intersection of the left MFS and the occipito-temporal sulcus. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for topological information structuring of functional representations within higher-order visual cortex. PMID:27272936

  5. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  6. Interim Human Factors Guidance for Hybrid and Digital I&C System

    SciTech Connect

    J.Naser, G.Morris

    2003-08-15

    OAK- B135 To help nuclear power plant operators and suppliers plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and other HSI in a way that takes advantage of digital systems and HSI technologies, reflects practical constraints associated with modernizing existing control rooms and I&C systems, and addresses issues associated with hybrid control room HSI.

  7. Toll-like receptor 3 activation promotes desensitization of histamine response in human gingival fibroblasts: Poly (I:C) induces histamine receptor desensitization in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Rodríguez-Pérez, Citlalli Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are associated with the development of periodontal disease, particularly during periods of suppressed cellular immunity. For this reason, we evaluated the hypothesis that viral components regulate the actions of histamine, an important mediator of immune responses. We assessed the effect of Poly (I:C) on histamine-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization in human gingival fibroblasts. Our results show that histamine induces an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. This response was blocked when cells were incubated in the presence of Poly (I:C). In addition, phorbol esters, a diacylglycerol analog, mimics the inhibitory actions of Poly (I:C) in response to histamine. The effect of Poly (I:C) was reversed by Stuarosporine (1 μM), GÖ6983 (7 μM), Bisindolylmaleimide (1 μM) [a protein inhibitor (PKC)], and SB 203580 (3 μM) (a p38-MAPK inhibitor). These findings suggest that Poly (I:C) regulates histamine-induced calcium mobilization through activation of PKC and p38.

  8. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is activated in human interstitial cystitis (IC) and rat protamine sulfate induced cystitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Wang, Liang; Dong, Xingyou; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Long; Liu, Qina; Song, Bo; Wu, Qingjian; Li, Longkun

    2016-02-17

    The pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is currently unclear. However, inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in BPS/IC. JNK downstream signaling plays an important role in numerous chronic inflammatory diseases. However, studies of the JNK pathway in BPS/IC are limited. In this study, we investigated the role of the JNK pathway in human BPS/IC and rat protamine sulfate (PS)-induced cystitis and examined the effect of the selective JNK inhibitor SP600125 on rat bladder cystitis. In our study, we demonstrated that the JNK signaling pathway was activated (the expression of JNK, c-Jun, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increasing in BPS/IC compared to the non-BPS/IC patients) and resulted in inflammation in human BPS/IC. Further animal models showed that the JNK pathway played an important role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. JNK inhibitors, SP600125, effectively inhibited the expression of p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α. The inhibition of these pathways had a protective effect on PS-induced rat cystitis by significantly decreasing histological score and mast cell count and improving bladder micturition function (micturition frequency significantly decreasing and bladder capacity significantly increasing). Therefore, JNK inhibition could be used as a potential treatment for BPS/IC.

  9. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is activated in human interstitial cystitis (IC) and rat protamine sulfate induced cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wang, Liang; Dong, Xingyou; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Long; Liu, Qina; Song, Bo; Wu, Qingjian; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is currently unclear. However, inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in BPS/IC. JNK downstream signaling plays an important role in numerous chronic inflammatory diseases. However, studies of the JNK pathway in BPS/IC are limited. In this study, we investigated the role of the JNK pathway in human BPS/IC and rat protamine sulfate (PS)-induced cystitis and examined the effect of the selective JNK inhibitor SP600125 on rat bladder cystitis. In our study, we demonstrated that the JNK signaling pathway was activated (the expression of JNK, c-Jun, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increasing in BPS/IC compared to the non-BPS/IC patients) and resulted in inflammation in human BPS/IC. Further animal models showed that the JNK pathway played an important role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. JNK inhibitors, SP600125, effectively inhibited the expression of p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α. The inhibition of these pathways had a protective effect on PS-induced rat cystitis by significantly decreasing histological score and mast cell count and improving bladder micturition function (micturition frequency significantly decreasing and bladder capacity significantly increasing). Therefore, JNK inhibition could be used as a potential treatment for BPS/IC. PMID:26883396

  10. Immune complexes (IC) down-regulate the basal and interferon-γ-induced expression of MHC Class II on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, P; Beigier-Bompadre, M; De La Barrera, S; Alves-Rosa, M F; Fernandez, G; Palermo, M S; Isturiz, M A

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRs) on monocytes/macrophages with immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Previous studies have shown that FcγR–IC interactions inhibit the IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II in murine macrophages. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for these effects have not been elucidated. In addition, whether this IC-dependent effect also occurs in human cells is not known. Taking into account the fact that IC and IFN-γ are frequently found in infections and autoimmune disorders, together with the crucial role MHC class II molecules play in the regulation of immune response, we explored the effect and mechanism of IC-induced MHC class II down-regulation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This effect was studied either in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. We demonstrate that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. This effect was mediated through the interaction of IC with both FcγRI and FcγRII. Moreover, similar results were obtained using supernatants from IC-treated PBMC. The IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is abrogated by pepstatin and phosphoramidon, supporting the role of aspartic protease(s) and metalloprotease(s) in this process. In parallel with MHC class II expression, antigen presentation was markedly inhibited in the presence of IC. PMID:11529917

  11. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... a “black box warning” regarding the potential for suicide and suicidal thinking in children and adolescents taking ... Flares Women & IC Pregnancy & IC Intimacy & IC Pelvic Exam Tips Men & IC Intimacy & IC Support for Men ...

  12. Mouse CD8alpha+ DCs and human BDCA3+ DCs are major producers of IFN-lambda in response to poly IC.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Henning; Bathke, Barbara; Gilles, Stefanie; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Luber, Christian A; Fejer, György; Freudenberg, Marina A; Davey, Gayle M; Vremec, David; Kallies, Axel; Wu, Li; Shortman, Ken; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; O'Keeffe, Meredith; Hochrein, Hubertus

    2010-11-22

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly IC), a double-stranded RNA, is an effective adjuvant in vivo. IFN-λs (also termed IL-28/29) are potent immunomodulatory and antiviral cytokines. We demonstrate that poly IC injection in vivo induces large amounts of IFN-λ, which depended on hematopoietic cells and the presence of TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3), IRF3 (IFN regulatory factor 3), IRF7, IFN-I receptor, Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL), and IRF8 but not on MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88), Rig-like helicases, or lymphocytes. Upon poly IC injection in vivo, the IFN-λ production by splenocytes segregated with cells phenotypically resembling CD8α(+) conventional dendritic cells (DCs [cDCs]). In vitro experiments revealed that CD8α(+) cDCs were the major producers of IFN-λ in response to poly IC, whereas both CD8α(+) cDCs and plasmacytoid DCs produced large amounts of IFN-λ in response to HSV-1 or parapoxvirus. The nature of the stimulus and the cytokine milieu determined whether CD8α(+) cDCs produced IFN-λ or IL-12p70. Human DCs expressing BDCA3 (CD141), which is considered to be the human counterpart of murine CD8α(+) DCs, also produced large amounts of IFN-λ upon poly IC stimulation. Thus, IFN-λ production in response to poly IC is a novel function of mouse CD8α(+) cDCs and their human equivalents.

  13. Children and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as his or her teachers, principal, school nurse, gym teacher, etc. Your child’s symptoms may be ... Out IC How to Schedule an IC Advocacy District Visit IC Advocates in Action Spur Research Funding ...

  14. Pregnancy and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hospital personnel (such as medical students or student nurses) to observe your birth process Whether you will ... Out IC How to Schedule an IC Advocacy District Visit IC Advocates in Action Spur Research Funding ...

  15. Men and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ...

  16. IC Associated Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ...

  17. IC Treatment: Surgical Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ...

  18. IC Treatment: Antihistamines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ...

  19. General IC Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ... Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider Toolkit Join the Provider Registry ...

  20. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management of IC Pain Complementary Therapies Complementary vs. Alternative Herbs, Dietary Supplements, & Biologicals Mind-body Medicine Massage, Manipulation, & Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider ...

  1. Nuclear Factor I-C promotes proliferation and differentiation of apical papilla-derived human stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zhihua; Jiang, Yong; Niu, Zhongying; Fu, Lei; Luo, Zhirong; Cooper, Paul R; Smith, Anthony J; He, Wenxi

    2015-03-15

    The transcription factor Nuclear Factor I-C (NFIC) has been implicated in the regulation of tooth root development, where it may be anticipated to impact on the behavior of stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) and root odontoblast activity. We hypothesized that NFIC may provide an important target for promoting dentin/root regeneration. In the present study, the effects of NFIC on the proliferation and differentiation of SCAPs were investigated. Over-expression of NFIC increased cell proliferation, mineralization nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in SCAPs. Furthermore, NFIC up-regulated the mRNA levels of odontogenic-related markers, ALP, osteocalcin and collagen type I as well as dentin sialoprotein protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of NFIC by si-RNA inhibited the mineralization capacity of SCAPs and down-regulated the expression of odontogenic-related markers. In conclusion, the results indicated that upregulation of NFIC activity in SCAPs may promote osteo/odontoblastic differentiation of SCAPs.

  2. Nuclear Factor I-C promotes proliferation and differentiation of apical papilla-derived human stem cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zhihua; Jiang, Yong; Niu, Zhongying; Fu, Lei; Luo, Zhirong; Cooper, Paul R.; Smith, Anthony J.; He, Wenxi

    2015-03-15

    The transcription factor Nuclear Factor I-C (NFIC) has been implicated in the regulation of tooth root development, where it may be anticipated to impact on the behavior of stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) and root odontoblast activity. We hypothesized that NFIC may provide an important target for promoting dentin/root regeneration. In the present study, the effects of NFIC on the proliferation and differentiation of SCAPs were investigated. Over-expression of NFIC increased cell proliferation, mineralization nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in SCAPs. Furthermore, NFIC up-regulated the mRNA levels of odontogenic-related markers, ALP, osteocalcin and collagen type I as well as dentin sialoprotein protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of NFIC by si-RNA inhibited the mineralization capacity of SCAPs and down-regulated the expression of odontogenic-related markers. In conclusion, the results indicated that upregulation of NFIC activity in SCAPs may promote osteo/odontoblastic differentiation of SCAPs. - Highlights: • NFIC promotes the proliferation of SCAPs in vitro. • NFIC promotes osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs in vitro. • Knockdown of NFIC inhibits odontogenic differentiation in SCAPs.

  3. A monoclonal antibody against the dynein IC1 peptide of sea urchin spermatozoa inhibits the motility of sea urchin, dinoflagellate, and human flagellar axonemes.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, C; White, D; Huitorel, P; Cosson, J

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the role of axonemal components in the mechanics and regulation of flagellar movement, we have generated a series of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against sea urchin (Lytechinus pictus) sperm axonemal proteins, selected for their ability to inhibit the motility of demembranated sperm models. One of these antibodies, mAb D1, recognizes an antigen of 142 kDa on blots of sea urchin axonemal proteins and of purified outer arm dynein, suggesting that it acts by binding to the heaviest intermediate chain (IC1) of the dynein arm. mAb D1 blocks the motility of demembranated sea urchin spermatozoa by modifying the beating amplitude and shear angle without affecting the ATPase activity of purified dynein or of demembranated immotile spermatozoa. Furthermore, mAb D1 had only a marginal effect on the velocity of sliding microtubules in trypsin-treated axonemes. This antibody was also capable of inhibiting the motility of flagella of Oxyrrhis marina, a primitive dinoflagellate, and those of demembranated human spermatozoa. Localization of the antigen recognized by mAb D1 by immunofluorescence reveals its presence on the axonemes of flagella from sea urchin spermatozoa and O. marina but not on the cortical microtubule network of the dinoflagellate. These results are consistent with a dynamic role for the dynein intermediate chain IC1 in the bending and/or wave propagation of flagellar axonemes. Images PMID:7841521

  4. A comparative analytical assessment of iodides in healthy and pathological human thyroids based on IC-PAD method preceded by microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Błażewicz, Anna; Orlicz-Szczęsna, Grażyna; Szczęsny, Piotr; Prystupa, Andrzej; Grzywa-Celińska, Anna; Trojnar, Marcin

    2011-03-15

    The aim of the study was to examine correlations between the content of iodides in 66 nodular goiters and 100 healthy human thyroid tissues (50- frozen and 50 formalin-fixed). A fast, accurate and precise ion chromatography method on IonPac AS11 chromatographic column (Dionex, USA) with a pulsed amperometric detection (IC-PAD) followed by alkaline digestion with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in a closed system and with the assistance of microwaves was developed and used for the comparative analysis of two types of human thyroid samples. Statistical analysis revealed over eightfold reduction of iodine concentration in the pathological tissues (the mean value was 77.13±14.02 ppm) in comparison with the control group (622.62±187.11 ppm for frozen samples and 601.49±192.11 ppm for formalin-fixed ones). A good correspondence (for 10 additional determinations) between the certified (3.38±0.02 ppm with variation coefficient (V.C.) of 0.59% for Standard Reference Material (SRM) NIST 1549-non-fat milk powder) and the measured iodine concentrations (3.52±0.29 ppm; V.C.=10%) was achieved. It was pointed out that the way of tissue preservation (either in formalin or by freezing) had no significant effect on the iodine determination result (α=0.1). Significantly lower iodide content was found in nodular goiter thyroid samples. The applied conditions of digestion, reinforced by the action of microwaves, brought about a decidedly shorter (less than 20 min) sample preparation time. Suitability of the developed IC method was supported by validation results.

  5. Momordin Ic couples apoptosis with autophagy in human hepatoblastoma cancer cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yashi; Xiao, Chunxia; Du, Qingwei; Wu, Wanqiang; Qi, Guoyuan; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-01-01

    Momordin Ic is a principal saponin constituent of Fructus Kochiae, which acts as an edible and pharmaceutical product more than 2000 years in China. Our previous research found momordin Ic induced apoptosis by PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways in HepG2 cells. While the role of autophagy in momordin Ic induced cell death has not been discussed, and the connection between the apoptosis and autophagy is not clear yet. In this work, we reported momordin Ic promoted the formation of autophagic vacuole and expression of Beclin 1 and LC-3 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with momordin Ic treatment alone, the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) also can inhibit apoptosis, while autophagy activator rapamycin (RAP) has the opposite effect, and the apoptosis inhibitor ZVAD-fmk also inhibited autophagy induced by momordin Ic. Momordin Ic simultaneously induces autophagy and apoptosis by suppressing the ROS-mediated PI3K/Akt and activating the ROS-related JNK and P38 pathways. Additionally, momordin Ic induces apoptosis by suppressing PI3K/Akt-dependent NF-κB pathways and promotes autophagy by ROS-mediated Erk signaling pathway. Those results suggest that momordin Ic has great potential as a nutritional preventive strategy in cancer therapy.

  6. Mutation in the human acetylcholinesterase-associated collagen gene, COLQ, is responsible for congenital myasthenic syndrome with end-plate acetylcholinesterase deficiency (Type Ic).

    PubMed Central

    Donger, C; Krejci, E; Serradell, A P; Eymard, B; Bon, S; Nicole, S; Chateau, D; Gary, F; Fardeau, M; Massoulié, J; Guicheney, P

    1998-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) with end-plate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease, recently classified as CMS type Ic (CMS-Ic). It is characterized by onset in childhood, generalized weakness increased by exertion, refractoriness to anticholinesterase drugs, and morphological abnormalities of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The collagen-tailed form of AChE, which is normally concentrated at NMJs, is composed of catalytic tetramers associated with a specific collagen, COLQ. In CMS-Ic patients, these collagen-tailed forms are often absent. We studied a large family comprising 11 siblings, 6 of whom are affected by a mild form of CMS-Ic. The muscles of the patients contained collagen-tailed AChE. We first excluded the ACHE gene (7q22) as potential culprit, by linkage analysis; then we mapped COLQ to chromosome 3p24.2. By analyzing 3p24.2 markers located close to the gene, we found that the six affected patients were homozygous for an interval of 14 cM between D3S1597 and D3S2338. We determined the COLQ coding sequence and found that the patients present a homozygous missense mutation, Y431S, in the conserved C-terminal domain of COLQ. This mutation is thought to disturb the attachment of collagen-tailed AChE to the NMJ, thus constituting the first genetic defect causing CMS-Ic. PMID:9758617

  7. POLY IC IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR ADJUVANT FOR SIV GAG PROTEIN INDUCED T CELL RESPONSES IN NON-HUMAN PRIMATES

    PubMed Central

    Park, Haesun; Adamson, Lauren; Ha, Tae; Mullen, Karl; Hagen, Shoko I; Nogueron, Arys; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Legasse, Al; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; McElrath, Juliana M.; Picker, Louis J.; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines elicits potent cellular immunity. Here, we assessed the influence of various TLR ligands on SIV Gag-specific T cell immunity and protection following prime-boost immunization. Rhesus macaques (RM) were primed with SIV Gag protein emulsified in montanide ISA51 with or without TLR3 (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly IC)), TLR4 (monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)), TLR7/8, TLR9 (CpG) or TLR3 (Poly IC) combined with TLR7/8 ligands, then boosted with replication defective adenovirus 5 expressing SIV Gag (rAd5-Gag). After priming, RM that received SIV Gag protein plus Poly IC developed significantly higher frequencies of SIV Gag-specific CD4+ Th1 responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid lymphocytes (BAL) compared to all other adjuvants, and low-level SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses. After the rAd5-Gag boost, the magnitude and breadth of SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses were significantly increased in RM primed with SIV Gag protein plus Poly IC, with or without the TLR7/8 ligand, or CpG. However, the anamnestic, SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell response to SIVmac251 challenge was not significantly enhanced by SIV Gag protein priming with any of the adjuvants. In contrast, the anamnestic SIV Gag-specific CD4+ T cell response in BAL was enhanced by SIV Gag protein priming with Poly IC or CpG, which correlated with partial control of early viral replication after SIVmac251 challenge. These results demonstrate that prime-boost vaccination with SIV Gag protein/Poly IC improves magnitude, breadth, and durability of CD4+ T cell immune responses, which may have a role in control of SIV viral replication. PMID:23509365

  8. A Multiwavelength Study of IC 63 and IC 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karr, J. L.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Martin, P. G.

    2005-02-01

    IC 63 and IC 59 are two nearby arc-shaped nebulae with relatively simple geometries and minimal obscuring material. The two regions, in spite of a similar projected distance from their ionizing star, have very different observational properties, both in continuum emission and in the presence and strength of line emission from molecular species. This paper conducts a multiwavelength study of the two regions using archived data from a variety of sources, including the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey and the Infrared Space Observatory. The multiwavelength morphology and structure of the two nebulae are studied in detail, particularly the ionization fronts in IC 63. The possibility of triggered star formation in IC 63 is investigated and determined to be spurious. H2 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission is detected in both IC 63 and IC 59, confirming the presence of molecular hydrogen in IC 59. The averaged line ratios are similar in the two regions, but variations are seen within each region. Temperatures and densities were calculated from the S(3) and S(5) pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen. We derived a temperature of 630 K in IC 63, comparable to previous results, and a column density of 5.8×1017 cm-2, somewhat lower than previous values. New results for IC 59 show values of 590 K and 3.4×1017 cm-2, slightly cooler and with lower column density than IC 63. The contrast in appearance between IC 63 and IC 59 is consistent with a difference in actual (rather than projected) distances and a small variation in temperature and column density.

  9. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  10. Leptin replacement improves postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity in human immunodeficiency virus-infected lipoatrophic men treated with pioglitazone: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Brennan, Aoife; Sweeney, Laura; Kang, Eun Seok; Doweiko, John; Karchmer, Adolf W; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2011-07-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced lipoatrophy is characterized by hypoleptinemia and insulin resistance. Evidence suggests that pioglitazone and recombinant methionyl human leptin (metreleptin) administration has beneficial effects in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected lipoatrophic patients. This proof-of-concept study aimed at evaluating whether the combination of metreleptin and pioglitazone has favorable effects, above and beyond pioglitazone alone, on both metabolic outcomes and peripheral lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients on HAART. Nine HIV-positive men with at least 6 months of HAART exposure, clinical evidence of lipoatrophy, and low leptin concentrations (≤4 ng/mL) were placed on pioglitazone treatment (30 mg/d per os) and were randomized to receive either metreleptin (0.04 mg/kg subcutaneously once daily; n = 5) or placebo (n = 4) for 3 months in a double-blinded fashion. Compared with placebo, metreleptin reduced fasting serum insulin concentration, increased adiponectin concentration, reduced the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, and attenuated postprandial glycemia in response to a mixed meal (all P ≤ .02), but did not affect trunk and peripheral fat mass. HIV control was not affected, and no major adverse effects were observed. Metreleptin administration in HIV-positive, leptin-deficient patients with lipoatrophy treated with pioglitazone improves postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. Results from this pilot study should be confirmed in larger clinical trials.

  11. Reliability in CMOS IC processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreeve, R.; Ferrier, S.; Hall, D.; Wang, J.

    1990-01-01

    Critical CMOS IC processing reliability monitors are defined in this paper. These monitors are divided into three categories: process qualifications, ongoing production workcell monitors, and ongoing reliability monitors. The key measures in each of these categories are identified and prioritized based on their importance.

  12. R&D100: IC ID

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason; Pierson, Lyndon; Bauer, Todd

    2015-11-19

    Supply chain security to detect, deter, and prevent the counterfeiting of networked and stand-alone integrated circuits (ICs) is critical to cyber security. Sandia National Laboratory researchers have developed IC ID to leverage Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) and strong cryptographic authentication to create a unique fingerprint for each integrated circuit. IC ID assures the authenticity of ICs to prevent tampering or malicious substitution.

  13. R&D100: IC ID

    ScienceCinema

    Hamlet, Jason; Pierson, Lyndon; Bauer, Todd

    2016-07-12

    Supply chain security to detect, deter, and prevent the counterfeiting of networked and stand-alone integrated circuits (ICs) is critical to cyber security. Sandia National Laboratory researchers have developed IC ID to leverage Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) and strong cryptographic authentication to create a unique fingerprint for each integrated circuit. IC ID assures the authenticity of ICs to prevent tampering or malicious substitution.

  14. Intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) induces local and systemic antitumor effects that involve both activated T and NK cells as well as enhanced IC retention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) is an immunocytokine consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase 2 clinical trials of i.v. hu14.18-IL-2 (i.v.-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. We showed previously that intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IT-IC) results in enhanced antitumor activity in mouse models compared with i.v.-IC. The studies presented in this article were designed to determine the mechanisms involved in this enhanced activity and to support the future clinical testing of intratumoral administration of immunocytokines. Improved survival and inhibition of growth of both local and distant tumors were observed in A/J mice bearing s.c. NXS2 neuroblastomas treated with IT-IC compared with those treated with i.v.-IC or control mice. The local and systemic antitumor effects of IT-IC were inhibited by depletion of NK cells or T cells. IT-IC resulted in increased NKG2D receptors on intratumoral NKG2A/C/E⁺ NKp46⁺ NK cells and NKG2A/C/E⁺ CD8⁺ T cells compared with control mice or mice treated with i.v.-IC. NKG2D levels were augmented more in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with splenocytes, supporting the localized nature of the intratumoral changes induced by IT-IC treatment. Prolonged retention of IC at the tumor site was seen with IT-IC compared with i.v.-IC. Overall, IT-IC resulted in increased numbers of activated T and NK cells within tumors, better IC retention in the tumor, enhanced inhibition of tumor growth, and improved survival compared with i.v.-IC.

  15. Human LTC-IC can be maintained for at least 5 weeks in vitro when interleukin-3 and a single chemokine are combined with O-sulfated heparan sulfates: requirement for optimal binding interactions of heparan sulfate with early-acting cytokines and matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Oegema, T R; Brazil, J J; Dudek, A Z; Slungaard, A; Verfaillie, C M

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that stromal O-sulfated heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (O-S-GAGs) regulate primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) growth and differentiation by colocalizing heparin-binding cytokines and matrix proteins with HPC in stem cell "niches" in the marrow microenvironment. We now show that long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) are maintained for 5 weeks in the absence of stroma when O-S-GAGs are added to IL-3 and either MIP-1alpha or PF4 (LTC-IC maintenance without GAGs, 32 +/- 2%; with GAGs, 95 +/- 7%; P <.001). When cultured with 5 additional cytokines, O-S-GAGs, IL-3, and MIP-1alpha, LTC-IC expanded 2- to 4-fold at 2 weeks, and 92 +/- 8% LTC-IC were maintained at 5 weeks. Similar results were seen when PF4 replaced MIP-1alpha. Although O-S-GAG omission did not affect 2-week expansion, only 20% LTC-IC were maintained for 5 weeks. When O-S-heparin was replaced by completely desulfated-, N-sulfated (O-desulfated), or unmodified heparins, LTC-IC maintenance at week 5 was not better than with cytokines alone. Unmodified- and O-S-heparin, but not desulfated- or N-sulfated heparin, bound to MIP-1alpha, IL-3, PF4, VEGF, thrombospondin, and fibronectin. However, the affinity of heparin for thrombospondin and PF4, and the association and dissociation rates of heparin for PF4, were higher than those of O-S-heparin. We conclude that (i) although cytokines may suffice to induce early expansion, adult human LTC-IC maintenance for longer than 1 month requires O-S-GAGs, and (ii) HPC support may depend not only on the ability of GAGs to bind proteins, but also on optimal affinity and kinetics of interactions that affect presentation of proteins in a biologically active manner to progenitors. (Blood. 2000;95:147-155)

  16. 75 FR 54940 - Agency Information Collection (IC) Activities; Revision of an Approved IC; Accident Recordkeeping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Agency Information Collection (IC) Activities; Revision of an Approved IC; Accident Recordkeeping Requirements AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA... revision of the Information Collection (IC) entitled, ``Accident Recordkeeping Requirements,''...

  17. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  18. IC and Component Selection for Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the integrated circuit (IC) and selections of the IC components for space systems. Included in the discussion are a overview of semiconductors and the evolution of integrated circuit. It also reviews the three different viewpoints of the IC selection: technical, programmatic, and risk. From a radiation perspective there are four criteria for selecting ICs for space systems: guaranteed hardness, historical ground-based data, historical flight usage, and unknown assurance.

  19. Rocket Observations of IC 405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Burgh, E. B.

    2001-12-01

    We present the preliminary results from a NASA/JHU sounding rocket mission (36.198 UG), launched on 09 February 2001 at 21:00 MST, to obtain a long slit (200\\arcsec x 12\\arcsec) spectrum of the reflection nebula IC 405 in the 900 -- 1400 Å wavelength region. Several pointings within the nebula were obtained, including a high quality (S/N ≈ 10-15 at R = 300) spectrum of the central star, HD 34078, which clearly shows absorption from molecular hydrogen (H2). Observations of the nebula reveal a surface brightness to stellar flux ratio that rises by two orders of magnitude between 1400 and 900 Å. This is in contrast with the relatively flat nebular dust scattering observed during a prior sounding rocket observation of the reflection nebula NGC 2023. We will also present additional nebular pointings within IC 405, including a region observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope showing evidence of H2 fluorescent emission. These observations were supported by NASA grant NAG5-5122 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  20. Differential regulation of metabolic, neuroendocrine, and immune function by leptin in humans.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Matarese, Giuseppe; Shetty, Greeshma K; Raciti, Patricia; Kelesidis, Iosif; Aufiero, Daniela; De Rosa, Veronica; Perna, Francesco; Fontana, Silvia; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2006-05-30

    To elucidate whether the role of leptin in regulating neuroendocrine and immune function during short-term starvation in healthy humans is permissive, i.e., occurs only when circulating leptin levels are below a critical threshold level, we studied seven normal-weight women during a normoleptinemic-fed state and two states of relative hypoleptinemia induced by 72-h fasting during which we administered either placebo or recombinant methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin) in replacement doses. Fasting for 72 h decreased leptin levels by approximately = 80% from a midphysiologic (14.7 +/- 2.6 ng/ml) to a low-physiologic (2.8 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) level. Administration of r-metHuLeptin during fasting fully restored leptin to physiologic levels (28.8 +/- 2.0 ng/ml) and reversed the fasting-associated decrease in overnight luteinizing hormone pulse frequency but had no effect on fasting-induced changes in thyroid-stimulating hormone pulsatility, thyroid and IGF-1 hormone levels, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and renin-aldosterone activity. FSH and sex steroid levels were not altered. Short-term reduction of leptin levels decreased the number of circulating cells of the adaptive immune response, but r-metHuLeptin did not have major effects on their number or in vitro function. Thus, changes of leptin levels within the physiologic range have no major physiologic effects in leptin-replete humans. Studies involving more severe and/or chronic leptin deficiency are needed to precisely define the lower limit of normal leptin levels for each of leptin's physiologic targets.

  1. Thackeray's Globules in IC 2944

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Strangely glowing dark clouds float serenely in this remarkable and beautiful image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. These dense, opaque dust clouds - known as 'globules' - are silhouetted against nearby bright stars in the busy star-forming region, IC 2944. These globules were first found in IC 2944 by astronomer A.D. Thackeray in 1950. Although globules like these have been known since Dutch-American astronomer Bart Bok first drew attention to such objects in 1947, little is still known about their origin and nature, except that they are generally associated with areas of star formation, called 'HII regions' due to the presence of hydrogen gas. The largest of the globules in this image is actually two separate clouds that gently overlap along our line of sight. Each cloud is nearly 1.4 light-years (50 arcseconds) along its longest dimension, and collectively, they contain enough material to equal over 15 solar masses. IC 2944, the surrounding HII region, is filled with gas and dust that is illuminated and heated by a loose cluster of O-type stars. These stars are much hotter and much more massive than our Sun. IC 2944 is relatively close by, located only 5900 light-years (1800 parsecs) away in the constellation Centaurus. Thanks to the remarkable resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers can for the first time study the intricate structure of these globules. The globules appear to be heavily fractured, as if major forces were tearing them apart. When radio astronomers observed the faint hiss of molecules within the globules, they realized that the globules are actually in constant, churning motion, moving supersonically among each other. This may be caused by the powerful ultraviolet radiation from the luminous, massive stars, which also heat up the gas in the HII region, causing it to expand and stream against the globules, leading to their destruction. Despite their serene appearance, the globules may actually be likened to clumps

  2. Mod 1 ICS TI Report: ICS Conversion of a 140% HPGe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bounds, John Alan

    2016-07-05

    This report evaluates the Mod 1 ICS, an electrically cooled 140% HPGe detector. It is a custom version of the ORTEC Integrated Cooling System (ICS) modified to make it more practical for us to use in the field. Performance and operating characteristics of the Mod 1 ICS are documented, noting both pros and cons. The Mod 1 ICS is deemed a success. Recommendations for a Mod 2 ICS, a true field prototype, are provided.

  3. ABC: Aging-Based IC Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    TERMS IP protection, active hardware metering, unclonability, hardware Trojans 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18... IP ) protection technique that offers universal protection to both application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and field-programmable gate...address several aspects of IC intellectual property ( IP ) protection such as prevention of use of non-authorized ICs, they have significant limitations

  4. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  5. High performance MPEG-audio decoder IC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, M.; Benbassat, G.; Cyr, K.; Li, S.; Gill, M.; Kam, D.; Walker, K.; Look, P.; Eldridge, C.; Ng, P.

    1993-01-01

    The emerging digital audio and video compression technology brings both an opportunity and a new challenge to IC design. The pervasive application of compression technology to consumer electronics will require high volume, low cost IC's and fast time to market of the prototypes and production units. At the same time, the algorithms used in the compression technology result in complex VLSI IC's. The conflicting challenges of algorithm complexity, low cost, and fast time to market have an impact on device architecture and design methodology. The work presented in this paper is about the design of a dedicated, high precision, Motion Picture Expert Group (MPEG) audio decoder.

  6. SPROC: A multiple-processor DSP IC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R.

    1991-01-01

    A large, single-chip, multiple-processor, digital signal processing (DSP) integrated circuit (IC) fabricated in HP-Cmos34 is presented. The innovative architecture is best suited for analog and real-time systems characterized by both parallel signal data flows and concurrent logic processing. The IC is supported by a powerful development system that transforms graphical signal flow graphs into production-ready systems in minutes. Automatic compiler partitioning of tasks among four on-chip processors gives the IC the signal processing power of several conventional DSP chips.

  7. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high-reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, J.M.; Stewart, H.D.; Pastorek, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Standard human-body-equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary MOS (CMOS) and metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low-range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the masking polysilicon ring failed because of input to V/sub DD/ or V/sub SS/ shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  8. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, J.M.; Pastorek, R.A.; Stewart, H.D.

    1984-02-01

    Standard human body equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary MOS (CMOS) and metal-nitrideoxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the masking polysilicon ring failed because of input to V/sub DD/ or V/sub SS/ shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  9. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high-reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, J. M.; Stewart, H. D.; Pastorek, R. A.

    Standard human-body-equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) and metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low-range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the making polysilicon ring failed because of input to V sub DD or V sub SS shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  10. Semiconductor/High-Tc-Superconductor Hybrid ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid integrated circuits (ICs) containing both Si-based semiconducting and YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-x) superconducting circuit elements on sapphire substrates developed. Help to prevent diffusion of Cu from superconductors into semiconductors. These hybrid ICs combine superconducting and semiconducting features unavailable in superconducting or semiconducting circuitry alone. For example, complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) readout and memory devices integrated with fast-switching Josephson-junction super-conducting logic devices and zero-resistance interconnections.

  11. Development of brain injury criteria (BrIC).

    PubMed

    Takhounts, Erik G; Craig, Matthew J; Moorhouse, Kevin; McFadden, Joe; Hasija, Vikas

    2013-11-01

    Rotational motion of the head as a mechanism for brain injury was proposed back in the 1940s. Since then a multitude of research studies by various institutions were conducted to confirm/reject this hypothesis. Most of the studies were conducted on animals and concluded that rotational kinematics experienced by the animal's head may cause axonal deformations large enough to induce their functional deficit. Other studies utilized physical and mathematical models of human and animal heads to derive brain injury criteria based on deformation/pressure histories computed from their models. This study differs from the previous research in the following ways: first, it uses two different detailed mathematical models of human head (SIMon and GHBMC), each validated against various human brain response datasets; then establishes physical (strain and stress based) injury criteria for various types of brain injury based on scaled animal injury data; and finally, uses Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) (Hybrid III 50th Male, Hybrid III 5th Female, THOR 50th Male, ES-2re, SID-IIs, WorldSID 50th Male, and WorldSID 5th Female) test data (NCAP, pendulum, and frontal offset tests) to establish a kinematically based brain injury criterion (BrIC) for all ATDs. Similar procedures were applied to college football data where thousands of head impacts were recorded using a six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) instrumented helmet system. Since animal injury data used in derivation of BrIC were predominantly for diffuse axonal injury (DAI) type, which is currently an AIS 4+ injury, cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM) and maximum principal strain (MPS) were used to derive risk curves for AIS 4+ anatomic brain injuries. The AIS 1+, 2+, 3+, and 5+ risk curves for CSDM and MPS were then computed using the ratios between corresponding risk curves for head injury criterion (HIC) at a 50% risk. The risk curves for BrIC were then obtained from CSDM and MPS risk curves using the linear relationship

  12. Silicon MCM substrates for integration of III-V photonic devices and CMOS IC`s

    SciTech Connect

    Seigal, P.; Carson, R.; Flores, R.; Rose, B.

    1993-07-01

    The progress made in advanced packaging development at Sandia National Laboratories for integration of III-V photonic devices and CMOS IC`s on Silicon MCM substrates for planar aid stacked applications will be reported. Studies to characterize precision alignment techniques using solder attach materials compatible with both silicon IC`s and III-V devices will be discussed. Examples of the use of back-side alignment and IR through-wafer inspection will be shown along with the extra processing steps that are used. Under bump metallurgy considerations are also addressed.

  13. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Banerjee, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is a multi-user facility to establish and maintain a state-of-the-art relational database and digital archive for rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to make such data generally available and to provide an information technology infrastructure for these and other research-oriented databases run by the international community. As its name implies, MagIC will not be restricted to paleomagnetic or rock magnetic data only, although MagIC will focus on these kinds of information during its setup phase. MagIC will be hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ where two "integrated" web portals will be developed, one for paleomagnetism (currently functional as a prototype that can be explored via the http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/ link) and one for rock magnetism. The MagIC database will store all measurements and their derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and their intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Ultimately, this database will allow researchers to study "on the internet" and to download important data sets that display paleo-secular variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field over geological time, or that display magnetic data in typical Zijderveld, hysteresis/FORC and various magnetization/remanence diagrams. The MagIC database is completely integrated in the EarthRef.org relational database structure and thus benefits significantly from already-existing common database components, such as the EarthRef Reference Database (ERR) and Address Book (ERAB). The ERR allows researchers to find complete sets of literature resources as used in GERM (Geochemical Earth Reference Model), REM (Reference Earth Model) and MagIC. The ERAB contains addresses for all contributors to the EarthRef.org databases, and also for those who participated in data collection, archiving and

  14. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage with detailed callouts of the components. The S-IC Stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  15. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This illustration shows a cutaway drawing with callouts of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimball for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  16. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a cutaway view of the Saturn V first stage, known as the S-IC, detailing the five F-1 engines and fuel cells. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through the five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  17. The H II regions of IC 1613

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.S.; Mason, S.F.; Gullixson, C.A. Prime Computer, Inc., Bedford, MA Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ )

    1990-08-01

    New H-alpha images are presented of IC 1613, a small irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The images, obtained with a CCD on the 42-in telescope at Lowell Observatory, have been calibrated and used to produce an H-alpha luminosity function and a size distribution for the H II regions in IC 1613. The results are compared to results for NGC 6822 and the Magellanic Clouds. The size distribution is found to be Poissonian over a limited range. 24 refs.

  18. IC Engine Applications of Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Rivers, H. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Many of the properties of carbon-carbon make it an ideal material for reciprocating materials of intermittent combustion (IC) engines. Recent diesel engine tests, shown herein, indicate that the thermal and mechanical properties of carbon-carbon are adequate for piston applications, However, reducing the manufacturing costs and providing long term oxidation protection are still issues that need to be addressed.

  19. Two possible active supernovae in IC 2150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Stu; Bock, Greg; Marples, Peter; Drescher, Colin; Pearl, Patrick; BOSS Team; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, Eric; Carnegie Supernova Project

    2016-03-01

    Stu Parker and the BOSS team report the discovery of a rare event involving two possible active supernovae in IC 2150 (z=0.010404; NED) which were recorded in images obtained by Stu Parker during the ongoing program by the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) team.

  20. Embedded I&C for Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger A.

    2016-04-01

    This project uses embedded instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies to demonstrate potential performance gains of nuclear power plant components in extreme environments. Extreme environments include high temperature, radiation, high pressure, high vibration, and high EMI conditions. For extreme environments, performance gains arise from moment-to-moment sensing of local variables and immediate application of local feedback control. Planning for embedding I&C during early system design phases contrasts with the traditional, serial design approach that incorporates minimal I&C after mechanical and electrical design is complete. The demonstration application involves the development and control of a novel, proof-of-concept motor/pump design. The motor and pump combination operate within the fluid environment, eliminating the need for rotating seals. Actively controlled magnetic bearings also replace failure-prone mechanical contact bearings that typically suspend rotating components. Such as design has the potential to significantly enhance the reliability and life of the pumping system and would not be possible without embedded I&C.

  1. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  2. Measurement selection for parametric IC fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, A.; Meador, J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with the use of measurement reduction for statistical IC fault diagnosis are described. The reduction method used involves data pre-processing in a fashion consistent with a specific definition of parametric faults. The effects of this preprocessing are examined.

  3. Parametric Model Checking with VerICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapik, Michał; Niewiadomski, Artur; Penczek, Wojciech; Półrola, Agata; Szreter, Maciej; Zbrzezny, Andrzej

    The paper presents the verification system verICS, extended with the three new modules aimed at parametric verification of Elementary Net Systems, Distributed Time Petri Nets, and a subset of UML. All the modules exploit Bounded Model Checking for verifying parametric reachability and the properties specified in the logic PRTECTL - the parametric extension of the existential fragment of CTL.

  4. TDR method for determine IC's parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenkov, V.; Rodionov, D.; Khlybov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Frequency domain simulation is a widely used approach for determine integrated circuits parameters. This approach can be found in most of software tools used in IC industry. Time domain simulation approach shows intensive usage last years due to some advantages. In particular it applicable for analysis of nonlinear and nonstationary systems where frequency domain is inapplicable. Resolution of time domain systems allow see heterogeneities on distance 1mm, determine it parameters and properties. Authors used approach based on detecting reflected signals from heterogeneities - time domain reflectometry (TDR). Field effect transistor technology scaling up to 30-60nm gate length and 10nm gate dielectric, heterojunction bi-polar transistors with 10-30nm base width allows fabricate digital IC's with 20GHz clock frequency and RF-IC's with tens GHz bandwidth. Such devices and operation speed suppose transit signal by use microwave lines. There are local heterogeneities can be found inside of the signal path due to connections between different parts of signal lines (stripe line-RF-connector pin, stripe line - IC package pin). These heterogeneities distort signals that cause bandwidth decrease for RF-devices. Time domain research methods of transmission and reflected signals give the opportunities to determine heterogeneities, it properties, parameters and built up equivalent circuits. Experimental results are provided and show possibility for inductance and capacitance measurement up to 25GHz. Measurements contains result of signal path research on IC and printed circuit board (PCB) used for 12GHz RF chips. Also dielectric constant versus frequency was measured up to 35GHz.

  5. IC-4, a new irreversible EGFR inhibitor, exhibits prominent anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Zhong-Qing; Yan, Xu; Chen, Mei-Wan; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Ge, Ze-Mei; Zhou, De-Min; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Run-Tao

    2013-10-28

    Accumulating evidence suggested that the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have potential to override the acquired resistance to target-based therapies. Herein, we reported IC-4 as a novel irreversible TKI for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). IC-4 potentially suppressed proliferation, induced apoptosis and a G2/M cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cells, correlating with inhibition of EGF-induced EGFR activation, but independent of DNA damage. In addition, IC-4 exhibited anti-angiogenetic activities both in vitro and in vivo. It suppressed cell viability and proliferation induced by various growth factors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). IC-4 also inhibited HUVECs migration and tube formation. In transgenic zebrafish embryo model, IC-4 was shown to suppress formation of intersegmental vessel and development of subintestinal vessels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that IC-4 is a new irreversible EGFR-TKI, exhibiting potent anti-breast cancer and anti-angiogenetic effects.

  6. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  7. Molecular Hydrogen Fluorescence in IC 63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, B-G

    2005-01-01

    This grant has supported the acquisition, reduction and analysis of data targeting the structure and excitation of molecular hydrogen in the reflection nebula IC 63 and in particular the fluorescent emission seen in the UV. In addition to manpower for analyzing the FUSE data, the grant supported the (attempted) acquisition of supporting ground-based data. We proposed for and received observing time for two sets of ground based, data; narrow band imaging ([S II], [O III) at KPNO (July 2002; Observer: Burgh) and imaging spectro-photometry of several of the near-infrared rotation-vibration lines of H2 at the IRTF (October 2003; Observer: Andersson). Unfortunately, both of these runs were failures, primarily because of bad weather, and did not result in any useful data. We combined the FUSE observations with rocket borne observations of the star responsible for exciting the H2 fluorescence in IC 63: gamma Cas, and with archival HUT observations of IC 63, covering the long-wavelength part of the molecular hydrogen fluorescence.

  8. The IC 342-Maffei 1 Group Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, M. L.; Buta, R.

    1996-12-01

    Deep wide-field CCD images of thirteen members of the IC 342-Maffei 1 Group in the Northern Milky Way have been acquired in the Johnson V and Cousins I photometric systems. The observations were obtained with the Kitt Peak Burrell-Schmidt telescope in Arizona during six nights in November 1995. Almost none of these galaxies was effectively studied in the past because of the heavy foreground extinction and significant foreground star contamination in the direction of the group. The tens of thousands of foreground stars included on the Schmidt images have been successfully subtracted using DAOPHOT, revealing the true extent and total brightness of most of the galaxies for the first time. In the absence of galactic extinction, Maffei 1, Maffei 2, and IC 342 would be among the five brightest galaxies in the northern sky, and both Maffei 1 and IC 342 would subtend angles as large as the full Moon. The results are critical for assessing the degree to which the group influenced the dynamical evolution of the Local Group. In this poster, we will present deep photographs, total magnitudes and color indices, luminosity profiles, and distance estimates for the member galaxies.

  9. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P.; Smith, C.K.

    1991-09-01

    Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.

  10. Simulation of SEU transients in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, N.; Bhuva, B.L.; Kerns, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that available analytical models of the number of single-event-induced errors (SEU) in combinational logic systems are not easily applicable to real integrated circuits (ICs). An efficient computer simulation algorithm set, SITA, predicts the vulnerability of data stored in and processed by complex combinational logic circuits to SEU. SITA is described in detail to allow researchers to incorporate it into their error analysis packages. Required simulation algorithms are based on approximate closed-form equations modeling individual device behavior in CMOS logic units. Device-level simulation is used to estimate the probability that ion-device interactions produce erroneous signals capable of propagating to a latch (or n output node), and logic-level simulation to predict the spread of such erroneous, latched information through the IC. Simulation results are compared to those from SPICE for several circuit and logic configurations. SITA results are comparable to this established circuit-level code, and SITA can analyze circuits with state-of-the-art device densities (which SPICE cannot). At all IC complexity levels, SITAS offers several factors of 10 savings in simulation time over SPICE.

  11. Finding Young Stars in IC417

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odden, Caroline; Rebull, Luisa M.; Sanchez, Richard; Hall, Garrison; Dear, AnnaMaria; Hengel, Cassie; LaRocca, Mia; Lin, Samantha; Nix, Sabine; Sweckard, Teaghan; Wilhelm, Katie

    2016-01-01

    IC 417 is a young cluster in the constellation Auriga, towards the Galactic anti-center in the Perseus arm, at a distance of ~2.3 kpc. Previous studies suggested that there are young stars in this region; Camargo et al. (2012) identified several few-Myr-old clusters in this region from 2MASS clustering, and Jose et al. (2008) identified H-alpha excess sources. Since stars form from clouds of interstellar dust and gas, a signature of star formation is excess infrared (IR) emission, which is interpreted as evidence for circumstellar dust around young stars. We identified new candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in IC 417 by incorporating near- and mid-infrared observations from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). Infrared excess sources were identified by using a series of color cuts in various 2MASS/WISE color-magnitude and color-color diagrams following Koenig & Leisawitz (2014). We also assembled a list of OB and H-alpha stars from the literature, including those from Jose et al. (2008), and H-alpha bright stars from the IPHAS survey (Witham et al. 2008). Starting with this compiled list of approximately 200 interesting objects in the region, we then set about checking their reliability in three ways. We inspected the POSS, 2MASS, and WISE images of the sources. We assembled and inspected spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from archival data ranging from wavelengths of 0.7 to 22 um. Finally, we created and inspected color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. We find enough new YSO candidates to more than double the number yet identified in the IC 417 region. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program.

  12. Discovery of a SN in IC 178

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzini, F.; Dimai, A.

    2005-07-01

    Federico Manzini report the discovery by Alessandro Dimai, on behalf of the CROSS Program (cf. IAUC 7373) with the 0.5-m "Ullrich" telescope of the Col Druscié observatory (Cortina d'Ampezzo- Italy), of an apparent supernova in IC 178 at a magnitude of 15.5 about; two unfiltered CCD images taken on 2005 July 15.05 (limiting magnitude about 19.0) shown the new object. The presence of the object with magnitude 15.4 about, is confirmed by other two unfiltered CCD images taken on 2005 July 16.01 (limiting magnitude about 18.5) with the same telescope.

  13. A Way to End the IC Designer Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the shortage of engineers capable of designing advanced integrated circuits (IC) and presents some suggestions for increasing the number of IC designers in universities and semiconductor companies. (HM)

  14. IC-Finder: inferring robustly the hierarchical organization of chromatin folding.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Noelle; Vaillant, Cédric; Jost, Daniel

    2017-01-26

    The spatial organization of the genome plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. Recent experimental techniques like Hi-C have emphasized the segmentation of genomes into interaction compartments that constitute conserved functional domains participating in the maintenance of a proper cell identity. Here, we propose a novel method, IC-Finder, to identify interaction compartments (IC) from experimental Hi-C maps. IC-Finder is based on a hierarchical clustering approach that we adapted to account for the polymeric nature of chromatin. Based on a benchmark of realistic in silico Hi-C maps, we show that IC-Finder is one of the best methods in terms of reliability and is the most efficient numerically. IC-Finder proposes two original options: a probabilistic description of the inferred compartments and the possibility to explore the various hierarchies of chromatin organization. Applying the method to experimental data in fly and human, we show how the predicted segmentation may depend on the normalization scheme and how 3D compartmentalization is tightly associated with epigenomic information. IC-Finder provides a robust and generic 'all-in-one' tool to uncover the general principles of 3D chromatin folding and their influence on gene regulation. The software is available at http://membres-timc.imag.fr/Daniel.Jost/DJ-TIMC/Software.html.

  15. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba myosin-IC as a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as "traction-mediated cytokinesis". We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy.

  16. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  17. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements

  18. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  19. Mass modelling of superthin galaxies: IC5249, UGC7321 and IC2233

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arunima; Bapat, Disha

    2017-04-01

    Superthin galaxies are low surface brightness (LSB) disc galaxies, characterized by optical discs with strikingly high values of planar-to-vertical axes ratios (>10), the physical origin and evolution of which continue to be a puzzle. We present mass models for three superthin galaxies: IC5249, UGC7321 and IC2233. We use high-resolution rotation curves and gas surface density distributions obtained from H I 21 cm radiosynthesis observations, in combination with their two-dimensional structural surface brightness decompositions at Spitzer 3.6 μm band, all of which were available in the literature. We find that while models with the pseudo-isothermal (PIS) and the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) dark matter density profiles fit the observed rotation curves of IC5249 and UGC7321 equally well, those with the NFW profile do not comply with the slowly rising rotation curve of IC2233. Interestingly, for all of our sample galaxies, the best-fitting mass models with a PIS dark matter density profile indicate a compact dark matter halo, i.e. Rc/RD < 2, where Rc is the core radius of the PIS dark matter halo and RD is the radial scalelength of the exponential stellar disc. The compact dark matter halo may be fundamentally responsible for the superthin nature of the stellar disc, and therefore our results may have important implications for the formation and evolution models of superthin galaxies in the universe.

  20. Magnetic field structure of IC 63 and IC 59 associated with H II region Sh 185

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soam, A.; Maheswar, G.; Lee, Chang Won; Neha, S.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2017-02-01

    Bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) are formed at the periphery of H II regions as the radiation from the central star interacts with dense gas. The ionization and resulting compression of the clouds may lead to cloud disruption causing secondary star formation depending on the stellar and gas parameters. Here we use R-band polarimetry to probe the plane-of-the sky magnetic field for two nearby BRCs, IC 59 and IC 63. Both nebulae are illuminated by γ Cas with the direction of the ionizing radiation being orientated parallel or perpendicular to the local magnetic field, allowing us to probe the importance of magnetic field pressure in the evolution of BRCs. Because of the proximity of the system (˜200 pc), we have acquired a substantial sample of over 500 polarization measurements for stars that form the background to the nebulae. On large scales, the magnetic field geometries of both clouds are anchored to the ambient magnetic field. For IC 63, the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the head-tail morphology of the main condensation, with a convex morphology relative to the direction of the ionizing radiation. We estimate the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field strength in IC 63 to be ˜ 90 μG. In IC 59, the projected magnetic field follows the M-shape morphology of the cloud. Here, field lines present a concave shape with respect to the direction of the ionizing radiation from γ Cas. Comparing our observations to published theoretical models, we find good general agreement, supporting the importance of magnetic fields in BRC evolution.

  1. Module comprising IC memory stack dedicated to and structurally combined with an IC microprocessor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John C. (Inventor); Indin, Ronald J. (Inventor); Shanken, Stuart N. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A computer module is disclosed in which a stack of glued together IC memory chips is structurally integrated with a microprocessor chip. The memory provided by the stack is dedicated to the microprocessor chip. The microprocessor and its memory stack may be connected either by glue and/or by solder bumps. The solder bumps can perform three functions--electrical interconnection, mechanical connection, and heat transfer. The electrical connections in some versions are provided by wire bonding.

  2. [Role of ICS/LABA on COPD treatment].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoko

    2016-05-01

    In the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchodilators such as long acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and long acting β agonist(LABA) play key roles for improving respiratory function and symptoms, and reducing risk of exacerbation. However, inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a key medicine for bronchial asthma, is limitedly used in COPD treatment. Japanese Respiratory Society recommends to use ICS for severe COPD patients who have been frequently exacerbated, because previous clinical studies indicated that ICS reduces exacerbation in moderate to severe COPD patients. Asthma sometimes overlaps with COPD, and symptoms of those patients are not well controlled by the bronchodilation therapy alone. Therefore, ICS/LABA or ICS/LAMA should be prescribed to those overlapped patients. Concentration of exhaled nitrogen oxide and percentage of peripheral eosinophil may be good biomarkers for discriminating the COPD patients who have good response to ICS treatment.

  3. Variations in IC(50) values with purity of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Neeley, Elizabeth; Fritch, George; Fuller, Autumn; Wolfe, Jordan; Wright, Jessica; Flurkey, William

    2009-09-02

    The effects of various inhibitors on crude, commercial and partially purified commercial mushroom tyrosinase were examined by comparing IC(50) values. Kojic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, tropolone, methimazole, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate had relatively similar IC(50) values for the crude, commercial and partially purified enzyme. 4-Hexylresorcinol seemed to have a somewhat higher IC(50) value using crude extracts, compared to commercial or purified tyrosinase. Some inhibitors (NaCl, esculetin, biphenol, phloridzin) showed variations in IC(50) values between the enzyme samples. In contrast, hydroquinone, lysozyme, Zn(2+), and anisaldehyde showed little or no inhibition in concentration ranges reported to be effective inhibitors. Organic solvents (DMSO and ethanol) had IC(50) values that were similar for some of the tyrosinase samples. Depending of the source of tyrosinase and choice of inhibitor, variations in IC(50) values were observed.

  4. Design of high speed LVDS transceiver ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaokang, Niu

    2010-07-01

    The design of low-power LVDS (low voltage differential signaling) transceiver ICs is presented. The LVDS transmitter integrates a common-mode feedback control on chip, while a specially designed pre-charge circuit is proposed to improve the speed of the circuit, making the highest data rate up to 622 Mb/s. For the LVDS receiver design, the performance degradation issues are solved when handling the large input common mode voltages of the conventional LVDS receivers. In addition, the LVDS receiver also supports the failsafe function. The transceiver chips were verified with the CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS process. The measured results showed that, for the LVDS transmitter with the pre-charge technique proposed, the maximum data rate is higher than 622 Mb/s. The power consumption is 6 mA with a 5-V power supply. The LVDS receiver can work properly with a larger input common mode voltage (0.1-2.4 V) but a differential input voltage as low as 100 mV. The power consumption is only 1.2 mA with a 5-V supply at the highest data rate of 400 Mb/s. The chip set meets the TIA/EIA-644-A standards and shows its potential prospects in LVDS transmission systems.

  5. Computer modeling of complete IC fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Robert W.

    1987-05-01

    The development of fundamental algorithms for process and device modeling as well as novel integration of the tools for advanced Integrated Circuit (IC) technology design is discussed. The development of the first complete 2D process simulator, SUPREM 4, is reported. The algorithms are discussed as well as application to local-oxidation and extrinsic diffusion conditions which occur in CMOS AND BiCMOS technologies. The evolution of 1D (SEDAN) and 2D (PISCES) device analysis is discussed. The application of SEDAN to a variety of non-silicon technologies (GaAs and HgCdTe) are considered. A new multi-window analysis capability for PISCES which exploits Monte Carlo analysis of hot carriers has been demonstrated and used to characterize a variety of silicon MOSFET and GaAs MESFET effects. A parallel computer implementation of PISCES has been achieved using a Hypercube architecture. The PISCES program has been used for a range of important device studies including: latchup, analog switch analysis, MOSFET capacitance studies and bipolar transient device for ECL gates. The program is broadly applicable to RAM and BiCMOS technology analysis and design. In the analog switch technology area this research effort has produced a variety of important modeling and advances.

  6. Electromigration of damascene copper of IC interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, William Kevin

    Copper metallization patterned with multi-level damascene process is prone to electromigration failure, which affects the reliability and performance of IC interconnect. In typical products, interconnect that is not already constrained by I·R drop or Joule self-heating operates at 'near threshold' conditions. Measurement of electromigration damage near threshold is very difficult due to slow degradation requiring greatly extended stress times, or high currents that cause thermal anomalies. Software simulations of the electromigration mechanism combined with characterization of temperature profiles allows extracting material parameters and calculation of design rules to ensure reliable interconnect. Test structures capable of demonstrating Blech threshold effects while allowing thermal characterization were designed and processed. Electromigration stress tests at various conditions were performed to extract both shortline (threshold) and long-line (above threshold) performance values. The resistance increase time constant shows immortality below Je·L (product of current density and segment length) of 3200 amp/cm. Statistical analysis of times-to-failure show that long lines last 105 hours at 3.1 mA/mum2 (120°C). While this is more robust than aluminum interconnect, the semiconductor industry will be challenged to improve that performance as future products require.

  7. Validating IC early-failure simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Mohamod S.; Poole, Kelvin F.; Grams, Michael L.

    1995-09-01

    Early failures are the dominant concern as integrated circuit technology matures into consistently producing systems of high reliability. These failures are attributed to the presence of randomly occurring defects in elementary objects (contacts, vias, metal runs, gate oxides, bonds etc.) that result in extrinsic rather than intrinsic (wearout-related) mortality. A model relating system failure to failure at the elementary objective level has been developed. Reliability is modeled as a function of circuit architecture, mask layout, material properties, life-test data, worst-case use-conditions and the processing environment. The effects of competing failure mechanisms and the presence of redundant sub-systems are accounted for. Hierarchy is exploited in the analysis, allowing large scale designs to be simulated. Experimental validation of the modeling of oxide leakage related failure, based on correlation between actual failures reported for a production integrated circuit and Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate wafer-level test results and process defect monitor data, is presented. The state of the art in IC reliability simulation is advanced in that a methodology that provides the capability to design-in reliability while accounting for early failures has been developed; applications include process qualification, design assessment and fabrication monitoring.

  8. Correct CMOS IC defect models for quality testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soden, Jerry M.; Hawkins, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    Leading edge, high reliability, and low escape CMOS IC test practices have now virtually removed the stuck-at fault model and replaced it with more defect-orientated models. Quiescent power supply current testing (I(sub DDQ)) combined with strategic use of high speed test patterns is the recommended approach to zero defect and high reliability testing goals. This paper reviews the reasons for the change in CMOS IC test practices and outlines an improved CMOS IC test methodology.

  9. Systolic array IC for genetic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.

    Measuring similarities between large sequences of genetic information is a formidable task requiring enormous amounts of computer time. Geneticists claim that nearly two months of CRAY-2 time are required to run a single comparison of the known database against the new bases that will be found this year, and more than a CRAY-2 year for next year's genetic discoveries, and so on. The DNA IC, designed at HP-ICBD in cooperation with the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is being implemented in order to move the task of genetic comparison onto workstations and personal computers, while vastly improving performance. The chip is a systolic (pumped) array comprised of 16 processors, control logic, and global RAM, totaling 400,000 FETS. At 12 MHz, each chip performs 2.7 billion 16 bit operations per second. Using 35 of these chips in series on one PC board (performing nearly 100 billion operations per second), a sequence of 560 bases can be compared against the eventual total genome of 3 billion bases, in minutes--on a personal computer. While the designed purpose of the DNA chip is for genetic research, other disciplines requiring similarity measurements between strings of 7 bit encoded data could make use of this chip as well. Cryptography and speech recognition are two examples. A mix of full custom design and standard cells, in CMOS34, were used to achieve these goals. Innovative test methods were developed to enhance controllability and observability in the array. This paper describes these techniques as well as the chip's functionality. This chip was designed in the 1989-90 timeframe.

  10. Systolic array IC for genetic computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.

    1991-01-01

    Measuring similarities between large sequences of genetic information is a formidable task requiring enormous amounts of computer time. Geneticists claim that nearly two months of CRAY-2 time are required to run a single comparison of the known database against the new bases that will be found this year, and more than a CRAY-2 year for next year's genetic discoveries, and so on. The DNA IC, designed at HP-ICBD in cooperation with the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is being implemented in order to move the task of genetic comparison onto workstations and personal computers, while vastly improving performance. The chip is a systolic (pumped) array comprised of 16 processors, control logic, and global RAM, totaling 400,000 FETS. At 12 MHz, each chip performs 2.7 billion 16 bit operations per second. Using 35 of these chips in series on one PC board (performing nearly 100 billion operations per second), a sequence of 560 bases can be compared against the eventual total genome of 3 billion bases, in minutes--on a personal computer. While the designed purpose of the DNA chip is for genetic research, other disciplines requiring similarity measurements between strings of 7 bit encoded data could make use of this chip as well. Cryptography and speech recognition are two examples. A mix of full custom design and standard cells, in CMOS34, were used to achieve these goals. Innovative test methods were developed to enhance controllability and observability in the array. This paper describes these techniques as well as the chip's functionality. This chip was designed in the 1989-90 timeframe.

  11. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22102 Smoking (I-C mines). (a) Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches, or lighters underground or within 50 feet...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22102 Smoking (I-C mines). (a) Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches, or lighters underground or within 50 feet...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22102 Smoking (I-C mines). (a) Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches, or lighters underground or within 50 feet...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22102 Smoking (I-C mines). (a) Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches, or lighters underground or within 50 feet...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22102 Smoking (I-C mines). (a) Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches, or lighters underground or within 50 feet...

  16. Comparison of IC and MEMS packaging reliability approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of IC and MEMS packaging technology with emphasis on reliability, compares the norm for IC packaging reliability evaluation and identifies challenges for development of reliability methodologies for MEMS, and finally, proposes the use of COTS MEMS in order to start generating statistically meaningful reliability data as a vehicle for future standardization of reliability test methodology for MEMS packaging.

  17. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  18. IMA (Information Mission Area) Integrated IC (Information Center) Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Visual Information Division; and Wanda Bowman of the Administrative Management Branch. The consensus of the group was that in the future the IC should act...performed in the IC. Ms. Darlene Moore spoke about records management (RM) at FBH. RM includes electronic typewriters and copiers, and the acquisition

  19. Hybrid IC / Microfluidic Chips for the Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hakho

    2005-03-01

    A hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip that can manipulate individual biological cells in a fluid with microscopic resolution has been demonstrated. The chip starts with a custom-designed silicon integrated circuit (IC) produced in a foundry using standard processing techniques. A microfluidic chamber is then fabricated on top of the IC to provide a biocompatible environment. The motion of biological cells in the chamber is controlled using a two-dimensional array of micro-scale electromagnets in the IC that generate spatially patterned magnetic fields. A local peak in the magnetic field amplitude will trap a magnetic bead and an attached cell; by moving the peak's location, the bead-bound cell can be moved to any position on the chip surface above the array. By generating multiple peaks, many cells can be moved independently along separate paths, allowing many different manipulations of individual cells. The hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip can be used, for example, to sort cells or to assemble tissue on micrometer length scales. To prove the concept, an IC / Microfluidic chip was fabricated, based on a custom-designed IC that contained a two-dimensional microcoil array with integrated current sources and control circuits. The chip was tested by trapping and moving biological cells tagged with magnetic beads inside the microfluidic chamber over the array. By combining the power of silicon technology with the biocompatibility of microfluidics, IC / Microfluidic chips will make new types of investigations possible in biological and biomedical studies.

  20. Dark Globule in IC 1396 (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view of inset

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope image of a glowing stellar nursery provides a spectacular contrast to the opaque cloud seen in visible light (inset). The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas. The dark globule is seen in silhouette at visible-light wavelengths, backlit by the illumination of a bright star located to the left of the field of view.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope pierces through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and previously unseen young stars. The infrared image was obtained by Spitzer's infrared array camera. The image is a four-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red). The filamentary appearance of the globule results from the sculpting effects of competing physical processes. The winds from a massive star, located to the left of the image, produce a dense circular rim comprising the 'head' of the globule and a swept-back tail of gas.

    A pair of young stars (LkHa 349 and LkHa 349c) that formed from the dense gas has cleared a spherical cavity within the globule head. While one of these stars is significantly fainter than the other in the visible-light image, they are of comparable brightness in the infrared Spitzer image. This implies the presence of a thick and dusty disc around LkHa 349c. Such circumstellar discs are the precursors of planetary systems. They are much thicker in the early stages of stellar formation when the placental planet-forming material (gas and dust) is still

  1. Momordin Ic induces HepG2 cell apoptosis through MAPK and PI3K/Akt-mediated mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yuan, Li; Xiao, Haifang; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo

    2013-06-01

    Momordin Ic is a natural triterpenoid saponin enriched in various Chinese and Japanese natural medicines such as the fruit of Kochia scoparia (L.) Schrad. So far, there is little scientific evidence for momordin Ic with regard to the anti-tumor activities. The aim of this work was to elucidate the anti-tumor effect of momordin Ic and the signal transduction pathways involved. We found that momordin Ic induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, which were supported by DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Meanwhile, momordin Ic triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production together with collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression. The activation of p38 and JNK, inactivation of Erk1/2 and Akt were also demonstrated. Although ROS production rather than NO was stimulated, the expression of iNOS and HO-1 were altered after momordin Ic treatment for 4 h. Furthermore, the cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, Bax/Bcl-2 expression and PARP cleavage were promoted with LY294002 and U0126 intervention but were blocked by SB203580, SP600125, PI3K activator, NAC and 1,400 W pretreatment, demonstrating the mitochondrial disruption. Furthermore, momordin Ic combination with NAC influenced MAPK, PI3K/Akt and HO-1, iNOS pathways, MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways also regulated the expression of HO-1 and iNOS. These results indicated that momordin Ic induced apoptosis through oxidative stress-regulated mitochondrial dysfunction involving the MAPK and PI3K-mediated iNOS and HO-1 pathways. Thus, momordin Ic might represent a potential source of anticancer candidate.

  2. Stability and Reproducibility Underscore Utility of RT-QuIC for Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Maria; Schmitz, Matthias; Karch, André; Mitrova, Eva; Kuhn, Franziska; Schroeder, Bjoern; Raeber, Alex; Varges, Daniela; Kim, Yong-Sun; Satoh, Katsuya; Collins, Steven; Zerr, Inga

    2016-04-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) allows the amplification of miniscule amounts of scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent studies applied the RT-QuIC methodology to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnosing human prion diseases. However, to date, there has not been a formal multi-centre assessment of the reproducibility, validity and stability of RT-QuIC in this context, an indispensable step for establishment as a diagnostic test in clinical practice. In the present study, we analysed CSF from 110 prion disease patients and 400 control patients using the RT-QuIC method under various conditions. In addition, "blinded" ring trials between different participating sites were performed to estimate reproducibility. Using the previously established cut-off of 10,000 relative fluorescence units (rfu), we obtained a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 99%. The multi-centre inter-laboratory reproducibility of RT-QuIC revealed a Fleiss' kappa value of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.40-1.00) indicating an almost perfect agreement. Moreover, we investigated the impact of short-term CSF storage at different temperatures, long-term storage, repeated freezing and thawing cycles and the contamination of CSF with blood on the RT-QuIC seeding response. Our data indicated that the PrP(Sc) seed in CSF is stable to any type of storage condition but sensitive to contaminations with blood (>1250 erythrocytes/μL), which results in a false negative RT-QuIC response. Fresh blood-contaminated samples (3 days) can be rescued by removal of erythrocytes. The present study underlines the reproducibility and high stability of RT-QuIC across various CSF storage conditions with a remarkable sensitivity and specificity, suggesting RT-QuIC as an innovative and robust diagnostic method.

  3. The broad-lined Type Ic supernova 2003jd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Patat, F.; Mazzali, P.; Turatto, M.; Hurley, K.; Maeda, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Foley, R. J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Pastorello, A.; Challis, P.; Frontera, F.; Harutyunyan, A.; Iye, M.; Kawabata, K.; Kirshner, R. P.; Li, W.; Lipkin, Y. M.; Matheson, T.; Nomoto, K.; Ofek, E. O.; Ohyama, Y.; Pian, E.; Poznanski, D.; Salvo, M.; Sauer, D. N.; Schmidt, B. P.; Soderberg, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2008-02-01

    The results of a worldwide coordinated observational campaign on the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) 2003jd are presented. In total, 74 photometric data points and 26 spectra were collected using 11 different telescopes. SN 2003jd is one of the most luminous SN Ic ever observed. A comparison with other Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) confirms that SN 2003jd represents an intermediate case between broad-line events (2002ap, 2006aj) and highly energetic SNe (1997ef, 1998bw, 2003dh, 2003lw), with an ejected mass of Mej = 3.0 +/- 1Msolar and a kinetic energy of Ek(tot) = 7+3-2 × 1051erg. SN 2003jd is similar to SN 1998bw in terms of overall luminosity, but it is closer to SNe 2006aj and 2002ap in terms of light-curve shape and spectral evolution. The comparison with other SNe Ic suggests that the V-band light curves of SNe Ic can be partially homogenized by introducing a time-stretch factor. Finally, because of the similarity of SN 2003jd to the SN 2006aj/XRF 060218 event, we discuss the possible connection of SN 2003jd with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). E-mail: svalenti@eso.org Based on observations at ESO-Paranal, Prog. 074.D-0161A.

  4. Considerations for IC and Component Selection for Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the integrated cycling and component selection technologies for aerospace systems. The topics include: 1) Semiconductors: The Evolution of ICs - Availability and Technology; 2) IC Selection Requirements - three fields of thought, "The Good", "The Bad" and "The Ugly"; 3) Reliability and Radiation; 4) Radiation Perspective-Four methods of selecting ICs for space systems, Guaranteed hardness, historical ground-based radiation data, historical flight usage, and unknown assurance; 5) Understanding Risk, including risk trade space and ASICs and FPGA sample selection criteria.

  5. A novel gene IC53 stimulates ECV304 cell proliferation and is upregulated in failing heart.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingzhou; Liu, Baohua; Liu, Yuqing; Han, Yu; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yinhui; Lu, Lihe; Zhen, Yisong; Hui, Rutai

    2002-05-31

    C53, cloned from rat brain cDNA library, can bind to p35, the precursor of activator of Cdk5. A novel gene with 84% homolog to C53, named IC53, was cloned from our 5300 EST database of human aorta cDNA library (GenBank Accession No. AF110322). Computational analysis showed that IC53 cDNA is 2538 bp long, encoding 419 amino acids, mapped to chromosome 17q21.31 with 12 exons, ubiquitously expressed in 12 tested normal tissues and 8 tumor cell lines from MTN membranes and vascular endothelial cells by Northern blot and in situ hybridization, and upregulated in the rat models of subacute heart failure and chronic ischemic heart failure by left coronary ligation. Stable transfection of IC53 stimulates ECV304 cell proliferation by 2.1-fold compared to cells with empty vector (P<0.05). The results support that IC53 is a novel gene, mainly expressed in vascular endothelial cells and mediates cell proliferation.

  6. Membership, lithium and chromospheric activity of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665 from GES (Gaia-ESO Survey) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, M.; Montes, D.; Gutiérrez Albarrán, M. L.; Tabernero, H. M.; Gónzalez Hernández, J. I.; GES Survey Builders

    2017-03-01

    We conduct a comparative study of the main properties of the of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665, focusing on their membership, lithium abundance and level of chromospheric activity and possible accretion. We use the fundamental parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and radial velocity) delivered by the Gaia-ESO survey (GES - https://www.gaia-eso.eu/) consortium in the four internal data release (iDR4) to select the members of these clusters among the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. Chromospheric activity criterium, and iterative process between radial velocity distribution and lithium-temperature diagram are applied to determinate what objects are members or non members of the clusters. All this information allowed us to characterize the properties of the members of these clusters and identify some field contaminant lithium-rich giants.

  7. BCH codes for large IC random-access memory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In this report some shortened BCH codes for possible applications to large IC random-access memory systems are presented. These codes are given by their parity-check matrices. Encoding and decoding of these codes are discussed.

  8. Vaccine adjuvant uses of poly-IC and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen A O; Bavari, Sina; Salazar, Andres M

    2015-03-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are stand-alone immunomodulators or 'danger signals,' that are increasingly recognized as critical components of many modern vaccines. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) is a synthetic dsRNA that can activate multiple elements of the host defense in a pattern that parallels that of a viral infection. When properly combined with an antigen, it can be utilized as a PAMP-adjuvant, resulting in modulation and optimization of the antigen-specific immune response. We briefly review the preclinical and clinical uses of poly-IC and two poly-IC derivatives, poly-IC12U (Ampligen) and poly-ICLC (Hiltonol), as vaccine adjuvants.

  9. IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Zhang

    2005-03-01

    A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

  10. IC 1257: A New Globular Cluster in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. E.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Pevunova, O.; Skiff, B. A.; Crute, C.; Wilson, B.

    1996-01-01

    New CCD photometry of the faint, compact star cluster IC 1257 (L = 17? = +/- 15?obtained with the Palomar 5m telescope, reveals that it is a highly reddened globular cluster well beyond the Galactic center.

  11. Kinematics around a non thermal superbubble in IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullejos, A.; Rosado, M.

    2000-11-01

    IC 10 has long recognized as a peculiar object (Hubble 1936). Among Local Gr oup dwarf galaxies, IC 10 has the highest surface density of WR stars and the highest current rate of star formation (Mateo 1998). The presence of so many WR stars and the high H alpha luminosity emphasize that IC 10 is undergoing a strong burst of star formation that began at least 10 Myr ago. Based upon radio continuum observations, Yang & Skillman (1993) found a non thermal superbubble in this galaxy. This large superbubble (about 250pc) seems to be associated with a region of star formation containing two of the most luminous H II regions and the most massive H I cloud in IC 10. In this work, we study the kinematics of this non-thermal supperbubble. We present our H alpha and [S II] images as well as the radial velocity field.

  12. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  13. Microglia isolated from patients with glioma gain antitumor activities on poly (I:C) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kees, Tim; Lohr, Jennifer; Noack, Johannes; Mora, Rodrigo; Gdynia, Georg; Tödt, Grischa; Ernst, Aurélie; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Falk, Christine S; Herold-Mende, Christel; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The role of microglia, the brain-resident macrophages, in glioma biology is still a matter of debate. Clinical observations and in vitro studies in the mouse model indicate that microglia and macrophages that infiltrate the brain tumor tissue in high numbers play a tumor-supportive role. Here, we provide evidence that human microglia isolated from brain tumors indeed support tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. However, after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly (I:C), microglia secrete factors that exerted toxic and suppressive effects on different glioblastoma cell lines, as assessed in cytotoxicity, migration, and tumor cell spheroid invasion assays. Remarkably, these effects were tumor-specific because the microglial factors impaired neither growth nor viability of astrocytes and neurons. Culture supernatants of tumor cells inhibited the poly (I:C) induction of this microglial M1-like, oncotoxic profile. Microglia stimulation before coculture with tumor cells circumvented the tumor-mediated suppression, as demonstrated by the ability to kill and phagocytose glioma cells. Our results show, for the first time to our knowledge, that human microglia exert tumor-supporting functions that are overridden by tumor-suppressing activities gained after poly (I:C) stimulation.

  14. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC.

  15. A strategy to model nonmonotonic dose-response curve and estimate IC50.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wang, Jiong; Liang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC[Formula: see text] is an important pharmacodynamic index of drug effectiveness. To estimate this value, the dose response relationship needs to be established, which is generally achieved by fitting monotonic sigmoidal models. However, recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mutants developing resistance to antiviral drugs show that the dose response curve may not be monotonic. Traditional models can fail for nonmonotonic data and ignore observations that may be of biologic significance. Therefore, we propose a nonparametric model to describe the dose response relationship and fit the curve using local polynomial regression. The nonparametric approach is shown to be promising especially for estimating the IC[Formula: see text] of some HIV inhibitory drugs, in which there is a dose-dependent stimulation of response for mutant strains. This model strategy may be applicable to general pharmacologic, toxicologic, or other biomedical data that exhibits a nonmonotonic dose response relationship for which traditional parametric models fail.

  16. A nonthermal superbubble in the irregular galaxy IC 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hui; Skillman, Evan D.

    1993-01-01

    We present synthesis radio continuum observations of the nearby irregular galaxy IC 10. These observations, at 6, 20, and 49 cm, allow us to measure the flux and spectral index of a number of resolved sources in IC 10. While most of these are easily identified as thermal emission from H II regions and a few are nonthermal background sources, one extended, nonthermal source appears to be a superbubble in IC 10. Its large size (about 250 pc) implies that it is most likely the product of several supernovae. Comparisons of these radio observations with Halpha, H I, and optical imaging observations reveal that the large nonthermal superbubble is associated with a region of star formation containing two of the most luminous H II regions and the most massive H I cloud in IC 10. We tentatively identify a stellar cluster with two Wolf-Rayet stars in the center of the superbubble. We propose that this superbubble in IC 10 represents a bridge between the giant H II regions and the H I shells and supershells observed in our Galaxy and external galaxies.

  17. Ocular Shock Front in the Colliding Galaxy IC 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Michele; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Bournaud, Frédéric; Brinks, Elias; Juneau, Stephanie; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-11-01

    ALMA observations in the 12CO J=1\\to 0 line of the interacting galaxy pair IC 2163 and NGC 2207 at 2″ × 1.″5 resolution reveal how the encounter drives gas to pile up in narrow, ∼1 kpc wide, “eyelids” in IC 2163. IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are involved in a grazing encounter, which has led to the development in IC 2163 of an eye-shaped (ocular) structure at mid-radius and two tidal arms. The CO data show that there are large velocity gradients across the width of each eyelid, with a mixture of radial and azimuthal streaming of gas at the outer edge of the eyelid relative to its inner edge. The sense of the radial streaming in the eyelids is consistent with the idea that gas from the outer part of IC 2163 flows inward until its radial streaming slows down abruptly and the gas piles up in the eyelids. The radial compression at the eyelids causes an increase in the gas column density by direct radial impact and also leads to a high rate of shear. A linear regression of the molecular column density N({{{H}}}2) on the magnitude of | {dv}/{dR}| across the width of the eyelid at fixed values of azimuth finds a strong correlation between N({{{H}}}2) and | {dv}/{dR}| . Substantial portions of the eyelids have high velocity dispersion in CO, indicative of elevated turbulence there.

  18. Detection of episomal banana streak badnavirus by IC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Dahal, G; Thottappilly, G; Hull, R

    1999-04-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based strategy to detect episomal banana streak badnavirus (BSV) in banana and plantain plants that carry integrated BSV sequences was developed. Antisera used in immuno-capture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) are capable of binding a large number of BSV serotypes. The primers used for PCR are capable of annealing to and amplifying across the aspartic protease-reverse transcriptase domain boundaries of both episomal and integrated BSV sequences and result in similar or identical sequence size fragments from either template. However, we show that under the conditions selected for IC-PCR, nuclear, mitochondrial or chloroplast genomic sequences are not amplified and thus only captured episomal BSV is amplified. IC-PCR is suitable for the large-scale screening of Musa for episomal BSV which is necessary for germplasm movement.

  19. Intravesical liposome drug delivery and IC/BPS.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph J; Gruber, Michele A; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Intravesical therapy has previously shown to be effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This local route of drug administration is now demonstrating promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with the benefit of minimal systemic side effects. Liposomes (LPs) are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and vastly improve cellular uptake of these drug molecules via endocytosis. Intravesical LPs have therapeutic effects on IC/BPS patients, mainly due to their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface and repair the damaged urothelium. This review considers the current status of intravesical LPs and LP mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/BPS.

  20. A Unified Submodular Framework for Multimodal IC Trojan Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koushanfar, Farinaz; Mirhoseini, Azalia; Alkabani, Yousra

    This paper presents a unified formal framework for integrated circuits (IC) Trojan detection that can simultaneously employ multiple noninvasive measurement types. Hardware Trojans refer to modifications, alterations, or insertions to the original IC for adversarial purposes. The new framework formally defines the IC Trojan detection for each measurement type as an optimization problem and discusses the complexity. A formulation of the problem that is applicable to a large class of Trojan detection problems and is submodular is devised. Based on the objective function properties, an efficient Trojan detection method with strong approximation and optimality guarantees is introduced. Signal processing methods for calibrating the impact of inter-chip and intra-chip correlations are presented. We propose a number of methods for combining the detections of the different measurement types. Experimental evaluations on benchmark designs reveal the low-overhead and effectiveness of the new Trojan detection framework and provides a comparison of different detection combining methods.

  1. Backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1998-07-01

    A new failure analysis technique has been developed for backside and frontside localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. This scanning optical microscopy technique takes advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The method utilizes the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detects shorts. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed.

  2. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  3. Saturn V S-IC (First Stage) Structural Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This illustration, with callouts, shows the structural arrangement of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage was 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, and produced more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that were powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines were mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine was rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equaled the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  4. Multicolor CCD Photometry of the Open Cluster IC361

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    journal Volume 19 Numbers 1/2 2010 Contents V. Straizys, A. Kazlauskas. Young stars in the Camelopardalis dust and molecular clouds. VI. YSOs...Vilnius + I system for 7250 stars down to 1= 19.6 mag has been obtained in the 20’ x 26’ field of the open cluster IC 361 in Camelopardalis . The catalog...1= 19.6 mag has been obtained in the 20’ x 26’ field of the open cluster IC 361 in Camelopardalis . The catalog of 1420 stars down to V ~ 18.5 mag

  5. Targeting polyIC to EGFR over-expressing cells using a dsRNA binding protein domain tethered to EGF

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Nufar; Lebendiker, Mario; Klein, Shoshana; Zigler, Maya; Langut, Yael; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Selective delivery of drugs to tumor cells can increase potency and reduce toxicity. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant chimeric protein, dsRBEC, which can bind polyIC and deliver it selectively into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. dsRBEC, comprises the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) of human PKR (hPKR), which serves as the polyIC binding moiety, fused to human EGF (hEGF), the targeting moiety. dsRBEC shows high affinity towards EGFR and triggers ligand-induced endocytosis of the receptor, thus leading to the selective internalization of polyIC into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. The targeted delivery of polyIC by dsRBEC induced cellular apoptosis and the secretion of IFN-β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. dsRBEC-delivered polyIC is much more potent than naked polyIC and is expected to reduce the toxicity caused by systemic delivery of polyIC. PMID:27598772

  6. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle-Poly I:C RNA Complexes: Implication as Therapeutics against Experimental Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Meghana; Mudge, Miranda C; Morris, R Tyler; Zhang, Yuntao; Warcholek, Stanislaw A; Hurst, Miranda N; Riviere, Jim E; DeLong, Robert K

    2017-03-06

    There is current interest in harnessing the combined anticancer and immunological effect of nanoparticles (NPs) and RNA. Here, we evaluate the bioactivity of poly I:C (pIC) RNA, bound to anticancer zinc oxide NP (ZnO-NP) against melanoma. Direct RNA association to unfunctionalized ZnO-NP is shown by observing change in size, zeta potential, and absorption/fluorescence spectra upon complexation. RNA corona was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the first time. Binding constant (Kb = 1.6-2.8 g(-1) L) was determined by modified Stern-Volmer, absorption, and biological surface activity index analysis. The pIC-ZnO-NP complex increased cell death for both human (A375) and mouse (B16F10) cell lines and suppressed tumor cell growth in BALB/C-B16F10 mouse melanoma model. Ex vivo tumor analysis indicated significant molecular activity such as changes in the level of phosphoproteins JNK, Akt, and inflammation markers IL-6 and IFN-γ. High throughput proteomics analysis revealed zinc oxide and poly I:C-specific and combinational patterns that suggested possible utility as an anticancer and immunotherapeutic strategy against melanoma.

  7. Comparison between conventional indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) and simplified icELISA for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Gang; Yi, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Bao-Min; Deng, Ai-Xing; Nan, Tie-Gui; Li, Zhao-Hu; Li, Qing X

    2006-06-30

    A simplified indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) for small molecules was established by modifying the procedure of conventional icELISA. The key change was that the analyte, antibody, and enzyme-labeled second antibody in the simplified icELISA were added in one step, whereas in conventional icELISA these reagents were added in two separate steps. Three small chemicals, namely zeatin riboside, glycyrrhetinic acid, and chlorimuron-ethyl, were used to verify the new assay format and compare the results obtained from conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA. The results indicated that, under optimized conditions, the new assay offered several advantages over the conventional icELISA, which are simpler, less time consuming and higher sensitive although it requires more amount of reagents. The assay sensitivity (IC50) was improved for 1.2-1.4-fold. Four licorice roots samples were analyzed by conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA, as well as liquid chromatography (LC). There was no significant difference among the content obtained from the three methods for each sample. The correlation between data obtained from conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA analyses was 0.9888. The results suggest that the simplified icELISA be useful for high throughput screening of small molecules.

  8. Evidence for iC3 generation during cardiopulmonary bypass as the result of blood-gas interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Pekna, M; Nilsson, L; Nilsson-Ekdahl, K; Nilsson, U R; Nilsson, B

    1993-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that iC3 is generated at the blood-gas interface in vitro and that the generation of this molecule is independent of complement activation and the composition of the gas. In order to investigate whether iC3 is also generated during cardiopulmonary bypass where blood comes into contact with oxygen bubbles, two bubble oxygenators were incubated at 37 degrees C with human heparinized blood. A continuous increase in the level of iC3 was shown in the oxygen-perfused bubble oxygenator (up to 100 nmol/l after 180 min) in contrast to the unbubbled control. Similarly, in plasma drawn from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass using either bubble or membrane oxygenators, the levels of iC3 were shown to increase continuously during the operation. Furthermore, this form of C3 was found to be susceptible to cleavage by factor I. The formation of iC3 at the blood-gas interface in vivo could be a mechanism by which gas bubbles induce clinical manifestations associated with complement activation, e.g. during cardiopulmonary bypass, adult respiratory distress syndrome and decompression sickness. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8443963

  9. Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Become familiar with the Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) major structural components: Forward Skirt, Oxidizer Tank, Intertank, Fuel Tank, and Thrust Structure. b) Gain a general understanding of the Stage I subsystems: Fuel, Oxidizer, Instrumentation, Flight Control, Environmental Control, Electrical, Control Pressure, and Ordinance.

  10. Lithium Abundances in the Young Open Cluster IC 2602

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randich, S.; Aharpour, N.; Pallavicini, R.; Prosser, C. F.; Stauffer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectra for 28 candidate late-type stars in the 30 Myr old cluster IC 2602. NLTE Li abundances have been derived from measured equivalent widths. The log n(Li) - T(sub eff) and log n(Li) - mass distributions for our sample stars have been compared with those of the Pleiades and alpha Persei. Our data show that F stars in the three clusters have the same lithium content, which corresponds to the initial content for Pop. I stars. G and early-K IC 2602 stars are, on average, somewhat more Li-rich than their counterparts in the two slightly older clusters. Finally, the latest-type IC 2602 stars are heavily Li depleted, with their Li content being as low as the lowest measured among the Pleiades. As in the Pleiades and alpha Per, a star-to-star scatter in lithium is observed among 30 Myr old late-K/early-K dwarfs in IC 2602, indicating that this spread develops in the pre-main sequence phases.

  11. Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph; Macher, Markus; Franchini, Cesare; Kresse, Georg; Bernard, Jürgen; Stern, Josef N; Loerting, Thomas

    2014-05-22

    Several proton-disordered crystalline ice structures are known to proton order at sufficiently low temperatures, provided that the right preparation procedure is used. For cubic ice, ice Ic, however, no proton ordering has been observed so far. Here, we subject ice Ic to an experimental protocol similar to that used to proton order hexagonal ice. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy carried out during this procedure reveals that the librational band of the spectrum narrows and acquires a structure that is observed neither in proton-disordered ice Ic nor in ice XI, the proton-ordered variant of hexagonal ice. On the basis of vibrational spectra computed for ice Ic and four of its proton-ordered variants using classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations, we conclude that the features of our experimental spectra are due to partial proton ordering, providing the first evidence of proton ordering in cubic ice. We further find that the proton-ordered structure with the lowest energy is ferroelectric, while the structure with the second lowest energy is weakly ferroelectric. Both structures fit the experimental spectral similarly well such that no unique assignment of proton order is possible based on our results.

  12. Validating the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS) in child welfare organizations.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Mark G; Torres, Elisa M; Wright, Lisa A; Martinez, Sandra Y; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in child welfare settings and growing recognition of the importance of the organizational environment, and the organization's climate in particular, for how employees perceive and support EBP implementation. Recently, Ehrhart, Aarons, and Farahnak (2014) reported on the development and validation of a measure of EBP implementation climate, the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS), in a sample of mental health clinicians. The ICS consists of 18 items and measures six critical dimensions of implementation climate: focus on EBP, educational support for EBP, recognition for EBP, rewards for EBP, selection or EBP, and selection for openness. The goal of the current study is to extend this work by providing evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS in a sample of child welfare service providers. Survey data were collected from 215 child welfare providers across three states, 12 organizations, and 43 teams. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated good fit to the six-factor model and the alpha reliabilities for the overall measure and its subscales was acceptable. In addition, there was general support for the invariance of the factor structure across the child welfare and mental health sectors. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS measure for use in child welfare service organizations.

  13. Validating the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS) in Child Welfare Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, Mark G.; Torres, Elisa M.; Wright, Lisa A.; Martinez, Sandra Y.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in child welfare settings and growing recognition of the importance of the organizational environment, and the organization’s climate in particular, for how employees perceive and support EBP implementation. Recently, Ehrhart, Aarons, and Farahnak (2014) reported on the development and validation of a measure of EBP implementation climate, the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS), in a sample of mental health clinicians. The ICS consists of 18 items and measures six critical dimensions of implementation climate: focus on EBP, educational support for EBP, recognition for EBP, rewards for EBP, selection or EBP, and selection for openness. The goal of the current study is to extend this work by providing evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS in a sample of child welfare service providers. Survey data were collected from 215 child welfare providers across three states, 12 organizations, and 43 teams. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated good fit to the six-factor model and the alpha reliabilities for the overall measure and its subscales was acceptable. In addition, there was general support for the invariance of the factor structure across the child welfare and mental health sectors. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS measure for use in child welfare service organizations. PMID:26563643

  14. Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several proton-disordered crystalline ice structures are known to proton order at sufficiently low temperatures, provided that the right preparation procedure is used. For cubic ice, ice Ic, however, no proton ordering has been observed so far. Here, we subject ice Ic to an experimental protocol similar to that used to proton order hexagonal ice. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy carried out during this procedure reveals that the librational band of the spectrum narrows and acquires a structure that is observed neither in proton-disordered ice Ic nor in ice XI, the proton-ordered variant of hexagonal ice. On the basis of vibrational spectra computed for ice Ic and four of its proton-ordered variants using classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations, we conclude that the features of our experimental spectra are due to partial proton ordering, providing the first evidence of proton ordering in cubic ice. We further find that the proton-ordered structure with the lowest energy is ferroelectric, while the structure with the second lowest energy is weakly ferroelectric. Both structures fit the experimental spectral similarly well such that no unique assignment of proton order is possible based on our results. PMID:24883169

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Image: Planetary Nebula IC 4406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a rainbow of colors in this dying star, called IC 446. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 446 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We do not see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting HST. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut. This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.' The donut of material confines the intense radiation coming from the remnant of the dying star. Gas on the inside of the donut is ionized by light from the central star and glows. Light from oxygen atoms is rendered blue in this image; hydrogen is shown as green, and nitrogen as red. The range of color in the final image shows the differences in concentration of these three gases in the nebula. This image is a composite of data taken by HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in June 2001 and in January 2002 by Bob O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and collaborators, and in January by the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). Filters used to create this color image show oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas glowing in this object.

  16. ASKAP H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Koribalski, B.; Kilborn, V.; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kamphuis, P.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Meyer, M.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Troup, E.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C.; Wong, O. I.; Wu, X.

    2015-09-01

    We present H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve H I in 11 galaxies down to a column density of ˜1020 cm-2 inside a ˜6 deg2 field and with a resolution of ˜1 arcmin on the sky and ˜8 km s-1 in velocity. We present H I images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three H I clouds - two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an H I mass of ˜109 M⊙ and accounts for ˜15 per cent of the H I associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data, we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density H I emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intragroup gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the H I found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times 109 M⊙, at least 10 per cent of the H I contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of November 20, 1963.

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken May 7, 1963, gives a close look at the four concrete tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 22, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left. Just to the lower front of those are the cylindrical liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken February 25, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Kerosene storage tanks can be seen to the left.

  2. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken March 29, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken April 4, 1963, gives a close up look at the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  4. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken April 17, 1963, gives a look at the four tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken from ground level on May 7, 1963, gives a close look at one of the four towers legs of the S-IC test stand nearing its completed height.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left.

  7. A Spitzer Census of the IC 348 Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, August A.; Lada, Charles J.; Luhman, K. L.; Muzerolle, James; Young, Erick

    2007-07-01

    Spitzer mid-infrared surveys enable an accurate census of young stellar objects by sampling large spatial scales, revealing very embedded protostars, and detecting low-luminosity objects. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we present a Spitzer-based census of the IC 348 nebula and embedded star cluster, covering a 2.5 pc region and comparable in extent to the Orion Nebula. Our Spitzer census supplemented with ground-based spectra has added 42 Class II T Tauri sources to the cluster membership and identified ~20 Class 0/I protostars. The population of IC 348 likely exceeds 400 sources after accounting statistically for unidentified diskless members. Our Spitzer census of IC 348 reveals a population of Class I protostars that is anticorrelated spatially with the Class II/III T Tauri members, which comprise the centrally condensed cluster around a B star. The protostars are instead found mostly at the cluster periphery about ~1 pc from the B star and spread out along a filamentary ridge. We further find that the star formation rate in this protostellar ridge is consistent with that rate which built the older exposed cluster, while the presence of 15 cold, starless, millimeter cores intermingled with this protostellar population indicates that the IC 348 nebula has yet to finish forming stars. Moreover, we show that the IC 348 cluster is of order 3-5 crossing times old, and, as evidenced by its smooth radial profile and confirmed mass segregation, is likely relaxed. While it seems apparent that the current cluster configuration is the result of dynamical evolution and its primordial structure has been erased, our finding of a filamentary ridge of Class I protostars supports a model in which embedded clusters are built up from numerous smaller subclusters. Finally, the results of our Spitzer census indicate that the supposition that star formation must progress rapidly in a dark cloud should not preclude these observations that show it can be relatively long lived.

  8. 76 FR 59672 - Notice of Change In IC Docket Numbering Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Change In IC Docket Numbering Policy Notice is hereby given that the Commission is modifying the numbering system for the docket prefix IC. These IC docket notices... Commission adopted the current IC docket prefix \\1\\ in order to properly track any comments it receives...

  9. Add-on LABA in a separate inhaler as asthma step-up therapy versus increased dose of ICS or ICS/LABA combination inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Colice, Gene; Israel, Elliot; Roche, Nicolas; Postma, Dirkje S.; Guilbert, Theresa W.; van Aalderen, Willem M.C.; Grigg, Jonathan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Thomas, Victoria; Martin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma management guidelines recommend adding a long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) or increasing the dose of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) as step-up therapy for patients with uncontrolled asthma on ICS monotherapy. However, it is uncertain which option works best, which ICS particle size is most effective, and whether LABA should be administered by separate or combination inhalers. This historical, matched cohort study compared asthma-related outcomes for patients (aged 12–80 years) prescribed step-up therapy as a ≥50% extrafine ICS dose increase or add-on LABA, via either a separate inhaler or a fine-particle ICS/LABA fixed-dose combination (FDC) inhaler. Risk-domain asthma control was the primary end-point in comparisons of cohorts matched for asthma severity and control during the baseline year. After 1:2 cohort matching, the increased extrafine ICS versus separate ICS+LABA cohorts included 3232 and 6464 patients, respectively, and the fine-particle ICS/LABA FDC versus separate ICS+LABA cohorts included 7529 and 15 058 patients, respectively (overall mean age 42 years; 61–62% females). Over one outcome year, adjusted OR (95% CI) for achieving asthma control were 1.25 (1.13–1.38) for increased ICS versus separate ICS+LABA and 1.06 (1.05–1.09) for ICS/LABA FDC versus separate ICS+LABA. For patients with asthma, increased dose of extrafine-particle ICS, or add-on LABA via ICS/LABA combination inhaler, is associated with significantly better outcomes than ICS+LABA via separate inhalers. PMID:27730200

  10. The latest eruption of planetary nebula IC 2165

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohigas, J.; Rodríguez, M.; Dufour, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Open slit high dispersion spectroscopic observations of the inner region of planetary nebula (PN) IC 2165 indicate that the object has a relatively uniform and high electron temperature, with its density being much larger close to the PN nucleus. Abundances imply that it is a non-type I PN. Calcium and iron have been heavily depleted into grains. The ionized mass is at least ˜ 0.05 M_⊙. A photoionization model (CLOUDY, version 10.00) assuming an inverse square law for the density and abundances typical of a non-type I PN, produced a fair replica of the spectrum and of all electron density and temperature sensitive line ratios, but not of the global properties of this object. All evidence indicates that IC 2165 was produced by a metal poor 2 M_⊙ A5 V star that took off some 2×10^9 yr ago.

  11. Tests of shock chemistry in IC 443G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. E.; Chan, Kin-Wing; Green, S.; Lubowich, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Eight molecular species, in the hot dense clump IC 443G, believed to be impacted by the shock wave from the SNR IC 443, are investigated. The clump consists of two distinct regions, one relatively cool, and one hotter and denser. Region 1 contains CO, HCO(+), HCN, and CN, whose abundances may be explained either by ion-molecule chemistry, or by a D shock of 60-90 km/s, passing through a clump of about 100,000/cu cm. Region 2 gives rise to SiO, CS, SO, and H2CO, and requires an ND shock of 5-15 km/s passing through a region of about 1,000,000/cu cm. Observed fractional abundances fit ND shock models if L is about 6.6 x 10 exp 15 cm. In general, observed line widths vary inversely with derived excitation density, while centroid velocities of all species are essentially identical.

  12. IC5063: A merger with a hidden luminous active nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, L.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    IC5063 is a nearby galaxy classified as an SO and containing a system of dust lanes parallel to its major optical axis (Danziger, Goss and Wellington, 1981; Bergeron, Durret and Boksenberg, 1983). Extended emission line regions with high excitation properties have been detected over distances of up to 19 kpc from the nucleus. This galaxy has been classified as Seyfert 2 on the basis of its emission line spectrum. These characteristics make IC5063 one of the best candidates for a merger remnant and an excellent candidate for a hidden luminous active nucleus. Based on new broad and narrow band images and long-slit spectroscopy obtained at the ESO 3.6 m telescope, the authors present some preliminary results supporting this hypothesis.

  13. The future impact of GaAs digital IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiling, P. T.

    1985-03-01

    A review of digital GaAs IC technology and an assessment of its future impact on gigabit signal processing is presented. High-speed signal processing and computers will require MSI-complexity interface circuits capable of 1-10 GHz clock frequencies and LSI-complexity digital circuits operating in the 0.2-5 GHz range at tens of microwatts per gate. A wide range of applications exists for frequency counters, multiplexers, A/D converters, FFT's, microprocessors, and memories that operate at speeds significantly higher than on presently available circuits. Issues related to high-speed IC design such as power dissipation, packing density, capacitance effects, design rules, and intra- and interchip propagation delays are discussed.

  14. Animal experiments with the microelectronics neural bridge IC.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyuan; Pei, Fei; Wang, Zhigong; Lü, Xiaoying

    2012-01-01

    The combination of the neural science and the microelectronics science offers a new way to restore the function of central nervous system. A neural regeneration module is used to be implanted into body to bridge the damaged nerve. A microelectronics neural bridge IC designed in CSMC 0.5□m CMOS process which can detect the neural signal and stimulate the nerve is presented. The neural regeneration module is composed of the microelectronics neural bridge IC and some discrete devices. An animal experiment has been done to check whether the neural signal can be transmitted with the chip normally or not. The animal experiment results suggest that the neural regeneration module can make the neural signal transmit normally.

  15. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  16. LSI/VLSI Ion Implanted GaAs IC Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-10

    insulating High Speed Logic Ion Implantation GaAs IC FET Integrated Circuits MESFET 20. ABSTRACT (Coalki. on.. roersie if oookay and IdoeI by WOOe tw**, This...The goal of this program is to realize the full potential of GaAs digital integrated circuits employing depletion mode MESFETs by developing the...Processing. The main objective of this program is to realize the full potential of GaAs digital integrated circuits by expanding and improving

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows pumps used for extracting water emerging form a disturbed natural spring that occurred during the excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  18. Model Checking with Multi-Threaded IC3 Portfolios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    Model Checking with Multi-Threaded IC3 Portfolios Sagar Chaki and Derrick Karimi Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University {chaki...different runs varies randomly depending on the thread interleaving. The use of a portfolio of solvers to maximize the likelihood of a quick solution is...investigated. Using the Extreme Value theorem, the runtime of each variant, as well as their portfolios is analysed statistically. A formula for the

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken June 24, 1963, the four tower legs of the test stand can be seen at their maximum height.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, depicts the progress of the stand as of January 14, 1963, with its four towers prominently rising.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This construction photo depicts the progress of the stand site as of October 8, 1962.

  2. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Optical Spectrum of the Compact Planetary Nebula IC 5117

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Seong-Jae; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution spectroscopic data of the very compact planetary nebula IC 5117 are obtained in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10050A, with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory, and which have been analyzed along with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) UV archive data. Although a diagnostic diagram shows significant density and temperature fluctuations, our analysis indicates that the nebular gas may be represented by a homogeneous shell of extremely high density gas, N(sub epsilon) approx. 90 000 /cu cm. The average electron temperatures, e.g. indicated by the [OIII] diagnostics, are around 12 000 K. We construct a photoionization model to represent most of the observed line intensities, and the physical condition of this compact nebulosity. Based on the semi-empirical ionization correction approach, and model indications, we derived the elemental abundances: He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar appear to be normal or marginally depleted compared to the average planetary nebula, while the remaining elements, S, Cl, and K appear to be enhanced. IC 5117 is perhaps a very young compact planetary nebula, slightly more evolved than the other well-known compact planetary nebula IC 4997. The central stellar temperature is likely to be around 120 000 K, evolved from a C-rich AGB progenitor.

  4. Competition between ices Ih and Ic in homogeneous water freezing.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Alberto; Conde, Maria M; Espinosa, Jorge R; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-10-07

    The role of cubic ice, ice Ic, in the nucleation of ice from supercooled water has been widely debated in the past decade. Computer simulations can provide insightful information about the mechanism of ice nucleation at a molecular scale. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study the competition between ice Ic and hexagonal ice, ice Ih, in the process of ice nucleation. Using a seeding approach, in which classical nucleation theory is combined with simulations of ice clusters embedded in supercooled water, we estimate the nucleation rate of ice for a pathway in which the critical nucleus has an Ic structure. Comparing our results with those previously obtained for ice Ih [Sanz et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)], we conclude that within the accuracy of our calculations both nucleation pathways have the same rate for the studied water models (TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005). We examine in detail the factors that contribute to the nucleation rate and find that the chemical potential difference with the fluid, the attachment rate of particles to the cluster, and the ice-water interfacial free energy are the same within the estimated margin of error for both ice polymorphs. Furthermore, we study the morphology of the ice clusters and conclude that they have a spherical shape.

  5. Emergency EC-IC bypass for symptomatic atherosclerotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Nitta, Junpei; Ishizaka, Shigetoshi; Kanaya, Kohei; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery has no preventive effect on subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid occlusion and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A few studies have assessed whether an urgent EC-IC bypass surgery is an effective treatment for main trunk stenosis or occlusion in acute stage. The authors retrospectively reviewed 58 consecutive patients who underwent urgent EC-IC bypass for symptomatic internal carotid artery or the middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion between January 2003 and December 2011. Clinical characteristics and neuroimagings were evaluated and analyzed. Based on preoperative angiogram, responsible lesions were the internal carotid artery in 19 (32.8%) patients and the middle cerebral artery in 39 (67.2%). No hemorrhagic complication occurred. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed improvement of neurological function after surgery, and 74.1% of patients had favorable outcome. Unfavorable outcome was associated with insufficient collateral flow and new infarction after bypass surgery.

  6. NGC 2207/IC 2163: Grazing Encounter with Large Scale Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M.; Struck, C.; Brinks, E.; Thomasson, M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.

    2005-05-01

    The galaxy pair NGC 2207/IC 2163 has an unusually high ratio of radio continuum/IRAS far-IR flux, yet neither galaxy contains an AGN. We present a 4.86 GHz radio continuum image of this pair from VLA observations with 2.5'' resolution. Much of the excess radio emission arises from apparent shock fronts in the outer parts of the companion sides of the galaxies and along the rim of the ocular oval of IC 2163. With a SFR deduced from Hα emission, each galaxy has a SFR/M(HI) typical of normal spiral disks. Unlike the radio continuum emission, the Hα emission is not enhanced on the companion side of NGC 2207. We also present the results of a detailed, hydrodynamic numerical simulation of the encounter, modelling the responses of the stars and gas in both galaxies in three dimensions. The short-lived ocular phase and other features, such as the HI kinematics, set strict constraints on the encounter model. In the model, shocks generated by disk scraping and mass transfer from IC 2163 to NGC 2207 occur and may account for the excess radio emission on the companion sides. Comparison with Spitzer observations of this pair will be made.

  7. Feeding IC 342: The nuclear spiral of a starburst galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D.; Turner, J. L.; Hurt, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    IC 342 is a large nearby (1.8 Mpc, Turner and Hurt, 1991, hereafter T&H) spiral galaxy undergoing a moderate nuclear starburst. T&H have previously mapped the inner arcminute in CO-13(1-0) using the Owens Valley Millimeter Interferometer and found evidence that the nuclear molecular gas takes the form of spiral arms in a density wave pattern. They suggest that radial streaming along the arms may channel gas from the exterior of the galaxy into the nucleus, feeding the starburst. We have mapped the CO-12(1-0) emission of the inner 2 kpc of IC 342 at 2.8 inch resolution using the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) Millimeter Interferometer. The greater sensitivity of CO-12 observations has allowed us to trace the spiral pattern out to a total extent of greater than 1 kpc. The CO-12 observations extend considerably the structure observed at CO-13 and offer further evidence that a spiral density wave may extend from the disk into the nucleus of IC 342.

  8. The X-ray source population of IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgard, Roy; Placek, Ben; Prestwich, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    The Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 10 is the nearest starburst to the Milky Way. Its proximity and low metallicity make it an ideal candidate for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries in quiescence. IC 10 presents an unique case for studying a complete sample of such objects, something made difficult in the Milky Way by absorption in the Galactic disc and in other galaxies by their distances.We present results from a set of Chandra/ACIS-S imaging observations of IC 10, including spectra, lightcurves, X-ray colors, and X-ray luminosity functions. The XLF is steeper than for the more luminous HMXBs observed in other galaxies, thus implying that the ``universal'' luminosity function for HMXBs does not extend below 1e36 erg/s. We also present initial results from a search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources using archival HST/ACS observations. Approximately 10% of the sources have strong optical counterpart candidates, all of which appear to be high-mass stars.

  9. The X-ray Source Population of IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Kilgard, R. E.; Prestwich, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 10 is the nearest starburst to the Milky Way. Its proximity and low metallicity make it an ideal candidate for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries in quiescence.  IC 10 presents an unique case for studying a complete sample of such objects, something made difficult in the Milky Way by absorption in the Galactic disc and in other galaxies by their distances. We present results from a set of Chandra/ACIS-S imaging observations of IC 10, including spectra, X-ray colors, and X-ray luminosity functions. The XLF is steeper than for the more luminous HMXBs observed in other galaxies, thus implying that the "universal" luminosity function for HMXBs does not extend below 1e36 erg/s.  We also present initial results from a search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources using archival HST/ACS observations.  Approximately 15% of the sources have strong optical counterpart candidates, all of which appear to be high-mass stars.

  10. Electronic States of IC60BA and PC71BM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Wang, Peng; Shen, Ying; Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhu, Jun-Fa; Lai, Guo-Qiao; Li, Hong-Nian

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the electronic states of IC60BA and PC71BM using first-principles calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The energy level structures for all possible isomers are reported and compared with those of C60, C70 and PC61BM. The attachment of the side chains can raise the LUMO energies and decrease the HOMO-LUMO gaps, and thus helps to increase the power-conversion efficiency of bulk heterojunction solar cells. In the PES studies, we prepared IC60BA and PC71BM films on Si:H(111) substrates to construct adsorbate/substrate interfaces describable with the integer charge-transfer (ICT) model. Successful measurements then revealed that one of the most important material properties for an electron acceptor, the energy of the negative integer charge-transfer state (EICT-), is 4.31 eV below the vacuum level for PC71BM. The EICT- of IC60BA is smaller than 4.14 eV.

  11. Competition between ices Ih and Ic in homogeneous water freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, Alberto; Conde, Maria M.; Espinosa, Jorge R.; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The role of cubic ice, ice Ic, in the nucleation of ice from supercooled water has been widely debated in the past decade. Computer simulations can provide insightful information about the mechanism of ice nucleation at a molecular scale. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study the competition between ice Ic and hexagonal ice, ice Ih, in the process of ice nucleation. Using a seeding approach, in which classical nucleation theory is combined with simulations of ice clusters embedded in supercooled water, we estimate the nucleation rate of ice for a pathway in which the critical nucleus has an Ic structure. Comparing our results with those previously obtained for ice Ih [Sanz et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)], we conclude that within the accuracy of our calculations both nucleation pathways have the same rate for the studied water models (TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005). We examine in detail the factors that contribute to the nucleation rate and find that the chemical potential difference with the fluid, the attachment rate of particles to the cluster, and the ice-water interfacial free energy are the same within the estimated margin of error for both ice polymorphs. Furthermore, we study the morphology of the ice clusters and conclude that they have a spherical shape.

  12. Dynamical Competition of IC-Industry Clustering from Taiwan to China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei; Tsai, Kuo-Hui

    2009-08-01

    Most studies employ qualitative approach to explore the industrial clusters; however, few research has objectively quantified the evolutions of industry clustering. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively analyze clustering among IC design, IC manufacturing as well as IC packaging and testing industries by using the foreign direct investment (FDI) data. The Lotka-Volterra system equations are first adopted here to capture the competition or cooperation among such three industries, thus explaining their clustering inclinations. The results indicate that the evolution of FDI into China for IC design industry significantly inspire the subsequent FDI of IC manufacturing as well as IC packaging and testing industries. Since IC design industry lie in the upstream stage of IC production, the middle-stream IC manufacturing and downstream IC packing and testing enterprises tend to cluster together with IC design firms, in order to sustain a steady business. Finally, Taiwan IC industry's FDI amount into China is predicted to cumulatively increase, which supports the industrial clustering tendency for Taiwan IC industry. Particularly, the FDI prediction of Lotka-Volterra model performs superior to that of the conventional Bass model after the forecast accuracy of these two models are compared. The prediction ability is dramatically improved as the industrial mutualism among each IC production stage is taken into account.

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken October 2, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen in the bottom center portion

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken September 25, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen rotated to the outside on

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In the early stages of excavation, a natural spring was disturbed that caused a water problem which required constant pumping from the site and is even pumped to this day. Behind this reservoir of pumped water is the S-IC test stand boasting its ever-growing four towers as of March 29, 1963.

  16. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo, taken September 5, 1963, the flame deflector is being installed in the S-IC test stand.

  17. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.J.; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  18. Somato-motor haptic processing in posterior inner perisylvian region (SII/pIC) of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Fornia, Luca; Grandi, Laura Clara; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    The posterior inner perisylvian region including the secondary somatosensory cortex (area SII) and the adjacent region of posterior insular cortex (pIC) has been implicated in haptic processing by integrating somato-motor information during hand-manipulation, both in humans and in non-human primates. However, motor-related properties during hand-manipulation are still largely unknown. To investigate a motor-related activity in the hand region of SII/pIC, two macaque monkeys were trained to perform a hand-manipulation task, requiring 3 different grip types (precision grip, finger exploration, side grip) both in light and in dark conditions. Our results showed that 70% (n = 33/48) of task related neurons within SII/pIC were only activated during monkeys' active hand-manipulation. Of those 33 neurons, 15 (45%) began to discharge before hand-target contact, while the remaining neurons were tonically active after contact. Thirty-percent (n = 15/48) of studied neurons responded to both passive somatosensory stimulation and to the motor task. A consistent percentage of task-related neurons in SII/pIC was selectively activated during finger exploration (FE) and precision grasping (PG) execution, suggesting they play a pivotal role in control skilled finger movements. Furthermore, hand-manipulation-related neurons also responded when visual feedback was absent in the dark. Altogether, our results suggest that somato-motor neurons in SII/pIC likely contribute to haptic processing from the initial to the final phase of grasping and object manipulation. Such motor-related activity could also provide the somato-motor binding principle enabling the translation of diachronic somatosensory inputs into a coherent image of the explored object.

  19. First Stellar Abundances in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautvaišienė, Gražina; Geisler, Doug; Wallerstein, George; Borissova, Jura; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pagel, Bernard E. J.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Smith, Verne

    2007-12-01

    Chemical abundances in three M supergiants in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 have been determined using high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the ESO 8.2 m Kueyen telescope. A detailed synthetic-spectrum analysis has been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, La, and Eu. We find the overall metallicity of the stars to be [Fe/H] = -0.67 ± 0.09 and the age 9-13 Myr, which is in excellent agreement with the present-day values in the age-metallicity relationship model of IC 1613 by Skillman et al. We have found that the three supergiants investigated have a mean [α/Fe] equal to about -0.1, which is lower than seen in Galactic stars at the same metallicity and is in agreement with the results obtained in other dwarf irregular galaxies. The oxygen abundances are in agreement with the upper values of the nebular oxygen determinations in IC 1613. The abundance ratios of s- and r-process elements to iron are enhanced relative to solar by about 0.3 dex. The abundance pattern of the elements studied is similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud, except for Co and Ni, which are underabundant in the SMC. The observed elemental abundances are generally in very good agreement with the recent chemical evolution model of Yuk and Lee. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope and the 2.2 m Telescope of the European Southern Observatory within the Observing Programs 70.B-0361(A) and 072.D-0113(D).

  20. Evaluation of in-plane local stress distribution in stacked IC chip using dynamic random access memory cell array for highly reliable three-dimensional IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Seiya; Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) ICs have many advantages, IC performances can be enhanced without scaling down of transistor size. However, 3D IC has mechanical stresses inside Si substrates owing to its 3D stacking structure, which induces negative effects on transistor performances such as carrier mobility changes. One of the mechanical stresses is local bending stress due to organic adhesive shrinkage among stacked IC chips. In this paper, we have proposed an evaluation method for in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips using retention time modulation of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell array. We fabricated a test structure composed of a DRAM chip bonded on a Si interposer with dummy Cu/Sn microbumps. As a result, we clarified that the DRAM cell array can precisely evaluate the in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips.

  1. ERRATUM; A Deep X-Ray Image of IC 2391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Theodore; Patten, Brian M.

    1998-06-01

    In the paper ``A Deep X-Ray Image of IC 2391'' by Theodore Simon and Brian M. Patten (PASP, 110, 283 [1998]), there is a typographical error in the mean energy conversion factor given on page 284, column (2). The correct value is (2.8+/-0.1)x10^-11 ergs cm^-2 s^-1 per HRI count s^-1. The factor ``x10^-11'' was omitted from the published version of the paper. The Press apologizes for this error.

  2. X-Ray Activity in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamapapa, Mark S.; Prosser, Charles F.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a joint ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) and optical investigation of the open cluster IC 4665. The ROSAT data contains detections for 28 stellar sources in the field, including 22 cluster members and candidate members spanning the color range -0.18 less than or equal to (B - V(sub o)) less than or equal to +1.63 (approx. B3 - M3). Upper limits are given for the remaining members (or candidate members) in the HRI field. Keck HIRES spectra have been obtained that yield radial and rotational velocity measures, respectively, for faint, low mass candidate members located within the field of the ROSAT HRI observation. In addition, photometry of possible optical counterparts to previously uncatalogued X-ray sources in the HRI field is presented. The trends in X-ray properties with (B - V) color in IC 4665 are found to be quite similar to that for other, more nearby young clusters such as the Pleiades and alpha Persei. In particular, a maximum in normalized X-ray luminosity of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol)) approx. equal 3 is observed, beginning in the color range of (B - V)(sub o) = 0.7 - 0.8. This is similar to the corresponding color range among Pleiades members, in agreement with the earlier estimate, that the age of IC 4665 is similar to the age of the Pleiades. The correlation of rotation and X-ray emission levels is consistent with that in other young clusters. Among the high mass stars in IC 4665, five B stars are detected as X-ray sources. Of these, one is a spectroscopic binary while the remaining objects are apparently single staxs. The level of intrinsic X-ray emission observed in the rapidly rotating (v sini greater than 200 km/ s), single B stars is consistent with an origin due to shock heating of the ambient medium by radiatively driven, rotationally enhanced winds. On the basis of these observations and the results for other clusters, we argue that observed levels of X-ray emission in high mass stars of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol

  3. Iterative categorization (IC): a systematic technique for analysing qualitative data.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The processes of analysing qualitative data, particularly the stage between coding and publication, are often vague and/or poorly explained within addiction science and research more broadly. A simple but rigorous and transparent technique for analysing qualitative textual data, developed within the field of addiction, is described. The technique, iterative categorization (IC), is suitable for use with inductive and deductive codes and can support a range of common analytical approaches, e.g. thematic analysis, Framework, constant comparison, analytical induction, content analysis, conversational analysis, discourse analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis. Once the data have been coded, the only software required is a standard word processing package. Worked examples are provided.

  4. Neutral hydrogen in the starburst galaxy NGC3690/IC694

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolstoy, E.; Dickey, John M.; Israel, F. P.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers made observations of the neutral hydrogen (HI) emission structure surrounding the very deep absorption peak (observed earlier by Dickey (1986)) in the galaxy pair NGC3690/IC694. This galaxy pair is highly luminous in the far infrared, and known to exhibit extensive star formation as well as nuclear activity. Knowledge of the spatial distribution and velocity structure of the HI emission is of great importance to the understanding of the dynamics of the interaction and the resulting environmental effects on the galaxies.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the construction progress of the test stand as of August 14, 1961. Water gushing in from the disturbance of a natural spring contributed to constant water problems during the construction process. It was necessary to pump water from the site on a daily basis and is still pumped from the site today. The equipment is partially submerged in the water emerging from the spring.

  6. A Census of the Young Cluster IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, John R.; Muench, A. A.; Rieke, G. H.; Lada, E. A.; Bouvier, J.; Lada, C. J.

    2003-08-01

    We present a new census of the stellar and substellar members of the young cluster IC 348. We have obtained images at I and Z for a 42'×28' field encompassing the cluster and have combined these measurements with previous optical and near-infrared photometry. From spectroscopy of candidate cluster members appearing in these data, we have identified 122 new members, 15 of which have spectral types of M6.5-M9, corresponding to masses of ~0.08-0.015 Msolar by recent evolutionary models. The latest census for IC 348 now contains a total of 288 members, 23 of which are later than M6 and thus are likely to be brown dwarfs. From an extinction-limited sample of members (AV<=4) for a 16'×14' field centered on the cluster, we construct an initial mass function (IMF) that is unbiased in mass and nearly complete for M/Msolar>=0.03 (<~M8). In logarithmic units where the Salpeter slope is 1.35, the mass function for IC 348 rises from high masses down to a solar mass, rises more slowly down to a maximum at 0.1-0.2 Msolar, and then declines into the substellar regime. In comparison, the similarly derived IMF for Taurus from Briceño et al. and Luhman et al. rises quickly to a peak near 0.8 Msolar and steadily declines to lower masses. The distinctive shapes of the IMFs in IC 348 and Taurus are reflected in the distributions of spectral types, which peak at M5 and K7, respectively. These data provide compelling, model-independent evidence for a significant variation of the IMF with star-forming conditions. Based on observations obtained at Keck Observatory, Steward Observatory, the MMT Observatory, and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation.

  7. Ion Implanted GaAs I.C. Process Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    in ion implantation in GaAs, coupled with better control of the substrate material. 1 Once ion implantation became a reliable processing technology it... Processing Technology for Planar GaAs Integrated Circuits," GaAs IC Symposium, Lake Tahoe, CA., Sept. 1979. 20. R.C. Eden, "GaAs Integrated Circuit Device...1980. 25. B.M. Welch, "Advances in GaAs LSI!VLSI Processing Technology ," Sol. St. Tech., Feb. 1980, pp. 95-101. 27. R. Zucca, B.M. Welch, P.M

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows the construction of forms which became the concrete foundation for the massive stand. The lower right hand corner reveals a pump used for extracting water emerging from a disturbed natural spring that occurred during excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  9. IC 1689: S0 galaxy with inner polar disk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    1997-03-01

    The results of spectroscopic observations of the S0 galaxy IC 1689 are given. The radial velocity curves constructed from the measurements of Hα and [NII]λ6583 lines show that in the galaxy interior there is a gas disk (r=~3kpc) rotating around the axis placed in the main plane of the galaxy (polar disk). Active star formation occurs in the outer part of the disk (in the ring). Both Hα and [NII]λ6583 emission lines are observed here. Only collisionally excited [NII] radiates in the inner regions of the disk.

  10. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph of the Pump House area was taken August 13, 1963. The massive round water storage tanks can be seen to the left of

  11. Construction Progress S-IC Test Stand Block House Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken August 12, 1963, offers a view of the Block House interior.

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a six month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications in March 1962. The original foundation walls built in the prior year were torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger boosters. This photo depicts that modification progress as of June 13,1962.

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a 6 month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications. The original foundation walls built in the prior year had to be torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger booster. The demolition can be seen in this photograph taken on May 21, 1962.

  14. The remarkable infrared galaxy Arp 220 = IC 4553

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Helou, G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P.; Rice, W.; Houck, J. R.; Low, F. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1984-01-01

    IRAS observations of the peculiar galaxy Arp 220 = IC 4553 show that it is extremely luminous in the far-infrared, with a total luminosity of 2 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities. The infrared-to-blue luminosity ratio of this galaxy is about 80, which is the largest value of the ratio for galaxies in the UGC catalog, and places it in the range of the 'unidentified' infrared sources recently reported by Houck et al. in the IRAS all-sky survey. Other observations of Arp 220, combined with the luminosity in the infrared, allow either a Seyfert-like or starburst origin for this luminosity.

  15. Development of a New Calibration Method for an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M.; Vandenboer, T.; Murphy, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    Fine atmospheric aerosols play an important role in the atmosphere as they alter the radiative balance of the Earth through direct and indirect climate effects, reduce visibility, participate in acid rain formation and affect human health. The motivation for chemically and temporally resolved measurements of fine aerosol composition has lead to the development of the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) system by Dionex/URG. This instrument is capable of simultaneously monitoring fine aerosols (<2.5μm) and associated precursor gases on a nearly continuous basis with a time resolution of 1 hour. The instrument utilizes a parallel-plate wet denuder with a constantly regenerated surface for collection of gases and a particle condensation chamber for the collection of aerosols. AIM-IC is capable of monitoring HCl(g), HONO(g), HNO3(g), SO2(g), NH3(g), Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, NH4+ , and some water soluble organic acids and amines. Standard calibration of the AIM-IC is carried out by injecting a series of mixed standards directly onto the ion chromatographs, bypassing the sampling component of the instrument. This results in calculated detection limits on the order of 10-200 pptv for gases and 10-500 of ng/m3 for individual particle constituents when collecting at 3 L/min for 55 minutes. In this work, we present a new method for the calibration of the AIM-IC for both gas and particle collection that enables us to evaluate the entire system from size-selection to detection. This external calibration method is assessed for the gases HNO3(g), SO2(g), and NH3(g), and for particles containing (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, and Na2SO4. Quantitative collection of SO2 is found to require careful optimization of the H2O2 concentration of the denuder liquid, while the replacement of a cyclone with an impactor improves the sampling efficiency of NH3 and HNO3.

  16. A multi-channel analog IC for in vitro neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü

    2016-02-01

    Recent work in the field of neurophysiology has demonstrated that, by observing the firing characteristic of action potentials (AP) and the exchange pattern of signals between neurons, it is possible to reveal the nature of “memory” and “thinking” and help humans to understand how the brain works. To address these needs, we developed a prototype fully integrated circuit (IC) with micro-electrode array (MEA) for neural recording. In this scheme, the microelectrode array is composed by 64 detection electrodes and 2 reference electrodes. The proposed IC consists of 8 recording channels with an area of 5 × 5 mm2. Each channel can operate independently to process the neural signal by amplifying, filtering, etc. The chip is fabricated in 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The simulated and measured results show the system provides an effective device for recording feeble signal such as neural signals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076118).

  17. Measuring RNA structure transcriptome-wide with icSHAPE.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dalen; Feng, Chao; Spitale, Robert C

    2017-03-20

    RNA molecules can be found at the heart of nearly every aspect of gene regulation: from gene expression to protein translation. The ability of RNA molecules to fold into intricate structures guides their function. Chemical methods to measure RNA structure have been part of the RNA biologists toolkit for several decades. These methods, although often cumbersome and difficult to perform on large RNAs, are notable for their accuracy and precision of structural measurements. Recent extension of these methods to transcriptome-wide analyses has opened the door to interrogating the structure of complete RNA molecules inside cells. Within this manuscript we describe the biochemical basis for the methodology behind a novel technology, icSHAPE, which measures RNA flexibility and single-strandedness in RNA. Novel methods such as icSHAPE have greatly expanded our understanding of RNA function and have paved the way to expansive analyses of large groups of RNA structures as they function inside the native environment of the cell.

  18. Low electron beam energy CIVA analysis of passivated ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Henderson, C.L.

    1994-08-01

    Low Energy Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (LECIVA) is a new scanning electron microscopy technique developed to localize open conductors in passivated ICs. LECIVA takes advantage of recent experimental work showing that the dielectric surface equilibrium voltage has an electron flux density dependence at low electron beam energies ({le}1.0 keV). The equilibrium voltage changes from positive to negative as the electron flux density is increased. Like Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA), LECIVA images are produced from the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as an electron beam is scanned over the IC surface. LECIVA image contrast is generated only by the electrically open part of a conductor, yielding, the same high selectivity demonstrated by CIVA. Because LECIVA is performed at low beam energies, radiation damage by the primary electrons and x-rays to MOS structures is far less than that caused by CIVA. LECIVA may also be performed on commercial electron beam test systems that do not have high primary electron beam energy capabilities. The physics of LECIVA signal generation are described. LECIVA imaging examples illustrate its utility on both a standard scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a commercial electron beam test system.

  19. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of OAB, BPH, and IC.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P

    2009-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are well known for their ability to potently and selectively disrupt and modulate neurotransmission. BoNT is currently undergoing regulatory evaluation for urological disorders in the United States and the European Union and is not FDA approved for urologic use. Overactive bladder (OAB) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common urologic conditions characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia, urge incontinence and, in the case of BPH, decreased urine flow that are currently being evaluated in clinical trials with BoNT-A. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic condition in which patients describe urinary frequency, urgency and associated bladder/pelvic pain. In the two former conditions, BoNT-A is currently being evaluated in Phase II or Phase III clinical trials as a therapeutic agent. Evidence for BoNT in the treatment of IC is limited to small case series. The purpose of this article is to provide up to date clinical evidence regarding the use of BoNT to treat these three urologic problems. For the sake of clarity, BoNT-A describes the use of Botox unless otherwise specified. In addition, when describing OAB, two sub-populations exist: those with OAB of neurogenic origin (NDO) and those with OAB of unknown (idiopathic) origin (IDO).

  20. Spectral Line Survey toward a Molecular Cloud in IC10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yuri; Shimonishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Aikawa, Yuri; Kawamura, Akiko; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    We have conducted a spectral line survey observation in the 3 mm band toward the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy IC10 with the 45 m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory to explore its chemical composition at a molecular-cloud scale (∼80 pc). The CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO+, and HNC lines are detected for the first time in this galaxy in addition to the CO and 13CO lines, while the c-C3H2, CH3OH, CN, C18O, and N2H+ lines are not detected. The spectral intensity pattern is found to be similar to those observed toward molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), whose metallicity is as low as IC10. Nitrogen-bearing species are deficient in comparison with the Galactic molecular clouds due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen. CCH is abundant in comparison with Galactic translucent clouds, whereas CH3OH may be deficient. These characteristic trends for CCH and CH3OH are also seen in the LMC, and seem to originate from photodissociation regions more extended in the peripheries of molecular clouds due to the lower metallicity condition.

  1. HUNTING FOR YOUNG DISPERSING STAR CLUSTERS IN IC 2574

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, Anne; Meyer, Martin M.; Calzetti, Daniella; Harris, Jason E-mail: martin.meyer@uwa.edu.au E-mail: jharris@30doradus.org

    2012-12-01

    Dissolving stellar groups are very difficult to detect using traditional surface photometry techniques. We have developed a method to find and characterize non-compact stellar systems in galaxies where the young stellar population can be spatially resolved. By carrying out photometry on individual stars, we are able to separate the luminous blue stellar population from the star field background. The locations of these stars are used to identify groups by applying the HOP algorithm, which are then characterized using color-magnitude and stellar density radial profiles to estimate age, size, density, and shape. We test the method on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys archival images of IC 2574 and find 75 dispersed stellar groups. Of these, 20 highly dispersed groups are good candidates for dissolving systems. We find few compact systems with evidence of dissolution, potentially indicating that star formation in this galaxy occurs mostly in unbound clusters or groups. These systems indicate that the dispersion rate of groups and clusters in IC 2574 is at most 0.45 pc Myr{sup -1}. The location of the groups found with HOP correlate well with H I contour map features. However, they do not coincide with H I holes, suggesting that those holes were not created by star-forming regions.

  2. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-01-01

    IC 443 is a supernova remnant of intermediate age, i.e. a few thousand years. It is especially interesting because part of its periphery is expanding into a molecular cloud while other sections are expanding into a typical interstellar medium of much lower density. Since the evolution of a supernova remnant through its various phases is affected by the density of the medium it expands into with the reasonable assumption that the supernova explosion was approximately symmetric we have an opportunity to observe a single object in two phases simultaneously. It was observed by ASCA in April, 1993 for a short period during the PV phase and more thoroughly in a 42 ksec exposure in March, 1994. The latter measurement provides most of the results that have been reported. Most of the analysis took place after the grant ended but is included here for completeness. The data was sent simultaneously to US and Japanese Pls. We worked independently. The software set of FTOOLs was used to construct images and spectra. They were judged to be rather unintuitive and not at all user friendly. I found I was using one FTOOL to read the header to obtain information that would only be provided to another FTOOL. The Japanese investigators were more successful. They analyzed the data and published results more rapidly. The scientific results summarized below are based primarily on their publications. Since IC 443 is an interesting example of a middle aged SNR in which a variety of processes are occurring it is one of a class. IC 443 exhibits shell-like emission in hard X-rays and extended soft X-rays with thin thermal spectra. It resembles SN 1006 in these respects. IC 443 contains hard X-rays in a semi-circular shell surrounding the thermal component. The total hard X-ray flux in the ASCA FOV is only a half of the Ginga hard component; which suggests that the hard X-rays are not confined only in the shell but some are extended larger than the ASCA FOV of eq 1 degree diameter. Japanese

  3. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-07-01

    IC 443 is a supernova remnant of intermediate age, i.e. a few thousand years. It is especially interesting because part of its periphery is expanding into a molecular cloud while other sections are expanding into a typical interstellar medium of much lower density. Since the evolution of a supernova remnant through its various phases is affected by the density of the medium it expands into with the reasonable assumption that the supernova explosion was approximately symmetric we have an opportunity to observe a single object in two phases simultaneously. It was observed by ASCA in April, 1993 for a short period during the PV phase and more thoroughly in a 42 ksec exposure in March, 1994. The latter measurement provides most of the results that have been reported. Most of the analysis took place after the grant ended but is included here for completeness. The data was sent simultaneously to US and Japanese Pls. We worked independently. The software set of FTOOLs was used to construct images and spectra. They were judged to be rather unintuitive and not at all user friendly. I found I was using one FTOOL to read the header to obtain information that would only be provided to another FTOOL. The Japanese investigators were more successful. They analyzed the data and published results more rapidly. The scientific results summarized below are based primarily on their publications. Since IC 443 is an interesting example of a middle aged SNR in which a variety of processes are occurring it is one of a class. IC 443 exhibits shell-like emission in hard X-rays and extended soft X-rays with thin thermal spectra. It resembles SN 1006 in these respects. IC 443 contains hard X-rays in a semi-circular shell surrounding the thermal component. The total hard X-ray flux in the ASCA FOV is only a half of the Ginga hard component; which suggests that the hard X-rays are not confined only in the shell but some are extended larger than the ASCA FOV of eq 1 degree diameter. Japanese

  4. Testing the Physics and Chemistry of Radiation Driven Cloud Evolution - [C II] Mapping of IC 59 and IC 63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.

    The interaction of newly formed stars with their natal clouds give rise to a number of dynamical and chemical effects, forming H II regions, injecting energy in the surrounding ISM and, potentially giving ride to triggered star formation. When an expanding H II region encounters density enhancements, Bright Rimmed Clouds (BRC) are formed, containing photo-dissociation regions (PDR). These provide valuable laboratories of radiation driven dynamics both for cloud dynamics and the physical and chemical evolution of the gas and dust. We propose to map the near-by pair of BRCs IC59 and IC 63, in the [C II] line, a well-known PDR tracer, with the upGREAT LFA array. These observations will complement a significant amount of existing data tracing the molecular gas and dust in the clouds. The parallel CO (J=11-10) data from the L1 channel will provide important information about the dense warm molecular gas to be compared e.g. to existing low-J CO transitions. Although at similar distance from the illuminating star gamma Cas, the two nebulae show dramatic differences in their structure. Because of their relative vicinity ( 190pc), the clouds provide a unique environment to acquire high spatial resolution observation of BRC and PDRs. Because of the high spectral resolution of upGREAT, our observations will provide detailed information about gas flows and turbulent motions, providing important constraints and test for models of radiation driven cloud evolution and the chemistry and physics of PDRs.

  5. RNA and a cell wall component of Enterococcus faecalis IC-1 are required for phagocytosis and interleukin 12 production by the mouse macrophage cell line J774.1.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Junpei; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Takemoto, Syoji; Kubo, Takayoshi; Sagesaka, Yuko M; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2017-04-13

    Enterococcus faecalis is a resident lactic acid bacterium in the human intestine. Its immunostimulatory action was reported to be enhanced by heat sterilization. To investigate its beneficial actions, we evaluated the ability of 10 E. faecalis strains to induce interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in a mouse macrophage cell line, J774.1 and found that the strain, E. faecalis IC-1, had a potent IL-12-inducing ability. Furthermore, we investigated the underlying mechanism by treating IC-1 cells with RNase or lysozyme. Its activity almost disappeared and an antagonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 inhibited this activity. Moreover, lysozyme-treated IC-1 bacteria were not phagocytized by J774.1 cells, and did not induce IL-12 production. Based on our results, we propose that macrophages recognize the cell wall components of IC-1, leading to phagocytosis. The IC-1 RNA is then recognized by TLR7, which induces the production of IL-12.

  6. Explosive Nucleosynthesis of Ultra-Stripped Type Ic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suwa, Yudai; Umeda, Hideyuki; Shibata, Masaru; Takahashi, Koh

    We investigate the explosive nucleosynthesis of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae (SNe) evolved from 1.45 and 1.5 M ȯ CO stars. We calculate the SN explosions using two-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamics code. The explosion energy of these SNe is about 1050 erg and the ejecta mass is about 0.1 M ȯ . The 56Ni yield is (6-10) × 10-3 M ȯ . Light curve of ultra-stripped SNe would be fast-fading and subluminous like SN 2005ek. Neutrino-driven winds contain neutron-rich materials and the first-peak r-process elements are produced. Ultra-stripped SNe and sub-energetic SNe evolved from single stars having a small CO core could be sources of light r-elements.

  7. Iterative categorization (IC): a systematic technique for analysing qualitative data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The processes of analysing qualitative data, particularly the stage between coding and publication, are often vague and/or poorly explained within addiction science and research more broadly. A simple but rigorous and transparent technique for analysing qualitative textual data, developed within the field of addiction, is described. The technique, iterative categorization (IC), is suitable for use with inductive and deductive codes and can support a range of common analytical approaches, e.g. thematic analysis, Framework, constant comparison, analytical induction, content analysis, conversational analysis, discourse analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis. Once the data have been coded, the only software required is a standard word processing package. Worked examples are provided. PMID:26806155

  8. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  9. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC.

    PubMed

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-09-30

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 μm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm². A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 μVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions.

  10. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 µm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm2. A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 µVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions. PMID:26437404

  11. Spectroscopic study of the peculiar galaxy IC 883

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, V. A.; Merkulova, O. A.; Karataeva, G. M.; Shalyapina, L. V.; Yablokova, N. V.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze new optical spectroscopic observations obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the SCORPIO focal reducer (in the modes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) and long-slit spectroscopy) and the Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph for the galaxy IC 883. We have confirmed that the main body of the galaxy rotates around its minor axis. The positions of the dynamical axes of the stellar and gaseous components have been found to differ by ~10°. The velocities in the SE tail do not correspond to the circular rotation around the galaxy's minor axis. This structure is probably a fragment of an unwound curved spiral arm. Regions with high velocity dispersions and peculiarities in the velocity fields have been found along the minor axis. Our study of the age and metallicity of the galaxy's stellar population has shown that the mean values of these parameters in the stellar disk, except for the central region ( r ≤ 5"), are ≈1 Gyr and ≈-0.4 dex, respectively. Both young (2-5 × 108 yr) and old (5-10 × 109 yr) stellar populations are present in the circumnuclear region. Our analysis of the spectroscopic data for the bright feature 8" south of the nucleus coincident in position with a compact X-ray source has shown that this is apparently a dwarf galaxy or a remnant of a companion galaxy. Our FPI observations in the Hα emission line and direct images have revealed a region of ionized gas that together with the already known structures along the minor axis forms a clumpy tidal structure of ionized gas pulled from the companion galaxy. The results of our study confirm the previously proposed hypothesis that the observed peculiar structures were formed by the merger of two galaxies. However, it can be said that IC 883 does not belong to the class of polar-ring galaxies.

  12. A revolutionary concept to improve the efficiency of IC antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2014-02-12

    The successful design of an Ion Cyclotron (IC) antenna mainly relies on the capability of coupling high power to the plasma (MW), feature that is currently reached by allowing rather high voltages (tens of kV) on the unavoidable unmatched part of the feeding lines. This requirement is often responsible of arcs along the transmission lines and other unwanted phenomena that considerably limit the usage of IC launchers. In this work, we suggest and describe a revolutionary approach based on high impedance surfaces, which allows to increase the antenna radiation efficiency and, hence, to highly reduce the imposed voltages to couple the same level of power to the plasma. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) displaced usually on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts usually embedded inside a dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. In terms of working properties, high impedance surfaces are electrically thin in-phase reflectors, i.e. they present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. While the usual design of a high impedance surface requires the presence of a dielectric layer, some alternative solutions can be realized in vacuum, taking advantage of double layers ofmetallic patches. After an introductory part on the properties of high impedance surfaces, this work documents both their design by means of numerical codes and their implementation on a scaled mock-up.

  13. MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY OF PROTOSTARS IN IC 1396A

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Calderon, M.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; Stauffer, J. R.; Rebull, L.; Ardila, D. R.; Whitney, B. A.; Song, I.; Brooke, T. Y.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.

    2009-09-10

    We have used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to conduct a photometric monitoring program of the IC1396A dark globule in order to study the mid-IR (3.6-8 {mu}m) variability of the heavily embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) present in that area. We obtained light curves covering a 14 day timespan with a twice daily cadence for 69 YSOs, and continuous light curves with approximately 12 s cadence over 7 hr for 38 YSOs. Typical accuracies for our relative photometry were 1%-2% for the long timespan data and a few millimagnitude, corresponding to less than 0.5%, for the 7 hr continuous 'staring-mode' data. More than half of the YSOs showed detectable variability, with amplitudes from {approx}0.05 mag to {approx}0.2 mag. About 30% of the YSOs showed quasi-sinusoidal light-curve shapes with apparent periods from 5 to 12 days and light-curve amplitudes approximately independent of wavelength over the IRAC bandpasses. We have constructed models which simulate the time-dependent spectral energy distributions of Class I and II YSOs in order to attempt to explain these light curves. Based on these models, the apparently periodic light curves are best explained by YSO models where one or two high-latitude photospheric spots heat the inner wall of the circumstellar disk, and where we view the disk at fairly large inclination angle. Disk inhomogeneities, such as increasing the height where the accretion funnel flows to the stellar hot spot, enhances the light-curve modulations. The other YSOs in our sample show a range of light-curve shapes, some of which are probably due to varying accretion rate or disk shadowing events. One star, IC1396A-47, shows a 3.5 hr periodic light curve; this object may be a PMS Delta Scuti star.

  14. Dual-broadband rotational CARS measurements in an IC engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, P.E.; Martinsson, L.; Alden, M.; Johansson, B.; Lassesson, B.; Marforio, K.; Lundholm, G.

    1994-12-31

    This is the first report of pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in an internal combustion (IC) engine. Single-shot, dual-broadband rotational CARS (DB-RCARS) spectra were recorded both prior to ignition and in the postcombustion gases. From these spectra, both temperature and relative oxygen concentrations were evaluated. The pressure was registered simultaneously with the CARS measurements in the spark-ignition engine burning natural gas and air. Prior to ignition, normally at temperatures below 1,000 K and pressures below 2 MPa, a rotational CARS spectrum is very temperature sensitive, and the technique can be used for temperature measurements with high accuracy. Evaluated temperatures show a negligible dependence on uncertainties in parameters such as the nonresonant susceptibility of the gas and slit width. Moreover, no collisional narrowing of the lines has to be taken into account. The relative standard deviation of evaluated temperatures and of relative oxygen concentrations from single-shot measurements were as low as 1, and 1.4--1.9%, respectively. In the postcombustion gases at temperatures above 2,000 K and pressures above 1.5 MPa, the nonresonant CARS background gave a large contribution to the total spectrum. In this temperature and pressure range, the evaluated values of temperature and nonresonant susceptibility are not independent, and the nonresonant susceptibility had to be fixed at a precalculated value to get a reliable temperature evaluation. The advantages and disadvantages of rotational CARS in comparison with vibrational CARS for IC engine measurements are discussed.

  15. An Infrared Search for Young Stellar Objects in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, Marcella; Gibbs, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Archibald, Andrew R.; Dickmann, Samantha Rose; Hart, Erica A.; Hedlund, Audrey R.; Hilfer, Shannon L.; Lacher, Thomas; McKernan, John T.; Medeiros, Emma M.; Nelson, Samantha Brooks; O'Leary, Harrison; Peña, Nicholas D.; Peterson, Alexis; Reader, Livia K.; Ropinski, Brandi Lucia; Scarpa, Gabriella; Sundeen, Kiera A.; Takara, Amber L.; Thiel, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    About 700 parsecs away from Earth, IC1396 lies along the galactic plane, in the direction of the constellation Cepheus, and includes many dark nebulae, including the Elephant’s Trunk Nebula. IC 1396A has been examined with a variety of telescopes, including Spitzer, 2MASS, IPHAS, Chandra, and WISE. The YSOVAR project (Rebull et al. 2014) also has Spitzer monitoring data in this region at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. Our team has merged these catalogs and identified candidate YSOs using IR color selection, X-ray detection, and variability metrics. In order to interpret the YSOVAR light curves, it is critical to understand which of the 700+ YSO candidates in this region are likely YSOs, and which are foreground/background stars or are extragalactic objects. As a first attempt to confirm these candidate YSOs, we have created spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for wavelengths from IPHAS r band to 24 microns, which we use, coupled with image inspection, to confirm (or refute) YSO candidates from this list of identified YSO candidates. We will then compare our vetted list of YSO candidates to the lists of YSO candidates already identified in the literature in this region. The goal of this study is to identify candidate YSO sources, as well as support the greater understanding of the variety, evolution and variability of young stars. This project is a collaborative effort of high school students from three states. They analyzed data individually and later collaborated online to compare results. This project is the result of many years of work with the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP).

  16. A functional variant of IC53 correlates with the late onset of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingzhou; Shi, Yi; Li, Ziyu; Yu, Hui; Han, Yu; Wang, Xiaojian; Sun, Kai; Yang, Tao; Lou, Kejia; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yinhui; Zhen, Yisong; Zhang, Guiguo; Hu, Ying; Ji, Jiafu; Hui, Rutai

    2011-01-01

    The IC53 gene was reported to be upregulated in the colon adenocarcinoma cell line SW480. Here, we show that the expression level of IC53 is positively correlated with the grade and depth of invasion in adenocarcinoma of the colon. Injection of IC53 stably transfected HCT-116 cells into athymic nude mice promoted tumor growth. Furthermore, overexpression of IC53 increased cell invasive growth, which could be dramatically prevented by knocking down IC53 with siRNA. The effects of IC53 on cell-invasive growth were mediated by upregulation of integrins, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt. A single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2737 in the IC53 gene created a potential microRNA379 target site, and microRNA379 expression inhibited IC53 translation. Among 222 patients with colorectal cancer, the C/C rs2737 genotype was associated with late onset of colorectal cancer (median age 63.0 versus 55.3 years, P = 0.003). The frequency of the C/C rs2737 genotype was much lower in patients who developed colorectal cancer below the age of 45 years than in individuals over age 45 years (10.8% versus 26.6%, P = 0.039). These data indicated that IC53 is a positive mediator for colon cancer progression, and IC53-rs2737 may serve as protection from the onset of colorectal cancer.

  17. A Functional Variant of IC53 Correlates with the Late Onset of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingzhou; Shi, Yi; Li, Ziyu; Yu, Hui; Han, Yu; Wang, Xiaojian; Sun, Kai; Yang, Tao; Lou, Kejia; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yinhui; Zhen, Yisong; Zhang, Guiguo; Hu, Ying; Ji, Jiafu; Hui, Rutai

    2011-01-01

    The IC53 gene was reported to be upregulated in the colon adenocarcinoma cell line SW480. Here, we show that the expression level of IC53 is positively correlated with the grade and depth of invasion in adenocarcinoma of the colon. Injection of IC53 stably transfected HCT-116 cells into athymic nude mice promoted tumor growth. Furthermore, overexpression of IC53 increased cell invasive growth, which could be dramatically prevented by knocking down IC53 with siRNA. The effects of IC53 on cell-invasive growth were mediated by upregulation of integrins, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt. A single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2737 in the IC53 gene created a potential microRNA379 target site, and microRNA379 expression inhibited IC53 translation. Among 222 patients with colorectal cancer, the C/C rs2737 genotype was associated with late onset of colorectal cancer (median age 63.0 versus 55.3 years, P = 0.003). The frequency of the C/C rs2737 genotype was much lower in patients who developed colorectal cancer below the age of 45 years than in individuals over age 45 years (10.8% versus 26.6%, P = 0.039). These data indicated that IC53 is a positive mediator for colon cancer progression, and IC53-rs2737 may serve as protection from the onset of colorectal cancer. PMID:21394385

  18. The OptIC Data Assimilation Intercomparison: A Statistical Critique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.; Clisby, N.

    2008-12-01

    The development of improved terrestrial carbon models has assumed great importance because of concerns about significant climate-to-carbon feedback processes. The complexity of the interactions leads to considerable difficulties in the process of model calibration. The OptIC intercomparison explored some aspects of model calibration, using an idealised terrestrial carbon model. Participants were invited to estimate model parameters in various cases defined by specified time series of the model state, with various forms of added noise. The study identified the crucial importance of the choice of cost function. The present analysis revisits the OptIC study, by considering it as an exercise in statistical estimation. This treats the observations as random variables. Consequently parameter estimates, â, based on observations will also be random variables whose distribution is known as the 'sampling distribution'. Key questions for any specific case are: Are departures from â/a_true =1 indication of bias or sampling error? Under what circumstance are uncertainty estimates (of Var[â]) reliable? We consider cases where the estimate is obtained by minimising a cost function, ΘX. Assuming that we know the true form of ℓ, the log likelihood, there are three different characterisations of uncertainty that should be distinguished: (i) The uncertainty from maximum-likelihood estimates, corresponding (either exactly or asymptotically) to the Cramer-Rao bound. In a realistic calibration situation, we won't be able to determine this because the 'true' form of the likelihood is unknown. (ii) The actual uncertainty associated with using a particular cost function. If the true noise distribution is known, this can be calculated in simple cases and determined from simulations in more complicated cases. (iii) The 'formal uncertainty' based on assuming (usually incorrectly) that ΘX is the true likelihood. In the first stage of the analysis, the distinctions are illustrated by

  19. Young T-dwarf candidates in IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, A. S. M.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Marmo, C.; Albert, L.; Bouy, H.

    2009-12-01

    Context: The determination of the lower-end of the initial mass function (IMF) provides strong constraints on star formation theories. Aims: We report here on a search for isolated planetary-mass objects in the 3 Myr-old star-forming region IC 348. Methods: Deep, narrowband CH4off and CH4on images were obtained with CFHT/WIRCam over 0.11 sq. deg. in the central part of IC 348 to identify young T-dwarfs from their 1.6 μm methane absorption bands. Results: We report three faint T-dwarf candidates with CH4on-CH4off colours >0.4 mag. Extinction was estimated for each candidate and lies in the range AV ~ 5-12 mag. Comparisons with T-dwarf spectral models, and colour/colour and colour/magnitude diagrams, reject two of the three candidates because of their extreme z'-J blueness. The one remaining object is not thought to be a foreground field dwarf because of a number density argument and also its strong extinction AV ~ 12 mag, or thought to be a background field T-dwarf which would be expected to be much fainter. Models and diagrams give this object a preliminary T6 spectral type. Conclusions: With a few Jupiter masses, the young T-dwarf candidate reported here is potentially amongst the youngest, lowest mass objects detected in a star-forming region so far. Its frequency is consistent with the extrapolation of current lognormal IMF estimates down to the planetary mass domain. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of CFHT, Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the “University of Hawaii. Research supported by the Marie Curie Research Training Network CONSTELLATION” under grant no. MRTN-CT-2006-035890.

  20. IC 630: Piercing the Veil of the Nuclear Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durré, Mark; Mould, Jeremy; Schartmann, Marc; Ashraf Uddin, Syed; Cotter, Garrett

    2017-04-01

    IC 630 is a nearby early-type galaxy with a mass of 6× {10}10 M ⊙ with an intense burst of recent (6 Myr) star formation (SF). It shows strong nebular emission lines, with radio and X-ray emission, which classifies it as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). With VLT-SINFONI and Gemini North-NIFS adaptive optics observations (plus supplementary ANU 2.3 m WiFeS optical IFU observations), the excitation diagnostics of the nebular emission species show no sign of standard AGN engine excitation; the stellar velocity dispersion also indicates that a supermassive black hole (if one is present) is small ({M}\\bullet =2.25× {10}5 {M}ȯ ). The luminosity at all wavelengths is consistent with SF at a rate of about 1–2 M ⊙ yr‑1. We measure gas outflows driven by SF at a rate of 0.18 M ⊙ yr‑1 in a face-on truncated cone geometry. We also observe a nuclear cluster or disk and other clusters. Photoionization from young, hot stars is the main excitation mechanism for [Fe ii] and hydrogen, whereas shocks are responsible for the H2 excitation. Our observations are broadly comparable with simulations where a Toomre-unstable, self-gravitating gas disk triggers a burst of SF, peaking after about 30 Myr and possibly cycling with a period of about 200 Myr.

  1. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  2. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  3. Broad Halpha Wing Formation in the Planetary Nebula IC 4997.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hyung

    2000-02-10

    The young and compact planetary nebula IC 4997 is known to exhibit very broad wings with a width exceeding 5000 km s-1 around Halpha. We propose that the broad wings are formed through Rayleigh-Raman scattering that involves atomic hydrogen, by which Lybeta photons with a velocity width of a few 102 km s-1 are converted to optical photons and fill the Halpha broad wing region. The conversion efficiency reaches 0.6 near the line center, where the scattering optical depth is much larger than 1, and rapidly decreases in the far wings. Assuming that close to the central star there exists an unresolved inner compact core of high density, nH approximately 109-1010 cm-3, we use the photoionization code "CLOUDY" to show that sufficient Lybeta photons for scattering are produced. Using a top-hat-incident profile for the Lybeta flux and a scattering region with a H i column density NHi=2x1020 cm-2 and a substantial covering factor, we perform a profile-fitting analysis in order to obtain a satisfactory fit to the observed flux. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of the Rayleigh-Raman processes in planetary nebulae and other emission objects.

  4. IRNSS/NavIC L5 Attitude Determination

    PubMed Central

    Zaminpardaz, Safoora; Teunissen, Peter J.G.; Nadarajah, Nandakumaran

    2017-01-01

    The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) has recently (May 2016) become fully-operational and has been provided with the operational name of NavIC (Navigation with Indian Constellation). It has been developed by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) with the objective of offering positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) to the users in its service area. This contribution provides for the first time an assessment of the IRNSS L5-signal capability to achieve instantaneous attitude determination on the basis of data collected in Perth, Australia. Our evaluations are conducted for both a linear array of two antennas and a planar array of three antennas. A pre-requisite for precise and fast IRNSS attitude determination is the successful resolution of the double-differenced (DD) integer carrier-phase ambiguities. In this contribution, we will compare the performances of different such methods, amongst which the unconstrained and the multivariate-constrained LAMBDA method for both linear and planar arrays. It is demonstrated that the instantaneous ambiguity success rates increase from 15% to 90% for the linear array and from 5% to close to 100% for the planar array, thus showing that standalone IRNSS can realize 24-h almost instantaneous precise attitude determination with heading and elevation standard deviations of 0.05° and 0.10°, respectively. PMID:28146107

  5. YBCO step-edge junctions with high IcRn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Foley, C. P.

    2010-06-01

    Step-edge junctions represent one type of grain boundary Josephson junction employed in high-temperature superconducting junction technology. To date, the majority of results published in the literature focus on [001]-tilt grain boundary junctions (GBJs) produced using bicrystal substrates. We investigate the step morphology and YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) film structure of YBCO-based step-edge junctions on MgO [001] substrates which structurally resemble [100]-tilt junctions. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals a clean GBJ interface of width ~ 1 nm and a single junction at the top edge. The dependence of the transport properties on the MgO step-edge and junction morphology is examined at 4.2 K, to enable direct comparison with results for other junction studies such as [001]-tilt and [100]-tilt junctions and building on previously published 77 K data. MgO step-edge junctions show a slower reduction in critical current density with step angle compared with [001]-tilt junctions. For optimized step parameters, transport measurements revealed large critical current and normal resistance (IcRN) products (~3-5 mV), comparable with the best results obtained in other kinds of [100]-tilt GBJs in YBCO at 4.2 K. Junction-based devices such as SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) and THz imagers show excellent performance when MgO-based step-edge junctions are used.

  6. Characterization Of Deformation Properties Of Metals In 3D ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittler, Olaf; Mroßko, Raul; Huber, Saskia; Dowhan, Lukasz; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2011-09-01

    The properties of the materials involved in the set-up of 3D ICs need to be known, when the occurring mechanical stresses are to be modeled. Especially elastic-plastic properties are relevant for the metal layers, which form redistribution layers and the through silicon vias. These can be characterized by the nanoindentation experiment, which is an established technique for the determination of Hardness and Young's modulus of thin films. But this standard data set is not sufficient to be used as input to finite element simulations, because stress strain curves are required for the analysis of reliability of metal layers. These stress-strain curves can be obtained by fitting the force displacement curves of the experiment with a finite-element model. This approach enables additionally a solution for the so called substrate effect, because the stiffness of the substrate can be considered in the fitting model. This known approach is being applied and tested on thin (300 nm) gold layers deposited on silicon. It is shown that a good sensitivity for Young's Modulus can be reached even for indents that exceed 10% of the film thickness, but for the plastic data the results are not unique and a range of plastic properties can be fitted.

  7. ICES IN THE QUIESCENT IC 5146 DENSE CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Ennico, K.; Greene, T. P.; Roellig, T. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Keane, J. V.; Lada, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.

    2011-04-10

    This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 {mu}m range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H{sub 2}O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03 {+-} 0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH{sub 3}OH and NH{sub 3} in the ices, present at the {approx}2% and {approx}5% levels, respectively, relative to H{sub 2}O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J - K) color excess is found to follow a much shallower slope relative to lines of sight that probe diffuse clouds, supporting the previous results by Chiar et al.

  8. IRNSS/NavIC L5 Attitude Determination.

    PubMed

    Zaminpardaz, Safoora; Teunissen, Peter J G; Nadarajah, Nandakumaran

    2017-01-30

    The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) has recently (May 2016) become fully-operational and has been provided with the operational name of NavIC (Navigation with Indian Constellation). It has been developed by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) with the objective of offering positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) to the users in its service area. This contribution provides for the first time an assessment of the IRNSS L5-signal capability to achieve instantaneous attitude determination on the basis of data collected in Perth, Australia. Our evaluations are conducted for both a linear array of two antennas and a planar array of three antennas. A pre-requisite for precise and fast IRNSS attitude determination is the successful resolution of the double-differenced (DD) integer carrier-phase ambiguities. In this contribution, we will compare the performances of different such methods, amongst which the unconstrained and the multivariate-constrained LAMBDA method for both linear and planar arrays. It is demonstrated that the instantaneous ambiguity success rates increase from 15% to 90% for the linear array and from 5% to close to 100% for the planar array, thus showing that standalone IRNSS can realize 24-h almost instantaneous precise attitude determination with heading and elevation standard deviations of 0.05 and 0.10 degrees, respectively.

  9. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  10. Polymeric nanoparticles for co-delivery of synthetic long peptide antigen and poly IC as therapeutic cancer vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Sima; Fransen, Marieke F; Kleinovink, Jan Willem; Christensen, Jonatan Riis; Amidi, Maryam; Hennink, Wim E; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2015-04-10

    The aim of the current study was to develop a cancer vaccine formulation for treatment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) derived from HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins have been used for therapeutic vaccination in clinical trials with promising results. In preclinical and clinical studies adjuvants based on mineral oils (such as incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) and Montanide) are used to create a sustained release depot at the injection site. While the depot effect of mineral oils is important for induction of robust immune responses, their administration is accompanied with severe adverse and long lasting side effects. In order to develop an alternative for IFA family of adjuvants, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) based on hydrophilic polyester (poly(d,l lactic-co-hydroxymethyl glycolic acid) (pLHMGA)) were prepared. These NPs were loaded with a synthetic long peptide (SLP) derived from HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and a toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand (poly IC) by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The therapeutic efficacy of the nanoparticulate formulations was compared to that of HPV SLP+poly IC formulated in IFA. Encapsulation of HPV SLP antigen in NPs substantially enhanced the population of HPV-specific CD8+ T cells when combined with poly IC either co-encapsulated with the antigen or in its soluble form. The therapeutic efficacy of NPs containing poly IC in tumor eradication was equivalent to that of the IFA formulation. Importantly, administration of pLHMGA nanoparticles was not associated with adverse effects and therefore these biodegradable nanoparticles are excellent substitutes for IFA in cancer vaccines.

  11. 1 Mpc giant radio galaxy IC 711 - 3 km Westerbork observations at 92 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, J.P.; Strom, R.G.

    1988-05-01

    New Westerbork obsevations at 92 cm of the galaxy IC 711 show a radio trail that extends 1 Mpc long, much farther out than previously observed at shorter wavelengths. These new observations confirm IC 711 as the longest head-tail galaxy known, and move IC 711 to the fifth rank among galaxies with the largest radio extension from an optical galaxy nucleus (after the classical double sources 3C 236, 3C 326, HB 13, and MSH 05-22). 20 references.

  12. Poly-IC preconditioning protects against cerebral and renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Packard, Amy E B; Hedges, Jason C; Bahjat, Frances R; Stevens, Susan L; Conlin, Michael J; Salazar, Andres M; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P

    2012-02-01

    Preconditioning induces ischemic tolerance, which confers robust protection against ischemic damage. We show marked protection with polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) preconditioning in three models of murine ischemia-reperfusion injury. Poly-IC preconditioning induced protection against ischemia modeled in vitro in brain cortical cells and in vivo in models of brain ischemia and renal ischemia. Further, unlike other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, which generally induce significant inflammatory responses, poly-IC elicits only modest systemic inflammation. Results show that poly-IC is a new powerful prophylactic treatment that offers promise as a clinical therapeutic strategy to minimize damage in patient populations at risk of ischemic injury.

  13. Effect of toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly I:C on intestinal mucosa and epithelial barrier function in mouse models of acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Yue, Yue-Hong; Han, Hua; Chen, Xiu-Li; Lu, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Ji-Min; Hou, Hong-Tao; Lang, Xiao-Meng; He, Li-Li; Hu, Qi-Lu; Dun, Zi-Qian

    2017-01-01

    -γ. CONCLUSION Our study suggested that poly I:C may protect against DSS-induced colitis through maintaining integrity of the epithelial barrier and regulating innate immune responses, which may shed light on the therapeutic potential of poly I:C in human colitis. PMID:28246473

  14. Qualification and Reliability for MEMS and IC Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2004-01-01

    Advanced IC electronic packages are moving toward miniaturization from two key different approaches, front and back-end processes, each with their own challenges. Successful use of more of the back-end process front-end, e.g. microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Wafer Level Package (WLP), enable reducing size and cost. Use of direct flip chip die is the most efficient approach if and when the issues of know good die and board/assembly are resolved. Wafer level package solve the issue of known good die by enabling package test, but it has its own limitation, e.g., the I/O limitation, additional cost, and reliability. From the back-end approach, system-in-a-package (SIAP/SIP) development is a response to an increasing demand for package and die integration of different functions into one unit to reduce size and cost and improve functionality. MEMS add another challenging dimension to electronic packaging since they include moving mechanical elements. Conventional qualification and reliability need to be modified and expanded in most cases in order to detect new unknown failures. This paper will review four standards that already released or being developed that specifically address the issues on qualification and reliability of assembled packages. Exposures to thermal cycles, monotonic bend test, mechanical shock and drop are covered in these specifications. Finally, mechanical and thermal cycle qualification data generated for MEMS accelerometer will be presented. The MEMS was an element of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) qualified for NASA Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs), Spirit and Opportunity that successfully is currently roaring the Martian surface

  15. The Kinematics of the Ionized Gas in IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Joshua C.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of a WIYN integral field unit study of the kinematics of the ionized gas in IC 10, a dwarf irregular starburst galaxy in the Local Group. Though the velocity field of the ionized gas closely matches that of the H I, there are several kinematically interesting features in the galaxy. The diffuse ionized gas in the galaxy exhibits larger Hα line widths than the bright complexes. In one case this is due to an infusion of energy into the gas associated with the radio superbubble discovered by Yang & Skillman. We find that the amount of energy in this region is consistent with their hypothesis that the region contains 10 supernova remnants. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) expanding shell in the ionized gas, which is likely driven by three confirmed Wolf-Rayet stars that are located within the shell. Extrapolating from Hunter's initial mass function, we find that the central starburst region contains approximately equal energy contributions from stellar winds and supernovae (SNe), suggesting that SNe are just beginning to play a significant role in shaping the kinematics of the ionized gas. However, all of this energy cannot be easily accounted for in the kinematics of the gas. We detect an energetic flow of gas (3×1052 ergs), which we believe originates from the starburst region. We also detect a high-velocity (70 km s-1) feature not coincident with any structure in our Hα image. This feature, along with the flow and shell, can account for the energy produced by stellar wind and SNe. The flow resembles one discovered by Wilcots & Thurow in NGC 4214; together they suggest that the porosity of the interstellar medium contributes significantly to the high velocity of some portion of the ionized gas in irregular galaxies.

  16. X-ray Emission from Megamaser Galaxy IC 2560

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Done, Chris; Zycki, Piotr; Greenhill, Lincoln; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2005-09-12

    Observation of the H{sub 2}O megamaser galaxy IC 2560 with the Chandra Observatory reveals a complex spectrum composed of soft X-ray emission due to multi-temperature thermal plasma, and a hard continuum with strong emission lines. The continuum is most likely a Compton reflection (reprocessing) of primary emission that is completely absorbed at least up to 7 keV. The lines can be identified with fluorescence from Si, S and Fe in the lowest ionization stages. The equivalent widths of the Si and S lines are broadly compatible with those anticipated for reprocessing by optically thick cold plasma of Solar abundances, while the large equivalent width of the Fe line requires some overabundance of iron. A contribution to the line from a transmitted component cannot be ruled out, but the limits on the strength of the Compton shoulder make it less likely. From the bolometric luminosity of the nuclear region, we infer that the source radiates at 1-10% of its Eddington luminosity, for an adopted central mass of 3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The overall spectrum is consistent with the hypotheses that the central engines powering the detected megamsers in accretion disks are obscured from direct view by the associated accretion disk material itself, and that there is a correlation between the occurrence of megamaser emission and Compton-thick absorption columns. For the 11 known galaxies with both column density measurements and maser emission believed to arise from accretion disks, eight AGN are Compton thick.

  17. Evidence for axisymmetric halos: The case of IC 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franx, Marijn; van Gorkom, J. H.; de Zeeuw, Tim

    1994-12-01

    We present a new method to derive the shape of the potential from the velocity field of a gas ring, or a gas disk with a flat rotation curve. The method is an extension of previous work by Binney and Teuben, and it can detect deviations from axisymmetry at the level of a few percent. The velocity field of the ring or disk is expanded into harmonics, and we present analytic expressions which relate these harmonic terms to the intrinsic parameters, and the viewing angles. We show that both the velocity field and the geometry of the ring are necessary to give complete information on the shape of the potential in the plane of the ring. The velocity field alone gives incomplete information for small ellipticities. We present new neutral hydrogen data on the H I ring around the early-type galaxy IC 2006, which was discovered by Schweizer, van Gorkom, & Seitzer (1989). The new data show that the ring is filled and has a remarkably regular velocity field. Application of our method to this gas ring shows that the halo must be close to perfectly axisymmetric. We detect a nonsignificant ellipticity of the potential of 0.012 +/- 0.026. The 95% confidence limit on the ellipticity is 0.05. This implies that the potential is nearly circular in the plane of the ring. The analysis indicates that the circular velocity is nearly constant from 0.5 Re to 6.5 Re. We confirm that the M/L ration in the outer parts increases (Schweizer et al. 1989). The stellar component probably has a strong disk. The data demonstrate that galaxies other than spiral galaxies have massive halos. The inferred shape of the halo can be contrasted to the strongly triaxial halos found in simulations of dissipationless halo formation. As suggested by Katz & Gunn (1991), the inclusion of baryonic matter in the simulations may be necessary to resolve this issue.

  18. Innovative Teaching of IC Design and Manufacture Using the Superchip Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, P. R.; Wilcock, R.; McNally, I.; Swabey, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how an intelligent chip architecture has allowed a large cohort of undergraduate (UG) students to be given effective practical insight into integrated circuit (IC) design by designing and manufacturing their own ICs. To achieve this, an efficient chip architecture, the "Superchip," was developed, which allows multiple student…

  19. A Solder Based Self Assembly Project in an Introductory IC Fabrication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Madhav; Lusth, John C.; Burkett, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated circuit (IC) fabrication principles is an elective course in a senior undergraduate and early graduate student's curriculum. Over the years, the semiconductor industry relies heavily on students with developed expertise in the area of fabrication techniques, learned in an IC fabrication theory and laboratory course. The theory course…

  20. 30 CFR 57.22313 - Explosion-protection systems (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion-protection systems (I-C mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22313 Explosion-protection systems (I-C mines). Pressure-relief systems including vents, or explosion suppression systems, shall...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22104 - Open flames (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open flames (I-C mines). 57.22104 Section 57... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22104 Open flames (I-C mines). (a) Open flames, including cutting and welding, shall not be used underground. (b) Welding...

  2. 30 CFR 57.22104 - Open flames (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open flames (I-C mines). 57.22104 Section 57... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22104 Open flames (I-C mines). (a) Open flames, including cutting and welding, shall not be used underground. (b) Welding...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22104 - Open flames (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Open flames (I-C mines). 57.22104 Section 57... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22104 Open flames (I-C mines). (a) Open flames, including cutting and welding, shall not be used underground. (b) Welding...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22104 - Open flames (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Open flames (I-C mines). 57.22104 Section 57... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Fire Prevention and Control § 57.22104 Open flames (I-C mines). (a) Open flames, including cutting and welding, shall not be used underground. (b) Welding...

  5. Industry-Oriented Laboratory Development for Mixed-Signal IC Test Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, J.; Haffner, M.; Yoder, S.; Scott, M.; Reehal, G.; Ismail, M.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry is lacking qualified integrated circuit (IC) test engineers to serve in the field of mixed-signal electronics. The absence of mixed-signal IC test education at the collegiate level is cited as one of the main sources for this problem. In response to this situation, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at…

  6. 30 CFR 57.22233 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22233 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). If methane reaches 0.5 percent in the mine atmosphere, ventilation...

  7. Mutations in the aph(2")-Ic Gene Are Responsible for Increased Levels of Aminoglycoside Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Clewell, Don B.; Lerner, Stephen A.; Chow, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Random PCR mutagenesis of the enterococcal aph(2")-Ic gene followed by selection for mutant enzymes that confer enhanced levels of aminoglycoside resistance resulted in mutants of APH(2")-Ic with His-258-Leu and Phe-108-Leu substitutions, all of which conferred rises in the MICs of several aminoglycosides. The mutated residues are located outside conserved regions of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. PMID:12234853

  8. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22241 Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). (a) Boreholes shall be drilled at least 25 feet in advance of a face whenever the work place...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22241 Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). (a) Boreholes shall be drilled at least 25 feet in advance of a face whenever the work place...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22241 Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). (a) Boreholes shall be drilled at least 25 feet in advance of a face whenever the work place...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22241 Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). (a) Boreholes shall be drilled at least 25 feet in advance of a face whenever the work place...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22241 Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). (a) Boreholes shall be drilled at least 25 feet in advance of a face whenever the work place...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22233 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22233 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). If methane reaches 0.5 percent in the mine atmosphere, ventilation...

  14. IC [Interior Communications] Electrician 3 and 2: Rate Training Manual. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The rate training manual provides information related to the tasks assigned to the Interior Communications (IC) Electricians Third and Second Class who operate and maintain the interior communications systems and associated equipment. Chapter one discusses career challenges for the IC Electrician in terms of responsibilities, advancement…

  15. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  16. The Shock Structure of Supernova Remnant IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Higdon, S. J. U.; Burton, M. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present and discuss ISO observations of IC443, a supernova remnant interacting with a molecular cloud. An SWS spectrum centered on molecular hydrogen clump R10E (RA(2000) = 6 17 7.6, Decl(2000) = 22 25 34.6) is dominated by strong [SiII] (34 microns) emission and the pure rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen ranging from 0-0 S(1) to 0-0 S(13). Fits to these H$-2$ lines imply a large column (approx. 7E19 cm$ {-2)$) of warm (T approx. 700 K) gas and an ortho/para ratio for hydrogen near 3. LWS Fabry-Perot spectra of [OI] (63 microns) and [CII] (158 microns) at positions R10E and C (RA(2000) = 6 17 42.8, Decl(2000) = 22 21 38.1) find broad (approx. 75 km/s), blue-shifted (-40 km/s) line profiles; their similarity strongly suggests a common, shock-generated origin for these two lines. The surprisingly large [CII]/[OI] ratio (approx. 0.1 to 0.2) confirms previous observations with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. These [CII] and [OI] line intensities, the [SiII] intensity (above), and LWS grating measurements of OH (119 microns) and [OI] (145 microns) are all readily fit by a single, fast J-shock model. Although the [OI] (63) emission can alternatively be produced by a slow C-shock, this ensemble of lines can not be produced by such a shock and provides strong evidence for the existence of a J-shock. A 24-arcmin strip map shows that this far-infrared line emission is spatially correlated with the H$-2$ 1-0 S(1) emission, which most likely arises in an associated C-shock. In addition to this spatially correlated shock emission, the strip map identifies extended [CII] and [OI] emission with a significantly larger line ratio (approx. 0.6); this 'background' component is compared with current J-shock, C-shock, photo-dissociation region (PDR), and X-ray dissociation region (XDR) models in an effort to explain its origin.

  17. Nasal and skin delivery of IC31(®)-adjuvanted recombinant HSV-2 gD protein confers protection against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Wizel, Benjamin; Persson, Josefine; Thörn, Karolina; Nagy, Eszter; Harandi, Ali M

    2012-06-19

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) remains the leading cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Given the disappointing results of the recent genital herpes vaccine trials in humans, development of novel vaccine strategies capable of eliciting protective mucosal and systemic immune responses to HSV-2 is urgently required. Here we tested the ability of the adjuvant IC31(®) in combination with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) used through intranasal (i.n.), intradermal (i.d.), or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization routes for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes infection in C57BL/6 mice. Immunization with gD plus IC31(®) through all three routes of immunization developed elevated gD-specific serum antibody responses with HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Whereas the skin routes promoted the induction of a mixed IgG2c/IgG1 isotype profile, the i.n. route only elicited IgG1 antibodies. All immunization routes were able to induce gD-specific IgG antibody responses in the vaginas of mice immunized with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD. Although specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in splenocytes from mice of most groups vaccinated with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD, only i.d. immunization resulted in a significant splenic IFN-γ response. Further, immunization with gD plus IC31(®) conferred 80-100% protection against an otherwise lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge with amelioration of viral replication and disease severity in the vagina. These results warrant further exploration of IC31(®) for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes and other sexually transmitted infections.

  18. A learning-enabled neuron array IC based upon transistor channel models of biological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Brink, S; Nease, S; Hasler, P; Ramakrishnan, S; Wunderlich, R; Basu, A; Degnan, B

    2013-02-01

    We present a single-chip array of 100 biologically-based electronic neuron models interconnected to each other and the outside environment through 30,000 synapses. The chip was fabricated in a standard 350 nm CMOS IC process. Our approach used dense circuit models of synaptic behavior, including biological computation and learning, as well as transistor channel models. We use Address-Event Representation (AER) spike communication for inputs and outputs to this IC. We present the IC architecture and infrastructure, including IC chip, configuration tools, and testing platform. We present measurement of small network of neurons, measurement of STDP neuron dynamics, and measurement from a compiled spiking neuron WTA topology, all compiled into this IC.

  19. Prion Seeding Activities of Mouse Scrapie Strains with Divergent PrPSc Protease Sensitivities and Amyloid Plaque Content Using RT-QuIC and eQuIC

    PubMed Central

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M.; Baron, Gerald S.; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrPSc) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrPSc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrPC, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrPSen) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrPSc (PrPRes). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10−8 and 10−13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrPRes levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrPC. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrPRes, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrPRes strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrPRes levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrPSc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML scrapie strains. Overall

  20. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  1. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A.

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  2. Long gamma-ray Bursts and Type Ic Core CollapseSupernovae have Similar Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.L.; Kirshner, R.P.; Pahre, M.

    2007-12-04

    When the afterglow fades at the site of a long-duration {gamma}-ray burst (LGRB), Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic) are the only type of core collapse supernova observed. Recent work found that a sample of LGRB had different environments from a collection of core-collapse supernovae identified in a high-redshift sample from colors and light curves. LGRB were in the brightest regions of their hosts, but the core-collapse sample followed the overall distribution of the galaxy light. Here we examine 263 fully spectroscopically-typed supernovae found in nearby (z < 0.06) galaxies for which we have constructed surface photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The distributions of the thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia) and some varieties of core-collapse supernovae (SN II and SN Ib) follow the galaxy light, but the SN Ic (like LGRB) are much more likely to erupt in the brightest regions of their hosts. The high-redshift hosts of LGRB are overwhelmingly irregulars, without bulges, while many low redshift SN Ic hosts are spirals with small bulges. When we remove the bulge light from our low-redshift sample, the SN Ic and LGRB distributions agree extremely well. If both LGRB and SN Ic stem from very massive stars, then it seems plausible that the conditions necessary for forming SN Ic are also required for LGRB. Additional factors, including metallicity, may determine whether the stellar evolution of a massive star leads to a LGRB with an underlying broad-lined SN Ic, or simply a SN Ic without a {gamma}-ray burst.

  3. Research on Methods of Processing Transit IC Card Information and Constructing Transit OD Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiuhua; Li, Jin; Peng, Han

    Transit OD matrix is of vital importance when planning urban transit system. Traditional transit OD matrix constructing method needs a large range of spot check survey. It is expensive and needs long cycle time to process information. Recently transit IC card charging systems have been widely applied in big cities. Being processed reasonably, transit passenger information stored in IC card database can turn into information resource. It will reduce survey cost a lot. The concept of transit trip chain is put forward in this paper. According to the characteristics of closed transit trip chain, it discusses how to process IC card information and construct transit OD matrix. It also points out that urban transit information platform and data warehouse should be constructed, and how to integrate IC card information.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  5. Local and commissural IC neurons make axosomatic inputs on large GABAergic tectothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Oliver, Douglas L

    2014-10-15

    Large GABAergic (LG) neurons are a distinct type of neuron in the inferior colliculus (IC) identified by their dense vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2)-containing axosomatic synaptic terminals. Yet the sources of these terminals are unknown. Since IC glutamatergic neurons express VGLUT2, and IC neurons are known to have local collaterals, we tested the hypothesis that these excitatory, glutamatergic axosomatic inputs on LG neurons come from local axonal collaterals and commissural IC neurons. We injected a recombinant viral tracer into the IC which enabled Golgi-like green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling in both dendrites and axons. In all cases, we found terminals positive for both GFP and VGLUT2 (GFP+/VGLUT2+) that made axosomatic contacts on LG neurons. One to six axosomatic contacts were made on a single LG cell body by a single axonal branch. The GFP-labeled neurons giving rise to the VGLUT2+ terminals on LG neurons were close by. The density of GFP+/VGLUT2+ terminals on the LG neurons was related to the number of nearby GFP-labeled cells. On the contralateral side, a smaller number of LG neurons received axosomatic contacts from GFP+/VGLUT2+ terminals. In cases with a single GFP-labeled glutamatergic neuron, the labeled axonal plexus was flat, oriented in parallel to the fibrodendritic laminae, and contacted 9-30 LG cell bodies within the plexus. Our data demonstrated that within the IC microcircuitry there is a convergence of inputs from local IC excitatory neurons on LG cell bodies. This suggests that LG neurons are heavily influenced by the activity of the nearby laminar glutamatergic neurons in the IC.

  6. Estimation of Ksub Ic from slow bend precracked Charpy specimen strength ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succop, G.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Strength ratios are reported which were derived from slow bend tests on 0.25 inch thick precracked Charpy specimens of steels, aluminum alloys, and a titanium alloy for which valid K sub Ic values were established. The strength ratios were used to develop calibration curves typical of those that could be useful in estimating K sub Ic for the purposes of alloy development of quality control.

  7. Achieving asthma control with ICS/LABA: A review of strategies for asthma management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, René; Vogelmeier, Claus; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Maintenance treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) is recommended for patients whose asthma is not controlled with a low-to-moderate dose of ICS alone; a separate reliever medication is used on an as-needed basis. The Gaining Optimal Asthma ControL (GOAL) study demonstrated that salmeterol/fluticasone maintenance treatment can improve asthma control and reduce future risk compared with fluticasone alone, although the dose escalation design of this study meant that most patients treated with salmeterol/fluticasone were receiving the highest dose of ICS at the end of the study. Similarly, budesonide/formoterol maintenance therapy improved asthma control and reduced future risk compared with budesonide alone in the Formoterol and Corticosteroids Establishing Therapy (FACET) study. An alternative approach to asthma management is to use an ICS/LABA for both maintenance and reliever therapy. A large body of clinical evidence has shown that the use of budesonide/formoterol in this way improves both current control and reduces future risk compared with ICS/LABA plus as-needed short-acting β2-agonist (SABA), even when patients receive lower maintenance doses of ICS as part of the maintenance and reliever therapy regimen. In addition, one study has shown that beclometasone/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy reduces exacerbations more effectively than beclometasone/formoterol plus as-needed SABA. The use of ICS/LABA as both maintenance and reliever therapy ensures that an increase in reliever use in response to worsening symptoms is automatically matched by an increase in ICS.

  8. AVP-IC50 Pred: Multiple machine learning techniques-based prediction of peptide antiviral activity in terms of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50).

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Tandon, Himani; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    Peptide-based antiviral therapeutics has gradually paved their way into mainstream drug discovery research. Experimental determination of peptides' antiviral activity as expressed by their IC50 values involves a lot of effort. Therefore, we have developed "AVP-IC50 Pred," a regression-based algorithm to predict the antiviral activity in terms of IC50 values (μM). A total of 759 non-redundant peptides from AVPdb and HIPdb were divided into a training/test set having 683 peptides (T(683)) and a validation set with 76 independent peptides (V(76)) for evaluation. We utilized important peptide sequence features like amino-acid compositions, binary profile of N8-C8 residues, physicochemical properties and their hybrids. Four different machine learning techniques (MLTs) namely Support vector machine, Random Forest, Instance-based classifier, and K-Star were employed. During 10-fold cross validation, we achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of 0.66, 0.64, 0.56, 0.55, respectively, for the above MLTs using the best combination of feature sets. All the predictive models also performed well on the independent validation dataset and achieved maximum PCCs of 0.74, 0.68, 0.59, 0.57, respectively, on the best combination of feature sets. The AVP-IC50 Pred web server is anticipated to assist the researchers working on antiviral therapeutics by enabling them to computationally screen many compounds and focus experimental validation on the most promising set of peptides, thus reducing cost and time efforts. The server is available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/ic50avp.

  9. Immune complexed (IC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically and acutely HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Riva, E; Maggi, F; Abbruzzese, F; Bellomi, F; Giannelli, G; Picardi, A; Scagnolari, C; Folgori, A; Spada, E; Piccolella, E; Dianzani, F; Antonelli, G

    2009-02-01

    In infected individuals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists in various forms of circulating particles which role in virus persistence and in HCV resistance to IFN therapy is still debated. Here, the proportion of HCV bound to immunoglobulin was determined in plasma of 107 chronically infected patients harbouring different HCV genotypes and, for comparison, of six patients with acute HCV infection. The results showed that, in spite of wide individual variability, chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited an extremely high proportion of immune complexed (IC) virus regardless of plasma HCV load and infecting genotype. Moreover, no significant association was found between baseline proportion of IC HCV and response to IFN treatment. Plasma samples collected within 2 weeks of treatment from 20 patients revealed a significant decline of mean IC HCV values relative to baseline that clearly paralleled the decay of total HCV load. In acutely infected patients, circulating HCV was not IC or IC at very low levels only in patients developing chronic HCV infection. Collectively, these findings strengthen the possibility that IC virus could play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  10. From behavioral context to receptors: serotonergic modulatory pathways in the IC.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Sullivan, Megan R

    2012-01-01

    In addition to ascending, descending, and lateral auditory projections, inputs extrinsic to the auditory system also influence neural processing in the inferior colliculus (IC). These types of inputs often have an important role in signaling salient factors such as behavioral context or internal state. One route for such extrinsic information is through centralized neuromodulatory networks like the serotonergic system. Serotonergic inputs to the IC originate from centralized raphe nuclei, release serotonin in the IC, and activate serotonin receptors expressed by auditory neurons. Different types of serotonin receptors act as parallel pathways regulating specific features of circuitry within the IC. This results from variation in subcellular localizations and effector pathways of different receptors, which consequently influence auditory responses in distinct ways. Serotonin receptors may regulate GABAergic inhibition, influence response gain, alter spike timing, or have effects that are dependent on the level of activity. Serotonin receptor types additionally interact in nonadditive ways to produce distinct combinatorial effects. This array of effects of serotonin is likely to depend on behavioral context, since the levels of serotonin in the IC transiently increase during behavioral events including stressful situations and social interaction. These studies support a broad model of serotonin receptors as a link between behavioral context and reconfiguration of circuitry in the IC, and the resulting possibility that plasticity at the level of specific receptor types could alter the relationship between context and circuit function.

  11. Silicon photonics-wireless interface ICs for micro-/millimeter-wave fiber-wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Ko, Minsu; Lee, Myung-Jae; Rücker, Holger; Choi, Woo-Young

    2013-09-23

    We present two types of Si photonics-wireless interface (PWI) integrated circuits (ICs) realized in standard Si technology. Our PWI ICs convert optical signals into radio-frequency (RF) signals for downlink remote antenna units in fiber-wireless networks. Characterization and modeling of Si avalanche photodetectors (APDs) fabricated in two different Si technologies are carried out and used for PWI IC design. A 5-GHz RF-over-fiber PWI IC composed of APD, preamplifier, and power amplifier (PA) is fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology and its performance is verified by 54-Mb/s wireless local area network data transmission. A 60-GHz baseband-over-fiber PWI IC containing APD, baseband photoreceiver, 60-GHz binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulator, and 60-GHz PA is realized in 0.25-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. Error-free transmission of 1.6-Gb/s BPSK data in 60 GHz with this PWI IC is successfully achieved.

  12. A New Interface for the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Shaar, R.; Jonestrask, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of uploading data, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Data uploading has been simplified and no longer requires the use of the Excel SmartBook interface. Instead, properly formatted MagIC text files can be dragged-and-dropped onto an HTML 5 web interface. Data can be uploaded one table at a time to facilitate ease of uploading and data error checking is done online on the whole dataset at once instead of incrementally in an Excel Console. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the ability to use them in complex combinations. Searches may also be saved as permanent URLs for easy reference or for use as a citation in a publication. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. Data from the MagIC database may be downloaded from individual contributions or from online searches for offline use and analysis in the tab delimited MagIC text file format. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  13. Multichannel analog front-end and analog-to-digital converter ICs for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Y. I.; Butuzov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Integrated circuit (IC) of multichannel analog front-end and a mixed-signal chip of multichannel analog-to-digital converter are presented. A chipset of these two ICs is intended for readout, analog preprocessing and analog to digital conversion of silicon photomultiplier array signals. The number of channels of the analog front-end IC as well as the types of their input stages depends on the application. The current test version of the chip contains three current-input channels and three voltage-input channels. Each of the channels includes a programmable pre-amplifier, integrator with baseline-holder, code-controlled amplifier, amplitude discriminator, two programmable timers, pulse-shaping low-pass filter, peak detector, and an output buffer with baseline tuning circuitry. The analog IC has code-configurable architecture. The mixed-signal IC includes nine main channels and one auxiliary channel, containing 10-bit analog-to-digital converter in each channel. It also has a buffer memory and a voltage reference. The chip features low power consumption, which is less than 0.5 mW per channel at a sampling rate of 100 kHz. Both ICs are implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS technology.

  14. 75 FR 51499 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C Systems The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Systems will hold a meeting on...--8:30 a.m. until 12 p.m. The Subcommittee will review Digital I&C Interim Staff Guidance on...

  15. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance

  16. A contact-lens-shaped IC chip technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ching-Yu; Yang, Frank; Teng, Chih-Chiao; Fan, Long-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    We report on novel contact-lens-shaped silicon integrated circuit chip technology for applications such as forming a conforming retinal prosthesis. This is achieved by means of patterning thin films of high residual stress on top of a shaped thin silicon substrate. Several strategies are employed to achieve curvatures of various amounts. Firstly, high residual stress on a thin film makes a thin chip deform into a designed three-dimensional shape. Also, a series of patterned stress films and ‘petal-shaped’ chips were fabricated and analyzed. Large curvatures can also be formed and maintained by the packaging process of bonding the chips to constraining elements such as thin-film polymer ring structures. As a demonstration, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS) image-sensing retina chip is made into a contact-lens shape conforming to a human eyeball 12.5 mm in radius. This non-planar and flexible chip technology provides a desirable device surface interface to soft tissues or non-planar bio surfaces and opens up many other possibilities for biomedical applications.

  17. Inhibition of human aromatase by myosmine.

    PubMed

    Doering, Irene L; Richter, Elmar

    2009-04-01

    Myosmine, a minor tobacco alkaloid widely occurring in food products of plant and animal origin, inhibits the conversion of testosterone to estradiol by human aromatase (IC(50): 33+/-2 microM) sevenfold more potent than nicotine (IC(50): 223+/-10 microM) and may have implications for sexual hormone homoeostasis.

  18. EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERACTION IN THE NEAREST STARBURSTING DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC 10

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E.; Ott, Jürgen; Johnson, Megan; Stanimirović, Snežana; Putman, Mary; Majewski, Steven R.; Jütte, Eva; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Burton, W. Butler

    2013-12-20

    Using deep 21 cm H I data from the Green Bank Telescope we have detected an ≳18.3 kpc long gaseous extension associated with the starbursting dwarf galaxy IC 10. The newly found feature stretches 1.°3 to the northwest and has a large radial velocity gradient reaching to ∼65 km s{sup –1} lower than the IC 10 systemic velocity. A region of higher column density at the end of the extension that possesses a coherent velocity gradient (∼10 km s{sup –1} across ∼26') transverse to the extension suggests rotation and may be a satellite galaxy of IC 10. The H I mass of IC 10 is 9.5 × 10{sup 7} (d/805 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉} and the mass of the new extension is 7.1 × 10{sup 5} (d/805 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉}. An IC 10-M31 orbit using known radial velocity and proper motion values for IC 10 show that the H I extension is inconsistent with the trailing portion of the orbit so that an M31-tidal or ram pressure origin seems unlikely. We argue that the most plausible explanation for the new feature is that it is the result of a recent interaction (and possible late merger) with another dwarf galaxy. This interaction could not only have triggered the origin of the recent starburst in IC 10, but could also explain the existence of previously found counter-rotating H I gas in the periphery of the IC 10 which was interpreted as originating from primordial gas infall.

  19. ICS logging solution for network-based attacks using Gumistix technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Jeremy R.; Berman, Dustin; Butts, Jonathan; Lopez, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Industrial Control Systems (ICS) monitor and control operations associated with the national critical infrastructure (e.g., electric power grid, oil and gas pipelines and water treatment facilities). These systems rely on technologies and architectures that were designed for system reliability and availability. Security associated with ICS was never an inherent concern, primarily due to the protections afforded by network isolation. However, a trend in ICS operations is to migrate to commercial networks via TCP/IP in order to leverage commodity benefits and cost savings. As a result, system vulnerabilities are now exposed to the online community. Indeed, recent research has demonstrated that many exposed ICS devices are being discovered using readily available applications (e.g., ShodanHQ search engine and Google-esque queries). Due to the lack of security and logging capabilities for ICS, most knowledge about attacks are derived from real world incidents after an attack has already been carried out and the damage has been done. This research provides a method for introducing sensors into the ICS environment that collect information about network-based attacks. The sensors are developed using an inexpensive Gumstix platform that can be deployed and incorporated with production systems. Data obtained from the sensors provide insight into attack tactics (e.g., port scans, Nessus scans, Metasploit modules, and zero-day exploits) and characteristics (e.g., attack origin, frequency, and level of persistence). Findings enable security professionals to draw an accurate, real-time awareness of the threats against ICS devices and help shift the security posture from reactionary to preventative.

  20. Impact of impurities on IC50 values of P450 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zeqi

    2011-08-01

    During early drug discovery, the synthetic pathways for test compounds are not well defined and impurities in the test compounds are inevitable. Compounds undergo serial screening tests at this stage to assess their biological activities and drug-like properties. Impurities in the test compounds can produce false positive results and therefore complicate the interpretation of data. P450 inhibition is one of the screens used in the early drug discovery process to assess the potential of drug-drug interactions caused by the inhibition of P450 enzymes. The impact of impurities on P450 inhibition has not been investigated. In this study, the impact of impurities on CYP2D6 IC(50) values was evaluated using model compounds. Cimetidine was chosen as the test compound. Quinidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and ibuprofen were chosen to represent impurities as they inhibit CYP2D6 to varying degrees. The IC(50) values of these model impurities for CYP2D6 were 0.11 µM, 0.98 µM, 13.4 µM, and >100 µM, respectively. Impurities with potent CYP2D6 inhibition, such as quinidine, can significantly decrease the apparent IC(50) value for the mixture. With the addition of only 2% quinidine to cimetidine (mol/mol), the apparent IC(50) value of cimetidine decreased from 98 µM to 4.4 µM. With the addition of 10% quinidine, the apparent IC(50) decreased to 1.04 µM. Such a significant decrease in apparent IC(50) values can produce a false alert and cause the inappropriate elimination of good compounds at an early stage. Impur6ities with low inhibitory potential, such as fluvoxamine and ibuprofen, did not cause a significant change in apparent IC(50) values. An impurity can have a similar effect on the IC(50) values for inhibition of other biological activities. The effect of an impurity on apparent IC(50) values can be predicted by using a simulation curve if the potency of the impurity is characterized.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Badarau, Adriana; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2008-02-01

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  2. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-02-11

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4(+) T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia.

  3. Determination of halogens and sulfur in high-purity polyimide by IC after digestion by MIC.

    PubMed

    Krzyzaniak, Sindy R; Santos, Rafael F; Dalla Nora, Flavia M; Cruz, Sandra M; Flores, Erico M M; Mello, Paola A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a method for sample preparation of high-purity polyimide was proposed for halogens and sulfur determination by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection and, alternatively, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A relatively high polyimide mass (600mg) was completely digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) using 20bar of O2 and 50mmolL(-1) NH4OH as absorbing solution. These conditions allowed final solutions with low carbon content (<10mgL(-1)) and suitable pH for analysis by both IC and ICP-MS. The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of polymer for Cl, Br and S and spike recovery experiments for all analytes. No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the results obtained for Cl, Br and S by IC after MIC and the certified values. In addition, spike recoveries obtained for F, Cl, Br, I and S ranged from 94% to 101%. The proposed method was suitable for polyimide decomposition for further determination of halogens and sulfur by IC and by ICP-MS (Br and I only). Taking into account the lack of methods and the difficulty of bringing this material into solution, MIC can be considered as a suitable alternative for the decomposition of polyimide for routine quality control of halogens and sulfur using IC or ICP-MS.

  4. A High-Resolution Radio Continuum Study Of The Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, J.; Brinks, E.; Beswick, R. J.; Heesen, V.; Argo, M. K.; Baldi, R. D.; Fenech, D. M.; McHardy, I. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Williams, D. R. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present high-resolution e-MERLIN radio continuum maps of the Dwarf Irregular galaxy IC 10 at 1.5 GHz and 5 GHz. We detect 11 compact sources at 1.5 GHz, 5 of which have complementary detections at 5 GHz. We classify 3 extended sources as compact HII regions within IC 10, 5 sources as contaminating background galaxies and identify 3 sources which require additional observations to classify. We do not expect that any of these 3 sources are Supernova Remnants as they will likely be resolved out at the assumed distance of IC 10 (0.7 Mpc). We correct integrated flux densities of IC 10 from the literature for contamination by unrelated background sources and obtain updated flux density measurements of 354 ± 11 mJy at 1.5 GHz and 199 ± 9 mJy at 4.85 GHz. The background contamination does not contribute significantly to the overall radio emission from IC 10, so previous analysis concerning its integrated radio properties remain valid.

  5. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  6. Optical observations of the broad-lined type Ic supernova SN 2012ap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Xu-Lin; Huang, Fang; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Chen, Jun-Cheng; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2015-02-01

    The optical observations of the type Ic supernova (SN Ic) SN 2012ap in NGC 1729 are presented. A comparison with other SNe Ic indicates that SN 2012ap is highly reddened (with E(B — V)host~0.8 mag) and may represent one of the most luminous SNe Ic ever observed, with an absolute V-band peak magnitude of ~ -19.3±0.5 mag after extinction correction. The near-maximum-light spectrum shows wide spectral features that are typical of broad-lined SNe Ic. One interesting feature in the spectrum is the appearance of some narrow absorption features that can be attributed to the diffuse interstellar bands, consistent with the large reddening inferred from the photometric method. Based on the light curves and the spectral data, we estimate that SN 2012ap produced a 56Ni mass of ~ 0.3 ± 0.1Msolar 1 in the explosion, with an ejecta mass of 2.4-0.7+0.7Msolar and a kinetic energy of EK = 1.1-0.4+0.4 × 1052 erg. The properties of its progenitor are also briefly discussed.

  7. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (≥0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (∼0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ∼10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  8. 50-Gb/s NRZ and RZ Modulator Driver ICs Based on Functional Distributed Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mamada, Masayuki

    We have developed two modulator driver ICs that are based on the functional distributed circuit (FDC) topology for over 40-Gb/s optical transmission systems using InP HBT technology. The FDC topology enables both a wide bandwidth amplifier and high-speed digital functions. The none-return-to-zero (NRZ) driver IC, which is integrated with a D-type flip-flop, exhibits 2.6-Vp-p (differential output: 5.2Vp-p) output-voltage swings with a high signal quality at 43 and 50Gb/s. The return-to-zero (RZ) driver IC, which is integrated with a NRZ to RZ converter, produces 2.4-Vp-p (differential output: 4.8Vp-p) output-voltage swings and excellent eye openings at 43 and 50Gb/s. Furthermore, we conducted electro-optical modulation experiments using the developed modulator driver ICs and a dual drive LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator. We were able to obtain NRZ and RZ clear optical eye openings with low jitters and sufficient extinction ratios of more than 12dB, at 43 and 50Gb/s. These results indicate that the FDC has the potential to achieve a large output voltage and create high-speed functional ICs for over-40-Gb/s transmission systems.

  9. A CCD color-magnitude diagram for the globular cluster IC 4499

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarajedini, Ata

    1993-01-01

    A color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based on CCD observations in B and V is presented for the Galactic globular cluster IC 4499. The CMD reaches the main-sequence turnoff and reveals a horizontal branch (HB) similar to that of M3 in morphology; however, RR Lyrae variables compose 68 percent of the HB stars in IC 4499. We find V(HB) = 17.68 +/- 0.03 mag and, after adopting a metal abundance of (Fe/H)=- 1.65 +/- 0.10, derive a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.15 +/- 0.03 using the color of the red giant branch. We show that the (B-V) color extent of the IC 4499 HB is significantly smaller than that of M3 and NGC 3201. In particular, the red HBs of these clusters appear morphologically indistinguishable, whereas the blue HBs of M3 and NGC 3201 are more extended than that of IC 4499. If this difference is due to a variation in the mass range along the blue HB, we estimate that, in the mean, stars on the blue HB of IC 4499 are at least roughly 0.02 solar mass more massive than similar stars in M3 and NGC 3201.

  10. Improvements to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of data uploading and editing, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Online data editing is now available and the need for proprietary spreadsheet software is therefore entirely negated. The data owner can change values in the database or delete entries through an HTML 5 web interface that resembles typical spreadsheets in behavior and uses. Additive uploading now allows for additions to data sets to be uploaded with a simple drag and drop interface. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the facility to use them in complex combinations. A comprehensive summary view of a search result has been added for increased quick data comprehension while a raw data view is available if one desires to see all data columns as stored in the database. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. MagIC data associated with individual contributions or from online searches may be downloaded in the tab delimited MagIC text file format for susbsequent offline use and analysis. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  11. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4+ T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia. PMID:26865417

  12. A nu-space for ICS: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells.

    PubMed

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency (ν, nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for STICS that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins (α6- and αLβ2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and ICAM ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrinligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results.

  13. A remotely-controlled locomotive IC driven by electrolytic bubbles and wireless powering.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jian-Yu; Kuo, Po-Hung; Huang, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Jie; Tsai, Rong-Da; Wang, Tao; Chiu, Hung-Wei; Wang, Yao-Hung; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2014-12-01

    A batteryless remotely-controlled locomotive IC utilizing electrolytic bubbles as propelling force is realized in 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Without any external components, such as magnets and on-board coils, the bare IC is wirelessly powered and controlled by a 10 MHz ASK modulated signal with RS232 control commands to execute movement in four moving directions and with two speeds. The receiving coil and electrolysis electrodes are all integrated on the locomotive chip. The experiment successfully demonstrated that the bare IC moved on the surface of an electrolyte with a speed up to 0.3 mm/s and change moving directions according to the commands. The total power consumptions of the chip are 207.4 μW and 180 μ W while the output electrolysis voltages are 2 V and 1.3 V, respectively.

  14. ASD IC for the thin gap chambers in the LHC Atlas experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Osamu; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    1999-12-01

    An amplifier-shaper-discriminator (ASD) chip was designed and built for Thin Gap Chambers in the forward muon trigger system of the LHC Atlas experiment. The ASD IC uses SONY Analog Master Slice bipolar technology. The IC contains 4 channels in a QFP48 package. The gain of its first stage (preamplifier) is approximately 0.8V/pC and output from the preamplifier is received by a shaper (main-amplifier) with a gain of 7. The baseline restoration circuit is incorporated in the main-amplifier. The threshold voltage for discriminator section is common to the 4 channels and their digital output level is LVDS-compatible. The IC also has analog output of the preamplifier. The equivalent noise charge at input capacitance of 150 pF is around 7,500 electrons. The power dissipation with LDVS outputs (100 {Omega} load) is 59mW/ch.

  15. Evidence for genetic modifiers of postnatal lethality in PWS-IC deletion mice.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Stormy J; Johnstone, Karen A; DuBose, Amanda J; Simon, Thomas A; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Resnick, James L; Brannan, Camilynn I

    2004-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), most notably characterized by infantile hypotonia, short stature and morbid obesity, results from deficiencies in multiple genes that are subject to genomic imprinting. The usefulness of current mouse models of PWS has been limited by postnatal lethality in affected mice. Here, we report the survival of the PWS-imprinting center (IC) deletion mice on a variety of strain backgrounds. Expression analyses of the genes affected in the PWS region suggest that while there is low-level expression from both parental alleles in PWS-IC deletion pups, this expression does not explain their survival on certain strain backgrounds. Rather, the data provide evidence for strain-specific modifier genes that support the survival of PWS-IC deletion mice.

  16. Men Working on Mock-Up of S-IC Thrust Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photograph depicts Marshall Space Flight Center employees, James Reagin, machinist (top); Floyd McGinnis, machinist; and Ernest Davis, experimental test mechanic (foreground), working on a mock up of the S-IC thrust structure. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of the 364-foot long Saturn V rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. The S-IC stage, burned over 15 tons of propellant per second during its 2.5 minutes of operation to take the vehicle to a height of about 36 miles and to a speed of about 6,000 miles per hour. The stage was 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust.

  17. QUALIFICATION OF THE SECOND ICS-3000 ION CHROMATOGRAPH FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

    2009-12-03

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification testing was a head to head comparison of the second ICS-3000 with the initial ICS-3000 system that was installed in 221-S M-13. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has recently replaced the Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems that had been used since 1998 by the first of two new ICS-3000 systems. The replacement effort was necessary due to the vendor of the DX-500 systems no longer supporting service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000

  18. SUPER-LUMINOUS TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE: CATCHING A MAGNETAR BY THE TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Smith, K.; Chen, T.-W.; Kotak, R.; Nicholl, M.; Valenti, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Botticella, M. T.; Ergon, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; and others

    2013-06-20

    We report extensive observational data for five of the lowest redshift Super-Luminous Type Ic Supernovae (SL-SNe Ic) discovered to date, namely, PTF10hgi, SN2011ke, PTF11rks, SN2011kf, and SN2012il. Photometric imaging of the transients at +50 to +230 days after peak combined with host galaxy subtraction reveals a luminous tail phase for four of these SL-SNe. A high-resolution, optical, and near-infrared spectrum from xshooter provides detection of a broad He I {lambda}10830 emission line in the spectrum (+50 days) of SN2012il, revealing that at least some SL-SNe Ic are not completely helium-free. At first sight, the tail luminosity decline rates that we measure are consistent with the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co, and would require 1-4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni to produce the luminosity. These {sup 56}Ni masses cannot be made consistent with the short diffusion times at peak, and indeed are insufficient to power the peak luminosity. We instead favor energy deposition by newborn magnetars as the power source for these objects. A semi-analytical diffusion model with energy input from the spin-down of a magnetar reproduces the extensive light curve data well. The model predictions of ejecta velocities and temperatures which are required are in reasonable agreement with those determined from our observations. We derive magnetar energies of 0.4 {approx}< E(10{sup 51} erg) {approx}< 6.9 and ejecta masses of 2.3 {approx}< M{sub ej}(M{sub Sun }) {approx}< 8.6. The sample of five SL-SNe Ic presented here, combined with SN 2010gx-the best sampled SL-SNe Ic so far-points toward an explosion driven by a magnetar as a viable explanation for all SL-SNe Ic.

  19. DIONEX ICS3000 ION CHROMATOGRAPHY SYSTEM INSTALLATION AND INSTRUMENT ASSESSMENT FOR SRNL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenman, B.; White, T.

    2009-11-16

    Ion Chromatography (IC) is routinely used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for sample analysis and characterization. Results from IC analysis are valued in corrosion control maintenance and measurement programs, remediation waste process control, soil and ground water measurement, nuclear materials processing, and various other research and development programs. Presented in this report are analytical methods developed on a DIONEX ICS3000 Reagent Free Ion Chromatography (RFIC) system located in AD at SRNL. This IC system contains two independent analysis channels comprising of a mobile phase generator, a pump, stationary phase columns, a suppressor and a conductivity detector. One channel is dedicated to anion analysis using Potassium Hydroxide (KOH) as the mobile phase while a second channel is configured for cation analysis using Methanesulfonic Acid (MSA) as the mobile phase. Both channels share an autosampler and the peak analysis software, Chromeleon{reg_sign} v.6.8. Instrument configuration is modified from the manufacturer for radiological service. Listed within this report are Dionex ICS3000 parameters and results for the analysis of routine anions and cations. Additional method parameters and discussion are presented on the analysis of Acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}) and Iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}). Previous IC analysis instruments at AD have been based upon carbonate/bicarbonate buffer mobile phase chemistry. This report represents a transition to hydroxide as a mobile phase eluent. The hydroxide eluent offers a lower baseline conductivity, which allows for greater sample dilution and/or lower detection limits. Also the hydroxide mobile phase and column set has a significant separation of the phosphate peak from the nitrate and sulfate peaks vs. the carbonate/bicarbonate mobile phase and column set, an advantage for the industrial waste analyzed at SRNL.

  20. Poly I:C induces development of diabetes mellitus in BB rat.

    PubMed

    Sobel, D O; Newsome, J; Ewel, C H; Bellanti, J A; Abbassi, V; Creswell, K; Blair, O

    1992-04-01

    Polyinosinic polycytidilic acid (poly I:C), an inducer of alpha-interferon, accelerates the development of diabetes in diabetes-prone (DP) BioBreeding (BB) rats. This study investigates the effect of administering poly I:C to a diabetes-resistant (DR) strain of BB rats. We compared the incidence of diabetes, the degree of insulitis, the number of NK cells, helper-inducer cells, cytotoxic-suppressor cells, Ia+ T cells, RT6.1+ T cells, and NK cell bioactivity in DR rats treated with saline and with a 5 micrograms/g body wt (poly-5) dose and a 10 micrograms/g body wt (poly-10) dose of poly I:C. The incidence of diabetes was also compared with that of DP rats receiving poly-5. We found that both doses of poly I:C significantly induce the development of diabetes in the DR BB rat. However, treatment of DR rats with the higher dose induces a greater rate of development of diabetes and earlier onset of diabetes than the lower poly-5 dose. The rate of diabetes development and the mean age of onset were similar in poly-10-treated DR and poly-5-treated DP rats. A significant degree of insulitis occurred in all the poly I:C-treated DR rats, even those not developing diabetes. Peripheral blood NK cell number was greater in poly I:C than in saline-treated rats, after 2 wk of treatment and when killed. The percentage of OX19+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing RT6.1 allotype or Ia antigen were similar in poly I:C- and saline-treated rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Potential Sources of the 1995 Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Subtype IC Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Aaron C.; Powers, Ann M.; Medina, Gladys; Wang, Eryu; Kang, Wenli; Salas, Rosa Alba; De Siger, Julieta; Weaver, Scott C.

    2001-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV) belonging to subtype IC have caused three (1962–1964, 1992–1993 and 1995) major equine epizootics and epidemics. Previous sequence analyses of a portion of the envelope glycoprotein gene demonstrated a high degree of conservation among isolates from the 1962–1964 and the 1995 outbreaks, as well as a 1983 interepizootic mosquito isolate from Panaquire, Venezuela. However, unlike subtype IAB VEEV that were used to prepare inactivated vaccines that probably initiated several outbreaks, subtype IC viruses have not been used for vaccine production and their conservation cannot be explained in this way. To characterize further subtype IC VEEV conservation and to evaluate potential sources of the 1995 outbreak, we sequenced the complete genomes of three isolates from the 1962–1964 outbreak, the 1983 Panaquire interepizootic isolate, and two isolates from 1995. The sequence of the Panaquire isolate, and that of virus isolated from a mouse brain antigen prepared from subtype IC strain P676 and used in the same laboratory, suggested that the Panaquire isolate represents a laboratory contaminant. Some authentic epizootic IC strains isolated 32 years apart showed a greater degree of sequence identity than did isolates from the same (1962–1964 or 1995) outbreak. If these viruses were circulating and replicating between 1964 and 1995, their rate of sequence evolution was at least 10-fold lower than that estimated during outbreaks or that of closely related enzootic VEEV strains that circulate continuously. Current understanding of alphavirus evolution is inconsistent with this conservation. This subtype IC VEEV conservation, combined with phylogenetic relationships, suggests the possibility that the 1995 outbreak was initiated by a laboratory strain. PMID:11390583

  2. Size Distribution of Star Clusters and Stellar Groups in IC2574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Anne; Meyer, Martin J.; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS archival study of compact and dispersed star clusters and stellar groups found in the nearby galaxy IC 2574. In this work, we identified and characterized the properties of clusters with spatially unresolved stars. We combined these properties with those found in a companion work on the dispersed stellar groups in IC 2574 with spatially resolved stars. We find that the size distribution of all young stellar groups, sparse and compact together, is consistent with the hierarchical model of star formation.

  3. Illuminating the Depths of the MagIC (Magnetics Information Consortium) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.; Minnett, R.; Jarboe, N.; Jonestrask, L.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the paleo-, geo-, and rock magnetic scientific community. Its mission is to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from magnetics studies on natural and synthetic samples. Many of these valuable data are legacy datasets that were never published in their entirety, some resided in other databases that are no longer maintained, and others were never digitized from the field notebooks and lab work. Due to the volume of data collected, most studies, modern and legacy, only publish the interpreted results and, occasionally, a subset of the raw data. MagIC is making an extraordinary effort to archive these data in a single data model, including the raw instrument measurements if possible. This facilitates the reproducibility of the interpretations, the re-interpretation of the raw data as the community introduces new techniques, and the compilation of heterogeneous datasets that are otherwise distributed across multiple formats and physical locations. MagIC has developed tools to assist the scientific community in many stages of their workflow. Contributors easily share studies (in a private mode if so desired) in the MagIC Database with colleagues and reviewers prior to publication, publish the data online after the study is peer reviewed, and visualize their data in the context of the rest of the contributions to the MagIC Database. From organizing their data in the MagIC Data Model with an online editable spreadsheet, to validating the integrity of the dataset with automated plots and statistics, MagIC is continually lowering the barriers to transforming dark data into transparent and reproducible datasets. Additionally, this web application generalizes to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so that the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences

  4. Piezo-fluidic Gaseous Fuel MPI System for Natural Gas Fuelled IC Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui

    A fast response piezo-fluidic gaseous fuel injector system designed for natural gas fuelled internal combustion (IC) engines is described in this paper. The system consists mainly of no moving part fluidic gas injector and piezo controlling interface. It can be arranged as a multi-point injection (MPI) system for IC engine fuel control. Both steady state and dynamic characteristics were investigated on a laboratory test rig. A comprehensive jet attachment and switching simulation model was also developed and reported. The agreement between predicted and experimental results is shown to be good.

  5. An HI and Optical Study of Interacting Galaxies NGC 672 and IC 1727

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchfield, Sara; Wilcots, E.; Prescott, M.

    2012-05-01

    We present VLA HI radio data and WIYN broadband optical observations of NGC 672 and IC 1727, two nearby, late-type, spiral galaxies. In the optical NGC 672 appears as a symmetric barred spiral with defined spiral arms and a scale length of 1.2 kpc. IC 1727 is asymmetric, lacks a true bar, and has a scale length of 2. 4 kpc. In the HI, we see tidal bridge, indicating interaction between the two galaxies. We map the distribution and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen gas in order to understand the nature of the true distribution of mass in these systems and present the resulting mass models.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex Bunker House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC stand, additional related facilities were built during this time frame. Built to the east of the S-IC stand, the block house served as the control room. To the south of the blockhouse was a newly constructed pump house used for delivering water to the S-IC stand during testing. North of the massive test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built for testing a single F-1 engine. Just southeast of the S-IC stand a concrete bunker house was constructed. The bunker housed

  7. Determining the size and concentration dependence of gold nanoparticles in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) test using WST-1 assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Nur Shafawati binti; Rahman, Azhar Abdul; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Shamsuddin, Shaharum

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) received a great deal of attention for biomedical applications, especially in diagnostic imaging and therapeutics. Even though AuNPs have potential benefits in biomedical applications, the impact of AuNPs on human and environmental health still remains unclear. The use of AuNPs which is a high-atomic-number materials, provide advantages in terms of radiation dose enhancement. However, before this can become a clinical reality, cytotoxicity of the AuNPs has to be carefully evaluated. Cytotoxicity test is a rapid, standardized test that is very sensitive to determine whether the nanoparticles produced are harmful or benign on cellular components. In this work the size and concentration dependence of AuNPs cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) are tested by using WST-1 assay. The sizes of AuNPs tested were 13 nm, 50 nm, and 70 nm. The cells were seeded in the 96-well plate and were treated with different concentrations of AuNPs by serial dilution for each size of AuNPs. The high concentration of AuNPs exhibit lower cell viability compared to low concentration of AuNPs. We quantified the toxicity of AuNPs in MCF-7 cell lines by determining the IC50 values in WST-1 assays. The IC50 values (inhibitory concentrations that effected 50% growth inhibition) of 50 nm AuNPs is lower than 13 nm and 70 nm AuNPs. Mean that, 50nm AuNPs are more toxic to the MCF-7 cells compared to smaller and larger sizes AuNPs. The presented results clearly indicate that the cytotoxicity of AuNPs depend not only on the concentration, but also the size of the nanoparticles.

  8. Intact cell/intact spore mass spectrometry (IC/ISMS) on polymer-based, nano-coated disposable targets.

    PubMed

    Bugovsky, Stefan; Winkler, Wolfgang; Balika, Werner; Koranda, Manfred; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Identification and differentiation of microorganisms has and still is a long arduous task, involving culturing of the organism in question on different growth media. This procedure, which is still commonly applied, is an established method, but takes a lot of time, up to several days or even longer. It has thus been a great achievement when other analytical tools like matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry were introduced for faster analysis based on the surface protein pattern. Differentiation and identification of human pathogens as well as plant/animal pathogens is of increasing importance in medical care (e.g. infection, sepsis, and antibiotics resistance), biotechnology, food sciences and detection of biological warfare agents. A distinction between microorganisms on the species and strain level was made by comparing peptide/protein profiles to patterns already stored in databases. These profiles and patterns were obtained from the surface of vegetative forms of microorganisms or even their spores by MALDI MS. Thus, an unknown sample can be compared against a database of known pathogens or microorganisms of interest. To benefit from newly available, metal-based disposable microscope-slide format MALDI targets that promise a clean and even surface at a fraction of the cost from full metal targets or MTP (microtiter plate) format targets, IC/ISMS analysis was performed on these and the data evaluated. Various types of bacteria as well as fungal spores were identified unambiguously on this disposable new type of metal nano-coated targets. The method even allowed differentiation between strains of the same species. The results were compared with those gained from using full metal standard targets and found to be equal or even better in several aspects, making the use of disposable MALDI targets a viable option for use in IC/ISMS, especially e.g. for large sample throughput and highly pathogenic species.

  9. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. V.; Mavritskii, O. B.; Egorov, A. N.; Pechenkin, A. A.; Savchenkov, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed.

  10. ON THE ANCESTRY OF THE ICS CLONES OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theobroma cacao L. or cacao is a tropical fruit tree species cultivated as the source of cocoa butter and powder for the confectionery and cosmetic industries. The ICS (Imperial College Selections) are cacao clones of Trinidad and Tobago that were selected by F.J. Pound from 1933 to 1935 from farms ...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22104 - Open flames (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open flames (I-C mines). 57.22104 Section 57.22104 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... mine opening is covered. The cover shall be a substantial material, such as metal or wood, topped...

  12. Biosynthesis of the lipophilic side chain in the cyclic hexadepsipeptide antibiotic IC101.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Kazuo; Ikeda, Yoko; Naganawa, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    Antibiotic IC101 is a cyclic hexadepsipeptide having a C(15) lipophilic side chain. The side chain was shown to be synthesized in Streptomyces from acetate, propionate, and 3-methylbutyrate derived from leucine. Thus, the terminal isopentyl structure came from leucine and not from the mevalonate pathway.

  13. Using Tablet PCs and Interactive Software in IC Design Courses to Improve Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an initial study of using tablet PCs and interactive course software in integrated circuit (IC) design courses. A rapidly growing community is demonstrating how this technology can improve learning and retention of material by facilitating interaction between faculty and students via cognitive exercises during lectures. While…

  14. Blue Supergiant X-Ray Binaries in the Nearby Dwarf Galaxy IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Binder, Breanna; Prestwich, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In young starburst galaxies, the X-ray population is expected to be dominated by the relics of the most massive and short-lived stars, black hole and neutron-star high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). In the closest such galaxy, IC 10, we have made a multi-wavelength census of these objects. Employing a novel statistical correlation technique, we have matched our list of 110 X-ray point sources, derived from a decade of Chandra observations, against published photometric data. We report an 8σ correlation between the celestial coordinates of the two catalogs, with 42 X-ray sources having an optical counterpart. Applying an optical color–magnitude selection to isolate blue supergiant (SG) stars in IC 10, we find 16 matches. Both cases show a statistically significant overabundance versus the expectation value for chance alignments. The blue objects also exhibit systematically higher {f}x/{f}v ratios than other stars in the same magnitude range. Blue SG-XRBs include a major class of progenitors of double-degenerate binaries, hence their numbers are an important factor in modeling the rate of gravitational-wave sources. We suggest that the anomalous features of the IC 10 stellar population are explained if the age of the IC 10 starburst is close to the time of the peak of interaction for massive binaries.

  15. Sensitivity of drug-resistant mutants of hepatitis B virus to poly-IC.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Chen, E; Chen, L; Nong, Y; Cheng, X; He, M; Tang, H

    2014-01-01

    The long-term benefits of antiviral treatment are limited by the resistance of hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, the effect of interferon (IFN)α treatment on drug-resistant HBVs is so far unknown. We, therefore, investigated the effects of IFN-α inducer poly-IC on the replication of HBV mutants resistant to drugs such as lamivudine (LAM), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and entecavir (ETV) in mice. HBV DNA and HBV DNA intermediate (RI) were employed as markers of the virus replication and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) mRNA as a marker of IFN-α/β induction. Poly-IC inhibited wtHBV replication and increased levels of OAS mRNA. Compared to the wt virus, the capacity of virus replication was reduced in most LAMr and ETVr mutants except those with mutations rtM(204V+L180M+V173L), and was similary in the ADVr mutants except rt(A121V+N236T). The virus replication was reduced after poly-IC treatment with LAMr and ADVr mutants similary to the wt virus. In contrast, ETVr mutants were resistant to the poly-IC treatment. In conclusion, the capacity of HBV replication and the sensitivity to IFN therapy are influenced by drug-resistant mutations. The IFN therapy may effectively inhibit HBV replication in particular in patients with LAMr or ADVr mutations but not in patients with ETVr mutations.

  16. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  17. Advanced digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants: Risk- sensitivities to environmental stressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1996-06-01

    Microprocessor-based advanced digital systems are being used for upgrading analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. A concern with using such advanced systems for safety-related applications in NPPs is the limited experience with this equipment in these environments. In this study, we investigate the risk effects of environmental stressors by quantifying the plant`s risk-sensitivities to them. The risk- sensitivities are changes in plant risk caused by the stressors, and are quantified by estimating their effects on I&C failure occurrences and the consequent increase in risk in terms of core damage frequency (CDF). We used available data, including military and NPP operating experience, on the effects of environmental stressors on the reliability of digital I&C equipment. The methods developed are applied to determine and compare risk-sensitivities to temperature, humidity, vibration, EMI (electromagnetic interference) from lightning and smoke as stressors in an example plant using a PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment). Uncertainties in the estimates of the stressor effects on the equipment`s reliability are expressed in terms of ranges for risk-sensitivities. The results show that environmental stressors potentially can cause a significant increase in I&C contributions to the CDF. Further, considerable variations can be expected in some stressor effects, depending on where the equipment is located.

  18. The red extended structure of IC 10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A. N.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-11-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC 10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and near infrared JHK imaging from United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Camera to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC 10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, starbursting population and the asymptotic giant branch population are both offset from the geometric centre of the older red giant branch (RGB) population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the centre of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ˜5.75 arcmin (˜1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC 10 is much more extended than has previously been realized, and this blue compact galaxy is one of the most extended dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The outermost isophotes of this galaxy are very regular in shape and essentially circular in morphology. Based on this analysis, we do not find any evidence to suggest that IC 10 has undergone a recent, significant, interaction with an unknown companion.

  19. 30 CFR 57.22209 - Auxiliary fans (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22209 Auxiliary fans (I-C mines.... Tests for methane shall be made at electric auxiliary fans before they are started. Such fans shall not be operated when air passing over or through them contains 0.5 percent or more methane....

  20. The next generation in optical transport semiconductors: IC solutions at the system level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Badri N.

    2005-02-01

    In this tutorial overview, we survey some of the challenging problems facing Optical Transport and their solutions using new semiconductor-based technologies. Advances in 0.13um CMOS, SiGe/HBT and InP/HBT IC process technologies and mixed-signal design strategies are the fundamental breakthroughs that have made these solutions possible. In combination with innovative packaging and transponder/transceiver architectures IC approaches have clearly demonstrated enhanced optical link budgets with simultaneously lower (perhaps the lowest to date) cost and manufacturability tradeoffs. This paper will describe: *Electronic Dispersion Compensation broadly viewed as the overcoming of dispersion based limits to OC-192 links and extending link budgets, *Error Control/Coding also known as Forward Error Correction (FEC), *Adaptive Receivers for signal quality monitoring for real-time estimation of Q/OSNR, eye-pattern, signal BER and related temporal statistics (such as jitter). We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of these receiver and transmitter architectures, provide examples of system performance and conclude with general market trends. These Physical layer IC solutions represent a fundamental new toolbox of options for equipment designers in addressing systems level problems. With unmatched cost and yield/performance tradeoffs, it is expected that IC approaches will provide significant flexibility in turn, for carriers and service providers who must ultimately manage the network and assure acceptable quality of service under stringent cost constraints.

  1. A Planar IC-Compatible Transferred Electron Device for Millimeter-Wave Operation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    RD-RI92 702 R PLRNAR IC-COMPRTIBLE TRANSFERRED ELECTRONI DEVICE FOR III MILLIMETER-UMV OPERRTION(U) JOHANNES KEPLER UNIV LINZ (AUSTRIA...lower in a shorter gate region. Personnel Dr. Kurt Lubke, Helmut Scheiber, Thomas Neugebauer, Christoph Schonherr, Gabriele Roitmayr and Johann

  2. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3–modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ~5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4–5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  3. On the Spin of the Black Hole in IC 10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, James F.; Walton, Dominic J.; García, Javier A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Laycock, Silas G. T.; Middleton, Matthew J.; Barnard, Robin; Madsen, Kristin K.

    2016-02-01

    The compact X-ray source in the eclipsing X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has reigned for years as ostensibly the most massive stellar-mass black hole, with a mass estimated to be about twice that of its closest rival. However, striking results presented recently by Laycock et al. reveal that the mass estimate, based on emission-line velocities, is unreliable and that the mass of the X-ray source is essentially unconstrained. Using Chandra and NuSTAR data, we rule against a neutron-star model and conclude that IC 10 X-1 contains a black hole. The eclipse duration of IC 10 X-1 is shorter and its depth shallower at higher energies, an effect consistent with the X-ray emission being obscured during eclipse by a Compton-thick core of a dense wind. The spectrum is strongly disk-dominated, which allows us to constrain the spin of the black hole via X-ray continuum fitting. Three other wind-fed black hole systems are known; the masses and spins of their black holes are high: M˜ 10{--}15{M}⊙ and {a}*\\gt 0.8. If the mass of IC 10 X-1's black hole is comparable, then its spin is likewise high.

  4. 30 CFR 57.22209 - Auxiliary fans (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22209 Auxiliary fans (I-C mines.... Tests for methane shall be made at electric auxiliary fans before they are started. Such fans shall not be operated when air passing over or through them contains 0.5 percent or more methane....

  5. The use of light emission in failure analysis of CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, C.F. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Soden, J.M.; Cole, E.I. Jr.; Snyder, E.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The use of photon emission for analyzing failure mechanisms and defects in CMOS ICs is presented. Techniques are given for accurate identification and spatial localization of failure mechanisms and physical defects, including defects such as short and open circuits which do not themselves emit photons.

  6. The Evolution of Stellar Coronae: Initial Results from a ROSAT PSPC Observation of IC 2391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, Brian M.; Simon, Theodore

    1993-01-01

    A 23 ks ROSAT PSPC image of the young star cluster, IC 2391, reveals 76 soft x-ray sources with L(sub x)(0.2-2.0 keV) greater than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 28) ergs/s in the direction of the cluster center. Nineteen of these sources are associated with known cluster members. We find that x-ray emission from the IC 2391 B stars deviates widely from the L(sub x)/L(sub bol) = 10(exp -7) relation based on Einstein observations of O and early B stars. Instead, we observe a wide range in L(sub x) with an order of magnitude spread at any given mass and no apparent dependence on spectral type. A comparison of the spread of L(sub x) as a function of B-V for low-mass stars between IC 2391 and the much older Hyades cluster shows that despite the factor of approx. 10 difference in their ages, these two clusters exhibit very similar dispersions in levels of stellar activity. We conclude that the low-mass stars in IC 2391 have arrived on the ZAMS with a wide range of coronal activity levels, from very strong to very weak, and that existing empirical activity-age scaling laws therefore cannot be valid.

  7. Long-term photometry of IC 348 with the Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzewski, D. J.; Kitze, M.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Adam, C.; Briceño, C.; Buder, S.; Butterley, T.; Chen, W.-P.; Dinçel, B.; Dhillon, V. S.; Errmann, R.; Garai, Z.; Gilbert, H. F. W.; Ginski, C.; Greif, J.; Hardy, L. K.; Hernández, J.; Huang, P. C.; Kellerer, A.; Kundra, E.; Littlefair, S. P.; Mallonn, M.; Marka, C.; Pannicke, A.; Pribulla, T.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, J. G.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Wilson, R. W.; Wolf, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present long-term photometric observations of the young open cluster IC 348 with a baseline time-scale of 2.4 yr. Our study was conducted with several telescopes from the Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (YETI) network in the Bessel R band to find periodic variability of young stars. We identified 87 stars in IC 348 to be periodically variable; 33 of them were unreported before. Additionally, we detected 61 periodic non-members of which 41 are new discoveries. Our wide field of view was the key to those numerous newly found variable stars. The distribution of rotation periods in IC 348 has always been of special interest. We investigate it further with our newly detected periods but we cannot find a statistically significant bimodality. We also report the detection of a close eclipsing binary in IC 348 composed of a low-mass stellar component (M ≳ 0.09 M⊙) and a K0 pre-main-sequence star (M ≈ 2.7 M⊙). Furthermore, we discovered three detached binaries among the background stars in our field of view and confirmed the period of a fourth one.

  8. Installation of C-6533(XE-2)/ARC ICS in UH-1H helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnat, J. A.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents the results of the installation of the C-6533(XE-2)/ARC ICS in UH-1H helicopter. Installation was performed at the AEL, Inc., Monmouth County Airport facility. Design of each installation was coordinated and approved by the Government. The mechanical and electrical installation drawings for the helicopter are attached as Appendix A of this report. The new ICS system consisted of new cabling, new intercoms and helmets rewired with new microphones. All four crew stations of the helicopter were reconfigured with the new system. Existing cabling for the standard ICS system remained in the aircraft but was securely stowed for later restoration of the aircraft. The helmets (4) were rewired using separate jacks for headphones and microphone lines. Transmit and receive cables were installed in the aircraft with a minimum separation of one inch between cables. A junction box was fabricated and installed on the aft end of the console to house the fan-out terminal strips. Transmit and receive lines' separation was maintained in the junction box. During the test phase the onboard radios were used with the new ICS system.

  9. Results from KMOS: Unravelling the origin of the counter-rotating core in IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prichard, Laura

    2015-08-01

    IC 1459 is the archetype of a massive early-type galaxy with a rapidly counter-rotating core. Previous studies of IC 1459 have revealed the outer part of the galaxy and the ionized gas in the central region are rotating in one direction, while the central stellar component is rapidly rotating in the opposite direction. We present new NIR integral field spectroscopic data from the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) on the VLT. NIR observations help probe through the dense gas and dust at the centre of this E3 galaxy to study the kinematically distinct stellar core. By combining the 24 integral field units of KMOS to make a 67” by 44” mosaic, we generate over 4500 spectra spanning this bright galaxy. We use this data to trace the kinematics and study the stellar populations of IC 1459 to better understand the origin of the counter-rotating core. In particular, we study dwarf-sensitive absorption features to place constraints on the spatial variation of the initial mass function. Investigating IC 1459 provides insights into how early-type galaxies evolve from high redshift to the local Universe. We present results from this work and demonstrate the science capabilities and potential of KMOS.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  11. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I, 16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (MV=+3.4) and I=27.1 (MI=+2.8) at the 50% completeness level, the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. We analyze the resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and compare it with CMDs created from theoretical stellar models using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH) as well as constrain the chemical evolution for IC 1613. All three methods find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), at roughly the same magnitude (factor of 3), over roughly the same period (from 3 to 6 Gyr ago). Additionally, all three methods were driven to similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR) that show an increase from [Fe/H]~-1.3 at earliest times to [Fe/H]~-0.7 at present. Good agreement is found between the AMR which is derived from the CMD analysis and that which can be inferred from the derived SFH at all but the earliest ages. The agreement between the three models and the self-consistency of the derived chemical enrichment history support the reality of the derived SFH of IC 1613 and, more generally, are supportive of the practice of constructing galaxy SFHs from CMDs. A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present-day galaxies should take this effect into account. Comparing the CMD of the outer field of IC 1613 with CMDs of Milky Way dSph companions, we find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant dSph companions (Carina, Fornax, Leo I, and Leo II) in that all are dominated

  12. The defective nature of ice Ic and its implications for atmospheric science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, W. F.; Hansen, T. C.

    2009-04-01

    The possible atmospheric implication of ice Ic (cubic ice) has already been suggested some time ago in the context of snow crystal formation [1]. New findings from air-borne measurements in cirrus clouds and contrails have put ice Ic into the focus of interest to understand the so-called "supersaturation puzzle" [2,3,4,5]. Our recent microstructural work on ice Ic [6,7] appears to be highly relevant in this context. We have found that ice Ic is characterized by a complex stacking fault pattern, which changes as a function of temperature as well as time. Indeed, from our own [8] and other group's work [9] one knows that (in contrast to earlier believe) ice Ic can form up to temperatures at least as high as 240K - thus in the relevant range for cirrus clouds. We have good preliminary evidence that the "cubicity" (which can be related to stacking fault probabilities) as well as the particle size of ice Ic are the relevant parameters for this correlation. The "cubicity" of stacking faulty ice Ic (established by diffraction) correlates nicely with the increased supersaturation at decreasing temperatures observed in cirrus clouds and contrails, a fact, which may be considered as further evidence for the presence of ice Ic. Moreover, the stacking faults lead to kinks in the outer shapes of the minute ice Ic crystals as seen by cryo scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM); these defective sites are likely to play some role in heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere. The cryo-SEM work suggests that stacking-faulty ice Ic has many more active centres for such reactions than the usually considered thermodynamically stable form, ice Ih. [1] T Kobayashi & T Kuroda (1987) Snow Crystals. In: Morphology of Crystals (ed. I Sunagawa), Terra Scientific Publishing, Tokyo, pp.649-743. [2] DM Murphy (2003) Dehydration in cold clouds is enhanced by a transition from from cubic to hexagonal ice. Geophys.Res.Lett.,30, 2230, doi:10.1029/2003GL018566. [3] RS Gao & 19 other authors (2004

  13. NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1: a new breed of black hole binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.; Clark, J. S.; Kolb, U. C.

    2008-09-01

    Context: IC 10 X-1 has recently been confirmed as a black hole (BH) + Wolf-Rayet (WR) X-ray binary, and NGC 300 X-1 is thought to be. The only other known BH+WR candidate is Cygnus X-3. IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1 have similar X-ray properties, with 0.3-10 keV luminosities ~1038 erg s-1, and their X-ray lightcurves exhibit orbital periods ~30 h. Aims: We investigate similarities between IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1, as well as differences between these systems and the known Galactic BH binary systems. Methods: We have examined all four XMM-Newton observations of NGC 300 X-1, as well as the single XMM-Newton observation of IC 10 X-1. For each observation, we extracted lightcurves and spectra from the pn, MOS1 and MOS2 cameras; power density spectra were constructed from the lightcurves, and the X-ray emission spectra were modeled. Results: Each source exhibits power density spectra that are well described by a power law with index, γ, ~1. Such variability is characteristic of turbulence in wind accretion or disc-accreting X-ray binaries (XBs) in the high state. In this state, Galactic XBs with known BH primaries have soft, thermal emission; however the emission spectra of NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1 in the XMM-Newton observations are predominantly non-thermal. Furthermore, the Observation 1 spectrum of NGC 300 X-1 is strikingly similar to that of IC 10 X-1. Conclusions: The remarkable similarity between the behaviour of NGC 300 X-1 in Observation 1 and that of IC 10 X-1 lends strong evidence for NGC 300 X-1 being a BH+WR binary. Our spectral modeling rules out Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a neutron star (NS) for NGC 300 X-1, but not a disc-accreting NS+WR system, nor a NS low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is merely coincident with the WR. We favour disc accretion for both systems, but cannot exclude Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a BH. The unusual spectra of NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1 may be due to these systems existing in a persistently high state, whereas all known BH LMXBs

  14. Identification of Ambient Molecular Clouds Associated with Galactic Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Snell, Ronald L.; Yun, Min S.; Heyer, Mark H.; Burton, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 is one of the most studied core-collapse SNRs for its interaction with molecular clouds. However, the ambient molecular clouds with which IC 443 is interacting have not been thoroughly studied and remain poorly understood. Using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope, we obtained fully sampled maps of the ~1° × 1° region toward IC 443 in the 12CO J = 1-0 and HCO+ J = 1-0 lines. In addition to the previously known molecular clouds in the velocity range v LSR = -6 to -1 km s-1 (-3 km s-1 clouds), our observations reveal two new ambient molecular cloud components: small (~1') bright clouds in v LSR = -8 to -3 km s-1 (SCs) and diffuse clouds in v LSR = +3 to +10 km s-1 (+5 km s-1 clouds). Our data also reveal the detailed kinematics of the shocked molecular gas in IC 443 however, the focus of this paper is the physical relationship between the shocked clumps and the ambient cloud components. We find strong evidence that the SCs are associated with the shocked clumps. This is supported by the positional coincidence of the SCs with shocked clumps and other tracers of shocks. Furthermore, the kinematic features of some shocked clumps suggest that these are the ablated material from the SCs upon the impact of the SNR shock. The SCs are interpreted as dense cores of parental molecular clouds that survived the destruction by the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor star or its nearby stars. We propose that the expanding SNR shock is now impacting some of the remaining cores and the gas is being ablated and accelerated, producing the shocked molecular gas. The morphology of the +5 km s-1 clouds suggests an association with IC 443. On the other hand, the -3 km s-1 clouds show no evidence for interaction.

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Excavation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken July 13, 1961, progress is made with the excavation and preparation of the S-IC test stand site.

  16. Solving the 56Ni Puzzle of Magnetar-powered Broad-lined Type IC Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling-Jun; Han, Yan-Hui; Xu, Dong; Wang, Shan-Qin; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Wei, Jian-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL) are of great importance because their association with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) holds the key to deciphering the central engine of LGRBs, which refrains from being unveiled despite decades of investigation. Among the two popularly hypothesized types of central engine, i.e., black holes and strongly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars), there is mounting evidence that the central engine of GRB-associated SNe (GRB-SNe) is rapidly rotating magnetars. Theoretical analysis also suggests that magnetars could be the central engine of SNe Ic-BL. What puzzled the researchers is the fact that light-curve modeling indicates that as much as 0.2{--}0.5 {M}⊙ of 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion of the SNe Ic-BL, which is unfortunately in direct conflict with current state-of-the-art understanding of magnetar-powered 56Ni synthesis. Here we propose a dynamic model of magnetar-powered SNe to take into account the acceleration of the ejecta by the magnetar, as well as the thermalization of the injected energy. Assuming that the SN kinetic energy comes exclusively from the magnetar acceleration, we find that although a major fraction of the rotational energy of the magnetar is to accelerate the SN ejecta, a tiny fraction of this energy deposited as thermal energy of the ejecta is enough to reduce the needed 56Ni to 0.06 M ⊙ for both SN 1997ef and SN 2007ru. We therefore suggest that magnetars could power SNe Ic-BL in aspects both of energetics and of 56Ni synthesis.

  17. Liposomal Bladder Instillations for IC/BPS: an Open-Label Clinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kenneth M; Hasenau, Deborah; Killinger, Kim A; Chancellor, Michael B; Anthony, Michele; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intravesical instillation of liposomes is a potentially new therapeutic option for subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). The aim of this study was to explore the safety and clinical outcomes of 4 weekly instillations of sphingomyelin liposomes in an open-label cohort of subjects with IC/BPS. Methods A total of fourteen symptomatic IC/BPS subjects were treated with intravesical liposomes once a week for 4 weeks. Safety measurements included lab specimen collection, vital signs, post void residual (PVR), and assessment of adverse events (AEs). Efficacy measurements included pain visual analog scales (VAS), voiding diaries, global response assessments (GRAs), and O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indices (ICSI and ICPI). Results No treatment-related adverse events (AE) were reported at any time over the course of the study. Urgency VAS scores significantly decreased at 4 weeks (p=0.0029) and 8 weeks (p=0.0112) post-treatment. Pain VAS scores significantly decreased at 4 weeks post-treatment (p=0.0073). Combined ICSI and ICPI scores improved significantly at 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p=0.002 for both time points) post-treatment. Responses to GRA showed improvement at 4 weeks post- instillation. No significant decrease in urinary frequency was found. Conclusion Sphingomyelin liposome instillations were well tolerated in subjects with IC/BPS with no AEs attributed to the test article. Treatment was associated with improvements in pain, urinary urgency, and overall symptom scores. Placebo controlled clinical trials are needed to assess this potential therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:25209396

  18. Molecular basis of hERG potassium channel blockade by the class Ic antiarrhythmic flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    The class Ic antiarrhythmic drug flecainide inhibits KCNH2-encoded “hERG” potassium channels at clinically relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of this action. Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37 °C. Wild-type (WT) IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.49 μM and this was not significantly altered by reversing the direction of K+ flux or raising external [K+]. The use of charged and uncharged flecainide analogues showed that the charged form of the drug accesses the channel from the cell interior to produce block. Promotion of WT IhERG inactivation slowed recovery from inhibition, whilst the N588K and S631A attenuated-inactivation mutants exhibited IC50 values 4–5 fold that of WT IhERG. The use of pore-helix/selectivity filter (T623A, S624A V625A) and S6 helix (G648A, Y652A, F656A) mutations showed < 10-fold shifts in IC50 for all but V625A and F656A, which respectively exhibited IC50s 27-fold and 142-fold their WT controls. Docking simulations using a MthK-based homology model suggested an allosteric effect of V625A, since in low energy conformations flecainide lay too low in the pore to interact directly with that residue. On the other hand, the molecule could readily form π–π stacking interactions with aromatic residues and particularly with F656. We conclude that flecainide accesses the hERG channel from the cell interior on channel gating, binding low in the inner cavity, with the S6 F656 residue acting as a principal binding determinant. PMID:26159617

  19. Winds of low-metallicity OB-type stars: HST-COS spectroscopy in IC 1613

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Miriam; Najarro, Francisco; Herrero, Artemio; Urbaneja, Miguel Alejandro

    2014-06-10

    We present the first quantitative ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of resolved OB stars in IC 1613. Because of its alleged very low metallicity (≲1/10 Z {sub ☉}, from H II regions), studies in this Local Group dwarf galaxy could become a significant step forward from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) toward the extremely metal-poor massive stars of the early universe. We present HST-COS data covering the ∼1150-1800 Å wavelength range with resolution R ∼ 2500. We find that the targets do exhibit wind features, and these are similar in strength to SMC stars. Wind terminal velocities were derived from the observed P Cygni profiles with the Sobolev plus Exact Integration method. The v {sub ∞}-Z relationship has been revisited. The terminal velocity of IC 1613 O stars is clearly lower than Milky Way counterparts, but there is no clear difference between IC 1613 and SMC or LMC analog stars. We find no clear segregation with host galaxy in the terminal velocities of B-supergiants, nor in the v {sub ∞}/v {sub esc} ratio of the whole OB star sample in any of the studied galaxies. Finally, we present the first evidence that the Fe-abundance of IC 1613 OB stars is similar to the SMC, which is in agreement with previous results on red supergiants. With the confirmed ∼1/10 solar oxygen abundances of B-supergiants, our results indicate that IC 1613's α/Fe ratio is sub-solar.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Spherical Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. This photograph taken September 18, 1963 shows a spherical hydrogen tank being constructed next to the S-IC test stand.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Hydrogen Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. In the center portion of this photograph, taken September 5, 1963, the spherical hydrogen storage tanks are being constructed. One of the massive tower legs of the S-IC test stand is visible to the far right.

  2. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  3. A Census of Young Stars and Brown Dwarfs in IC 348 and NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L.; Loutrel, N. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained optical and near-infrared spectra of candidate members of the star-forming clusters IC 348 and NGC 1333. We classify 100 and 42 candidates as new members of the clusters, respectively, which brings the total numbers of known members to 478 and 203. We also have performed spectroscopy on a large majority of the previously known members of NGC 1333 in order to provide spectral classifications that are measured with the same scheme that has been applied to IC 348 in previous studies. The new census of members is nearly complete for K s < 16.8 at A J < 1.5 in IC 348 and for K s < 16.2 at A J < 3 in NGC 1333, which correspond to masses of ≳0.01 M ⊙ for ages of 3 Myr according to theoretical evolutionary models. The faintest known members extend below these completeness limits and appear to have masses of ˜0.005 M ⊙. In extinction-limited samples of cluster members, NGC 1333 exhibits a higher abundance of objects at lower masses than IC 348. It would be surprising if the initial mass functions of these clusters differ significantly given their similar stellar densities and formation environments. Instead, it is possible that average extinctions are lower for less massive members of star-forming clusters, in which case extinction-limited samples could be biased in favor of low-mass objects in the more heavily embedded clusters like NGC 1333. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the median sequences of IC 348 and NGC 1333 coincide with each other for the adopted distances of 300 and 235 pc, which would suggest that they have similar ages. However, NGC 1333 is widely believed to be younger than IC 348 based on its higher abundance of disks and protostars and its greater obscuration. Errors in the adopted distances may be responsible for this discrepancy. Based on data from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, Gemini Observatory, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Keck Observatory, Subaru Telescope, the Digitized Sky Survey, and the Two Micron All

  4. iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Corsi, A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Lunnan, R.; Bue, B.; Ergon, M.; Kasliwal, M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H- (and He-) poor stars, which could either be single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak (~10-15 d), without any early (in the first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). Aims: We have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long (~30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic to be observed. Our aim is to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Methods: Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modeled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. Results: iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modeling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass (~10 M⊙) and strong 56Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended (≳500 R⊙), low-mass (≳0.045 M⊙) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. Conclusions: The large ejecta mass and the presence of H- and He-free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive (≳35 M⊙) WR star that experienced strong mass loss.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Crane Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken at the S-IC test stand on October 2, 1963, is of a crane control. It was from here that the massive cranes were operated. Seen in the background is the F-1 Test Stand. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  7. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH.

  8. 78 FR 50457 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C will hold a briefing on September 19, 2013, Room T... identification of digital system failure modes and use of hazard analysis methods for digital safety systems....

  9. 77 FR 67688 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C will hold a meeting on November 16, 2012, Room...

  10. The Temperature Dependence of a GaAs pHEMT Wideband IQ Modulator IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Kiyoyuki

    The author developed a GaAs wideband IQ modulator IC, which is utilized in RF signal source instruments with direct-conversion architecture. The layout is fully symmetric to obtain a temperature-stable operation. However, thee actual temperature drift of EVM (Error Vector Magnitude) is greater in some frequency and temperature ranges than the first generation IC of the same architecture. For applications requiring the precision of electric instrumentation, temperature drift is highly critical. This paper clarifies that linear phase error is the dominant factor causing the temperature drift. It also identifies that such temperature drift of linear phase error is due to equivalent series impedance, especially parasitic capacitance of the phase shifter. This effect is verified by comparing the SSB measurements to a mathematical simulation using an empirical temperature-dependent small-signal FET model.

  11. A new ATLAS pixel front-end IC for upgraded LHC luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, M.; Arutinov, D.; Beccherle, R.; Darbo, G.; Ely, R.; Fougeron, D.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gnani, D.; Hemperek, T.; Karagounis, M.; Kluit, R.; Kostioukhine, V.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menouni, M.; Schipper, J.-D.

    2009-06-01

    A new pixel Front-End (FE) IC is being developed in a 130 nm technology for use in the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. The new pixel FE will be made of smaller pixels (50×250 μm vs. 50×400 μm for the present FE, FE-I3), a much improved active area over inactive area ratio, and a new analog pixel chain tuned for low power and new detector input capacitance. The higher luminosity for which this IC is tuned implies a complete redefinition of the digital architecture logic, which will not be based on End-of-Column data buffering but on local pixel logic and local pixel data storage. An overview of the new FE is given with particular emphasis on the new digital logic architecture and possible architecture variations.

  12. 20-μm deep trench isolation process characterization for linear bipolar ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Terry; Doohan, Ian J.; Fallon, Martin; McAlpine, Dave; Aitkenhead, Adam; McGinty, Jim; Taylor, M.; Gravelle, Philip; Schouten, A.; Bryce, M.

    2001-04-01

    The use of junction isolation in linear bipolar ICs substantially consumes silicon area. The replacement of junction isolation with trench isolation has the potential to significantly reduce device area while maintaining high voltage operation. Deep trench isolation has been implemented on a conventional non- complementary 40V (NPN BVceo) linear IC process. A fully functional lower power operational amplifier has been fabricated as a technology driver. Device characterization shows that transistor leakage currents (Iceo) and leakage between trench tubs can be made comparable with junction isolated devices. The NPN buried layer can successfully be butted against the trench sidewall without device degradation, although this is currently not possible with the NPN base. An NPN device shrink of 3X has been achieved and further development is underway to increase this towards the 4X level, where the base diffusion front touches the trench sidewall.

  13. ICS-283: a system for targeted intravenous delivery of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Raymond M; Storm, Gert

    2006-05-01

    ICS-283 was developed within Intradigm Corporation as a system that is designed for the systemic delivery of therapeutic small interfering (siRNA) to sites of pathological angiogenesis. The non-viral siRNA delivery system is based on synthetic nanoparticles, known as Targe (Intradigm Corporation), which functions as a broad-platform technology to deliver siRNA to specific target cells in diseased tissues. The system is constructed to incorporate different functionalities that address critical needs for successful nucleic acid delivery. The TargeTran synthetic vector is a self-assembling, layered nanoparticle that protects and targets siRNA to specific cell types in pathological tissues. At present, ICS-283 is the only antiangiogenic siRNA delivery system that is designed for intravenous administration to treat angiogenesis-driven diseases.

  14. Transient power supply voltage (v{sub DDT}) analysis for detecting IC defects

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Beegle, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    Transient power supply voltage (V{sub DDT}) analysis is a new testing technique demonstrated as a powerful alternative and complement to I{sub DDQ} testing. V{sub DDT} takes advantage of the limited response time of a voltage supply to the changing power demands of an IC during operation. Changes in the V{sub DD} response time are used to detect increases in power demand with resolutions of 100 nA at 100 kHz, 1 {mu}A at 1 MHz, and 2.5 {mu}A at 1.5 MHz. These current sensitivities have been shown for ICs with quiescent currents < 0.1 {mu}A and > 300 {mu}A. The V{sub DDT} signal acquisition protocols, frequency versus sensitivity tradeoffs, hardware considerations and limitations, data examples, and areas for future research are described.

  15. Spectrum and chemical analysis of the double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Keyes, Charles D.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1986-01-01

    The double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297 resembles NGC 7662 in appearance, although it is of much lower surface brightness. What is remarkable is the great strength of the dielectronic recombination O V line. Although this line is seen as a P Cygni feature in a number of planetary nebulae, it is in those instances accompanied by a strong continuum and other easily recognized features of stellar origin. No star is visible on CCD images of IC 1297. Optical region measurements are supplemented by IUE observations. The following logarithmic abundance values are found: log N(He) = 11.065; log N(forbidden C) = 8.6; log N(N) = 8.1; log N(O) = 8.74; log N(Ne) = 8.16; log N(S) = 7.0; log N(Cl) = 5.4; log N(Ar) = 6.2. The nebula shows no dramatic pattern of nucleogenesis events.

  16. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex-Aerial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex-Aerial View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and

  19. A transient supergiant X-ray binary in IC 10: An extragalactic SFXT?

    SciTech Connect

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Oram, Kathleen; Balchunas, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of a large amplitude (factor of ∼100) X-ray transient (IC 10 X-2, CXOU J002020.99+591758.6) in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 10 during our Chandra monitoring project. Based on the X-ray timing and spectral properties, and an optical counterpart observed with Gemini, the system is a high-mass X-ray binary consisting of a luminous blue supergiant and a neutron star. The highest measured luminosity of the source was 1.8 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}during an outburst in 2003. Observations before, during, and after a second outburst in 2010 constrain the outburst duration to be less than 3 months (with no lower limit). The X-ray spectrum is a hard power law (Γ = 0.3) with fitted column density (N{sub H} = 6.3 × 10{sup 21} atom cm{sup –2}), consistent with the established absorption to sources in IC 10. The optical spectrum shows hydrogen Balmer lines strongly in emission at the correct blueshift (-340 km s{sup –1}) for IC 10. The N III triplet emission feature is seen, accompanied by He II [4686] weakly in emission. Together these features classify the star as a luminous blue supergiant of the OBN subclass, characterized by enhanced nitrogen abundance. Emission lines of He I are seen, at similar strength to Hβ. A complex of Fe II permitted and forbidden emission lines are seen, as in B[e] stars. The system closely resembles galactic supergiant fast X-ray transients, in terms of its hard spectrum, variability amplitude, and blue supergiant primary.

  20. Good trellises for IC implementation of viterbi decoders for linear block codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Moorthy, Hari T.; Uehara, Gregory T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates trellis structures of linear block codes for the IC (integrated circuit) implementation of Viterbi decoders capable of achieving high decoding speed while satisfying a constraint on the structural complexity of the trellis in terms of the maximum number of states at any particular depth. Only uniform sectionalizations of the code trellis diagram are considered. An upper bound on the number of parallel and structurally identical (or isomorphic) subtrellises in a proper trellis for a code without exceeding the maximum state complexity of the minimal trellis of the code is first derived. Parallel structures of trellises with various section lengths for binary BCH and Reed-Muller (RM) codes of lengths 32 and 64 are analyzed. Next, the complexity of IC implementation of a Viterbi decoder based on an L-section trellis diagram for a code is investigated. A structural property of a Viterbi decoder called ACS-connectivity which is related to state connectivity is introduced. This parameter affects the complexity of wire-routing (interconnections within the IC). The effect of five parameters namely: (1) effective computational complexity; (2) complexity of the ACS-circuit; (3) traceback complexity; (4) ACS-connectivity; and (5) branch complexity of a trellis diagram on the VLSI complexity of a Viterbi decoder is investigated. It is shown that an IC implementation of a Viterbi decoder based on a non-minimal trellis requires less area and is capable of operation at higher speed than one based on the minimal trellis when the commonly used ACS-array architecture is considered.

  1. Good Trellises for IC Implementation of Viterbi Decoders for Linear Block Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorthy, Hari T.; Lin, Shu; Uehara, Gregory T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates trellis structures of linear block codes for the integrated circuit (IC) implementation of Viterbi decoders capable of achieving high decoding speed while satisfying a constraint on the structural complexity of the trellis in terms of the maximum number of states at any particular depth. Only uniform sectionalizations of the code trellis diagram are considered. An upper-bound on the number of parallel and structurally identical (or isomorphic) subtrellises in a proper trellis for a code without exceeding the maximum state complexity of the minimal trellis of the code is first derived. Parallel structures of trellises with various section lengths for binary BCH and Reed-Muller (RM) codes of lengths 32 and 64 are analyzed. Next, the complexity of IC implementation of a Viterbi decoder based on an L-section trellis diagram for a code is investigated. A structural property of a Viterbi decoder called add-compare-select (ACS)-connectivity which is related to state connectivity is introduced. This parameter affects the complexity of wire-routing (interconnections within the IC). The effect of five parameters namely: (1) effective computational complexity; (2) complexity of the ACS-circuit; (3) traceback complexity; (4) ACS-connectivity; and (5) branch complexity of a trellis diagram on the very large scale integration (VISI) complexity of a Viterbi decoder is investigated. It is shown that an IC implementation of a Viterbi decoder based on a nonminimal trellis requires less area and is capable of operation at higher speed than one based on the minimal trellis when the commonly used ACS-array architecture is considered.

  2. IC-51, an injectable vaccine for the prevention of Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Taff

    2009-02-01

    The mosquito-borne Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is the major etiological agent of viral encephalitis in children living in South-East Asia, causing comas, seizures and Parkinson's disease-like movement disorders. Travelers and military personnel visiting the region are also highly susceptible to the disease. As the population in South-East Asia increases, more land is irrigated to produce rice paddies (the ideal breeding habitat for mosquitoes), and pig breeding (a zoonotic host for mosquitoes) becomes more widespread. Given the exponential growth in tourism to the region and the globalization of business and commerce, an enhanced requirement for mass vaccination exists. In the West, the current licensed vaccine against JE, JE-VAX, has been highly effective; however, the use of mouse brain-derived virus has been linked to cases of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Intercell AG, under license from VaccGen International LLC, is developing IC-51, a formalin-inactivated vaccine derived from cell culture-based attenuated virus that has been adapted to grow in Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cells). In extensive clinical trials performed to date, IC-51 was safe, with mild to moderate adverse events reported. In terms of immunogenicity, IC-51 was highly effective, demonstrating rapid seroconversion rates and long-term maintenance of geometric mean titers that exceeded the protective titer. The results suggests that IC-51 is fully compliant with the stringent regulatory requirements set by the WHO, has an acceptable safety profile and is non-inferior to JE-VAX.

  3. Shock chemistry in the molecular clouds associated with SNR IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Snell, Ronald L.; Dickman, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of several interstellar molecules toward the highly perturbed B and G clouds associated with SNR IC 443 are reported. The results suggest that hot and dense material is present in the SNR, and that shocks are present in both regions. The HCO(+) abundance is shown to be a few times greater that found in cold quiescent gas, in contradiction with previous results. The SO, CS, CN, and NH3 abundances are similar to those found in cold dark clouds.

  4. Efavirenz concentrations in CSF exceed IC50 for wild-type HIV

    PubMed Central

    Best, Brookie M.; Koopmans, Peter P.; Letendre, Scott L.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Rossi, Steven S.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Mbeo, Gilbert; McCutchan, J. Allen; Simpson, David M.; Haubrich, Richard; Ellis, Ronald; Grant, Igor; Grant, Igor; McCutchan, J. Allen; Ellis, Ronald J.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Franklin, Donald; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Alexander, Terry; Letendre, Scott; Capparelli, Edmund; Heaton, Robert K.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Woods, Steven Paul; Dawson, Matthew; Wong, Joseph K.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cushman, Clint; Abramson, Ian; Vaida, Florin; Marcotte, Thomas D.; von Jaeger, Rodney; McArthur, Justin; Smith, Mary; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David; Mintz, Letty; McCutchan, J. Allen; Toperoff, Will; Collier, Ann; Marra, Christina; Jones, Trudy; Gelman, Benjamin; Head, Eleanor; Clifford, David; Al-Lozi, Muhammad; Teshome, Mengesha

    2011-01-01

    Objectives HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders remain common despite use of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART). Ongoing viral replication due to poor distribution of antivirals into the CNS may increase risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. This study's objective was to determine penetration of a commonly prescribed antiretroviral drug, efavirenz, into CSF. Methods CHARTER is an ongoing, North American, multicentre, observational study to determine the effects of ART on HIV-associated neurological disease. Single random plasma and CSF samples were drawn within 1 h of each other from subjects taking efavirenz between September 2003 and July 2007. Samples were assayed by HPLC or HPLC/mass spectrometry with detection limits of 39 ng/mL (plasma) and <0.1 ng/mL (CSF). Results Eighty participants (age 44 ± 8 years; 79 ± 15 kg; 20 females) had samples drawn 12.5 ± 5.4 h post-dose. The median efavirenz concentrations after a median of 7 months [interquartile range (IQR) 2–17] of therapy were 2145 ng/mL in plasma (IQR 1384–4423) and 13.9 ng/mL in CSF (IQR 4.1–21.2). The CSF/plasma concentration ratio from paired samples drawn within 1 h of each other was 0.005 (IQR 0.0026–0.0076; n = 69). The CSF/IC50 ratio was 26 (IQR 8–41) using the published IC50 for wild-type HIV (0.51 ng/mL). Two CSF samples had concentrations below the efavirenz IC50 for wild-type HIV. Conclusions Efavirenz concentrations in the CSF are only 0.5% of plasma concentrations but exceed the wild-type IC50 in nearly all individuals. Since CSF drug concentrations reflect those in brain interstitial fluids, efavirenz reaches therapeutic concentrations in brain tissue. PMID:21098541

  5. A SCUBA-2 850-μm survey of protoplanetary discs in the IC 348 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, L.; Williams, J.; Kourkchi, E.; Andrews, S.; Casassus, S.; Graves, S.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present 850-μm observations of the 2-3 Myr cluster IC 348 in the Perseus molecular cloud using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Our SCUBA-2 map has a diameter of 30 arcmin and contains ˜370 cluster members, including ˜200 objects with IR excesses. We detect a total of 13 discs. Assuming standard dust properties and a gas-to-dust-mass ratio of 100, we derive disc masses ranging from 1.5 to 16 MJUP. We also detect six Class 0/I protostars. We find that the most massive discs (MD > 3 MJUP; 850-μm flux > 10 mJy) in IC 348 tend to be transition objects according to the characteristic `dip' in their infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). This trend is also seen in other regions. We speculate that this could be an initial conditions effect (e.g. more massive discs tend to form giant planets that result in transition disc SEDs) and/or a disc evolution effect (the formation of one or more massive planets results in both a transition disc SED and a reduction of the accretion rate, increasing the lifetime of the outer disc). A stacking analysis of the discs that remain undetected in our SCUBA-2 observations suggests that their median 850-μm flux should be ≲1 mJy, corresponding to a disc mass ≲0.3 MJUP (gas plus dust) or ≲1 M⊕ of dust. While the available data are not deep enough to allow a meaningful comparison of the disc luminosity functions between IC 348 and other young stellar clusters, our results imply that disc masses exceeding the minimum-mass solar nebula are very rare (≲1per cent) at the age of IC 348, especially around very low-mass stars.

  6. THE FAST AND FURIOUS DECAY OF THE PECULIAR TYPE Ic SUPERNOVA 2005ek

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, M. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N. E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chakraborti, S.; Challis, P.; Friedman, A.; Hicken, M.; Jensen, C.; Mazzali, P. A.; Parrent, J. T.; Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Cenko, S. B.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Brown, P. J.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova (SN Ic), SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of M{sub R} = -17.3 and decaying by {approx}3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of {approx}0.3 M{sub Sun} that is dominated by oxygen ({approx}80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by {approx}0.03 M{sub Sun} of radioactive {sup 56}Ni. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SNe Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1%-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.

  7. The Fast and Furious Decay of the Peculiar Type Ic Supernova 2005ek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drout, M. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Mazzali, P. A.; Parrent, J. T.; Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N. E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Brown, P. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Chakraborti, S.; Challis, P.; Friedman, A.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Hicken, M.; Jensen, C.; Modjaz, M.; Perets, H. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Wong, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova (SN Ic), SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of MR = -17.3 and decaying by ~3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of ~0.3 M ⊙ that is dominated by oxygen (~80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by ~0.03 M ⊙ of radioactive 56Ni. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SNe Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1%-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the construction progress of the forms for the concrete foundation walls as of September 7, 1961.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 22, 1961, shows the progress of the concrete walls for the stand's foundation. Some of the walls have been poured and some of the concrete forms have been removed.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 29, 1961, shows the progress of the concrete walls for the stand's foundation. Some of the walls have been poured and some of the concrete forms have been removed.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 1, 1961, shows the construction of forms which became the concrete foundation for the massive stand.

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 15, 1961, is a close up inside of the foundation wall forms as concrete is being poured.

  13. Long-term prediction test procedure for most ICs, based on linear response theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Ivakhnenko, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimentally, thermal annealing is known to be a factor which enables a number of different integrated circuits (IC's) to recover their operating characteristics after suffering radiation damage in the space radiation environment; thus, decreasing and limiting long term cumulative total-dose effects. This annealing is also known to be accelerated at elevated temperatures both during and after irradiation. Linear response theory (LRT) was applied, and a linear response function (LRF) to predict the radiation/annealing response of sensitive parameters of IC's for long term (several months or years) exposure to the space radiation environment were constructed. Compressing the annealing process from several years in orbit to just a few hours or days in the laboratory is achieved by subjecting the IC to elevated temperatures or by increasing the typical spaceflight dose rate by several orders of magnitude for simultaneous radiation/annealing only. The accomplishments are as follows: (1) the test procedure to make predictions of the radiation response was developed; (2) the calculation of the shift in the threshold potential due to the charge distribution in the oxide was written; (3) electron tunneling processes from the bulk Si to the oxide region in an MOS IC were estimated; (4) in order to connect the experimental annealing data to the theoretical model, constants of the model of the basic annealing process were established; (5) experimental data obtained at elevated temperatures were analyzed; (6) time compression and reliability of predictions for the long term region were shown; (7) a method to compress test time and to make predictions of response for the nonlinear region was proposed; and (8) nonlinearity of the LRF with respect to log(t) was calculated theoretically from a model.

  14. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of the radio galaxy IC310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.; Marinelli, A.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Aguilar-Ruiz, E.

    2017-03-01

    The radio galaxy IC310 located in the Perseus Cluster is one of the brightest objects in the radio and X-ray bands, and one of the closest active galactic nuclei observed in very-high energies. In GeV - TeV γ-rays, IC310 was detected in low and high flux states by the MAGIC telescopes from October 2009 to February 2010. Taking into account that the spectral energy distribution (SED) up to a few GeV seems to exhibit a double-peak feature and that a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model can explain all of the multiwavelength emission except for the non-simultaneous MAGIC emission, we interpret, in this work, the multifrequency data set of the radio galaxy IC310 in the context of homogeneous hadronic and leptonic models. In the leptonic framework, we present a multi-zone SSC model with two electron populations to explain the whole SED whereas for the hadronic model, we propose that a single-zone SSC model describes the SED up to a few GeVs and neutral pion decay products resulting from pγ interactions could describe the TeV - GeV γ-ray spectra. These interactions occur when Fermi-accelerated protons interact with the seed photons around the SSC peaks. We show that, in the leptonic model the minimum Lorentz factor of second electron population is exceedingly high γe ∼ 105 disfavoring this model, and in the hadronic model the required proton luminosity is not extremely high ∼1044 erg/s, provided that charge neutrality between the number of electrons and protons is given. Correlating the TeV γ-ray and neutrino spectra through photo-hadronic interactions, we find that the contribution of the emitting region of IC310 to the observed neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic ray fluxes are negligible.

  15. Use of IC tags in short-term carcinogenicity study on CB6F1 TGrasH2 mice.

    PubMed

    Urano, Koji; Suzuki, Syuzo; Machida, Kazuhiko; Sawa, Nobuko; Eguchi, Natsuko; Kikuchi, Koji; Fukasawa, Kazumasa; Taguchi, Fukushi; Usui, Toshimi

    2006-12-01

    We studied the effect of IC tags, subcutaneously implanted animal identification tools, on rasH2 mice. A 26-week short-term carcinogenicity study was performed on a total of 299 mice including 75 male and female rasH2 mice each, and 74 male and 75 female non-Tg mice from the same litter as the rasH2 mice divided into a non-IC tag group, the IC-tag group, acetone group, TPA group and MNU group (all of the animals except for those in the non-IC tag group) had IC tags implanted subcutaneously in their backs. The administration methods of the positive control drugs TPA (2.5 micro g/kg, 3 times/week, percutaneously) and MNU (75 mg/kg, single intraperitoneal injection) were based on the protocol of the ILSI/HESI international collaborative study. The results showed no differences in the tumorigenic incidence and organs developing tumors between the IC tag and non-IC tag groups in both rasH2 and non-Tg mice. In the positive control MNU group, the tumorigenic incidence and organs developing tumors were the same as the background data and no promotion of carcinogenesis was observed. In all IC tag groups including the TPA group and MNU group, a fibrous capsule was formed around the IC tags subcutaneously, but no inflammatory changes or neoplastic changes were observed. From these findings, it was concluded that the IC tag has no effect on a 26-week carcinogenicity test of rasH2 mice under the conditions of the present study.

  16. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The third International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Madrid, Spain, from Thursday 28 to Sunday 31 August 2014. The Conference was attended by more than 200 participants and hosted about 350 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. More than 600 pre-registered authors were also counted. The third IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral sessions and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  17. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences 2013 (IC-MSQUARE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The second International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Prague, Czech Republic, from Sunday 1 September to Thursday 5 September 2013. The Conference was attended by more than 280 participants and hosted about 400 oral, poster, and virtual presentations while counted more than 600 pre-registered authors. The second IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel sessions were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee. Further information on the editors, speakers and committees is available in the attached pdf.

  18. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  19. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr.

    PubMed

    Paragi, Z; Taylor, G B; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Bietenholz, M; van der Horst, A J; Pidopryhora, Y; van Langevelde, H J; Garrett, M A; Szomoru, A; Argo, M K; Bourke, S; Paczyński, B

    2010-01-28

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft gamma-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60 days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities approximately 6,000 km s(-1), much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  20. X-ray Properties of the Young Open Clusters HM1 and IC 2944-2948

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Y.; Rauw, G.; Sana, H.; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Using XMM-Newton data, we study for the first time the X-ray emission of HM1 and IC 2944/2948. Low-mass, pre-main-sequence objects with an age of a few Myr are detected, as well as a few background or foreground objects. Most massive stars in both clusters display the usual high-energy properties of that type of objects, though with log [L(sub X)/L(sub BOL)] apparently lower in HM1 than in IC2944/2948. Compared with studies of other clusters, it seems that a low signal-to-noise ratio at soft energies, due to the high extinction, may be the main cause of this difference. In HM1, the two Wolf-Rayet stars show contrasting behaviors:WR89 is extremely bright, but much softer than WR87. It remains to be seen whether wind-wind collisions or magnetically confined winds can explain these emissions. In IC 2944/2948, the X-ray sources concentrate around HD 101205; a group of massive stars to the north of this object is isolated, suggesting that there exist two subclusters in the field-of-view.

  1. Chemical Abundances of the Planetary Nebula IC 4634 and Its Central Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, S.; Aller, L. H.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have measured the spectral line intensities of the metal poor planetary nebula IC 4634. Using a photo-ionization model calculation, we try to fit the the optical and UV region spectra, i.e., Hamilton Echelle and IUE observations. From direct images, one expects complicated density variations, but the model predicts a range in densities that may be smaller than actually exist. We find N(sub epsilon) approximates 5000 /cubic meter. In spite of the geometrical complexity of the S shaped double-lobed structure, the simple photoionization model with a spherical symmetry can fit most emission lines, fairly well. The derived chemical composition has been compared with previous estimates and also with the Sun - The metallicity in IC 4634 appears to be lower than in the Sun or the average planetary nebula. The most likely temperature of the central ionizing source of IC 4634 appears to be about 55,000 K. We find a central star mass of about 0.55 Solar Mass from comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks.

  2. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    PubMed

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system.

  3. Monolithic 3D-ICs with single grain Si thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, R.; Derakhshandeh, J.; Tajari Mofrad, M. R.; Chen, T.; Golshani, N.; Beenakker, C. I. M.

    2012-05-01

    Monolithic 3D integration is the ultimate approach in 3D-ICs as it provides high-density and submicron vertical interconnects and hence transistor level integration. Here, high-quality Si layer formation at a low temperature is a key challenge. We review our recent achievements in monolithic 3D-ICs based on single-grain Si TFTs that are fabricated inside a single-grain with a low-temperature process. With the μ-Czochralski process based on a pulsed-laser crystallization, Si grains with a diameter of 6 μm are successfully formed on predetermined positions. Single-grain (SG) Si TFTs are fabricated inside the single-grain with mobility for electron and holes of 600 cm2/V s and 200 cm2/V s, respectively. Two layers of the SG Si TFT were vertically stacked and successfully implemented into CMOS inverter, 3D 6T-SRAM and single-grain lateral PIN photo-diode with in-pixel amplifier. Those results indicate that the SG TFTs are attractive for use in monolithic 3D-ICs on an arbitrary substrate including a glass and even a plastic for applications such as ultra-high-density memories, logic-to-logic integration, CPU integrated display, and high-definition image sensor for artificial retina.

  4. Interpretation of two compact planetary nebulae, IC 4997 and NGC 6572, with aid of theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Hyung, S; Aller, L H

    1993-01-15

    Observations of two dense compact planetary nebulae secured with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph at Lick Observatory combined with previously published UV spectra secured with the International Ultraviolet Explorer enable us to probe the electron densities and temperatures (plasma diagnostics) and ionic concentrations in these objects. The diagnostic diagrams show that no homogenous model will work for these nebulae. NGC 6572 may consist of an inner torordal ring of density 25,000 atoms/cm3 and an outer conical shell of density 10,000 atoms/cm3. The simplest model of IC 4997 suggests a thick inner shell with a density of about 107 atoms/cm3 and an outer envelope of density 10,000 atoms/cm3. The abundances of all elements heavier than He appear to be less than the solar values in NGC 6572, whereas He, C, N, and O may be more abundant in IC 4997 than in the sun. IC 4997 presents puzzling problems.

  5. Stress Voiding in IC Interconnects - Rules of Evidence for Failure Analysts

    SciTech Connect

    FILTER, WILLIAM F.

    1999-09-17

    Mention the words ''stress voiding'', and everyone from technology engineer to manager to customer is likely to cringe. This IC failure mechanism elicits fear because it is insidious, capricious, and difficult to identify and arrest. There are reasons to believe that a damascene-copper future might be void-free. Nevertheless, engineers who continue to produce ICs with Al-alloy interconnects, or who assess the reliability of legacy ICs with long service life, need up-to-date insights and techniques to deal with stress voiding problems. Stress voiding need not be fearful. Not always predictable, neither is it inevitable. On the contrary, stress voids are caused by specific, avoidable processing errors. Analytical work, though often painful, can identify these errors when stress voiding occurs, and vigilance in monitoring the improved process can keep it from recurring. In this article, they show that a methodical, forensics approach to failure analysis can solve suspected cases of stress voiding. This approach uses new techniques, and patiently applies familiar ones, to develop evidence meeting strict standards of proof.

  6. ULTRA-STRIPPED TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE FROM CLOSE BINARY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.; Moriya, T. J.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Yoon, S.-C.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries of weak and fast optical transients raise the question of their origin. We investigate the minimum ejecta mass associated with core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Type Ic. We show that mass transfer from a helium star to a compact companion can produce an ultra-stripped core which undergoes iron core collapse and leads to an extremely fast and faint SN Ic. In this Letter, a detailed example is presented in which the pre-SN stellar mass is barely above the Chandrasekhar limit, resulting in the ejection of only ∼0.05-0.20 M {sub ☉} of material and the formation of a low-mass neutron star (NS). We compute synthetic light curves of this case and demonstrate that SN 2005ek could be explained by our model. We estimate that the fraction of such ultra-stripped to all SNe could be as high as 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}. Finally, we argue that the second explosion in some double NS systems (for example, the double pulsar PSR J0737–3039B) was likely associated with an ultra-stripped SN Ic.

  7. Evidence for Magnetar Formation in Broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae 1998bw and 2002ap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Yu, H.; Liu, L. D.; Wang, S. Q.; Han, Y. H.; Xu, D.; Dai, Z. G.; Qiu, Y. L.; Wei, J. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Broad-lined type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL) are peculiar stellar explosions that are distinct from ordinary SNe. Some SNe Ic-BL are associated with long-duration (≳ 2 {{s}}) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Black holes and magnetars are two types of compact objects that are hypothesized to be central engines of GRBs. In spite of decades of investigations, no direct evidence for the formation of black holes or magnetars has yet been found for GRBs. Here we report the finding that the early peak (t≲ 50 {days}) and late-time (t≳ 300 {days}) slow decay displayed in the light curves of SNe 1998bw (associated with GRB 980425) and 2002ap (not GRB-associated) can be attributed to magnetar spin-down with an initial rotation period {P}0∼ 20 {ms}, while the intermediate-time (50≲ t≲ 300 {days}) exponential decline is caused by the radioactive decay of 56Ni. The connection between the early peak and late-time slow decline in the light curves is unexpected in alternative models. We thus suggest that GRB 980425 and SN 2002ap were powered by magnetars.

  8. Dislocation mechanism for transformation between cubic ice Ic and hexagonal ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondoh, T.

    2015-11-01

    Cubic ice Ic is metastable, yet can form by the freezing of supercooled water, vapour deposition at low temperatures and by depressurizing high-pressure forms of ice. Its structure differs from that of common hexagonal ice Ih in the order its molecular layers are stacked. This stacking order, however, typically has considerable disorder; that is, not purely cubic, but alternating in hexagonal and cubic layers. In time, stacking-disordered ice gradually decreases in cubicity (fraction having cubic structure), transforming to hexagonal ice. But, how does this disorder originate and how does it transform to hexagonal ice? Here we use numerical data on dislocations in hexagonal ice Ih to show that (1) stacking-disordered ice (or Ic) can be viewed as fine-grained polycrystalline ice with a high density of extended dislocations, each a widely extended stacking fault bounded by partial dislocations, and (2) the transformation from ice Ic to Ih is caused by the reaction and motion of these partial dislocations. Moreover, the stacking disorder may be in either a higher stored energy state consisting of a sub-boundary network arrangement of partial dislocations bounding stacking faults, or a lower stored energy state consisting of a grain structure with a high density of stacking faults, but without bounding partial dislocations. Each state transforms to Ih differently, with a duration to fully transform that strongly depends on temperature and crystal grain size. The results are consistent with the observed transformation rates, transformation temperatures and wide range in heat of transformation.

  9. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment on COSmIC: Probing Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Ricketts, Claire L.; Salama, Farid

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment is to contribute to a better understanding of aerosol formation in Titan's atmosphere through the study of the chemical formation pathways that link the simpler gas phase molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry, to the more complex gas phase precursors of aerosols; and more specifically, to investigate the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs), among other hydrocarbons, in this process. In the THS experiment developed at the NASA Ames Cosmic simulation facility (COSmIC), Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by a pulsed plasma jet expansion at temperature conditions (∼150 K) close to those found in Titan's atmosphere in regions where aerosols are formed. In addition, because of the very short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the initial steps of the chemistry occur, making the COSmIC/THS a unique tool to study the first and intermediate (when adding heavier precursors to the initial N2-CH4 mixture) steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature as shown in the study presented here. We further illustrate the potential of COSmIC/THS for the simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry by presenting very promising results from a preliminary comparison of the laboratory data to data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer-Ion Beam Spectrometer (CAPS-IBS) instrument.

  10. Iron Abundances and Atmospheric Parameters of Red Giants in the Open Cluster IC 4756

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Julie O.

    Three red giants were investigated within the open cluster IC 4756 using observations taken from the McDonald Observatory's 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope and the Sandiford Cassegrain Echelle Spectrometer (SES). Iron abundances were calculated for each star based on the equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines measured using the line lists of Bubar and King (2010) and Schuler et al. (2005). Also derived were the basic atmospheric parameters: effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and microturbulence. Her 35, Her 85, and Her 249 were found to have corresponding [Fe I/H] of 0.06 +/- 0.04, -0.16 +/- 0.03, and -0.16 +/- 0.06 as derived from the neutral lines. These values, when compared to the results of other studies, suggest that the cluster has an overall metallicity within the solar to subsolar value. This would indicate IC 4756 as a slightly metal-poor object. The star Her 85 is also examined to determine if derived atmospheric parameters support the classification of more recent studies as a nonmember of the cluster. The studies base their decisions on its deviation in radial velocity from the cluster mean. It is concluded that there is little solid evidence to support the dismissal of Her 85 from metallicity studies of IC 4756 and present-day membership and proper motion studies with modern equipment are required to confirm or reject this theory.

  11. Search for associations containing young stars: chemical tagging IC 2391 and the Argus association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, G. M.; D'Orazi, V.; Melo, C.; Torres, C. A. O.; Gieles, M.; Quast, G. R.; Sterzik, M.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the possible connection between the open cluster IC 2391 and the unbound Argus association identified by the search for associations containing young stars survey. In addition to common kinematics and ages between these two systems, here we explore their chemical abundance patterns to confirm if the two substructures shared a common origin. We carry out a homogenous high-resolution elemental abundance study of eight confirmed members of IC 2391 as well as six members of the Argus association using UVES spectra. We derive spectroscopic stellar parameters and abundances for Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni and Ba. All stars in the open cluster and Argus association were found to share similar abundances with the scatter well within the uncertainties, where [Fe/H] = -0.04 ± 0.03 for cluster stars and [Fe/H] = -0.06 ± 0.05 for Argus stars. Effects of overionization/excitation were seen for stars cooler than roughly 5200 K as previously noted in the literature. Also, enhanced Ba abundances of around 0.6 dex were observed in both systems. The common ages, kinematics and chemical abundances strongly support the fact that the Argus association stars originated from the open cluster IC 2391. Simple modelling of this system finds this dissolution to be consistent with two-body interactions.

  12. High-resolution elemental abundance analysis of the open cluster IC 4756

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; De Silva, Gayandhi M.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Parker, Stacey Jo

    2012-11-01

    We present detailed elemental abundances of 12 subgiants in the open cluster IC 4756 including Na, Al, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Fe, Zn and Ba. We measure the cluster to have [Fe/H] = -0.01 ± 0.10. Most of the measured star-to-star [X/H] abundance variation is below σ < 0.03, as expected from a coeval stellar population preserving natal abundance patterns, supporting the use of elemental abundances as a probe to reconstruct dispersed clusters. We find discrepancies between Cr I and Cr II abundances as well as between Ti I and Ti II abundances, where the ionized abundances are larger by about 0.2 dex. This follows other such studies which demonstrate the effects of overionization in cool stars. IC 4756 are supersolar in Mg, Si, Na and Al, but are solar in the other elements. The fact that IC 4756 is supersolar in some α-elements (Mg, Si) but solar in the others (Ca, Ti) suggests that the production of α-elements is not simply one dimensional and could be exploited for chemical tagging.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IC 2391 and Argus young stars (de Silva+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, G. M.; D'Orazi, V.; Melo, C.; Torres, C. A. O.; Gieles, M.; Quast, G. R.; Sterzik, M.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possible connection between the open cluster IC 2391 and the unbound Argus association identified by the search for associations containing young stars survey. In addition to common kinematics and ages between these two systems, here we explore their chemical abundance patterns to confirm if the two substructures shared a common origin. We carry out a homogeneous high-resolution elemental abundance study of eight confirmed members of IC 2391 as well as six members of the Argus association using UVES spectra. We derive spectroscopic stellar parameters and abundances for Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni and Ba. All stars in the open cluster and Argus association were found to share similar abundances with the scatter well within the uncertainties, where [Fe/H]=-0.04+/-0.03 for cluster stars and [Fe/H]=-0.06+/-0.05 for Argus stars. Effects of overionization/excitation were seen for stars cooler than roughly 5200K as previously noted in the literature. Also, enhanced Ba abundances of around 0.6dex were observed in both systems. The common ages, kinematics and chemical abundances strongly support the fact that the Argus association stars originated from the open cluster IC 2391. Simple modelling of this system finds this dissolution to be consistent with two-body interactions. (4 data files).

  14. Metabolic Effects Associated with ICS in Patients with COPD and Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes: A Historical Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Price, David B.; Burden, Anne; Skinner, Derek; Mikkelsen, Helga; Ding, Cherlyn; Brice, Richard; Chavannes, Niels H.; Kocks, Janwillem W. H.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Haughney, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Management guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are prescribed to patients with the most severe symptoms. However, these guidelines have not been widely implemented by physicians, leading to widespread use of ICS in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. Of particular concern is the potential risk of worsening diabetic control associated with ICS use. Here we investigate whether ICS therapy in patients with COPD and comorbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a negative impact on diabetic control, and whether these negative effects are dose-dependent. Methods and Findings This was a historical matched cohort study utilising primary care medical record data from two large UK databases. We selected patients aged ≥40 years with COPD and T2DM, prescribed ICS (n = 1360) or non-ICS therapy (n = 2642) between 2008 and 2012. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c between the baseline and outcome periods. After 1:1 matching, each cohort consisted of 682 patients. Over the 12–18-month outcome period, patients prescribed ICS had significantly greater increases in HbA1c values compared with those prescribed non-ICS therapies; adjusted difference 0.16% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.05–0.27%) in all COPD patients, and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.10–0.40%) in mild-to-moderate COPD patients. Patients in the ICS cohort also had significantly more diabetes-related general practice visits per year and received more frequent glucose strip prescriptions, compared with those prescribed non-ICS therapies. Patients prescribed higher cumulative doses of ICS (>250 mg) had greater odds of increased HbA1c and/or receiving additional antidiabetic medication, and increased odds of being above the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) target for HbA1c levels, compared with those prescribed lower cumulative doses (≤125 mg). Conclusion For patients with COPD and comorbid T2DM, ICS therapy may have a negative impact on

  15. PREFACE: IC-MSQUARE 2012: International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, Theocharis; Vagenas, Elias; Vlachos, Dimitrios

    2013-02-01

    The first International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Budapest, Hungary, from Monday 3 to Friday 7 September 2012. The conference was attended by more than 130 participants, and hosted about 290 oral, poster and virtual papers by more than 460 pre-registered authors. The first IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields in which mathematical modelling is used, such as theoretical/mathematical physics, neutrino physics, non-integrable systems, dynamical systems, computational nanoscience, biological physics, computational biomechanics, complex networks, stochastic modelling, fractional statistics, DNA dynamics, and macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, two parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The mounting question is whether this occurred accidentally, or whether IC-MSQUARE is a necessity in the field of physical and mathematical modelling. For all of us working in the field, the existing and established conferences in this particular field suffer from two distinguished and recognized drawbacks: the first is the increasing orientation, while the second refers to the extreme specialization of the meetings. Therefore, a conference which aims to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with applications of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology, environmental sciences etc., appears to be a necessity. This is the key role that IC-MSQUARE will play. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to IC-MSQUARE. We would also

  16. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand- Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  17. Refined turbulence models for simulation of IC-engine cylinder flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Ibrahim

    2000-11-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing are two of the most important factors that influence the efficiency and emissions level in internal combustion (IC) engines, particularly for diesel engines. This study has been performed with the premise to accurately predict in-cylinder turbulence by employing the large eddy simulation (LES) technique. In order to assess the turbulence scales involved correctly, a review of measured and computed scales relevant to IC engines is conducted. An assessment of these is made in comparison with the self-imposed scales of the engine itself. This assessment focuses on the influence of combustion, compression ratio, initial conditions and numerical mesh on predicted turbulence scales. It was found that the turbulence scales predicted by employing the commonly used k-epsilon turbulence model were in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations and could be used as a guide to determine the degree of resolution needed in LES. To establish a base to improve existing Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, a comparative study of the commonly used RANS models applied to IC engines was conducted, using an experimental benchmark case, which is an isothermal, incompressible flow within a piston-cylinder arrangement motored without combustion. This study has lead to a new hybrid turbulence model, namely, the Smagorinsky based eddy viscosity (SEV) model, which is self-adjusting between an eddy viscosity model and subgrid-scale model, depending on the grid size, continuously from RANS to LES. It was tested against the above-mentioned experimental benchmark. The predicted velocity profiles and streamlines are in good agreement with experiments. The new model is a viable alternative to the k-epsilon model in predicting the mean flowfield in IC engines. Furthermore, the relative importance of the turbulence generation mechanisms in IC engines has been studied using LES. First, the compression and expansion strokes of a piston

  18. Recent Progress in Planetary Laboratory Astrophysics achieved with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-10-01

    We describe the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for "Cosmic Simulation Chamber" and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nanoparticles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate various space environments such as planetary atmospheres. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. The COSmIC experimental setup is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion, that generates a plasma in the stream of a free supersonic jet expansion, coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection [2, 3], and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [4].Recent results obtained using COSmIC will be highlighted. In particular, the progress that has been achieved in an on-going study investigating the formation and the characterization of laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols generated from gas-phase molecular precursors [5] will be presented. Plans for future laboratory experiments on planetary molecules and aerosols in the growing field of planetary laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed, as well as the implications of studies underway for astronomical observations.References: [1] Salama F., in Organic Matter in Space, IAU S251, Kwok & Sandford eds, CUP, S251, 4, 357 (2008).[2] Biennier L., Salama, F., Allamandola L., & Scherer J., J. Chem. Phys., 118, 7863 (2003)[3] Tan X, & Salama F., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 84318 (2005)[4] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Excavation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken July 13, 1961, progress is being made with the excavation of the S-IC test stand site. During the digging, a natural spring was disturbed which caused a constant flooding problem. Pumps were used to remove the water all through the construction process and the site is still pumped today.

  20. Fermi Observations of Resolved Large-Scale Jets: Testing the IC/CMB Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiding, Peter; Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2017-01-01

    It has been observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory since the early 2000s that many powerful quasar jets show X-ray emission on the kpc scale (Harris & Krawczynski, 2006). In many cases these X-rays cannot be explained by the extension of the radio-optical spectrum produced by synchrotron emitting electrons in the jet, since the observed X-ray flux is too high and the X-ray spectral index too hard. A widely accepted model for the X-ray emission first proposed by Celotti et al. 2001 and Tavecchio et al. 2000 posits that the X-rays are produced when relativistic electrons in the jet up-scatter ambient cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons via inverse Compton scattering from microwave to X-ray energies (the IC/CMB model). However, explaining the X-ray emission for these jets with the IC/CMB model requires high levels of IC/CMB γ-ray emission (Georganopoulos et al., 2006), which we are looking for using the FERMI/LAT γ-ray space telescope. Another viable model for the large scale jet X-ray emission favored by the results of Meyer et al. 2015 and Meyer & Georganopoulos 2014 is an alternate population of synchrotron emitting electrons. In contrast with the second synchrotron interpretation; the IC/CMB model requires jets with high kinetic powers which can exceed the Eddington luminsoity (Dermer & Atoyan 2004 and Atoyan & Dermer 2004) and be very fast on the kpc scale with a Γ~10 (Celotti et al. 2001 and Tavecchio et al. 2000). New results from data obtained with the Fermi/LAT will be shown for several quasars not in the Fermi/LAT 3FGL catalog whose large scale X-ray jets are attributed to IC/CMB. Additionally, recent work on the γ-ray bright blazar AP Librae will be shown which helps to constrain some models attempting to explain the high energy component of its SED, which extends from X-ray to TeV energies (e.g., Zacharias & Wagner 2016 & Petropoulou et al. 2016).

  1. Recent Progresses in Laboratory Astrophysics with Ames’ COSmIC Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-06-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) [3] and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [4] and planetary atmospheres [5]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References: [1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Salama F., Galazutdinov G., Krelowski J

  2. Laboratory Astrophysics Studies with the COSmIC Facility: Interstellar and Planetary Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar S.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2015-08-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [3] and planetary atmospheres [4]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References:[1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Cesar Contreras and Farid Salama, The

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo, taken August 12, 1963, the S-IC stand has received some of its internal components. Directly in the center is the framework

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House Waterline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken September 25, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen rotated to the outside on

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand and Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph taken February 4, 1963, gives an impressive look at the Block House looking directly through the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Completed Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken February 25, 1963, gives a close up look at the completed Block House. The side shown faces the S-IC Test Stand.

  8. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Complex-Aerial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and

  9. Humanized H19/Igf2 locus reveals diverged imprinting mechanism between mouse and human and reflects Silver–Russell syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Stella K.; Freschi, Andrea; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Thorvaldsen, Joanne L.; Luense, Lacey J.; Weller, Angela H.; Berger, Shelley L.; Cerrato, Flavia; Riccio, Andrea; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals, such that they are expressed in a monoallelic, parent-of-origin–specific manner. These genes are regulated by imprinting control regions (ICRs), cis-regulatory elements that exhibit allele-specific differential DNA methylation. Although genomic imprinting is conserved in mammals, ICRs are genetically divergent across species. This raises the fundamental question of whether the ICR plays a species-specific role in regulating imprinting at a given locus. We addressed this question at the H19/insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) imprinted locus, the misregulation of which is associated with the human imprinting disorders Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS). We generated a knock-in mouse in which the endogenous H19/Igf2 ICR (mIC1) is replaced by the orthologous human ICR (hIC1) sequence, designated H19hIC1. We show that hIC1 can functionally replace mIC1 on the maternal allele. In contrast, paternally transmitted hIC1 leads to growth restriction, abnormal hIC1 methylation, and loss of H19 and Igf2 imprinted expression. Imprint establishment at hIC1 is impaired in the male germ line, which is associated with an abnormal composition of histone posttranslational modifications compared with mIC1. Overall, this study reveals evolutionarily divergent paternal imprinting at IC1 between mice and humans. The conserved maternal imprinting mechanism and function at IC1 demonstrates the possibility of modeling maternal transmission of hIC1 mutations associated with BWS in mice. In addition, we propose that further analyses in the paternal knock-in H19+/hIC1 mice will elucidate the molecular mechanisms that may underlie SRS. PMID:27621468

  10. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. First determination of s-process element abundances in pre-main sequence clusters. Y, Zr, La, and Ce in IC 2391, the Argus association, and IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazi, V.; De Silva, G. M.; Melo, C. F. H.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Several high-resolution spectroscopic studies have provided compelling observational evidence that open clusters display a decreasing trend of their barium abundances as a function of the cluster's age. Young clusters (ages ≲ 200 Myr) exhibit significant enhancement in the [Ba/Fe] ratios, at variance with solar-age clusters where the Ba content has been found to be [Ba/Fe] 0 dex. Different viable solutions have been suggested in the literature; nevertheless, a conclusive interpretation of such a peculiar trend has not been found. Interestingly, it is debated whether the other species produced with Ba via s-process reactions follow the same trend with age. Aims: Pre-main sequence clusters (≈10-50 Myr) show the most extreme behaviour in this respect: their [Ba/Fe] ratios can reach 0.65 dex, which is higher than the solar value by a factor of four. Crucially, there are no investigations of the other s-process species for these young stellar populations. In this paper we present the first determination of Y, Zr, La, and Ce in clusters IC 2391, IC 2602, and the Argus association. The main objective of our work is to ascertain whether these elements reveal the same enhancement as Ba. Methods: We have exploited high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra in order to derive abundances for Y, Zr, La, and Ce via spectral synthesis calculations. Our sample includes only stars with very similar atmospheric parameters so that internal errors due to star-to-star inhomogeneity are negligible. The chemical analysis was carried out in a strictly differential way, as done in all our previous investigations, to minimise the impact of systematic uncertainties. Results: Our results indicate that, at variance with Ba, all the other s-process species exhibit a solar scaled pattern; these clusters confirm a similar trend discovered in the slightly older local associations (e.g. AB Doradus, Carina-Near), where only Ba exhibit enhanced value with all other s-process species

  12. Differences in the efficacy and safety among inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) combinations in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Role of ICS.

    PubMed

    Latorre, M; Novelli, F; Vagaggini, B; Braido, F; Papi, A; Sanduzzi, A; Santus, P; Scichilone, N; Paggiaro, P

    2015-02-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are frequently recommended for the treatment of asthma and COPD, often in combination with long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA), depending on the severity of the disease and/or on the specific phenotype. Several ICS/LABA combinations are currently available that differ in their pharmacokinetic characteristics and dose of both components. Thus, this review assesses differences in the efficacy and the safety profiles of the ICS components in the two more frequently used ICS/LABA combinations (budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol) for the management of COPD. Whereas the basic mechanism of action is similar for all ICS (binding with the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor, which mediates both genomic and non genomic effects), the pharmacokinetic and characteristics of ICS are quite different in terms of receptor affinity, bioavailability, lipophilicity and drug persistence in the airways. Fluticasone persists longer in airway mucus and requires more time to dissolve in the lining fluid and then enter the airway wall, whereas budesonide is cleared more quickly from the airways. Comparative efficacy of the two major ICS/LABA combinations recommended for the treatment of COPD show similar efficacy in terms of reduction of exacerbations, improvement in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and quality of life. One retrospective cohort study suggested a greater efficacy for the budesonide/formoterol combination on hospital or emergency department admissions, oral corticosteroid courses, and addition of tiotropium, and an observational real-life study reported a greater reduction of COPD exacerbations with budesonide/formoterol than with fluticasom/salmeterol combination. Among the potential side effects of chronic ICS treatment in patients with COPD, recently the use of fluticasone or fluticasone/salmeterol combination has been associated with a higher prevalence of pneumonia in the major long-term studies. On the other

  13. A sensitive data extraction algorithm based on the content associated encryption technology for ICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Hao, Huang; Xie, Changsheng

    With the development of HD video, the protection of copyright becomes more complicated. More advanced copyright protection technology is needed. Traditional digital copyright protection technology generally uses direct or selective encryption algorithm and the key does not associate with the video content [1]. Once the encryption method is cracked or the key is stolen, the copyright of the video will be violated. To address this issue, this paper proposes a Sensitive Data Extraction Algorithm (SDEA) based on the content associated encryption technology which applies to the Internet Certification Service (ICS). The principle of content associated encryption is to extract some data from the video and use this extracted data as the key to encrypt the rest data. The extracted part from video is called sensitive data, and the rest part is called the main data. After extraction, the main data will not be played or poorly played. The encrypted sensitive data reach the terminal device through the safety certificated network and the main data are through ICS disc. The terminal equipments are responsible for synthesizing and playing these two parts of data. Consequently, even if the main data on disc is illegally obtained, the video cannot be played normally due to the lack of necessary sensitive data. It is proved by experiments that ICS using SDEA can destruct the video effectively with 0.25% extraction rates and the destructed video cannot be played well. It can also guarantee the consistency of the destructive effect on different videos with different contents. The sensitive data can be transported smoothly under the home Internet bandwidth.

  14. Developing a Decision Support System for Flood Response: NIMS/ICS Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenson, J. L.; Zhang, X.; Ernest, A. N. S.; Oubeidillah, A.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective response to regional disasters such as floods requires a multipronged, non-linear approach to reduce loss of life, property and harm to the environment. These coordinated response actions are typically undertaken by multiple jurisdictions, levels of government, functional agencies and other responsible entities. A successful response is highly dependent on the effectiveness and efficiency of each coordinated response action undertaken across a broad spectrum of organizations and activities. In order to provide a unified framework for those responding to incidents or planned events, FEMA provides a common and flexible approach for managing incidents, regardless of cause, size, location or complexity, referred to as the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Integral to NIMS is the Incident Command System (ICS), which establishes a common, pre-defined organizational structure to ensure coordination and management of procedures, resources and communications, for efficient incident management. While being both efficient and rigorous, NIMS, and ICS to a lesser extent, is an inherently complex framework that requires significant amount of training for planners, responders and managers to master, especially considering the wide array of incident types that Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) must be prepared to respond to. The existing Water-Wizard Decision Support System (DSS), developed to support water distribution system recovery operations for Decontamination (Decon), Operational Optimization (WDS), and Economic Consequence Assessment (Econ), is being evolved to integrate incident response functions. Water-Wizard runs on both mobile and desktop devices, and is being extended to utilize smartphone and mobile device specific data streams (e.g GPS location) to augment its fact-base in real-time for situational-aware DSS recommendations. In addition, the structured NIMS and ICS frameworks for incident management and response are being incorporated

  15. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technological Processes (IC-CMTP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Gömze A.

    2013-12-01

    Competitiveness is one of the most important factors in our life and it plays a key role in the efficiency both of organizations and societies. The more scientifically supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive materials with better physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technology processes. The aims of the 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes (ic-cmtp2) are the following: Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of material, biological, environmental and technology sciences; Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. Promote the communication between the scientist of different nations, countries and continents. Among the major fields of interest are materials with extreme physical, chemical, biological, medical, thermal, mechanical properties and dynamic strength; including their crystalline and nano-structures, phase transformations as well as methods of their technological processes, tests and measurements. Multidisciplinary applications of materials science and technological problems encountered in sectors like ceramics, glasses, thin films, aerospace, automotive and marine industry, electronics, energy, construction materials, medicine, biosciences and environmental sciences are of particular interest. In accordance to the program of the conference ic-cmtp2, more than 250 inquiries and registrations from different organizations were received. Researchers from 36 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America arrived at the venue of conference. Including co-authors, the research work of more than 500 scientists are presented in this volume. Professor Dr Gömze A László Chair, ic-cmtp2 The PDF also contains lists of the boards, session chairs and sponsors.

  16. ON THE RADIAL EXTENT OF THE DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC10

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, N.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R.; Stetson, P. B.; Ferraro, I.; Caputo, F.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Bresolin, R.; Cignoni, M.; Matsunaga, N.; Pietrinferni, A.; Romaniello, M.; Storm, J.; Walker, A. R.

    2010-10-20

    We present new deep and accurate space (Advanced Camera for Surveys-Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope) and ground-based (Suprime-Cam at Subaru Telescope, Mega-Cam at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) photometric and astrometric data for the Local Group dwarf irregular IC10. We confirm the significant decrease of the young stellar population when moving from the center toward the outermost regions. We find that the tidal radius of IC10 is significantly larger than previous estimates of r{sub t} {approx_lt} 10'. By using the I, V-I color-magnitude diagram based on the Suprime-Cam data, we detect sizable samples of red giant (RG) stars up to radial distances of 18'-23' from the galactic center. The ratio between observed star counts (Mega-Cam data) across the tip of the RG branch and star counts predicted by Galactic models indicates a star count excess at least at a 3{sigma} level up to 34'-42' from the center. This finding supports the hypothesis that the huge H I cloud covering more than 1{sup 0} across the galaxy is associated with IC10. We also provide new estimates of the total luminosity (L{sub V} {approx} 9 x 10{sup 7} L {sub sun}, M{sub V} {approx} -15.1 mag) that agree with similar estimates available in the literature. If we restrict our study to the regions where rotational velocity measurements are available (r {approx} 13'), we find a mass-to-light ratio ({approx}10 M {sub sun}/L {sub sun}) that is at least one order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. The new estimate should be cautiously treated, since it is based on a minimal fraction of the body of the galaxy.

  17. Unveiling the AGN in IC 883: discovery of a parsec-scale radio jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cañizales, C.; Alberdi, A.; Ricci, C.; Arévalo, P.; Pérez-Torres, M. Á.; Conway, J. E.; Beswick, R. J.; Bondi, M.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K.; Bauer, F. E.; Efstathiou, A.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    IC 883 is a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) classified as a starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) composite. In a previous study we detected a low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) radio candidate. Here we report on our radio follow-up at three frequencies which provides direct and unequivocal evidence of the AGN activity in IC 883. Our analysis of archival X-ray data, together with the detection of a transient radio source with luminosity typical of bright supernovae, give further evidence of the ongoing star formation activity, which dominates the energetics of the system. At sub-parsec scales, the radio nucleus has a core-jet morphology with the jet being a newly ejected component showing a subluminal proper motion of 0.6-1 c. The AGN contributes less than two per cent of the total IR luminosity of the system. The corresponding Eddington factor is ˜10-3, suggesting this is a low-accretion rate engine, as often found in LLAGNs. However, its high bolometric luminosity (˜1044 erg s-1) agrees better with a normal AGN. This apparent discrepancy may just be an indication of the transition nature of the nucleus from a system dominated by star-formation, to an AGN-dominated system. The nucleus has a strongly inverted spectrum and a turnover at ˜4.4 GHz, thus qualifying as a candidate for the least luminous (L5.0 GHz ˜ 6.3 × 1028 erg s-1 Hz-1) and one of the youngest (˜3 × 103 yr) gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) sources. If the GPS origin for the IC 883 nucleus is confirmed, then advanced mergers in the LIRG category are potentially key environments to unveil the evolution of GPS sources into more powerful radio galaxies.

  18. X-ray properties of the young open clusters HM1 and IC 2944/2948

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Y.; Rauw, G.; Sana, H.; Corcoran, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    Using XMM-Newton data, we study for the first time the X-ray emission of HM1 and IC 2944/2948. Low-mass, pre-main-sequence objects with an age of a few Myr are detected, as well as a few background or foreground objects. Most massive stars in both clusters display the usual high-energy properties of that type of objects, though with log [LX/LBOL] apparently lower in HM1 than in IC 2944/2948. Compared with studies of other clusters, it seems that a low signal-to-noise ratio at soft energies, due to the high extinction, may be the main cause of this difference. In HM1, the two Wolf-Rayet stars show contrasting behaviors: WR89 is extremely bright, but much softer than WR87. It remains to be seen whether wind-wind collisions or magnetically confined winds can explain these emissions. In IC 2944/2948, the X-ray sources concentrate around HD 101205; a group of massive stars to the north of this object is isolated, suggesting that there exist two subclusters in the field-of-view. Tables 2, 5, and Figs. 5, 9 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).Tables 1, 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A83

  19. Multispectral analysis of Cygnus Loop and IC 443 with iFTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarie, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Cygnus Loop and IC 443 are supernova remnants (SNRs) recognized as excellent laboratories to study the interaction between the SNR and the surrounding interstellar medium. The overall complex morphologies and large dimensions of those SNRs have always represented an observational challenge. This is especially true for optical observations for which the data available are very scarce. In order to palliate this scarcity in the optical regime, we are using two wide field-imaging Fourier transform spectrometers (iFTS): SpIOMM, attached to the Mont Megantic 1.6-m telescope and SITELLE recently installed at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Both instruments are capable of obtaining the spatially resolved visible spectrum of every source of light in an 11 arc minute field of view, in selected bandpasses. Using those iFTS on extended object such as Cygnus Loop and IC 443, we have obtained millions of spectra covering all major emission lines. Due to the large projected surface of Cygnus Loop and IC 443, we started a survey and the latest dataset will be presented. The extended 2D mappings of several emission lines ([O II] 3727, [O III] 4363, Hb, [O III] 4959, 5007, Ha, [N II] 6548, 6583 and [S II] 6716, 6731) allowed the creation of numerous ratios maps useful for shock diagnostics: shock velocity, electronic and temperature densities, location of incomplete shocks and extinction maps. These maps are then used to determine key parameters needed to compare the observations with theoretical shock models. Using the shock modeling code MAPPINGS, we can create abundances maps of nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur for an appreciable fraction of the observed regions. Furthermore, using the radial velocity as well as the spectro-imagery capability of the iFTS, we can have a glimpse of the three-dimensional structure of the remnants. All those data allow us to forge a coherent analysis of the complex interaction between the SNRs and their surrounding environment.

  20. Properties of Magnetars Mimicking 56Ni-powered Light Curves in Type IC Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Many Type Ic superluminous supernovae have light-curve decline rates after their luminosity peak, which are close to the nuclear decay rate of {}56{Co}, consistent with the interpretation that they are powered by {}56{Ni} and possibly pair-instability supernovae. However, their rise times are typically shorter than those expected from pair-instability supernovae, and Type Ic superluminous supernovae are often suggested to be powered by magnetar spin-down. If magnetar spin-down is actually a major mechanism to power Type Ic superluminous supernovae, it should be able to produce decline rates similar to the {}56{Co} decay rate rather easily. In this study, we investigate the conditions for magnetars under which their spin-down energy input can behave like the {}56{Ni} nuclear decay energy input. We find that an initial magnetic field strength within a certain range is sufficient to keep the magnetar energy deposition within a factor of a few of the {}56{Co} decay energy for several hundreds of days. Magnetar spin-down needs to be by almost pure dipole radiation with the braking index close to three to mimic {}56{Ni} in a wide parameter range. Not only late-phase {}56{Co}-decay-like light curves, but also rise time and peak luminosity of most {}56{Ni}-powered light curves can be reproduced by magnetars. Bolometric light curves for more than 700 days are required to distinguish the two energy sources solely by them. We expect that more slowly declining superluminous supernovae with short rise times should be found if they are mainly powered by magnetar spin-down.

  1. A human imprinting centre demonstrates conserved acquisition but diverged maintenance of imprinting in a mouse model for Angelman syndrome imprinting defects.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Karen A; DuBose, Amanda J; Futtner, Christopher R; Elmore, Michael D; Brannan, Camilynn I; Resnick, James L

    2006-02-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are caused by the loss of imprinted gene expression from chromosome 15q11-q13. Imprinted gene expression in the region is regulated by a bipartite imprinting centre (IC), comprising the PWS-IC and the AS-IC. The PWS-IC is a positive regulatory element required for bidirectional activation of a number of paternally expressed genes. The function of the AS-IC appears to be to suppress PWS-IC function on the maternal chromosome through a methylation imprint acquired during female gametogenesis. Here we have placed the entire mouse locus under the control of a human PWS-IC by targeted replacement of the mouse PWS-IC with the equivalent human region. Paternal inheritance of the human PWS-IC demonstrates for the first time that a positive regulatory element in the PWS-IC has diverged. These mice show postnatal lethality and growth deficiency, phenotypes not previously attributed directly to the affected genes. Following maternal inheritance, the human PWS-IC is able to acquire a methylation imprint in mouse oocytes, suggesting that acquisition of the methylation imprint is conserved. However, the imprint is lost in somatic cells, showing that maintenance has diverged. This maternal imprinting defect results in expression of maternal Ube3a-as and repression of Ube3a in cis, providing evidence that Ube3a is regulated by its antisense and creating the first reported mouse model for AS imprinting defects.

  2. POxylated Polyurea Dendrimers: Smart Core-Shell Vectors with IC50 Lowering Capacity.

    PubMed

    Restani, Rita B; Conde, João; Pires, Rita F; Martins, Pedro; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V; Bonifácio, Vasco D B; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2015-08-01

    The design and preparation of highly efficient drug delivery platforms using green methodologies is at the forefront of nanotherapeutics research. POxylated polyurea dendrimers are efficiently synthesized using a supercritical-assisted polymerization in carbon dioxide. These fluorescent, pH-responsive and water-soluble core-shell smart nanocarriers show low toxicity in terms of cell viability and absence of glutathione depletion, two of the major side effect limitations of current vectors. The materials are also found to act as good transfection agents, through a mechanism involving an endosomal pathway, being able to reduce 100-fold the IC50 of paclitaxel.

  3. Analog/digital pH meter system I.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Paul; Park, Jea

    1992-01-01

    The project utilizes design automation software tools to design, simulate, and fabricate a pH meter integrated circuit (IC) system including a successive approximation type seven-bit analog to digital converter circuits using a 1.25 micron N-Well CMOS MOSIS process. The input voltage ranges from 0.5 to 1.0 V derived from a special type pH sensor, and the output is a three-digit decimal number display of pH with one decimal point.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House Water Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Pump House Water Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This close up photograph, taken September 5, 1963, shows the ground level frame work for the Pump House and its massive

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Water Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photograph, a construction worker demonstrates the size of the massive water valve that was used in the testing cooling

  8. Combined air-oil cooling on a supercharged TC IC TAM diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Trenc, F. ); Pavletic, R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    In order to reduce the maximum cylinder wall temperatures of an air-cooled TC IC diesel engine with large longitudinal and circumferential temperature gradients, a curved, squared cross-sectional channel supplied with engine lubrication oil was introduced into the upper part of the cylinder wall. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer within the baseline air-cooled cylinder and intensive experimental work helped to understand the temperature situation in the cylinder at diverse engine running conditions. The results of the combined cooling were greatly affected by the design, dimensions, position of the channel, and the distribution of the cooling oil flow, and are presented in the paper.

  9. Static and dynamic properties of incommensurate smectic-A(IC) liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubensky, T. C.; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John

    1988-01-01

    The elasticity, topological defects, and hydrodynamics of the incommensurate smectic A(IC) phase liquid crystals are studied. The phase is characterized by two colinear mass density waves of incommensurate spatial frequency. The elastic free energy is formulated in terms of a displacement field and a phason field. It is found that the topological defects of the system are dislocations with a nonzero phason field and phason field components. A two-dimensional Burgers lattice for these dislocations is introduced. It is shown that the hydrodynamic modes of the phase include first- and second-sound modes whose direction-dependent velocities are identical to those in ordinary smectics.

  10. Solar cell and I.C. aspects of ingot-to-slice mechanical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    Intensive efforts have been put into the growth of silicon crystals to suit today's solar cell and integrated circuit requirements. Each step of processing the crystal must also receive concentrated attention to preserve the grown-in perfection and to provide a suitable device-ready wafer at reasonable cost. A comparison is made between solar cell and I.C. requirements on the mechanical processing of silicon from ingot to wafer. Specific defects are described that can ruin the slice or can possibly lead to device degradation. These include grinding cracks, saw exit chips, crow's-foot fractures, edge cracks, and handling scratches.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVRcIC photometry of V2615 Oph (Munari+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Henden, A.; Valentini, M.; Siviero, A.; Dallaporta, S.; Ochner, P.; Tomasoni, S.

    2009-06-01

    The BVRcIc photometric evolution of NOph07 has been monitored, for seven months and over a 7mag decline, with three different telescopes: (a) the Sonoita Research Observatory (SRO) 0.35-m Celestron C14 robotic telescope (b) the 0.30-m Meade RCX-400 f/8 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope owned by Associazione Astrofili Valle di Cembra (Trento, Italy), and (c) the 0.50-m f/8 Ritchey-Cretien telescope operated on top of Mt. Zugna by Museo Civico di Rovereto (Trento, Italy) (1 data file).

  12. A controllable IC-compatible thin-film fuse realized using electro-explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuran Lou, Wenzhong E-mail: fengyue@bit.edu.cn; Feng, Yue E-mail: fengyue@bit.edu.cn

    2016-01-15

    A controllable IC-compatible thin-film fuse was developed that had Al/SiO{sub 2} thin-film stacks on a silicon substrate. The micro fuse has both a traditional mode and a controllable mode when applied as a fuse. It blows at 800 mA and 913.8 mV in the traditional mode. In the controllable mode, it blows within 400 ns at 10 V. It can be used for small electronic elements as well as electropyrotechnic initiators to improve the no-firing current.

  13. Transformation studies of Bacillus thuringiensis cryIC gene into a nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum lipoferum.

    PubMed

    Gounder, R; Rajendran, N

    2001-01-01

    A lepidopteran toxin gene, cryIC (pSB607) from entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai was introduced into nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum lipoferum by transformation. Regeneration of spheroplasts was achieved at 99% with 39% frequency of regeneration. Transformants were screened on NB kanamycin with ampicillin plates and 4 transformants were selected after ten generations. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of a 68 kDa protein in the transformants. Studies on utilization of carbon sources indicate that glucose and sucrose are the most favorable carbon sources and 2% molasses is the cheap alternate carbon source for the better growth of parent A. lipoferum and transformants.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Faraday tomography of foreground towards IC342 (Van Eck+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eck, C. L.; Haverkorn, M.; Alves, M. I. R.; Beck, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Ensslin, T.; Farnes, J. S.; Ferriere, K.; Heald, G.; Horellou, C.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jelic, V.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Reich, W.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Sobey, C.; Sridhar, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    The Faraday depth cube of the IC342 field in polarized intensity, produced from LOFAR HBA observations as part of LOFAR proposal LC0_043. The cube is approximately 5x5 degrees in size, with 4-arcmin resolution, and covers Faraday depths from -25 to +25rad/m2. The detailed specifications are given in the table and in the FITS header. Selected frames from this cubes are shown in the paper in Figures 2 through 5. An extended description of the data processing leading to this cube is included in the paper. (2 data files).

  15. Surprisingly high-pressure shocks in the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    The intensities of several lines of molecular hydrogen have been measured from two regions of the supernova-remnant/molecular-cloud shock in IC 443. The lines measured have upper-state energies ranging from 7000 K to 23,000 K. Their relative intensities differ in the two regions, but are consistent with those predicted from the post-shock regions of simple jump-type shocks of different pressure. The pressures so derived are far higher than the pressure in the supernova remnant itself, and a possible reason for this discrepancy is discussed.

  16. Design of a 3D-IC multi-resolution digital pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard, N.; Nebhen, J.; Dubois, J.; Ginhac, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a digital pixel sensor (DPS) integrating a sigma-delta analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at pixel level. The digital pixel includes a photodiode, a delta-sigma modulation and a digital decimation filter. It features adaptive dynamic range and multiple resolutions (up to 10-bit) with a high linearity. A specific row decoder and column decoder are also designed to permit to read a specific pixel chosen in the matrix and its neighborhood of 4 x 4. Finally, a complete design with the CMOS 130 nm 3D-IC FaStack Tezzaron technology is also described, revealing a high fill-factor of about 80%.

  17. ic-cmtp3: 3rd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-04-01

    Competitiveness is one of the most important factors in our lives and it plays a key role in the efficiency both of organizations and societies. The more scientifically advanced and prepared organizations develop more competitive materials with better physical, chemical, and biological properties, and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technological processes. The aims of the 3rd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes (ic-cmtp3), and the 1st International Symposium on Innovative Carbons and Carbon Based Materials (is-icbm1) and the 1st International Symposium on Innovative Construction Materials (is-icm1) organized alongside are the following: —Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of material, biological, environmental and technological sciences; —Exchange information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implementations; —Promote communication and collaboration between the scientists, researchers and engineers of different nations, countries and continents. Among the major fields of interest are advanced and innovative materials with competitive characteristics, including mechanical, physical, chemical, biological, medical and thermal, properties and extreme dynamic strength. Their crystalline, nano - and micro-structures, phase transformations as well as details of their technological processes, tests and measurements are also in the focus of the ic-cmtp3 conference and the is-scbm1 and is-icm1 symposia. Multidisciplinary applications of material science and the technological problems encountered in sectors like ceramics, glasses, thin films, aerospace, automotive and marine industries, electronics, energy, construction materials, medicine, biosciences and environmental sciences are of particular interest. In accordance with the program of the ic-cmtp3 conference and is-icbm1 and is-icm1 symposia we have received more

  18. The emergence of GaAs IC's technology for high-speed digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzillat, G.

    The speed-power performance tradeoffs currently achieved by GaAs-FET logic ICs with 1-micron gate geometry is presented, taking advantage of performance data of a large variety of fabricated circuits including frequency dividers, arithmetic circuits, and random-access memories. Short-term perspectives offered by device-scaling down to quarter micron geometries and the use of structured design techniques are discussed. Finally, the prospects offered by supermobility heterojunction devices for ultra-high-speed VLSI circuit implementation are briefly assessed.

  19. Network security system for health and medical information using smart IC card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yoichi; Yachida, Masuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroharu; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1998-07-01

    A new network security protocol that uses smart IC cards has been designed to assure the integrity and privacy of medical information in communication over a non-secure network. Secure communication software has been implemented as a library based on this protocol, which is called the Integrated Secure Communication Layer (ISCL), and has been incorporated into information systems of the National Cancer Center Hospitals and the Health Service Center of the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Both systems have succeeded in communicating digital medical information securely.

  20. Estudio Fotométrico en la región de IC 2944/2948

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M. J.; Panei, J. A.; Corti, M. A.; Baume, G. L.; Carraro, G.

    Deep images in several bands corresponding to the area of IC 2944/2948 obtained using a wide-field camera (WFI/2.2m MPG / ESO); have been used in this work. Then we carried out PSF photometry of the combined images. Thus the behavior of the lower main sequence from the stellar population in this area has been studied. Our data were supplemented with information of the brightest objects available in different previous work and/or public databases. The preliminary analysis of the obtained data has allowed us to estimate the characteristics of the stellar population in this direction of the Galaxy. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XMM sources in IC 1805 (Rauw+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Naze, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The table provides the full catalogue of X-ray sources detected with the EPIC instruments onboard XMM-Newton inside the IC1805 cluster. The sources are ordered by increasing right ascension. The coordinates of the sources were cross-correlated with the optical and IR catalogues of Straizys et al. (2013, Cat. J/A+A/554/A3), Wolff et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/726/19), and the SIMBAD catalogue. We adopted in each case a correlation radius of 4 arcsec. (1 data file).

  2. Keeping Up with Healthcare Trends: IcHeart as a Medication Management Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Azah Samsudin, Noor

    2016-11-01

    According to the US governments, more than 125,000 people die each year due to failure to manage their medications, leading to approximately USD100 billion in preventable costs to healthcare systems. The core failure in medication management is attributed by patients failing to adhere their medication regimens, whether by accident, negligence, or intentional. Recognizing the importants of vigilant monitoring in medication management, this paper is set to review the latest android-based healthcare trends and propose a new mobile medication reminder application called IcHeart.

  3. Placement with Symmetry Constraints for Analog IC Layout Design Based on Tree Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Natsumi; Fujiyoshi, Kunihiro

    Symmetry constrains are the constraints that the given cells should be placed symmetrically in design of analog ICs. We use O-tree to represent placements and propose a decoding algorithm which can obtain one of the minimum placements satisfying the constraints. The decoding algorithm uses linear programming, which is too much time consuming. Therefore we propose a graph based method to recognize if there exists no placement satisfying both the given symmetry and O-tree constraints, and use the method before application of linear programming. The effectiveness of the proposed method was shown by computational experiments.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Time-series photometry of IC 348 (Fritzewski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzewski, D. J.; Kitze, M.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhauser, R.; Adam, C.; Briceno, C.; Buder, S.; Butterley, T.; Chen, W.-P.; Dincel, B.; Dhillon, V. S.; Errmann, R.; Garai, Z.; Gilbert, H. F. W.; Ginski, C.; Greif, J.; Hardy, L. K.; Hernandez, J.; Huang, P. C.; Kellerer, A.; Kundra, E.; Littlefair, S. P.; Mallonn, M.; Marka, C.; Pannicke, A.; Pribulla, T.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, J. G.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Wilson, R. W.; Wolf, V.

    2016-08-01

    Our Bessell R band photometric study of IC 348 used data from eight observatories. The observations were conducted between 2012 August 22 and 2015 January 18 in 125 nights. All telescopes had observed slightly different fields, while all stars were included in the field observed from the University Observatory Jena with the Schmidt telescope (centred at RA=3:45:20, DEC=+32:04:50). This telescope has a 2048x2048 CCD and a FoV of 52.8'x58.2'. In this work we present rotation periods for members and non-members alike. (1 data file).

  5. PSN J19065165-6142163 a supernova candidate by TAROT in IC 4815

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, A.

    2012-06-01

    From images taken on 2012 June 20.36 with the TAROT La Silla telescope A. Klotz report the discovery of a supernova candidate located at R.A. = 19h06m51.65s, Decl. = -61o42'16.3" (equinox 2000.0), which is offset of 6" E and 12" S from the nucleus of IC 4815. The image was R filtered and magnitude was R~19. The presence of the candidate is confirmed on two images taken on 2012 June 26.34 with the same telescope.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph, taken September 25, 1963, depicts the construction progress of the Pump House and massive round water

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Access Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken on May 21, 1962 depicts the access tunnel construction.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo, taken July 3, 1962, depicts the Block House with a portion of its concrete walls poured and exposed while many are still in the forms stage.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House Access Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Construction of the tunnel is depicted in this photo taken June 13, 1962.

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand- Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo, taken November 15, 1962, depicts a view of the Block House.

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House Access Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts a view of the Block House tunnel opening.

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand and Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This distant construction photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts a view of the Block House and test stand site.

  16. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts a nearly completed view of the Block House.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo, taken October 8, 1962, depicts a front view of the Block House nearing completion.

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo taken August 17, 1962 depicts a back side view of the Block House.

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo taken July 3, 1962 depicts the Block House with a portion of its concrete walls poured and exposed while many are still in the forms stage.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. In this photo taken February 4, 1963, the Block House exterior is complete.

  2. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Block House Access Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This construction photo taken August 17, 1962 depicts a view of the Block House from the test stand site. The tunnel opening is visible in the forefront center of the photo.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Demolition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a 6 month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications. The original foundation walls built in the prior year had to be torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger booster. The demolition can be seen in this photograph taken on April 16, 1962.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  5. Rotational Periods and Starspot Activity of Young Solar-Type Dwarfs in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allain, S.; Bouvier, J.; Prosser, C.; Marschall, L. A.; Laaksonen, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a V-band photometric monitoring survey of 15 late-type dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665. Low-amplitude periodic light variations are found for 8 stars and ascribed to the modulation by starspots that cover typically a few percent of the stellar disk. Periods range from 0.6 to 3.7 d, translating to equatorial velocities between 13 and 93 km/s. That no period longer than 4 d was detected suggests a relative paucity of extremely slow rotators (V(sub eq) much less than 10 km/s) among late-type dwarfs in IC 4665. The fractional number of slow rotators in IC 4665 is similar to that of Alpha Per cluster, suggesting that IC 4665 is close in age to Alpha Per (approx. 50 Myr).

  6. Effect of Inducers, Incubation Time and Heme Concentration on IC(50) Value Variation in Anti-heme Crystallization Assay.

    PubMed

    Nhien, Nguyen Thanh Thuy; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Uyen, Dinh Thanh; Deharo, Eric; Hoa, Pham Thi Le; Hirayama, Kenji; Harada, Shigeharu; Kamei, Kaeko

    2011-12-01

    Heme detoxification through crystallization into hemozoin has been suggested as a good target for the development of screening assays for new antimalarials. However, comparisons among the data obtained from different experiments are difficult, and the IC(50) values (the concentrations of drug that are required to inhibit 50% of hemozoin formation) for the same drug vary widely. We studied the effects of changes in heme concentration (precursor of β-hematin), incubation time and three inducers (SDS, Tween 20 and linoleic acid) on the IC(50) of some antimalarials (chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, and clotrimazole). The results showed that increasing both inducer concentration and incubation time raised the IC(50) of selected antimalarials. Any change in those factors caused the IC(50) value to vary. Standardization of assay conditions is, therefore, necessary to increase reproducibility and reduce discrepancies in assay performance. Considering all of the variables, the best choice of inducers is in the order of SDS > Tween 20 > linoleic acid.

  7. BLACK HOLE POWERED NEBULAE AND A CASE STUDY OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IC 342 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, David; Corbel, Stephane; Paragi, Zsolt; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Tudose, Valeriu; Feng Hua

    2012-04-10

    We present new radio, optical, and X-ray observations of three ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that are associated with large-scale nebulae. We report the discovery of a radio nebula associated with the ULX IC 342 X-1 using the Very Large Array (VLA). Complementary VLA observations of the nebula around Holmberg II X-1, and high-frequency Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Telescope spectroscopic observations of NGC 5408 X-1 are also presented. We study the morphology, ionization processes, and the energetics of the optical/radio nebulae of IC 342 X-1, Holmberg II X-1, and NGC 5408 X-1. The energetics of the optical nebula of IC 342 X-1 is discussed in the framework of standard bubble theory. The total energy content of the optical nebula is 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg. The minimum energy needed to supply the associated radio nebula is 9.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg. In addition, we detected an unresolved radio source at the location of IC 342 X-1 at the VLA scales. However, our Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations using the European VLBI Network likely rule out the presence of any compact radio source at milliarcsecond (mas) scales. Using a simultaneous Swift X-ray Telescope measurement, we estimate an upper limit on the mass of the black hole in IC 342 X-1 using the 'fundamental plane' of accreting black holes and obtain M{sub BH} {<=} (1.0 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. Arguing that the nebula of IC 342 X-1 is possibly inflated by a jet, we estimate accretion rates and efficiencies for the jet of IC 342 X-1 and compare with sources like S26, SS433, and IC 10 X-1.

  8. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). 57.22217 Section 57.22217 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). 57.22217 Section 57.22217 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  13. Distinct recognition of complement iC3b by integrins αXβ2 and αMβ2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shutong; Wang, Jianchuan; Wang, Jia-Huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-03-28

    Recognition by the leukocyte integrins αXβ2 and αMβ2 of complement iC3b-opsonized targets is essential for effector functions including phagocytosis. The integrin-binding sites on iC3b remain incompletely characterized. Here, we describe negative-stain electron microscopy and biochemical studies of αXβ2 and αMβ2 in complex with iC3b. Despite high homology, the two integrins bind iC3b at multiple distinct sites. αXβ2 uses the αX αI domain to bind iC3b on its C3c moiety at one of two sites: a major site at the interface between macroglobulin (MG) 3 and MG4 domains, and a less frequently used site near the C345C domain. In contrast, αMβ2 uses its αI domain to bind iC3b at the thioester domain and simultaneously interacts through a region near the αM β-propeller and β2 βI domain with a region of the C3c moiety near the C345C domain. Remarkably, there is no overlap between the primary binding site of αXβ2 and the binding site of αMβ2 on iC3b. Distinctive binding sites on iC3b by integrins αXβ2 and αMβ2 may be biologically beneficial for leukocytes to more efficiently capture opsonized pathogens and to avoid subversion by pathogen factors.

  14. Poly IC triggers a cathepsin D- and IPS-1-dependent pathway to enhance cytokine production and mediate dendritic cell necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Kawai, Taro; Tsuchida, Tetsuo; Kozaki, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Hiroki; Shin, Kyung-Sue; Kumar, Himanshu; Akira, Shizuo

    2013-04-18

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) sense virus-derived RNA or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC) to exert antiviral immune responses. Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying the adjuvant effects of poly IC. Poly IC was taken up by dendritic cells (DCs), and it induced lysosomal destabilization, which, in turn, activated an RLR-dependent signaling pathway. Upon poly IC stimulation, cathepsin D was released into the cytoplasm from the lysosome to interact with IPS-1, an adaptor molecule for RLRs. This interaction facilitated cathepsin D cleavage of caspase 8 and the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, resulting in enhanced cytokine production. Further recruitment of the kinase RIP-1 to this complex initiated the necroptosis of a small number of DCs. HMGB1 released by dying cells enhanced IFN-β production in concert with poly IC. Collectively, these findings suggest that cathepsin D-triggered, IPS-1-dependent necroptosis is a mechanism that propagates the adjuvant efficacy of poly IC.

  15. A sub-10 nA DC-balanced adaptive stimulator IC with multi-modal sensor for compact electro-acupuncture stimulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kiseok; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hong, Sunjoo; Cho, Hyunwoo; Ha, Unsoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2012-12-01

    A compact electro-acupuncture (EA) system is proposed for a multi-modal feedback EA treatment. It is composed of a needle, a compact EA patch, and an interconnecting conductive thread. The 3 cm diameter compact EA patch is implemented with an adaptive stimulator IC and a small coin battery on the planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB) technology. The adaptive stimulator IC can form a closed current loop for even a single needle, and measure the electromyography (EMG) and the skin temperature to analyze the stimulation status as well as supply programmable stimulation current (40 μA-1 mA) with 5 different modes. The large time constant (LTC) sample and hold (S/H) current matching technique achieves the high-precision charge balancing ( <;10 nA) for the patient's safety. The measured data can be wirelessly transmitted to the external EA analyzer through the body channel communication (BCC) transceiver for the low power consumption. The external EA analyzer can show the patient's status, such as the muscle fatigue and the change of the skin temperature. Based on these analyses, the practitioner can adaptively change the stimulation parameters for the optimal treatment value. A 12.5 mm(2) 0.13 μm RF CMOS stimulator chip consumes 6.8 mW at 1.2 V supporting 32 different current levels. The proposed compact EA system is fully implemented and tested on the human body.

  16. Disseminated vasculomyelinopathy in the peripheral nervous system mediated by immune complexes (ICs). Immunohistochemical studies of sciatic nerves in chronic serum sickness (CHSS) in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, S; Szablowska-Krajewska, M

    1986-02-01

    Histological examination of 20 sciatic nerves from rabbits with experimental chronic serum sickness (CHSS) revealed patchy vasculitis of the vasa nervorum of various intensity. The vessel lesions ranged from endothelial proliferation to vessel wall necrosis with fibrinoid degeneration and infiltration by lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages and, sporadically, by neutrophils. Perivascularly, there were oedema, chronic infiltrates or small haemorrhages. The myelinated fibres in close relation to the vascular system were focally depleted and features of perivascular demyelination were found. Teased fibres showed paranodal and segmental demyelination, axonal degeneration and, sporadically, remyelination. In all cases, immunofluorescent deposits of bovine serum albumin (BSA), IgG and C3 complement were found in and around some vasa nervorum. Other indirect evidence for immune complex (IC) deposition was provided by ultrastructural examination where vascular and endoneurial osmophilic deposits were found; in 4 cases with paracrystalline organization resembling cryoglobulin component. IC-mediated vasculitis led to blood-nerve barrier impairment and leakage of serum proteins into the endoneurial space. The morphological and immunohistochemical changes in this model which develop after a latency period of 2 or more weeks, strongly resemble those observed in human acquired inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies or in connective tissue diseases.

  17. A Single-Chip Solar Energy Harvesting IC Using Integrated Photodiodes for Biomedical Implant Applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Law, Man-Kay; Mak, Pui-In; Martins, Rui P

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an ultra-compact single-chip solar energy harvesting IC using on-chip solar cell for biomedical implant applications is presented. By employing an on-chip charge pump with parallel connected photodiodes, a 3.5 × efficiency improvement can be achieved when compared with the conventional stacked photodiode approach to boost the harvested voltage while preserving a single-chip solution. A photodiode-assisted dual startup circuit (PDSC) is also proposed to improve the area efficiency and increase the startup speed by 77%. By employing an auxiliary charge pump (AQP) using zero threshold voltage (ZVT) devices in parallel with the main charge pump, a low startup voltage of 0.25 V is obtained while minimizing the reversion loss. A 4 Vin gate drive voltage is utilized to reduce the conduction loss. Systematic charge pump and solar cell area optimization is also introduced to improve the energy harvesting efficiency. The proposed system is implemented in a standard 0.18- [Formula: see text] CMOS technology and occupies an active area of 1.54 [Formula: see text]. Measurement results show that the on-chip charge pump can achieve a maximum efficiency of 67%. With an incident power of 1.22 [Formula: see text] from a halogen light source, the proposed energy harvesting IC can deliver an output power of 1.65 [Formula: see text] at 64% charge pump efficiency. The chip prototype is also verified using in-vitro experiment.

  18. High rate nitrogen removal by ANAMMOX internal circulation reactor (IC) for old landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Phan, The Nhat; Van Truong, Thi Thanh; Ha, Nhu Biec; Nguyen, Phuoc Dan; Bui, Xuan Thanh; Dang, Bao Trong; Doan, Van Tuan; Park, Joonhong; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the performance of a high rate nitrogen removal lab-scale ANAMMOX reactor, namely Internal Circulation (IC) reactor, for old landfill leachate treatment. The reactor was operated with pre-treated leachate from a pilot Partial Nitritation Reactor (PNR) using a high nitrogen loading rate ranging from 2 to 10kgNm(-3)d(-1). High rate removal of nitrogen (9.52±1.11kgNm(-3)d(-1)) was observed at an influent nitrogen concentration of 1500mgNL(-1). The specific ANAMMOX activity was found to be 0.598±0.026gN2-NgVSS(-1)d(-1). Analysis of ANAMMOX granules suggested that 0.5-1.0mm size granular sludge was the dominant group. The results of DNA analysis revealed that Candidatus Kueneniastuttgartiensis was the dominant species (37.45%) in the IC reactor, whereas other species like uncultured Bacteroidetes bacterium only constituted 5.37% in the system, but they were still responsible for removing recalcitrant organic matter.

  19. An ultra low-power front-end IC for wearable health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Yu-Pin Hsu; Zemin Liu; Hella, Mona M

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a low-power front-end IC for wearable health monitoring systems. The IC, designed in a standard 0.13μm CMOS technology, fully integrates a low-noise analog front-end (AFE) to process the weak bio-signals, followed by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to digitize the extracted signals. An AC-coupled driving buffer, that interfaces between the AFE and the ADC is introduced to scale down the power supply of the ADC. The power consumption decreases by 50% compared to the case without power supply scaling. The AFE passes signals from 0.5Hz to 280Hz and from 0.7Hz to 160Hz with a simulated input referred noise of 1.6μVrms and achieves a maximum gain of 35dB/41dB respectively, with a noise-efficiency factor (NEF) of the AFE is 1. The 8-bit ADC achieves a simulated 7.96-bit resolution at 10KS/s sampling rate under 0.5V supply voltage. The overall system consumes only 0.86μW at dual supply voltages of 1V (AFE) and 0.5 V (ADC).

  20. [IC triage in patients with an acutely worsening condition; challenges, considerations and decisions].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, C; Klijnsma, A F; Balk, E; Janse, A; Tjan, D H T

    2016-01-01

    Acute intensive care (IC) triage involves a challenging decision-making process. Physicians are required to make life or death decisions about an unfamiliar patient within a short time frame. An 84-year-old female was admitted to the stroke unit following an extensive cerebral infarction. The intensive care unit (ICU) physician was consulted because of a suspected severe abdominal sepsis even though ICU treatment had never previously been discussed. A 77-year-old female with a previous history of myocardial infarction and severe COPD developed acute respiratory failure on the ward, and was admitted to the ICU for support by a mechanical ventilator. The family felt this was an inappropriate course of treatment, considering her former poor quality of life. When physicians are confronted with sudden deterioration of the patient's clinical condition without advanced care planning a limited-time IC treatment trial is often initiated, possibly leading to inappropriate ICU admissions. ICU treatment options should preferably be discussed beforehand; preliminary background information regarding the patient's wishes is essential for adequate decision-making.

  1. The Carnegie Hubble Program: The Infrared Leavitt Law in IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. E.; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R.; Melbourne, Jason

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the dwarf galaxy IC 1613 at multiple epochs in the midinfrared using Spitzer and the in the near-infrared using the new FourStar near-IR camera on Magellan. We have constructed Cepheid period luminosity relations in the J, H, Ks, [3.6] and [4.5] bands and have used the run of their apparent distance moduli as a function of wavelength to derive the line of sight reddening and distance to IC 1613. Using a nineband fit, we find E(BV ) = 0.050.01 mag and an extinction corrected distance modulus of 0 = 24.29 0.03statistical 0.03systematic mag. By comparing our multiband and [3.6] distance moduli to results from the tip of the red giant branch and red clump distance indicators, we find that metallicity has no measurable effect on Cepheid distances at 3.6 m in the metallicity range 1.0 [Fe/H] 0.2, hence derivations of the Hubble constant at this wavelength require no correction for metallicity.

  2. Separation of combustion noise in IC engines under cyclo-non-stationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, J.; Ducleaux, N.; NGhiem, G.; Wang, S.

    2013-07-01

    The separation and ranking of combustion and mechanical noise sources is of prime concern for the noise control of internal combustion (IC) engines. Signal processing techniques have been devised recently that can achieve such a separation using the cyclostationary property of IC engine signals. The object of this paper is to extend this framework to the situation where the engine undergoes a transient speed regime, for instance during a run-up. This raises some new and non-trivial questions. First, the assumption of cyclostationarity has to be relaxed and replaced by the vaguer notion of "cyclo-non-stationarity". Second - and related to the first point - the practice of cyclic averaging has to be revisited. Third, the design of the separation filter must explicitly incorporate speed dependence. This paper proposes simple but robust solutions to these issues, with a special effort to make them practicable from an industrial point of view. In particular, the cyclic difference operator is introduced in lieu of cyclic averaging, and speed-dependence is captured by use of a flexible basis of B-splines whose knots density is automatically selected from the data. Successful examples of separation are then demonstrated on actual data measured during an engine run-up.

  3. Evidence of a pulsar wind nebula in supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbert, Charles M.; Clearfield, Christopher R.; Williams, Nikolas E.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; Frail, Dale A.

    2001-05-01

    New Chandra X-Ray Observatory and Very Large Array observations of the hard X-ray feature along the southern edge of the supernova remnant IC 443 have revealed a comet-shaped nebula of hard emission with a soft X-ray point source at its apex. Based on the X-ray spectrum, X-ray and radio morphology, and the radio polarization properties, we argue that this object is a synchrotron nebula powered by the compact source. The derived parameters of the system favor an interpretation in which the central object is a young, energetic neutron star physically associated with IC 443. The cometary morphology of the nebula originates from the supersonic motion of the pulsar (VPSR~=250+/-50 km s-1), which causes the relativistic wind of the pulsar to terminate in a bow shock and trail behind as a synchrotron tail. This velocity is consistent with an age of 30,000 years for the SNR and its associated pulsar. .

  4. A comprehensive study of the X-ray structure and spectrum of IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Seward, F. D.; Willingale, R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study of the X-ray emission from the supernova remnant IC 443, using the solid state spectrometer, IPC, and high-resolution images of the Einstein Observatory, and the medium-energy detector of the HEAO 1 A-2 experiment. A soft X-ray appearance was observed, highly atypical of a supernova remnant in the adiabatic phase, with little correlation between X-ray and optical or radio features. The best-fit models of the low-energy X-ray spectrum of the brightest area of the remnant suggest either that the remnant has not yet attained ionization equilibrium or that the X-rays arise in a multiphase medium. Pronounced soft X-ray spectral differences across the remnant are accounted for by variations in absorption by an intervening molecular cloud. The analysis suggests that, despite the atypical X-ray appearance, the X-ray emission in IC 443 is probably confined to a thin (0.1 pc) shell.

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (icQoQi) 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    Quantum Information can be understood as being naturally derived from a new understanding of information theory when quantum systems become information carriers and quantum effects become non negligible. Experiments and the realization of various interesting phenomena in quantum information within the established field of quantum optics have been reported, which has provided a very convenient framework for the former. Together, quantum optics and quantum information are among the most exciting areas of interdisciplinary research in modern day science which cover a broad spectrum of topics, from the foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information science to the introduction of new types of quantum technologies and metrology. The International Conference on Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (icQoQi) 2013 was organized by the Faculty of Science, International Islamic University Malaysia with the objective of bringing together leading academic scientists, researchers and scholars in the domain of interest from around the world to share their experiences and research results about all aspects of quantum optics and quantum information. While the event was organized on a somewhat modest scale, it was in fact a rather fruitful meeting for established researchers and students as well, especially for the local scene where the field is relatively new. We would therefore, like to thank the organizing committee, our advisors and all parties for having made this event successful and last but not least would extend our sincerest gratitude to IOP for publishing these selected papers from icQoQi2013 in Journal of Physics: Conference Series.

  6. The determination of haloacetic acids in real world samples using IC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, Rosanne; Saini, Charanjit; Pohl, Christopher

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the determination of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) in high ionic strength, treated effluent waters using an ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS-MS) method with internal standards and discussions of each of the method parameters. Data is also provided for these same samples using USEPA Method 552.2. The sample matrices contain up to 170 mg/L chloride and 243 mg/L sulfate. Matrix ions are separated from the analytes using a high capacity anion exchange analytical column and diverted to a waste stream during each analysis to avoid signal suppression and contamination of the detector. No derivatization, offline matrix elimination, or preconcentration is used. Four isotopically-labeled HAAs are used for quantification, and detection limits are in the range of 400-1000 microg/L with R(2) of at least 0.997 over two orders of magnitude for all analytes in matrix. A trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) internal standard with the label on the alpha carbon is found to be more stable than the TCAA-1-(13)C. Amounts found using IC-MS-MS are 65-130% of amounts found using Method 552.2 for all analytes in the real world treated effluent waters. Detection limits for all nine analytes in matrix are in the range of 100-700 ng/L.

  7. The IC1396N proto-cluster at a scale of ~250 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, R.; Fuente, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Caselli, P.; Johnstone, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wyrowski, F.; Tafalla, M.; Lefloch, B.; Plume, R.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We investigate the mm-morphology of IC 1396 N with unprecedented spatial resolution to analyze its dust and molecular gas properties, and draw comparisons with objects of similar mass. Methods: We have carried out sensitive observations in the most extended configurations of the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer, to map the thermal dust emission at 3.3 and 1.3 mm, and the emission from the J=13_k→ 12k hyperfine transitions of methyl cyanide (CH3CN). Results: We unveil the existence of a sub-cluster of hot cores in IC 1396 N, distributed in a direction perpendicular to the emanating outflow. The cores are embedded in a common envelope of extended and diffuse dust emission. We find striking differences in the dust properties of the cores (β≃ 0) and the surrounding envelope (β≃ 1), very likely testifying to differences in the formation and processing of dust material. The CH3CN emission peaks towards the most massive hot core and is marginally extended in the outflow direction. Based on observations obtained at the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). IRAM is funded by the Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique (France), the Max-Planck Gesellschaft (Germany), and the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (Spain).

  8. Understanding compact object formation and natal kicks. IV. The case of IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey; Glebbeek, Evert E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ansari@ldeo.columbia.edu

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be ≳ 31 M{sub ☉} (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be ≲ 130 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, we find that the 'enthalpy' formalism recently suggested by Ivanova and Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ≅ 0.6-1.

  9. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    PubMed

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs.

  10. Ellipticals with kinematically distinct cores : HST imaging of the nuclear structure of IC 1459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.

    1994-01-01

    The elliptical galaxy IC 1459 has one of the strongest counter-rotating core components of any observed elliptical. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Planetary Camera images of the center of IC 1459. Before deconvolution, our V band images reveal a bright point source at the galaxy nucleus, and dust near the nucleus. After removal of the central point source, deconvolution and model fitting, we show that the central starlight profile is better fit by a 'cusp' model than an isothermal core model. The photometric properties of the stellar light are comparable to those of other ellipticals without counter-rotating core components. There is an indication of a central stellar disk, although its detection is complicated by the extensive dust. Although the velocity field of the emission-line gas is ordered, the dust distribution is very irregular, and indicates nonequilibrium motions. The irregular dust distribution suggests that material is currently infalling and may be fueling the active nucleus. There is no direct evidence which relates the dust and gas to the peculiar stellar kinematics.

  11. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  12. DISK EVOLUTION IN OB ASSOCIATIONS: DEEP SPITZER/IRAC OBSERVATIONS OF IC 1795

    SciTech Connect

    Roccatagliata, Veronica; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Gennaro, Mario; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Feigelson, Eric; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Lawson, Warrick A.

    2011-06-01

    We present a deep Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) survey of the OB association IC 1795 carried out to investigate the evolution of protoplanetary disks in regions of massive star formation. Combining Spitzer/IRAC data with Chandra/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, we find 289 cluster members. An additional 340 sources with an infrared excess, but without X-ray counterpart, are classified as cluster member candidates. Both surveys are complete down to stellar masses of about 1 M{sub sun}. We present pre-main-sequence isochrones computed for the first time in the Spitzer/IRAC colors. The age of the cluster, determined via the location of the Class III sources in the [3.6]-[4.5]/[3.6] color-magnitude diagram, is in the range of 3-5 Myr. As theoretically expected, we do not find any systematic variation in the spatial distribution of disks within 0.6 pc of either O-type star in the association. However, the disk fraction in IC 1795 does depend on the stellar mass: sources with masses >2 M{sub sun} have a disk fraction of {approx}20%, while lower mass objects (2-0.8 M{sub sun}) have a disk fraction of {approx}50%. This implies that disks around massive stars have a shorter dissipation timescale.

  13. A linear acoustic model for intake wave dynamics in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M. F.; Stanev, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a linear acoustic model is described that has proven useful in obtaining a better understanding of the nature of acoustic wave dynamics in the intake system of an internal combustion (IC) engine. The model described has been developed alongside a set of measurements made on a Ricardo E6 single cylinder research engine. The simplified linear acoustic model reported here produces a calculation of the pressure time-history in the port of an IC engine that agrees fairly well with measured data obtained on the engine fitted with a simple intake system. The model has proved useful in identifying the role of pipe resonance in the intake process and has led to the development of a simple hypothesis to explain the structure of the intake pressure time history: the early stages of the intake process are governed by the instantaneous values of the piston velocity and the open area under the valve. Thereafter, resonant wave action dominates the process. The depth of the early depression caused by the moving piston governs the intensity of the wave action that follows. A pressure ratio across the valve that is favourable to inflow is maintained and maximized when the open period of the valve is such to allow at least, but no more than, one complete oscillation of the pressure at its resonant frequency to occur while the valve is open.

  14. Use of ICS/LABA (extra-fine and non-extra-fine) in elderly asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Benfante, Alida; Basile, Marco; Battaglia, Salvatore; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Age represents an exclusion criterion in randomized clinical trials designed to test the efficacy and safety of inhaled drugs in asthma. As a consequence, data on efficacy and safety of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2 agonist (LABA) combinations in elderly asthmatics are scanty. Older age is associated with an increased proportion of comorbid conditions; in addition, all organ functions undergo a process of senescence, thus reducing their ability to metabolize the agents. Overall, these age-associated conditions may variably, and often unpredictably, affect the metabolism and excretion of respiratory drugs. However, pharmacological treatment of asthma does not follow specific recommendations in the elderly. In the elderly, the ICS/LABA combinations may carry an increased risk of local indesiderable effects, primarily due to the lack of coordination between activation of the device and inhalation, and systemic adverse events, mainly due to the greater amount of active drug that is available because of the age-associated changes in organ functions as well as drug-to-drug and drug-to-concomitant disease interactions. The extra-fine formulations of ICSs/LABAs, which allow for a more favorable drug deposition in the lungs at a reduced dose, may contribute to overcome this issue. This review revises the efficacy and safety of treatment with ICSs/LABAs, focusing on the main pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs and highlighting the potential risks in the elderly asthmatic population. PMID:27789954

  15. A Journey In The Radio Galaxy IC 1531: Through The Linear Scale, Across The Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Tiziana; Migliori, G.; Grandi, P.; Vignali, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present a multi-scale and multi-frequency study of the radio galaxy IC1531 (z=0.026) with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Fermi. The Chandra image shows an X-ray core and 5 extended emission with the radio jet. The X-ray spectrum of the core is well fitted by a power law (Γ=2.2). The X-ray emission of the large scale jet is most-likely synchrotron emission, further confirming the low-power source classication. The gamma-ray analisys shows a 5-days variability, from which it is possible to estimate the size of the emitting region. We present a study of the spectral energy distribution of the core of IC1531 from radio to gamma-ray emission. The models allowed us to determine the nature of the gamma-ray emission and infer the jet kinetic power at sub-pc scales. The jet power at kpc scales is estimated from the total radio luminosity at 151 MHz. Finally, we compare the jet power with the disk luminosity. We discuss our results in terms of the formation and evolution of the jet.

  16. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Bäck, S.; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    IC3DDose 2014, the 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry was held in Ystad, Sweden, from 4-7 September 2014. This grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The 7th and last meeting was held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012. It is worth remembering that the conference series started at the very beginning of the intensity modulated radiotherapy era and that the dosimeters being developed then were, to some extent, ahead of the clinical need of radiotherapy. However, since then the technical developments in radiation therapy have been dramatic, with dynamic treatments, including tracking, gating and volumetric modulated arc therapy, widely introduced in the clinic with the need for 3D dosimetry thus endless. This was also reflected by the contributions at the meeting in Ystad. Accordingly the scope of the meeting has also broadened to IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose. A multitude of dosimetry techniques and radiation detectors are now represented, all with the common denominator: three-dimensional or 3D. Additionally, quality assurance (QA) procedures and other aspects of clinical dosimetry are represented. The implementation of new dosimetric techniques in radiotherapy is a process that needs every kind of caution, carefulness and thorough validation. Therefore, the clinical needs, reformulated as the aims for IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose, are: • Enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatments through improved clinical dosimetry. • Investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatment techniques. • Provide

  17. 2nd International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials (IC-RMM2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technology processes. The aims of the 2nd International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials (ic-rmm2) and the parallel organized symposiums of the 1st International Symposium on Powder Injection Molding (is-pim1) and the 1st International Symposium on Rheology and Fracture of Solids (is-rfs1) are the followings: Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications; Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. Promote the communication and collaboration between the scientists, researchers and engineers of different disciplines, different nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm2 and symposiums of is-pim1 and is-rfs1 provide a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among thr major fields of interest are the influence of materials structures, mechanical stresses, temperatures, deformation speeds and shear rates on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of foams, foods, polymers, plastics and other competitive materials like ceramics

  18. NGC 2207/IC 2163: A Grazing Encounter with Large Scale Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Kaufman, M.; Grupe, D.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Struck, C.; Brinks, E.

    2013-01-01

    Radio continuum, Spitzer infrared, optical, XMM X-ray, and ultraviolet observations are used to study large-scale shock fronts, young star complexes, and the galactic nuclei in the interacting galaxies NGC 2207/IC 2163. A large shock along the rim of the ocular oval in IC 2163 has produced vigorous star formation in a dusty environment, bright in the Spitzer 8 and 24 micron images. In the outer part of the companion side of NGC 2207, a large front attributed to halo scraping is bright in 6 cm and 20 cm radio continuum (RC) but not in tracers of star formation or X-rays. Values of the flux density ratio S(8 mu)/S(6 cm) of kpc-size star-forming clumps are compared with those of giant radio HII regions in M81. For the bright clumps in NGC 2207, the mean value of this ratio is the same as for the M81 HII regions, whereas for the bright clumps on the rim of the IC 2163 ocular oval, the mean value is nearly a factor of two greater. Global values of the ratios of IR to RC are significantly below the averages for large samples of galaxies. A mini-starburst on the outer arm of NGC 2207 is the most luminous FIR, RC, and Halpha source in the galaxy pair. We find evidence that a radio supernova occurred there in 2001. X-ray emission is detected from the nucleus of NGC 2207 and from nine discrete sources that are possible candidates for ULXs. One of these corresponds with the Type Ib SN 1999ec, which is also bright in the UV, and another may be a radio supernova or a background quasar. The X-ray luminosity of the NGC 2207 nucleus is log L(0.3-10.0 keV) = 40.6 ergs/s, which, together with its X-ray spectrum, suggests that this is a highly absorbed, low-luminosity AGN.

  19. Triggered star-formation in the bright rimmed globule IC1396A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Goldsmith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    IC1396 is a well known HII region