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Sample records for icd italian registry

  1. Detect Long-term Complications After ICD Replacement (DECODE): Rationale and Study Design of a Multicenter Italian Registry.

    PubMed

    Diemberger, Igor; Parisi, Quintino; De Filippo, Paolo; Narducci, Maria Lucia; Zanon, Francesco; Potenza, Domenico Rosario; Ciaramitaro, Gianfranco; Malacrida, Maurizio; Boriani, Giuseppe; Biffi, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The replacement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may give rise to considerable clinical consequences, the importance of which is underrated by the medical community. Replacement-related adverse events are difficult to identify and require monitoring of both short-term complications and long-term patient outcome. The aim of this study is to perform a structured evaluation of both short- and long-term adverse events and a cost analysis of consecutive ICD replacement procedures. Detect Long-term Complications After ICD Replacement (DECODE) is a prospective, single-arm, multicenter cohort study designed to estimate long-term complication rates (at 12 months and 5 years) in patients undergoing ICD generator replacement. The study will also evaluate predictors of complications, patient management before and during the replacement procedure in clinical practice, and the costs related to use of health care resources. About 800 consecutive patients with standard indications for ICD generator replacement will be enrolled in this study. The decision to undertake generator replacement/upgrade will be made according to the investigators' own judgment (which will be recorded). Patients will be followed for 60 months through periodic in-hospital examinations or remote monitoring. Detailed data on complications related to ICD replacement in current clinical practice are still lacking. The analysis of adverse events will reveal the value of new preventive strategies, thereby yielding both clinical and economic benefits. Moreover, assessment of complication rates after ICD replacement in a real-life setting will help estimate the actual long-term cost of ICD therapy and assess the real impact of increasing ICD longevity on cost-effectiveness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Non–Evidence-Based ICD Implantations in the United States: Results from the NCDR-ICD Registry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Hellkamp, Anne; Curtis, Jeptha; Mark, Daniel; Peterson, Eric; Sanders, Gillian D.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Hammill, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Context Practice guidelines do not recommend a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in patients recovering from a myocardial infarction (MI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and those with severe heart failure symptoms or a recent diagnosis of heart failure. Objective To determine the number, characteristics, and in-hospital outcomes of patients who receive a non–evidence-based ICD and examine the distribution of these implants by site, physician specialty, and year of procedure. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort study of cases submitted to the National Cardiovascular Data Registry-ICD Registry between 1/1/06 and 6/30/09. Main Outcome Measure In-hospital outcomes. Results The number of non–evidence-based ICD implants was 25,145 out of 111,707 (22.5%). The risk of in-hospital death and any post-procedure complication was significantly higher in patients who received a non–evidence-based ICD (0.6% [95% CI 0.5, 0.7] vs. 0.2% [95% CI 0.1, 0.2] and 3.2% [95% CI 3.0, 3.5] vs. 2.4% [95% CI 2.3, 2.5] respectively; p<0.0001 for each comparison). There was substantial variation in non–evidence-based ICDs by site. The rate of non–evidence-based ICD implants was significantly lower for electrophysiologists (20.8% [95% CI 20.5, 21.1]) than non-electrophysiologists (24.8% [95% CI 24.2, 25.3] for non-electrophysiology cardiologists, 36.1% [95% CI 34.3, 38.0] for thoracic surgeons, 24.9 % [95% CI 23.8, 25.9] for other specialties) (p<0.0001). There was no clear decrease in the rate of non–evidence-based ICDs over time (24.5% in 2006, 21.8% in 2007, 22.0% in 2008, 21.7% in 2009, p<0.0001 for a trend from 2006 to 2009 and p=0.94 for a trend from 2007 to 2009). Conclusions Among patients with ICD implants in this registry, 22.5% did not meet evidence-based criteria for implantation. PMID:21205965

  3. Renal dysfunction and clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ICD and CRTD implantation: data from the Israeli ICD registry.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Alon; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Strasberg, Boris; Sela, Ron; Rosenheck, Shimon; Freedberg, Nahum A; Geist, Michael; Ben-Zvi, Shlomit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Glikson, Michael; Haim, Moti

    2014-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (HF) and left ventricular dysfunction. However, their efficacy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. We examined the association between renal dysfunction and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing ICD and CRT defibrillator (CRTD) implantation. Data were collected from the Israeli ICD registry. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at implantation was assessed using the modification of diet in renal disease formula. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included the composite endpoints of death or HF and death or ventricular arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation [VT/VF]); any hospitalizations; first appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy. During the study period (July 2010-November 2012), 2,811 patients were implanted with ICD or CRTD. One-year follow-up data were available for 730 ICD patients and 453 CRTD patients. Patients with eGFR < 30 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) (n = 54, 4.6%) were older, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, or ischemic heart disease. eGFR <30 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) was associated with increased mortality risk in ICD (HR 5.4; 95% CI 1.5-19.2), but not in CRTD patients (HR 0.9; 95% CI 0.1-7.5). Renal dysfunction was associated with the composite endpoints of death or HF and death or VT/VF in ICD, but not in CRTD patients. Mean eGFR during follow-up decreased by 8.0 ± 4.3 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) in ICD patients (P = 0.06) and by 1.8 ± 1.3 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) in patients with CRTD (P = 0.2). Based on this retrospective analysis, CKD is associated with adverse prognosis after ICD implantation, but not after CRTD implantation. GFR decreased in patients with ICD, but not in CRTD patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Italian subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator survey: S-ICD, why not?

    PubMed

    Botto, Giovanni Luca; Forleo, Giovanni B; Capucci, Alessandro; Solimene, Francesco; Vado, Antonello; Bertero, Giovanni; Palmisano, Pietro; Pisanò, Ennio; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Infusino, Tommaso; Vicentini, Alessandro; Viscusi, Miguel; Ferrari, Paola; Talarico, Antonello; Russo, Giovanni; Boriani, Giuseppe; Padeletti, Luigi; Lovecchio, Mariolina; Valsecchi, Sergio; D'Onofrio, Antonio

    2016-12-23

    A recommendation for a subcutaneous-implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) has been added to recent European Society of Cardiology Guidelines. However, the S-ICD is not ideally suitable for patients who need pacing. The aim of this survey was to analyse the current practice of ICD implantation and to evaluate the actual suitability of S-ICD. The survey 'S-ICD Why Not?' was an independent initiative taken by the Italian Heart Rhythm Society (AIAC). Clinical characteristics, selection criteria, and factors guiding the choice of ICD type were collected in consecutive patients who underwent ICD implantation in 33 Italian centres from September to December 2015. A cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device was implanted in 39% (369 of 947) of patients undergoing de novo ICD implantation. An S-ICD was implanted in 12% of patients with no CRT indication (62 of 510 with available data). S-ICD patients were younger than patients who received transvenous ICD, more often had channelopathies, and more frequently received their device for secondary prevention of sudden death. More frequently, the clinical reason for preferring a transvenous ICD over an S-ICD was the need for pacing (45%) or for antitachycardia pacing (36%). Nonetheless, only 7% of patients fulfilled conditions for recommending permanent pacing, and 4% of patients had a history of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia that might have been treatable with antitachycardia pacing. The vast majority of patients needing ICD therapy are suitable candidates for S-ICD implantation. Nevertheless, it currently seems to be preferentially adopted for secondary prevention of sudden death in young patients with channelopathies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators and Chagas' disease: results of the ICD Registry Latin America.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Claudio A; Batista Sa, Luiz A; Chiale, Pablo A; Eloy, Ricardo; Tentori, Maria Cristina; Escudero, Jaime; Lima, Antonio Malan Cavalcanti; Medina, Luis E; Garillo, Raúl; Maloney, Jennifer

    2009-02-01

    Chagas' disease is an endemic parasitic affliction in Latin America. It is frequently associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. The aim of this study is to assess the evolution of patients with Chagas' disease treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Eighty-nine chagasic patients with ICD were included for analysis from the Medtronic ICD Registry Latin America. At implant, mean age was 59 +/- 10 years, and 72% were male. Eighty-one patients (91%) had secondary prevention indications. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 40 +/- 11%, and mean follow-up was 12 +/- 7 months. During follow-up, six patients died (6.7%); three due to congestive heart failure, one due to sudden death, and two due to non-cardiac cause. Hospitalization occurred in seven patients. Thirty-eight patients (42%) received appropriate ICD therapies. A total of 737 episodes were detected by the ICD. The mean period between ICD implantation and the first appropriate therapy was 104 days. Electrical storms were observed in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7%). Inappropriate therapies were observed in seven patients. This registry confirms that ICD therapy provides protection by effectively terminating life-threatening arrhythmias in patients with Chagas' disease. This is especially so when patients receive the device for secondary prevention.

  6. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  7. Comparison of the effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with class II versus class III and IV heart failure (from the InSync/InSync ICD Italian Registry).

    PubMed

    Landolina, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio; Gasparini, Maurizio; Santini, Massimo; Padeletti, Luigi; Achilli, Augusto; Bianchi, Stefano; Laurenzi, Francesco; Curnis, Antonio; Vincenti, Antonio; Valsecchi, Sergio; Denaro, Alessandra

    2007-09-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is recommended for patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III or IV heart failure and wide QRS complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of CRT in patients in NYHA class II with those in NYHA class III or IV. Nine hundred fifty-two patients (188 in NYHA class II) consecutively implanted with biventricular devices and enrolled in a national observational registry were studied. Clinical outcomes were estimated after 12 months of CRT, and long-term survival was assessed. At a median follow-up of 16 months, significantly fewer major cardiovascular events were reported in patients in NYHA class II compared with NYHA class III or IV (rate 13 vs 23 per 100 patient-years of follow-up, p<0.001). The percentage of patients who improved in NYHA class status after 12 months of CRT was lower in those in class II than in those in class III or IV (34% vs 69%, p<0.001), whereas the absolute increase in the ejection fraction was similar (8+/-9% vs 9+/-11%, p=NS), as well as the reductions in end-diastolic diameter (-3+/-8 vs -3+/-8 mm, p=NS) and end-systolic diameter (-4+/-10 vs -6+/-10 mm, p=NS). The NYHA class II group experienced lower all-cause mortality (log-rank test p=0.018). In the 2 groups, patients with major cardiovascular events during follow-up exhibited less or no reverse remodeling compared with those with better long-term clinical outcomes. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that CRT induced similar improvements in ventricular function in the 2 groups, whereas the improvement in functional status was significantly lower for patients in NYHA class II than for those in class III or IV. A positive effect of CRT on cardiac dimensions was associated with a long-term beneficial effect on disease progression in patients in NYHA class II.

  8. Open-access clinical trial registries: the Italian scenario.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Paola; Roberto, Anna

    2012-10-18

    Citizens, patients and their representatives are increasingly insisting on working with health professionals to organize and discuss research protocols. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommended setting up a public clinical trial registry where anyone can find key information about a trial. Around the world, governments have, in fact, now begun to legislate mandatory disclosure of all clinical trials. The aims of the present survey were to assess the availability of clinical trial registries for Italian citizens and to examine the transparency of the data items reported. The availability of open-access clinical trial registries was surveyed on a sample of 182 websites, including research institutes and centers of excellence (IRCCS-teaching hospitals), hospitals and associations. For each registry we downloaded a sample of two trials to assess the correspondence of the data items reported. Results from the Italian and international registries were compared. Fifteen percent of the sample had an open-access registry of clinical trials. Comparison of the data items available, in terms of completeness and transparency, from institutional and international registries indicated wide variability. Italian citizens, patients and their associations have scant access to local registries of clinical trials, and international registries are generally more informative. On the European level, advocacy and lobby actions are needed among citizens and patients to boost the diffusion of open-access clinical trial registries without language barriers, thereby facilitating participation, access to information, and the coordination of clinical research.

  9. Design and implementation of a population-based registry of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs) in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Lee, Douglas S; Birnie, David; Cameron, Douglas; Crystal, Eugene; Dorian, Paul; Gula, Lorne J; Healey, Jeffrey S; Janmohammed, Amir; Khaykin, Yaariv; Krahn, Andrew D; LeFeuvre, Catherine; Simpson, Christopher S; Yee, Raymond; Hardy, Judy; Slaughter, Pamela M; Chen, Zhongliang; Alter, David A; Laupacis, Andreas; Tu, Jack V

    2008-09-01

    There are scarce population-based data on the use, complication rates, and outcomes of patients receiving implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study sought to describe the methodology of the Ontario ICD Database, a prospective study of all ICD recipients in Ontario, Canada. In this registry, web-based data collection will be performed in all patients referred to a cardiac electrophysiologist for consideration of an ICD. The variables included in the database were determined by consensus. Outcomes to be assessed will include defibrillator device therapies (e.g., shock or antitachycardia pacing), morbidity, and death. Preliminary statistics are reported after the first 6 months of data collection. Of 208 total variables selected by consensus, 111 (53.4%) were referral/patient characteristics, 12 (5.8%) were implant-related, and 85 (40.9%) were outcome variables. Among 990 referred patients, 902 were accepted, with the following ICD indications: primary prevention (63.3%), secondary prevention (21.6%), and generator replacement (15.1%). The mean (SD) age of patients with implants was 63.9 +/- 12.6 years, and 79% were men. Among accepted ICD patients, 66% had ischemic heart disease, 23% had nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, and 11% had other cardiac conditions. Left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was highly prevalent, with 82% of primary and 44% of secondary prevention patients having LV ejection fraction ICD Database will examine defibrillator patient characteristics and clinical and device-related outcomes. Contemporary ICDs are implanted largely for primary prevention, and the majority of these conformed with LV ejection fraction guidelines.

  10. Design, development and first validation of a transcoding system from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10 in the IT.DRG Italian project.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Vuattolo, Omar; Frattura, Lucilla; Munari, Flavia; Verdini, Eleonora; Zanier, Loris; Arcangeli, Laura; Carle, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, ICD-9-CM is currently used for coding health conditions at hospital discharge, but ICD-10 is being introduced thanks to the IT-DRG Project. In this project, one needed component is a set of transcoding rules and associated tools for easing coders work in the transition. The present paper illustrates design and development of those transcoding rules, and their preliminary testing on a subset of Italian hospital discharge data.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Single- versus Dual-Chamber Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: Lessons from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Konstantino, Yuval; Haim, Moti; Boxer, Jeremy; Goldenberg, Ilan; Feldman, Alexander; Michowitz, Yoav; Glikson, Michael; Suleiman, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of a single- versus dual-chamber ICD for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in a large, national ICD registry. Data were collected from the prospective Israeli ICD Registry. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including mortality, admissions for heart failure (HF), and ICD therapy were compared between the two groups. A total of 1,125 subjects, 37% with a single-chamber and 63% with a dual-chamber ICD, constructed the baseline cohort. Approximately 80% had ischemic heart disease (IHD). Mean follow-up was 22 months, mean ejection fraction was 30%, and mean QRS width was 103 milliseconds in both groups. During follow-up, there were no significant differences in the rate of mortality, admissions for HF, appropriate or inappropriate therapy, or in time to any of the clinical outcomes. Using multivariate analysis, single-chamber ICD was not associated with increased risk of death or admission for HF. In a subgroup of patients with IHD, single-chamber ICD was associated with a higher rate of inappropriate therapy. In this large retrospective population-based cohort, dual-chamber ICD showed no benefit in reducing the incidence of death or HF admissions, whereas in a subgroup of patients with IHD, single-chamber ICD was associated with increased inappropriate therapy. Further prospective studies are necessary to assess the benefit of dual-chamber ICD in reducing the rate of inappropriate therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Italian Dystonia Registry: rationale, design and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Giovanni; Esposito, M; Abbruzzese, G; Scaglione, C L; Fabbrini, G; Ferrazzano, G; Peluso, S; Pellicciari, R; Gigante, A F; Cossu, G; Arca, R; Avanzino, L; Bono, F; Mazza, M R; Bertolasi, L; Bacchin, R; Eleopra, R; Lettieri, C; Morgante, F; Altavista, M C; Polidori, L; Liguori, R; Misceo, S; Squintani, G; Tinazzi, M; Ceravolo, R; Unti, E; Magistrelli, L; Coletti Moja, M; Modugno, N; Petracca, M; Tambasco, N; Cotelli, M S; Aguggia, M; Pisani, A; Romano, M; Zibetti, M; Bentivoglio, A R; Albanese, A; Girlanda, P; Berardelli, A

    2017-05-01

    The Italian Dystonia Registry is a multicenter data collection system that will prospectively assess the phenomenology and natural history of adult-onset dystonia and will serve as a basis for future etiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic studies. In the first 6 months of activity, 20 movement disorders Italian centres have adhered to the registry and 664 patients have been recruited. Baseline historical information from this cohort provides the first general overview of adult-onset dystonia in Italy. The cohort was characterized by a lower education level than the Italian population, and most patients were employed as artisans, builders, farmers, or unskilled workers. The clinical features of our sample confirmed the peculiar characteristics of adult-onset dystonia, i.e. gender preference, peak age at onset in the sixth decade, predominance of cervical dystonia and blepharospasm over the other focal dystonias, and a tendency to spread to adjacent body parts, The sample also confirmed the association between eye symptoms and blepharospasm, whereas no clear association emerged between extracranial injury and dystonia in a body site. Adult-onset dystonia patients and the Italian population shared similar burden of arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, dyslipidemia, and hypothyroidism, while hyperthyroidism was more frequent in the dystonia population. Geographic stratification of the study population yielded no major difference in the most clinical and phenomenological features of dystonia. Analysis of baseline information from recruited patients indicates that the Italian Dystonia Registry may be a useful tool to capture the real world clinical practice of physicians that visit dystonia patients.

  13. Worldwide experience with a totally subcutaneous implantable defibrillator: early results from the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry

    PubMed Central

    Lambiase, Pier D.; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A.M.J.; Knops, Reinoud; Neuzil, Petr; Johansen, Jens Brock; Hood, Margaret; Pedersen, Susanne; Kääb, Stefan; Murgatroyd, Francis; Reeve, Helen L.; Carter, Nathan; Boersma, Lucas; Adragão, P.; Agarwal, S.; Barr, C.; Boersma, L.; Brock-Johanssen, J.; Butter, C.; Calò, L.; Eckhardt, L.; Gulizia, M.; Scholten, M.; Dekker, L.; Khiani, R.; Hjortshot, S.; Høgh Petersen, H.; Hood, M.; Kääb, S.; Knops, R.; Kuschyk, J.; Lambiase, P.; Maass, K. A.; McLeod, K.; Molon, G.; Morgan, J.; Mortensen, P.; Murgatroyd, F.; Neuzil, P.; Pepper, C.; Sheridan, P.; Stellbrink, C.; Stuart, G.; Theuns, D.; Vernooy, K.; Veltmann, C.; Wende, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The totally subcutaneous implantable-defibrillator (S-ICD) is a new alternative to the conventional transvenous ICD system to minimize intravascular lead complications. There are limited data describing the long-term performance of the S-ICD. This paper presents the first large international patient population collected as part of the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry. Methods and results The EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry is a non-randomized, standard of care, multicentre Registry designed to collect long-term, system-related, clinical, and patient reported outcome data from S-ICD implanted patients since June 2009. Follow-up data are systematically collected over 60-month post-implant including Quality of Life. The study population of 472 patients of which 241 (51%) were enrolled prospectively has a mean follow-up duration of 558 days (range 13–1342 days, median 498 days), 72% male, mean age of 49 ± 18 years (range 9–88 years), 42% mean left ventricular ejection fraction. Complication-free rates were 97 and 94%, at 30 and 360 days, respectively. Three hundred and seventeen spontaneous episodes were recorded in 85 patients during the follow-up period. Of these episodes, 169 (53%) received therapy, 93 being for Ventricular Tachycardia/Fibrillation (VT/VF). One patient died of recurrent VF and severe bradycardia. Regarding discrete VT/VF episodes, first shock conversion efficacy was 88% with 100% overall successful clinical conversion after a maximum of five shocks. The 360-day inappropriate shock rate was 7% with the vast majority occurring for oversensing (62/73 episodes), primarily of cardiac signals (94% of oversensed episodes). Conclusion The first large cohort of real-world data from an International patient S-ICD population demonstrates appropriate system performance with clinical event rates and inappropriate shock rates comparable with those reported for conventional ICDs. Clinical trial registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT

  14. Role of defibrillation threshold testing during implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement: data from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Arnson, Yoav; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Glikson, Michael; Sela, Ron; Geist, Michael; Amit, Guy; Schliamser, Jorge E; Goldenberg, Ilan; Ben-Zvi, Shlomit; Orvin, Katia; Rosenheck, Shimon; Adam Freedberg, Nahum; Strasberg, Boris; Haim, Moti

    2014-05-01

    Defibrillation threshold (DFT) testing during placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has been considered mandatory. Accumulating data suggest a more limited role for DFT. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of ICD recipients who underwent DFT testing compared with those who did not. In this prospective cohort analysis of patients who received an ICD between July 2010 and March 2013, we compared patients who underwent DFT testing and those who did not. Primary end-points were death and malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Secondary end-points included the composite end-points and inappropriate ICD discharges. Of the 3596 patients in the registry, 614 patients (17%) underwent DFT testing during ICD placement vs 2982 (83%) who did not. Variables associated with ICD testing were implantation for secondary prevention (relative risk [RR] 1.87), prior ventricular arrhythmias (RR 1.81), use of antiarrhythmic medication (RR 1.59), and sinus rhythm (RR 2.05). Factors predisposing against testing were cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator implantation (RR 0.56) and concomitant diuretic use (RR 0.71). ICD testing was not associated with 1-year mortality (5.3% vs 5.1%, P = .74), delivery of appropriate shocks (8.6% vs 5.6%, P = .16), combined outcomes of ventricular arrhythmias and death (12.9% vs 11.3%, P = .45), or inappropriate ICD discharges (3.9% vs 2.1%, P = .2) compared to no DFT testing. No significant differences in the incidence of mortality, malignant ventricular arrhythmias, or inappropriate ICD discharges were observed between patients who underwent DFT testing compared to those who did not. Our results may support avoiding DFT testing during ICD placement, but this requires confirmation by additional prospective studies. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [The contribution of the Italian association of cancer registries (AIRTUM)].

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    The study of cluster requires the ability to identify, with accuracy and completeness, the health events of interest and their geographical location and time of occurrence. For rare and complex diseases, such as childhood cancers, it is possible to observe a significant health migration from the place of residence, which makes the detection even more complex. The best tool to identify these rare diseases is represented by cancer registries (CRs). In fact, CRs collect, through many sources, information related to tumours that arise in the population resident in their areas of activity. The number of the sources of information has increased thanks to the computerization of health services. The availability of multiple sources of information increases the completeness of data collection overcoming the limits of a single source, and makes it possible to describe the diagnostic-therapeutic course and the outcome of the cases. Among all data sources, for childhood cancers the model 1.01, which summarize the clinical information of the cases treated in one of the Italian Association of paediatric haematology and oncology (AIEOP) centres, is relevant. Moreover, CRs produce reliable and comparable data due to the use of international rules and classifications for the definition of the topography and morphology of cancer, for the date of diagnosis, and for quality checks. In Italy, the Italian association of cancer registries (AIRTUM) coordinates the activities of 45 population CRs, both general and specialized (by age or tumour type). AIRTUM involves a population of over 6.7 million citizens under the age of 20 years, approximately 60% of the total resident population. AIRTUM plays a role of coordination, support, and harmonization for Italian CRs through training, accreditation, and a shared database, it promotes and participates in national and international collaboration involving scientific societies (AIEOP, Italian Association of medical oncology - AIOM, Italian

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma in thalassaemia: an update of the Italian Registry.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina; Garani, Maria Chiara; Forni, Gian Luca; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Cassinerio, Elena; Fidone, Carmelo; Spadola, Vincenzo; Maggio, Aurelio; Restivo Pantalone, Gaetano; Piga, Antonio; Longo, Filomena; Gamberini, Maria Rita; Ricchi, Paolo; Costantini, Silvia; D'Ascola, Domenico; Cianciulli, Paolo; Lai, Maria Eliana; Carta, Maria Paola; Ciancio, Angela; Cavalli, Paola; Putti, Maria Caterina; Barella, Susanna; Amendola, Giovanni; Campisi, Saveria; Capra, Marcello; Caruso, Vincenzo; Colletta, Grazia; Volpato, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    The risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with thalassaemia is increased by transfusion-transmitted infections and haemosiderosis. All Italian Thalassaemia Centres use an ad hoc form to report all diagnoses of HCC to the Italian Registry. Since our last report, in 2002, up to December 2012, 62 new cases were identified, 52% of whom were affected by thalassaemia major (TM) and 45% by thalassaemia intermedia (TI). Two had sickle-thalassaemia (ST). The incidence of the tumour is increasing, possibly because of the longer survival of patients and consequent longer exposure to the noxious effects of the hepatotropic viruses and iron. Three patients were hepatitis B surface antigen-positive, 36 patients showed evidence of past infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Fifty-four patients had antibodies against hepatitis C virus (HCV), 43 of whom were HCV RNA positive. Only 4 had no evidence of exposure either to HCV or HBV. The mean liver iron concentration was 8 mg/g dry weight. Therapy included chemoembolization, thermoablation with radiofrequency and surgical excision. Three patients underwent liver transplant, 21 received palliative therapy. As of December 2012, 41 patients had died. The average survival time from HCC detection to death was 11·5 months (1·4-107·2 months). Ultrasonography is recommended every 6 months to enable early diagnosis of HCC, which is crucial to decrease mortality. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Developing a Risk Model for in-Hospital Adverse Events following ICD Implantation: A Report from the NCDR® Registry

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Bao, Haikun; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Kremers, Mark S.; Mirro, Michael J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To better inform patients and physicians of the expected risk of adverse events, and to assist hospitals’ efforts to improve the outcomes of patients undergoing implantable cardioverter defibrillation (ICD) implantation, we developed and validated a risk model using data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s (NCDR®) ICD Registry™. Background: ICDs prolong life in selected patients, but ICD implantation carries risk of periprocedural complications. Methods: We analyzed data from 240,632 ICD implantation procedures between 4/2010 and 12/2011 in the Registry. The population was divided into a derivation (70%) and a validation (30%) cohort. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with in-hospital adverse events (complications or mortality). A parsimonious risk score was developed based on beta estimates derived from the logistic model. Hierarchical models were then used to calculate risk-standardized complication rates to account for differences in case mix and procedural volume. Results: Overall 4388 (1.8%) of patients experienced at least one in-hospital complication or death. Thirteen factors were independently associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Model performance was similar in the derivation and validation cohorts (C statistics = 0.724 and 0.719, respectively). The risk score characterized patients into low and high risk subgroups for adverse events (≤10 points, 0.3%; ≥30 points, 4.2%). The risk-standardized complication rates varied significantly across hospitals (median 1.77, IQR 1.54 to 2.14, 5th/95th percentiles 1.16/3.15). Conclusions: We developed a simple model that predicts risk for in-hospital adverse events among patients undergoing ICD placement. This can be used for shared decision making and to benchmark hospital performance. PMID:24333491

  18. Evaluation of ICD-10 algorithms to identify hypopituitary patients in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Agnethe; Olsen, Morten; Andersen, Marianne; Nielsen, Eigil Husted; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kistorp, Caroline; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Stochhholm, Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Objective Routinely collected health data may be valuable sources for conducting research. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of algorithms detecting hypopituitary patients in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) using medical records as reference standard. Study design and setting Patients with International Classification of Diseases (10th edition [ICD-10]) diagnoses of hypopituitarism, or other diagnoses of pituitary disorders assumed to be associated with an increased risk of hypopituitarism, recorded in the DNPR during 2000–2012 were identified. Medical records were reviewed to confirm or disprove hypopituitarism. Results Hypopituitarism was confirmed in 911 patients. In a candidate population of 1,661, this yielded an overall positive predictive value (PPV) of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.4–57.3). Using algorithms searching for patients recorded at least one, three or five times with a diagnosis of hypopituitarism (E23.0x) and/or at least once with a diagnosis of postprocedural hypopituitarism (E89.3x), PPVs gradually increased from 73.3% (95% CI: 70.6–75.8) to 83.3% (95% CI: 80.7–85.7). Completeness for the same algorithms, however, decreased from 90.8% (95% CI: 88.7–92.6) to 82.9% (95% CI: 80.3–85.3) respectively. Including data of hormone replacement in the same algorithms PPVs increased from 73.2% (95% CI: 70.6–75.7) to 82.6% (95% CI: 80.1–84.9) and completeness decreased from 94.3% (95% CI: 92.6–95.7) to 89.7% (95% CI: 87.5–91.6) with increasing records of E23.0x. Conclusion The DNPR is a valuable data source to identify hypopituitary patients using a search criteria of at least five records of E23.0x and/or at least one record of E89.3x. Completeness is increased when including hormone replacement data in the algorithm. The consequences of misclassification must, however, always be considered. PMID:28223847

  19. Sex differences in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation indications and outcomes: lessons from the Nationwide Israeli-ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Amit, Guy; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Konstantino, Yuval; Luria, David; Kazatsker, Mark; Chetboun, Israel; Haim, Moti; Gavrielov-Yusim, Natalie; Goldenberg, Ilan; Glikson, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve survival in certain high arrhythmic risk populations. However, there are sex differences regarding both the utilization and the benefit of these devices. Using a prospective national ICD registry, we aim to compare the indications for ICD implantation as well as outcomes in implanted women vs. men. All subjects implanted with an ICD or cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRTD) in Israel between July 2010 and February 2013 were included. A total of 3544 subjects constructed the baseline cohort, of whom 615 (17%) were women. Women had the same age (64 years) and rate of secondary prevention indication (26%) as men. However, women were more likely than men to have significant heart failure symptoms (52 vs. 45%), QRS > 120 ms (41 vs. 36%), and a higher rate of non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy (54 vs. 21%, all P values <0.05). Using multivariate analysis, women were more likely to undergo CRTD implantation (odds ratio = 1.8, P < 0.01). Follow-up data were available for 1518 subjects with a mean follow-up of 12 months. During follow-up, there were no significant differences among genders in the rate of any single or the combined outcomes of appropriate device therapies, heart failure admissions, or death. First-year re-intervention rate was double among women (5.6 vs. 3.0%, P < 0.01). In real-world setting, women implanted with an ICD differ significantly from men in their baseline characteristics and in the use of CRTD devices. These, however, did not translate into outcome differences. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Defibrillator implantations for primary prevention in the United States: Inappropriate care or inadequate documentation: Insights from the National Cardiovascular Data ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Daniel W; Tsai, Vivian; Heidenreich, Paul A; Goldstein, Mary K; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2015-10-01

    Prior studies have reported that more than 20% of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantations in the United States do not adhere to trial-based criteria. We sought to investigate the patient characteristics associated with not meeting the inclusion criteria of the clinical trials that have demonstrated the efficacy of primary prevention ICDs. Using data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's ICD Registry, we identified patients who received ICDs for primary prevention from January 2006 to December 2008. We determined whether patients met the inclusion criteria of at least 1 of the 4 ICD primary prevention trials: Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT), MADIT-II, Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT), and the Multicenter Unsustained Tachycardia Trial (MUSTT). Among 150,264 patients, 86% met criteria for an ICD implantation based on trial data. The proportion of patients who did not meet trial-based criteria increased as age decreased. In multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for not meeting trial criteria included prior cardiac transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 2.1), pediatric electrophysiology operator (OR 2.0), and high-grade atrioventricular conduction disease (OR 1.4). Among National Cardiovascular Data Registry registrants receiving first-time ICDs for primary prevention, the majority met trial-based criteria. Multivariate analyses suggested that many patients who did not meet the trial-based criteria may have had clinical circumstances that warranted ICD implantation. These findings caution against the use of trial-based indications to determine site quality metrics that could penalize sites that care for younger patients. The planned incorporation of appropriate use criteria into the ICD registry may better characterize patient- and site-level quality and performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Contemporary rates of appropriate shock therapy in patients who receive implantable device therapy in a real-world setting: From the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Sabbag, Avi; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Samania, Nimer; Kazatsker, Mark; Goldenberg, Ilan; Glikson, Michael; Beinart, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have become the mainstay of preventive measures for sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, there are limited data on rates of appropriate life-saving ICD shock therapies in contemporary real-life settings. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the rate of appropriate life-saving ICD shock therapies in a contemporary registry. The Israeli ICD Registry includes all implants and other ICD operative procedures nationwide. The present study comprises 2349 consecutive cases who were enrolled in the Registry and prospectively followed up for information regarding survival, hospitalizations, and ICD therapies since 2010. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that the rate of appropriate ICD shock therapy at 30-month follow-up was 2.6% among patients who received an ICD for primary prevention compared with 7.4% among those who received a device for secondary prevention (log-rank P < .001). Rates of appropriate ICD shocks among primary prevention patients were 1.1% at 1-year of follow-up and 2.6% at 30 months, whereas the corresponding rates in the secondary prevention group were 3.8% at 1 year and 7.4% at 30 months (log-rank P < .001). A total of 253 patients (4.8%) died during follow-up, 65% of noncardiac causes. Rates of life-saving appropriate ICD shock therapies among patients implanted with a defibrillator for the primary prevention of SCD in a contemporary real-world setting are lower than reported previously. These findings suggest a need for improved risk stratification and patient selection in this population. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Canadian Registry of ICD Implant Testing procedures (CREDIT): current practice, risks, and costs of intraoperative defibrillation testing.

    PubMed

    Healey, Jeff S; Dorian, Paul; Mitchell, L Brent; Talajic, Mario; Philippon, Francois; Simpson, Chris; Yee, Raymond; Morillo, Carlos A; Lamy, Andre; Basta, Magdy; Birnie, David H; Wang, Xiaoyin; Nair, Girish M; Crystal, Eugene; Kerr, Charles R; Connolly, Stuart J

    2010-02-01

    There is uncertainty about the proper role of defibrillation testing (DT) at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) insertion. A prospective registry was conducted at 13 sites in Canada between January 2006 and October 2007. To document the details of DT, the reasons for not conducting DT, and the costs and complications associated with DT. DT was conducted at implantation in 230 of 361 patients (64%). DT was more likely to be conducted for new implants compared with impulse generator replacements (71% vs 32%, P = 0.0001), but was similar for primary and secondary prevention indications (64% vs 63%, P = NS). Among patients not having DT, the reason(s) given were: considered unnecessary (44%); considered unsafe, mainly due to persistent atrial fibrillation (37%); lack of an anesthetist (20%); and, patient or physician preference (6%). When performed, DT consisted of a single successful shock > or = 10J below maximum device output in 65% of cases. A 10J safety-margin was met by 97% of patients, requiring system modification in 2.3%. Major perioperative complications occurred in 4.4% of patients having DT versus 6.6% of patients not having DT (P = NS). ICD insertion was $844 more expensive for patients having DT (P = 0.16), largely due to increased costs ($28,017 vs $24,545) among patients having impulse generator replacement (P = 0.02). DT was not performed in a third of ICD implants, usually due to a perceived lack of need or relative contraindication.

  3. Predictors of an inadequate defibrillation safety margin at ICD implantation: insights from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jonathan C; Marcus, Gregory M; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P; Sood, Nitesh; Parker, Matthew W; Kluger, Jeffrey; Lampert, Rachel; Russo, Andrea M

    2014-07-22

    Defibrillation testing is often performed to establish effective arrhythmia termination, but predictors and consequences of an inadequate defibrillation safety margin (DSM) remain largely unknown. The aims of this study were to develop a simple risk score predictive of an inadequate DSM at implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation and to examine the association of an inadequate DSM with adverse events. A total of 132,477 ICD Registry implantations between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed. Using logistic regression models, factors most predictive of an inadequate DSM (defined as the lowest successful energy tested <10 J from maximal device output) were identified, and the association of an inadequate DSM with adverse events was evaluated. Inadequate DSMs occurred in 12,397 patients (9.4%). A simple risk score composed of 8 easily identifiable variables characterized patients at high and low risk for an inadequate DSM, including (with assigned points) age <70 years (1 point); male sex (1 point); race: black (4 points), Hispanic (2 points), or other (1 point); New York Heart Association functional class III (1 point) or IV (3 points); no ischemic heart disease (2 points); renal dialysis (3 points); secondary prevention indication (1 point); and ICD type: single-chamber (2 points) or biventricular (1 point) device. An inadequate DSM was associated with greater odds of complications (odds ratio: 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.09 to 1.37; p = 0.0006), hospital stay >3 days (odds ratio: 1.24; 95% confidence interval: 1.19 to 1.30; p < 0.0001), and in-hospital mortality (odds ratio: 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.63 to 2.36; p < 0.0001). A simple risk score identified ICD recipients at risk for an inadequate DSM. An inadequate DSM was associated with an increased risk for in-hospital adverse events. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics and outcomes of diabetic patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a real world setting: results from the Israeli ICD registry.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Hillel; Geist, Michael; Goldenberg, Ilan; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Glikson, Michael; Tenenbaum, Alexander; Swissa, Moshe; Fisman, Enrique Z; Golovchiner, Gregory; Strasberg, Boris; Barsheshet, Alon

    2016-12-01

    There are limited data regarding the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the risks of both appropriate and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. The present study was designed to compare the outcome of appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy in patients with or without DM. The risk of a first appropriate ICD therapy for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (including anti tachycardia pacing and shock) was compared between 764 DM and 1346 non-DM patients enrolled in the national Israeli ICD registry. We also compared the risks of inappropriate ICD therapy, and death or cardiac hospitalization between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients were older, were more likely to have ischemic cardiomyopathy, lower ejection fraction, atrial fibrillation, and other co-morbidities. The 3-year cumulative incidence of appropriate ICD therapy was similar in the DM and non-DM groups (12 and 13%, respectively, p = 0.983). Multivariate analysis showed that DM did not affect the risk of appropriate ICD therapy (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.78-1.47, p = 0.694) or inappropriate therapy (HR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.42-1.23, p = 0.232). However, DM was associated with a 31% increased risk for death or cardiac hospitalization (p = 0.005). Results were similar in subgroup analyses including ICD and defibrillators with cardiac resynchronization therapy function recipients, primary or secondary prevention indication for an ICD. Despite a significant excess of cardiac hospitalizations and mortality in the diabetic population, there was no difference in the rate of ICD treatments, suggesting that the outcome difference is not related to arrhythmias.

  5. Contemporary rates and outcomes of single- vs. dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator lead implantation: data from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Eran; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Konstantino, Yuval; Glikson, Michael; Barsheshet, Alon; Goldenberg, Ilan; Michowitz, Yoav

    2017-09-01

    Dual-coil leads were traditionally considered standard of care due to lower defibrillation thresholds (DFT). Higher complication rates during extraction with parallel progression in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) technology raised questions on dual coil necessity. Prior substudies found no significant outcome difference between dual and single coils, although using higher rates of DFT testing then currently practiced. We evaluated the temporal trends in implantation rates of single- vs. dual-coil leads and determined the associated adverse clinical outcomes, using a contemporary nation-wide ICD registry. Between July 2010 and March 2015, 6343 consecutive ICD (n = 3998) or CRT-D (n = 2345) implantation patients were prospectively enrolled in the Israeli ICD Registry. A follow-up of at least 1 year of 2285 patients was available for outcome analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. Single-coil leads were implanted in 32% of our cohort, 36% among ICD recipients, and 26% among CRT-D recipients. Secondary prevention indication was associated with an increased rate of dual-coil implantation. A significant decline in dual-coil leads with reciprocal incline of single coils was observed, despite low rates of DFT testing (11.6%) during implantation, which also declined from 31 to 2%. In the multivariate Cox model analysis, dual- vs. single-coil lead implantation was not associated with an increased risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23; P= 0.33], heart failure hospitalization (HR = 1.34; P=0.13), appropriate (HR = 1.25; P= 0.33), or inappropriate ICD therapy (HR = 2.07; P= 0.12). Real-life rates of single-coil lead implantation are rising while adding no additional risk. These results of single-coil safety are reassuring and obtained, despite low and contemporary rates of DFT testing.

  6. Positive predictive values of ICD-10 codes to identify incident acute pancreatitis and incident primary malignancy in the Scandinavian national patient registries among women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Munch, Troels; Christensen, Lotte B; Adelborg, Kasper; Tell, Grethe S; Apalset, Ellen M; Westerlund, Anna; Lagerros, Ylva T; Kahlert, Johnny; Xue, Fei; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Validation of definitions used to identify conditions of interest is imperative to epidemiologic studies based on routinely collected data. The objective of the study was thus to estimate positive predictive values (PPVs) of International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes to identify cases of incident acute pancreatitis leading to hospitalization and incident primary malignancy in the Scandinavian (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden) national patient registries in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). This validation study included postmenopausal (defined as 55 years or older) women with osteoporosis, identified between 2005-2014. Potential cases were sampled based on ICD-10 codes from the three national patient registries. Cases were adjudicated by physicians, using medical record review as gold standard. PPVs with corresponding 95% CIs were computed. Medical records of 286 of 325 (retrieval rate 88%) women with PMO were available for adjudication. Acute pancreatitis leading to hospitalization had a PPV of 87.6% (95% CI: 80.8%-90.2%). Incident primary malignancy had a PPV of 88.1% (95% CI: 81.3%-92.7%). The PPVs did not vary substantially across the three countries. ICD-10 codes to identify acute pancreatitis leading to hospitalization, and incident primary malignancy in the Scandinavian national patient registries had high PPVs among women with PMO. This allows identification of cases of acute pancreatitis and incident primary malignancy with reasonable validity and to use these as outcomes in comparative analyses.

  7. Outcome of Patients with Advanced Heart Failure Who Receive Device-Based Therapy for Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: Insights from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Goldenberg, Ilan; Samniah, Nimer; Rosso, Raphael; Marai, Ibrahim; Pekar, Alexander; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Militianu, Arie; Glikson, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Randomized clinical trials have shown conflicting data on the benefit of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with more advanced heart failure (HF) symptoms. Using the Israeli ICD Registry data, we sought to examine the effect of HF functional class on the outcome of patients who receive device therapy in a real-world setting. The association between HF functional class (categorized as baseline New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class I and II in [61%] vs class III and IV in [39%]) and clinical outcomes was assessed among 913 patients who received an ICD (n = 514) or a cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D; n = 399) device and were prospectively followed in the Israeli ICD Registry between July 2011 and June 2013. The risk associated with advanced HF functional class was significantly different in ICD and CRT-D recipients. In the former group, patients with NYHA classes III and IV experienced >3-fold increased risk of HF or death (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.28; P < 0.001), whereas among CRT-D recipients the risk was similar between patients with NYHA III/IV and those with less advanced HF symptoms (HR = 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-1.78]; P = 0.42; P value for NYHA functional class by device type interaction = 0.002). The risk for ventricular arrhythmia (VA) was significantly lower among patients with more advanced NYHA functional class, regardless of device type (overall HR = 0.52; 95% CI 0.33-0.91; P = 0.04). Our findings suggest that patients with less advanced HF symptoms experience a greater risk for VA and the development of HF is attenuated in CRT-D recipients with more advanced NYHA functional class. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Italian registry of patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: general data and quality of life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Luisetti, Maurizio; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Corda, Luciano; Ottaviani, Stefania; Gatta, Nuccia; Tinelli, Carmine; Bruletti, Gisella; Bertella, Enrica; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Confalonieri, Marco; Seebacher, Christine; Iannacci, Leonardo; Ferrari, Simona; Salerno, Francesco G; Mariani, Frescesca; Carone, Mauro; Balbi, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD) is a rare hereditary disorder with an estimated prevalence of about 1/5000 individuals in Italy. Deficient patients are at a higher risk of developing lung emphysema and chronic liver disease. The low estimated prevalence of AATD prompted the establishment of a registry with the aim of learning more about the natural history and the quality of care of these patients. The Italian registry for AATD was established in 1996. In this study, genetic and clinical findings of Italian AATD patients are presented. Moreover, we also evaluated the changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with COPD and AAT deficiency over a three-year period, in relation to augmentation therapy. In a period spanning 18 years (1996-2014) a total of 422 adult subjects with severe AATD were enrolled, namely 258 PI*ZZ, 74 PI*SZ, 4 PI*SS and 86 patients with at least one rare deficient allele. The 21.3% frequency for AATD patients with at least one deficient rare variant is the highest so far recorded in national registries of AATD. The registry data allow a detailed characterization of the natural course of the disease and the level of patient care, as well as confirm the usefulness of early AATD detection.

  9. The Italian Twin Project: from the personal identification number to a national twin registry.

    PubMed

    Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Patriarca, Valeria; Brescianini, Sonia; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Cannoni, Stefania; Ristori, Giovanni; Salvetti, Marco

    2002-10-01

    The unique opportunity given by the "fiscal code", an alphanumeric identification with demographic information on any single person residing in Italy, introduced in 1976 by the Ministry of Finance, allowed a database of all potential Italian twins to be created. This database contains up to now name, surname, date and place of birth and home address of about 1,300,000 "possible twins". Even though we estimated an excess of 40% of pseudo-twins, this still is the world's largest twin population ever collected. The database of possible twins is currently used in population-based studies on multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. A system is currently being developed for linking the database with data from mortality and cancer registries. In 2001, the Italian Government, through the Ministry of Health, financed a broad national research program on twin studies, including the establishment of a national twin registry. Among all the possible twins, a sample of 500,000 individuals are going to be contacted and we expect to enrol around 120,000 real twin pairs in a formal Twin Registry. According to available financial resources, a sub sample of the enrolled population will be asked to donate DNA. A biological bank from twins will be then implemented, guaranteeing information on future etiological questions regarding genetic and modifiable factors for physical impairment and disability, cancers, cardiovascular diseases and other age related chronic illnesses.

  10. Rationale and design of a multidisciplinary national real-world registry on carotid stenting: the Italian Registry for Carotid Stenting (RISC).

    PubMed

    Biasi, Giorgio M; Deleo, Gaetano; Froio, Alberto; Cremonesi, Alberto; Inglese, Luigi; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Setacci, Carlo

    2006-04-01

    The Registro Italiano per lo Stenting Carotideo (RISC, Italian Registry for Carotid Stenting) has been organized by Italian specialists from different disciplines directly involved in the prevention of stroke due to carotid plaques through stenting of carotid lesions. The Registry has been endorsed by the national societies of 4 different specialties: vascular surgery, interventional cardiology, radiology, and neuroradiology. Each society contributed in the planning stage. The basis for the registry is to collect data on carotid stenting procedures performed by different specialists with different techniques in a "real-world" setting without the limitations of a randomized clinical trial. The Registry was funded to enroll at least 1200 patients over a minimum period of 36 months. The results will be analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle and are anticipated in late 2006. Primary endpoints of the registry are the 30-day combined death and stroke rate and the occurrence of restenosis and ipsilateral neurological deficit at 12 and 24 months. Considerable attention has been paid to the registry's quality control program to ensure scientific validation. An online database facilitates the collection of data with speed and accuracy.

  11. Variation among hospitals in selection of higher-cost, "higher-tech," implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) Implantable Cardioverter/Defibrillator (ICD) Registry.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Rachel; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P

    2013-06-01

    New implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) models are regularly introduced, incorporating technological advantages. The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with use of a newer, higher-tech/higher-cost device, as opposed to a previously released device, among patients undergoing ICD implantation. We analyzed the 78,494 cases receiving new ICD implants submitted by 978 hospitals to the NCDR ICD Registry between January 2005 and June 2007. Devices were categorized as "previously released" 3 months after a new model from the same manufacturer was released. A nonparsimonious model including all demographic, clinical, provider, and hospital characteristics was created using logistic regression to predict use of a previously released device. Overall, 36% of implants involved previously released devices. However, no demographic (race, gender, payor status), clinical, or provider characteristics had a meaningful impact on use of previously released devices. The model C-statistic was 0.602, suggesting that measured characteristics had a limited ability to differentiate those receiving a previously released device. However, individual hospitals varied greatly in use of "previously released" devices, from 3% in the lowest decile to 91% in the top decile. Among physicians implanting at >1 hospital, there was minimal correlation between use of previously released devices between hospitals, suggesting hospital policies or culture, rather than physician preference, drives the large interhospital variation seen. The use of "previously released" devices is influenced minimally by measured patient or provider characteristics. Rather, the main determinant of whether patients receive the newest, versus a previously released device, appears to be practice patterns at individual hospitals. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Latent tuberculosis infection in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis: evidence from the Italian Psocare Registry.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, P; Cazzaniga, S; Chimenti, S; Maccarone, M; Picardo, M; Girolomoni, G; Naldi, L

    2015-06-01

    The nationwide prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in Italian patients with psoriasis has never been investigated. To estimate the nationwide prevalence of LTBI in Italian patients with psoriasis who are candidates for systemic treatment. Data were obtained from the Psocare Registry on those patients (n = 4946) with age > 18 years, systemic treatment at entry specified and tuberculin skin test (TST) performed according to the Mantoux method. LTBI diagnosis was based on a positive TST result in the absence of any clinical, radiological or microbiological evidence of active tuberculosis. Latent tuberculosis infection was diagnosed in 8·3% of patients with psoriasis (409 of 4946). The prevalence of LTBI was lower in patients on biologics than in those on conventional systemic treatments, ranging from 4·3% (19 of 444) of patients on adalimumab to 31% (eight of 26) of those on psoralen-ultraviolet A (P < 0·05). Independent factors associated with LTBI were male sex [odds ratio (OR) 1·30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·04-1·62; P = 0·02], age over 55 years (OR 2·93, 95% CI 2·18-3·93; P < 0·001) and being entered into a conventional treatment (OR 3·83, 95% CI 3·10-4·74; P < 0·001). Positive history of tuberculosis was seen in 1% of patients (n = 49). The nationwide prevalence of LTBI in Italian patients with psoriasis candidate to systemic treatment is high, and screening is recommended prior to biological treatment. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Portal vein thrombosis relevance on liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous Thrombotic Events Registry.

    PubMed

    Violi, Francesco; Corazza, Roberto Gino; Caldwell, Stephen Hugh; Perticone, Francesco; Gatta, Angelo; Angelico, Mario; Farcomeni, Alessio; Masotti, Michela; Napoleone, Laura; Vestri, Annarita; Raparelli, Valeria; Basili, Stefania

    2016-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis may occur in cirrhosis; nevertheless, its prevalence, and predictors are still elusive. To investigate this issue, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine undertook the "Portal vein thrombosis Relevance On Liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous thrombotic Events Registry" (PRO-LIVER). This prospective multicenter study includes consecutive cirrhotic patients undergoing Doppler ultrasound examination of the portal area to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of portal vein thrombosis over a 2-year scheduled follow-up. Seven hundred and fifty-three (68 % men; 64 ± 12 years) patients were included in the present analysis. Fifty percent of the cases were cirrhotic outpatients. Viral (44 %) etiology was predominant. Around half of the patients had a mild-severity disease according to the Child-Pugh score; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in 20 %. The prevalence of ultrasound-detected portal vein thrombosis was 17 % (n = 126); it was asymptomatic in 43 % of the cases. Notably, more than half of the portal vein thrombosis patients (n = 81) were not treated with anticoagulant therapy. Logistic step-forward multivariate analysis demonstrated that previous portal vein thrombosis (p < 0.001), Child-Pugh Class B + C (p < 0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.01), previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding (p = 0.030) and older age (p = 0.012) were independently associated with portal vein thrombosis. Portal vein thrombosis is a frequent complication of cirrhosis, particularly in patients with moderate-severe liver failure. The apparent undertreatment of patients with portal vein thrombosis is a matter of concern and debate, which should be addressed by planning interventional trials especially with newer oral anticoagulants. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01470547.

  14. The predictive value of ICD-10 diagnostic coding used to assess Charlson comorbidity index conditions in the population-based Danish National Registry of Patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Charlson comorbidity index is often used to control for confounding in research based on medical databases. There are few studies of the accuracy of the codes obtained from these databases. We examined the positive predictive value (PPV) of the ICD-10 diagnostic coding in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) for the 19 Charlson conditions. Methods Among all hospitalizations in Northern Denmark between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2007 with a first-listed diagnosis of a Charlson condition in the NRP, we selected 50 hospital contacts for each condition. We reviewed discharge summaries and medical records to verify the NRP diagnoses, and computed the PPV as the proportion of confirmed diagnoses. Results A total of 950 records were reviewed. The overall PPV for the 19 Charlson conditions was 98.0% (95% CI; 96.9, 98.8). The PPVs ranged from 82.0% (95% CI; 68.6%, 91.4%) for diabetes with diabetic complications to 100% (one-sided 97.5% CI; 92.9%, 100%) for congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, chronic pulmonary disease, mild and severe liver disease, hemiplegia, renal disease, leukaemia, lymphoma, metastatic tumour, and AIDS. Conclusion The PPV of NRP coding of the Charlson conditions was consistently high. PMID:21619668

  15. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of elderly patients treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy in a real-world setting: data from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Goldenberg, Ilan; Haim, Moti; Schliamser, Jorge E; Boulos, Monther; Ilan, Michael; Swissa, Moshe; Gavrielov-Yusim, Natalie; Fuchs, Therese; Amit, Guy; Glikson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials of device therapy. To provide real-world data regarding outcomes associated with device-based therapy in a large cohort of elderly patients enrolled in the Israeli ICD Registry. Between July 2010 and June 2012, a total of 2807 consecutive patients undergoing implanted cardioverter-defibrillator/cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (ICD/CRT-D) implantation were prospectively enrolled in the Israeli ICD Registry. For the present analysis, patients were categorized into 3 age groups: ≤60 years (n = 1378 [49%]), 61-75 years (n = 863 [31%]), and >75 years (n = 566 [20%]). Elderly patients (>75 years of age) had more comorbid conditions and were more likely to undergo CRT-D implantation (all P < .01). However, the rate of device-related complications associated with surgical reinterventions at 1 year was <3% regardless of age (P = .70 for the comparison among the 3 age groups). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of heart failure or death and of appropriate ICD therapy for ventricular arrhythmias was significantly increased with increasing age among patients who received an ICD. In contrast, the age-related increase in the risk of all end points was attenuated among patients who received CRT-D devices (all P values for age-by-device-type interactions are <.05). In a real-world scenario, elderly patients (>75 years of age) comprise approximately 20% of the ICD/CRT-D recipients and experience a device reintervention rate similar to that of their younger counterparts. Our data suggest that the association between advanced age and adverse clinical outcomes is attenuated in elderly patients implanted with CRT-D devices. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic abnormalities associated with initiation of systemic treatment for psoriasis: evidence from the Italian Psocare Registry.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, P; Cazzaniga, S; Chimenti, S; Giannetti, A; Maccarone, M; Picardo, M; Girolomoni, G; Naldi, L

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate variations in laboratory parameters and diagnoses of selected clinical conditions up to 16 weeks after starting a new systemic psoriasis treatment for Psocare Registry enrollees. Prospective cohort study. Italian public referral centres for psoriasis treatment. First-time recipients (n = 10,539) of continuous systemic psoriasis treatment for at least 16 weeks. Mean variations in (weeks 8 and 16) and proportions of patients reaching a clinically meaningful increase in serum levels (week 16) of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and creatinine, as well as week-16 cumulative incidences of new diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. Mean cholesterol and triglyceride levels significantly increased in patients treated with acitretin or cyclosporine. Mean triglyceride levels also increased in efalizumab- and etanercept-treated patients. Mean transaminase values increased in methotrexate-treated patients, and mean aspartate amino transferase levels increased in infliximab-treated patients. The average serum creatinine value increased in cyclosporine-treated patients. Acitretin and cyclosporine were associated with risk of hypercholesterolaemia (odds ratios 1.51 and 1.34) and acitretin with risk of hypertriglyceridaemia (odds ratio 1.43). Methotrexate and infliximab were associated with risk of more than doubling the upper normal aspartate amino transferase (odds ratios 2.06 and 1.87) and alanine amino transferase (odds ratios 2.38 and 1.74) values. The relative risk of developing arterial hypertension and diabetes was increased for patients receiving cyclosporine (odds ratios 3.31 and 2.88). Systemic treatments for psoriasis resulted in heterogeneous effects on the parameters analysed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Chronic haemodialysis in small children: a retrospective study of the Italian Pediatric Dialysis Registry.

    PubMed

    Paglialonga, Fabio; Consolo, Silvia; Pecoraro, Carmine; Vidal, Enrico; Gianoglio, Bruno; Puteo, Flora; Picca, Stefano; Saravo, Maria Teresa; Edefonti, Alberto; Verrina, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Chronic haemodialysis (HD) in small children has not been adequately investigated. This was a retrospective investigation of the use of chronic HD in 21 children aged  <2 years (n = 12 aged <1 year) who were registered in the Italian Pediatric Dialysis Registry. Data collected over a period of >10 years were analysed. The median age of the 21 children at start of HD was 11.4 [interquartile range (IQR) 6.2-14.6] months, and HD consisted mainly of haemodiafiltration for 3-4 h in  ≥4 sessions/week. A total of 51 central venous catheters were placed, and the median survival of tunnelled and temporary lines was 349 and 31 days, respectively (p  < 0.001). Eight children (38 %) showed evidence of central vein thrombosis. Although 19 % of patients received growth hormone and 63.6 % received enteral feeding, the weight and height of these patients remained suboptimal. During the HD period the haemoglobin level increased in all patients, but not to normal levels (from 8.5 to 9.6 g/dl) despite erythropoietin administration (503-600 U/kg/week). The hospitalisation rate was 1.94/patient-year. Seventeen patients underwent renal transplantation at a median age of 3.0 years. Four patients, all affected by severe comorbidities, died during follow-up (in 2 cases due to absence of a vascular access). The 5- and 10-year cumulative survival was 82.4 and 68.7 %, respectively. Extracorporeal dialysis is feasible in children aged  <2 years, but comorbidities, vascular access, growth and anaemia remain major concerns.

  18. Validity of ICD-9-CM codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in three Italian administrative healthcare databases: a diagnostic accuracy study protocol.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Iosief; Serraino, Diego; Giovannini, Gianni; Stracci, Fabrizio; Casucci, Paola; Alessandrini, Giuliana; Bidoli, Ettore; Chiari, Rita; Cirocchi, Roberto; De Giorgi, Marcello; Franchini, David; Vitale, Maria Francesca; Fusco, Mario; Montedori, Alessandro

    2016-03-25

    Administrative healthcare databases are useful tools to study healthcare outcomes and to monitor the health status of a population. Patients with cancer can be identified through disease-specific codes, prescriptions and physician claims, but prior validation is required to achieve an accurate case definition. The objective of this protocol is to assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in identifying patients diagnosed with the relative disease in three Italian administrative databases. Data from the administrative databases of Umbria Region (910,000 residents), Local Health Unit 3 of Napoli (1,170,000 residents) and Friuli--Venezia Giulia Region (1,227,000 residents) will be considered. In each administrative database, patients with the first occurrence of diagnosis of breast, lung or colorectal cancer between 2012 and 2014 will be identified using the following groups of ICD-9-CM codes in primary position: (1) 233.0 and (2) 174.x for breast cancer; (3) 162.x for lung cancer; (4) 153.x for colon cancer and (5) 154.0-154.1 and 154.8 for rectal cancer. Only incident cases will be considered, that is, excluding cases that have the same diagnosis in the 5 years (2007-2011) before the period of interest. A random sample of cases and non-cases will be selected from each administrative database and the corresponding medical charts will be assessed for validation by pairs of trained, independent reviewers. Case ascertainment within the medical charts will be based on (1) the presence of a primary nodular lesion in the breast, lung or colon-rectum, documented with imaging or endoscopy and (2) a cytological or histological documentation of cancer from a primary or metastatic site. Sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs will be calculated. Study results will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and

  19. Validity of ICD-9-CM codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in three Italian administrative healthcare databases: a diagnostic accuracy study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Iosief; Serraino, Diego; Giovannini, Gianni; Stracci, Fabrizio; Casucci, Paola; Alessandrini, Giuliana; Bidoli, Ettore; Chiari, Rita; Cirocchi, Roberto; De Giorgi, Marcello; Franchini, David; Vitale, Maria Francesca; Fusco, Mario; Montedori, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful tools to study healthcare outcomes and to monitor the health status of a population. Patients with cancer can be identified through disease-specific codes, prescriptions and physician claims, but prior validation is required to achieve an accurate case definition. The objective of this protocol is to assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision—Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in identifying patients diagnosed with the relative disease in three Italian administrative databases. Methods and analysis Data from the administrative databases of Umbria Region (910 000 residents), Local Health Unit 3 of Napoli (1 170 000 residents) and Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region (1 227 000 residents) will be considered. In each administrative database, patients with the first occurrence of diagnosis of breast, lung or colorectal cancer between 2012 and 2014 will be identified using the following groups of ICD-9-CM codes in primary position: (1) 233.0 and (2) 174.x for breast cancer; (3) 162.x for lung cancer; (4) 153.x for colon cancer and (5) 154.0–154.1 and 154.8 for rectal cancer. Only incident cases will be considered, that is, excluding cases that have the same diagnosis in the 5 years (2007–2011) before the period of interest. A random sample of cases and non-cases will be selected from each administrative database and the corresponding medical charts will be assessed for validation by pairs of trained, independent reviewers. Case ascertainment within the medical charts will be based on (1) the presence of a primary nodular lesion in the breast, lung or colon–rectum, documented with imaging or endoscopy and (2) a cytological or histological documentation of cancer from a primary or metastatic site. Sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs will be calculated. Dissemination Study results will be disseminated widely through

  20. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Diamond Blackfan anaemia: a report from the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry.

    PubMed

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Zecca, Marco; Lanino, Edoardo; Corti, Paola; Favre, Claudio; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Locatelli, Franco; Prete, Arcangelo

    2014-06-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for patients with Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA). We report the transplantation outcome of 30 Italian DBA patients referred to the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry between 1990 and 2012. This is one of the largest national registry cohorts of transplanted DBA patients. Most patients (83%) were allografted after 2000. A matched sibling donor was employed in 16 patients (53%), the remaining 14 patients (47%) were transplanted from matched unrelated donors. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients engrafted. One patient died at day +6 due to veno-occlusive disease without achieving neutrophil recovery and another patient remained transfusion-dependent despite the presence of a full donor chimerism. The 5-year overall survival and transplant-related mortality was 74·4% and 25·6%, respectively. Patients younger than 10 years as well as those transplanted after 2000 showed a significantly higher overall survival and a significantly lower risk of transplant-related mortality. No difference between donor type was observed. Our data suggest that allogeneic HSCT from a related or unrelated donor was a reasonable alternative to transfusion therapy in young and well chelated DBA patients.

  1. Twenty years of the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry: where we stand and what remains to be learned

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M.; Marotta, Serena; Calzone, Rita; Grimaldi, Francesco; Zatterale, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of Fanconi anemia remains hard to establish because of its rarity and its heterogeneous clinical presentation; since 1994, the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry has collected clinical, epidemiological and genetic data of Italian Fanconi Anemia patients. This registry includes 180 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Fanconi anemia who have either been enrolled prospectively, at diagnosis, or later on. After enrollment, follow-up data were periodically collected to assess the clinical course, possible complications and long-term survival; the median follow up was 15.6 years. The main goal of the study was to describe the natural history of Fanconi anemia, focusing on the following variables: family history, disease presentation, development of hematological manifestations, development of malignancies, occurrence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and survival. Typical morphological and/or hematological abnormalities and/or growth retardation were the most common manifestations at diagnosis; the majority of patients (77%) exhibited hematological abnormalities at the initial presentation, and almost all (96%) eventually developed hematological manifestations. More than half of the patients (57%) underwent a bone-marrow transplant. The occurrence of cancer was quite rare at diagnosis, whereas the cumulative incidence of malignancies at 10, 20 and 30 years was 5%, 8% and 22%, respectively, for hematological cancers and 1%, 15% and 32%, respectively, for solid tumors. Overall survival at 10, 20 and 30 years were 88%, 56% and 37%, respectively; the main causes of death were cancer, complications of the hematological presentation and complications of transplantation. These data clearly confirm the detrimental outcome of Fanconi anemia, with no major improvement in the past decades. PMID:26635036

  2. Physician-initiated prospective Italian Registry of carotid stenting with the C-Guard mesh-stent: the IRON-Guard registry. Rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; Speziale, F; De Donato, G; Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Capoccia, L; Galzerano, G; Mansour, W

    2015-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization, every year, 5 million peoples die for stroke and another 5 million are permanently disabled. Although there are many causes of acute stroke, a common treatable cause of acute stroke is atheromatous narrowing at the carotid bifurcation. Carotid endarterectomy is still the standard of car, even if carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become an effective, less invasive alterantive. Unfortunately, CAS procedure is not yet perfect; regardless the use of an embolic protection device (EPD), percutaneous treatment has been correlated with a risk of cerebral ischemic events related to distal embolization. The objective of the IRON-Guard Registry is to evaluate the clinical outcome of treatment by means of stenting with the C-Guard (InspireMD, Boston, MA, USA) in subjects requiring CAS due to significant extracranial carotid artery stenosis with a physician-initiated, Italian, prospective, multicenter, single-arm study. A total of 200 enrolled subjects divided over different centers are planned to be enrolled. CAS will performed by implanting of C-Guard stent. Procedure will be performed according to the physician's standard of care. Standard procedures will be followed based on the Instructions for Use, for the C-Guard device of Inspire. The primary endpoint of this study is the 30-day rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as the cumulative incidence of any periprocedural (≤30 days postprocedure) death, stroke or myocardial infarction. Secondary endpoints are rate of late ipsilateral stroke (31 through 365 days), system technical success, device malfunctions, major adverse events (MAEs), serious device-related and procedure-related adverse events, target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis rates.

  3. One-year outcome of biolimus eluting stent with biodegradable polymer in all comers: the Italian Nobori Stent Prospective Registry.

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Parenti, Dennis Zavalloni; Regazzoli, Damiano; Rutigliano, David; Lucisano, Luigi; Viani, Giacomo Maria; Spartera, Marco; Chieffo, Alaide; Donahue, Michael; Cappelletti, Alberto; Locuratolo, Nicola; Parisi, Rosario; Fattori, Rossella; Presbitero, Patrizia; Margonato, Alberto; Briguori, Carlo; Sardella, Gennaro; Colombo, Antonio

    2014-11-15

    INSPIRE-1 (Italian Nobori Stent ProspectIve REgistry-1) was designed and conducted to assess clinical performance of Nobori biolimus A9-eluting stent (BES) implantation in an unrestricted "real-world" cohort of patients. Unrestricted consecutive high-risk patients treated with BES with biodegradable polymer (Nobori, Terumo, Tokyo, Japan) between February 2008 and July 2012 were prospectively enrolled in an independent multicenter registry and divided in two groups: complex and non complex lesions. 1066 patients (1589 lesions) treated with Nobori BES were analyzed. The majority of patients (57%) were treated for at least one complex lesion and presented a high-risk clinical profile (previous CABG 17.6%, diabetes mellitus 33.1%, chronic kidney disease 14.3%). Angiographic success rate was achieved in 96.2% cases. At 1 year, the primary endpoint, (composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and clinically driven target vessel revascularization), occurred in 39 (4.0%) patients, and was higher in the complex lesions (5.2% vs. 2.5%, P = 0.032). Target lesion failure (TLF, secondary endpoint) occurred in 45 (4.6%) patients, and was more frequent in the complex lesions group (6.2% vs. 2.7%, P = 0.011), mainly due to a higher incidence of any target lesion revascularization (4.8% vs. 2.7%; P = 0.095). Definite and probable stent thrombosis (ST) rate was 0.6% and 0.5% respectively, with no difference between groups. In unrestricted daily practice, BESs were implanted predominantly in high risk patients with complex lesions. Despite this, the Nobori BES was associated with a relatively low rate of primary endpoint and TLF, with a higher risk in patients with complex lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Italian multiregional thalassemia registry: Centers characteristics, services, and patients' population.

    PubMed

    Conte, Rosa; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gambino, Arianna; Bartoloni, Franco; Baiardi, Paola; Bonifazi, Donato; Bonifazi, Fedele; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Padula, Rosa; Pepe, Alessia; Putti, Maria Caterina; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Maggio, Aurelio; Filosa, Aldo; Iacono, Angela; Mangiarini, Laura; Ceci, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis of beta-Thalassemia major and other congenital hemoglobinopathies has profoundly changed over the last decades. Moreover, only few countries in Europe provide dedicated services and the description of the measures for patients monitoring and treatment is overall very scarce. The HTA-Thal project is aimed to identify the services available in Italy and to collect epidemiological and clinical data on the thalassemic population (HTA-Thal Registry). A map of the existing centers was created and two electronic questionnaires were completed with information on the services and patients. On 182 centers identified, 60 completed the two questionnaires. Centers resulted to be extremely heterogeneous in terms of size, age of patients in care, and services availability. The transition of pediatric patients to adult centers was not guaranteed. Thousand eight hundred and seventy-three beta-Thalassemia major patients (of which 259 pediatrics), regularly transfused, were registered. Deferasirox is the most used chelator as monotherapy (616 patients) and its use prevails in younger patients. A higher number of patients (847 patients) use Deferoxamine, either alone (448 patients) or in combination with DFP (399 patients), while 782 patients use Deferiprone alone (383 patients) or in combination (399 patients). 31.6 and 66.6% of centers were not equipped for specialized visits or local MRI, respectively. Centers with 30-80 patients show the high percentage of patients appropriately monitored when compared to smaller or bigger centers. This analysis confirms the importance of patients' registries for the collection of large datasets and the need for dedicated 'specialized centers' equipped to provide the best standard treatment to patients.

  5. Juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia: report of the Italian Registry. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Aricò, M; Bossi, G; Schirò, R; Galimberti, M; Longoni, D; Macchia, P; Miniero, R; Natale, D; Pession, A; Pillon, M

    1993-01-01

    Since juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia (JCML) represents no more than 2% of leukemia in children, clinical and investigative experience of this disorder has been limited. In order to evaluate the diagnostic criteria currently applied, to provide centralized facilities for blood culture and to collect data on treatment, and to propose a uniform treatment protocol in our country, a National Registry for JCML was recently established in the "Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica" (AIEOP). Out of the 24 cases reported from 9/35 centres, 22 were considered sufficiently documented and were enrolled in the Registry. Clonogenic assay on marrow and peripheral blood cells was performed in all available cases. Common features were non-specific clinical (fever, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, lymphadenomegaly) and hematologic alterations (anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis usually < 50 x 10(9)/l, monocytosis, circulating immature granulocytes, increased HbF, normal karyotype). In 11 out of 11 cases, in vitro blood cultures showed the spontaneous growth of CFU-C in the absence of any exogenous source of colony-stimulating activity. Twelve of the 22 patients (55%) are alive (probability of survival 47.7%); most patients were treated according to an acute myeloid leukemia-directed schedule; 5/7 children treated with interferon were alive with disease after a median time of 29 months from diagnosis (range 8-95 months); 4/5 children who underwent bone marrow transplantation were alive in complete remission 10, 24, 42 and 118 months, after the diagnosis. Age < 1 year at presentation was the most significant prognostic factor in terms of probability of survival (80% vs 28%; p = 0.0024). JCML must be considered in young children for whom acute leukemia has been suspected but ruled out; in vitro cultures should be considered mandatory to confirm the diagnosis. Age less than one year at the presentation was associated with prolonged survival. Only bone marrow

  6. Clinical epidemiology in Italian Registry of Infective Endocarditis (RIEI): Focus on age, intravascular devices and enterococci.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Enrico; Chirillo, Fabio; Castiglione, Anna; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cecconi, Moreno; Moreo, Antonella; Cialfi, Alessandro; Rinaldi, Mauro; Del Ponte, Stefano; Squeri, Angelo; Corcione, Silvia; Canta, Francesca; Gaddi, Oscar; Enia, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Costanzo, Piera; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Ronzani, Giuliana; Bologna, Flavio; Patrignani, Anna; Belli, Riccardo; Ciccone, Giovannino; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of infective endocarditis (IE) is changing due to a number of factors, including aging and health related comorbidities and medical procedures. The aim of this study is to describe the main clinical, epidemiologic and etiologic changes of IE from a large database in Italy. We prospectively collected episodes of IE in 17 Italian centers from July 2007 to December 2010. We enrolled 677 patients with definite IE, of which 24% health-care associated. Patients were male (73%) with a median age of 62 years (IQR: 49-74) and 61% had several comorbidities. One hundred and twenty-eight (19%) patients had prosthetic left side IE, 391 (58%) native left side IE, 94 (14%) device-related IE and 54 (8%) right side IE. A predisposing cardiopathy was present in 50%, while odontoiatric and non odontoiatric procedures were reported in 5% and 21% of patients respectively. Symptoms were usually atypical and precocious. The prevalent etiology was represented by Staphylococcus aureus (27%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, 21%), Streptococcus viridans (15%) and enterococci (14%). CNS and enterococci were relatively more frequent in patients with intravascular devices and prosthesis and S. viridans in left native valve. Diagnosis was made by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography in 62% and 94% of cases, respectively. The in-hospital mortality was 14% and 1-year mortality was 21%. The epidemiology is changing in Italy, where IE more often affects older patients with comorbidities and intravascular devices, with an acute onset and including a high frequency of enterococci. There were few preceding odontoiatric procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Italian Diffuse/Multivessel Disease ABSORB Prospective Registry (IT-DISAPPEARS). Study design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Testa, Luca; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Tomai, Fabrizio; Ribichini, Flavio; Indolfi, Ciro; Tamburino, Corrado; Bartorelli, Antonio; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Bedogni, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco

    2015-03-01

    The Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (Absorb BVS) is an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold able to provide temporary scaffolding and antiproliferative drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease. This temporary scaffolding could be the true feature to overcome the limitations of the conventional metallic stents. A growing body of evidence worldwide is supporting its implementation into daily practice as being associated with comparable results as the second-generation everolimus-eluting stent. However, these pieces of evidence come from 'studies in which the majority of the patients had low-risk stenoses', whereas patients with more complex coronary artery disease could benefit the most from the Absorb BVS technology. The aim of the IT-DISAPPEARS is to investigate the procedural and clinical performance of the Absorb BVS in patients with long (>24 mm), single-vessel coronary disease or with multivessel disease. At least 50 centers across the Italian territory will enroll 1000 patients with either stable or acute coronary syndromes. Follow-up will end up at 5 years. Primary endpoint will be the cumulative hierarchical incidence of major adverse cardiac events at 1 year, defined as: cardiac death, nonfatal target vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The efficacy as well as safety parameters will be evaluated along with a detailed evaluation of the dual antiplatelet therapy duration/interruption. The IT-DISAPPEARS could provide the first evidence worldwide concerning the performance of Absorb BVS in patients with high-risk diffuse coronary disease.

  8. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry.

    PubMed

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having "sporadic" HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry

    PubMed Central

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M.; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. Objective This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. Methods From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Results Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having “sporadic” HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. Conclusion We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. PMID:26342526

  10. Chronic peritoneal dialysis catheters in children: a fifteen-year experience of the Italian Registry of Pediatric Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Stefano; Sera, Francesco; Verrina, Enrico; Edefonti, Alberto; Gianoglio, Bruno; Perfumo, Francesco; Sorino, Palma; Zacchello, Graziella; Cutaia, Ignazio; Lavoratti, Giancarlo; Leozappa, Giovanna; Pecoraro, Carmine; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2004-01-01

    To analyze data on 503 chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) catheters implanted between 1986 and 2000 in pediatric patients enrolled in the Italian Registry of Pediatric Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis (the Registry), comparing three different time periods: 1986-1990, 1991-1995, and 1996-2000. Retrospective study. 23 dialysis centers participating in the Registry. Data were collected from questionnaires filled in every year. The information for each peritoneal catheter included type, site and technique of insertion, exit-site orientation, exit-site care, complications, survival, and reason for removal. 503 catheters were implanted in 363 pediatric patients aged younger than 15 years at the start of CPD: 97 catheters in patients under 2 years of age, 67 in patients aged 2-5 years, and 339 in patients over 5 years of age. Mean patient age at onset of CPD was 8.0 +/- 5.1 years. All catheters were surgically implanted and omentectomy was performed in 82.4% of cases. The catheters used were Tenckhoff [468 (93.0%): 443 double cuff, 25 single cuff] and double-cuffed Valli [35 (7.0%)]. The entry site was in the midline in 153 cases (30.4%) and paramedian in 350 (69.6%). During 9048 dialysis-months we observed 451 catheter-related complications, yielding an incidence of 1 episode/20.1 CPD-months: 330 catheter infections (exit-site and/or tunnel infections), 26 leakages, 26 dislocations, 24 obstructions, 22 cuff extrusions, 6 hemoperitoneums, 17 others. 171 catheters were removed due to catheter-related causes; exit-site and/or tunnel infections were the main cause for removal (75.4%), followed by obstruction, dislocation, outer-cuff extrusion, and leakage. Younger children (< 2 years) had a higher risk of infectious causes of catheter removal compared to children aged 2-5 years (p = 0.004) and over 5 years of age (p = 0.002). During the 15-year observation period, a significant reduction in the incidence of leakage was observed and risk of leakage was lower in catheters with

  11. Natalizumab-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in Multiple Sclerosis: Findings from an Italian Independent Registry

    PubMed Central

    de Rossi, Nicola; Scarpazza, Cristina; Moiola, Lucia; Cosottini, Mirco; Gerevini, Simonetta; Capra, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    Background The monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NTZ) is a highly effective treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, this drug is associated with increased risk of developing Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), an opportunistic infection of central nervous system (CNS) caused by the John Cunningham polyomavirus (JCV). Objective To describe the 12-month clinical course of 39 patients with MS (28 women, 11 men) who developed NTZ-related PML after a mean exposure of 39 infusions. Methods An Italian independent collaborative repository initiative collected and analyzed socio-demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and number of JCV-DNA copies detected on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients diagnosed as affected by NTZ-related PML. The evolution of disability, measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale, was assessed at NTZ start, at PML diagnosis and after 2, 6 and 12 months from PML diagnosis. The effect of clinical and paraclinical characteristics at PML diagnosis on the final outcome was also investigated. Results Ten patients (25.6%) were diagnosed before 24 NTZ infusions. In six cases (15.4%) the PML suspect was made on the basis of highly suggestive MRI findings in absence of any detectable change of clinical conditions (asymptomatic PML). In patients with symptomatic PML, the diagnosis was quicker for those who presented with cognitive symptoms (n = 12) rather than for those with other neurological pictures (n = 21) (p = 0.003). Three patients (7.7%) died during the 12-month observation period, resulting in a survival rate of 92.3%. Asymptomatic PML, more localized brain involvement and gadolinium-enhancement detected at MRI, as well as lower viral load were associated with a better disability outcome (p-values<0.01). Conclusion Our findings support that early PML diagnosis, limited CNS involvement and initial signs of immune restoration are associated with a better outcome and higher survival

  12. Marriage and parenthood among childhood cancer survivors: a report from the Italian AIEOP Off-Therapy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Pivetta, Emanuele; Maule, Milena M.; Pisani, Paola; Zugna, Daniela; Haupt, Riccardo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Aricò, Maurizio; Casale, Fiorina; Clerico, Anna; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Kiren, Valentina; Locatelli, Franco; Palumbo, Giovanna; Pession, Andrea; Pillon, Marta; Santoro, Nicola; Terenziani, Monica; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Dama, Elisa; Magnani, Corrado; Merletti, Franco; Pastore, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of marriage and parenthood in a cohort of childhood cancer survivors included in the Off-Therapy Registry maintained by the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. Design and Methods We analyzed a cohort of 6,044 patients diagnosed with cancer between 1960 and 1998, while aged 0 to 14 years and who were 18 years old or older by December 2003. They were followed up through the regional vital statistics registers until death or the end of follow up (October 30, 2006), whichever occurred first, and their marital status and date of birth of their children were recorded. The cumulative probabilities of being married and having a first child were computed by gender and compared by tumor type within the cohort. Marriage and fertility rates (the latter defined as the number of live births per woman-year) were compared with those of the Italian population of the same age, gender, area of residence and calendar period by means of the observed to expected (O/E) ratios. Results During the follow-up period, 4,633 (77%) subjects had not married. The marriage O/E ratios were 0.56 (95% CI: 0.51–0.61) and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.65–0.76) among men and women, respectively. Overall, 263 men had 367 liveborn children, and 473 women had 697 liveborn children. The female fertility O/E ratio was 0.57 (95% CI: 0.53–0.62) overall, and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.99–1.17) when analyses were restricted to married/cohabiting women Conclusions Childhood cancer survivors are less likely to marry and to have children than the general population, confirming the life-long impact of their previous disease on their social behavior and choices. The inclusion of counseling in the strategies of management and long-term surveillance of childhood cancer patients could be beneficial to survivors as they approach adulthood. PMID:21228031

  13. Natalizumab in the pediatric MS population: results of the Italian registry.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Moiola, Lucia; Pozzilli, Carlo; Brescia-Morra, Vincenzo; Gallo, Paolo; Grimaldi, Luigi Maria Edoardo; Filippi, Massimo; G, Giancarlo Comi

    2015-09-25

    Natalizumab is a promising option for pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with active evolution and a poor response to Interferon-beta or Glatiramer Acetate. However, no data are available in large cohorts of patients and after a long-term follow up. Our study was planned to shed lights on this topic. A registry was established in 2007 in Italy to collect MS cases treated with Natalizumab (NA) before 18 years of age. 101 patients were included (69 females), mean age of MS onset 12.9 ± 2.7 years, mean age at NA initiation 14.7 ± 2.4 years. Mean treatment duration was 34.2 ± 18.3 months. During NA treatment, a total of 15 relapses were recorded in 9 patients, annualized relapse rate was 2.3 ± 1.0 in the year prior to NA and decreased to 0.1 ± 0.3 (p < 0.001) at last NA infusion. Mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) decreased from 2.6 ± 1.3 at initiation of NA to 1.8 ± 1.2 at the time of last visit (p < 0.001). At brain MRI, new T2 or Gd enhancing lesions were observed in 10/91 patients after 6 months, 6/87 after 12 months, 2/61 after 18 months, 2/68 after 24 months, 3/62 after 30 months, and 5/43 at longer follow up. At the time of last observation, 58% of patients were free from clinical (relapses/increased EDSS) and/or MRI activity (new T2 or gadolinium-enhancing lesions). No relevant adverse events were recorded. NA was safe, well tolerated and very efficacious in the large majority of patients. Our data support the use of this medication in subjects with pediatric MS and an aggressive course. A relevant reduction of relapse rate and EDSS was observed during NA treatment, compared to pre-treatment period. No evidence of disease activity (NEDA) occurred in 58% of cases.

  14. Efficacy of switching between tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors in psoriasis: results from the Italian Psocare registry.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Simone; Chimenti, Sergio; Giannetti, Alberto; Maccarone, Mara; Picardo, Mauro; Peserico, Andrea; Naldi, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Some studies have shown that switching patients from one tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alfa inhibitor to another may be beneficial when they have an inadequate response or an adverse event. We sought to assess the variables predicting the efficacy of the second TNF-alfa inhibitor in patients discontinuing the first TNF-alfa inhibitor. Data from all 5423 consecutive patients starting TNF-alfa inhibitor therapy for psoriasis between September 2005 and September 2010 who were included in the Italian Psocare registry were analyzed. In 105 patients who switched to a second TNF-alfa inhibitor who had complete follow-up data, 75% improvement in the Psoriasis Area Severity Index score (PASI 75) was reached by 29% after 16 weeks and by 45.6% after 24 weeks. Patients who switched because of secondary loss of efficacy (loss of initial PASI 75 response) or adverse events/intolerance were more likely to reach PASI 75 than those who switched as a result of primary inefficacy (PASI 75 never achieved) (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.3-5.5 vs hazard ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0-3.9 and 1, respectively). There was a small number of patients with complete follow-up data. PASI 75 response in patients who switched from one anti-TNF-alfa agent to another was significantly reduced in patients who showed primary inefficacy of the first anti-TNF-alfa. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis: granulocyte-monocyte apheresis in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. A multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Stefano; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Bresci, Giampaolo; D'Ovidio, Valeria; Astegiano, Marco; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Testa, Roberto; D'Incà, Renata; Valpiani, Daniela; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Sablich, Renato; Cavallaro, Flaminia; Costa, Francesco; Di Leo, Vincenza; Colombo, Elisabetta; Santini, Alessia; Aratari, Annalisa; Lecis, Pierenrico; Saladino, Valeria; Riegler, Gabriele; Marco, Marino; Calella, Francesca; Ricci, Chiara; Guidi, Maria Luisa; Repaci, Giuseppe; Silla, Michele

    2011-12-01

    Leukocytes are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases; granulocyte-monocyte adsorptive (GMA) apheresis, an extracorporeal technique aimed at removing activated circulating leukocytes from the blood, may represent a safe and effective therapeutic tool in these patients. The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis performed an observational, multicentric study involving 24 Gastroenterology Units. In this study, laboratory data and clinical outcomes of 230 patients (148 males, mean age 43.5 years) affected with ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 194) or Crohn's disease (CD, n = 36) who underwent one or more cycles of GMA were analyzed. Each cycle consisted of five GMA treatments. The patients were followed up for a mean of 8.7 (min. 3 to max. 12) months. At 3 months, positive outcome was achieved in 77.7% of UC patients (72.0% remission, 5.7% clinical response) and 61.3% of CD patients (54.8% remission, 6.5% clinical response). The cumulative proportion of positive outcome at 12 months was 87.1% for UC patients (83.7% remission, 3.4% clinical response) and 77.4% for CD patients (74.2% remission, 3.2% clinical response). No single clinical or laboratory parameter among those analyzed (age, sex, disease characteristics, history of smoking, medication history, baseline values of clinical activity index (CAI)/Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), hemoglobin, white blood cells count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) was independently associated with clinical outcome. The procedure was well tolerated with no significant adverse effects registered. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. What Potential Donors in Research Biobanking Want to Know: A Large Population Study of the Italian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Toccaceli, Virgilia; Brescianini, Sonia; Fagnani, Corrado; Gigantesco, Antonella; D'Abramo, Flavio; Stazi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-12-01

    Donation of human tissues for research and ELSI (ethical, legal, and social issues) of biobanking are increasingly debated issues. While several studies have highlighted patients' concerns, little is known about opinions and preferences of healthy potential donors. Further investigations in this respect may allow communication procedures tailored to participants' needs. Based on the Italian Twin Registry, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among twins who had not yet donated biological samples for research. The objective was to assess the importance these potential donors attributed to specific procedures and pieces of communication related to research biobanking. A self-administered questionnaire was constructed and validated. Items were as follows: potential agreement on use of biological samples for research; knowledge of biobanks; and importance given to privacy protection and to communication of general and individual tests results, study objectives, type and amount of participant involvement, location and duration of sample storage, and benefits and potential risks. Multivariate analysis was performed to estimate the association of these items with sociodemographic factors as well as with perceived health status and chronic or long-term diseases. The questionnaire was mailed to 4894 twins aged 18-65 (response rate 34%). One-third of subjects already knew about biobanks, 52% had some knowledge, and 20% were uninformed. A majority expressed unconditional agreement to sample use for research. Only 6% of respondents considered privacy protection not important in research biobanking. Knowledge of biobanks predicted attention to most of the issues. Higher education was associated with more frequent concern about type and amount of involvement, but less frequent concern about place and time of storage, and presence of benefits. Women were more attentive to research biobanking. This study supports the need of procedures tailored on different donors' concerns and

  17. Elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes admitted to Italian intensive cardiac care units: a Blitz-3 Registry sub-analysis.

    PubMed

    Casella, Gianni; Scorcu, Giampaolo; Cassin, Matteo; Chiarella, Francesco; Chinaglia, Alessandra; Conte, Maria R; Fradella, Giuseppe; Lucci, Donata; Maggioni, Aldo P; Visconti, Luigi O

    2012-03-01

    Guideline-recommended therapies for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) derive from randomized trials in which elderly patients are underrepresented. Although numbers of this population are increasing, they are largely undertreated in the real world. The study evaluates the impact of older age on care for patients with ACS admitted to the Italian Intensive Cardiac Care Units (ICCUs) network. We analyzed data from the BLITZ-3 Registry in order to assess in-hospital care among unselected elderly patients (≥75 years). From 7-20 April 2008, 6986 consecutive patients with acute cardiac conditions were admitted to ICCUs and prospectively enrolled; 3636 (52%) had ACS and 38% of them were elderly. Elderly patients had a higher risk profile, their median length of stay in ICCU was longer [4 days, interquartile range (IQR): 3-6 vs. 3 days, IQR: 2-5; P < 0.0001] and guideline-recommended care was applied less often. At multivariable analysis, elderly patients were less likely to receive reperfusion [odds ratio (OR) = 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.42-0.67] for ST-elevation, or early coronary angiography (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.37-0.56) for non-ST elevation ACS. Besides, unadjusted in-ICCU total mortality was higher for elderly patients with ST-elevation (11.8% elderly vs. 1.8% younger patients; P < 0.0001) or non-ST-elevation (3.9% elderly vs. 0.6% younger patients; P < 0.0001) ACS. In a nationwide survey, age impacts on care. The elderly with ACS have a higher risk profile but receive less guideline-recommended care than younger patients. Thus, further improvements in care of this population should be pursued.

  18. Diffusion, outcomes and implementation of minimally invasive liver surgery: a snapshot from the I Go MILS (Italian Group of Minimally Invasive Liver Surgery) Registry.

    PubMed

    Aldrighetti, Luca; Ratti, Francesca; Cillo, Umberto; Ferrero, Alessandro; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Giuliante, Felice; Calise, Fulvio

    2017-08-31

    The Italian Group of MILS (I Go MILS) prospective registry was established in 2014 with the goals to create a hub for data and projects on a national basis and to promote the diffusion and implementation of MILS programs on a national scale. The primary endpoint of the present study is to give a snapshot of the real diffusion and outcomes of MILS in Italy, while analyzing the role of the registry in the implementation of MILS programs nationwide. The I Go MILS Registry is a prospective and intention-to-treat registry opened to any Italian center performing MILS, without restriction criteria based on number of procedures. The Registry is developed through the eClinical, an electronic platform for the management of clinical trials and is based on 34 clinical variables, regarding indication, intra- and postoperative course. Clinical outcomes and data regarding implementation of MILS activity have been analyzed for the aim of the study. Between November 2014 and June 2017, data from 1678 MILS performed in 48 centers have been collected (mean number of procedures per center 35, range 1-302). 22% of procedures were performed for benign and 78% for malignant disease (HCC constituted the 49.1% and CRLM the 31.2% of malignant tumors). Major liver resections (>3 liver segments), including right and left hepatectomies, trisectionectomies and ALPPS procedures were 10% of the series. Mean blood loss was 200 ± 230 mL Morbidity rate was 20.5% and mortality was 0.3%. 10.4% of cases were converted to open approach. Median length of stay was 5 days. MILS/total resections ratio in 13 experienced centers increased from 14 to 30% after Registry establishment. MILS programs are well established in Italy, with progressive increase both in the number of cases and in the numerosity of centers. The I Go MILS Registry is playing a crucial role in monitoring the development of MILS in the real world on a national basis while giving a significant contribution to the implementation of MILS

  19. A comparative study of the risk profile of hemodialysis patients in a for profit network and in two regional registries of the Italian Society of Nephrology.

    PubMed

    Postorino, Maurizio; Amato, Claudia; Mancini, Elena; Carioni, Paola; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Di Benedetto, Attilio; Cerino, Fabrizio; Marino, Carmela; Vilasi, Antonio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Stuard, Stefano; Capasso, Giovanbattista; Santoro, Antonio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-02-16

    In 2013, the Italian Society of Nephrology joined forces with Nephrocare-Italy to create a clinical research cohort of patients on file in the data-rich clinical management system (EUCLID) of this organization for the performance of observational studies in the hemodialysis (HD) population. To see whether patients in EUCLID are representative of the HD population in Italy, we set out to compare the whole EUCLID population with patients included in the regional HD registries in Emilia-Romagna (Northern Italy) and in Calabria (Southern Italy), the sole regions in Italy which have systematically collected an enlarged clinical data set allowing comparison with the data-rich EUCLID system. An analysis of prevalent and incident patients in 2010 and 2011 showed that EUCLID patients had a lower prevalence of coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, liver disease, peptic ulcer and other comorbidities and risk factors and a higher fractional urea clearance (Kt/V) than those in the Emilia Romagna and Calabria registries. Accordingly, survival analysis showed a lower mortality risk in the EUCLID 2010 and 2011 cohorts than in the combined two regional registries in the corresponding years: for 2010, hazard ratio (HR) EUCLID vs. Regional registries: 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.71-0.90]; for 2011, HR: 0.76 [0.65-0.90]. However, this difference was nullified by statistical adjustment for the difference in comorbidities and risk factors, indicating that the longer survival in the EUCLID database was attributable to the lower risk profile of patients included in that database. This preliminary analysis sets the stage for future observational studies and indicates that appropriate adjustment for difference in comorbidities and risk factors is needed to generalize to the Italian HD population analyses based on the data-rich EUCLID database.

  20. [Geographical differences in clinical characteristics and management of stable outpatients with coronary artery disease: comparison between the Italian and international population included in the Worldwide CLARIFY registry].

    PubMed

    Pozzoli, Massimo; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding specific differences among countries in demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. CLARIFY is an international, prospective and longitudinal registry including more than 33 000 patients with stable coronary artery disease enrolled in 45 countries worldwide. Data were used to compare the characteristics of patients enrolled in Italy with those enrolled in Europe and in the rest of the world. Baseline data were available for 33 283 patients, 2112 of whom from Italy and 12 614 from the remaining western European countries. Italian patients were found to be older, more frequently smoker, hypertensive and with sedentary habits. In addition, they presented more frequently a history of myocardial infarction, carotid arterial disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In addition, when compared with patients of both European and international cohorts, more Italian patients had undergone coronary angiography and angioplasty. As far as treatment was concerned, a greater number of Italian patients were taking ivabradine, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers, nitrates, thienopyridines, while those taking beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and other antianginal medications were fewer. Among ambulatory patients with stable coronary artery disease, there are important geographic differences in terms of risk factors, clinical characteristics, surgical and pharmacological treatment.

  1. [Scientific collaboration between Istituto Superiore di Sanità and Italian Association of Cancer Registries for the study of cancer incidence in Italian polluted sites].

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Crocetti, E; Buzzoni, C; Fazzo, L; Ferretti, S; Fusco, M; Iavarone, I; Pirastu, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative study between Istituto superiore di sanità and Associazione italiana registri tumori (ISS-AIRTUM) aims at investigating cancer incidence in polluted sites for adults and for children (0-14 years) and adolescents (15-19 years) to comment the study results in the light of a set of a priori hypotheses. On the whole, 141 out of 298 municipalities included in SENTIERI Project are served by a Cancer Register participating to the AIRTUM network. For a description of SENTIERI, refer to the 2010 Supplement of Epidemiology & Prevention devoted to SENTIERI Project. The time window of the study is the period 1996-2005. The number of expected cases in each polluted site will be estimated by applying incidence rates of the national pool of cancer registries and of the pool of the geographic macroarea in which each site is located: Northern, Central, Southern Italy and Islands. Cancer incidence in children and adolescents is one of the main priorities of international public health institutions, because of the need to protect childhood health from involuntary exposure to environmental risk factors. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) will be computed using expected figures derived from the national pool of cancer registries.

  2. A breast cancer clinical registry in an Italian comprehensive cancer center: an instrument for descriptive, clinical, and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Baili, Paolo; Torresani, Michele; Agresti, Roberto; Rosito, Giuseppe; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Veneroni, Silvia; Cavallo, Ilaria; Funaro, Francesco; Giunco, Marco; Turco, Alberto; Amash, Hade; Scavo, Antonio; Minicozzi, Pamela; Bella, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Sant, Milena

    2015-01-01

    In clinical research, many potentially useful variables are available via the routine activity of cancer center-based clinical registries (CCCR). We present the experience of the breast cancer clinical registry at Fondazione IRCCS "Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori" to give an example of how a CCCR can be planned, implemented, and used. Five criteria were taken into consideration while planning our CCCR: (a) available clinical and administrative databases ought to be exploited to the maximum extent; (b) open source software should be used; (c) a Web-based interface must be designed; (d) CCCR data must be compatible with population-based cancer registry data; (e) CCCR must be an open system, able to be connected with other data repositories. The amount of work needed for the implementation of a CCCR is inversely linked with the amount of available coded data: the fewer data are available in the input databases as coded variables, the more work will be necessary, for information technology staff, text mining analysis, and registrars (for collecting data from clinical records). A cancer registry in a comprehensive cancer center can be used for several research aspects, such as estimate of the number of cases needed for clinical studies, assessment of biobank specimens with specific characteristics, evaluation of clinical practice and adhesion to clinical guidelines, comparative studies between clinical and population sets of patients, studies on cancer prognosis, and studies on cancer survivorship.

  3. [Registry of the Italian Institute for Occupational Prevention and Safety of local productive units: methodology and structure].

    PubMed

    Scarselli, A; Leva, A; Campo, G; Marconi, M; Nesti, M; Erba, P

    2005-01-01

    The Italian Institute for Occupational Prevention and Safety (ISPESL) carried out a register of enterprises operating in industry, services and agriculture sector to provide information on their location, economical activity and occupational data. This database has been built merging administrative files from the National Institute of Social Security (INPS) and the Computer Science Society of Italian Chambers of Commerce (InfoCamere). Enterprises have been classified by economic sector - in accordance with ISTAT (National Statistics Institute) "Ateco91" classification--and by accuracy level of the record linkage. In details, three different subsystems have been set up: (A) enterprises satisfying linkage; (B) enterprises in InfoCamere file not linked with INPS file; (C) enterprises in INPS file not linked with InfoCamere file. In the whole, 6.026.676 factories have been collected, of which 1.188.784 in group A, 4.543.091 in group B and 294.801 in group C. Establishing a database of information on industries may be useful to improve preventive programs and to plan health care surveillance systems.

  4. Safety of Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Data from the Italian National ADHD Registry.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Samuele; Panei, Pietro; Arcieri, Romano; Germinario, Elena A P; Capuano, Annalisa; Margari, Lucia; Chiarotti, Flavia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the type and frequency of adverse events (AEs) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treated with methylphenidate or atomoxetine over a 5-year period in a large naturalistic study. We draw on data from the Italian ADHD Registry, a national database for postmarketing phase IV pharmacovigilance of ADHD medications across 90 centers. AEs were defined as severe or mild as per the classification of the Italian Medicines Agency. AE frequency in the two treatment groups was compared using incidence rates per 100 person-years (IR100PY) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Mantel-Haenszel adjusted IRRs were calculated to control for psychiatric comorbidity. A total of 1350 and 753 participants (aged 6-18 years, mean age 10.7 ± 2.8) were treated with methylphenidate and atomoxetine, respectively, from 2007 to 2012. Ninety participants (7 %) were switched from methylphenidate to atomoxetine, and 138 (18 %) from atomoxetine to methylphenidate. Thirty-seven children treated with atomoxetine and 12 with methylphenidate had their medication withdrawn. Overall, 645 patients (26.8 %) experienced at least one mild AE (including decreased appetite and irritability, for both drugs) and 95 patients (3.9 %) experienced at least one severe AE (including severe gastrointestinal events). IR100PY were significantly higher in the atomoxetine-treated group compared with the methylphenidate-treated group for a number of mild and severe AEs and for any severe or mild AEs. After controlling for comorbidities, IRR was still significantly higher in the atomoxetine group compared with the methylphenidate group for a number of mild (decreased appetite, weight loss, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, stomach ache, irritability, mood disorder and dizziness) and severe (gastrointestinal, neuropsychiatric, and cardiovascular) AEs. In this naturalistic study, methylphenidate had a better safety profile than atomoxetine.

  5. Management of paediatric Lyme disease in non-endemic and endemic areas: data from the Registry of the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Baggi, E; Villani, A; Norbedo, S; Pellegrini, G; Bozzola, E; Palumbo, E; Bosis, S; Nigro, G; Garazzino, S; Principi, N

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine how specialists in paediatric infectious diseases (PIDs) manage children with suspected Lyme disease (LD) by comparing their approaches in Italian endemic and non-endemic areas. A cross-sectional survey of the PID specialists participating in the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Disease (SITIP) Registry of LD was carried out between 1 January and 30 April 2012. A total of 160 children (80 living in endemic areas and 80 living in non-endemic areas) were diagnosed as having LD between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2011. The clinical manifestations were erythema migrans in 130 cases (81.3 %), arthritis in 24 (15.0 %) and neuroborreliosis in six (3.8 %). Significant differences from the recommendations concerning serology and the tests to undertake were mainly observed in the children with erythema migrans, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). The children with erythema migrans who lived in non-endemic areas were treated with antibiotics significantly less frequently than those living in endemic areas (p < 0.05), and significantly fewer children with erythema migrans or arthritis living in non-endemic areas were treated with amoxicillin in comparison with those living in endemic regions (p < 0.05). The duration of antimicrobial therapy was significantly shorter than recommended in the children with erythema migrans or arthritis, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). Paediatric LD is also present in areas of Italy in which it is not considered endemic, but knowledge concerning its management is generally poor among PID specialists and characterised by enormous gaps in non-endemic areas.

  6. Epidemiology and patterns of care of patients admitted to Italian Intensive Cardiac Care units: the BLITZ-3 registry.

    PubMed

    Casella, Gianni; Cassin, Matteo; Chiarella, Francesco; Chinaglia, Alessandra; Conte, Maria R; Fradella, Giuseppe; Lucci, Donata; Maggioni, Aldo P; Pirelli, Salvatore; Scorcu, Giampaolo; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona

    2010-06-01

    Intensive cardiac care units (ICCUs) have shifted from the observation of patients with myocardial infarction to the care of different acute cardiac diseases. However, few data on such an evolution are available. From 7 to 20 April 2008, 6986 consecutive patients admitted to 81% of Italian ICCUs were prospectively enrolled. Patients observed were mainly elderly men (median age 72 years) with several co-morbidities. Most of them were triaged to ICCU from the emergency room, but 15% of admissions were transfer-in from other hospitals. Several diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were applied (78% had echocardiography and 35% coronary angiography) during the ICCU stay [median length 4 days, interquartile range (IQR) 2-5]. The discharge diagnosis was ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in 21%, non-ST-elevation ACS in 31%, acute heart failure (AHF) in 14% and other acute non-ACS, non-AHF cardiac diseases in 34%. Of those with ST-elevation ACS, 60% received reperfusion (15% fibrinolysis and 45% primary percutaneous coronary intervention). The overall in-ICCU crude mortality was 3.3%. The BLITZ-3 survey provides a unique snapshot of current epidemiology and patterns of care of patients admitted to ICCUs. Although ACS still remains the most frequent admission diagnosis, the number of non-ACS patients is substantial. However, the correct standard of care for these non-ACS patients has to be defined.

  7. Indication to cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and outcome in real world primary prevention. Data from the IRIDE [Italian registry of prophylactic implantation of defibrillators] study.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Muser, Daniele; Campana, Andrea; Zoni-Berisso, Massimo; Zecchin, Massimo; Locatelli, Alessandro; Brieda, Marco; Gramegna, Lorena; Santarone, Mauro; Chiodi, Leandro; Mazzone, Patrizio; Rebellato, Luca; Facchin, Domenico

    2013-09-30

    Several trials demonstrated the life saving role of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) in primary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). The aim was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and 4-year outcome of consecutive patients treated in clinical practice by prophylactic ICD implantation on the basis of class I recommendations and up-to-date ICD programming. IRIDE multi-center, prospective and observational study enrolled 604 consecutive patients (mean age: 66 ± 10 years) treated by ICD between 01/01/2006 and 30/06/2010. Main characteristics were similarly distributed among the inclusion criteria of MADIT II (24%), SCD-HeFT (24%), COMPANION (26%) and MADIT-CRT (18%) trials, while a small number of patients met the MUSTT and MADIT (7%) inclusion criteria. Single-chamber ICDs were implanted in 168 (28%) patients, dual-chamber in 167 (28%) and biventricular in 269 (43%) patients. ATP programming was activated in 546 (90%) patients. Overall survival and rate of appropriate ICD intervention by ATP and/or shock at 12-24-36-48 months of follow-up were 94%, 89%, 80%, 75% and 16%, 28%, 37% and 50%, respectively. No difference in mortality rate between the groups who received or did not receive appropriate ICD interventions was demonstrated (p=ns). The IRIDE study confirms the effectiveness in real world practice of ICD implantation in patients at risk of SCD. The life saving role of ICD therapy increases as the duration of follow-up is prolonged and the survival benefit is similar in patients who received or did not receive appropriate device treatment, thus suggesting a beneficial effect of up-to-date device programming. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ISS mapped from ICD-9-CM by a novel freeware versus traditional coding: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Injury severity measures are based either on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) or the International Classification of diseases (ICD). The latter is more convenient because routinely collected by clinicians for administrative reasons. To exploit this advantage, a proprietary program that maps ICD-9-CM into AIS codes has been used for many years. Recently, a program called ICDPIC trauma and developed in the USA has become available free of charge for registered STATA® users. We compared the ICDPIC calculated Injury Severity Score (ISS) with the one from direct, prospective AIS coding by expert trauma registrars (dAIS). Methods The administrative records of the 289 major trauma cases admitted to the hospital of Udine-Italy from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005 and enrolled in the Italian Trauma Registry were retrieved and ICDPIC-ISS was calculated. The agreement between ICDPIC-ISS and dAIS-ISS was assessed by Cohen's Kappa and Bland-Altman charts. We then plotted the differences between the 2 scores against the ratio between the number of traumatic ICD-9-CM codes and the number of dAIS codes for each patient (DIARATIO). We also compared the absolute differences in ISS among 3 groups identified by DIARATIO. The discriminative power for survival of both scores was finally calculated by ROC curves. Results The scores matched in 33/272 patients (12.1%, k 0.07) and, when categorized, in 80/272 (22.4%, k 0.09). The Bland-Altman average difference was 6.36 (limits: minus 22.0 to plus 34.7). ICDPIC-ISS of 75 was particularly unreliable. The differences increased (p < 0.01) as DIARATIO increased indicating incomplete administrative coding as a cause of the differences. The area under the curve of ICDPIC-ISS was lower (0.63 vs. 0.76, p = 0.02). Conclusions Despite its great potential convenience, ICPIC-ISS agreed poorly with its conventionally calculated counterpart. Its discriminative power for survival was also significantly lower. Incomplete ICD-9-CM coding was a

  9. ISS mapped from ICD-9-CM by a novel freeware versus traditional coding: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Stefano; Tillati, Silvia; Valent, Francesca; Zanier, Loris; Barbone, Fabio

    2010-03-31

    Injury severity measures are based either on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) or the International Classification of diseases (ICD). The latter is more convenient because routinely collected by clinicians for administrative reasons. To exploit this advantage, a proprietary program that maps ICD-9-CM into AIS codes has been used for many years. Recently, a program called ICDPIC trauma and developed in the USA has become available free of charge for registered STATA users. We compared the ICDPIC calculated Injury Severity Score (ISS) with the one from direct, prospective AIS coding by expert trauma registrars (dAIS). The administrative records of the 289 major trauma cases admitted to the hospital of Udine-Italy from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005 and enrolled in the Italian Trauma Registry were retrieved and ICDPIC-ISS was calculated. The agreement between ICDPIC-ISS and dAIS-ISS was assessed by Cohen's Kappa and Bland-Altman charts. We then plotted the differences between the 2 scores against the ratio between the number of traumatic ICD-9-CM codes and the number of dAIS codes for each patient (DIARATIO). We also compared the absolute differences in ISS among 3 groups identified by DIARATIO. The discriminative power for survival of both scores was finally calculated by ROC curves. The scores matched in 33/272 patients (12.1%, k 0.07) and, when categorized, in 80/272 (22.4%, k 0.09). The Bland-Altman average difference was 6.36 (limits: minus 22.0 to plus 34.7). ICDPIC-ISS of 75 was particularly unreliable. The differences increased (p < 0.01) as DIARATIO increased indicating incomplete administrative coding as a cause of the differences. The area under the curve of ICDPIC-ISS was lower (0.63 vs. 0.76, p = 0.02). Despite its great potential convenience, ICPIC-ISS agreed poorly with its conventionally calculated counterpart. Its discriminative power for survival was also significantly lower. Incomplete ICD-9-CM coding was a main cause of these findings. Because this

  10. Results from an Italian multicentric registry comparing heparin-bonded ePTFE graft and autologous saphenous vein in below-knee femoro-popliteal bypasses.

    PubMed

    Dorigo, W; Pulli, R; Piffaretti, G; Castelli, P; Griselli, F; Dorrucci, V; Ferilli, F; Ottavi, P; De Blasis, G; Scalisi, L; Monaca, V; Battaglia, G; Vecchiati, E; Casali, G; Pratesi, C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate early and follow-up results of below-knee bypasses performed with a bioactive heparin-treated ePTFE graft in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD) in a multicentric retrospective registry involving seven Italian vascular centers and to compare them with those obtained in patients operated on with autologous saphenous vein (ASV) in the same centres in the same period of time. Over a nine-year period, ending in 2010, a heparin bonded prosthetic graft (Propaten Gore-Tex, W.L. Gore & Associates Inc, Flagstaff, AZ, USA) was implanted in 556 patients undergoing below-knee revascularization for PAOD (HePTFE group). In the same period of time 394 below-knee bypasses with ipsilateral ASV were performed (ASV group). Data concerning these interventions were retrospectively collected in a multicenter registry with a dedicated database. Early (<30 days) results were analyzed in terms of graft patency, major amputation rates and mortality. Follow-up results were analyzed in terms of primary and secondary graft patency, limb salvage and survival. Among patients of HePTFE group, 413 had critical limb ischemia (74%); the corresponding figure for ASV group was 84% (332 interventions, P<0.001). Eighty-nine patients in HePTFE group (16%) and 207 patients in ASV group (52.5%; P<0.001) had distal tibial anastomosis. Patients in HePTFE group had more frequently adjunctive procedures performed at distal anastomotic sites in order to improve run-off status. Thirty-day death rate was 1.9% in HePTFE group and 0.5% in ASV group (P=0.08). The rates of perioperative thromboses and amputations were 6% and 3.5% in HePTFE group, and 5% and 1.7% in ASV group, without significant differences between the two groups. Mean duration of follow-up was 28.5±22.1 months; 921 patients (97%) had at least one postoperative clinical and ultrasonographic control. Estimated 48-month survival rates were 81% in HePTFE group and 74% in ASV group (P=0

  11. Implantable electrical devices for prevention of sudden cardiac death: data on implant rates from a 'real world' regional registry.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Berti, Elena; Biffi, Mauro; Marino, Massimiliano; Sassone, Biagio; Villani, Giovanni Q; Bottoni, Nicola; Malavasi, Vincenzo L; Melandri, Francesco; Barbato, Gaetano; Talamonti, Ennio; Marconi, Marco

    2010-09-01

    International and national consensus guidelines define appropriate indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), but the variability in implant rates in 'real world' clinical practice is still unknown. In Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with around 4.3 million inhabitants, a web-based registry was instituted to collect data for all ICDs implanted. Between January 2006 and December 2008, data from all consecutive patients resident in this region who underwent first implant of an ICD or a biventricular ICD were collected and standardized, considering each regional area (i.e. each of the nine provinces). The overall number of implanted ICDs had an increase in years 2007 and 2008, with a relative increase in comparison to 2006, by 14 and 48% respectively, reaching an average value of 16.2 per 10,000 inhabitants in 2008. Most of the increase was due to a rise in ICDs for primary prevention. The ratio between the implant rates of the provinces with the highest and the lowest implant rates, respectively, was around 2 in 2008. Implant rates for ICDs, considering both primary and secondary prevention of sudden death, show up to two-fold variations even in a geographical region where the general level of health care is advanced and well appreciated by the population. The lack of a common strategy for sudden death prevention, approved by both physicians and institutional regional authorities, together with some degree of variability in translating guidelines into clinical practice, were identified as the main factors explaining the heterogeneity in ICD implant rates.

  12. Adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell support for high-risk primary breast cancer: results from the Italian national registry.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Rosti, Giovanni; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Aieta, Michele; Secondino, Simona; Cinieri, Saverio; Fedele, Roberta; Bengala, Carmelo; Bregni, Marco; Grasso, Donatella; De Giorgi, Ugo; Lanza, Francesco; Castagna, Luca; Bruno, Barbara; Martino, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (AHPCT) for breast cancer (BC) patients has been an area of intense controversy among the medical oncology community. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of this procedure in a large cohort of high-risk primary BC patients who underwent AHPCT in Italy. A total of 1183 patients receiving HDC for high-risk BC (HRBC) (>3 positive nodes) were identified in the Italian registry. The median age was 46 years, 62% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 60.1% had endocrine-responsive tumors, and 20.7% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumor. The median number of positive lymph nodes (LN) at surgery was 15, with 71.5% of patients having ≥ 10 positive nodes. Seventy-three percent received an alkylating agent-based HDC as a single procedure, whereas 27% received epirubicin or mitoxantrone-containing HDC, usually within a multitransplantation program. The source of stem cells was peripheral blood in the vast majority of patients. Transplantation-related mortality was .8%, whereas late cardiac and secondary tumor-related mortality were around 1%, overall. With a median follow-up of 79 months, median disease-free and overall survival (OS) in the entire population were 101 and 134 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that OS was significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors and in patients receiving multiple transplantation procedures. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. The size of the primary tumor and number of involved LN negatively affected OS. Adjuvant HDC with AHPCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk primary BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be proposed in selected HRBC patients and further investigated in clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and

  13. Comparing ICD-9 and ICD-10: the impact on intentional and unintentional injury mortality statistics in Italy and Norway.

    PubMed

    Gjertsen, Finn; Bruzzone, Silvia; Vollrath, Margarete E; Pace, Monica; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2013-01-01

    The international classification of diseases (ICD) provides guidelines for the collection, classification and dissemination of official cause-of-death statistics. New revisions of the ICD can potentially disrupt time trends of cause-of-death statistics and affect between-country comparisons. The aim of this study was to measure how switching from ICD-9 to ICD-10 affected mortality statistics for external causes of death, i.e. intentional and unintentional injuries, in Italy and Norway. A sample of death certificates (N=454,897) were selected in Italy from the first year the ICD-10 was implemented (2003) and reclassified from ICD-10 to ICD-9 by the Italian National Institute of Statistics. A sample of death certificates was also selected in Norway (N=10,706) from the last year the ICD-9 was used (1995) and reclassified according to ICD-10 by Statistics Norway. The reclassification (double-coding) was performed by special trained personal in governmental offices responsible for official mortality statistics. Although the reclassification covered all causes of death (diseases and injuries) in the sample, our analysis focused on just one ICD chapter XX. This was external causes of mortality (injury deaths), and covered 15 selected categories of injuries. The switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10 had a significant net impact on 8 of the 15 selected categories. In Italy, accidental falls decreased by 76%; traffic accidents decreased by 9%; suicide by hanging decreased by 3%; events of undetermined intent decreased by 69%; and overall injury deaths decreased by 4%. These net decreases reflect the moving of death records from injury categories in ICD-9 to other injury or disease categories in ICD-10. In Norway, the number of records in three categories decreased significantly: transport accidents, 9%; traffic accidents, 13%; and suicide by self-poisoning, 18%. No statistically significant differences (net changes) were observed in the total number of accidents, suicides and

  14. Paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. First report from the Italian Registry of Pediatric Thrombosis (R. I. T. I., Registro Italiano Trombosi Infantili).

    PubMed

    Suppiej, Agnese; Gentilomo, Chiara; Saracco, Paola; Sartori, Stefano; Agostini, Manuela; Bagna, Rossana; Bassi, Bianca; Giordano, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Guzzetta, Andrea; Lasagni, Donatella; Luciani, Matteo; Molinari, Angelo C; Palmieri, Antonella; Putti, Maria Caterina; Ramenghi, Luca Antonelli; Rota, Lidia Luciana; Sperlì, Domenico; Laverda, Anna Maria; Simioni, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Data from large case series of children with cerebral thrombotic events are pivotal to improve prevention, early recognition and treatment of these conditions. The Italian Registry of Pediatric Thrombosis (R. I. T. I.) was established in 2007 by a multidisciplinary team, aiming for a better understanding of neonatal and paediatric thrombotic events in Italy and providing a preliminary source of data for the future development of specific clinical trials and diagnostic-therapeutic protocols. We analysed data relative to the paediatric cerebral thrombotic events of the R. I. T. I. which occurred between January 2007 and June 2012. In the study period, 79 arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS) events (49 in males) and 91 cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) events (65 in males) were enrolled in the R. I. T. I. Mean age at onset was 4.5 years in AIS, and 7.1 years in CSVT. Most common modes of presentation were hemiparesis, seizures and speech disturbances in AIS, and headache, seizures and lethargy in CSVT. Most common etiologies were underlying chronic diseases, vasculopathy and cardiopathy in AIS, and underlying chronic diseases and infection in CSVT. Time to diagnosis exceeded 24 hours in 46 % AIS and 59 % CSVT. Overall data from the Italian Registry are in substantial agreement with those from the literature, despite small differences. Among these, a longer time to diagnosis compared to other registries and case series poses the accent to the need of an earlier recognition of paediatric cerebrovascular events in Italy, in order to enable prompt and effective treatment strategies.

  15. Strategies for ICD-10 implementation.

    PubMed

    Zeisset, Ann; Bowman, Sue

    2012-09-01

    Hospitals and health systems should consider seven strategies for preparing for the conversion from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS: Form a project planning team. Assess the range of impact on each department and on productivity, revenue, and resources. Perform a gap analysis. Analyze data. Develop a training strategy specific to coding professionals and heavy data users. Work to improve documentation. Communicate with vendors regarding their plans for the transition to ICD-10.

  16. One-year clinical outcome of amphilimus polymer-free drug-eluting stent in diabetes mellitus patients: Insight from the ASTUTE registry (AmphilimuS iTalian mUlticenTre rEgistry).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Antonio; Godino, Cosmo; Donahue, Michael; Testa, Luca; Chiarito, Mauro; Pavon, Anna Giulia; Colantonio, Riccardo; Cappelletti, Alberto; Monello, Alberto; Magni, Valeria; Milazzo, Diego; Parisi, Rosario; Nicolino, Annamaria; Moshiri, Shahram; Fattori, Rossella; Aprigliano, Gianfranco; Palloshi, Altin; Caramanno, Giuseppe; Montorfano, Matteo; Bedogni, Francesco; Margonato, Alberto; Briguori, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Despite several improvements in drug-eluting stent (DES) technology, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are affected by higher rate of adverse events after PCI with DES, mainly in terms of target lesion revascularization (TLR). The Cre8 stent, a polymer-free amphilimus-eluting stent (AES), has shown promising preliminary results in DM patients. The ASTUTE registry was conceived to assess clinical performance of this polymer-free AES in DM in a "real-world" multicenter-independent cohort of patients. 1216 consecutive patients (1637 lesions) treated with Cre8 between August 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively enrolled and divided in two groups: DM and non-DM patients. The primary and secondary endpoints were target lesion failure (TLF) and TLR at 1-year, respectively. 1-Year clinical outcome was available for 407 (80%) DM and 566 (84%) non-DM patients. Diabetic patients were more frequently affected by hypertension (p<0.001) and dyslipidemia (p<0.001) and more frequently dialyzed (p=0.010). At 1-year, TLF occurred in 50 (5.1%) overall patients, and was similar in DM and non-DM patients (4.9 vs 5.3%, respectively, p=0.788). The secondary endpoint (TLR) occurred in 3% of overall patients and similarly in DM and non-DM patients (3.7 vs 2.5%, respectively, p=0.273). Primary and secondary endpoints were similar also between insulin and non-insulin dependent DM patients. The results of this large, real-world, multicenter-independent registry show that Cre8 AES has similar safety and efficacy profile in DM as well as non-DM patients, reducing the adverse outcomes related to DM in patients undergoing PCI. A large randomized trial will be necessary to definitely prove these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Midterm and one-year outcome of amphilimus polymer free drug eluting stent in patients needing short dual antiplatelet therapy. Insight from the ASTUTE registry (AmphilimuS iTalian mUlticenTer rEgistry).

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Chiarito, Mauro; Donahue, Michael; Testa, Luca; Colantonio, Riccardo; Cappelletti, Alberto; Monello, Alberto; Magni, Valeria; Milazzo, Diego; Parisi, Rosario; Nicolino, Annamaria; Moshiri, Shahram; Fattori, Rossella; Aprigliano, Gianfranco; Palloshi, Altin; Caramanno, Giuseppe; Montorfano, Matteo; Bedogni, Francesco; Briguori, Carlo; Margonato, Alberto; Colombo, Antonio

    2017-03-15

    To assess clinical outcomes of patients needing short dual antiplatelet therapy (S-DAPT) after PCI with Cre8 polymer-free amphilimus eluting-stent (AES). The Cre8-AES with pure i-Carbofilm coating was supposed to induce faster stent endothelialization and reduce device thrombogenicity. We performed a sub-analysis of unrestricted consecutive patients treated with Cre8-AES between August 2011 and January 2015. Two groups were formed: 1) patients discharged with S-DAPT (≤3-month), because of high bleeding risk or attending urgent non-cardiac surgery; and 2) patients discharged with Recommended DAPT duration (R-DAPT; ≥6-month). The primary ischemic- and bleeding-safety endpoints were Target Vessel Failure (TVF, composite endpoint of cardiac-death, target vessel-myocardial infarction and target vessel-revascularization), and major-bleeding (BARC ≥type-3a) at 6-month and 1-year. 106 patients (8.7%) were discharged with ≤3-month DAPT (83±19days; S-DAPT group) and 1102 patients (90.6%) with ≥6-month DAPT (342±62days; R-DAPT group). Between S-DAPT and R-DAPT groups no significant differences were observed in TVF at 1-year (5.7% vs 5.1%); 1-year BARC major bleeding rate was higher in S-DAPT group (3.4% vs 0.2%, p=0.007) with all bleeding events occurred within 3months. The landmark analysis (started at 90days, ended at 1year) showed no differences in BARC major bleedings between groups (0% vs. 0.3%). The results of this multicenter registry show that the use of Cre8 AES in patients needing short DAPT (≤3-month) was safe regarding ischemic events and could favor a reduction of bleeding events related to the recommended DAPT. A large randomized trial is necessary to support these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors influencing the choice of first- and second-line biologic therapy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: real-life data from the Italian LORHEN Registry.

    PubMed

    Monti, Sara; Klersy, Catherine; Gorla, Roberto; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Pellerito, Raffaele; Fusaro, Enrico; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Rocchetta, Pier Andrea; Favalli, Ennio Giulio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Caporali, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    According to international recommendations, the selection of the biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is mainly left to the clinician's preference. We analyzed the real-life factors influencing the first-line choice or the switching strategy, focusing on the prescription of abatacept (ABA) or tocilizumab (TCZ) compared to TNFα inhibitors (TNFi). Patients enrolled in the Lombardy Rheumatology Network (LORHEN) Registry after January 1, 2010, when all considered bDMARD agents were available, were included. The population was divided into "first-" and "second-line" bDMARD. We included 1910 patients (first line n = 1264, second line n = 646). Age was higher in ABA or TCZ vs TNFi treated patients (p < 0.0001). Positive latent tuberculosis screening was associated with first-line ABA (p = 0.002). Methotrexate (MTX) combination therapy was lower in the TCZ group (p = 0.02). The type (dyslipidemia, hypertension, pulmonary disease) and the number of comorbidities influenced the choice towards ABA (p = 0.01). Multinomial logistic regression demonstrated that a second-line treatment, higher age, dyslipidemia, pulmonary disease, other comorbidities, and extra-articular RA manifestations were associated with ABA compared to TNFi. TCZ was associated with a second-line treatment, higher age, and more severe disease activity. Stopping the first bDMARD due to adverse events (AE) influenced the choice towards ABA. In real life, higher age and comorbidities influence the choice towards ABA and TCZ compared to TNFi. ABA was preferred in case of suspension of previous treatments due to AE. After failing a first-line TNFi, swapping to a different mechanism of action is more common.

  19. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  20. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  1. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  2. Propensity Score-Based Analysis of Percutaneous Closure Versus Medical Therapy in Patients With Cryptogenic Stroke and Patent Foramen Ovale: The IPSYS Registry (Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults).

    PubMed

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Grassi, Mario; Lodigiani, Corrado; Patella, Rosalba; Gandolfo, Carlo; Zini, Andrea; DeLodovici, Maria Luisa; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Toriello, Antonella; Musolino, Rossella; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bovi, Paolo; Adami, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Sessa, Maria; Cavallini, Anna; Marcheselli, Simona; Marco Bonifati, Domenico; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Tancredi, Lucia; Chiti, Alberto; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Spalloni, Alessandra; Giorli, Elisa; Costa, Paolo; Giacalone, Giacomo; Ferrazzi, Paola; Poli, Loris; Morotti, Andrea; Piras, Valeria; Rasura, Maurizia; Simone, Anna Maria; Gamba, Massimo; Cerrato, Paolo; Zedde, Maria Luisa; Micieli, Giuseppe; Melis, Maurizio; Massucco, Davide; Guido, Davide; De Giuli, Valeria; Bonaiti, Silvia; D'Amore, Cataldo; La Starza, Sara; Iacoviello, Licia; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    We sought to compare the benefit of percutaneous closure to that of medical therapy alone for the secondary prevention of embolism in patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO) and otherwise unexplained ischemic stroke, in a propensity scored study. Between 2000 and 2012, we selected consecutive first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 18 to 45 years with PFO and no other cause of brain ischemia, as part of the IPSYS registry (Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults), who underwent either percutaneous PFO closure or medical therapy for comparative analysis. Primary end point was a composite of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, or peripheral embolism. Secondary end point was brain ischemia. Five hundred and twenty-one patients qualified for the analysis. The primary end point occurred in 15 patients treated with percutaneous PFO closure (7.3%) versus 33 patients medically treated (10.5%; hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.32; P=0.285). The rates of the secondary end point brain ischemia were also similar in the 2 treatment groups (6.3% in the PFO closure group versus 10.2% in the medically treated group; hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.21; P=0.168). Closure provided a benefit in patients aged 18 to 36 years (hazard ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.81; P=0.026) and in those with a substantial right-to-left shunt size (hazard ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.68; P=0.011). PFO closure seems as effective as medical therapy for secondary prevention of cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Whether device treatment might be more effective in selected cases, such as in patients younger than 37 years and in those with a substantial right-to-left shunt size, deserves further investigation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Near-Fatal ICD Lead Dysfunction with Implications for ICD Testing.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Alexander; Attanasio, Philipp; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Blaschke, Florian

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) experienced ventricular fibrillation. After resuscitation, no communication between the device and an ICD programmer was possible. The ICD was explanted, no signs of destruction were visible, and the ICD leads revealed normal values. A new ICD was implanted, interrogation values were stable. However, immediately after defibrillation testing the connection between programmer and ICD was interrupted and could not be established again. The device showed burn marks and a hole in the can. Analysis revealed an isolation defect of the ICD lead, which was not detectable with standard interrogation.

  4. Device Longevity in a Contemporary Cohort of ICD/CRT-D Patients Undergoing Device Replacement.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Francesco; Martignani, Cristian; Ammendola, Ernesto; Menardi, Endrj; Narducci, Maria Lucia; DE Filippo, Paolo; Santamaria, Matteo; Campana, Andrea; Stabile, Giuseppe; Potenza, Domenico Rosario; Pastore, Gianni; Iori, Matteo; LA Rosa, Concetto; Biffi, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The longevity of defibrillators (ICD) is extremely important from both a clinical and economic perspective. We studied the reasons for device replacement, the longevity of removed ICD, and the existence of possible factors associated with shorter service life. Consecutive patients who underwent ICD replacement from March 2013 to May 2015 in 36 Italian centers were included in this analysis. Data on replaced devices were collected. A total of 953 patients were included in this analysis. In 813 (85%) patients the reason for replacement was battery depletion, while 88 (9%) devices were removed for clinical reasons and the remaining 52 because of system failure (i.e., lead or ICD generator failure or a safety advisory indication). The median service life was 5.9 years (25th-75th percentile, 4.9-6.9) for single- and dual-chamber ICD and 4.9 years (25th-75th percentile, 4.0-5.7) for CRT-D. On multivariate analysis, the factors CRT-D device, SC/DC ICD generator from Biotronik, percentage of ventricular pacing, and the occurrence of a system failure were positively associated with a replacement procedure. By contrast, the device from Boston Scientific was an independent protective factor against replacement. Considerable differences were seen in battery duration in both ICD and CRT-D. Specifically, Biotronik devices showed the shortest longevity among ICD and Boston Scientific showed the longest longevity among CRT-D (log-rank test, P < 0.001 for pairwise comparisons). Several factors were associated with shorter service life of ICD devices: CRT-D, occurrence of system failure and percentage of ventricular pacing. Our results confirmed significant differences among manufacturers. © The Authors. Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Development of structured ICD-10 and its application to computer-assisted ICD coding.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takeshi; Kajino, Masayuki; Sato, Megumi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents: (1) a framework of formal representation of ICD10, which functions as a bridge between ontological information and natural language expressions; and (2) a methodology to use formally described ICD10 for computer-assisted ICD coding. First, we analyzed and structurized the meanings of categories in 15 chapters of ICD10. Then we expanded the structured ICD10 (S-ICD10) by adding subordinate concepts and labels derived from Japanese Standard Disease Names. The information model to describe formal representation was refined repeatedly. The resultant model includes 74 types of semantic links. We also developed an ICD coding module based on S-ICD10 and a 'Coding Principle,' which achieved high accuracy (>70%) for four chapters. These results not only demonstrate the basic feasibility of our coding framework but might also inform the development of the information model for formal description framework in the ICD11 revision.

  6. [Taxonomy and definition of clinical registries].

    PubMed

    Costa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    In order to assess the needs of knowledge about surveillance and registries in Italy and to prepare a proposal for the advancement of monitoring and recording capacity, a working group led by the Italian Association of Epidemiology and composed by the University of Turin, the Institute of Health and Agenas, carried out a survey of definitions and approaches used in public health and consulted the main Italian experts in surveillance and registries. Some of the reflections developed in this project are presented, to assess to which extent they are adaptable to the prospects the program PRIER aims to. Different aspects of the issue are analyzed: from the frame work necessary to identify information needs and how to improve the ability to measure and types of definitions and taxonomies of the registers, to the implications of the choices about what to include in registries on regulation of the instruments and investment priorities for new registries and surveillance.

  7. Conducting Retrospective Ontological Clinical Trials in ICD-9-CM in the Age of ICD-10-CM

    PubMed Central

    Venepalli, Neeta K; Shergill, Ardaman; Dorestani, Parvaneh; Boyd, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of International Classification of Disease 10th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) transition in cancer clinical trials by comparing coding accuracy and data discontinuity in backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM mapping via two tools, and to develop a standard ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM bridging methodology for retrospective analyses. BACKGROUND While the transition to ICD-10-CM has been delayed until October 2015, its impact on cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses has been inadequately explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three high impact journals with broad national and international readerships were reviewed for cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes in study design, methods, or results. Forward ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM mapping was performing using a translational methodology with the Motif web portal ICD-9-CM conversion tool. Backward mapping from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM was performed using both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) general equivalence mappings (GEMs) files and the Motif web portal tool. Generated ICD-9-CM codes were compared with the original ICD-9-CM codes to assess data accuracy and discontinuity. RESULTS While both methods yielded additional ICD-9-CM codes, the CMS GEMs method provided incomplete coverage with 16 of the original ICD-9-CM codes missing, whereas the Motif web portal method provided complete coverage. Of these 16 codes, 12 ICD-9-CM codes were present in 2010 Illinois Medicaid data, and accounted for 0.52% of patient encounters and 0.35% of total Medicaid reimbursements. Extraneous ICD-9-CM codes from both methods (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services general equivalent mapping [CMS GEMs, n = 161; Motif web portal, n = 246]) in excess of original ICD-9-CM codes accounted for 2.1% and 2.3% of total patient encounters and 3.4% and 4.1% of total Medicaid reimbursements from the 2010 Illinois Medicare database. DISCUSSION Longitudinal data analyses post-ICD-10

  8. Cancer incidence in Italian contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Comba, Pietro; Ricci, Paolo; Iavarone, Ivano; Pirastu, Roberta; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Fusco, Mario; Ferretti, Stefano; Fazzo, Lucia; Pasetto, Roberto; Zona, Amerigo; Crocetti, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cancer among residents in sites contaminated by pollutants with a possible health impact is not adequately studied. In Italy, SENTIERI Project (Epidemiological study of residents in National Priority Contaminated Sites, NPCSs) was implemented to study major health outcomes for residents in 44 NPCSs. The Italian Association of Cancer Registries (AIRTUM) records cancer incidence in 23 NPCSs. For each NPCSs, the incidence of all malignant cancers combined and 35 cancer sites (coded according to ICD-10), was analysed (1996-2005). The observed cases were compared to the expected based on age (5-year period,18 classes), gender, calendar period (1996-2000; 2001-2005), geographical area (North-Centre and Centre-South) and cancer sites specific rates. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIR) with 90% Confidence Intervals were computed. In both genders an excess was observed for overall cancer incidence (9% in men and 7% in women) as well as for specific cancer sites (colon and rectum, liver, gallblad-der, pancreas, lung, skin melanoma, bladder and Non Hodgkin lymphoma). Deficits were observed for gastric cancer in both genders, chronic lymphoid leukemia (men), malignant thyroid neoplasms, corpus uteri and connective and soft-tissue tumours and sarcomas (women). This report is, to our knowledge, the first one on cancer risk of residents in NPCSs. The study, although not aiming to estimate the cancer burden attributable to the environment as compared to occupation or life-style, supports the credibility of an etiologic role of environmental exposures in contaminated sites. Ongoing analyses focus on the interpretation of risk factors for excesses of specific cancer types overall and in specific NPCSs in relation to the presence of carcinogenic pollutants.

  9. Pseudoaneurysm after ICD battery replacement.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S L; Lehmkuhl, H; Zipfel, K B; Hetzer, R

    2007-02-01

    False aneurysms of the extracranial carotid arteries are rare and mainly of traumatic origin. We report on a patient who presented with a sudden onset mass in his right neck 2 weeks after routine replacement of his ICD battery. He had received systemic anticoagulation since an aortic valve replacement 5 years before. By color Doppler sonography the mass was identified as a partly thrombosed false aneurysm originating from the common carotid artery. As no spontaneous resolution occurred during the following days the aneurysm was removed surgically 5 days later without further complications. However no connection to the common carotid artery was found at surgery. Yet in the histopathological examination the specimen showed the morphological characteristics of a pseudoaneurysm. There was no history of neck-trauma and no attempted vascular access during the recent operation.

  10. [The development of the ICD-11].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The ICD-10 will have been used for approximately twenty years by the time the new revision of the ICD (ICD-11) is completed, and the revision process is being implemented. Accordingly, the WHO has organized groups of experts designated to deal with issues in each field, and the International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioral Disorders has been launched for the field of psychiatry. Regarding the revision, this group is responsible for ultimate decision-making in establishing a framework for the new version. We reported processes of the ICD-11 by the above mentioned group and its coordinating groups and working groups. In addition, we reported the WHO-WPA Survey which was distributed to 500 members of the Japanese Society for Psychiatry and Neurology.

  11. Primary ICD-therapy in patients with advanced heart failure: selection strategies and future trials.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Nelles, Manfred; Schellberg, Dieter; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo

    2008-09-01

    For allocation of primary ICD-therapy, a possible lower limit of inclusion criteria--defining overly advanced heart failure--is less well investigated. Also, a multi-variable approach to stratification beyond ejection fraction (LVEF) appears warranted. We examined whether adding a selection limit of peak VO(2) registry 1,926 patients with systolic CHF were recruited consecutively since 1994. Of these patients, 292 met the selection criteria described above. The mean age was 57.6 +/- 9.5 years, 83% were male, 37% had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 28% received primary ICD-therapy. All cause mortality was considered as end point. Median follow-up was 45 (18-86) months. ICD was not a significant predictor of outcome either for the entire population, or grouped according to aetiology of CHF. Still, 3-year mortality was 15% (ICD-patients) Vs. 28% (non-ICD-patients); P = 0.05; under combination medical therapy. Inversely, in ICD-patients medical combination therapy conveyed a significant survival benefit (P < 0.001). Consequently, the number-needed-to-treat was eight under combination therapy and the size estimate amounts to 300 patients for a prospective trial in this cohort. A cut-off of LVEF ICD-therapy. Our results indicate the need for a specific randomized trial in this cohort. The according mortality data and a size estimate are provided.

  12. Living with Your Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the phone or through an Internet connection. ICD batteries last 5 to 7 years. Your doctor uses a special analyzer to detect the first warning that the batteries are running down, before you can detect any ...

  13. ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

    2013-01-01

    The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

  14. ICD-9 to ICD-10: evolution, revolution, and current debates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Shafran-Topaz, Leah; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-01-01

    The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) has undergone a long evolution from its initial inception in the late 18th century. Today, ICD is the internationally recognized classification that helps clinicians, policy makers, and patients to navigate, understand, and compare healthcare systems and services. Currently in the United States, hot debates surround the transition from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). This article presents an analysis of the views of the proponents and opponents of the upcoming change. We also briefly present and analyze the quality of the most frequently cited scientific evidence that underpins the recent debates focusing on two major issues: ICD-10-CM implementation costs and revenue gains and the projected clinical data quality improvement. We conclude with policy and research suggestions for healthcare stakeholders.

  15. Strategies for successful ICD-10 implementation.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    The transition to ICD-10 is the largest mandate in U.S. healthcare history. Full ICD-10 implementation will require diligent, comprehensive actions. The three pillars to ICD-10 success are the same with any enormous organizational change: governance, education, and documentation. Many organizations have called for additional delays before full implementation, while other organizations across the United States have already made significant strides to prepare for the change. But is another delay of ICD-10 the solution? Many believe not, because any further delays can hinder forward momentum. Organizations that fell behind before the delay haven't taken the extra time to get up to speed, and therefore additional time to prepare isn't likely to motivate them any more than the first delay did. ICD-10 readiness is a journey, but unless the fundamentals are in place, moving toward an Oct. 1 launch is an uphill journey on a very steep slope. But with a solid strategy in place, healthcare organizations can complete the transition, even if they're a little late at the start.

  16. [Internet therapy for ICD-patients].

    PubMed

    Schulz, S M; Pauli, P

    2011-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) are increasingly used for the prevention of potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias due to their confirmed superior medical efficiency. Nevertheless, ICD-patients often suffer from psychosocial problems, e.g., anxiety and depression. These issues are rarely addressed in routine medical follow-up care. Due to the limited mobility of many ICD-patients, Internet-based care may be ideal for delivering psychosocial care to patients in their homes. Our pilot study and case studies illustrate prospects and challenges of this approach. We developed icd-forum.de, a 6-week internet-based prevention program that provides a platform for information, a virtual self-help group, and a professionally moderated chat room in order to help decrease anxiety and to improve quality of life. A critical evaluation in the context of other published studies on the subject allows recommendations for the implementation of future internet-based psychosocial programs for ICD-patients to be deduced. It is the authors' opinion that such programs offer advantages specifically for heart failure patients and they recommend their broader use. Prior to this, conclusive evaluation studies are needed.

  17. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  18. Occupational Disease Registries-Characteristics and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Haghighi, Khosro Sadeghniat; Kalhori, Sharareh Rostam Niakan; Hosseini, Narges Shams; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Due to growth of occupational diseases and also increase of public awareness about their consequences, attention to various aspects of diseases and improve occupational health and safety has found great importance. Therefore, there is the need for appropriate information management tools such as registries in order to recognitions of diseases patterns and then making decision about prevention, early detection and treatment of them. These registries have different characteristics in various countries according to their occupational health priorities. Aim of this study is evaluate dimensions of occupational diseases registries including objectives, data sources, responsible institutions, minimum data set, classification systems and process of registration in different countries. In this study, the papers were searched using the MEDLINE (PubMed) Google scholar, Scopus, ProQuest and Google. The search was done based on keyword in English for all motor engines including "occupational disease", "work related disease", "surveillance", "reporting", "registration system" and "registry" combined with name of the countries including all subheadings. After categorizing search findings in tables, results were compared with each other. Important aspects of the registries studied in ten countries including Finland, France, United Kingdom, Australia, Czech Republic, Malaysia, United States, Singapore, Russia and Turkey. The results show that surveyed countries have statistical, treatment and prevention objectives. Data sources in almost the rest of registries were physicians and employers. The minimum data sets in most of them consist of information about patient, disease, occupation and employer. Some of countries have special occupational related classification systems for themselves and some of them apply international classification systems such as ICD-10. Finally, the process of registration system was different in countries. Because occupational diseases are often

  19. Simulation of ICD-9 to ICD-10-CM Transition for Family Medicine: Simple or Convoluted?

    PubMed

    Grief, Samuel N; Patel, Jesal; Kochendorfer, Karl M; Green, Lee A; Lussier, Yves A; Li, Jianrong; Burton, Michael; Boyd, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the impact of the transition from International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), to Interactional Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), on family medicine and to identify areas where additional training might be required. Family medicine ICD-9-CM codes were obtained from an Illinois Medicaid data set (113,000 patient visits and $5.5 million in claims). Using the science of networks, we evaluated each ICD-9-CM code used by family medicine physicians to determine whether the transition was simple or convoluted. A simple transition is defined as 1 ICD-9-CM code mapping to 1 ICD-10-CM code, or 1 ICD-9-CM code mapping to multiple ICD-10-CM codes. A convoluted transition is where the transitions between coding systems is nonreciprocal and complex, with multiple codes for which definitions become intertwined. Three family medicine physicians evaluated the most frequently encountered complex mappings for clinical accuracy. Of the 1635 diagnosis codes used by family medicine physicians, 70% of the codes were categorized as simple, 27% of codes were convoluted, and 3% had no mapping. For the visits, 75%, 24%, and 1% corresponded with simple, convoluted, and no mapping, respectively. Payment for submitted claims was similarly aligned. Of the frequently encountered convoluted codes, 3 diagnosis codes were clinically incorrect, but they represent only <0.1% of the overall diagnosis codes. The transition to ICD-10-CM is simple for 70% or more of diagnosis codes, visits, and reimbursement for a family medicine physician. However, some frequently used codes for disease management are convoluted and incorrect, and for which additional resources need to be invested to ensure a successful transition to ICD-10-CM. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. The dilemma of ICD implant testing.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Charles D; Russo, Andrea M; Degroot, Paul J

    2007-05-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) has been induced at implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant to ensure reliable sensing, detection, and defibrillation. Despite its risks, the value was self-evident for early ICDs: failure of defibrillation was common, recipients had a high risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or VF, and the only therapy for rapid VT or VF was a shock. Today, failure of defibrillation is rare, the risk of VT/VF is lower in some recipients, antitachycardia pacing is applied for fast VT, and vulnerability testing permits assessment of defibrillation efficacy without inducing VF in most patients. This review reappraises ICD implant testing. At implant, defibrillation success is influenced by both predictable and unpredictable factors, including those related to the patient, ICD system, drugs, and complications. For left pectoral implants of high-output ICDs, the probability of passing a 10 J safety margin is approximately 95%, the probability that a maximum output shock will defibrillate is approximately 99%, and the incidence of system revision based on testing is < or = 5%. Bayes' Theorem predicts that implant testing identifies < or = 50% of patients at high risk for unsuccessful defibrillation. Most patients who fail implant criteria have false negative tests and may undergo unnecessary revision of their ICD systems. The first-shock success rate for spontaneous VT/VF ranges from 83% to 93%, lower than that for induced VF. Thus, shocks for spontaneous VT/VF fail for reasons that are not evaluated at implant. Whether system revision based on implant testing improves this success rate is unknown. The risks of implant testing include those related to VF and those related to shocks alone. The former may be due to circulatory arrest alone or the combination of circulatory arrest and shocks. Vulnerability testing reduces risks related to VF, but not those related to shocks. Mortality from implant testing probably is 0.1-0.2%. Overall, VF should

  1. [Spanish implantable cardioverter-defibrillator registry. First official report of the spanish society of cardiology working group on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (2002-2004)].

    PubMed

    Peinado, Rafael; Arenal, Angel; Arribas, Fernando; Torrecilla, Esteban; Alvarez, Miguel; Ormaetxe, José M; Pérez-Castellano, Nicasio

    2005-12-01

    To report the 2002-2004 findings of the Spanish National Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry, established by the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators. Data were collected prospectively after implantation using a single-page questionnaire returned to the Spanish Society of Cardiology. Participation was voluntary. The registry received reports on 925, 1,046 and 1414 implants, respectively, in the years 2002, 2003 and 2004. These figures represent 63%, 59% and 67.5%, respectively, of the total number of ICDs implanted. The reported implantation rates were 22, 24 and 33 per million, respectively, and the estimated total implantation rates were 35, 41 and 49, per million, respectively. The number of device replacements increased from 20% to 30% between 2002 and 2004. The majority of patients were male, their median age was 66 years, they had severe or moderate left ventricular dysfunction, and they were in functional class I or II. The most common underlying heart disease was ischemic heart disease. The main indications for an ICD were sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and aborted sudden cardiac death, though the number of prophylactic indications has increased. Most ICDs were implanted in an electrophysiology laboratory by a cardiac electrophysiologist. The implantation rates of dual-chamber ICDs and ICDs with cardiac resynchronization therapy were approximately 30% and 15%, respectively. Very few complications occurred during implantation. The Spanish National ICD Registry contains a representative sample of ICD implantations performed in the country. The registry is one of the largest reported.

  2. Automatic Extraction of ICD-O-3 Primary Sites from Cancer Pathology Reports.

    PubMed

    Kavuluru, Ramakanth; Hands, Isaac; Durbin, Eric B; Witt, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Although registry specific requirements exist, cancer registries primarily identify reportable cases using a combination of particular ICD-O-3 topography and morphology codes assigned to cancer case abstracts of which free text pathology reports form a main component. The codes are generally extracted from pathology reports by trained human coders, sometimes with the help of software programs. Here we present results that improve on the state-of-the-art in automatic extraction of 57 generic sites from pathology reports using three representative machine learning algorithms in text classification. We use a dataset of 56,426 reports arising from 35 labs that report to the Kentucky Cancer Registry. Employing unigrams, bigrams, and named entities as features, our methods achieve a class-based micro F-score of 0.9 and macro F-score of 0.72. To our knowledge, this is the best result on extracting ICD-O-3 codes from pathology reports using a large number of possible codes. Given the large dataset we use (compared to other similar efforts) with reports from 35 different labs, we also expect our final models to generalize better when extracting primary sites from previously unseen reports.

  3. National Suicide Registry Malaysia (NSRM).

    PubMed

    Hayati, A N; Kamarul, A K

    2008-09-01

    To create a nationwide system to capture data on completed suicide in Malaysia i.e. the morbidity, geographic and temporal trends and the population at high risk of suicide. Data from this registry can later be used to stimulate and facilitate further research on suicide. This paper describes the rationale and processes involved in developing a national suicide registry in 2007. The diagnosis of suicide is based on the ICD-10 codes for fatal intentional self-harm (X60-X84). A case report form with an accompanying instruction manual had been prepared to ensure systematic and uniform data collection. State Forensic Pathologist's offices are responsible for data collection in their respective states, and in turn will submit the data to a central data management unit. Data collection began in July 2007 and currently in data cleaning process. Training for source data producers is ongoing. In 2008, the NSRM plans to involve university hospitals into its network as currently only Ministry of Health hospitals are involved. The NSRM will be launching its online application for case registration this year while an overview of results will be available via its public domain at www.nsrm.gov.my beginning 20 April 2008. To efficiently capture the data on suicide, a concerted effort between various agencies is needed. A lot of conceptual work and data base development remains to be done in order to position preventive efforts on a more solid foundation.

  4. Effectiveness of remote monitoring of CIEDs in detection and treatment of clinical and device-related cardiovascular events in daily practice: the HomeGuide Registry.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Calò, Leonardo; Vaccari, Diego; Zanotto, Gabriele; Curnis, Antonio; Buja, Gianfranco; Rovai, Nicola; Gargaro, Alessio

    2013-07-01

    The HomeGuide Registry was a prospective study (NCT01459874), implementing a model for remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in daily clinical practice, to estimate effectiveness in major cardiovascular event detection and management. The workflow for remote monitoring [Biotronik Home Monitoring (HM)] was based on primary nursing: each patient was assigned to an expert nurse for management and to a responsible physician for medical decisions. In-person visits were scheduled once a year. Seventy-five Italian sites enrolled 1650 patients [27% pacemakers, 27% single-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 22% dual-chamber ICDs, 24% ICDs with cardiac resynchronization therapy]. Population resembled the expected characteristics of CIED patients. During a 20 ± 13 month follow-up, 2471 independently adjudicated events were collected in 838 patients (51%): 2033 (82%) were detected during HM sessions; 438 (18%) during in-person visits. Sixty were classified as false-positive, with generalized estimating equation-adjusted sensitivity and positive predictive value of 84.3% [confidence interval (CI), 82.5-86.0%] and 97.4% (CI, 96.5-98.2%), respectively. Overall, 95% of asymptomatic and 73% of actionable events were detected during HM sessions. Median reaction time was 3 days [interquartile range (IQR), 1-14 days]. Generalized estimating equation-adjusted incremental utility, calculated according to four properties of major clinical interest, was in favour of the HM sessions: +0.56 (CI, 0.53-0.58%), P < 0.0001. Resource consumption: 3364 HM sessions performed (76% by nurses), median committed monthly manpower of 55.5 (IQR, 22.0-107.0) min × health personnel/100 patients. Home Monitoring was highly effective in detecting and managing clinical events in CIED patients in daily practice with remarkably low manpower and resource consumption.

  5. Effectiveness of remote monitoring of CIEDs in detection and treatment of clinical and device-related cardiovascular events in daily practice: the HomeGuide Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Calò, Leonardo; Vaccari, Diego; Zanotto, Gabriele; Curnis, Antonio; Buja, Gianfranco; Rovai, Nicola; Gargaro, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Aims The HomeGuide Registry was a prospective study (NCT01459874), implementing a model for remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in daily clinical practice, to estimate effectiveness in major cardiovascular event detection and management. Methods and results The workflow for remote monitoring [Biotronik Home Monitoring (HM)] was based on primary nursing: each patient was assigned to an expert nurse for management and to a responsible physician for medical decisions. In-person visits were scheduled once a year. Seventy-five Italian sites enrolled 1650 patients [27% pacemakers, 27% single-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 22% dual-chamber ICDs, 24% ICDs with cardiac resynchronization therapy]. Population resembled the expected characteristics of CIED patients. During a 20 ± 13 month follow-up, 2471 independently adjudicated events were collected in 838 patients (51%): 2033 (82%) were detected during HM sessions; 438 (18%) during in-person visits. Sixty were classified as false-positive, with generalized estimating equation-adjusted sensitivity and positive predictive value of 84.3% [confidence interval (CI), 82.5–86.0%] and 97.4% (CI, 96.5–98.2%), respectively. Overall, 95% of asymptomatic and 73% of actionable events were detected during HM sessions. Median reaction time was 3 days [interquartile range (IQR), 1–14 days]. Generalized estimating equation-adjusted incremental utility, calculated according to four properties of major clinical interest, was in favour of the HM sessions: +0.56 (CI, 0.53–0.58%), P < 0.0001. Resource consumption: 3364 HM sessions performed (76% by nurses), median committed monthly manpower of 55.5 (IQR, 22.0–107.0) min × health personnel/100 patients. Conclusion Home Monitoring was highly effective in detecting and managing clinical events in CIED patients in daily practice with remarkably low manpower and resource consumption. PMID:23362021

  6. Novel ICD Programming and Inappropriate ICD Therapy in CRT-D Versus ICD Patients: A MADIT-RIT Sub-Study.

    PubMed

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Daubert, James P; Schuger, Claudio; Goldenberg, Ilan; Klein, Helmut; Aktas, Mehmet K; McNitt, Scott; Stockburger, Martin; Merkely, Bela; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    The Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Reduce Inappropriate therapy (MADIT-RIT) trial showed a significant reduction in inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients programmed to high-rate cut-off (Arm B) or delayed ventricular tachycardia therapy (Arm C), compared with conventional programming (Arm A). There is limited data on the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with a cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on the effect of ICD programming. We aimed to elucidate the effect of CRT-D on ICD programming to reduce inappropriate ICD therapy in patients implanted with CRT-D or an ICD, enrolled in MADIT-RIT. The primary end point of this study was the first inappropriate ICD therapy. Secondary end points were inappropriate anti-tachycardia pacing and inappropriate ICD shock. The study enrolled 742 (49%) patients with an ICD and 757 (51%) patients with a CRT-D. Patients implanted with a CRT-D had 62% lower risk of inappropriate ICD therapy than those with an ICD only (hazard ratio [HR] =0.38, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.57; P<0.001). High-rate cut-off or delayed ventricular tachycardia therapy programming significantly reduced the risk of inappropriate ICD therapy compared with conventional ICD programming in ICD (HR=0.14 [B versus A]; HR=0.21 [C versus A]) and CRT-D patients (HR=0.15 [B versus A]; HR=0.23 [C versus A]; P<0.001 for all). There was a significant reduction in inappropriate anti-tachycardia pacings in both group and a significant reduction in inappropriate ICD shock in CRT-D patients. Patients implanted with a CRT-D have lower risk of inappropriate ICD therapy than those with an ICD. Innovative ICD programming significantly reduces the risk of inappropriate ICD therapy in both ICD and CRT-D patients. http://clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT00947310. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. ICD-10: 5 steps to a comprehensive financial impact analysis.

    PubMed

    Levy, Brian

    2013-03-01

    To ensure a successful transition to ICD-IO, hospitals should: Investigate industry guidelines. Analyze claims using mapping tools. Measure the potential impact on payment. Practice ICD-10 coding in collaboration with payers. Study cost reduction opportunities.

  8. Patterns of domestic migrations and access to childhood cancer care centres in Italy: a report from the hospital based registry of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Dama, Elisa; Rondelli, Roberto; De Rosa, Marisa; Aricò, Maurizio; Carli, Modesto; Bellani, Franca Fossati; Magnani, Corrado; Merletti, Franco; Pastore, Guido; Pession, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Tertiary care centres, grouped in the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP) are unevenly distributed across the country. In an attempt to describe their perceived efficacy, we matched the residence and the location of the treatment centre in 18,441 patients aged

  9. ICD9 Code Assistant: A prototype.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Selnur; Ding, Jing; Osborn, Carol; Mekhjian, Hagop; Kamal, Jyoti

    2007-10-11

    At The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) patient reports are available in real time along with other clinical and financial data in the OSUMC Information Warehouse (IW). Using the UMLS Meta Thesaurus we have leveraged the IW to develop a tool that can assist the medical record coders as well as administrators, physicians and researchers to quickly identify clinical concepts and their associated ICD-9 codes.

  10. Stereotyped movement disorder in ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Woods, Douglas W

    2014-01-01

    According to current proposals for ICD-11, stereotyped movement disorder will be classified in the grouping of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a qualifier to indicate whether self-injury is present, similar to the classification of stereotypic movement disorder in DSM-5. At the same time, the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders has proposed a grouping of body-focused repetitive behavior disorders within the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRD) cluster to include trichotillomania and skin-picking disorder. DSM-5 has taken a slightly different approach: trichotillomania and excoriation (skin picking) disorder are included in the OCRD grouping, while body-focused repetitive behavior disorder is listed under other specified forms of OCRD. DSM-5 also includes a separate category of nonsuicidal self-injury in the section on "conditions for further study." There are a number of unresolved nosological questions regarding the relationships among stereotyped movement disorder, body-focused repetitive behavior disorders, and nonsuicidal self-injury. In this article, we attempt to provide preliminary answers to some of these questions as they relate to the ICD-11 classification of mental and behavioral disorders.

  11. Development of the ICD-10 simplified version and field test.

    PubMed

    Paoin, Wansa; Yuenyongsuwan, Maliwan; Yokobori, Yukiko; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Kim, Sukil

    2017-01-01

    The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) has been used in various Asia-Pacific countries for more than 20 years. Although ICD-10 is a powerful tool, clinical coding processes are complex; therefore, many developing countries have not been able to implement ICD-10-based health statistics (WHO-FIC APN, 2007). This study aimed to simplify ICD-10 clinical coding processes, to modify index terms to facilitate computer searching and to provide a simplified version of ICD-10 for use in developing countries. The World Health Organization Family of International Classifications Asia-Pacific Network (APN) developed a simplified version of the ICD-10 and conducted field testing in Cambodia during February and March 2016. Ten hospitals were selected to participate. Each hospital sent a team to join a training workshop before using the ICD-10 simplified version to code 100 cases. All hospitals subsequently sent their coded records to the researchers. Overall, there were 1038 coded records with a total of 1099 ICD clinical codes assigned. The average accuracy rate was calculated as 80.71% (66.67-93.41%). Three types of clinical coding errors were found. These related to errors relating to the coder (14.56%), those resulting from the physician documentation (1.27%) and those considered system errors (3.46%). The field trial results demonstrated that the APN ICD-10 simplified version is feasible for implementation as an effective tool to implement ICD-10 clinical coding for hospitals. Developing countries may consider adopting the APN ICD-10 simplified version for ICD-10 code assignment in hospitals and health care centres. The simplified version can be viewed as an introductory tool which leads to the implementation of the full ICD-10 and may support subsequent ICD-11 adoption.

  12. Multipole analysis of heart rate variability as a predictor of imminent ventricular arrhythmias in ICD patients.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Guy; Kobo, Roi; Beinart, Roy; Feldman, Shlomo; Sapunar, Michal; Luria, David; Eldar, Michael; Levitan, Jacob; Glikson, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD) enable storage of multiple, preepisode R-R recordings in patients who suffered from ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VTA). Timely prediction of VTA, using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis techniques, may facilitate the implementation of preventive and therapeutic strategies. To evaluate the novel multipole method of the HRV analysis in prediction of imminent VTAs in ICD patients. We screened patients from the Biotronik HAWAI Registry (Heart Rate Analysis with Automated ICDs). A total of 28 patients from the HAWAI registries (phase I and II), having medical records, who had experienced documented, verified VTA during the 2-year follow-up, were included in our analysis. HRV during preepisode recordings of 4,500 R-R intervals were analyzed using the Dyx parameter and compared to HRV of similar length recordings from the same patients that were not followed by arrhythmia. Our study population consisted mainly of men 25 of 28 (89%), average age of 64.8 ± 9.4 years, 92% with coronary artery disease. HRV during 64 preevent recordings (2.3 events per patient on average) was analyzed and compared with 60 control recordings. The multipole method of HRV analysis showed 50% sensitivity and 91.6% specificity for prediction of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in the study population, with 84.5% positive predictive value. No statistically significant correlation was found between various clinical parameters and the sensitivity of imminent VTA predetection in our patients. The multipole method of HRV analysis emerges as a highly specific, possible predictor of imminent VTA, providing an early warning allowing to prepare for an arrhythmic episode. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Current use of implantable electrical devices in Sweden: data from the Swedish pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator registry.

    PubMed

    Gadler, Fredrik; Valzania, Cinzia; Linde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The National Swedish Pacemaker and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry collects prospective data on all pacemaker and ICD implants in Sweden. We aimed to report the 2012 findings of the Registry concerning electrical devices implantation rates and changes over time, 1 year complications, long-term device longevity and patient survival. Forty-four Swedish implanting centres continuously contribute implantation of pacemakers and ICDs to the Registry by direct data entry on a specific website. Clinical and technical information on 2012 first implants and postoperative complications were analysed and compared with previous years. Patient survival data were obtained from the Swedish population register database. In 2012, the mean pacemaker and ICD first implantation rates were 697 and 136 per million inhabitants, respectively. The number of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) first implantations/million capita was 41 (CRT pacemakers) and 55 (CRT defibrillators), with only a slight increase in CRT-ICD rate compared with 2011. Most device implantations were performed in men. Complication rates for pacemaker and ICD procedures were 5.3 and 10.1% at 1 year, respectively. Device and lead longevity differed among manufacturers. Pacemaker patients were older at the time of first implant and had generally worse survival rate than ICD patients (63 vs. 82% after 5 years). Pacemaker and ICD implantation rates seem to have reached a level phase in Sweden. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and CRT implantation rates are very low and do not reflect guideline indications. Gender differences in CRT and ICD implantations are pronounced. Device and patient survival rates are variable, and should be considered when deciding device type. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The impact of a model-based clinical regional registry for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Michele; Cartabia, Massimo; Didoni, Anna; Fortinguerra, Filomena; Reale, Laura; Mondini, Matteo; Bonati, Maurizio

    2016-03-17

    This article describes the development and clinical impact of the Italian Regional ADHD Registry, aimed at collecting and monitoring diagnostic and therapeutic pathways of care for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder children and adolescents, launched by the Italian Lombardy Region in June 2011. In particular, the model-based software used to run the registry and manage clinical care data acquisition and monitoring, is described. This software was developed using the PROSAFE programme, which is already used for data collection in many Italian intensive care units, as a stand-alone interface case report form. The use of the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder regional registry led to an increase in the appropriateness of the clinical management of all patients included in the registry, proving to be an important instrument in ensuring an appropriate healthcare strategy for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

  15. Thin strut chrome-cobalt stent implantation for treatment of de-novo lesions in small coronary vessels: results of the RISICO Italian Registry (Registro Italiano Mini VISION nei piccolo Vasi) utilizing the Mini VISION coronary stent platform.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Nedy; Morici, Nuccia; Bedogni, Francesco; De Benedictis, Mauro; Scrocca, Innocente; Naldi, Monica; Fiscella, Antonio; Prosperi, Franco; Dominici, Mauro; Rebuzzi, Antonio; Colombo, Antonio; Sangiorgi, Giuseppe M

    2009-11-01

    The Registro Italiano Mini VISION nei piccoli Vasi registry is a prospective, multicenter, observational study, aimed at assessing immediate and long-term angiographic and clinical outcomes of a small-vessel cobalt-chrome super alloy-dedicated stent (Multi-Link RX VISION) in de-novo and long lesions. Small artery size is an important determinant of poor outcomes in percutaneous coronary interventions. Patients with ischemic heart disease were included. The primary end point was procedural success. Secondary end points included clinical restenosis (need for target lesion revascularization ), incidence of major adverse cardiac events at 6 months, and cost-effectiveness analysis. Between September 2004 and October 2005, 143 patients (mean age 67 +/- 11 years; 22% diabetes) were enrolled; 6-month follow-up was completed in May 2006. Average lesion length, mean stent length and diameter were 16.8 +/- 7.1, 17.01 +/- 3.9 and 2.41 +/- 0.14 mm, respectively. Procedural success was 96%. At 6-month follow-up, the hierarchical major adverse cardiac event rate was 11.6%, 2.9% deaths, 2.9% myocardial infarction and 5.8% target lesion revascularization. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be reported in a further publication. Small-vessel disease treatment with Mini VISION stents permits an elevated procedural success rate with low incidence of clinical restenosis and major adverse cardiac events at mid-term follow-up. Such results require confirmation by means of a randomized controlled study against drug-eluting stents.

  16. PTSD in ICD-10 and proposed ICD-11 in elderly with childhood trauma: prevalence, factor structure, and symptom profiles

    PubMed Central

    Glück, Tobias M.; Knefel, Matthias; Tran, Ulrich S.; Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background The proposal for ICD-11 postulates major changes for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, which needs investigation in different samples. Aims To investigate differences of PTSD prevalence and diagnostic agreement between ICD-10 and ICD-11, factor structure of proposed ICD-11 PTSD, and diagnostic value of PTSD symptom severity classes. Method Confirmatory factor analysis and latent profile analysis were used on data of elderly survivors of childhood trauma (>60 years, N=399). Results PTSD rates differed significantly between ICD-10 (15.0%) and ICD-11 (10.3%, z=2.02, p=0.04). Unlike previous research, a one-factor solution of ICD-11 PTSD had the best fit in this sample. High symptom profiles were associated with PTSD in ICD-11. Conclusions ICD-11 concentrates on PTSD's core symptoms and furthers clinical utility. Questions remain regarding the tendency of ICD-11 to diagnose mainly cases with severe symptoms and the influence of trauma type and participant age on the factor structure. PMID:26800660

  17. Neurodevelopmental Disorders (ASD and ADHD): DSM-5, ICD-10, and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Doernberg, Ellen; Hollander, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, specifically autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have undergone considerable diagnostic evolution in the past decade. In the United States, the current system in place is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), whereas worldwide, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) serves as a general medical system. This review will examine the differences in neurodevelopmental disorders between these two systems. First, we will review the important revisions made from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) to the DSM-5, with respect to ASD and ADHD. Next, we will cover the similarities and differences between ASD and ADHD classification in the DSM-5 and the ICD-10, and how these differences may have an effect on neurodevelopmental disorder diagnostics and classification. By examining the changes made for the DSM-5 in 2013, and critiquing the current ICD-10 system, we can help to anticipate and advise on the upcoming ICD-11, due to come online in 2017. Overall, this review serves to highlight the importance of progress towards complementary diagnostic classification systems, keeping in mind the difference in tradition and purpose of the DSM and the ICD, and that these systems are dynamic and changing as more is learned about neurodevelopmental disorders and their underlying etiology. Finally this review will discuss alternative diagnostic approaches, such as the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative, which links symptom domains to underlying biological and neurological mechanisms. The incorporation of new diagnostic directions could have a great effect on treatment development and insurance coverage for neurodevelopmental disorders worldwide.

  18. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future.

  19. Dollars and sense: Mitigating budget risk for ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Newell, Lucy Mancini; DeSilva, Joseph J

    2013-02-01

    The extended deadline for ICD-10 implementation is time that should not be wasted. Healthcare leaders should keep three things in mind: CFOs should approach the effort knowing the costs of ICD-10 implementation will be high and spread over multiple budget years. Training, productivity, and contractual issues are among key areas that will be challenged by ICD-10 implementation. Healthcare finance leaders should work to improve cash-on-hand and cash reserves prior to the ICD-10 deadline to ensure liquidity post-compliance.

  20. A rare type of ventricular oversensing in ICD therapy--inappropriate ICD shock delivery due to triple counting.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Michael; Rauwolf, Thomas P; Bock, Manja; Strasser, Ruth H; Braun, Martin U

    2010-02-01

    Irregular sensing by triple counting of wide QRS complexes resulted in inappropriate shocks in a patient with a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD): A 66-year-old male patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy, left bundle branch block, and impaired left ventricular function received a biventricular ICD for optimal therapy of heart failure (CHF). Two years after implantation, the patient experienced recurrent unexpected ICD shocks without clinical symptoms of malignant tachyarrhythmia, or worsened CHF. The patient's condition rapidly worsened, with progressive cardiogenic shock and electrical-mechanical dissociation. After unsuccessful resuscitation of the patient the interrogation of the ICD showed an initial triple counting of extremely wide and fragmented QRS complexes with inappropriate shocks.

  1. The ICD diagnoses of fetishism and sadomasochism.

    PubMed

    Reiersøl, Odd; Skeid, Svein

    2006-01-01

    In this article we discuss psychiatric diagnoses of sexual deviation as they appear in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), the internationally accepted classification and diagnostic system of the World Health Organization (WHO). Namely, we discuss the background of three diagnostic categories: Fetishism (F65.0), Fetishistic Transvestism (F65.1), and Sadomasochism (F65.5). Pertinent background issues regarding the above categories are followed by a critique of the usefulness of diagnosing these phenomena today. Specifically, we argue that Fetishism, Fetishistic Transvestism, and Sadomasochism, also labeled Paraphilia or perversion, should not be considered illnesses. Finally, we present the efforts of an initiative known as ReviseF65, which was established in 1997, to abolish these diagnoses.

  2. Identification of ICD Codes Suggestive of Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Patricia G.; Slusher, Paula L.; Kruse, Robin L.; Tarleton, Molly M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In order to be reimbursed for the care they provide, hospitals in the United States are required to use a standard system to code all discharge diagnoses: the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9). Although ICD-9 codes specific for child maltreatment exist, they do not identify all…

  3. Social network integration of the ICD11 revision platform.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Vuattolo, Omar; Celik, Can; Ustun, Bedirhan

    2013-01-01

    Classification revision and update can be defined as a social experience, with the participating community of experts behaving like a social network. ICD11 is being revised using an innovative web based process, for which we envisioned also tools for social platforms integration. The present poster preliminarily describes the Facebook tools developed for soliciting expert and participation in the ICD11 revision process.

  4. Questions to Ask Your Doctor--Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... better chance for survival or better quality of life? Can you explain the ICD my child is receiving in understandable terms? Is there anything I need to know about an ICD regarding end-stage heart failure or death? After Implantation, Early Recovery, Adjustment How do I take ...

  5. Identification of ICD Codes Suggestive of Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Patricia G.; Slusher, Paula L.; Kruse, Robin L.; Tarleton, Molly M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In order to be reimbursed for the care they provide, hospitals in the United States are required to use a standard system to code all discharge diagnoses: the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9). Although ICD-9 codes specific for child maltreatment exist, they do not identify all…

  6. Italian cancer figures, report 2012: Cancer in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    registries, covering 47%of the Italian population below age 20 years, in the period 2003-2008. Quality of cancer registration in Italy is elevated, with high proportions of microscopically verified diagnoses (91%in the 0-14 years age group and 96% between 15 and 19 years of age) and a very small proportion of cases collected through death certificate only (0.1%).The proportion of cases in diagnostic groups XI (other malignant epithelial neoplasms) and XII (other and unspecified neoplasms) of the International Classification for Childhood Cancer (ICCC), based on the third revision of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O-3), were 7.0% in the 0-14 years age group and 26.0%in the 15-19 years age group.The ratio between mortality and incidence was 17.7% in both children and adolescents. Detailed results are presented in 24 fact sheets for the 12 major ICCC-3 diagnostic groups and 10 sub-groups of special interest; the series is completed by a sheet on all malignant tumours and one on all tumours including non-malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system. All sheets include results for three age groups (0-14, 15-19, and 0-19 years) and are followed by two commentaries on incidence in the recent period, one on trends and the other on survival. Incidence rates were age-standardized on the European population and presented per million children. Incidence rates are also presented by age group, sex, and geographical area. Incidence trends were evaluated for two periods, 1988-2008 and 1998-2008, using estimated annual percent changes, and survival estimates were calculated by age and period. Indicators and corresponding 95% confidence intervals are shown in forms of graphics and tables at the end of the monograph and online at http://www.registri-tumori.it. Geographical analyses were conducted rearranging cancer registries into four macroareas (North-West, North-East, Centre, and South and Islands). Age groups were the same used in descriptive studies on

  7. Electric smog: telemetry interference between ICD and LVAD.

    PubMed

    Duncker, David; König, Thorben; Müller-Leisse, Johanna; Michalski, Roman; Oswald, Hanno; Schmitto, Jan D; Bauersachs, Johann; Veltmann, Christian

    2017-05-12

    Electromagnetic interferences between implantable cardioverter/defibrillators (ICD) and left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) impacting telemetry have been described in previous generations of ICD as well as LVAD, but have been predominantly overcome in current ICD generations. After introduction of a new fully magnetically levitated centrifugal continuous-flow circulatory pump, we report a case of tenacious telemetry interference between the HeartMate 3 LVAD and an ICD after battery exchange to an Iforia 5. Initialization of the initial telemetry handshake was only possible using several specific maneuvers simultaneously. In order to exclude device-device interference, we suggest to place the ICD above the LVAD before implantation and to test for possible telemetry interferences.

  8. Mortality Implications of Appropriate Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Secondary Prevention Patients: Contrasting Mortality in Primary Prevention Patients From a Prospective Population-Based Registry.

    PubMed

    Almehmadi, Fahad; Porta-Sánchez, Andreu; Ha, Andrew C T; Fischer, Hadas D; Wang, Xuesong; Austin, Peter C; Lee, Douglas S; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy

    2017-08-19

    We sought to examine the mortality impact of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy between patients who received ICD for primary versus secondary prevention purposes. From a prospective, population-based registry, we identified 7020 patients who underwent de novo ICD implantation between February 2007 and May 2012 in Ontario, Canada. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard modeling to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and analyzed the mortality impact of first appropriate ICD therapy (shock and antitachycardia pacing [ATP]) as a time-varying covariate. There were 1929 (27.5%) patients who received ICDs for secondary prevention purposes. The median follow-up period was 5.02 years. Compared with those with secondary prevention ICDs, patients with primary prevention ICDs had more medical comorbidities, and lower ejection fraction. Patients who experienced appropriate ICD shock or ATP had greater risk of death compared with those who did not, irrespective of implant indication. In the primary prevention group, the adjusted hazard ratios of death for appropriate shock and ATP were 2.00 (95% CI: 1.72-2.33) and 1.73 (95% CI: 1.52-1.97), respectively. In the secondary prevention group, the adjusted hazard ratios of death for appropriate ICD shock and ATP were 1.46 (95% CI: 1.20-1.77) and 1.38 (95% CI: 1.16-1.64), respectively. Despite having a more favorable clinical profile, occurrence of appropriate ICD shock or ATP in patients with secondary prevention ICDs was associated with similar magnitudes of mortality risk as those with primary prevention ICDs. A heightened degree of care is warranted for all patients who experience appropriate ICD shock or ATP therapy. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Cancer prevalence in the city of Naples: Contribution of the GP database analyses to the cancer registries network

    PubMed Central

    PIZZI, CLAUDIA; ARPINO, GRAZIA; ACAMPORA, GIUSEPPE; AIELLO, NADIA; DE ROSA, AUGUSTO; DIAFERIA, IMMACOLATA; DI NUNZIO, ALESSANDRO; FRAGNA, GIUSEPPE; FRANCO, AMEDEO; RUSSO, MARIA; SANSONE, FULVIA; SCARPATI, CARMELA; SPINUSO, ANTONIO; ARPINO, GIOVANNI; LUCE, AMALIA; TOMMASIELLI, GIUSEPPINA; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; DE PLACIDO, SABINO

    2013-01-01

    The Italian cancer registries network has not been sufficiently developed in the Southern regions. General practitioners (GPs) are knowledgeable about the prevalence, incidence and mortality for different types of cancer in their patient populations. The aim of this pilot study was to verify the feasibility and reliability of the characterization of cancer populations using GP databases in order to evaluate the impact of cancer in the general population of Naples. The characteristics of the cases studied have been collected by interview or electronic health record and recorded on paper or magnetic supports, appropriately conforming to the current privacy law. Databases are centralized, stored and codified on electronic data-sheets and periodically elaborated by the ‘Consorzio Nazionale delle Cooperative Mediche’ and ‘Federico II’ University. The present study was initiated on September 15, 2004. The analysed geographical area included the suburbs of ‘Stella’ and ‘San Carlo all’Arena’, situated in the historical center of Naples and corresponding to Health Care District 29 of the local health service. The analysis included 16,927 men and women (age range, 6–97 years) from the outpatient offices of 12 GPs who agreed to participate in the study. Results showed that the analysed population represents 16.3% of the general population residing in the area under study. We identified 342 (2%) patients with cancer, 143 (0.8%) of whom were men and 199 (1.2%) women (M/F ratio of 0.7). Of the 342 patients, 10 (5 men and 5 women) had a double cancer; thus, a total of 352 malignancies was characterized. Cancer prevalence was 2,020/100,000 inhabitants. This estimate is lower compared to the national prevalence (2,683/100,000 inhabitants) but higher compared to that in other southern Italian areas. Results, stratified by International Classification of Disease, ninth revision (ICD-IX), based on factors including gender and age, demonstrated that breast cancer

  10. Leveraging the NLM map from SNOMED CT to ICD-10-CM to facilitate adoption of ICD-10-CM.

    PubMed

    Cartagena, F Phil; Schaeffer, Molly; Rifai, Dorothy; Doroshenko, Victoria; Goldberg, Howard S

    2015-05-01

    Develop and test web services to retrieve and identify the most precise ICD-10-CM code(s) for a given clinical encounter. Facilitate creation of user interfaces that 1) provide an initial shortlist of candidate codes, ideally visible on a single screen; and 2) enable code refinement. To satisfy our high-level use cases, the analysis and design process involved reviewing available maps and crosswalks, designing the rule adjudication framework, determining necessary metadata, retrieving related codes, and iteratively improving the code refinement algorithm. The Partners ICD-10-CM Search and Mapping Services (PI-10 Services) are SOAP web services written using Microsoft's.NET 4.0 Framework, Windows Communications Framework, and SQL Server 2012. The services cover 96% of the Partners problem list subset of SNOMED CT codes that map to ICD-10-CM codes and can return up to 76% of the 69,823 billable ICD-10-CM codes prior to creation of custom mapping rules. We consider ways to increase 1) the coverage ratio of the Partners problem list subset of SNOMED CT codes and 2) the upper bound of returnable ICD-10-CM codes by creating custom mapping rules. Future work will investigate the utility of the transitive closure of SNOMED CT codes and other methods to assist in custom rule creation and, ultimately, to provide more complete coverage of ICD-10-CM codes. ICD-10-CM will be easier for clinicians to manage if applications display short lists of candidate codes from which clinicians can subsequently select a code for further refinement. The PI-10 Services support ICD-10 migration by implementing this paradigm and enabling users to consistently and accurately find the best ICD-10-CM code(s) without translation from ICD-9-CM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Why Study Italian?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Charles

    1978-01-01

    One studies Italian for the same reason one studies any language--to become educated. Even more than for art and music, Italian is necessary for literature. Dante must be read, and in the original. Further, we study Italian to know our cultural roots and heritage. (AMH)

  12. Teaching Business Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivelli, Remo J.

    The University of Rhode Island's business Italian course is an advanced language course whose focus is the Italian business world and its reflection of values, customs, and traditions. The course begins with presentations on salient features of contemporary Italian, such as syntactical simplification and nominalization, and how the social,…

  13. Development of an expert based ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM map to AIS 2005 update 2008.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Kathryn L; Price, Janet P; Gillich, Patrick J; Cookman, Kathy J; Brammer, Amy L; St Germain, Trish; Barnes, Jo; Graymire, Vickie; Nayduch, Donna A; Read-Allsopp, Christine; Baus, Katherine; Stanley, Patsye A; Brennan, Maureen

    2016-09-01

    This article describes how maps were developed from the clinical modifications of the 9th and 10th revisions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) to the Abbreviated Injury Scale 2005 Update 2008 (AIS08). The development of the mapping methodology is described, with discussion of the major assumptions used in the process to map ICD codes to AIS severities. There were many intricacies to developing the maps, because the 2 coding systems, ICD and AIS, were developed for different purposes and contain unique classification structures to meet these purposes. Experts in ICD and AIS analyzed the rules and coding guidelines of both injury coding schemes to develop rules for mapping ICD injury codes to the AIS08. This involved subject-matter expertise, detailed knowledge of anatomy, and an in-depth understanding of injury terms and definitions as applied in both taxonomies. The official ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM versions (injury sections) were mapped to the AIS08 codes and severities, following the rules outlined in each coding manual. The panel of experts was composed of coders certified in ICD and/or AIS from around the world. In the process of developing the map from ICD to AIS, the experts created rules to address issues with the differences in coding guidelines between the 2 schemas and assure a consistent approach to all codes. Over 19,000 ICD codes were analyzed and maps were generated for each code to AIS08 chapters, AIS08 severities, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) body regions. After completion of the maps, 14,101 (74%) of the eligible 19,012 injury-related ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes were assigned valid AIS08 severity scores between 1 and 6. The remaining 4,911 codes were assigned an AIS08 of 9 (unknown) or were determined to be nonmappable because the ICD description lacked sufficient qualifying information for determining severity according to AIS rules. There were also 15,214 (80%) ICD codes mapped to AIS08 chapter and ISS body region, which

  14. [Role of cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Schaffer, P

    1995-05-01

    The first Cancer Registries were created in 1975 in France. Their ulterior development and their scientific production have been furthered by the apparition from 1986 under the aegis of the Health Ministry and of the INSERM, of a National Population Registry Committee. Cancer Registries have seriously contributed to a better knowledge of the cancer problem in our country and to describe the french specificities, in particular the importance of the mouth and pharynx cancers. They insure both a monitoring and an alert role; they also contribute to the medical supervision of the Chernobyl accident effects. French registries play a very active role concerning clinical research. They participate to many European studies of health care evaluation. In other respects, many etiological studies have been realized about professional risks of cancer, risks linked with nutritional habits, and on the etiologic role of the Tamoxifen. Finally, certain registries have created DNA banks. If nowadays their role in health planning remains modest, they very actively contribute in evaluating screening actions of breast, cervix and large bowel cancers. They also attracted the attention of Health Authorities on the cervix cancer screening's incoherencies. They evaluate the pilot project of the breast cancer and the registry of the Côte d'Or country evaluates the efficacity of a randomized colo rectal mass screening study. The main difficulties met by the registries are linked with the development of laws protecting more and more the individual freedoms, making it harder and harder the registration exhaustive character.

  15. A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Patients With an Entirely Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator System Versus a Transvenous System (from the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Quality of Life Substudy).

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Carter, Nathan; Barr, Craig; Neuzil, Petr; Scholten, Marcoen; Lambiase, Pier D; Boersma, Lucas; Johansen, Jens B; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2016-08-15

    The first clinical results from the Evaluation of Factors Impacting Clinical Outcome and Cost Effectiveness of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (EFFORTLESS S-ICD) Registry on the entirely S-ICD system are promising, but the impact of the S-ICD system on patients' quality of life (QoL) is not known. We evaluated the QoL of patients with an S-ICD against an unrelated cohort with a transvenous (TV)-ICD system during 6 months of follow-up. Consecutively implanted patients with an S-ICD system were matched with patients with a TV-ICD system on a priori selected variables including baseline QoL. QoL was measured with the Short-Form Health Survey at baseline, 3, and 6 months after implant and compared using multivariable modeling with repeated measures. Patients with an S-ICD (n = 167) versus a TV-ICD system (n = 167) did not differ significantly on physical (p = 0.8157) and mental QoL scores (p = 0.9080) across baseline, 3, and 6 months after implantation in adjusted analyses. The evolution in physical (p = 0.0503) and mental scores (p = 0.3772) during follow-up was similar for both cohorts, as indicated by the nonsignificant interaction effect for ICD system by time. Both patients with an S-ICD system and a TV-ICD system experienced significant improvements in physical and mental QoL between time of implant and 3 months (both p's <0.0001) and between time of implant and 6 months (both p's <0.0001) but not between 3 and 6 months (both p's >0.05). In conclusion, these first results show that the QoL of patients with an S-ICD versus TV-ICD system is similar and that patients with either system experience improvements in QoL on the short term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Closing the ICD-l0 revenue gap.

    PubMed

    Carr, Kimberly Janet

    2013-06-01

    Hospitals can improve clinical documentation under ICD-10 by implementing three strategies: Bring clinical documentation improvement (CDI) specialists and coders together for daily or weekly communications to improve documentation quality, processes, and outcomes. Encourage CDI specialists to engage in direct, one-on-one conversations with physicians or generate queries, whether paper or EHR-based, to clarify missing or unclear documentation to promote better overall clinical documentation outcomes. Assess ICD-10 hot spots for documentation gaps to mitigate risk of lost revenue under ICD-10.

  17. Necessity and implications of ICD-10: facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10 is a new system that is expected to be implemented effective on October 1, 2013. This new system is a federally mandated change affecting all payers and providers, and is expected to exceed both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Y2K in terms of costs and risks. However, the Administration is poised to implement these changes at a rapid pace which could be problematic for health care in the United States. In 2003, HIPAA named ICD-9 as the code set for supporting diagnoses and procedures in electronic administrative transactions. However, on January 16, 2009, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a regulation requiring the replacement of ICD-9 with ICD-10 as of October 1, 2013. While ICD-9 and 10 have a similar type of hierarchy in their structures, the ICD-10 is more complex and incorporates numerous changes. Overall, ICD-10 contains over 141,000 codes, a whopping 712% increase over the less than 20,000 codes in ICD-9, creating enormous complexities, confusion, and expense. Multiple published statistics illustrate that there are approximately 119 instances where a single ICD-9 code can map to more than 100 distinct ICD-10 codes, whereas there are 255 instances where a single ICD-9 code can map to more than 50 ICD-10 codes. To add to the confusion, there are 3,684 instances in the mapping for diseases where a single ICD-10 code can map to more than one ICD-9 code. Proponents of the new ICD-10 system argue that the granularity should lead to improvements in the quality of health care, since more precise coding that more accurately reflects actual patient conditions will permit smarter and more effective disease management in pay-for-performance programs.  This, in essence, encapsulates the benefits that supporters of this new system believe will be realized, even though many of these experts may not be involved in actual day-to-day medical practices

  18. The Complexity and Challenges of the ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM Transition in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Krive, Jacob; Patel, Mahatkumar; Gehm, Lisa; Mackey, Mark; Kulstad, Erik; Li, Jianrong ‘John’; Lussier, Yves A.; Boyd, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning October 2015, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will require medical providers to utilize the vastly expanded ICD-10-CM system. Despite wide availability of information and mapping tools for the next generation of the ICD classification system, some of the challenges associated with transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM are not well understood. To quantify the challenges faced by emergency physicians, we analyzed a subset of a 2010 Illinois Medicaid database of emergency department ICD-9-CM codes, seeking to determine the accuracy of existing mapping tools in order to better prepare emergency physicians for the change to the expanded ICD-10-CM system. We found that 27% of 1,830 codes represented convoluted multidirectional mappings. We then analyzed the convoluted transitions and found 8% of total visit encounters (23% of the convoluted transitions) were clinically incorrect. The ambiguity and inaccuracy of these mappings may impact the work flow associated with the translation process and affect the potential mapping between ICD codes and CPT (Current Procedural Codes) codes, which determine physician reimbursement. PMID:25863652

  19. CADDIS Volume 5. Causal Databases: Interactive Conceptual Diagrams (ICDs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In Interactive Conceptual Diagram (ICD) section of CADDIS allows users to create conceptual model diagrams, search a literature-based evidence database, and then attach that evidence to their diagrams.

  20. Coping With My Partner's ICD and Cardiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners may feel the weight of assuming more responsibilities in the relationship. Partners may find that less ... for ICD-Related Matters Your beliefs about caregiving responsibilities may be different from the patient’s beliefs. It ...

  1. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  2. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  3. ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM mapping of the AAST Emergency General Surgery disease severity grading systems: Conceptual approach, limitations, and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Utter, Garth H; Miller, Preston R; Mowery, Nathan T; Tominaga, Gail T; Gunter, Oliver; Osler, Turner M; Ciesla, David J; Agarwal, Suresh K; Inaba, Kenji; Aboutanos, Michel B; Brown, Carlos V R; Ross, Steven E; Crandall, Marie L; Shafi, Shahid

    2015-05-01

    The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) recently established a grading system for uniform reporting of anatomic severity of several emergency general surgery (EGS) diseases. There are five grades of severity for each disease, ranging from I (lowest severity) to V (highest severity). However, the grading process requires manual chart review. We sought to evaluate whether International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM, ICD-10-CM) codes might allow estimation of AAST grades for EGS diseases. The Patient Assessment and Outcomes Committee of the AAST reviewed all available ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes relevant to 16 EGS diseases with available AAST grades. We then matched grades for each EGS disease with one or more ICD codes. We used the Official Coding Guidelines for ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM and the American Hospital Association's "Coding Clinic for ICD-9-CM" for coding guidance. The ICD codes did not allow for matching all five AAST grades of severity for each of the 16 diseases. With ICD-9-CM, six diseases mapped into four categories of severity (instead of five), another six diseases into three categories of severity, and four diseases into only two categories of severity. With ICD-10-CM, five diseases mapped into four categories of severity, seven diseases into three categories, and four diseases into two categories. Two diseases mapped into discontinuous categories of grades (two in ICD-9-CM and one in ICD-10-CM). Although resolution is limited, ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes might have some utility in roughly approximating the severity of the AAST grades in the absence of more precise information. These ICD mappings should be validated and refined before widespread use to characterize EGS disease severity. In the long-term, it may be desirable to develop alternatives to ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes for routine collection of disease severity characteristics.

  4. ICD-10 FIELD TRIALS IN INDIA - A REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, R.; Shamasundar, C.

    1992-01-01

    The draft of the tenth revision of the International Classification Of Diseases, Chapter V (ICD-10) was subjected to extensive field trials throughout the world. In India, Nine Field Trial Centres (PTCs) conducted the field trials. The results showed that the ICD-10 was quite adequate in its face-validity, reliability, applicability and ease of use. A brief account of the field trials and the result are reported. PMID:21776123

  5. Emergency department coding of bicycle and pedestrian injuries during the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10

    PubMed Central

    Karkhaneh, M; Hagel, B E; Couperthwaite, A; Saunders, L D; Voaklander, D C

    2011-01-01

    Background The international classification of diseases version 10 (ICD-10) uses alphanumeric expanded codes and external cause of injury codes (E-codes). Objective To examine the reliability and validity of emergency department (ED) coders in applying E-codes in ICD-9 and -10. Methods Bicycle and pedestrian injuries were identified from the ED information system from one period before and two periods after transition from ICD-9 to -10 coding. Overall, 180 randomly selected bicycle and pedestrian injury charts were reviewed as the reference standard (RS). Original E-codes assigned by ED coders (ICD-9 in 2001 and ICD-10 in 2004 and 2007) were compared with charts (validity) and also to ICD-9 and -10 codes assigned from RS chart review, to each case by an independent (IND) coder (reliability). Sensitivity, specificity, simple, and chance-corrected agreements (κ statistics) were calculated. Results Sensitivity of E-coding bicycle injuries by the IND coder in comparison with the RS ranged from 95.1% (95% CI 86.3 to 99.0) to 100% (95% CI 94.0 to 100.0) for both ICD-9 and -10. Sensitivity of ED coders in E-coding bicycle injuries ranged from 90.2% (95% CI 79.8 to 96.3) to 96.7% (95% CI 88.5 to 99.6). The sensitivity estimates for the IND coder ranged from 25.0% (95% CI 14.7 to 37.9) to 45.0% (95% CI 32.1 to 58.4) for pedestrian injuries for both ICD-9 and -10. Conclusion Bicycle injuries are coded in a reliable and valid manner; however, pedestrian injuries are often miscoded as falls. These results have important implications for injury surveillance research. PMID:21705466

  6. A Linear Regression and Markov Chain Model for the Arabian Horse Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    as a tax deduction? Yes No T-4367 68 26. Regardless of previous equine tax deductions, do you consider your current horse activities to be... (Mark one...E L T-4367 A Linear Regression and Markov Chain Model For the Arabian Horse Registry Accesion For NTIS CRA&I UT 7 4:iC=D 5 D-IC JA" LI J:13tjlC,3 lO...the Arabian Horse Registry, which needed to forecast its future registration of purebred Arabian horses . A linear regression model was utilized to

  7. Implementation and impact of ICD-10 (Part II).

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Deen, H Gordon; Dokken, Judith A; Pirris, Stephen M; Pichelmann, Mark A; Nottmeier, Eric W; Reimer, Ronald; Wharen, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    The transition from the International Classification of Disease-9(th) clinical modification to the new ICD-10 was all set to occur on 1 October 2015. The American Medical Association has previously been successful in delaying the transition by over 10 years and has been able to further postpone its introduction to 2015. The new system will overcome many of the limitations present in the older version, thus paving the way to more accurate capture of clinical information. The benefits of the new ICD-10 system include improved quality of care, potential cost savings, reduction of unpaid claims, and improved tracking of healthcare data. The areas where challenges will be evident include planning and implementation, the cost to transition, a shortage of qualified coders, training and education of the healthcare workforce, and a loss of productivity when this occurs. The impacts include substantial costs to the healthcare system, but the projected long-term savings and benefits will be significant. Improved fraud detection, accurate data entry, ability to analyze cost benefits with procedures, and enhanced quality outcome measures are the most significant beneficial factors with this change. The present Current Procedural Terminology and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System code sets will be used for reporting ambulatory procedures in the same manner as they have been. ICD-10-PCS will replace ICD-9 procedure codes for inpatient hospital services. The ICD-10-CM will replace the clinical code sets. Our article will focus on the challenges to execution of an ICD change and strategies to minimize risk while transitioning to the new system. With the implementation deadline gradually approaching, spine surgery practices that include multidisciplinary health specialists have to anticipate and prepare for the ICD change in order to mitigate risk. Education and communication is the key to this process in spine practices.

  8. Health Information in Italian (Italiano)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Italian (Italiano) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/italian.html Health Information in Italian (Italiano) To use ...

  9. A frame-based representation of ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Fabry, Paul; Baud, Robert; Ruch, Patrick; Le Beux, Pierre; Lovis, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Physicians are required to code information concerning a patient's stay in order to measure the medical activity in hospitals. They use the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Coding is usually performed manually and computerized tools may be useful in speeding up and facilitating the tedious task of coding patient information. The aim of this work is to build a surface semantic model of ICD-10 in order to ameliorate a coding help system. This work was focused on chapter XI of the ICD-10, Diseases of the Digestive System. Each term from both analytical and alphabetical indexes about this chapter were submitted to a morphological analysis in order to extract the medical concepts within. After a statistical analysis of these concepts and the way they connect themselves, a semantic model based on a "semantic frame" approach was built. Although this model could represent a reasonable amount of medical knowledge within chapter XI of the ICD-10 in a quite satisfactory way, it shows lack of efficiency for some other chapters. Difficulties have to be overcome when modelling a classification meant for manual utilisation, and a lot of work still has to be done to obtain an effective coding help system using the ICD-10.

  10. [Remarks on the guideline recommendations for cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac Death in patients with severe ventricular dysfunction. Consensus Document of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO)/Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC)/Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC)].

    PubMed

    Berisso, Massimo Zoni; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Curnis, Antonio; Calvi, Valeria; Catanzariti, Domenico; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Inama, Giuseppe; Landolina, Maurizio E; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Mantovan, Roberto; Mascioli, Giosuè; Occhetta, Eraldo; Padeletti, Luigi; Salerno-Uriarte, Jorge A; Santini, Massimo; Sassone, Biagio; Senni, Michele; Zecchin, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    The indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy for the prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction have rapidly expanded over the last 10 years on the basis of the very satisfying results of the numerous randomized clinical trials that have provided the framework for guidelines. However, the analysis of clinical practice in the real world has highlighted some important criticisms in the complex process of selection-management of those patients candidates for ICD therapy: 1) approximately one fourth of all ICD implantations is not justified by clinical evidence, 2) approximately one half of patients with an indication for ICD therapy do not undergo implantation, 3) the benefits from ICD therapy do not apply uniformly to all patients, 4) the relationship between the lifesaving benefit and the potential for harm of ICD therapy is still scarcely known. The main reason for this clinical scenario can be ascribed to the guideline recommendations that are based only on few standard cut-off criteria and therefore too generic and insufficiently detailed. This does not help cardiologists in their decision-making process, and results in fear, uncertainty, and sometimes emotional choices. The aim of this consensus document is to discuss current guideline recommendations and to provide the Italian cardiologists with the most updated information to optimize the selection of patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who should receive ICD therapy.

  11. Assessing Validity of ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 Administrative Data in Recording Clinical Conditions in a Unique Dually Coded Database

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hude; Li, Bing; Duncan Saunders, L; Parsons, Gerry A; Nilsson, Carolyn I; Alibhai, Arif; Ghali, William A

    2008-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to assess the validity of the International Classification of Disease, 10th Version (ICD-10) administrative hospital discharge data and to determine whether there were improvements in the validity of coding for clinical conditions compared with ICD-9 Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) data. Methods We reviewed 4,008 randomly selected charts for patients admitted from January 1 to June 30, 2003 at four teaching hospitals in Alberta, Canada to determine the presence or absence of 32 clinical conditions and to assess the agreement between ICD-10 data and chart data. We then recoded the same charts using ICD-9-CM and determined the agreement between the ICD-9-CM data and chart data for recording those same conditions. The accuracy of ICD-10 data relative to chart data was compared with the accuracy of ICD-9-CM data relative to chart data. Results Sensitivity values ranged from 9.3 to 83.1 percent for ICD-9-CM and from 12.7 to 80.8 percent for ICD-10 data. Positive predictive values ranged from 23.1 to 100 percent for ICD-9-CM and from 32.0 to 100 percent for ICD-10 data. Specificity and negative predictive values were consistently high for both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 databases. Of the 32 conditions assessed, ICD-10 data had significantly higher sensitivity for one condition and lower sensitivity for seven conditions relative to ICD-9-CM data. The two databases had similar sensitivity values for the remaining 24 conditions. Conclusions The validity of ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 administrative data in recording clinical conditions was generally similar though validity differed between coding versions for some conditions. The implementation of ICD-10 coding has not significantly improved the quality of administrative data relative to ICD-9-CM. Future assessments like this one are needed because the validity of ICD-10 data may get better as coders gain experience with the new coding system. PMID:18756617

  12. Italienischunterricht (Italian Instruction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moine, Virgile; And Others

    1965-01-01

    This issue of "Schulpraxis," a Swiss journal for language teaching, is devoted to Italian instruction in Switzerland. It includes: (1) an interpretation of the poem "Le morte chitarre" by Salvatore Quasimodo, conducted in a girls' school in German Switzerland, (2) a presentation of principles for an Italian textbook to be based…

  13. Italian 102 Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzarino, Graziana

    This workbook was prepared as a supplement to "Basic Italian" by C. Speroni and C. L. Golino, lessons 20-35. It reflects a typical second-semester program at the University of Colorado. Although each lesson deals with the specific grammar, vocabulary and subject matter used in the respective lessons of "Basic Italian," the workbook can be used…

  14. Teaching Contemporary Italian Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivelli, Remo J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a workshop offered at the Middlebury College Italian School on contemporary Italy. The morning sessions consisted of a discussion by a native Italian scholar of contemporary Italy and of related readings and the afternoon sessions consisted of readings and discussions and hands-on activities in lesson preparation. (SED)

  15. Italian in Colonial America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Antonio

    1976-01-01

    A brief historical review shows the cultural influence of Italy on England, a cultural climate the colonists brought to America. The attitude of J. Adams, J. Madison, T. Jefferson and B. Franklin towards the Italian language are reported. In particular, Franklin's considerable appreciation for the Italian culture is pointed out. (MS)

  16. Hospice Use Following Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Older Patients: Results From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Daniel B; Reynolds, Matthew R; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Parzynski, Craig S; Spertus, John A; Mor, Vincent; Mitchell, Susan L

    2016-05-24

    Older recipients of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are at increased risk for short-term mortality in comparison with younger patients. Although hospice use is common among decedents aged >65, its use among older ICD recipients is unknown. Medicare patients aged >65 matched to data in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry - ICD Registry from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010 were eligible for analysis (N=194 969). The proportion of ICD recipients enrolled in hospice, cumulative incidence of hospice admission, and factors associated with time to hospice enrollment were evaluated. Five years after device implantation, 50.9% of patients were either deceased or in hospice. Among decedents, 36.8% received hospice services. The cumulative incidence of hospice enrollment, accounting for the competing risk of death, was 4.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%-4.8%) within 1 year and 21.3% (95% CI, 20.7%-21.8%) at 5 years. Factors most strongly associated with shorter time to hospice enrollment were older age (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.73-1.81), class IV heart failure (versus class I; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.66-1.94); ejection fraction <20 (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48-1.67), and greater hospice use among decedents in the patients' health referral region. More than one-third of older patients dying with ICDs receive hospice care. Five years after implantation, half of older ICD recipients are either dead or in hospice. Hospice providers should be prepared for ICD patients, whose clinical trajectories and broader palliative care needs require greater focus. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. The current state of ICD-10 & preparing for it.

    PubMed

    Barbe, David O; Savickis, Mari; Spector, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The AMA continues to harbor serious concerns and reservations with the significant burden of the ICD-10 mandate and continues to convey these points to policymakers in Washington. The AMA is well aware of the concerns of physicians related to the growing number of burdens being placed on their practices, of which ICD-10 is a large one, and continues to advocate for overall regulatory relief. While the AMA has been working for many years to hold back the implementation of ICD-10, at this time, it does remain a regulatory mandate. Because of this, it is important that physicians prepare for its implementation in order to avoid the rejection of claims and cash flow interruptions.

  18. Body-focused repetitive behavior disorders in ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Stein, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the question of how body-focused repetitive behavior disorders (e.g., trichotillomania and skin-picking disorder) should be characterized in ICD-11. The article reviews the historical nosology of the two disorders and the current approaches in DSM-5 and ICD-10. Although data are limited and mixed regarding the optimal relationship between body-focused repetitive behavior disorders and nosological categories, these conditions should be included within the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category, as this is how most clinicians see these behaviors, and as this may optimize clinical utility. The descriptions of these disorders should largely mirror those in DSM-5, given the evidence from recent field surveys. The recommendations regarding ICD-11 and body-focused repetitive behavior disorders should promote the global identification and treatment of these conditions in primary care settings.

  19. ICD Therapy for Primary Prevention in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common and heterogeneous disorder that increases an individual’s risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This review article discusses the relevant factors that are involved in the challenge of preventing SCD in patients with HCM. The epidemiology of SCD in patients is reviewed as well as the structural and genetic basis behind ventricular arrhythmias in HCM. The primary prevention of SCD with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is the cornerstone of modern treatment for individuals at high risk of SCD. The focus here is on the current and emerging predictors of SCD as well as risk stratification recommendations from both North American and European guidelines. Issues related to ICD implantation, such as programming, complications and inappropriate therapies, are discussed. The emerging role of the fully subcutaneous ICD and the data regarding its implantation are reviewed. PMID:28116084

  20. Effects of scatter radiation on ICD and CRT function.

    PubMed

    Kapa, Suraj; Fong, Luis; Blackwell, Charles R; Herman, Michael G; Schomberg, Paula J; Hayes, David L

    2008-06-01

    Effects of direct radiation on implantable cardiac devices have been well studied. However, the effects of scatter radiation are not as clear. Recommendations on management of patients with implantable cardiac devices undergoing radiotherapy are based on limited studies mostly involving pacemakers. We sought to elucidate the effects of scatter radiation on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-ICDs. We exposed 12 ICDs and eight CRT-ICDs to 400 cGy of scatter radiation from a 6-MV photon beam. Devices were programmed with nominal parameters and interrogated prior to radiation, after each fraction, upon completion of the radiation course and again 1 week later. A retrospective review of patients undergoing radiotherapy at the Mayo Clinic-Rochester between 2002 and 2007 in whom the device was outside the radiation field was also performed. There were 13 patients with devices undergoing radiotherapy during this time period, 12 of whom were interrogated prior to and after radiation. Interrogation reports were reviewed for device reset or parameter changes. There was no evidence of reset or malfunction during or after radiation. Also, no episodes of device reset, inappropriate sensing or therapy, or changes in programmed parameters were found in our review of patients undergoing radiotherapy. Device reset or malfunction associated with scatter radiation likely represents an unpredictable, rare occurrence. While we see no clear contraindication to radiotherapy in patients with ICDs or CRT-ICDs, precautions should be taken to avoid direct radiation exposure and to closely evaluate patient outcomes before and after the radiation course.

  1. Getting Ready for ICD-10 and Meaningful Use Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Bert, Jack M; Beach, William R; McIntyre, Louis F; Sachdev, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    For the past 24 years, most developed countries have used the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) to report physician services. In the United States, physicians have continued to use the American Medical Association Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition and the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System. The ICD-10-Clinical Modification (CM) has approximately 4.9 times more codes than the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. ICD-10-CM allows for more specific descriptors of a procedure and is broken down by category, etiology, anatomic site, severity, and extension. ICD-10-CM is scheduled to be implemented by Medicare and commercial payers on October 1, 2015. In addition to ICD-10 implementation, physicians have to meet the requirements of the Meaningful Use Electronic Health Record Incentive Program. The Meaningful Use program is designed to promote the use of certified electronic health technology by providing eligible professionals with incentive payments if they meet the defined core and menu objectives of each stage of the program. All core measures must be met; however, providers can choose to meet a preset number of menu measures. Meaningful Use Stage 1 required eligible professionals to meet core and menu objectives that focused on data capture and sharing. Meaningful Use Stage 2 requires eligible professionals to meet core and menu objects that focus on advanced clinical processes for a full year in 2015. Stage 3 has been delayed until 2017, and core and menu measures that will focus on improving outcomes have not yet been defined. It is important for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the history of and techniques for the use of ICD-10-CM in clinical practice. Orthopaedic surgeons also should understand the requirements for Meaningful Use Stages 1 and 2, including the core objectives that must be met to achieve satisfactory attestation.

  2. Patient satisfaction and suggestions for improvement of remote ICD monitoring.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Larsen, Mie Christa Jensen; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Kensing, Finn; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2012-09-01

    The study aim was to evaluate patient acceptance and content with remote follow-up (FU) of their implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and to estimate patients' wish for changes in remote follow-up routines. Four hundred seventy-four ICD patients at the device follow-up clinic at Rigshospitalet using CareLink® (Medtronic) remote follow-up, who had made ≥2 transmissions, received a questionnaire. Three hundred eighty-five patients (81.2%) answered. Mean time with ICD was 56 ± 45 months and mean age was 62 ± 13 years; 80% was male. Diagnosis related to ICD implant was: ischemic heart disease in 56% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 21%. Twenty-six percent had primary prophylactic indication. Mean time on remote FU was 16.4 ± 6.9 months. Mean time spent on in-clinic FU (two-way transport and FU) was 4 h and 36 min ± 7 h and 50 min, excluding 12 patients from Greenland and Faroe Islands. Ninety-five percent of the patients was very content or content with remote FU compared to in-clinic FU; 3% was less content and 2% was not content. For scheduled transmissions, 21% of the patients wished for a faster reply (sms or e-mail) compared to current practice with a letter. Eighty-four percent preferred more detailed information concerning ICD leads, battery status, and ICD therapies. A total of 96 patients (25%) had performed extra unscheduled remote transmissions: 20 due to shock, 20 due to alarm, 35 due to palpitations, and 18 for other or combined reasons. Ninety-five percent of the patients were content with the remote FU. Only 25% had unscheduled transmissions and most unscheduled transmissions were for appropriate reasons. Eighty-four percent of the patients wished for a more detailed response and 21% wished for a faster reply after routine transmissions.

  3. Spanish implantable cardioverter-defibrillator registry. 5th official report of the spanish society of cardiology working group on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (2008).

    PubMed

    Peinado, Rafael; Torrecilla, Esteban G; Ormaetxe, José; Alvarez, Miguel; Cózar, Rocío; Alzueta, Javier

    2009-12-01

    To summarize the findings of the Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry for 2008 compiled by the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators. Prospective data recorded voluntarily on single-page questionnaires were sent to the Spanish Society of Cardiology by each implantation team. Overall, 3486 device implantations were reported, which is 84.7% of the estimated total number of implantations. The reported implantation rate was 76 per million population and the estimated total implantation rate was 90 per million. The proportion of first implantations was 78.1%. There continued to be substantial regional variations within Spain. The majority of ICD implantations took place in men (mean age 62+/-12 years) who had severe or moderate-to-severe ventricular dysfunction and were in New York Heart Association functional class II. Ischemic heart disease was the most frequent underlying cardiac condition, followed by dilated cardiomyopathy. The number of indications for primary prevention increased relative to the previous year, especially in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, and now account for 57% of first implantations. The types of ICD implanted were unchanged from 2007. Overall, 73.6% of ICDs were implanted by cardiac electrophysiologists. The 2008 Spanish ICD Registry includes data on almost 85% of all ICD implantations performed in Spain. Although the number has continued to increase, it still remains far from the European average. There was a significant increase in indications for primary prevention. Substantial regional variations continue to exist within Spain.

  4. [Stored electrograms in pacemakers and ICDs from St. Jude Medical].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2010-03-01

    Stored electrograms (EGMs) significantly improve pacemaker and ICD therapy. In pacemaker systems, the main focus of stored EGMs concerns the manual control of device detection of atrial tachyarrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation. In ICD therapy, stored EGMs allow the discrimination of adequate and inadequate detection of ventricular tachycardia. This review presents the implementation of stored EGMs in systems from St. Jude Medical and explains the mode of EGM storage and marker annotations, which are useful for interpretation of stored EGMs and to understand the way the device interprets the EGM. Clinical examples illustrate appropriate and inappropriate device classifications.

  5. Outer insulation failure in a multilumen ICD lead.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxing; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Geng

    2013-08-01

    Insulation defects in the leads are a common complication in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Although the new multilumen leads have significantly reduced the incidence of insulation defects, they have introduced the new and rare problem of outer-insulation abrasions. In this report, we present the case of a 53-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy who was found to have an outer-insulation abrasion on fluoroscopy 3 years after the implantation of an ICD. Several electrical storms experienced by the patient were considered to be responsible for the abrasions; results of routine evaluations were normal. A CRT-D device was finally implanted.

  6. Predictors of a high defibrillation threshold test during routine ICD implantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Atia, B; Vandenberk, B; Vörös, G; Garweg, C; Ector, J; Willems, R

    2017-09-08

    There is growing evidence that routine defibrillation threshold (DFT) testing during implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is not necessary. However a small group of patients might be at risk if no DFT testing is performed. Patients with a new pectoral ICD implantation in our hospital between 2006 and 2014 were included in a retrospective registry. A clinical high DFT was defined as a safety margin <10 J of the maximal device output. Logistic regression for prediction of high DFT was performed using patient characteristics, clinical, echocardiographic and device-related parameters. DFT testing was performed in 788/864 (91.2%) procedures. In 76 (8.8%) patients no DFT testing was performed mainly due to atrial fibrillation, intra-cardiac thrombus, hemodynamic instability or logistical reasons. A high DFT was present in 44 (5.6%) patients. A QRS duration ≥150 ms, a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤25%), a severely dilated left ventricle ≥60 mm and right sided pre-pectoral implantations were univariate predictors of a high DFT. Independent predictors of a high DFT were a LVEF ≤25% (HR 2.195, 95%CI 1.085-4.443) and right sided pre-pectoral implantations (HR 3.135, 95% CI 1.186-8.287). A high DFT is still present in about 5% of patients and is more frequent in patients with a severely dilated left ventricle, a very low LVEF, right sided pre-pectoral implantation and wider QRS duration. It might be clinically important to continue DFT testing in these high risk patients.

  7. "The Italianate Englishman": The Italian Influence in Elizabethan Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Whether it was thought of positively or negatively, Italy is a popular topic of discussion in Elizabethan literature. Some Elizabethan writers mimic Italian writers and incorporate Italian ideas into their own works, while other writers alter Italian literary conventions and openly attack Italian morals. This range of positive and negative…

  8. An initial psychometric assessment of an ICD-11 based measure of PTSD and complex PTSD (ICD-TQ): Evidence of construct validity.

    PubMed

    Karatzias, Thanos; Shevlin, Mark; Fyvie, Claire; Hyland, Philip; Efthymiadou, Erifili; Wilson, Danielle; Roberts, Neil; Bisson, Jonathan I; Brewin, Chris R; Cloitre, Marylene

    2016-12-01

    Among the conditions following exposure to traumatic life events proposed by ICD-11 are Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD). The primary aim of this study was to provide an assessment of the reliability and validity of a newly developed self-report measure of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD: the ICD-11 Trauma Questionnaire (ICD-TQ). Participants in this study were a sample of individuals who were referred for psychological therapy to a National Health Service (NHS) trauma centre in Scotland (N=193). Participants completed the ICD-TQ and measures of traumatic life events, DSM-5 PTSD, emotion dysregulation, self-esteem, and interpersonal difficulties. Confirmatory factor analysis results supported the factorial validity of the ICD-TQ with results in line with ICD-11 proposals. The ICD-TQ demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability, and correlation results indicated that the scale exhibited convergent and discriminant validity. Current results provide initial support for the psychometric properties of this initial version of the ICD-TQ. Future theoretical and empirical work will be required to generate a final version of the ICD-TQ that will match the diagnostic structure of PTSD and CPTSD when ICD-11 is published. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Remote monitoring improves outcome after ICD implantation: the clinical efficacy in the management of heart failure (EFFECT) study.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Antonio; Leoni, Loira; Luzi, Mario; Amellone, Claudia; Stabile, Giuseppe; La Rocca, Vincenzo; Capucci, Alessandro; D'onofrio, Antonio; Ammendola, Ernesto; Accardi, Francesco; Valsecchi, Sergio; Buja, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    Internet-based remote interrogation systems have been shown to reduce emergency department and in-office visits in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), resulting in increased efficiency for healthcare providers. Nonetheless, studies sized to demonstrate the impact of remote monitoring on patients' outcome have been lacking. The EFFECT study was a multicentre clinical trial aimed at measuring and comparing the outcome of ICD patients conventionally followed-up by means of in-clinic visits (Standard arm) or by remote monitoring (Remote arm) in the clinical practice of 25 Italian centres. From 2011 to 2013, 987 consecutive patients were enrolled and followed up for at least 12 months. The primary endpoint was the rate of death and cardiovascular hospitalizations. Remote monitoring was adopted by 499 patients. Patients in the Standard and Remote arms did not differ significantly in terms of baseline clinical characteristics, except for a more frequent use of ICD with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D) in the Remote arm (48 vs. 36%, P < 0.001). One-year rates of the primary combined endpoint were 0.27 events/year for patients in the Standard arm and were 0.15 events/year for those in the Remote arm (incident rate ratio, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.73; P < 0.001). The endpoint rates in the Standard and Remote arms were 0.27 and 0.08 events/year, respectively, among CRT-D recipients (P < 0.001), and 0.28 vs. 0.21 among ICD patients (P = 0.094). The rates of in-office visits were 1.9 per year in the Standard arm and 1.7 per year in the Remote arm. Compared with the standard follow-up through in-office visits, remote monitoring is associated with reduced death and cardiovascular hospitalizations in patients with ICD in clinical practice. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ Identifier: NCT01723865. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The effect of ICD programming on inappropriate and appropriate ICD Therapies in ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy: the MADIT-RIT trial.

    PubMed

    Sedláček, Kamil; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina; McNitt, Scott; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Klein, Helmut; Stockburger, Martin; Wichterle, Dan; Merkely, Bela; DE LA Concha, Joaquin Fernandez; Swissa, Moshe; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J; Kautzner, Josef; Ruwald, Martin H

    2015-04-01

    The MADIT-RIT trial demonstrated reduction of inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapies and mortality by high-rate cut-off and 60-second-delayed VT therapy ICD programming in patients with a primary prophylactic ICD indication. The aim of this analysis was to study effects of MADIT-RIT ICD programming in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. First and total occurrences of both inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapies were analyzed by multivariate Cox models in 791 (53%) patients with ischemic and 707 (47%) patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy had similar incidence of first inappropriate (9% and 11%, P = 0.21) and first appropriate ICD therapy (11.6% and 14.1%, P = 0.15). Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy had higher mortality rate (6.1% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.01). MADIT-RIT high-rate cut-off (arm B) and delayed VT therapy ICD programming (arm C) compared with conventional (arm A) ICD programming were associated with a significant risk reduction of first inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapy in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy (HR range 0.11-0.34, P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Occurrence of total inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapies was significantly reduced by high-rate cut-off ICD programming and delayed VT therapy ICD programming in both ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy patients. High-rate cut-off and delayed VT therapy ICD programming are associated with significant reduction in first and total inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapy in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Case study: developing product lines using ICD-9-CM codes.

    PubMed

    Benz, P D; Burnham, J

    1985-12-01

    In this marketing case study, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital used a product line approach to maximize the use of its resources. The method used, based on ICD-9-CM codes, fulfilled the demands of increased efficiency by encouraging customer-oriented thinking, enhancing communication with physicians and patients, and helping the institution to compete more effectively.

  12. ICDE Librarians' Roundtable (Hong Kong, October 11-12, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai-man, Wong; Schafer, Steve; Watson, Elizabeth F.; Tai-loon, Fong

    The International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) Librarians' Roundtable is the first of its kind for librarians of international distance and open education institutions to exchange their views on how to cope with the development of their institutions in the use of new technology, and in the provision of library services to…

  13. Psychotic disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Falko; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 2013, and the Work Group on the Classification of Psychotic disorders (WGPD), installed by the World Health Organization (WHO), is expected to publish the new chapter about schizophrenia and other primary psychotic disorders in 2017. We reviewed the available literature to summarize the major changes, innovations, and developments of both manuals. If available and possible, we outline the theoretical background behind these changes. Due to the fact that the development of ICD-11 has not yet been completed, the details about ICD-11 are still proposals under ongoing revision. In this ongoing process, they may be revised and therefore have to be seen as proposals. DSM-5 has eliminated schizophrenia subtypes and replaced them with a dimensional approach based on symptom assessments. ICD-11 will most likely go in a similar direction, as both manuals are planned to be more harmonized, although some differences will remain in details and the conceptual orientation. Next to these modifications, ICD-11 will provide a transsectional diagnostic criterion for schizoaffective disorders and a reorganization of acute and transient psychotic and delusional disorders. In this manuscript, we will compare the 2 classification systems.

  14. Clashing Diagnostic Approaches: DSM-ICD versus RDoC

    PubMed Central

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Treadway, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Since at least the middle of the past century, one overarching model of psychiatric classification, namely, that of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases (DSM-ICD), has reigned supreme. This DSM-ICD approach embraces an Aristotelian view of mental disorders as largely discrete entities that are characterized by distinctive signs, symptoms, and natural histories. Over the past several years, however, a competing vision, namely, the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative launched by the National Institute of Mental Health, has emerged in response to accumulating anomalies within the DSM-ICD system. In contrast to DSM-ICD, RDoC embraces a Galilean view of psychopathology as the product of dysfunctions in neural circuitry. RDoC appears to be a valuable endeavor that holds out the long-term promise of an alternative system of mental illness classification. We delineate three sets of pressing challenges – conceptual, methodological, and logistical/pragmatic – that must be addressed for RDoC to realize its scientific potential, and conclude with a call for further research, including investigation of a rapprochement between Aristotelian and Galilean approaches to psychiatric classification. PMID:26845519

  15. Validating ICD coding algorithms for diabetes mellitus from administrative data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanmin; Khan, Nadia; Walker, Robin; Quan, Hude

    2010-08-01

    To assess validity of diabetes International Classification of Disease (ICD) 9 and 10 coding algorithms from administrative data using physicians' charts as the 'gold standard' across time periods and geographic regions. From 48 urban and 16 rural general practitioners' clinics in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada, we randomly selected 50patient charts/clinic for those who visited the clinic in either 2001 or 2004. Reviewed chart data were linked with inpatient discharge abstract and physician claims administrative data. We identified patients with diabetes in the administrative databases using ICD-9 code 250.xx and ICD-10 codes E10.x-E14.x. The prevalence of diabetes was 8.1% among clinic charts. The coding algorithm of "2 physician claims within 2 years or 1 hospitalization with the relevant diabetes ICD codes" had higher validity than other 7 algorithms assessed (sensitivity 92.3%, specificity 96.9%, positive predictive value 77.2%, and negative predictive value 99.3%). After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbid conditions, sensitivity and positive predictive values were not significantly different between time periods and regions. Diabetes could be accurately identified in administrative data using the following case definition "2 physician claims within 2 years or 1 hospital discharge abstract record with diagnosis codes 250.xx or E10.x-E14.x". Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Questionable Indication For ICD Extraction After Successful VT Ablation.

    PubMed

    Segreti Md, Luca; Di Cori Md, Andrea; Zucchelli Md PhD, Giulio; Soldati Md, Ezio; Coluccia Md, Giovanni; Viani Md, Stefano; Paperini Md, Luca; Grazia Bongiorni Md Fesc, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias represent a kind of complication shared by a number of clinical presentations of heart disease, sometimes leading to sudden cardiac death. Many efforts have been made in the fight against such a complication, mainly being represented by the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). In recent years, catheter ablation has grown as a means to effectively treat patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias, in the contest of different cardiac substrates. Since carrying an ICD is associated with a potential risk deriving from its possible infective or malfunctioning complications, and given the current effectiveness of lead extraction procedures, it has been thought not to be unreasonable to ask ourselves about how to deal with ICD patients who have been successfully treated by means of ablation of their ventricular arrhythmias. To date, no control data have been published on transvenous lead extraction in the setting of VT ablation. In this paper we will review the current evidence about ICD therapy, catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias and lead extraction, trying to outline some considerations about how to face this new clinical issue.

  17. ICD monitoring zones: intricacies, pitfalls, and programming tips.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fadi; Khairy, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) are widely regarded as the treatment of choice for primary and secondary prevention against sudden cardiac death across a broad spectrum of underlying pathologies. Over the past 20 years, ICDs have evolved into complex multifunctional units capable of recording, chronicling, self-testing, and delivering interventional therapies. Technological advances permitted the creation of ICD monitoring zones that are now considered valuable in diagnosing slower, presumably more stable ventricular arrhythmias. They may be helpful especially in patients with unexplained symptoms such as palpitations and/or syncope, particularly in the setting of antiarrhythmic pharmacological therapy that may slow ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Caregivers largely view ICD monitoring zones as passive features that do not interfere or interact with appropriate functioning of active treatment zones. As will be discussed in this clinical review, this is not always the case. Herein, we unravel the intricacies regarding monitoring zone functions and algorithms, highlight potential pitfalls, and offer practical programming tips relevant to each device manufacturer.

  18. Validation of ICDPIC software injury severity scores using a large regional trauma registry.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel H; Kernic, Mary A; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-10-01

    Administrative or quality improvement registries may or may not contain the elements needed for investigations by trauma researchers. International Classification of Diseases Program for Injury Categorisation (ICDPIC), a statistical program available through Stata, is a powerful tool that can extract injury severity scores from ICD-9-CM codes. We conducted a validation study for use of the ICDPIC in trauma research. We conducted a retrospective cohort validation study of 40,418 patients with injury using a large regional trauma registry. ICDPIC-generated AIS scores for each body region were compared with trauma registry AIS scores (gold standard) in adult and paediatric populations. A separate analysis was conducted among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) comparing the ICDPIC tool with ICD-9-CM embedded severity codes. Performance in characterising overall injury severity, by the ISS, was also assessed. The ICDPIC tool generated substantial correlations in thoracic and abdominal trauma (weighted κ 0.87-0.92), and in head and neck trauma (weighted κ 0.76-0.83). The ICDPIC tool captured TBI severity better than ICD-9-CM code embedded severity and offered the advantage of generating a severity value for every patient (rather than having missing data). Its ability to produce an accurate severity score was consistent within each body region as well as overall. The ICDPIC tool performs well in classifying injury severity and is superior to ICD-9-CM embedded severity for TBI. Use of ICDPIC demonstrates substantial efficiency and may be a preferred tool in determining injury severity for large trauma datasets, provided researchers understand its limitations and take caution when examining smaller trauma datasets. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Pregnancy registries in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Beghi, E; Annegers, J F

    2001-11-01

    The risk of major malformations in the offspring of mothers with epilepsy receiving antiepileptic drugs is 4--8% compared to 2--4% in the general population. Risk factors include daily dose and polytherapy. Selected drugs have been found to be associated with a higher risk of specific malformations (congenital heart defects and cleft palate with phenytoin and barbiturates; neural tube defects with valproate and carbamazepine). Although some of these findings are unquestionable, several questions are still unsolved, depending the characteristics of the target populations, the small samples of patients, and the design and limiting factors of the published reports. In the last decade, pregnancy registries have been activated by collaborative groups of physicians in Europe (EURAP), North America (NAREP), Australia and India (the latter two recently merged into EURAP), to enroll a large number of exposed women to be monitored prospectively with standardized methods, and by three pharmaceutical companies marketing lamotrigine, gabapentin and vigabatrin, as part of their post-marketing surveillance. Even though the structure of these registries and the target populations should theoretically result in the identification of a sufficient number of women exposed to different drugs and examined for the occurrence of malformations of any type and severity, the implementation of a common database with information from the existing registries may provide valuable information in a shorter time period. Although differences between some of the registries limit the possibility to pool data, a gradual development of a collaboration is highly desirable to discuss a list of design issues and assess to what extent and how data could be compared and organized.

  20. Registries supporting new drug applications.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Carla J; van den Berg, H Marijke; Kwa, Marcel S G; Hoes, Arno W; Mol, Peter G M

    2017-10-06

    Knowledge of the benefits and risks of new drugs is incomplete at the time of marketing approval. Registries offer the possibility for additional, post-approval, data collection. For all new drugs, which were approved in the European Union between 2007 and 2010, we reviewed the frequency, the type, and the reason for requiring a registry. The European Public Assessment Reports, published on the website of the European Medicine Agency, were reviewed for drugs approved by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use. We searched for key characteristics of these drugs, including therapeutic area (ATC1 level), level of innovation (the score is an algorithm based on availability of treatment and therapeutic effect), and procedural characteristics. In addition, we identified if these registries were defined by disease (disease registry) or exposure to a single drug (drug registry). Out of 116 new drugs approved in the predefined period, for 43 (37%), 1 to 6 registry studies were identified, with a total of 73 registries. Of these 46 were disease registries and 27 (single) drug registries. For 9 drugs, the registry was a specific obligation imposed by the regulators. The level of innovation and the orphan status of the drugs were determinants positively predicting post-approval registries (OR 10.3 [95% CI 1.0-103.9] and OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.0-7.5], respectively). The majority of registries required by regulators are existing disease registries. Registries are an important and frequently used tool for post-approval data collection for orphan and innovative drugs. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Brazilian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Junqueira, Daniela R; Cisneros, Lígia C; Ferreira, Lucas C; Murphy, Kate; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hopper, John L; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-12-01

    The Brazilian Twin Registry (BTR) was established in 2013 and has impelled twin research in South America. The main aim of the initiative was to create a resource that would be accessible to the Brazilian scientific community as well as international researchers interested in the investigation of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of common diseases, phenotypes, and human behavior traits. The BTR is a joint effort between academic and governmental institutions from Brazil and Australia. The collaboration includes the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil, the University of Sydney and University of Melbourne in Australia, the Australian Twin Registry, as well as the research foundations CNPq and CAPES in Brazil. The BTR is a member of the International Network of Twin Registries. Recruitment strategies used to register twins have been through participation in a longitudinal study investigating genetic and environmental factors for low back pain occurrence, and from a variety of sources including media campaigns and social networking. Currently, 291 twins are registered in the BTR, with data on demographics, zygosity, anthropometrics, and health history having been collected from 151 twins using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Future BTR plans include the registration of thousands of Brazilian twins identified from different sources and collaborate nationally and internationally with other research groups interested on twin studies.

  2. The Swiss Orthopaedic Registry.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; El-Kerdi, A; Frigg, A; Kolling, C; Staub, L P; Bach, B; Müller, U

    2005-01-01

    Following the tradition of the IDES European Hip Registry inaugurated by M. E. Müller in the 1960s, the Institute for Evaluative Research in Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bern started a new era of data collection using internet technology (www.memdoc.org). With support of the Swiss Orthopaedic Society, the pilot of the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was conducted, and in cooperation with different academic and non-academic centers the practicability of integrating the various data collection instruments into the daily clinical workflow was evaluated. Three different sizes of hip and knee questionnaires were compiled, covering the individual demands of the participating hospitals whereby the smaller questionnaires always represent a subset of the next larger one. Different types of data collection instruments are available: the online interface, optical mark reader paper questionnaires, and barcode sheets. Precise implant tracking is implemented by scanning the implant barcodes directly in the operating theaters and linking them to the clinical data set via a central server. In addition, radiographic information can be linked with the clinical data set. The pilot clinics suggested enhancements to the user interface and additional features for data management. Also, recommendations were made to simplify content in some instances and diversify in others. With a new software release and adapted questionnaires the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was officially launched in Summer 2005.

  3. National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology 2007 and 2008.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel Nogueira; Bonhorst, Daniel; de Sousa, João

    2009-11-01

    Clinical electrophysiology remains one of the most dynamic areas of cardiology, with continuing developments in equipping centers with more modern mapping and navigation systems. This has enabled an increase in the number and variety of interventions, resulting in significant improvements in results of therapeutic ablation of arrhythmias and prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this phase of transition towards implementation of a computerized national registry with nationwide data transmitted via the internet, publication of the registry in its previous form, although requiring more work, still seems justified, in order to appraise and disseminate qualitative and quantitative developments in this activity and enable comparisons with what is being done internationally, assess the centers' training capacity and inform national and European health authorities of the activities and real needs in this sector. The authors analyze the number and type of procedures performed during 2007 and 2008 based on a survey sent to centers performing diagnostic and interventional electrophysiology (16 centers in 2007 and 2008) and/or implanting cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) (19 centers in 2007 and 21 in 2008). Compared to 2006, one more center began interventional electrophysiology in 2007 and two centers began implanting ICDs in 2008. In the years under review, 2060 electrophysiological studies were performed in 2007 and 2007 were performed in 2008, of which 74 and 79.5% respectively were followed by therapeutic ablation, making totals of 1523 and 1596 ablations (increases of 10.7 and 4.6% from previous years). Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was the main indication for ablation (28.4 and 28.7%), followed by accessory pathways (26.8 and 25.4%), atrial flutter (20.8 and 19.7%), atrial fibrillation (13.9 and 14.6%), ventricular tachycardia (4.7 and 5.1%), atrial tachycardia (2.8 and 2.6%) and atrioventricular junction ablation (2.7 and 3.9%). Regarding ICDs, a

  4. The Italian activist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Michele

    2012-02-01

    Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi has been an outspoken critic of Silvio Berlusconi's lack of support for science. He talks about how physics may fare under the new administration led by the economist Mario Monti.

  5. Greater Prevalence of Proposed ICD-11 Alcohol and Cannabis Dependence Compared to ICD-10, DSM-IV, and DSM-5 in Treated Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tammy; Cornelius, Jack; Clark, Duncan; Martin, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Proposed International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition (ICD-11), criteria for substance use disorder (SUD) radically simplify the algorithm used to diagnose substance dependence. Major differences in case identification across DSM and ICD impact determinations of treatment need and conceptualizations of substance dependence. This study compared the draft algorithm for ICD-11 SUD against DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10, for alcohol and cannabis. Adolescents (n = 339, ages 14 to 18) admitted to intensive outpatient addictions treatment completed, as part of a research study, a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM SUDs adapted for use with adolescents and which has been used to assess DSM and ICD SUD diagnoses. Analyses examined prevalence across classification systems, diagnostic concordance, and sources of diagnostic disagreement. Prevalence of any past-year proposed ICD-11 alcohol or cannabis use disorder was significantly lower compared to DSM-IV and DSM-5 (ps < 0.01). However, prevalence of proposed ICD-11 alcohol and cannabis dependence diagnoses was significantly higher compared to DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10 (ps < 0.01). ICD-11 and DSM-5 SUD diagnoses showed only moderate concordance. For both alcohol and cannabis, youth typically met criteria for an ICD-11 dependence diagnosis by reporting tolerance and much time spent using or recovering from the substance, rather than symptoms indicating impaired control over use. The proposed ICD-11 dependence algorithm appears to "overdiagnose" dependence on alcohol and cannabis relative to DSM-IV and ICD-10 dependence, and DSM-5 moderate/severe use disorder, generating potential "false-positive" cases of dependence. Among youth who met criteria for proposed ICD-11 dependence, few reported impaired control over substance use, highlighting ongoing issues in the conceptualization and diagnosis of SUD. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. Reliability and Validity of the Self Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scales

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Thompson, Elaine Adams

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (SE-ICD) and outcome expectations (OE-ICD) in survivors (n=168) of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), all of whom received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Cronbach's alpha reliability demonstrated good internal consistency (SE-ICD α = 0.93 and OE-ICD α = 0.81). Correlations with other self-efficacy instruments (general self-efficacy and social self-efficacy) were consistently high. The instruments were responsive to change across time with effect sizes of 0.46 for SE-ICD, and 0.26 for OE-ICD. These reliable, valid, and responsive instruments for measurement of self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations after an ICD can be used in research and clinical settings. PMID:17693214

  7. Preliminary studies of the ICD-11 classification of personality disorder in practice.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, Peter; Crawford, Mike; Sanatinia, Rahil; Tyrer, Helen; Cooper, Sylvia; Muller-Pollard, Chris; Christodoulou, Polyxeni; Zauter-Tutt, Maria; Miloseska-Reid, Katerina; Loebenberg, Gemma; Guo, Boliang; Yang, Min; Wang, Duolao; Weich, Scott

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to compare ICD-10 and putative ICD-11 classifications of personality disorder in different clinical populations. Prospective recording of ICD-10 and ICD-11 personality disorder classifications was carried out in (1) an anxious medical population, (2) an acute psychiatric in-patient population and (3) a retrospective recording of a mixed anxiety depression cohort in which all baseline data were scored from baseline information using the ICD-11 classification and compared with the original ICD-10 assessments. Comparison of ICD-10 and ICD-11 prevalence of personality disorder in each population was carried out. Data from 722 patients were recorded. Using the ICD-10 criteria, the prevalence of generic personality disorder was 33.8% compared with 40.4% using the ICD-11 ones (χ2  = 6.7; P < 0.01), with 103 (14.3%) discordant assessments. Using the severity definitions in ICD-11, 34.3% of patients had personality difficulty. Severity level varied greatly by population; severe personality disorder was five times more common in the inpatient group. The four domain traits originally denoted as qualifying severity in ICD-11, negative affective, dissocial, anankastic and detached, were linked to anxious, borderline, dissocial, anankastic and schizoid personality disorders in ICD-10. Many patients had pathology in two or more domains. The ICD-11 classification of personality disorder yields somewhat higher levels of personality dysfunction than ICD-10, possibly because the age range for the onset of diagnosis is now flexible. The range of severity levels make the classification more useful than ICD-10 in clinical practice as it identifies the greater pathology necessary for intervention. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. 77 FR 8877 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... Standards Staff, announces the following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... ), for questions about the registration process. Purpose: The ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance...

  9. [Data from the IN-HF Outcome registry].

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Gianfranco; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Camerini, Alberto; Cloro, Cosima; Gorini, Marco

    2012-05-01

    The IN-HF Outcome registry enrolled 1855 patients admitted for acute heart failure and 3755 outpatients with chronic heart failure seen at 64 cardiology units of the Italian Network-Heart Failure. We assessed gender-related differences in clinical characteristics, management, and short- and long-term mortality and morbidity outcomes. Women were older, more often hypertensive and with a higher prevalence of heart failure with preserved systolic function. Aggressive management was less frequent in women who underwent less often diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We found no gender-related differences in either acute or long-term mortality nor in hospital readmissions.

  10. The Danish Heart Registry

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Flensted Lassen, Jens; von Kappelgaard, Lene Mia; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Gislason, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. Study population All adult (≥15 years) patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. Main variables The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR and WDHR). For each type of procedure, up to 70 variables are registered in the DHR. Since 2010, the data quality protocol encompasses fulfillment of web-based validation rules of daily-submitted records and yearly approval of the data by the EDHR and WDHR. Descriptive data The data collection on procedure has been complete for PCI and surgery since 2000, and for CAG as of 2006. From 2000 to 2014, the number of CAG, PCI, and surgical procedures changed by 231%, 193%, and 99%, respectively. Until the end of 2014, a total of 357,476 CAG, 131,309 PCI, and 60,831 surgical procedures had been performed, corresponding to 249,445, 100,609, and 55,539 first-time patients, respectively. The DHR generally has a high level of completeness (1–missing) of each procedure (>90%) when compared to the National Patient Registry. Variables important for assessing the quality of care have a high level of completeness for surgery since 2000, and for CAG and PCI since 2010. Conclusion The DHR contains valuable data on cardiac invasive procedures, which makes it an important national monitoring and quality system and at the same time serves as a platform for research projects in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27822091

  11. Psychological adaptation to ICDs and the influence of anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jim; Edelman, Sarah

    2007-03-01

    Forty-nine patients scheduled for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation completed self-report psychological questionnaires prior to surgery and at 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery. The most common psychological problem identified was anxiety, with clinically significant cases based on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) ranging between 26% and 34%. Clinically significant depression ranged between 8% and 20%. Anxiety sensitivity was associated with high levels of anxiety, depression and stress at baseline, but not at follow-up assessments. It is possible that within this population anxiety sensitivity is associated with distress during high-threat situations, but the relationship diminishes once the threat has passed. In addition, the reassurance provided by the ICD may reduce negative perceptions of symptoms, promoting psychological adaptation.

  12. The ICD-10 system: a gift that keeps on taking.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Joshua A; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Nicola, Gregory N; Oklu, Rahmi; Schoppe, Kurt A; Silva, Ezequiel; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2015-08-01

    The Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 was signed into law on April Fool's Day. Indeed, 2014 saw unprecedented enthusiasm for the possibility of a permanent solution to the sustainable growth rate formula. Congress failed to come together on methods to pay for that fix. Instead, Congress provided another temporary patch on April 1. As part of that law, International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) adoption was pushed back by at least 1 year until, at the earliest, October 1, 2015. While many physicians support the delay in ICD-10 implementation, there are those that disagree. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Association of Single vs. Dual Chamber ICDs with Mortality, Readmissions and Complications among Patients Receiving an ICD for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Pamela N; Varosy, Paul D; Heidenreich, Paul A; Wang, Yongfei; Dewland, Thomas A; Curtis, Jeptha P; Go, Alan S; Greenlee, Robert T; Magid, David J; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2013-01-01

    Importance Randomized trials of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for primary prevention predominantly employed single chamber devices. In clinical practice, patients often receive dual chamber ICDs, even without clear indications for pacing. The outcomes of dual versus single chamber devices are uncertain. Objective Compare outcomes of single and dual chamber ICDs for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study. Admissions in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s (NCDR®) ICD Registry™ from 2006–2009 that could be linked to CMS fee for service Medicare claims data were identified. Patients were included if they received an ICD for primary prevention and did not have a documented indication for pacing. Main Outcome Measures Adjusted risks of 1-year mortality, all-cause readmission, HF readmission and device-related complications within 90 days were estimated with propensity-score matching based on patient, clinician and hospital factors. Results Among 32,034 patients, 38% (n=12,246) received a single chamber device and 62% (n=19,788) received a dual chamber device. In a propensity-matched cohort, rates of complications were lower for single chamber devices (3.5% vs. 4.7%; p<0.001; risk difference −1.20; 95% CI −1.72, −0.69), but device type was not significantly associated with mortality or hospitalization outcomes (unadjusted rate 9.9% vs. 9.8%; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.91–1.07; p=0.792 for 1-year mortality; unadjusted rate 43.9% vs. 44.8%; HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.97–1.04; p=0.821 for 1-year all-cause hospitalization; unadjusted rate 14.7% vs. 15.4%; HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.99–1.12; p=0.189 for 1-year HF hospitalization). Conclusions and Relevance Among patients receiving an ICD for primary prevention without indications for pacing, the use of a dual chamber device compared with a single chamber device was associated with a higher risk of device-related complications but not with

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of predicting somatization from patients' ICD-9 diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert C; Gardiner, Joseph C; Luo, Zhehui; Rost, Kathryn

    2009-04-01

    To hypothesize in a new and different population that administrative database (ADB) screening would identify somatizing patients by increasing numbers of visits, female gender, and greater percent of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition (ICD-9) primary diagnosis codes in musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal (GI), and ill-defined body systems. We labeled these codes as having "somatization potential." Our earlier study demonstrated that ICD-9 codes and other data from the ADB effectively identified somatization. Using a prospective observational design in a staff model health maintenance organization, we evaluated 1364 patients aged 18 to 65 years who had > or =8 visits yearly in the 2 years before study. Clinician raters applied a reliable method of medical chart review to identify patients meeting the criteria for somatization. We randomly selected 2/3 for the derivation set (n = 901) for logistic regression to evaluate the contribution of potential ADB correlates (age, gender, all encounters, primary diagnosis codes (ICD-9), revenue codes, and charges) of a diagnosis of somatization. This prediction rule was then applied to the remaining 1/3 of subjects, the validation set (n = 463). Patients averaged 47.1 years, 12.8 visits per year, and 71.6% were female; 319 had somatization. Age, visits, and somatization potential were associated with clinician-rated somatization, with a c-statistic 0.72 in the derivation set and 0.68 in the validation set. These data support our earlier findings that selected ICD-9 diagnoses in the ADB predict somatization, suggesting their potential in identifying a common, costly, and usually unrecognized problem.

  15. Functional disorders in the Neurology section of ICD-11

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Mark; Carson, Alan; Bergen, Donna; Shakir, Raad

    2014-01-01

    Functional disorders are one of the most common diagnoses in neurologic practice, but this is not reflected in current classification systems. The 11th revision of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) in 2017 offers an opportunity for these disorders to appear within both neurologic and psychiatric categories for the first time. We discuss the rationale for this proposal and highlight the potential benefits for health professionals and patients. PMID:25488992

  16. Are Cancer Registries Unconstitutional?

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Robert H; Clarke, Christina A; Crawley, LaVera M; Glaser, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    Population-based cancer registration, mandated throughout the United States, is central to quantifying the breadth and impact of cancer. It facilitates research to learn what causes cancer to develop and, in many cases, lead to death. However, as concerns about privacy increase, cancer registration has come under question. Recently, its constitutionality was challenged on the basis of 1) the vagueness of statutory aims to pursue public health versus the individual privacy interests of cancer patients, and 2) the alleged indignity of one's individual medical information being transmitted to government authorities. Examining cancer registry statutes in states covered by the US National Cancer Institute's SEER Program and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries, we found that cancer registration laws do state specific public health benefits, and offer reasonable limits and safeguards on the government's possession of private medical information. Thus, we argue that cancer registration would survive constitutional review, is compatible with the civil liberties protected by privacy rights in the U.S., satisfies the conditions that justify public health expenditures, and serves human rights to enjoy the highest attainable standards of health, the advances of science, and the benefits of government efforts to prevent and control disease. PMID:20199835

  17. The New ADL Registry. ADL Registry Web Portal Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    Approaches 18 19 Primary ADL Registry Contributors Contributor Records Entry Date Navy eLearning (US Navy) 2,086 08/05/2008 Joint Knowledge Development...ADL Registry  http://adlregistry.adlnet.gov/  Navy eLearning Content Team  https://www.netc.navy.mil/ile  Joint Knowledge Online  http

  18. Interdependence of ICD rates in paired quantum dots on geometry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Fabian; Aziz, Emad F; Bande, Annika

    2017-09-30

    Using state-of-the-art antisymmetrized multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) electron dynamics calculations we study the interdependence of the intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process on the geometric parameters of a doubly-charged paired quantum dot (PQD) model system in the framework of the effective mass approximation (EMA). We find that ICD displays a maximum rate for a certain geometry of the electron-emitting quantum dot, which is simultaneously dependent on both the distance between the quantum dots as well as the photon-absorbing quantum dot's geometry. The rate maximum is shown to be caused by the competing effects of polarization of electron density and Coulomb repulsion. The ICD rate-maximized PQD geometry in GaAs QDs yields a decay time of 102.39 ps. It is given by two vertically-aligned cylindrical QDs with radii of 14.42 nm separated by 86.62 nm. The photon absorbing QD then has a height of 46.59 nm and the electron emitting QD a height of 16.33 nm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Recent advances in the entirely subcutaneous ICD System

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Florian; Rath, Benjamin; Köbe, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD®) is emerging as a widely accepted therapeutic alternative to a conventional implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for prevention of sudden cardiac death. Essentially, the S-ICD® is promising in terms of reduction of electrode-related complications such as lead failure and infections. The conventional transvenous ICD has proven efficacy in various randomized clinical trials. The first results of S-ICD® studies confirm efficacy and safety in primary and secondary prevention as well. Owing to basic differences between S-ICD® and transvenous ICD—such as limited programming options and lack of pacing—not all patients are eligible for the S-ICD®. Concerns exist regarding inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing, dimensions of the device, and shorter battery longevity. However, the S-ICD® should be considered a useful supplementation of ICD therapy in those patients at risk for sudden cardiac death who are not expected to require pacing due to bradycardia or antitachycardic pacing. PMID:26097719

  20. Effective communication and ethical consent in decisions related to ICDs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alexander M; Jaarsma, Tiny; Strachan, Patricia; Davidson, Patricia M; Jerke, Megan; Beattie, James M; Duncan, Amanda S; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R

    2011-07-26

    This Review examines recommendations and principles that promote good decision-making with regard to the insertion, deactivation, and potential malfunction of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). This guidance is important because ICDs are now used for primary and secondary prevention of arrhythmias in more than 20 diverse clinical populations, which accounts for the exponential increase in insertion rates over the past decade. Current guidelines require clinicians to provide personalized, culturally appropriate, and easy to understand information to patients on the benefits and harms of proposed treatment choices; however, obtaining valid informed consent for insertion and deactivation of ICDs is challenging. Initiating early conversations with patients and continuing this dialogue over time, implementation of localized care protocols, increased collaboration (particularly between cardiac and palliative care teams), and the provision of training for all health professionals involved in the care of these patients, can help to ensure that adequate informed consent is maintained throughout their care. In addition to providing information, health professionals should identify and address high levels of anxiety in patients and their next of kin and promote effective communication throughout decision making. In the future, use of standardized checklists or decision aids based on a clear understanding of the principles underlying key topics could support this process.

  1. [Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry. Fourth Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators (2007)].

    PubMed

    Peinado Peinado, Rafael; Torrecilla, Esteban G; Ormaetxe, José; Alvarez, Miguel

    2008-11-01

    This article presents the 2007 findings of the Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry, established by the Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators, Electrophysiology and Arrhythmia Section, Spanish Society of Cardiology. The Spanish Society of Cardiology received prospective data recorded on a single-page questionnaire on 96.6% of device implantations. Overall, 3,291 implantations were reported (90.1% of the estimated total). The reported implantation rate was 72.8 per million inhabitants, and 77.1% were first implantations. The majority of ICDs were implanted in males (mean age, 61 [12] years) in functional class II with severe or moderate-to-severe left ventricular dysfunction. The most frequent form of heart disease was ischemic heart disease, followed by dilated cardiomyopathy. Indications for primary prevention remained unchanged relative to the previous year and now account for half of all first implantations, with an increasing number of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The number of ICDs incorporating cardiac resynchronization therapy has increased slightly and now comprises 30.1% of the total. Around 70% of ICD implantations were performed in an electrophysiology laboratory by a cardiac electrophysiologist. The incidence of complications was very low. The 2007 Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry contains data on more than 90% of all ICD implantations performed in Spain, thereby confirming that it has become increasingly representative in recent years. The number of implantations has continued to grow, though the proportion carried out for primary prevention has stabilized at around 50%.

  2. ICD-10 Medical Coding: The Role of Perioperative Services in Addressing Implementation Challenges.

    PubMed

    Wing, Toni L

    2016-02-01

    The International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) was adopted in the United States on October 1, 2015. Replacing the outdated ICD, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) coding system was long overdue, and the updated classifications were needed to accurately collect data and improve patient care. However, the complexity of ICD-10 may present substantial challenges for health information management coders and affect hospital revenue collection. Because the OR generates a large share of a hospital's overall revenue, perioperative services personnel must take a critical look at ICD-10 changes and address adoption challenges to minimize the negative effects ICD-10 may have on surgical revenue and help personnel identify perioperative services' important role in ICD-10 implementation.

  3. Mortality of congenital osteochondrodysplasias: a nationwide registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Morales-Piga, Antonio; Alonso-Ferreira, Verónica; Villaverde-Hueso, Ana; Posada de la Paz, Manuel; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2013-07-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of more than 200 entities, characterized by abnormalities of cartilage, bone growth, and skeletal development. The aim of this study was to assess temporal and spatial changes in overall mortality due to these disorders in Spain, using data from a nationwide registry. Annual deaths showing osteochondrodysplasias as the underlying cause of death were selected using the International Classification of Diseases-9th revision (ICD-9) codes for the period 1981 through 1998, and ICD-10 codes for the period 1999 through 2008. Age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated by sex, and geographic analysis was performed by municipality. A total of 679 deaths were recorded (53% men). Age-adjusted mortality rates went from 0.09 (0.06, 0.12) per 100,000 population in 1981 to 0.05 (0.03, 0.08) per 100,000 population in 2008. A changing trend in the age-standardized mortality rate was in evidence, with an annual increase of 2.4% (-0.4, 5.2) from 1981 to 1994, and an annual decrease of -7.3% (-10.9, -3.5) from 1995 onwards. Geographic analysis showed some places situated in the west and south of Spain with greater risk of mortality. There is a need to identify risk factors and to increase overall knowledge about the life expectancy and epidemiology of osteochondrodysplasias. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reduction in inappropriate therapy and mortality through ICD programming.

    PubMed

    Moss, Arthur J; Schuger, Claudio; Beck, Christopher A; Brown, Mary W; Cannom, David S; Daubert, James P; Estes, N A Mark; Greenberg, Henry; Hall, W Jackson; Huang, David T; Kautzner, Josef; Klein, Helmut; McNitt, Scott; Olshansky, Brian; Shoda, Morio; Wilber, David; Zareba, Wojciech

    2012-12-13

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is highly effective in reducing mortality among patients at risk for fatal arrhythmias, but inappropriate ICD activations are frequent, with potential adverse effects. We randomly assigned 1500 patients with a primary-prevention indication to receive an ICD with one of three programming configurations. The primary objective was to determine whether programmed high-rate therapy (with a 2.5-second delay before the initiation of therapy at a heart rate of ≥200 beats per minute) or delayed therapy (with a 60-second delay at 170 to 199 beats per minute, a 12-second delay at 200 to 249 beats per minute, and a 2.5-second delay at ≥250 beats per minute) was associated with a decrease in the number of patients with a first occurrence of inappropriate antitachycardia pacing or shocks, as compared with conventional programming (with a 2.5-second delay at 170 to 199 beats per minute and a 1.0-second delay at ≥200 beats per minute). During an average follow-up of 1.4 years, high-rate therapy and delayed ICD therapy, as compared with conventional device programming, were associated with reductions in a first occurrence of inappropriate therapy (hazard ratio with high-rate therapy vs. conventional therapy, 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13 to 0.34; P<0.001; hazard ratio with delayed therapy vs. conventional therapy, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.40; P<0.001) and reductions in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio with high-rate therapy vs. conventional therapy, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.85; P=0.01; hazard ratio with delayed therapy vs. conventional therapy, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.30 to 1.02; P=0.06). There were no significant differences in procedure-related adverse events among the three treatment groups. Programming of ICD therapies for tachyarrhythmias of 200 beats per minute or higher or with a prolonged delay in therapy at 170 beats per minute or higher, as compared with conventional programming, was associated with reductions in

  5. [Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry. Third Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators (2006)].

    PubMed

    Peinado, Rafael; Torrecilla, Esteban G; Ormaetxe, José; Alvarez, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    To report the 2006 findings of the Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry, established by the Working Group on Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators, Electrophysiology and Arrhythmia Section, Spanish Society of Cardiology. Each ICD team voluntarily reported data to the Spanish Society of Cardiology by completing a single-page questionnaire. Prospective data were collected on 91.8% of implantations. In total, 2679 implantations were reported to the registry (86.6% of the estimated total). The reported implantation rate was 60 per million inhabitants, and the estimated rate was 69 per million. The proportion of first implantations was 80%. The majority of ICDs were implanted in males (mean age 61.5 [14] years) with severe or moderate-to-severe left ventricular dysfunction who were in functional class II or I. Ischemic heart disease was the most frequent etiology, followed by dilated cardiomyopathy. This is the first year that half of first device implantations were carried out for primary prevention, with substantial increases among patients with ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy. The number of ICDs incorporating cardiac resynchronization therapy has continued to grow, and now comprises 28.6% of all devices implanted. As in the previous year, around 70% of ICD implantations were performed in an electrophysiology laboratory by a cardiac electrophysiologist. The incidence of complications during device implantation was very low. The 2006 Spanish Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry contains data on more than 86% of all ICD implantations performed in Spain. Half of first device implantations were carried out for the purposes of primary prevention.

  6. A Self-Report Measure for the ICD-11 Dimensional Trait Model Proposal: The Personality Inventory for ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Joshua R; Widiger, Thomas A

    2017-02-23

    Proposed for the 11th edition of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) is a dimensional trait model for the classification of personality disorder (Tyrer, Reed, & Crawford, 2015). The ICD-11 proposal consists of 5 broad domains: negative affective, detachment, dissocial, disinhibition, and anankastic (Mulder, Horwood, Tyrer, Carter, & Joyce, 2016). Several field trials have examined this proposal, yet none has included a direct measure of the trait model. The purpose of the current study was to develop and provide initial validation for the Personality Inventory for ICD-11 (PiCD), a self-report measure of this proposed 5-domain maladaptive trait model. Item selection and scale construction proceeded through 3 initial data collections assessing potential item performance. Two subsequent studies were conducted for scale validation. In Study 1, the PiCD was evaluated in a sample of 259 MTurk participants (who were or had been receiving mental health treatment) with respect to 2 measures of general personality structure: The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and the 5-Dimensional Personality Test. In Study 2, the PiCD was evaluated in an additional sample of 285 participants with respect to 2 measures of maladaptive personality traits: The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and the Computerized Adaptive Test for Personality Disorders. Study 3 provides an item-level exploratory structural equation model with the combined samples from Studies 1 and 2. The results are discussed with respect to the validity of the measure and the potential benefits for future research in having a direct, self-report measure of the ICD-11 trait proposal. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Italian in the Modern World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adorno, Elvira, Ed.

    This booklet of 15 reprinted letters sent in response to a query concerning the actual use of Italian in the United States designates various areas of professional application. Some reference to current Italian publications is included. It is hoped that these letters will help promote the study of Italian in American schools. (RL)

  8. [Drug registries: post-marketing evaluation of the benefit-risk profile and promotion of appropriateness. The regional point of view].

    PubMed

    Martelli, Luisa; Venegoni, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    Italian Regions and the Italian regulatory agency share a common interest in promoting the appropriateness of drug use, containing drug expenditure and acquiring additional evidence on the effectiveness and safety of drugs. Drug registries can help attaining these objectives. Specifically, the registries implemented in Italy were able to cover the first two objectives, whereas some critical issues were raised on the third one. For instance, the data recorded in the registries are not available at regional level to conduct safety and effectiveness investigations. This is a paradox, when considering that drugs included in the registries have a risk-benefit profile that is only partially defined at the moment of marketing. Currently, researchers and regions can conduct epidemiological research (cohort and case control studies), on the basis of record-linkage procedures, on all drugs prescribed in general practice (which are older drugs with a better defined risk-benefit profile). The expected outcomes of registries should be more clearly defined: when the main aim is to promote appropriateness, the recording of only a very limited amount of data should be required (to avoid a bureaucratic burden on clinicians).The Italian centers of the ENCePP network might play an important role in planning and conducting drug registries: through the presence in the steering committees of the registries, and in conducting epidemiological studies that make the most of this powerful instrument.

  9. Development and validation of a registry-based definition of eosinophilic esophagitis in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S; Erichsen, Rune; Pedersen, Lars; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Baron, John A; Sørensen, Henrik T; Vyberg, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a case definition of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) in the linked Danish health registries. METHODS: For case definition development, we queried the Danish medical registries from 2006-2007 to identify candidate cases of EoE in Northern Denmark. All International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) and prescription codes were obtained, and archived pathology slides were obtained and re-reviewed to determine case status. We used an iterative process to select inclusion/exclusion codes, refine the case definition, and optimize sensitivity and specificity. We then re-queried the registries from 2008-2009 to yield a validation set. The case definition algorithm was applied, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 51 and 49 candidate cases identified in both the development and validation sets, 21 and 24 had EoE, respectively. Characteristics of EoE cases in the development set [mean age 35 years; 76% male; 86% dysphagia; 103 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf)] were similar to those in the validation set (mean age 42 years; 83% male; 67% dysphagia; 77 eos/hpf). Re-review of archived slides confirmed that the pathology coding for esophageal eosinophilia was correct in greater than 90% of cases. Two registry-based case algorithms based on pathology, ICD-10, and pharmacy codes were successfully generated in the development set, one that was sensitive (90%) and one that was specific (97%). When these algorithms were applied to the validation set, they remained sensitive (88%) and specific (96%). CONCLUSION: Two registry-based definitions, one highly sensitive and one highly specific, were developed and validated for the linked Danish national health databases, making future population-based studies feasible. PMID:23382628

  10. Speaking the same language: underestimating financial impact when using diagnosis-related group versus ICD-9-based definitions for trauma inclusion criteria.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Sharon; Truax, Christopher B; Opalek, Judy M; Santanello, Steven A

    2009-04-01

    Hospital accounting methods use diagnosis-related group (DRG) data to identify patients and derive financial analyses and reports. The National Trauma Data Bank and trauma programs identify patients with trauma by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9)-based definitions for inclusion criteria. These differing methods of identifying patients result in economic reports that vary significantly and fail to accurately identify the financial impact of trauma services. Routine financial data were collected for patients admitted to our Trauma Service from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006 using two methods of identifying the cases; by trauma DRGs and by trauma registry database inclusion criteria. The resulting data were compared and stratified to define the financial impact on hospital charges, reimbursement, costs, contribution to margin, downstream revenue, and estimated profit or loss. The results also defined the impact on supporting services, market share and total revenue from trauma admissions, return visits, discharged trauma alerts, and consultations. A total of 3,070 patients were identified by the trauma registry as meeting ICD-9 inclusion criteria. Trauma-associated DRGs accounted for 871 of the 3,070 admissions. The DRG-driven data set demonstrated an estimated profit of $800,000 dollars; the ICD-9 data set revealed an estimated 4.8 million dollar profit, increased our market share, and showed substantial revenue generated for other hospital service lines. Trauma DRGs fail to account for most trauma admissions. Financial data derived from DRG definitions significantly underestimate the trauma service line's financial contribution to hospital economics. Accurately identifying patients with trauma based on trauma database inclusion criteria better defines the business of trauma.

  11. Know Your Laws. Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joan Q.

    This Italian language version of "Know Your Laws" consists of 24 self-contained modules designed to acquaint the Florida adult students with law they will meet in everyday life; fundamentals of local, state, and federal governments; and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. (The 130 objectives are categorized in the first three…

  12. Thematic Issue: Italian Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    In 1964, when the "living" theatre appeared to be dying in New York, theater in Italy began changing from an author-oriented to a performance-oriented, nonliterary form. The articles in this document trace the historical development of Italian theatre and analyze current dramas which demonstrate the diversity of approaches and the energy…

  13. Know Your Laws. Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joan Q.

    This Italian language version of "Know Your Laws" consists of 24 self-contained modules designed to acquaint the Florida adult students with law they will meet in everyday life; fundamentals of local, state, and federal governments; and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. (The 130 objectives are categorized in the first three…

  14. Thematic Issue: Italian Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    In 1964, when the "living" theatre appeared to be dying in New York, theater in Italy began changing from an author-oriented to a performance-oriented, nonliterary form. The articles in this document trace the historical development of Italian theatre and analyze current dramas which demonstrate the diversity of approaches and the energy…

  15. I Can Speak Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The guide presents content and techniques for teaching conversational Italian in the elementary grades. It contains an introductory section and 20 units for classroom instruction. The introduction includes notes on the overall objectives of the course, general guidelines on classroom procedure, and specific techniques for use of the materials…

  16. I Can Speak Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The guide presents content and techniques for teaching conversational Italian in the elementary grades. It contains an introductory section and 20 units for classroom instruction. The introduction includes notes on the overall objectives of the course, general guidelines on classroom procedure, and specific techniques for use of the materials…

  17. ICD-11 for quality and safety: overview of the WHO Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Ghali, William A; Pincus, Harold A; Southern, Danielle A; Brien, Susan E; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Drösler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Moskal, Lori; Forster, Alan J; Gurevich, Yana; Quan, Hude; Colin, Cyrille; Munier, William B; Harrison, James; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Ustün, T Bedirhan

    2013-12-01

    This paper outlines the approach that the WHO's Family of International Classifications (WHO-FIC) network is undertaking to create ICD-11. We also outline the more focused work of the Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group, whose activities include the following: (i) cataloguing existing ICD-9 and ICD-10 quality and safety indicators; (ii) reviewing ICD morbidity coding rules for main condition, diagnosis timing, numbers of diagnosis fields and diagnosis clustering; (iii) substantial restructuring of the health-care related injury concepts coded in the ICD-10 chapters 19/20, (iv) mapping of ICD-11 quality and safety concepts to the information model of the WHO's International Classification for Patient Safety and the AHRQ Common Formats; (v) the review of vertical chapter content in all chapters of the ICD-11 beta version and (vi) downstream field testing of ICD-11 prior to its official 2015 release. The transition from ICD-10 to ICD-11 promises to produce an enhanced classification that will have better potential to capture important concepts relevant to measuring health system safety and quality-an important use case for the classification.

  18. Migrating existing clinical content from ICD-9 to SNOMED.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Prakash M; Darer, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    To identify challenges in mapping internal International Classification of Disease, 9th edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) encoded legacy data to Systematic Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), using SNOMED-prescribed compositional approaches where appropriate, and to explore the mapping coverage provided by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM)'s SNOMED clinical core subset. This study selected ICD-CM codes that occurred at least 100 times in the organization's problem list or diagnosis data in 2008. After eliminating codes whose exact mappings were already available in UMLS, the remainder were mapped manually with software assistance. Of the 2194 codes, 784 (35.7%) required manual mapping. 435 of these represented concept types documented in SNOMED as deprecated: these included the qualifying phrases such as 'not elsewhere classified'. A third of the codes were composite, requiring multiple SNOMED code to map. Representing 45 composite concepts required introducing disjunction ('or') or set-difference ('without') operators, which are not currently defined in SNOMED. Only 47% of the concepts required for composition were present in the clinical core subset. Search of SNOMED for the correct concepts often required extensive application of knowledge of both English and medical synonymy. Strategies to deal with legacy ICD data must address the issue of codes created by non-taxonomist users. The NLM core subset possibly needs augmentation with concepts from certain SNOMED hierarchies, notably qualifiers, body structures, substances/products and organisms. Concept-matching software needs to utilize query expansion strategies, but these may be effective in production settings only if a large but non-redundant SNOMED subset that minimizes the proportion of extensively pre-coordinated concepts is also available.

  19. ICD Social Codes: An Underutilized Resource for Tracking Social Needs.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline M; Lawlor, John; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Sills, Marion R; Bettenhausen, Jessica L; Davidson, Amber; Cutler, Gretchen J; Hall, Matt; Gottlieb, Laura M

    2017-09-01

    Social determinants of health (SDH) data collected in health care settings could have important applications for clinical decision-making, population health strategies, and the design of performance-based incentives and penalties. One source for cataloging SDH data is the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD). To explore how SDH are captured with ICD Ninth revision SDH V codes in a national inpatient discharge database. Data come from the 2013 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) National Inpatient Sample, a national stratified sample of discharges from 4363 hospitals from 44 US states. We estimate the rate of ICD-9 SDH V code utilization overall and by patient demographics and payer categories. We additionally estimate the rate of SDH V code utilization for: (a) the 5 most common reasons for hospitalization; and (b) the 5 conditions with the highest rates of SDH V code utilization. Fewer than 2% of overall discharges in the National Inpatient Sample were assigned an SDH V code. There were statistically significant differences in the rate of overall SDH V code utilization by age categories, race/ethnicity, sex, and payer (all P<0.001). Nevertheless, SDH V codes were assigned to <7% of discharges in any demographic or payer subgroup. SDH V code utilization was highest for major diagnostic categories related to mental health and alcohol/substance use-related discharges. SDH V codes are infrequently utilized in inpatient settings for discharges other than those related to mental health and alcohol/substance use. Utilization incentives will likely need to be developed to realize the potential benefits of cataloging SDH information.

  20. World apheresis registry report.

    PubMed

    Stegmayr, Bernd; Ptak, Jan; Wikström, Björn

    2007-02-01

    The establishment of national apheresis registries has been helpful to learn about therapeutic profiles and adverse event incidences. During 2003, the World Apheresis Registry was established and centers from all countries were invited to participate to register their apheresis activities (at www.iml.umu.se/medicin). In this paper, we will report and analyze the first data retrieved from three centers, in 2 European countries, that registered a total of 388 therapeutic apheresis treatments in 122 patients, 95% due to acute indications. Statistical analyses were performed using an independent Student t-test and Fisher's test. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Fifty percent of the treated patients were women. The mean age of the patients was 51 years (+/-17, range 16-84) and there was no difference between genders (w 50.4, m 51.6 years). Diagnoses for treatment were mainly neurological and vasculitis. In 63% peripheral access was used with a central double lumen catheter, 22% in the jugular vein, 8% in the subclavian vein and 6% the femoral vein. Significant inter-center differences were seen in regard to the access used. The main technique used was centrifugation for conventional plasma exchange (86%), while other modes were leukapheresis, erythrapheresis, platelet apheresis, LDL-apheresis and adsorption of antibodies. Citrate was the only anticoagulant in 92%. During plasma exchange procedures using centrifugation, replacement was by albumin only (58%) or plasma, the latter often in combination with albumin (42%). Adverse events (AEs) were noted in 11% of the procedures. Patients with hypocalcaemia side effects with tingling sensations were included in those data as mild AE and as moderate AEs if they received calcium (Ca) medication. No patient died due to adverse effects. A mild AE was present in 1.8% and moderate in 8.5%. During two procedures (0.5%), the AE was considered severe and therefore the procedure was interrupted. If those with

  1. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  3. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry).

    PubMed

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran's Ministry of Health and Education.

  4. Anatomy of the ICDS series: A bibliometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel; Marxa, Werner

    2007-12-01

    In this article, the proceedings of the International Conferences on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS) have been analyzed by bibliometric methods. The papers of these conferences have been published as articles in regular journals or special proceedings journals and in books with diverse publishers. The conference name/title changed several times. Many of the proceedings did not appear in the so-called “source journals” covered by the Thomson/ISI citation databases, in particular by the Science Citation Index (SCI). But the number of citations within these source journals can be determined using the Cited Reference Search mode under the Web of Science (WoS) and the SCI offered by the host STN International. The search functions of both systems were needed to select the papers published as different document types and to cover the full time span of the series. The most cited ICDS papers were identified, and the overall numbers of citations as well as the time-dependent impact of these papers, of single conferences, and of the complete series, was established. The complete of citing papers was analyzed with respect to the countries of the citing authors, the citing journals, and the ISI subject categories.

  5. [Curriculum and expert courses on pacemaker and ICD therapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, L-I; Griebenow, R

    2010-09-01

    The curricula "Practice of Pacemaker Therapy" and "Practice of ICD Therapy" have been developed from practical experience with the first educational courses which are necessary to fulfill the German requirements of the medical products law which restricts the application of medical products to persons with the necessary education, knowledge and experience. The corresponding courses of competence under the auspices of the German Cardiac Society derive from this legal prerequisite. Competence refers to technical knowledge in cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs) and understanding of possible dysfunctions as well as substantial knowledge on arrhythmia. The two curricula form the theoretical basis for the application of CIEDs. These courses represent an offer to cardiologists and all other physicians who wish to acquire and document competency in this field. A legal obligation to participate in these competency courses does not currently exist in Germany as long as evidence can be provided that this competency has been achieved by other means. Both curricula have proven to be comprehensive and practically highly useful and have been presented by highly committed specialists with expertise in this topic at a high level. Since 2005 some 2,000 physicians have been trained in courses on pacemaker therapy and more than 1,000 physicians in courses on ICD therapy with an ongoing high level demand to be expected in the future.

  6. Disorders related to sexuality and gender identity in the ICD-11: revising the ICD-10 classification based on current scientific evidence, best clinical practices, and human rights considerations.

    PubMed

    Reed, Geoffrey M; Drescher, Jack; Krueger, Richard B; Atalla, Elham; Cochran, Susan D; First, Michael B; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Arango-de Montis, Iván; Parish, Sharon J; Cottler, Sara; Briken, Peer; Saxena, Shekhar

    2016-10-01

    In the World Health Organization's forthcoming eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11), substantial changes have been proposed to the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders related to sexuality and gender identity. These concern the following ICD-10 disorder groupings: F52 Sexual dysfunctions, not caused by organic disorder or disease; F64 Gender identity disorders; F65 Disorders of sexual preference; and F66 Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation. Changes have been proposed based on advances in research and clinical practice, and major shifts in social attitudes and in relevant policies, laws, and human rights standards. This paper describes the main recommended changes, the rationale and evidence considered, and important differences from the DSM-5. An integrated classification of sexual dysfunctions has been proposed for a new chapter on Conditions Related to Sexual Health, overcoming the mind/body separation that is inherent in ICD-10. Gender identity disorders in ICD-10 have been reconceptualized as Gender incongruence, and also proposed to be moved to the new chapter on sexual health. The proposed classification of Paraphilic disorders distinguishes between conditions that are relevant to public health and clinical psychopathology and those that merely reflect private behaviour. ICD-10 categories related to sexual orientation have been recommended for deletion from the ICD-11. © 2016 World Psychiatric Association.

  7. Attitudes toward Potential Participant Registries.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Holbrook, Andrew; Pierce, Aimee; Hoang, Dan; Gillen, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Difficult participant recruitment is a consistent barrier to successful medical research. Potential participant registries represent an increasingly common intervention to overcome this barrier. A variety of models for registries exist, but few data are available to instruct their design and implementation. To provide such data, we surveyed 110 cognitively normal research participants enrolled in a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. Seventy-four (67%) individuals participated in the study. Most (78%, CI: 0.67, 0.87) participants were likely to enroll in a registry. Willingness to participate was reduced for registries that required enrollment through the Internet using a password (26%, CI: 0.16, 0.36) or through email (38%, CI: 0.27, 0.49). Respondents acknowledged their expectations that researchers share information about their health and risk for disease and their concerns that their data could be shared with for-profit companies. We found no difference in respondent preferences for registries that shared contact information with researchers, compared to honest broker models that take extra precautions to protect registrant confidentiality (28% versus 30%; p = 0.46). Compared to those preferring a shared information model, respondents who preferred the honest broker model or who lacked model preference voiced increased concerns about sharing registrant data, especially with for-profit organizations. These results suggest that the design of potential participant registries may impact the population enrolled, and hence the population that will eventually be enrolled in clinical studies. Investigators operating registries may need to offer particular assurances about data security to maximize registry enrollment but also must carefully manage participant expectations.

  8. The clinical documentation advantage protecting the revenue cycle under ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Leenheer, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    Healthcare providers need to prepare their revenue cycles for the profound increase in coding complexity and detail that will result from the transition to ICD-10. The best strategy for providers to build a solid foundation for effective ICD-10 coding, and thereby protect the revenue cycle, is to establish a clinical documentation improvement (CDI) program. CDI specialists will need to work with physicians to ensure the level of specificity required for ICD-10 coding is included in the clinical documentation.

  9. [Therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) in the early of third millenium].

    PubMed

    Kozák, M

    2010-08-01

    The patients without ventricular arrhythmias with markers of high risk of sudden cardiac death are indicated for ICD implantation today. Last generation of ICD systems are equipped with high capacity batteries, with many automatic functions, capabilities of data sending and possibilities of prediction of worsening of heart failure. Nowadays ICD systems offers not only elimination of the risk of sudden cardiac death but reduction of symptoms of chronic heart failure through the resynchronization therapy, too.

  10. Longitudinal changes in quality of life following ICD implant and the impact of age, gender, and ICD shocks: observations from the INTRINSIC RV trial.

    PubMed

    Gopinathannair, Rakesh; Lerew, Darin R; Cross, Natalie J; Sears, Samuel F; Brown, Scott; Olshansky, Brian

    2017-04-01

    ICDs can improve survival in at-risk patients but no consensus exists with respect to their impact on health-related quality of life (QOL). Moreover, the data are unclear on QOL benefits in specific patient subgroups. We sought to analyze, in the INTRINSIC RV ICD trial population, health-related QOL longitudinally following ICD implant and consider impact of age, gender, and ICD shocks on QOL by employing a global measure of health-related QOL. One thousand five hundred thirty patients had an ICD implanted. One week after implant (n = 1461), 988 patients were randomized to DDDR with AV search hysteresis (n = 502) or VVI (n = 486) programming. QOL data, using the SF-36 short form, were obtained for the 1461 patient cohort, irrespective of randomization status, at baseline and prospectively for 1 year following ICD implant. Longitudinal mixed-effect analyses revealed significant improvements from baseline across all SF-36 subscales and component scores for the overall study cohort. Women had a substantially lower QOL at baseline, although their improvement after implant was similar to men. Patients <50 years scored consistently worse at baseline but experienced the greatest QOL improvement versus other age groups. Patients with higher NYHA class, angina, and diabetes had greater QOL improvements. There was no significant difference in QOL between patients with and without ICD shocks. Our findings indicate that QOL was reportedly better post-implant and suggest that benefits associated with ICD implantation go beyond the direct treatment of arrhythmias, with benefits seen across genders and different age groups. These results further highlight that ICD implantation, in and of itself, does not reduce QOL.

  11. Inadvertent transposition of defibrillator coil terminal pins causing inappropriate ICD therapies.

    PubMed

    Issa, Ziad F

    2008-06-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) and severe ischemic cardiomyopathy who underwent implantation of a prophylactic single-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The patient experienced inappropriate ICD therapies due to oversensing of pectoral muscle myopotential secondary to reversal of the defibrillator coil terminal pins in the ICD header. Recognizing this possibility is important to avoid misinterpretation of spontaneous oversensing as hardware failure (e.g., lead fracture or insulation breech) and potentially unnecessary ICD system surgical intervention, including lead extraction.

  12. [Classifications of mental disorders: from Bertillon to ICD-10, the century of international collaboration].

    PubMed

    Bertolote, J M; Sartorius, N

    1993-01-01

    The first International Classification of Diseases (ICD) was approved during the Congress of the Statistical International Institute, in Chicago, in Paris, in 1893. It was based on a list of diseases prepared by Jacques Bertillon. Minor changes were introduced in this classification during decennial revisions made at international meetings and it remained in use until 1948, when the World Health Organization's Provisional Committee was charged with the task producing ICD-6. ICD-6 represented a major shift from the previous internal conceptualization, particularity in what concerns the Chapter V., dealing with mental disorders. From 1955 on Who produced with approximately a 10-year interval ICD-7, 8 and 9. Few modifications in relation to ICD-6 were introduced by these revisions, except for the introduction of a glossary of terms in the chapter on mental disorders. This glossary had a major impact towards the development of a common language in psychiatry. Based on epidemiological findings, and based also on an intensive and extensive international network of clinicians and investigators, ICD-10 was published in 1992. It represented a substantial improvement regarding the conceptualization of the classification of mental disorders, in relation to previous revisions of the ICD. Future tasks relating to ICD-10 include training of health personnel for its proper utilization, in addition to finalizing further ICD-10 versions, e.g. for research purposes and for primary health care use.

  13. Electron relaxation in quantum dot and quantum well systems by the ICD mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2014-05-01

    Electron relaxation in quantum dot (QD) and quantum well (QW) systems has a significant impact on QD and QW optoelectronic devices such as lasers, photodetectors, and solar cells. Several different fundamental relaxation mechanisms are known. We focus here on inter-coulombic decay (ICD) mechanism. In 2011 we have shown that the electron relaxation in a quantum dot dimer due to the ICD mechanism is on a picoseconds timescale (PRB 83, 113303) and therefore IR QD detectors based on ICD seems to be feasible. Here we discuss the possibility to observe electron relaxation in QWs. In QWs the effective mass of the electron is not continuous, and can affect the lifetime of the ICD process. In order for the ICD to be the dominant decay mechanism, it must prevail over all other possible competitive decay processes. We have found in our setup that the ICD lifetime is on the timescale of picoseconds. An enhancement of the ICD process occurs when the ionized electron temporarily trapped in a shape-type resonance in the continuum. An experiment based on our findings is currently in progress. In this talk another possibility to observe the ICD phenomenon in two coupled QWs is proposed, by transferring an electron through a two coupled quantum wells structure populated by only one electron. An enhancement in the electron transmission would be obtained when the energy of the incoming electrons allows them to be temporarily trapped inside one of the two quantum wells via the ICD mechanism.

  14. Radiofrequency ablation of fast ventricular tachycardia causing an ICD storm in an infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ergul, Yakup; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Bilici, Meki; Ozturk, Erkut; Haydin, Sertaç; Guzeltas, Alper

    2017-07-27

    An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) storm involves very frequent arrhythmia episodes and ICD shocks, and it is associated with poor short-term and long-term prognosis. Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be used as an effective rescue treatment for patients with an ICD storm. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with an ICD storm and undergoing successful radiofrequency catheter ablation salvage treatment for the fast left posterior fascicular ventricular tachycardia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Oral Tradition of Italian-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Lucia Chiavola

    The assimilation of Italians into American culture led to the loss of the Italian language, and an oral tradition of Italian peasants in which Italian feminist philosophy was grounded. The legends, parables, and proverbs told by these Italian women challenged the teachings of Catholicism, perpetuating an underground religious tradition which…

  16. Oral Tradition of Italian-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Lucia Chiavola

    The assimilation of Italians into American culture led to the loss of the Italian language, and an oral tradition of Italian peasants in which Italian feminist philosophy was grounded. The legends, parables, and proverbs told by these Italian women challenged the teachings of Catholicism, perpetuating an underground religious tradition which…

  17. White paper of Italian Gastroenterology: delivery of services for digestive diseases in Italy: weaknesses and strengths.

    PubMed

    Buscarini, Elisabetta; Conte, Dario; Cannizzaro, Renato; Bazzoli, Franco; De Boni, Michele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Farinati, Fabio; Ravelli, Paolo; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Lisiero, Manola; Spolaore, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    In 2011 the three major Italian gastroenterological scientific societies (AIGO, the Italian Society of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists; SIED, the Italian Society of Endoscopy; SIGE, the Italian Society of Gastroenterology) prepared their official document aimed at analysing medical care for digestive diseases in Italy, on the basis of national and regional data (Health Ministry and Lombardia, Veneto, Emilia-Romagna databases) and to make proposals for planning of care. Digestive diseases were the first or second cause of hospitalizations in Italy in 1999-2009, with more than 1,500,000 admissions/year; however only 5-9% of these admissions was in specialized Gastroenterology units. Reported data show a better outcome in Gastroenterology Units than in non-specialized units: shorter average length of stay, in particular for admissions with ICD-9-CM codes proxying for emergency conditions (6.7 days versus 8.4 days); better case mix (higher average diagnosis-related groups weight in Gastroenterology Units: 1 vs 0.97 in Internal Medicine units and 0.76 in Surgery units); lower inappropriateness of admissions (16-25% versus 29-87%); lower in-hospital mortality in urgent admissions (2.2% versus 5.1%); for patients with urgent admissions due to gastrointestinnal haemorrhage, in-hospital mortality was 2.3% in Gastroenterology units versus 4.0% in others. The present document summarizes the scientific societies' official report, which constitutes the "White paper of Italian Gastroenterology".

  18. Complications Associated With Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease or Left Ventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy (From the NCDR(®) Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Registry).

    PubMed

    Gleva, Marye J; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P; Berul, Charles I; Huddleston, Charles B; Poole, Jeanne E

    2017-08-08

    Patients with childhood heart disease are living longer and entering adulthood, and may undergo implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation to reduce the risk of sudden death. We evaluated the characteristics of adult patients with congenital heart disease or left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) in the National Cardiovascular Disease Registry ICD Registry and determined ICD-related in-hospital complications. Patients with LVNC or transposition of the great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein's anomaly, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, or common ventricle were identified in the registry. In-hospital complications were compared among different diagnoses using the chi-square test for categorical variables and the F-test in analyses of variance for continuous variables. A total of 3,077 patients were identified. The mean age was 48.0 ± 16.0 years, and 39.9% were female. Single-chamber ICDs were implanted in 25.2%, dual chamber in 41.9%, and cardiac resynchronization in 30.8%. Intraprocedural or postprocedural complications occurred in 70 patients (2.3%); there were 6 in-hospital deaths (0.2%). The most frequent complications were acute lead dislodgments, pneumothorax, and hematomas. Patients with Ebstein's anomaly had the greatest complication rate (8.3%, p = 0.03). The complication rate was 1.55% in single-chamber devices, 1.86% in dual chamber, and 3.5% in cardiac resynchronization (p < 0.001). For initial implants, the complication rate was 2.55%, 1.62% in generator replacements, and 8.77% in lead revisions (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in this large contemporary adult cohort of congenital heart disease and LVNC patients who underwent ICD implant procedures, periprocedural complication rates were low. Lead-related risks predominated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparing for ICD-10-CM/PCS Implementation: Impact on Productivity and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Stanfill, Mary H.; Hsieh, Kang Lin; Beal, Kathleen; Fenton, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    Coding productivity is expected to drop significantly during the lead-up to and in the initial stages of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation, now expected to be delayed until October 1, 2015. This study examined the differences in coding productivity between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS for hospital inpatient cases matched for complexity and severity. Additionally, interrater reliability was calculated to determine the quality of the coding. On average, coding of an inpatient record took 17.71 minutes (69 percent) longer with ICD-10-CM/PCS than with ICD-9-CM. A two-tailed T-test for statistical validity for independent samples was significant (p = .001). No coder characteristics such as years of experience or educational level were found to be a significant factor in coder productivity. Coders who had received more extensive training were faster than coders who had received only basic training. Though this difference was not statistically significant, it provides a strong indication of significant return on investment for staff training time. Coder interrater reliability was substantial for ICD-9-CM but only moderate for ICD-10-CM/PCS, though some ICD-10-CM/PCS cases had complete interrater (coder) agreement. Time spent coding a case was negatively correlated with interrater reliability (−0.425 for ICD-10-CM and −0.349 for ICD-10-PCS). This finding signals that increased time per case does not necessarily translate to higher quality. Adequate training for coders, as well as guidance regarding time invested per record, is important. Additionally, these findings indicate that previous estimates of initial coder productivity loss with ICD-10-CM/PCS may have been understated. PMID:25214823

  20. Trends in Gastroenteritis-associated Mortality in the United States 1985-2005: Variations by ICD-9 and ICD-10 Codes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BackgroundTrends in gastroenteritis-associated mortality are changing over time with development of antibiotic resistant strains of certain pathogens, improved diagnostic methods, and changing healthcare. In 1999, ICD-10 coding was introduced for mortality records which can also ...

  1. Trends in Gastroenteritis-associated Mortality in the United States 1985-2005: Variations by ICD-9 and ICD-10 Codes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BackgroundTrends in gastroenteritis-associated mortality are changing over time with development of antibiotic resistant strains of certain pathogens, improved diagnostic methods, and changing healthcare. In 1999, ICD-10 coding was introduced for mortality records which can also ...

  2. Expanding the Definition of Addiction: DSM-5 vs. ICD-11

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jon E.; Chamberlain, Samuel R.

    2017-01-01

    While considerable efforts have been made to understand the neurobiological basis of substance addiction, the potentially ‘addictive’ qualities of repetitive behaviors, and whether such behaviors constitute ‘behavioral addictions’, is relatively neglected. It has been suggested that some conditions, such as gambling disorder, compulsive stealing, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, and problem internet use, have phenomenological and neurobiological parallels with substance use disorders. This review considers how the issue of ‘behavioral addictions’ has been handled by latest revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) and International Classification of Disease (ICD), leading to somewhat divergent approaches. We also consider key areas for future research in order to address optimal diagnostic classification and treatments for such repetitive, debilitating behaviors. PMID:27151528

  3. Expanding the definition of addiction: DSM-5 vs. ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-08-01

    While considerable efforts have been made to understand the neurobiological basis of substance addiction, the potentially "addictive" qualities of repetitive behaviors, and whether such behaviors constitute "behavioral addictions," is relatively neglected. It has been suggested that some conditions, such as gambling disorder, compulsive stealing, compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, and problem Internet use, have phenomenological and neurobiological parallels with substance use disorders. This review considers how the issue of "behavioral addictions" has been handled by latest revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), leading to somewhat divergent approaches. We also consider key areas for future research in order to address optimal diagnostic classification and treatments for such repetitive, debilitating behaviors.

  4. Parental alienation, DSM-5, and ICD-11: response to critics.

    PubMed

    Bernet, William; Baker, Amy J L

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest among forensic practitioners in the proposals that parental alienation be included in the next editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases (DSM) and The International Classification of Diseases (ICD). However, there has also been a great deal of misunderstanding about the proposals, and misinformation has been expressed in professional meetings, on websites, and in journal articles. In this article we address four common misunderstandings regarding parental alienation: that there is a lack of research to support it as a diagnosis; that adopting parental alienation as a diagnosis will lead to serious adverse consequences; that the advocates of parental alienation are driven by self-serving or malevolent motives; and that Richard Gardner should be criticized for self-publishing his description of parental alienation syndrome.

  5. Bipolar and related disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Alexander; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders with profound negative impact on affected patients. Even if their symptomatology has long been recognized, diagnostic criteria have changed over time and diagnosis often remains difficult. The Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), issued in May 2013, comprises several changes regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorders compared to the previous edition. Diagnostic categories and criteria for bipolar disorders show some concordance with the internationally also widely used Tenth Edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). However, there are also major differences that are worth highlighting. The aim of the following text is to depict and discuss those.

  6. On the road to DSM-V and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, David J; Regier, Darrel A; Kuhl, Emily A

    2008-11-01

    Development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) has been ongoing since 1994, though official release will not occur for another 4 years. Potential revisions are being derived from multiple sources, including building on perceived limitations of DSM-IV; broad-based literature reviews; secondary and primary data analyses; and discussions between global members of the mental health community. The current focus on aligning DSM with the International Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) speaks to the importance of creating a unified text that embraces cross-cutting issues of diagnostics, such as developmental, age-related, and cultural phenomena. International discourse is vital to this process and has been fostered by a National Institutes of Health-sponsored conference series on diagnosis-specific topics. From this series, the DSM-V Task Force developed the following set of revision principals to guide the efforts of the DSM-V Work Groups: grounding recommendations in empirical evidence; maintaining continuity with previous editions of DSM; removing a priori limitations on the amount of changes DSM-V may incur; and maintaining DSM's status as a living document. With work group formation complete, members are currently carrying out the research and revision recommendations proposed during the conference series. Ongoing activities include adding specialized advisors to each work group; completing literature reviews and planning data analyses; and forming study groups to discuss integration of cross-cutting issues (e.g., developmental lifespan factors; formation of diagnostic spectra). The road to DSM-V and ICD-11 has been challenging, but members continue to work diligently in their goal of constructing the most harmonious, scientifically sound, and clinically relevant DSM to date.

  7. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (<40%). These proportions can be even lower when only affirmative decisions are considered. One nation provides priority status on the transplant waiting list as an incentive to affirmative registration, while another nation makes registering a donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (<0.5%). The variation in organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  8. Systematic review of validated case definitions for diabetes in ICD-9-coded and ICD-10-coded data in adult populations

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Bushra; Jette, Nathalie; Metcalfe, Amy; Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Butalia, Sonia; Rabi, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With steady increases in ‘big data’ and data analytics over the past two decades, administrative health databases have become more accessible and are now used regularly for diabetes surveillance. The objective of this study is to systematically review validated International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-based case definitions for diabetes in the adult population. Setting, participants and outcome measures Electronic databases, MEDLINE and Embase, were searched for validation studies where an administrative case definition (using ICD codes) for diabetes in adults was validated against a reference and statistical measures of the performance reported. Results The search yielded 2895 abstracts, and of the 193 potentially relevant studies, 16 met criteria. Diabetes definition for adults varied by data source, including physician claims (sensitivity ranged from 26.9% to 97%, specificity ranged from 94.3% to 99.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) ranged from 71.4% to 96.2%, negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 95% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.8 to 0.9), hospital discharge data (sensitivity ranged from 59.1% to 92.6%, specificity ranged from 95.5% to 99%, PPV ranged from 62.5% to 96%, NPV ranged from 90.8% to 99% and κ ranged from 0.6 to 0.9) and a combination of both (sensitivity ranged from 57% to 95.6%, specificity ranged from 88% to 98.5%, PPV ranged from 54% to 80%, NPV ranged from 98% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.7 to 0.8). Conclusions Overall, administrative health databases are useful for undertaking diabetes surveillance, but an awareness of the variation in performance being affected by case definition is essential. The performance characteristics of these case definitions depend on the variations in the definition of primary diagnosis in ICD-coded discharge data and/or the methodology adopted by the healthcare facility to extract information from patient records. PMID:27496226

  9. Systematic review of validated case definitions for diabetes in ICD-9-coded and ICD-10-coded data in adult populations.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Bushra; Jette, Nathalie; Metcalfe, Amy; Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Quan, Hude; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Butalia, Sonia; Rabi, Doreen

    2016-08-05

    With steady increases in 'big data' and data analytics over the past two decades, administrative health databases have become more accessible and are now used regularly for diabetes surveillance. The objective of this study is to systematically review validated International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-based case definitions for diabetes in the adult population. Electronic databases, MEDLINE and Embase, were searched for validation studies where an administrative case definition (using ICD codes) for diabetes in adults was validated against a reference and statistical measures of the performance reported. The search yielded 2895 abstracts, and of the 193 potentially relevant studies, 16 met criteria. Diabetes definition for adults varied by data source, including physician claims (sensitivity ranged from 26.9% to 97%, specificity ranged from 94.3% to 99.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) ranged from 71.4% to 96.2%, negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 95% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.8 to 0.9), hospital discharge data (sensitivity ranged from 59.1% to 92.6%, specificity ranged from 95.5% to 99%, PPV ranged from 62.5% to 96%, NPV ranged from 90.8% to 99% and κ ranged from 0.6 to 0.9) and a combination of both (sensitivity ranged from 57% to 95.6%, specificity ranged from 88% to 98.5%, PPV ranged from 54% to 80%, NPV ranged from 98% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.7 to 0.8). Overall, administrative health databases are useful for undertaking diabetes surveillance, but an awareness of the variation in performance being affected by case definition is essential. The performance characteristics of these case definitions depend on the variations in the definition of primary diagnosis in ICD-coded discharge data and/or the methodology adopted by the healthcare facility to extract information from patient records. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10

    PubMed Central

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907–0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding. PMID:26656501

  11. Live Virtual Constructive (LVC): Interface Control Document (ICD) for the LVC Gateway. [Flight Test 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srba

    2015-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) documents and tracks the necessary information required for the Live Virtual and Constructive (LVC) systems components as well as protocols for communicating with them in order to achieve all research objectives captured by the experiment requirements. The purpose of this ICD is to clearly communicate all inputs and outputs from the subsystem components.

  12. Comparison of ICD-10 and DC: 0-3R Diagnoses in Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equit, Monika; Paulus, Frank; Fuhrmann, Pia; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare diagnoses of patients from a special outpatient department for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Specifically, overlap, age and gender differences according to the two classification systems DC: 0-3R and ICD-10 were examined. 299 consecutive children aged 0-5;11 years received both ICD-10 and…

  13. The Capacity of ICD-10-CM/PCS to Characterize Surgical Care.

    PubMed

    Utter, Garth H; Schuster, Kevin M; Miller, Preston R; Mowery, Nathan T; Agarwal, Suresh K; Winchell, Robert J; Crandall, Marie L

    2017-05-22

    The International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, Clinical Modification and Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) have been in effect since October 1, 2015 and offer much greater capacity than previous classifications to characterize the nature and treatment of surgical conditions. However, the diagnosis codes of ICD-10-CM are unevenly specific across the spectrum of surgical conditions and currently do not adequately allow description of important distinctions in disease severity for many common surgical conditions. Through our work on the Patient Assessment Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, we sought changes to ICD-10-CM to allow for better characterization of the severity of several common emergency general surgical conditions, such as acute appendicitis and acute pancreatitis. The ICD Coordination and Maintenance Committee periodically entertains requests to improve ICD-10-CM/PCS through a formal process with public input; the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, in coordination with other agencies and organizations, issue annual updates to these classifications. We describe some potential improvements to ICD-10-CM/PCS as well as how individuals and organizations can propose and effect such changes. With the next parent classification for mortality reporting (ICD-11) currently in development by the World Health Organization, now is also an opportune time to request changes that eventually would be incorporated into the future U.S. version of ICD-11 for morbidity reporting.

  14. 77 FR 32975 - AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of Quality Indicators (QIs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of... nominations for members of approximately 10 multidisciplinary workgroups, to be convened by AHRQ's contractor, on ICD-10-CM/PCS conversion of the AHRQ Quality Indicators (QIs). DATES: Please submit nominations...

  15. Wavelength sensitive detector based on ICD in two coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2014-05-01

    We design a wavelength sensitive detector based on inter coulombic decay (ICD) mechanism in a two-quantum well nano-structure. The two coupled quantum wells are designed to satisfy the specific conditions which allow the ICD to occur. In this setup, by absorbing light an electron in one well is excited. Its relaxation back to the ground state is a non-radiative process which transfers the excess energy to the ionization of the electron in the neighboring well into the continuum. Only radiation with a specific wavelength will be absorbed, when the wavelength matches the excitation energy in the quantum well. By applying a weak bias a current is obtained even when light with a very low intensity is absorbed. For the ICD to be dominant decay mechanism it must prevail over all other possible competitive decay processes. We have found that the lifetime of the ICD is on the timescale of picoseconds. Control over the ICD lifetime can be achieved by variation of different parameters in the two quantum well nano-structure. The most useful parameter is the distance between the two quantum wells. We show that as the distance decreases the decay rate of the ICD increases. Furthermore the distance can be tuned such that the emitted electron would be in a metastable state in the continuum (a resonance state); this causes the life time of the ICD to be an order of magnitude smaller, and improves the efficiency of the ICD.

  16. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907-0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding.

  17. ICD-11 should not repeat the mistakes made by DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Frances, Allen J; Nardo, John M

    2013-07-01

    Having two systems of psychiatric diagnosis creates unnecessary confusion therefore it would be desirable to achieve increased consistency between ICD-11 and DSM-5. Unfortunately, however, DSM-5 has included many controversial suggestions that have weak scientific support and insufficient risk-benefit analysis. As a result ICD-11 should learn from the DSM-5 mistakes rather than repeating them.

  18. Comparison of ICD-10 and DC: 0-3R Diagnoses in Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equit, Monika; Paulus, Frank; Fuhrmann, Pia; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare diagnoses of patients from a special outpatient department for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Specifically, overlap, age and gender differences according to the two classification systems DC: 0-3R and ICD-10 were examined. 299 consecutive children aged 0-5;11 years received both ICD-10 and…

  19. Colorado Twin Registry: an update.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Sally-Ann; Gross, Andy A; Haberstick, Brett C; Corley, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    The Colorado Twin Registry (CTR) is a population-based registry housed at the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado. Recruitment began in 1982 and includes twins born from 1968 to the present. Four samples are currently drawn from the CTR: The Community Twin Sample, the Longitudinal Twin Sample, the Early Reading Development Sample, and the Colorado Learning Sample. Criteria for enrollment, recruitment strategies, demographic information, and zygosity assignment are explained for each sample. In addition, five studies in which CTR twins are now participating are highlighted. These include studies of cognition, learning ability, and vulnerability to substance abuse and antisocial behavior. The development of the CTR is an ongoing and evolving process, and it has proven to be a valuable registry, relatively representative of the population from which it was drawn.

  20. Italian Polar Metadata System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Nativi, S.; Leone, C.; Migliorini, S.; Mazari Villanova, L.

    2012-04-01

    Italian Polar Metadata System C.Leone, S.Longo, S.Migliorini, L.Mazari Villanova, S. Nativi The Italian Antarctic Research Programme (PNRA) is a government initiative funding and coordinating scientific research activities in polar regions. PNRA manages two scientific Stations in Antarctica - Concordia (Dome C), jointly operated with the French Polar Institute "Paul Emile Victor", and Mario Zucchelli (Terra Nova Bay, Southern Victoria Land). In addition National Research Council of Italy (CNR) manages one scientific Station in the Arctic Circle (Ny-Alesund-Svalbard Islands), named Dirigibile Italia. PNRA started in 1985 with the first Italian Expedition in Antarctica. Since then each research group has collected data regarding biology and medicine, geodetic observatory, geophysics, geology, glaciology, physics and atmospheric chemistry, earth-sun relationships and astrophysics, oceanography and marine environment, chemistry contamination, law and geographic science, technology, multi and inter disciplinary researches, autonomously with different formats. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Research assigned the scientific coordination of the Programme to CNR, which is in charge of the management and sharing of the scientific results carried out in the framework of the PNRA. Therefore, CNR is establishing a new distributed cyber(e)-infrastructure to collect, manage, publish and share polar research results. This is a service-based infrastructure building on Web technologies to implement resources (i.e. data, services and documents) discovery, access and visualization; in addition, semantic-enabled functionalities will be provided. The architecture applies the "System of Systems" principles to build incrementally on the existing systems by supplementing but not supplanting their mandates and governance arrangements. This allows to keep the existing capacities as autonomous as possible. This cyber(e)-infrastructure implements multi-disciplinary interoperability following

  1. Endocardial Lead Extraction in the Polish Registry – clinical practice versus current Heart Rhythm Society consensus

    PubMed Central

    Kutarski, Andrzej; Mitkowski, Przemysław; Przybylski, Andrzej; Lewek, Joanna; Małecka, Barbara; Smukowski, Tomasz; Maciąg, Aleksander; Śmigielski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of patients with pacemaker (PM) and cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). This study is a retrospective analysis of indications for endocardial pacemaker and ICD lead extractions between 2003 and 2009 based on the experience of three Polish Referral Lead Extraction Centers. Material and methods Since 2003, the authors have consecutively retrospectively collected all cases and entered the information in the database. All patients which had indication for lead extraction according to Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines were included to final analyze. Between 2003 and 2005, the data were analyzed together. Since 2006, data have been collected and analyzed annually. Results In each year, a significant increase in lead extraction was observed. The main indications for LE were infections in 52.4% of patients. Nonfunctioning lead extraction constituted the second group of indications for LE in 29.7% of patients. During the registry period, the percentage of class I indications decreased from 80% in 2006 to only 47% in 2009. On the other hand, increasingly more leads were removed because of class 2, especially class 2b. In 2009, 40% of leads were extracted due to class 2b. Conclusions Polish Registry of Endocardial Lead Extraction 2003-2009, shows an increasing frequency of lead extraction. The main indication for LE is infection: systemic and pocket. An increase in class 2, especially 2b, LE indication in every center during the study period was found. PMID:24904658

  2. Leveraging Lexical Matching and Ontological Alignment to Map SNOMED CT Surgical Procedures to ICD-10-PCS

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Kin Wah; Xu, Julia; Ameye, Filip; Gutiérrez, Arturo Romero; D'Havé, Arabella

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 ICD-10-PCS replaced ICD-9-CM for coding medical procedures in the U.S. We explored two methods to automatically map SNOMED CT surgical procedures to ICD-10-PCS. First, we used MetaMap to lexically map ICD-10-PCS index terms to SNOMED CT. Second, we made use of the axial structure of ICD-10-PCS and aligned them to defining attributes in SNOMED CT. Lexical mapping produced 45% of correct maps and 44% of broader maps. Ontological mappings were 40% correct and 5% broader. Both correct and broader maps will be useful in assisting mappers to create the map. When the two mapping methods agreed, the accuracy increased to 93%. Reviewing the MetaMap generated body part mappings and using additional information in the SNOMED CT names and definitions can lead to better results for the ontological map. PMID:28269853

  3. Dual device therapy in the setting of changing ICD technology: device-device interaction revisited.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, R G; Dorian, P; Poludnikiewicz, M; Newman, D

    1997-06-01

    This case report concerns an adverse device-device interaction between a replacement ICD and a dual chamber rate responsive pacemaker. It was observed that subtle changes in the design of sensing circuits between an older first-generation ICD and the newer third-generation ICD device led to unexpected and dramatic changes in the interactive behavior of a dual device system. The new ICD was connected to chronically implanted hardware. The sensing behavior of the newer ICD included a shorter time constant in the decay of the automatic gain control function, resulting in triple sensing of both the atrial and ventricular paced stimuli and the evoked QRS complex. Physicians should be aware of new design changes in the future so as to anticipate such interactions. In the setting of rapidly changing technology, extra caution must be exercised when choosing to implant two devices in the same patient.

  4. Comparing ICD-10 external cause codes for pedal cyclists with self-reported crash details.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ben; Ekegren, Christina L; Cameron, Peter; Stevenson, Mark; Judson, Rodney; Bucknill, Andrew; Edwards, Elton; Gabbe, Belinda

    2017-02-16

    Accurate coding of injury event information is critical in developing targeted injury prevention strategies. However, little is known about the validity of the most universally used coding system, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), in characterising crash counterparts in pedal cycling events. This study aimed to determine the agreement between hospital-coded ICD-10-AM (Australian modification) external cause codes with self-reported crash characteristics in a sample of pedal cyclists admitted to hospital following bicycle crashes. Interview responses from 141 injured cyclists were mapped to a single ICD-10-AM external cause code for comparison with ICD-10-AM external cause codes from hospital administrative data. The percentage of agreement was 77.3% with a κ value of 0.68 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.77), indicating substantial agreement. Nevertheless, studies reliant on ICD-10 codes from administrative data should consider the 23% level of disagreement when characterising crash counterparts in cycling crashes.

  5. The Italian screening program for primary congenital hypothyroidism: actions to improve screening, diagnosis, follow-up, and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Cassio, A; Corbetta, C; Antonozzi, I; Calaciura, F; Caruso, U; Cesaretti, G; Gastaldi, R; Medda, E; Mosca, F; Pasquini, E; Salerno, M C; Stoppioni, V; Tonacchera, M; Weber, G; Olivieri, A

    2013-03-01

    The Italian screening program for primary congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is an integrated system including neonatal screening, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and nationwide surveillance of the disease. The aim of the Italian screening program for CH is to identify not only babies with severe permanent CH (core target), but also babies with mild persistent and transient forms of CH who could have a benefit from an early replacement therapy (secondary target). In the last years, despite the important results obtained in terms of standardization of screening and follow-up procedures, it has become clear the need of optimizing the program in order to harmonize the screening strategy and the screening procedures among Regions, and to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic approach in all affected infants. On the basis of available guidelines, the experience of the Italian screening and clinical reference centers, and the knowledge derived from the nation-wide surveillance activity performed by the Italian National Registry of Infants with CH, the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology together with the Italian Society for the Study of Metabolic Diseases and Neonatal Screening and the Italian National Institute of Health promoted actions aimed at improving diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and surveillance of CH in our country. In this paper the most important actions to improve the Italian screening program for CH are described. ©2013, Editrice Kurtis

  6. A "Quiz" on Italian Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Giuseppe Antonio

    1940-01-01

    The cultural achievements of Italy are utilized to spur interest in the study of Italian. A weekly, multiple-choice type quiz posted on the Italian bulletin board questions curious passers-by in the areas of fine arts, literature, science, geography, history, and miscellaneous items. Sample items of this motivational device follow a description of…

  7. The Languages of Italian Canadians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizmuller-Zocco, Jana

    1995-01-01

    Examines the transplantation of dialects of Italian abroad, particularly to Canada. Argues that any discussion of the language of immigrants from Italy has to start from the premise that they brought their dialect, not Italian, to their new home. Conclusions indicate that "Italo-Canadian" shares many linguistic characteristics with…

  8. Results from the Veterans Health Administration ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Shelley; Heller, Pamela; Fenton, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the US Department of Veterans Affairs has been preparing for the October 1, 2015, conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification and Procedural Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) for more than four years. The VHA's Office of Informatics and Analytics ICD-10 Program Management Office established an ICD-10 Learning Lab to explore expected operational challenges. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the classification system conversion on coding productivity. ICD codes are integral to VHA business processes and are used for purposes such as clinical studies, performance measurement, workload capture, cost determination, Veterans Equitable Resource Allocation (VERA) determination, morbidity and mortality classification, indexing of hospital records by disease and operations, data storage and retrieval, research purposes, and reimbursement. The data collection for this study occurred in multiple VHA sites across several months using standardized methods. It is commonly accepted that coding productivity will decrease with the implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. The findings of this study suggest that the decrease will be more significant for inpatient coding productivity (64.5 percent productivity decrease) than for ambulatory care coding productivity (6.7 percent productivity decrease). This study reveals the following important points regarding ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity: Ambulatory care ICD-10-CM coding productivity is not expected to decrease as significantly as inpatient ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity.Coder training and type of record (inpatient versus outpatient) affect coding productivity.Inpatient coding productivity is decreased when a procedure requiring ICD-10-PCS coding is present. It is highly recommended that organizations perform their own analyses to determine the effects of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation on coding productivity. PMID:26396553

  9. Results from the Veterans Health Administration ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Weems, Shelley; Heller, Pamela; Fenton, Susan H

    2015-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the US Department of Veterans Affairs has been preparing for the October 1, 2015, conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification and Procedural Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) for more than four years. The VHA's Office of Informatics and Analytics ICD-10 Program Management Office established an ICD-10 Learning Lab to explore expected operational challenges. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the classification system conversion on coding productivity. ICD codes are integral to VHA business processes and are used for purposes such as clinical studies, performance measurement, workload capture, cost determination, Veterans Equitable Resource Allocation (VERA) determination, morbidity and mortality classification, indexing of hospital records by disease and operations, data storage and retrieval, research purposes, and reimbursement. The data collection for this study occurred in multiple VHA sites across several months using standardized methods. It is commonly accepted that coding productivity will decrease with the implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. The findings of this study suggest that the decrease will be more significant for inpatient coding productivity (64.5 percent productivity decrease) than for ambulatory care coding productivity (6.7 percent productivity decrease). This study reveals the following important points regarding ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity: 1. Ambulatory care ICD-10-CM coding productivity is not expected to decrease as significantly as inpatient ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity. 2. Coder training and type of record (inpatient versus outpatient) affect coding productivity. 3. Inpatient coding productivity is decreased when a procedure requiring ICD-10-PCS coding is present. It is highly recommended that organizations perform their own analyses to determine the effects of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation on coding productivity.

  10. Italian families and family interventions.

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2014-06-01

    In Italy, as in many countries, relatives are closely involved in caring for persons with physical and mental disorders. The Italian scenario lends itself to routine involvement of family members in psychiatric treatment because, despite becoming smaller and smaller, Italian families keep close ties, and men and women do not leave the parental home until relatively late. The authors describe the impact of international family psychosocial research on the Italian mental health services (MHSs) and the main psychosocial interventions currently in use, including family psychoeducational interventions and the "Milan family therapy approach." They also highlight the contribution Italian researchers have given to the study of important variables in integrated mental disorder care, such as family burden of care, relatives' attitudes, family functioning, and satisfaction with the MHSs. Finally, they discuss the difficulties of implementing and disseminating family interventions within the Italian MHS, despite the growing evidence of their effectiveness.

  11. Functional characterization and transcriptional analysis of icd2 gene encoding an isocitrate dehydrogenase of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ying-Chuan; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Du, Shin-Chiao; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2017-08-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate. In the genome of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the phytopathogen that causes black rot in cruciferous plants, two putative IDH genes, icd1 and icd2, have been annotated. Their physiological roles in X. campestris pv. campestris are unclear. In this study, the icd2 gene from X. campestris pv. campestris was characterized in detail. We demonstrated genetically that icd2 gene encodes a functional IDH, and is involved in virulence as well as bacterial attachment. Furthermore, the icd2 transcription initiation site was mapped at nucleotide G, 127 nucleotide upstream of the icd2 translation start codon. In addition, promoter analysis revealed that icd2 expression exhibits a distinct expression profile under different culture conditions, is subjected to catabolite repression, and is affected by acetate. This is the first time that the function and transcription of icd2 have been characterized in the crucifer pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris.

  12. Prevalence, correlates, and temporal trends in antiarrhythmic drug use at discharge after implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement (from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry [NCDR]).

    PubMed

    Dev, Sandesh; Peterson, Pamela N; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P; Varosy, Paul D; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2014-01-15

    Patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) can require antiarrhythmic drugs to manage arrhythmias and prevent device shocks. We sought to determine the prevalence, clinical correlates, and institutional variation in the use of antiarrhythmic drugs over time after ICD implantation. From the ICD Registry (2006 to 2011), we analyzed the trends in the use of antiarrhythmic agents prescribed at hospital discharge for patients undergoing first-time ICD placement. The patient, provider, and facility level variables associated with antiarrhythmic use were determined using multivariate logistic regression models. A median odds ratio was calculated to assess the hospital-level variation in the use of antiarrhythmic drugs. Of the cohort (n = 500,995), 15% had received an antiarrhythmic drug at discharge. The use of class III agents increased modestly (13.9% to 14.9%, p <0.01). Amiodarone was the most commonly prescribed drug (82%) followed by sotalol (10%). Among the subgroups, the greatest increase in prescribing was for patients who had received a secondary prevention ICD (26% in 2006% and 30% in 2011, p <0.01) or with a history of ventricular tachycardia (23% to 27%, p <0.01). The median odds ratio for antiarrhythmic prescription was 1.45, indicating that 2 randomly selected hospitals would have had a 45% difference in the odds of treating identical patients with an antiarrhythmic drug. In conclusion, antiarrhythmic drug use, particularly class III antiarrhythmic drugs, is common among ICD recipients at hospital discharge and varies by hospital, suggesting an influence from local treatment patterns. The observed hospital variation suggests a role for augmentation of clinical guidelines regarding the use of antiarrhythmic drugs for patients undergoing implantation of an ICD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The Registry Evaluating Functional Outcomes of Resynchronization Management (REFORM): quality of life and psychological functioning in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jessica; Sears, Samuel; Ramza, Brian; Reynolds, Dwight W; Nguyen, Paul; Fedewa, Michelle; House, John; Kennedy, Paul; Thompson, Rose; Murray, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a treatment for heart failure (HF) that improves cardiac, functional, and quality of life (QoL) outcomes. This study was designed to examine the effect of the addition of CRT (CRTD) to the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) on psychological functioning. Overall, 99 participants completed batteries before and 9 months after ICD or CRTD implantation in a registry of HF patients receiving device treatment in 3 US centers. Measures included validated indices of mental health (State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire: Depression) and generic and disease/device-specific QoL (Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-12, Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, Florida Patient Acceptance Survey, Florida Shock Anxiety Scale). Mixed between-within analyses of covariance were employed to compare device groups on each outcome controlling for cardiac and demographic covariates. Clinically significant anxiety was elevated in both groups at both time points (57% CRTD at baseline, 29% CRTD 9 months, 44% ICD at baseline, 45% ICD 9 months). Clinically significant depressive symptoms were high at baseline (38% CRTD, 31% ICD), but dropped at follow-up (16% CRTD, 7% ICD; P = 0.01). Participants with CRTD had improved mental component and disease-specific QoL following CRT; however, CRTD patients had worse QoL, worse mental component QoL at baseline, and worse device acceptance at 9-month follow-up than patients with ICDs (all P < 0.05). Evidence of low QoL, psychological functioning, and device acceptance provides the impetus to increase research on well-being of HF patients being implanted with CRTD in research and clinical work. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Positive predictive value of ICD-9th codes for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzzi, C; Troncon, M G; Agostinis, L; García Rodríguez, L A

    1999-06-01

    We identified patients whose records in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database in the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia showed a code of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and perforation according to codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9th revision. The validity of site- and lesion-specific codes (531 to 534) and nonspecific codes (5780, 5781, and 5789) was ascertained through manual review of hospital clinical records. The initial group was made of 1779 potential cases of UGIB identified with one of these codes recorded. First, the positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated in a random sample. As a result of the observed high PPV of 531 and 532 codes, additional hospital charts were solely requested for all remaining potential cases with 533, 534, and 578 ICD-9 codes. The overall PPV reached a high of 97% for 531 and 532 site-specific codes, 84% for 534 site-specific codes, and 80% for 533 lesion-specific codes, and a low of 59% for nonspecific codes. These data suggest a considerable research potential for this new computerized health care database in Southern Europe.

  15. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  16. Incidence of primary breast cancer in Iran: Ten-year national cancer registry data report.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Ramezani, Rashid; Kaviani, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The screening programs and advances in the treatment of patients with breast cancer have led to an increase in overall survival. Cancer registry systems play an important role in providing basic data for research and the monitoring of the cancer status. In this study, the results of the 10-year national cancer registry (NCR) of Iran in breast cancer are reviewed. NCR database records were searched for primary breast cancer records according to ICD-O-3 coding and the cases were reviewed. A total of 52,068 cases were found with the coding of primary breast cancer. Females constituted 97.1% of the cases. Breast cancer was the leading type of cancer in Iranian females, accounting for 24.6% of all cancers. The mean age of the women with breast cancer was 49.6 years (95%CI 49.5-49.6). Most of the cases (95.7%) were registered as having invasive pathologies (behavior code 3). The most common morphology of primary breast cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma (ICD-O 8500/3) followed by invasive lobular carcinoma (ICD-O 8520/3) with relative frequencies of 77.8% and 5.2%, respectively. The average annual crude incidence of primary breast cancer in females was 22.6 (95%CI 22.1-23.1) per 100,000 females, with an age-standardized rate (ASR) of 27.4 (95%CI 22.5-35.9). There were no data on survival, staging or immunohistochemical marker(s) of the breast-cancer-registered cases. The incidence of breast cancer in Iran is lower than in low-middle-income neighboring countries. The NCR data registry of breast cancer is not accurate in monitoring the effect of screening programs or determining the current status of breast cancer in Iran. Screening programs of breast cancer in Iran have failed to enhance the detection of the patients with in situ lesion detection. A quality breast cancer registry and a screening program for breast cancer are both needed. Copyright © 2015

  17. A PROLOG registry of experts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Mashburn, S.A.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of Prolog in the construction of a user-friendly registry of consultants. This data base provides access by name, expertise, organization, or state. Also discussed are the features of this language which make it adaptable for this purpose. 3 refs., 11 figs. (LSP)

  18. First inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is often due to inaccurate device programming: analysis of the French OPERA registry.

    PubMed

    Leenhardt, Antoine; Defaye, Pascal; Mouton, Elisabeth; Delay, Marc; Delarche, Nicolas; Dupuis, Jean-Marc; Bizeau, Olivier; Mabo, Philippe; Cheggour, Saida; Babuty, Dominique

    2012-10-01

    Inappropriate therapy delivered by implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) remains a challenge. The OPERA registry measured the times to, and studied the determinants of, first appropriate (FAT) and inappropriate (FIT) therapies delivered by single-, dual- and triple-chamber [cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D)] ICD. We entered 636 patients (mean age = 62.0 ± 13.5 years; 88% men) in the registry, of whom 251 received single-, 238 dual-, and 147 triple-chamber ICD, for primary (30.5%) or secondary (69.5%) indications. We measured times to FAT and FIT as a function of multiple clinical characteristics, examined the effects of various algorithm components on the likelihood of FAT and FIT delivery, and searched for predictors of FAT and FIT. Over 22.8 ± 8.8 months of observation, 184 patients (28.9%) received FAT and 70 (11.0%) received FIT. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) was the trigger of 88% of FAT, and supraventricular tachycardia was the trigger of 91% of FIT. The median times to FIT (90 days; range 49-258) and FAT (171 days; 50-363) were similar. The rate of FAT was higher (P <0.001) in patients treated for secondary than primary indications, while that of FIT were similar in both groups. Out of 57 analysable FIT, 27 (47.4%) could have been prevented by fine tuning the device programming like the sustained rate duration or the VT discrimination algorithm. First inappropriate therapy occurred in 11% of 636 ICD recipients followed for ∼2 years. Nearly 50% of FIT could have been prevented by improving device programming.

  19. The Utility and Challenges of Using ICD Codes in Child Maltreatment Research: A Review of Existing Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Debbie; Tonmyr, Lil; Fraser, Jenny; Walker, Sue; McKenzie, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this article are to explore the extent to which the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) has been used in child abuse research, to describe how the ICD system has been applied, and to assess factors affecting the reliability of ICD coded data in child abuse research.…

  20. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded winery...

  1. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded winery...

  2. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded winery...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  5. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics... General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the FAA under this Part must be mailed to the Registry, Department of Transportation, Post Office Box...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  7. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics... General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the FAA under this part must be mailed to the Registry, Department of Transportation, Post Office Box...

  8. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics... General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the FAA under this part must be mailed to the Registry, Department of Transportation, Post Office Box...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  11. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded winery...

  12. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded winery...

  13. Non-Standard Italian Dialect Heritage Speakers' Acquisition of Clitic Placement in Standard Italian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the acquisition of object clitic placement in Standard Italian by heritage speakers (HSs) of non-standard Italian dialects. It compares two different groups of Standard Italian learners--Northern Italian dialect HSs and Southern Italian dialect HSs--whose heritage dialects contrast with each other in clitic word order.…

  14. Non-Standard Italian Dialect Heritage Speakers' Acquisition of Clitic Placement in Standard Italian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the acquisition of object clitic placement in Standard Italian by heritage speakers (HSs) of non-standard Italian dialects. It compares two different groups of Standard Italian learners--Northern Italian dialect HSs and Southern Italian dialect HSs--whose heritage dialects contrast with each other in clitic word order.…

  15. Obsessive-compulsive disorder for ICD-11: proposed changes to the diagnostic guidelines and specifiers

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Reddy, Y. C. Janardhan

    2016-01-01

    Since the approval of the ICD-10 by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1990, global research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has expanded dramatically. This article evaluates what changes may be needed to enhance the scientific validity, clinical utility, and global applicability of OCD diagnostic guidelines in preparation for ICD-11. Existing diagnostic guidelines for OCD were compared. Key issues pertaining to clinical description, differential diagnosis, and specifiers were identified and critically reviewed on the basis of the current literature. Specific modifications to ICD guidelines are recommended, including: clarifying the definition of obsessions (i.e., that obsessions can be thoughts, images, or impulses/urges) and compulsions (i.e., clarifying that these can be behaviors or mental acts and not calling these “stereotyped”); stating that compulsions are often associated with obsessions; and removing the ICD-10 duration requirement of at least 2 weeks. In addition, a diagnosis of OCD should no longer be excluded if comorbid with Tourette syndrome, schizophrenia, or depressive disorders. Moreover, the ICD-10 specifiers (i.e., predominantly obsessional thoughts, compulsive acts, or mixed) should be replaced with a specifier for insight. Based on new research, modifications to the ICD-10 diagnostic guidelines for OCD are recommended for ICD-11. PMID:25388607

  16. The impact of proposed changes to ICD-11 on estimates of PTSD prevalence and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wisco, Blair E; Miller, Mark W; Wolf, Erika J; Kilpatrick, Dean; Resnick, Heidi S; Badour, Christal L; Marx, Brian P; Keane, Terence M; Rosen, Raymond C; Friedman, Matthew J

    2016-06-30

    The World Health Organization's posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) work group has published a proposal for the forthcoming edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that would yield a very different diagnosis relative to DSM-5. This study examined the impact of the proposed ICD-11 changes on PTSD prevalence relative to the ICD-10 and DSM-5 definitions and also evaluated the extent to which these changes would accomplish the stated aim of reducing the comorbidity associated with PTSD. Diagnostic prevalence estimates were compared using a U.S. national community sample and two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clinical samples. The ICD-11 definition yielded prevalence estimates 10-30% lower than DSM-5 and 25% and 50% lower than ICD-10 with no reduction in the prevalence of common comorbidities. Findings suggest that by constraining the diagnosis to a narrower set of symptoms, the proposed ICD-11 criteria set would substantially reduce the number of individuals with the disorder. These findings raise doubt about the extent to which the ICD-11 proposal would achieve the aim of reducing comorbidity associated with PTSD and highlight the public health and policy implications of such a redefinition.

  17. ICD Therapy In RVOT-VT And Early Stage ARVD/C Patients.

    PubMed

    Aizawa Md, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki Md, Seiji; Fukuda Md, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve the survival of patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and a reduced ejection fraction. However, the efficacy of ICD therapy in patients with right ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia (RVOT-VT) and early stage arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia / cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) has not been well clarified. Although the prognosis of RVOT-VT is generally good, malignant forms of RVOT-VT resulting in polymorphic VT have been reported by several investigators. Radiofrequency catheter ablation is still effective in such patients, and thus an ICD implantation is usually not required. On the other hand, according to the current guidelines in patients with ARVD/C, an ICD implantation is recommended for secondary prevention when the patients develop sustained VT or VF. An ICD implantation may also be considered for primary prevention in high-risk patients: extensive disease, family history of sudden cardiac death, or undiagnosed syncope. Since an ICD implantation in the early stage of ARVD/C is controversial, physicians should well consider its risks and benefits. Early intervention with ICD therapy in ARVD/C patients may reduce the arrhythmic death rate but increases the device related complications especially in younger patients.

  18. Reliability of ICD-10 external cause of death codes in the National Coroners Information System.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Lyndal; Clapperton, Angela J; Killian, Jessica J; Stephan, Karen L; Ozanne-Smith, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Availability of ICD-10 cause of death codes in the National Coroners Information System (NCIS) strengthens its value as a public health surveillance tool. This study quantified the completeness of external cause ICD-10 codes in the NCIS for Victorian deaths (as assigned by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in the yearly Cause of Death data). It also examined the concordance between external cause ICD-10 codes contained in the NCIS and a re-code of the same deaths conducted by an independent coder. Of 7,400 NCIS external cause deaths included in this study, 961 (13.0%) did not contain an ABS assigned ICD-10 code and 225 (3.0%) contained only a natural cause code. Where an ABS assigned external cause ICD-10 code was present (n=6,214), 4,397 (70.8%) matched exactly with the independently assigned ICD-10 code. Coding disparity primarily related to differences in assignment of intent and specificity. However, in a small number of deaths (n=49, 0.8%) there was coding disparity for both intent and external cause category. NCIS users should be aware of the limitations of relying only on ICD-10 codes contained within the NCIS for deaths prior to 2007 and consider using these in combination with the other NCIS data fields and code sets to ensure optimum case identification.

  19. Preparing for ICD-10-CM/PCS: One Payer's Experience with General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs)

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Davis, Sydney V

    2012-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition, Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) has been mandated as the new code set to be used for medical coding in the United States beginning on October 1, 2013, replacing the use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). To assist in the transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS, the National Center for Health Statistics developed bidirectional general equivalent mappings (GEMs) between the old and new code sets. This article looks at how the GEMs have been leveraged by Health Care Service Corporation (HCSC) to achieve the goal of transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS. The analysis examines the questions asked and lessons learned in the practical application of the GEMs for the translation of business rules and processes in order to promote a deeper understanding of the data issues involved in the transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS from a payer's perspective. PMID:22548023

  20. The Impact of Proposed Changes to ICD-11 on Estimates of PTSD Prevalence and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wisco, Blair E.; Miller, Mark W.; Wolf, Erika J.; Kilpatrick, Dean; Resnick, Heidi S.; Badour, Christal L.; Marx, Brian P.; Keane, Terence M.; Rosen, Raymond C.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization's posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) work group has published a proposal for the forthcoming edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that would yield a very different diagnosis relative to DSM-5. This study examined the impact of the proposed ICD-11 changes on PTSD prevalence relative to the ICD-10 and DSM-5 definitions and also evaluated the extent to which these changes would accomplish the stated aim of reducing the comorbidity associated with PTSD. Diagnostic prevalence estimates were compared using a U.S. national community sample and two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clinical samples. The ICD-11 definition yielded prevalence estimates 10 to 30 percent lower than DSM-5 and 25 and 50 percent lower than ICD-10 with no reduction in the prevalence of common comorbidities. Findings suggest that by constraining the diagnosis to a narrower set of symptoms, the proposed ICD-11 criteria set would substantially reduce the number of individuals with the disorder. These findings raise doubt about the extent to which the ICD-11 proposal would achieve the aim of reducing comorbidity associated with PTSD and highlight the public health and policy implications of such a redefinition. PMID:27124207

  1. The development of the ICD-11 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines for Mental and Behavioural Disorders

    PubMed Central

    First, Michael B; Reed, Geoffrey M; Hyman, Steven E; Saxena, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization is in the process of preparing the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), scheduled for presentation to the World Health Assembly for approval in 2017. The International Advisory Group for the Revision of the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders made improvement in clinical utility an organizing priority for the revision. The uneven nature of the diagnostic information included in the ICD-10 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (CDDG), especially with respect to differential diagnosis, is a major shortcoming in terms of its usefulness to clinicians. Consequently, ICD-11 Working Groups were asked to collate diagnostic information about the disorders under their purview using a standardized template (referred to as a “Content Form”). Using the information provided in the Content Forms as source material, the ICD-11 CDDG are being developed with a uniform structure. The effectiveness of this format in producing more consistent clinical judgments in ICD-11 as compared to ICD-10 is currently being tested in a series of Internet-based field studies using standardized case material, and will also be tested in clinical settings. PMID:25655162

  2. Positive Psychotherapy to Improve Autonomic Function and Mood in ICD Patients (PAM-ICD): Rationale and Design of an RCT Currently Underway.

    PubMed

    Serber, Eva R; Fava, Joseph L; Christon, Lillian M; Buxton, Alfred E; Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Gold, Michael R; Rodrigue, James R; Frisch, Michael B

    2016-05-01

    Improving mental and physical health of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) is critical because this group is at high risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death and depressed or anxious cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients appear to be at even higher risk for mortality compared to nondepressed or nonanxious CVD patients. Further, autonomic dysfunction is present in these patients, and negative emotions and arrhythmias form a downward spiral further worsening mood, well-being, and cardiovascular health. Much research demonstrates that positive emotion is related to health benefits, improved physiology, and increased survival. This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial aiming to recruit 60 adult ICD patients comparing 12 individually delivered, weekly sessions of: (1) a positive emotion-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (Quality of Life Therapy [QOLT]), and (2) Heart Healthy Education. Autonomic functioning, heart rhythm indices, and psychosocial health are measured at baseline, 3 months, and 9 months. The first goal is feasibility and acceptability, with the primary outcome being arrhythmic event frequency data. This study is designed to test whether QOLT produces changes in mood, quality of life/well-being, autonomic function, and arrhythmic and ICD therapy event rates. This feasibility trial is a foundational step for the next trial of QOLT to help determine whether a 3-month QOLT trial can reduce arrhythmias occurrences among ICD patients, and examine a mechanism of autonomic functioning. This study may help to develop and implement new medical or psychological therapies for ICD patients. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Intracellular fragment of NLRR3 (NLRR3-ICD) stimulates ATRA-dependent neuroblastoma differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Jesmin; Takatori, Atsushi; Islam, Md. Sazzadul; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Nagase, Hiroki; Nakagawara, Akira

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • NLRR3 is a membrane protein highly expressed in favorable neuroblastoma. • NLRR3-ICD was produced through proteolytic processing by secretases. • NLRR3-ICD was induced to be translocated into cell nucleus following ATRA exposure. • NLRR3-ICD plays a pivotal role in ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. - Abstract: We have previously identified neuronal leucine-rich repeat protein-3 (NLRR3) gene which is preferentially expressed in favorable human neuroblastomas as compared with unfavorable ones. In this study, we have found for the first time that NLRR3 is proteolytically processed by secretases and its intracellular domain (NLRR3-ICD) is then released to translocate into cell nucleus during ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. According to our present observations, NLRR3-ICD was induced to accumulate in cell nucleus of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells following ATRA treatment. Since the proteolytic cleavage of NLRR3 was blocked by α- or γ-secretase inhibitor, it is likely that NLRR3-ICD is produced through the secretase-mediated processing of NLRR3. Intriguingly, forced expression of NLRR3-ICD in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells significantly suppressed their proliferation as examined by a live-cell imaging system and colony formation assay. Similar results were also obtained in neuroblastoma TGW cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRR3-ICD stimulated ATRA-dependent neurite elongation in SK-N-BE cells. Together, our present results strongly suggest that NLRR3-ICD produced by the secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of NLRR3 plays a crucial role in ATRA-mediated neuronal differentiation, and provide a clue to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against aggressive neuroblastomas.

  4. How well do the DSM-5 alcohol use disorder designations map to the ICD-10 disorders?

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Norman G; Kopak, Albert M

    2015-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10), both establish diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders. The dimensional severity perspective provided by the DSM-5 may overlap in important ways but also may diverge from the categorical harmful use versus dependence designations presented by the ICD-10. It is especially important to consider the convergence of these 2 diagnostic approaches as the DSM is widely used by clinicians, but the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently required that providers bill for services using the ICD-10 designations. Data from 6,871 male and 801 female admissions to a state prison system were used to compare the DSM-5 severity index for alcohol use disorder to the ICD-10 clinical and research formulations for harmful use and dependence. The DSM-5 and the ICD-10 were highly convergent for the most severe alcohol use disorders and also for those who did not receive a diagnosis. Most DSM-5 moderate alcohol use disorder cases were classified as dependence cases under both the clinical and research ICD criteria. In contrast, there was much more variation in the DSM mild cases. These were divided into categories of harmful use or misuse, depending on whether the clinical or research ICD criteria were applied. Results were similar among male and female inmates. The DSM-5 and ICD-10 exhibit a high level of agreement for cases that would not receive a diagnosis as well as the most severe cases. However, there are important distinctions to be made between the 2 approaches for mild and moderate DSM disorders in addition to harmful use/misuse cases in the ICD. The cases influenced by these discrepancies are most likely to be affected by recently implemented service provider billing practices. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Diagnostic Concordance between DSM-5 and ICD-10 Cannabis Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Steven L; Williams, Daniel C; Kopak, Albert M; Voluse, Andrew C; Connolly, Kevin M; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2016-07-01

    With the recent federal mandate that all U.S. health care settings transition to ICD-10 billing codes, empirical evidence is necessary to determine if the DSM-5 designations map to their respective ICD-10 diagnostic categories/billing codes. The present study examined the concordance between DSM-5 and ICD-10 cannabis use disorder diagnoses. Data were derived from routine clinical assessments of 6871 male and 801 female inmates recently admitted to a state prison system from 2000 to 2003. DSM-5 and ICD-10 diagnostic determinations were made from algorithms corresponding to the respective diagnostic formulations. Past 12-month prevalence rates of cannabis use disorders were comparable across classification systems. The vast majority of inmates with no DSM-5 diagnosis continued to have no diagnosis per the ICD-10, and a similar proportion with a DSM-5 severe diagnosis received an ICD-10 dependence diagnosis. Most of the variation in diagnostic classifications was accounted for by those with a DSM-5 moderate diagnosis in that approximately half of these cases received an ICD-10 dependence diagnosis while the remaining cases received a harmful use diagnosis. Although there appears to be a generally high level of agreement between diagnostic classification systems for those with no diagnosis or those evincing symptoms of a more severe condition, concordance between DSM-5 moderate and ICD-10 dependence diagnoses was poor. Additional research is warranted to determine the appropriateness and implications of the current DSM-5 coding guidelines regarding the assignment of an ICD-10 dependence code for those with a DSM-5 moderate diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychological correlates, allostatic overload and clinical course in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    PubMed

    Gostoli, Sara; Bonomo, Matteo; Roncuzzi, Renzo; Biffi, Mauro; Boriani, Giuseppe; Rafanelli, Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a key treatment option for both primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Despite this, there is a growing number of studies showing that ICD is often associated with post-implantation deleterious psychosocial effects, even in the absence of medical complications. Knowledge about the predictive role of pre-ICD psychological profile is scant. The present research aims to describe patients' pre-ICD psychological profile, focusing on acute and chronic distress, such as anxiety, depression, type D personality, psychosomatic syndromes and allostatic overload (AO), and to evaluate if these psychological variables could affect ICD outcomes and survival. 117 consecutive patients (74.4% males; mean age=63.1±13.7years) underwent psychological assessment prior to ICD implantation. Data on ICD-related complications and death were collected up to 26months after the intervention. At baseline, 36.8% of the sample had anxiety and 17.9% depression. Among psychosomatic syndromes, psychological factors affecting medical conditions were the most frequent (37.6%). 12.8% presented with type D personality, whereas 16.2% showed moderate AO and 4.3% severe AO. 25.6% of the patients had post-ICD complications and 6% died. Severe AO was the only predictor of survival. Our findings show that a reliable evaluation of stress and the inability to cope with it (allostatic overload) may help to identify patients at higher risk of post-ICD complications and death. Such sensitive index, more than traditional psychiatric diagnostic criteria, may help the physician to identify easily manifestations of distress and clinically relevant information, which could affect medical illness outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding Italian American cultural norms.

    PubMed

    Rozendal, N

    1987-02-01

    The components of Italian American culture in many ways provide a striking contrast to current American beliefs, values, and living habits. The challenge to the psychiatric nurse lies in maximizing the strengths of this culture to enhance the individual's ability to be what he or she can and chooses to be within the Italian culture and within the broader context of contemporary American society. By being culturally well informed and sensitive, and sharing goals and expectations with clients (Louie), the psychiatric nurse will be accepted and trusted to provide the kind of high quality care that will ultimately have a positive impact on the mental health status of Italian Americans.

  8. Italian Volcano Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  9. An Xrootd Italian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccali, T.; Donvito, G.; Diacono, D.; Marzulli, G.; Pompili, A.; Della Ricca, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Argiro, S.; Gregori, D.; Grandi, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Lista, L.; Fabozzi, F.; Barone, L. M.; Santocchia, A.; Riahi, H.; Tricomi, A.; Sgaravatto, M.; Maron, G.

    2014-06-01

    The Italian community in CMS has built a geographically distributed network in which all the data stored in the Italian region are available to all the users for their everyday work. This activity involves at different level all the CMS centers: the Tier1 at CNAF, all the four Tier2s (Bari, Rome, Legnaro and Pisa), and few Tier3s (Trieste, Perugia, Torino, Catania, Napoli, ...). The federation uses the new network connections as provided by GARR, our NREN (National Research and Education Network), which provides a minimum of 10 Gbit/s to all the sites via the GARR-X[2] project. The federation is currently based on Xrootd[1] technology, and on a Redirector aimed to seamlessly connect all the sites, giving the logical view of a single entity. A special configuration has been put in place for the Tier1, CNAF, where ad-hoc Xrootd changes have been implemented in order to protect the tape system from excessive stress, by not allowing WAN connections to access tape only files, on a file-by-file basis. In order to improve the overall performance while reading files, both in terms of bandwidth and latency, a hierarchy of xrootd redirectors has been implemented. The solution implemented provides a dedicated Redirector where all the INFN sites are registered, without considering their status (T1, T2, or T3 sites). An interesting use case were able to cover via the federation are disk-less Tier3s. The caching solution allows to operate a local storage with minimal human intervention: transfers are automatically done on a single file basis, and the cache is maintained operational by automatic removal of old files.

  10. [A life-saving shock from a subcutaneous ICD during skydiving].

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stefan; Roeger, Susanne; Becher, Tobias; Akin, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Kuschyk, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old man who was implanted a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) and then performed a skydive from a height of 3000 m. During the jump, he lost consciousness due to ventricular fibrillation (VF). The S‑ICD detected the VF properly and successfully shocked the arrhythmia. Our illustrative case emphasizes the S‑ICD as an appropriate therapy in patient with life-threatening arrhythmias even under extreme conditions.

  11. Validation of Stroke Diagnosis in the National Registry of Hospitalized Patients in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Sedova, Petra; Brown, Robert D; Zvolsky, Miroslav; Kadlecova, Pavla; Bryndziar, Tomas; Volny, Ondrej; Weiss, Viktor; Bednarik, Josef; Mikulik, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in Eastern Europe. However, detailed epidemiological data are not available. The National Registry of Hospitalized Patients (NRHOSP) is a nationwide registry of prospectively collected data regarding each hospitalization in the Czech Republic since 1998. As a first step in the evaluation of stroke epidemiology in the Czech Republic, we validated stroke cases in NRHOSP. Any hospital in the Czech Republic with a sufficient number of cases was included. We randomly selected 10 of all 72 hospitals and then 50 patients from each hospital in 2011 stratified according to stroke diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision [ICD-10] cerebrovascular codes I60, I61, I63, I64, and G45). Discharge summaries from hospitalization were reviewed independently by 2 reviewers and compared with NRHOSP for accuracy of discharge diagnosis. Any disagreements were adjudicated by a third reviewer. Of 500 requested discharge summaries, 484 (97%) were available. Validators confirmed diagnosis in NRHOSP as follows: transient ischemic attack (TIA) or any stroke type in 82% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79-86), any stroke type in 85% (95% CI, 81-88), I63/cerebral infarction in 82% (95% CI, 74-89), I60/subarachnoid hemorrhage in 91% (95% CI, 85-97), I61/intracerebral hemorrhage in 91% (95% CI, 85-96), and G45/TIA in 49% (95% CI, 39-58). The most important reason for disagreement was use of I64/stroke, not specified for patients with I63. The accuracy of coding of the stroke ICD-10 codes for subarachnoid hemorrhage (I60) and intracerebral hemorrhage (I61) included in a Czech Republic national registry was high. The accuracy of coding for I63/cerebral infarction was somewhat lower than for ICH and SAH. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A renal registry for Africa: first steps

    PubMed Central

    Davids, M. Razeen; Eastwood, John B.; Selwood, Neville H.; Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A.M.; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries. PMID:26798479

  13. Automatic ICD-10 classification of cancers from free-text death certificates.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Bevan; Zuccon, Guido; Nguyen, Anthony; Bergheim, Anton; Grayson, Narelle

    2015-11-01

    Death certificates provide an invaluable source for cancer mortality statistics; however, this value can only be realised if accurate, quantitative data can be extracted from certificates--an aim hampered by both the volume and variable nature of certificates written in natural language. This paper proposes an automatic classification system for identifying cancer related causes of death from death certificates. Detailed features, including terms, n-grams and SNOMED CT concepts were extracted from a collection of 447,336 death certificates. These features were used to train Support Vector Machine classifiers (one classifier for each cancer type). The classifiers were deployed in a cascaded architecture: the first level identified the presence of cancer (i.e., binary cancer/nocancer) and the second level identified the type of cancer (according to the ICD-10 classification system). A held-out test set was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the classifiers according to precision, recall and F-measure. In addition, detailed feature analysis was performed to reveal the characteristics of a successful cancer classification model. The system was highly effective at identifying cancer as the underlying cause of death (F-measure 0.94). The system was also effective at determining the type of cancer for common cancers (F-measure 0.7). Rare cancers, for which there was little training data, were difficult to classify accurately (F-measure 0.12). Factors influencing performance were the amount of training data and certain ambiguous cancers (e.g., those in the stomach region). The feature analysis revealed a combination of features were important for cancer type classification, with SNOMED CT concept and oncology specific morphology features proving the most valuable. The system proposed in this study provides automatic identification and characterisation of cancers from large collections of free-text death certificates. This allows organisations such as Cancer Registries

  14. Obstetric hospitalizations among Italian women, regular and irregular immigrants in North-Eastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Fedeli, Ugo; Alba, Natalia; Lisiero, Manola; Zambon, Francesco; Avossa, Francesco; Spolaore, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Italy has become an important host country for economic immigrants. The study is aimed at providing a descriptive analysis of obstetric hospitalizations among Italian and immigrant women in North-Eastern Italy. Population-based registry descriptive study. Veneto Region, Italy. All obstetric hospitalizations in 2006-2007 were extracted from the regional archive of hospital discharge records (n = 144,698). Discharges for vaginal delivery, cesarean section, threatened abortion and other antepartum diagnoses, miscarriages, and induced abortions were identified among residents with Italian or foreign citizenship, and irregular immigrants. Hospitalization rates for the above diagnostic categories were computed for Italian and foreign Veneto residents. Delivery rates, proportion of cesarean sections, hospitalization rates for antepartum hospitalizations, miscarriage, induced abortion, and hospitalization rate ratios of immigrants versus Italian women. Among Italian women, regular and irregular immigrants, the percentages of teenage deliveries were 0.7, 2.9, and 8.4%; the ratios of miscarriages to deliveries were 0.16, 0.15 and 0.35; the ratios of induced abortions to deliveries were 0.13, 0.24 and 0.81, respectively. Regular immigrants accounted for 10% of population aged 15-49 and for 20% of deliveries. The age-related increase in miscarriage risk was steeper among regular immigrants. The induced abortions to deliveries ratio peaked among Italians aged <25 and regular immigrants aged ≥35 years. 40% of Italians and 30% of regular immigrants sought care outside nearest hospitals. Wide differences in reproductive behavior, health status, and patterns in the access to health services exist between Italians, regular and irregular immigrants even though they represent three connected populations.

  15. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  16. The new WAA apheresis registry.

    PubMed

    Stegmayr, Bernd; Klingstedt, Jonas; Grahn, Bengt Erik; Vinnervik, Peter

    2006-06-01

    The WAA (World Apheresis Association) registry for apheresis has been developed to enable registration through internet by centers all around the world. It is of no charge for the registering centers. The new version is available at the site www.iml.umu.se/medicin. Until now more than 5700 treatments have been registered from centers in 6 countries. It allows registration of acute or chronic therapeutic apheresis and also collection of stem cells, cellapheresis, photopheresis and various adsorption technologies. Registration includes diagnoses, access, anticoagulation, replacement fluids, mode of treatment, volumes processed, techniques used and adverse events that develop. Analyses of data enables improvement of quality of apheresis. The new registry enables you to change data that were wrongly entered as well as add data that was missed when you firstly entered the file. We cordially invite all of you to join the registration procedure.

  17. Security Implications Of Italian Nationalism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    13. ABSTRACT Italy boasts the fourth -largest military establishment within the European Union and the sixth-largest in NATO, so Italian national... fourth -largest military establishment within the European Union and the sixth-largest in NATO, so Italian national security efforts and collective...is highly dependent upon political stability12 and governing parties.13 Fourth , European integration may threaten not only strong national and local

  18. Factors in Italian Military Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-17

    Italian public’s ambiguous support for the war in Iraq, threaten the relationship. President Bush and Prime Minister Berlusconi share a rare relationship...between US and European leaders. Their relationship is such that the Italian press considered Prime Minister Berlusconi a trusted communications...Verderami “Italy’s Berlusconi Unleashes Bid To Regain Lost Popularity, Foil Allies’ Coup,” Corriere della Sera, 26 November 2004 [article on-line

  19. An evaluation of ICD-11 posttraumatic stress disorder criteria in two samples of adolescents and young adults exposed to mass shootings: factor analysis and comparisons to ICD-10 and DSM-IV.

    PubMed

    Haravuori, Henna; Kiviruusu, Olli; Suomalainen, Laura; Marttunen, Mauri

    2016-05-12

    The proposed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 11th revision are simpler than the criteria in ICD-10, DSM-IV or DSM-5. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ICD-11 PTSD factor structure in samples of young people, and to compare PTSD prevalence rates and diagnostic agreement between the different diagnostic systems. Possible differences in clinical characteristics of the PTSD cases identified by ICD-11, ICD-10 and DSM-IV are explored. Two samples of adolescents and young adults were followed after exposure to similar mass shooting incidents in their schools. Semi-structured diagnostic interviews were performed to assess psychiatric diagnoses and PTSD symptom scores (N = 228, mean age 17.6 years). PTSD symptom item scores were used to compose diagnoses according to the different classification systems. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the proposed ICD-11 PTSD symptoms represented two rather than three factors; re-experiencing and avoidance symptoms comprised one factor and hyperarousal symptoms the other factor. In the studied samples, the three-factor ICD-11 criteria identified 51 (22.4%) PTSD cases, the two-factor ICD-11 identified 56 (24.6%) cases and the DSM-IV identified 43 (18.9%) cases, while the number of cases identified by ICD-10 was larger, being 85 (37.3%) cases. Diagnostic agreement of the ICD-11 PTSD criteria with ICD-10 and DSM-IV was moderate, yet the diagnostic agreement turned to be good when an impairment criterion was imposed on ICD-10. Compared to ICD-11, ICD-10 identified cases with less severe trauma exposure and posttraumatic symptoms and DSM-IV identified cases with less severe trauma exposure. The findings suggest that the two-factor model of ICD-11 PTSD is preferable to the three-factor model. The proposed ICD-11 criteria are more restrictive compared to the ICD-10 criteria. There were some differences in the clinical characteristics of the PTSD cases

  20. Evaluation of inpatient clinical documentation readiness for ICD-10-CM.

    PubMed

    DeAlmeida, Dilhari R; Watzlaf, Valerie J; Anania-Firouzan, Patti; Salguero, Otto; Rubinstein, Elaine; Abdelhak, Mervat; Parmanto, Bambang

    2014-01-01

    This research study examined the gaps in documentation that occur when coding in ICD-10-CM. More than 4,000 diagnoses from all chapters were coded from 656 electronic documents obtained from a large integrated healthcare facility at the time the study was conducted (2012). After the documents were coded, areas for documentation improvement were identified for chapters that resulted in deficiencies in documentation, and a quick reference guide was developed. The overall absent documentation percentage was 15.4 percent. The 10 chapters with the highest percentage of absent documentation were chapter 7 (Diseases of Eye and Adnexa), with 67.65 percent (p < .001); chapter 8 (Diseases of Ear and Mastoid Process), with 63.64 percent (p < .001); chapter 13 (Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue), with 46.05 percent (p < .001); chapter 14 (Diseases of the Genitourinary System), with 40.29 percent (p < .001); chapter 10 (Diseases of Respiratory System), with 35.52 percent (p < .001); chapter 1 (Infectious and Parasitic Diseases), with 32.88 percent (p < .001); chapter 12 (Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue), with 32.35 percent (p < .001); chapter 2 (Neoplasms), with 25.45 percent (p < .001); chapter 4 (Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases), with 14.58 percent (p < .001); and chapter 17 (Congenital Malformations, Deformations, and Chromosomal Abnormalities), with 12.50 percent. We addressed the deficient areas in the quick reference guide developed for clinicians and technology vendors. Having complete and accurate documentation would benefit both the clinician and the patient in providing the highest quality of care.

  1. 76 FR 51985 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Implantable meshes. ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Topics Aggressive periodontitis. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Chronic periodontitis. Gingival recession. Agenda items are subject to change as priorities dictate. Note: CMS and NCHS...

  2. Prophylactic left thoracic sympathectomy to prevent electrical storms in CPVT patients needing ICD placement.

    PubMed

    Moray, Amol; Kirk, Edwin P; Grant, Peter; Camphausen, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), a life threatening arrhythmia induced by sympathetic stimulation in susceptible individuals is often refractory to antiarrhythmic agents. First line of treatment, beta-blockers can be ineffective in up to 50% with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement for refractory cases. Paradoxically ICD can be arryhthmogenic from shock-associated sympathetic stimulation, initiating more shocks and "electrical storms". This has led to the use of more effective beta blockade offered by left sympathectomy, now performed by minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Sympathectomy has been traditionally performed long after ICD placement, after the patient has experienced multiple shocks, thus necessitating two procedures. We report simultaneous ICD insertion and thoracoscopic sympathectomy in a 10 year-old boy with CPVT, and suggest it as a better approach than sequential procedures. To our knowledge this is first such reported case. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Value of ICD-9 coded chief complaints for detection of epidemics.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F. C.; Wagner, M. M.; Dato, V.; Chang, C. C.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the value of ICD-9 coded chief complaints for early detection of epidemics, we measured sensitivity, positive predictive value, and timeliness of Influenza detection using a respiratory set (RS) of ICD-9 codes and an Influenza set (IS). We also measured inherent timeliness of these data using the cross-correlation function. We found that, for a one-year period, the detectors had sensitivity of 100% (1/1 epidemic) and positive predictive values of 50% (1/2) for RS and 25% (1/4) for IS. The timeliness of detection using ICD-9 coded chief complaints was one week earlier than the detection using Pneumonia and Influenza deaths (the gold standard). The inherent timeliness of ICD-9 data measured by the cross-correlation function was two weeks earlier than the gold standard. PMID:11825278

  4. Value of ICD-9-Coded Chief Complaints for Detection of Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Wagner, Michael M.; Dato, Virginia; Chang, Chung-Chou Ho

    2002-01-01

    To assess the value of ICD-9-coded chief complaints for early detection of epidemics, we measured sensitivity, positive predictive value, and timeliness of Influenza detection using a respiratory set (RS) of ICD-9 codes and an Influenza set (IS). We also measured inherent timeliness of these data using the cross-correlation function. We found that, for a one-year period, the detectors had sensitivity of 100% (1/1 epidemic) and positive predictive values of 50% (1/2) for RS and 25% (1/4) for IS. The timeliness of detection using ICD-9-coded chief complaints was one week earlier than the detection using Pneumonia and Influenza deaths (the gold standard). The inherent timeliness of ICD-9 data measured by the cross-correlation function was two weeks earlier than the gold standard.

  5. Automatic annotation of ICD-to-MedDRA mappings with SKOS predicates.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Gunnar; Souvignet, Julien; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Robust alignments between ICD and MedDRA are essential to enable the secondary use of clinical data for pharmacovigilance research. UMLS makes available ICD-to-MedDRA mappings, but they are only poorly specified, which introduces difficulties when exploited in an automatic way. SKOS vocabulary can help achieve quality and machine-processable mappings. We have developed an algorithm based on several simple rules which annotates automatically ICD-to-MedDRA mappings with SKOS predicates. The method was tested and evaluated on a sample of ICD-10-to MedDRA mappings extracted from UMLS. The algorithm demonstrated satisfying performances, especially for skos:exactMatch properties, which suggests that automatic methods can be used to improve the quality of terminology mappings.

  6. Iranian Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Registry.

    PubMed

    Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Fahimi, Fanak; Sharif-Kashani, Babak; Malek Mohammad, Majid; Saliminejad, Leila; Monjazebi, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a fatal disorder with a prevalence of 8.6 per million. We introduce a registry website for IPAH and PAH patients ( www.IPAH.ir) for access and efficient delivery of government-aided and subsidized antihypertensive medications. The IPAH registry was opened in November 2009. Information of IPAH and PAH patients with a username and password were uploaded in the site. Data entry was possible only via the physicians and healthcare organizations via internet that were given a personalized username and password for entry. Following the patients' profile submission, a scientific committee composed of a cardiologist and a pulmonologist who were selected by the Ministry of Health of Iran (MOH), evaluated the data. The eligibility of the patient to receive the medications was confirmed after evaluation. If the patient was eligible, 82% of the Bosentan cost was paid by MOH. To date, one hundred and sixteen patients (82 females, 34 males) have been registered. The mean pulmonary artery pressure by right heart catheterization was 69.24±17 mmHg (ranging from 35 to 110 mmHg). The first online Iranian registry program for IPAH and PAH patients is believed to supply essential information for health care providers in the field.

  7. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  8. Dione: An OWL representation of ICD-10-CM for classifying patients' diseases.

    PubMed

    Roldán-García, María Del Mar; García-Godoy, María Jesús; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2016-10-13

    Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) has been designed as standard clinical terminology for annotating Electronic Health Records (EHRs). EHRs textual information is used to classify patients' diseases into an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) category (usually by an expert). Improving the accuracy of classification is the main purpose of using ontologies and OWL representations at the core of classification systems. In the last few years some ontologies and OWL representations for representing ICD-10-CM categories have been developed. However, they were not designed to be the basis for an automatic classification tool nor do they model ICD-10-CM inclusion terms as Web Ontology Language (OWL) axioms, which enables automatic classification. In this context we have developed Dione, an OWL representation of ICD-10-CM. Dione is the first OWL representation of ICD-10-CM, which is logically consistent, whose axioms define the ICD-10-CM inclusion terms by means of a methodology based on SNOMED CT/ICD-10-CM mappings. The ICD-10-CM exclusions are handled with these mappings. Dione currently contains 391,669 classes, 391,720 entity annotation axioms and 11,795 owl:equivalentClass axioms which have been constructed using 104,646 relationships extracted from the SNOMED CT/ICD-10-CM and BioPortal mappings included in Dione using the owl:intersectionOf and the owl:someValuesFrom statements. The resulting OWL representation has been classified and its consistency tested with the ELK reasoner. We have also taken three clinical records from the Virgen de la Victoria Hospital (Málaga, Spain) which have been manually annotated using SNOMED CT. These annotations have been included as instances to be classified by the reasoner. The classified instances show that Dione could be a promising ICD-10-CM OWL representation to support the classification of patients' diseases. Dione is a first step towards

  9. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Moderately Strenuous Aerobic Exercise After an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Glenny, Robb W.; Burr, Robert L.; Flo ARNP, Gayle L.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its salutary effects on health, aerobic exercise is often avoided after receipt of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) because of fears that exercise may provoke acute arrhythmias. We prospectively evaluated the effects of a home aerobic exercise training and maintenance program (EX) on aerobic performance, ICD shocks and hospitalizations exclusively in ICD recipients. Methods and Results One hundred sixty (124 men, 36 women) were randomized who had an ICD for primary (43%) or secondary (57%) prevention to EX or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2), measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline, 8 and 24 weeks. EX consisted of 8 weeks of home walking 1 hour/day, 5 days/week at 60-80% of heart rate reserve, followed by 16 weeks of maintenance home walking for 150 minutes/week. Adherence to EX was determined from exercise logs, ambulatory HR recordings of exercise, and weekly telephone contacts. UC received no exercise directives and were monitored by monthly telephone contact. Adverse events were identified by ICD interrogations, patient reports and medical records. ICD recipients averaged 55±12 years and mean ejection fraction of 40.6±15.7, all were taking beta blocker medications. EX significantly increased peakVO2 ml/kg/min (EX 26.7±7.0; UC 23.9±6.6, p=0.002) at 8 weeks, which persisted during maintenance exercise at 24 weeks (EX 26.9±7,7; UC 23.4±6.0, p<0.001). ICD shocks were infrequent (EX=4 vs UC=8), with no differences in hospitalizations or deaths between groups. Conclusions Prescribed home exercise is safe and significantly improves cardiovascular performance in ICD recipients without causing shocks or hospitalizations. PMID:25792557

  10. Domains of concern of intimate partners of sudden cardiac arrest survivors after ICD implantation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Cynthia M; Pyper, Gail P; Benoliel, Jeanne Q

    2004-01-01

    There is limited research that describes the experiences of intimate partners of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors. The purposes of this article are to (1) describe the domains of concern of intimate partners of SCA survivors during the first year after internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation and (2) outline strategies used by partners of SCA survivors in dealing with the concerns and demands of recovery in the first year after ICD implantation. This is a secondary analysis of interview data collected for the primary study "Family Experiences Following Sudden Cardiac Arrest." A grounded theory method was used to identify experiences of SCA survivors and their family members from hospitalization through the first year after ICD implantation. Data were collected from the SCA survivor and one intimate partner at 5 times: hospital discharge, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postdischarge. Eight Domains of Concern were identified for intimate partners following SCA and ICD implantation during the first year. These included (1) Care of the survivor, (2) My (partner) self-care, (3) Relationship, (4) ICD, (5) Money, (6) Uncertain future, (7) Health care providers, and (8) Family. Five categories of strategies to deal with the Domains of Concerns were identified (1) Care of the survivor, (2) My (partner) self-care, (3) Relationship, (4) Uncertain future, and (5) Controlling the environment. Nursing intervention programs should include the intimate partner of SCA survivors and contain education and support in the following areas: (1) information on the function of the ICD, (2) normal progression of physical and emotional recovery experiences, (3) safety and maintenance of the ICD, (4) activities of daily living after an ICD, (5) strategies to assist with the survivors care, and (6) strategies to assist with partner self care.

  11. An Evaluation of Comparability between NEISS and ICD-9-CM Injury Coding

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Meghan C.; Wheeler, Krista K.; Shi, Junxin; Smith, Gary A.; Xiang, Huiyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System’s (NEISS) comparability with a data source that uses ICD-9-CM coding. Methods A sample of NEISS cases from a children’s hospital in 2008 was selected, and cases were linked with their original medical record. Medical records were reviewed and an ICD-9-CM code was assigned to each case. Cases in the NEISS sample that were non-injuries by ICD-9-CM standards were identified. A bridging matrix between the NEISS and ICD-9-CM injury coding systems, by type of injury classification, was proposed and evaluated. Results Of the 2,890 cases reviewed, 13.32% (n = 385) were non-injuries according to the ICD-9-CM diagnosis. Using the proposed matrix, the comparability of the NEISS with ICD-9-CM coding was favorable among injury cases (κ = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.85–0.88). The distribution of injury types among the entire sample was similar for the two systems, with percentage differences ≥1% for only open wounds or amputation, poisoning, and other or unspecified injury types. Conclusions There is potential for conducting comparable injury research using NEISS and ICD-9-CM data. Due to the inclusion of some non-injuries in the NEISS and some differences in type of injury definitions between NEISS and ICD-9-CM coding, best practice for studies using NEISS data obtained from the CPSC should include manual review of case narratives. Use of the standardized injury and injury type definitions presented in this study will facilitate more accurate comparisons in injury research. PMID:24658100

  12. Generator replacement is associated with an increased rate of ICD lead alerts.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Joshua D; Cruz, Cesar; Hoskins, Michael H; Jones, Paul; El-Chami, Mikhael F; Lloyd, Michael S; Leon, Angel; DeLurgio, David B; Langberg, Jonathan J

    2014-10-01

    Lead malfunction is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We have shown that the failure of recalled high-voltage leads significantly increases after ICD generator replacement. However, generator replacement has not been recognized as a predictor of lead failure in general. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of ICD generator exchange on the rate of ICD lead alerts. A time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze a database of remotely monitored ICDs. The model assessed the impact of generator exchange on the rate of lead alerts after ICD generator replacement. The analysis included 60,219 patients followed for 37 ± 19 months. The 5-year lead survival was 99.3% (95% confidence interval 99.2%-99.4%). Of 60,219 patients, 7458 patients (12.9%) underwent ICD generator exchange without lead replacement. After generator replacement, the rate of lead alerts was more than 5-fold higher than in controls with leads of the same age without generator replacement (hazard ratio 5.19; 95% confidence interval 3.45-7.84). A large number of lead alerted within 3 months of generator replacement. Lead alerts were more common in patients with single- vs dual-chamber ICDs and in younger patients. Sex was not associated with lead alerts. Routine generator replacement is associated with a 5-fold higher risk of lead alert compared to age-matched leads without generator replacement. This suggests the need for intense surveillance after generator replacement and the development of techniques to minimize the risk of lead damage during generator replacement. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Translating ICD-11 into French using lexical-based approach: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Merabti, Tayeb; Grosjean, Julien; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Darmoni, Stefan Jacques

    2015-01-01

    To translate the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) into French, we proposed a lexical approach using Natural Language Processing techniques. This method relies on the 56 biomedical terminologies and ontologies included in the Cross-lingual Health Multiple Terminologies and Ontologies Portal. From a sample of 336 ICD-11 terms, the algorithm translated 164 (49%) terms into at least one French term each.

  14. Training and support to improve ICD coding quality: A controlled before-and-after impact evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dyers, Robin; Ward, Grant; Du Plooy, Shane; Fourie, Stephanus; Evans, Juliet; Mahomed, Hassan

    2017-05-24

    The proposed National Health Insurance policy for South Africa (SA) requires hospitals to maintain high-quality International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for patient records. While considerable strides had been made to improve ICD coding coverage by digitising the discharge process in the Western Cape Province, further intervention was required to improve data quality. The aim of this controlled before-and-after study was to evaluate the impact of a clinician training and support initiative to improve ICD coding quality. To compare ICD coding quality between two central hospitals in the Western Cape before and after the implementation of a training and support initiative for clinicians at one of the sites. The difference in differences in data quality between the intervention site and the control site was calculated. Multiple logistic regression was also used to determine the odds of data quality improvement after the intervention and to adjust for potential differences between the groups. The intervention had a positive impact of 38.0% on ICD coding completeness over and above changes that occurred at the control site. Relative to the baseline, patient records at the intervention site had a 6.6 (95% confidence interval 3.5 - 16.2) adjusted odds ratio of having a complete set of ICD codes for an admission episode after the introduction of the training and support package. The findings on impact on ICD coding accuracy were not significant. There is sufficient pragmatic evidence that a training and support package will have a considerable positive impact on ICD coding completeness in the SA setting.

  15. Pediatric complex chronic conditions classification system version 2: updated for ICD-10 and complex medical technology dependence and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pediatric complex chronic conditions (CCC) classification system, developed in 2000, requires revision to accommodate the International Classification of Disease 10th Revision (ICD-10). To update the CCC classification system, we incorporated ICD-9 diagnostic codes that had been either omitted or incorrectly specified in the original system, and then translated between ICD-9 and ICD-10 using General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs). We further reviewed all codes in the ICD-9 and ICD-10 systems to include both diagnostic and procedural codes indicative of technology dependence or organ transplantation. We applied the provisional CCC version 2 (v2) system to death certificate information and 2 databases of health utilization, reviewed the resulting CCC classifications, and corrected any misclassifications. Finally, we evaluated performance of the CCC v2 system by assessing: 1) the stability of the system between ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes using data which included both ICD-9 codes and ICD-10 codes; 2) the year-to-year stability before and after ICD-10 implementation; and 3) the proportions of patients classified as having a CCC in both the v1 and v2 systems. Results The CCC v2 classification system consists of diagnostic and procedural codes that incorporate a new neonatal CCC category as well as domains of complexity arising from technology dependence or organ transplantation. CCC v2 demonstrated close comparability between ICD-9 and ICD-10 and did not detect significant discontinuity in temporal trends of death in the United States. Compared to the original system, CCC v2 resulted in a 1.0% absolute (10% relative) increase in the number of patients identified as having a CCC in national hospitalization dataset, and a 0.4% absolute (24% relative) increase in a national emergency department dataset. Conclusions The updated CCC v2 system is comprehensive and multidimensional, and provides a necessary update to accommodate widespread implementation of ICD-10

  16. PS3-11: Beyond General Equivalency Mappings (GEMs): Understanding the Implications of ICD 10 in Research

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims With the implementation of ICD 10 CM and ICD 10 PCS less than two years away, there are still unanswered questions as to how research teams will effectively translate or use ICD 10 codes in research. Approximately 84% of the ICD 10 codes have only approximate matches with 10% having multiple matches and only 5% have exact one-to-one matches between ICD 9 and ICD 10. With the number of codes increasing five-fold, this offers additional opportunities and risks when pulling data. Methods Besides looking at the General Equivalency Mappings and other tools that are used to translate ICD 9 codes to ICD 10 codes, we will examine some common research areas where only approximate matches between ICD 9 and ICD 10 exist. We will also discuss how the finer level of detail that ICD 10 gives allows research teams to pinpoint exactly what type of asthma, Crohn’s disease, and diabetic retinopathy they wish to study without including some of the other cases that do not meet their research criteria. Results There are significant ambiguities and irregularity in several common areas such as diabetes, mental health, asthma, and gastroenterology due to approximate, multiple, or combination matches. Even in the case of exact matches such as an old myocardial infarction where there is an exact match, the definition of when a myocardial infarction becomes “old” is different. Conclusions ICD 10 offers a finer level of detail and a higher level of specificity, thereby allowing research teams to be more targeted when pulling data. On the other hand, research teams need to exercise caution when using GEMs and other tools to translate ICD 9 codes into ICD 10 codes and vice versa, especially if they are looking at data that overlaps the implementation date of October 1, 2014.

  17. Pediatric complex chronic conditions classification system version 2: updated for ICD-10 and complex medical technology dependence and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris; Feinstein, James A; Zhong, Wenjun; Hall, Matt; Dai, Dingwei

    2014-08-08

    The pediatric complex chronic conditions (CCC) classification system, developed in 2000, requires revision to accommodate the International Classification of Disease 10th Revision (ICD-10). To update the CCC classification system, we incorporated ICD-9 diagnostic codes that had been either omitted or incorrectly specified in the original system, and then translated between ICD-9 and ICD-10 using General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs). We further reviewed all codes in the ICD-9 and ICD-10 systems to include both diagnostic and procedural codes indicative of technology dependence or organ transplantation. We applied the provisional CCC version 2 (v2) system to death certificate information and 2 databases of health utilization, reviewed the resulting CCC classifications, and corrected any misclassifications. Finally, we evaluated performance of the CCC v2 system by assessing: 1) the stability of the system between ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes using data which included both ICD-9 codes and ICD-10 codes; 2) the year-to-year stability before and after ICD-10 implementation; and 3) the proportions of patients classified as having a CCC in both the v1 and v2 systems. The CCC v2 classification system consists of diagnostic and procedural codes that incorporate a new neonatal CCC category as well as domains of complexity arising from technology dependence or organ transplantation. CCC v2 demonstrated close comparability between ICD-9 and ICD-10 and did not detect significant discontinuity in temporal trends of death in the United States. Compared to the original system, CCC v2 resulted in a 1.0% absolute (10% relative) increase in the number of patients identified as having a CCC in national hospitalization dataset, and a 0.4% absolute (24% relative) increase in a national emergency department dataset. The updated CCC v2 system is comprehensive and multidimensional, and provides a necessary update to accommodate widespread implementation of ICD-10.

  18. The utility of ICD9-CM codes in identifying induction of labor

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Lisa D.; Limaye, Meghana; Srinivas, Sindhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data evaluating the accuracy of ICD9-CM codes in identifying inductions are limited. Our objective was to examine the test characteristics of ICD9-CM coding for induction of labor and to identify differences between those captured by coding and those not. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of ICD9-CM codes in identifying charts of induced women at our institution from 2005-2009. Review of the medical record was the gold standard. Characteristics of the charts were compared using Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests where appropriate. Results 3263 women were included, 708 with ICD9-CM coding for induction (screen positive). 422 women were randomly sampled from those not coded as induction (screen negative). The sensitivity of ICD9-CM coding for induction was 51.4%, specificity 98.8%, PPV 96.6%, NPV 74.7%. False negative charts (25%) were more likely to be women induced for premature rupture of membranes (40% vs. 8%, p<0.001) or with oxytocin (51% vs. 33%, p<0.001) when compared to screen positive charts. Conclusions It is reassuring that 97% of charts coded for induction by ICD9-CM codes are, in fact, patients that were induced. With this degree of accuracy, we can be confident that charts coded as induction are unlikely to be miscoded. PMID:25262453

  19. Physicians’ Outlook on ICD-10-CM/PCS and Its Effect on Their Practice

    PubMed Central

    Watzlaf, Valerie; Alkarwi, Zahraa; Meyers, Sandy; Sheridan, Patty

    2015-01-01

    Background The United States is one of the last countries to change from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. The compliance date for implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS is expected to fall on October 1, 2015. Objectives Evaluate physicians’ perceptions on the change from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS and its effect on their practice, determine how HIM professionals can assist in this transition, and assess what resources are needed to aid in the transition. Results Twenty physicians were asked to participate in one of three focus groups. Twelve physicians (60 percent) agreed to participate. Top concerns included electronic health record software readiness, increase in documentation specificity and time, ability of healthcare professionals to learn a new language, and inadequacy of current training methods and content. Conclusion Physicians expressed that advantages of ICD-10-CM/PCS were effective data analytics and complexity of patient cases with more specific codes. Health information management professionals were touted as needed during the transition to create simple, clear specialty guides and crosswalks as well as education and training tools specific for physicians. PMID:26807074

  20. Proposed ICD-10-CM Surveillance Case Definitions for Injury Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Holly B; Johnson, Renee L; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a collaboration between the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control to develop proposed surveillance case definitions for injury hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for use with administrative data sets coded using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). The proposed ICD-10-CM surveillance case definitions were developed by applying General Equivalence Mappings to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) definitions. As with the ICD-9-CM definitions, there are slight differences between the proposed ICD-10-CM surveillance case definition for injury hospitalizations and the one for ED visits. The inclusion criteria for an injury hospitalization requires a case to have a principal diagnosis of one of the included nature-of-injury (injury diagnosis) codes. The inclusion criteria for an injury ED visit requires the case to have either a principal diagnosis of one of the included nature-of-injury codes or the presence of selected external-cause codes. The ICD-10-CM nature-of-injury and external-cause codes included in the proposed definitions are presented and caveats for use of the proposed definitions are described.

  1. Piloting a Collaborative Web-Based System for Testing ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Donada, Marc; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Celik, Can; Jakob, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), for the first time in ICD history, deployed web-based collaboration of experts and ICT tools. To ensure that ICD-11 is working well, it needs to be systematically field tested in different settings, across the world. This will be done by means of a number of experiments. In order to support its implementation, a web-based system (ICDfit) has been designed and developed. The present paper illustrates the current prototype of the system and its technical testing. the system has been designed according to WHO requirements, and implemented using PHP and MySQL. Then, a preliminary technical test has been designed and run in January 2016, involving 8 users. They had to carry out double coding, that is, coding case summaries with both ICD-10 and ICD-11, and answering quick questions on the coding difficulty. the 8 users coded 632 cases each, spending an average of 163 seconds per case. While we found an issue in the mechanism used to record coding times, no further issues were found. the proposed system seems to be technically adequate for supporting future ICD-11 testing.

  2. Substance Dependence Severity Scale: reliability and validity for ICD-10 substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Miele, G M; Carpenter, K M; Cockerham, M S; Trautman, K D; Blaine, J; Hasin, D S

    2001-01-01

    The Substance Dependence Severity Scale (SDSS) is a semistructured interview that assesses the severity of the DSM-IV diagnoses of dependence and abuse and the ICD-10 diagnoses of substance dependence and harmful use across a wide range of substances. Previous research has demonstrated that the SDSS' DSM-IV dependence scales are reliable and valid indicators of diagnostic severity. However, the ICD-10 scales have not been psychometrically tested. This study investigated the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, diagnostic concordance, and concurrent validity of the SDSS' ICD-10 dependence and harmful use scales in 180 (112 male and 68 female) treated substance users. Test-retest reliabilities for the ICD-10 dependence scales ranged from good to excellent for alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and cannabis. Test-retest reliabilities for the SDSS' ICD-10 harmful use scales were in the good range for alcohol, cocaine, and heroin and the poor to fair range for cannabis. Internal consistency, diagnostic concordance, and concurrent validity results were comparable to the test-retest findings. These results support the use of the SDSS for assessing the severity of the ICD-10 dependence and harmful use diagnoses.

  3. Optimal tachycardia programming in ICDs : Recommendations in the post-MADIT-RIT era.

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Burmistrava, Tatsiana

    2016-09-01

    Optimal implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) programming can reduce the incidence of inappropriate shock therapy and improve prognosis in patients with an ICD. Only after results from randomized trials became available was the "safety first" feeling overcome that mandated early shock therapy, waived the use of antitachycardia pacing and forced shock therapy after a time of 30 s expired, even if tachycardia discriminators would have withheld the therapy. The strong evidence to limit ICD therapy to longer ventricular tachycardia (VT) should not result in individually dangerous ICD programming, particularly in patients with a high risk of slow VT (known monomorphic VT, post VT ablation, during treatment with amiodarone, very dilated left ventricle). Monitoring zones may aid to detect unexpected slow VT and to explain symptoms such as presyncope without exposing the patient to an unnecessary risk of inappropriate therapy. This review summarizes our current knowledge on optimal ICD programming and explains exactly how we should program device parameters in practice in single- or dual-chamber ICDs by different manufacturers and in different groups of patients.

  4. Handling Age Specification in the SNOMED CT to ICD-10-CM Cross-map

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junchuan; Fung, Kin Wah

    2012-01-01

    A SNOMED CT-encoded problem list will be required to satisfy the Certification Criteria for Stage 2 “Meaningful Use” of the EHR incentive program. ICD-10-CM will be replacing ICD-9-CM as the reimbursement code set in the near future. Having a cross-map from SNOMED CT to ICD-10-CM will promote the use of SNOMED CT as the primary problem list terminology, while easing the transition to ICD-10-CM. This rule-based map will support semi-automatic generation of ICD-10-CM codes from SNOMED CT-encoded data. Among the different types of rules, the age rule is used to handle age-specific code assignment in ICD-10-CM. To supplement the manual process of creation of age rules, a special QA process was implemented to flag maps that were potentially missing age rules. The QA flagged 342 concepts for review (out of 7,277), of which 172 concepts (50.3%) were true positives. Without the special QA, many of the age rules would have been missed. PMID:23304377

  5. Development of a hematology/oncology ICD-10 documentation job aid.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel B; Silas, Sean; Covner, Audrey; Hendrie, Paul C; Stewart, F Marc

    2015-04-01

    Conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) was mandated for October 1, 2014, but was delayed by one year. ICD-10 accommodates newly developed diagnoses and procedures and is expected to help measure quality of care. When implemented, it will impact oncology practices because of conversion costs, loss of productivity, and billing problems. Clinical documentation must meet the specificity required by ICD-10 codes or risk denial of payments, which are projected to dramatically increase. In preparation for the now delayed conversion, the ICD-10 transition team at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) examined the ICD-10 codes for primary hematology/oncology diagnoses and comorbidities of cancer and therapy seen at our institution to identify the need for and feasibility of developing a printable job aid to guide clinical documentation. We found that the variable complexity of ICD-10 codes in hematology/oncology frequently requires nonintuitive specificity likely to be overlooked without prompting. We were able to develop a succinct and facile documentation aid usable in both electronic and printed forms that includes all hematology/oncology diagnoses and the comorbidities most frequently seen in our multidisciplinary institution. This document is organized in a notebook format for easy review and will be continuously improved with feedback from practitioners. It is available for free download from the SCCA Web site. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  6. Validity of ICD-9-CM codes for the identification of complications related to central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tukey, Melissa H; Borzecki, Ann M; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2015-01-01

    Two complications of central venous catheterization (CVC), iatrogenic pneumothorax and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), have dedicated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Despite increasing use of ICD-9-CM codes for research and pay-for-performance purposes, their validity for detecting complications of CVC has not been established. Complications of CVCs placed between July 2010 and December 2011 were identified by ICD-9-CM codes in discharge records from a single hospital and compared with those revealed by medical record abstraction. The ICD-9-CM code for iatrogenic pneumothorax had a sensitivity of 66.7%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.5%. The ICD-9-CM codes for CLABSI had a sensitivity of 33.3%, specificity of 99.0%, PPV of 28.6%, and NPV of 99.2%. The low sensitivity and variable PPV of ICD-9-CM codes for detection of complications of CVC raise concerns about their use for research or pay-for-performance purposes.

  7. The National Cardiovascular Data Registry Voluntary Public Reporting Program: An Interim Report From the NCDR Public Reporting Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Jennings, Jonathan; Madden, Ruth A; Malenka, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; McKay, Charles R; Ness, Debra L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Ring, Michael E; Rumsfeld, John S; Shelton, Marc E; Simanowith, Michael C; Slattery, Lara E; Weintraub, William S; Lovett, Ann; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2016-01-19

    Public reporting of health care data continues to proliferate as consumers and other stakeholders seek information on the quality and outcomes of care. Medicare's Hospital Compare website, the U.S. News & World Report hospital rankings, and several state-level programs are well known. Many rely heavily on administrative data as a surrogate to reflect clinical reality. Clinical data are traditionally more difficult and costly to collect, but more accurately reflect patients' clinical status, thus enhancing the validity of quality metrics. We describe the public reporting effort being launched by the American College of Cardiology and partnering professional organizations using clinical data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) programs. This hospital-level voluntary effort will initially report process of care measures from the percutaneous coronary intervention (CathPCI) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) registries of the NCDR. Over time, additional process, outcomes, and composite performance metrics will be reported.

  8. [Memorandum registry for health services research].

    PubMed

    Müller, D; Augustin, M; Banik, N; Baumann, W; Bestehorn, K; Kieschke, J; Lefering, R; Maier, B; Mathis, S; Rustenbach, S J; Sauerland, S; Semler, S C; Stausberg, J; Sturm, H; Unger, C; Neugebauer, E A M

    2010-11-01

    On August 30, 2010, the German Network for Health Services Research [Deutsches Netzwerk Versorgungsforschung e. V. (DNVF e. V.)] approved the Memorandum III "Methods for Health Services Research", supported by their member societies mentioned as authors and published in this Journal [Gesundheitswesen 2010; 72: 739-748]. Registries in Health Services Research vary in their aims and research questions as well as in their designs, methods of data collection, and statistical analyses. This paper aims to provide both a methodological guideline for developers to ensure a high quality of a planned registry and, to provide an instrument for users of data from registries to assess their overall quality. First, the paper provides a definition of registries and presents an overview of objectives in Health Services Research where registries can be useful. Second, several areas of methodological importance for the development of registries are presented. This includes the different phases of a registry (i. e., conceptual and preliminary design, implementation), technical organisation of a registry, statistical analysis, reporting of results, data protection, and ethical/legal aspects. From these areas, several criteria are deduced to allow the assessment of the quality of a registry. Finally, a checklist to assess a registry's quality is presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The Management of Iron Chelation Therapy: Preliminary Data from a National Registry of Thalassaemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Adriana; Mangiarini, Laura; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Bartoloni, Franco; Ciancio, Angela; Capra, Marcello; D'Ascola, Domenico; Cianciulli, Paolo; Filosa, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies constitute an important health problem in Mediterranean countries, placing a tremendous emotional, psychological, and economic burden on their National Health systems. The development of new chelators in the most recent years had a major impact on the treatment of thalassaemia and on the quality of life of thalassaemic patients. A new initiative was promoted by the Italian Ministry of Health, establishing a Registry for thalassaemic patients to serve as a tool for the development of cost-effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and for the definition of guidelines supporting the most appropriate management of the iron-chelating therapy and a correct use of the available iron-chelating agents. This study represents the analysis of the preliminary data collected for the evaluation of current status of the iron chelation practice in the Italian thalassaemic population and describes how therapeutic interventions can widely differ in the different patients' age groups. PMID:21738864

  10. The Screen-ICD trial. Screening for anxiety and cognitive therapy intervention for patients with implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD): a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Herning, Margrethe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous research shows that patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) have a fourfold increased mortality risk when suffering from anxiety compared with ICD patients without anxiety. This research supports the screening of ICD patients for anxiety with the purpose of starting relevant intervention. Methods and analysis Screen-ICD consists of 3 parts: (1) screening of all hospitalised and outpatient patients at two university hospitals using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), scores ≥8 are invited to participate. (2) Assessment of type of anxiety by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID). (3) Investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 randomisation to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) performed by a cardiac nurse with CBT training, plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary outcome is HADS-A measured at 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include Becks Anxiety Inventory, HeartQoL, Hamilton Anxiety Scale, heart rate variability, ICD shock, time to first shock and antitachycardia pacing. A total of 88 participants will be included. The primary analyses are based on the intention-to-treat principle and we use a mixed model with repeated measurements for continuous outcomes. For binary outcomes (HADS-A score <8), we use a generalised mixed model with repeated measurements. Ethics and dissemination The trial is performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. All patients must give informed consent prior to participation and the trial is initiated after approval by the Danish Data Protection Agency (RH-2015-282) and the regional ethics committee (H-16018868). Positive, neutral and negative results of the trial will be published. Trial registration number NCT02713360. PMID:27798030

  11. Covering sleeves can shield the high-voltage coils from lead chatter in an integrated bipolar ICD lead.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua M; Sauer, William H; Garcia, Fermin C; Krautkramer, Michael J; Verdino, Ralph J

    2007-02-01

    Integrated bipolar implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads use the distal high-voltage coil as both the ventricular sensing anode and the distal shocking electrode. Mechanical interactions between the distal ICD coil and other intracardiac leads have been reported to result in electrical oversensing and inappropriate ICD therapies. We sought to determine whether covering sleeves over the high-voltage coils of an integrated bipolar ICD lead could prevent sensed artefact from mechanical lead interactions. Endotak Reliance 0157 and Endotak Reliance-G 0185 leads, the latter with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) sleeves covering the high-voltage coils, were connected to ICD generators and the leads were submerged in saline. Device programmers were used to communicate with the ICD generators, providing real-time electrogram recording throughout testing. A series of mechanical interactions were performed with the ICD leads, including sliding and striking each distal coil against metal and non-metal components of other ICD and pacemaker leads. All direct metal-metal interactions resulted in sensed electrical artefact, including interactions between the bare ICD coil and another bare ICD coil or metal pacemaker ring. Identical mechanical interactions where metal-metal contact was prevented due to an interposed ePTFE covering sleeve were electrically silent with no sensed artefact. A covering sleeve over the distal high-voltage coil of an integrated bipolar ICD lead can mechanically shield the lead from metal-metal interactions, which might otherwise result in sensed artefact and inappropriate ICD therapies or withholding of pacing output. This finding has implications for lead selection when a new ICD lead is to be implanted adjacent to abandoned intracardiac leads or lead fragments.

  12. T Wave Safety Margin during the Process of ICD Implantation As a Novel Predictor of T Wave Oversensing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Xun; Gao, Jing; Jiang, Chen-Yang; Xue, Yu-Mei; Xu, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Gang; Guo, Ji-Hong; Sheng, Xia; Ye, Yang; He, Hong; Zhao, Yun-Tao; Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Fu, Guo-Sheng; Hu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: T wave oversensing (TWOS) is a major drawback of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and data on predictors of TWOS in ICD is limited. We aimed to calculate a novel index of T wave safety margin (TWSM) and assess its potential for evaluating TWOS during the procedure of ICD implantation. Methods and Results: Thirty-two consecutive patients with ICD implantation were enrolled. During each procedure of ICD implantation, different ICD generators were connected to implanted sensing lead through active-fixation leads and bridging cables. R and T wave amplitudes were measured on ICD printouts according to the gain. The ICDs were programed to the most sensitive settings to reveal possible TWOS. A novel index TWSM was calculated according to the corresponding sensing algorithm of ICD. There was discrepancy of R wave amplitudes measured by different ICDs (P < 0.01). In Fortify and Teligen ICDs, T wave amplitudes showed no difference (P > 0.05) and TWSMs were sufficiently high (post sensing: 13.0 ± 7.6 and 28.3 ± 16.5, respectively, post pacing: 5.0 ± 2.2 and 4.6 ± 0.9, respectively). In nine patients with 10 TWOS episodes detected during the procedure of ICD implantation, generators with the highest TWSM were chosen. Only one TWOS episode during pacing was recorded during the 25 ± 7 mo follow-up period. Conclusions: We first propose the index of TWSM during ICD implantation as a potentially efficient predictor for TWOS. Evaluation of TWSM might help to reduce TWOS episodes in patients with high risk of TWOS. Prospective studies are warranted to validate this index and its potential to reduce TWOS episodes.

  13. Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets (PRIM).

    PubMed

    Strassberg, Melissa; Peters, Katherine; Marazita, Mary; Ganger, Jennifer; Watt-Morse, Margaret; Murrelle, Lenn; Tarter, Ralph; Vanyukov, Michael

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets (PRIM; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the results of pilot research conducted in this registry, and the plans for future studies. The main focus of the registry is on psychological development and the risk for behavioral disorders. Particularly, characteristics associated with antisociality and the risk for substance use disorders (e.g., aggressivity, hyperactivity/impulsivity), as well as language development and other traits (e.g., dental health) are among the research targets.

  14. eXtended MetaData Registry

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  15. eXtended MetaData Registry

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  16. USEPA Facility Registry Service Datasets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This collection contains datasets relating to location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS). Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This collection provides access to a variety of live data services, APIs and downloadable FRS data, many of which are also enumerated here: https://www.epa.gov/enviro/frs-data-resources .

  17. Dominant Suppression of β1 Integrin by Ectopic CD98-ICD Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Yu; Yang, Xiang-Min; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jiang-Hua; Feng, Fei; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2016-11-10

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the Asia-Pacific region. Our previous work showed that knockdown of CD98 significantly inhibits malignant HCC cell phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. The level of CD98 in the membrane is tightly regulated to mediate complex processes associated with cell-cell communication and intracellular signaling. In addition, the intracellular domain of CD98 (CD98-ICD) seems to be of vital importance for recycling CD98 to the membrane after it is endocytosed. The intracellular and transmembrane domains of CD98 associate with β-integrins (primarily β1 but also β3), and this association is essential for CD98 mediation of integrin-like signaling and complements dominant suppression of β1-integrin. We speculated that isolated CD98-ICD would similarly suppress β1-integrin activation and inhibit the malignant behaviors of cancer cells. In particular, the exact role of CD98-ICD has not been studied independently in HCC. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of CD98-ICD inhibited the malignant phenotypes of HCC cells, and the mechanism possibly involves β1-integrin suppression. Moreover, the expression levels of CD98, β1-integrin-A (the activated form of β1-integrin) and Ki-67 were significantly increased in HCC tissues relative to those of normal liver tissues. Therefore, our preliminary study indicates that ectopic CD98-ICD has an inhibitory role in the malignant development of HCC, and shows that CD98-ICD acts as a dominant negative mutant of CD98 that attenuates β1-integrin activation. CD98-ICD may emerge as a promising candidate for antitumor treatment.

  18. Dominant Suppression of β1 Integrin by Ectopic CD98-ICD Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Yu; Yang, Xiang-Min; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jiang-Hua; Feng, Fei; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the Asia-Pacific region. Our previous work showed that knockdown of CD98 significantly inhibits malignant HCC cell phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. The level of CD98 in the membrane is tightly regulated to mediate complex processes associated with cell–cell communication and intracellular signaling. In addition, the intracellular domain of CD98 (CD98-ICD) seems to be of vital importance for recycling CD98 to the membrane after it is endocytosed. The intracellular and transmembrane domains of CD98 associate with β-integrins (primarily β1 but also β3), and this association is essential for CD98 mediation of integrin-like signaling and complements dominant suppression of β1-integrin. We speculated that isolated CD98-ICD would similarly suppress β1-integrin activation and inhibit the malignant behaviors of cancer cells. In particular, the exact role of CD98-ICD has not been studied independently in HCC. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of CD98-ICD inhibited the malignant phenotypes of HCC cells, and the mechanism possibly involves β1-integrin suppression. Moreover, the expression levels of CD98, β1-integrin-A (the activated form of β1-integrin) and Ki-67 were significantly increased in HCC tissues relative to those of normal liver tissues. Therefore, our preliminary study indicates that ectopic CD98-ICD has an inhibitory role in the malignant development of HCC, and shows that CD98-ICD acts as a dominant negative mutant of CD98 that attenuates β1-integrin activation. CD98-ICD may emerge as a promising candidate for antitumor treatment. PMID:27834933

  19. Participation of pregnant and lactating mothers in ICDS programme in rural area.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Khanna, P; Vashisht, B M; Punia, M S; Satpathy, S; Kumar, S

    1995-01-01

    In the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) project Chiri in India, interviews with 363 pregnant and lactating mothers and an examination of household records were conducted to learn the extent of their participation in the ICDS Programme activities and to identify obstacles to under- or non-utilization of these services. 62% of the women were currently involved in the ICDS Programme. 23.7% had never used ICDS services. The most frequented services were supplementary nutrition (97.3%), tetanus toxoid prophylaxis (89.3%), and iron and folic acid prophylaxis (87.1%). 62.8% of the women participating in the supplementary nutrition program participated more than 20 days/month. Since tetanus toxoid prophylaxis and iron and folic acid prophylaxis occurred one day/month with high participation, the workers could have used this day for group meetings, individual counseling, discussions, and demonstration, but the opportunity was missed for prenatal care, contraception, growth monitoring, and health and nutrition activities. 89.8% of women participating in the supplementary nutrition program took the food home to share with family members. Participation rates were less than 50% for organized radio listening (9.3%), Mahila Swasthya Sangh meetings (20.4%), birth spacing (40.4%), health and nutrition education (40.4%), family planning (46.2%), and prenatal care (47.4%). The major reasons for never using ICDS services were: could not spare time (53.5%) and working outside the household for long hours (50%). 15% were never approached by an anganwadi worker and were therefore not aware of ICDS services or the workers did not have an encouraging attitude. Other possible contributing factors to under- or non-utilization were high illiteracy (61%) and insufficient awareness of ICDS services among heads of households (94.9%).

  20. Coding the circumstances of injury: ICD-10 a step forward or backwards?

    PubMed Central

    Langley, J.; Chalmers, D.

    1999-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) E codes are the most widely used coding frame for categorising the circumstances of injury and poisoning. In 1992 major revisions to the E codes were released. The aim of this paper was to consider whether the changes made are a step forward or backwards in terms of facilitating injury prevention. The approach taken was to reflect on some former injury prevention research needs and the challenges they presented using data coded according to ICD-9, and then to consider how, if at all, ICD-10 has addressed these difficulties. As with ICD-9, there are essentially two axes associated with each cause: intent and mechanism of injury, and these are captured by one code. This approach can have the unintended effect of hiding the significance of some mechanisms of injury. While there have been significant improvements in some areas, such as falls, in others, such as injuries due to firearms, ICD-10 has taken a step backward. In addition the failure to produce mutually exclusive codes presents problems for determining the incidence of downing events. A welcome addition are "optional" activity codes which enable the identification of work related and sport related injury for the first time. Nevertheless, the limited range of codes and absence of coding guides limits their utility. The revised place of occurrence codes do not represent a significant improvement on ICD-9 in that they are limited to 10, they are not mutually exclusive, and they do not adequately cover a range of specific places of occurrence. In summary, relative to its predecessor, ICD-10 represents a significant improvement in many areas. Unfortunately, it still falls far short of the mark for many injury prevention needs. PMID:10628910

  1. [GPs' Perceptions of Strengths and Shortcomings of the ICD-10 for Diagnosis of depression].

    PubMed

    Kammerer, K; Falk, K; Döpfmer, S; Heintze, C

    2016-04-07

    Aim: For the health care of people with depressive disorders, general practitioners are important contact persons. Some investigations have shown an under-diagnosis of these patients in GPs' surgeries. The significance of the ICD-10 for the diagnosis of depression is disputed. The BMBF-funded study "PSYTIA - Psychotherapy in old age" engages, among others, with the treatment of older people with depression in GPs' surgeries. This study presents the strengths and shortcomings of the ICD-10 for diagnosis of depression from the point of view of GPs. Methods: With the help of a questionnaire, 402 teaching GPs were asked how they diagnose and treat elderly people (60+) with depressive disorders in their practices. The response rate was 23.6%. 2 open-ended questions dealt with GPs' perceptions of strengths and shortcomings of ICD-10 for the diagnosis of depression. The responses were matched to inductively developed overarching categories. Results: About three-quarters of the respondents answered the 2 questions. While nearly one-fifth of the respondents did not state any opinion about the suitability of ICD-10 as a diagnostic instrument for depressive disorders, 41% of the respondents mentioned the shortcomings and one-third the strengths of ICD-10. Shortcomings and strengths relate primarily to the complexity of the instrument and its manageability in everyday practice. Conclusions: The results show that application of ICD-10 in a GP's surgery depends on a holistic, hermeneutical approach to the case in family practice, a need for efficient practice management, and billing. These different perceptions explain the heterogeneous and ambivalent assessment of the suitability of ICD-10 for the diagnosis of depression.

  2. International importance of robust breast device registries.

    PubMed

    Cooter, Rodney D; Barker, Shane; Carroll, Sean M; Evans, Gregory R D; von Fritschen, Uwe; Hoflehner, Helmut; Le Louarn, Claude; Lumenta, David B; Mathijssen, Irene M J; McNeil, John; Mulgrew, Stephen; Mureau, Marc A M; Perks, Graeme; Rakhorst, Hinne; Randquist, Charles; Topaz, Moris; Verheyden, Charles; de Waal, John

    2015-02-01

    Breast implants are high-risk devices that have been at the epicenter of much debate and controversy. In light of the Poly Implant Prothèse crisis, data registries among 11 national societies around the world are cooperatively calling for the urgent need to establish robust national clinical quality registries based on international best practice within a framework of international collaboration. A survey was conducted on the historic and current status of national breast device registries. Eleven countries participated in the study, illustrating different data collection systems and registries around the world. Data collection was designed to illustrate the capabilities of current national registries, with particular focus on capture rate and outcome reporting mechanisms. A study of national breast implant registries revealed that less than half of the participating countries had operational registries and that none of these had adequately high data capture to enable reliable outcome analysis. The study revealed that the two most common problems that discouraged participation are the complexity of data sets and the opt-in consent model. Recent implant crises have highlighted the need for robust registries. This article argues the importance of securing at least 90 percent data capture, which is achievable through the opt-out consent model. Since adopting this model, the Australian Breast Device Registry has increased data capture from 4 percent to over 97 percent. Simultaneously, it is important to foster international collaboration from the outset to avoid duplication of efforts and enable the development of effective international early warning systems.

  3. Administrative simplification: change to the compliance date for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS) medical data code sets. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-04

    This final rule implements section 212 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 by changing the compliance date for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) for diagnosis coding, including the Official ICD-10-CM Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, and the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) for inpatient hospital procedure coding, including the Official ICD-10-PCS Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, from October 1, 2014 to October 1, 2015. It also requires the continued use of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, Volumes 1 and 2 (diagnoses), and 3 (procedures) (ICD-9-CM), including the Official ICD-9-CM Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, through September 30, 2015.

  4. Donor characteristics can influence overall transplant activities: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, E; Rosati, A; Zanazzi, M; Becherelli, P; Gallo, M; Salvadori, M

    2004-01-01

    The notable increase in organ donations and transplants in Italy in recent years has lead to the development of an atypical approach to kidney transplantation. All propitious considerations left aside regarding the organ donation rate which has placed Italy among the European leaders, a careful comparative evaluation of the data taken from Italian and international registries demonstrates that renal transplantations in Italy have not shared the same significant growth. The typology of the donors has influenced in a decisive way not only the number of renal transplantations, but also the access to transplant for some age groups and probably even the quality and cost. The overall view which emerges is complex and somewhat contradictory, but we believe that this perspective can furnish solid arguments for choices that need not to be delayed for the living donor transplant, the divulgence of a donation culture in the population, and the criteria for the allocation of the organs.

  5. [Italian Thesaurus of Bioethics, TIB].

    PubMed

    Navarini, Claudia; Poltronieri, Elisabetta

    2004-01-01

    The article aims at illustrating the characteristics and functions of a monolingual thesaurus, focusing on the Italian Thesaurus of Bioethics (Thesaurus Italiano di Bioetica, TIB) the controlled vocabulary used to index and retrieve documents within SIBIL (Italian Online Bioethics Information System). TIB includes controlled terms (descriptors) translated from the Bioethics Thesaurus adopted by the Kennedy Institute of Ethics of the Georgetown University of Washington and revised according to the Italian context of study and scientific debate in the field of bioethics. The overall amount of TIB terms consists in over 1600 headings. Methods to link thesaurus terms hierarchically, by association and by showing synonyms as recommended in ISO standards are applied with reference to descriptors drawn from TIB. Future plans to make the English version of TIB available online within European networks are also illustrated, aiming at spreading information relating to bioethics at an international level.

  6. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  7. Coping with the isotretinoin registry.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Hilary E

    2006-01-01

    The isotretinoin registry has arrived. It has a lofty goal of preventing all isotretinoin pregnancies. How we got to this point and what the registry means to prescribers and patients have many dermatologists confused and concerned. Will it be burdensome, will it preclude the use in most offices of this most important drug? Will it breed a new group of "isotretinologists" who are willing to take on the challenge? This article endeavors to answer these questions and to put most concerns at rest. The new system seems ultimately to have few changes compared to the risk management program we are already (technically) following. The difference is that compliance with all the rules will be monitored and mandatory. The system seems user friendly, is accessible to the computer-savvy as well as those of us still addicted to telephone, and may well turn out to be much fuss made over minimal hassle. What is clear is that this is likely our last chance to save this wonderful drug from oblivion. It is time for dermatologists to step to the plate and do what is in the best interest of their patients.

  8. Factors predicting survival in ALS: a multicenter Italian study.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Lunetta, Christian; Marinou, Kalliopi; Ticozzi, Nicola; Ferrante, Gianluca Drago; Scialo, Carlo; Sorarù, Gianni; Trojsi, Francesca; Conte, Amelia; Falzone, Yuri M; Tortelli, Rosanna; Russo, Massimo; Chiò, Adriano; Sansone, Valeria Ada; Mora, Gabriele; Silani, Vincenzo; Volanti, Paolo; Caponnetto, Claudia; Querin, Giorgia; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Sabatelli, Mario; Riva, Nilo; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Messina, Sonia; Fini, Nicola; Mandrioli, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter, retrospective study is to investigate the role of clinical characteristics and therapeutic intervention on ALS prognosis. The study included patients diagnosed from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in 13 Italian referral centers for ALS located in 10 Italian regions. Caring neurologists collected a detailed phenotypic profile and follow-up data until death into an electronic database. One center collected also data from a population-based registry for ALS. 2648 incident cases were collected. The median survival time from onset to death/tracheostomy was 44 months (SE 1.18, CI 42-46). According to univariate analysis, factors related to survival from onset to death/tracheostomy were: age at onset, diagnostic delay, site of onset, phenotype, degree of certainty at diagnosis according to revised El Escorial criteria (R-EEC), presence/absence of dementia, BMI at diagnosis, patients' provenance. In the multivariate analysis, age at onset, diagnostic delay, phenotypes but not site of onset, presence/absence of dementia, BMI, riluzole use, R-EEC criteria were independent prognostic factors of survival in ALS. We compared patients from an ALS Registry with patients from tertiary centers; the latter ones were younger, less frequently bulbar, but more frequently familial and definite at diagnosis. Our large, multicenter study demonstrated the role of some clinical and demographic factors on ALS survival, and showed some interesting differences between referral centers' patients and the general ALS population. These results can be helpful for clinical practice, in clinical trial design and to validate new tools to predict disease progression.

  9. Rationale and design of the health economics evaluation registry for remote follow-up: TARIFF.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Renato P; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Sagone, Antonio; Vicentini, Alfredo; Vincenti, Antonio; Morichelli, Loredana; Cavallaro, Ciro; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Leonida; Fusco, Antonio; Rovaris, Giovanni; Silvestri, Paolo; Guidotto, Tiziana; Pollastrelli, Annalisa; Santini, Massimo

    2012-11-01

    The aims of the study are to develop a cost-minimization analysis from the hospital perspective and a cost-effectiveness analysis from the third payer standpoint, based on direct estimates of costs and QOL associated with remote follow-ups, using Merlin@home and Merlin.net, compared with standard ambulatory follow-ups, in the management of ICD and CRT-D recipients. Remote monitoring systems can replace ambulatory follow-ups, sparing human and economic resources, and increasing patient safety. TARIFF is a prospective, controlled, observational study aimed at measuring the direct and indirect costs and quality of life (QOL) of all participants by a 1-year economic evaluation. A detailed set of hospitalized and ambulatory healthcare costs and losses of productivity that could be directly influenced by the different means of follow-ups will be collected. The study consists of two phases, each including 100 patients, to measure the economic resources consumed during the first phase, associated with standard ambulatory follow-ups, vs. the second phase, associated with remote follow-ups. Remote monitoring systems enable caregivers to better ensure patient safety and the healthcare to limit costs. TARIFF will allow defining the economic value of remote ICD follow-ups for Italian hospitals, third payers, and patients. The TARIFF study, based on a cost-minimization analysis, directly comparing remote follow-up with standard ambulatory visits, will validate the cost effectiveness of the Merlin.net technology, and define a proper reimbursement schedule applicable for the Italian healthcare system. NCT01075516.

  10. Reduction of the inappropriate ICD therapies by implementing a new fuzzy logic-based diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Michał; Przybylski, Andrzej; Kuźmicz, Wiesław; Szwed, Hanna

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the value of a completely new fuzzy logic-based detection algorithm (FA) in comparison with arrhythmia classification algorithms used in existing ICDs in order to demonstrate whether the rate of inappropriate therapies can be reduced. On the basis of the RR intervals database containing arrhythmia events and controls recordings from the ICD memory a diagnostic algorithm was developed and tested by a computer program. This algorithm uses the same input signals as existing ICDs: RR interval as the primary input variable and two variables derived from it, onset and stability. However, it uses 15 fuzzy rules instead of fixed thresholds used in existing devices. The algorithm considers 6 diagnostic categories: (1) VF (ventricular fibrillation), (2) VT (ventricular tachycardia), (3) ST (sinus tachycardia), (4) DAI (artifacts and heart rhythm irregularities including extrasystoles and T-wave oversensing-TWOS), (5) ATF (atrial and supraventricular tachycardia or fibrillation), and 96) NT (sinus rhythm). This algorithm was tested on 172 RR recordings from different ICDs in the follow-up of 135 patients. All diagnostic categories of the algorithm were present in the analyzed recordings: VF (n = 35), VT (n = 48), ST (n = 14), DAI (n = 32), ATF (n = 18), NT (n = 25). Thirty-eight patients (31.4%) in the studied group received inappropriate ICD therapies. In all these cases the final diagnosis of the algorithm was correct (19 cases of artifacts, 11 of atrial fibrillation and 8 of ST) and fuzzy rules algorithm implementation would have withheld unnecessary therapies. Incidence of inappropriate therapies: 3 vs. 38 (the proposed algorithm vs. ICD diagnosis, respectively) differed significantly (p < 0.05). VT/VF were detected correctly in both groups. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated: 100%, 97.8%, and 100%, 72.9% respectively for FA and tested ICDs recordings (p < 0.05). Diagnostic performance of the proposed fuzzy logic based

  11. Italian/Italiano. Resource Guides for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jenny

    This resource guide, intended for current prospective teachers of Italian, is designed as a source of information and inspiration for Italian instructors at all educational levels. The first of the guide's 11 chapters provides a brief general introduction to this book. Chapter 2 looks at the status of and rationale for Italian language instruction…

  12. Italian neurology: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Antonio

    Summary This short history of the Italian Society of Neurology focuses on its founders and leading personalities. The article also considers the present and the future of Italian neurology, emphasising in particular the scientific impact of Italian neurological research on the main international journals and the activities undertaken to increase the role of neurologists. PMID:21729588

  13. Italian/Italiano. Resource Guides for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jenny

    This resource guide, intended for current prospective teachers of Italian, is designed as a source of information and inspiration for Italian instructors at all educational levels. The first of the guide's 11 chapters provides a brief general introduction to this book. Chapter 2 looks at the status of and rationale for Italian language instruction…

  14. A Handbook for Teachers of Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollica, Anthony, Ed.

    This handbook for teachers of Italian consists of a collection of 16 essays by noted professionals in the field of Italian instruction: (1) "Fundamentals of Language Learning and Language Instruction," by A. Papalia; (2) "Linguistic Methodology and the Teacher of Italian," by R.J. Di Pietro; (3) "Preparation for Language Teaching," by F.J. Bosco;…

  15. Lessons Learned from an ICD-10-CM Clinical Documentation Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moczygemba, Jackie; Fenton, Susan H

    2012-01-01

    On October 1, 2013, the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) will be mandated for use in the United States in place of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). This new classification system will used throughout the nation's healthcare system for recording diagnoses or the reasons for treatment or care. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether current levels of inpatient clinical documentation provide the detail necessary to fully utilize the ICD-10-CM classification system for heart disease, pneumonia, and diabetes cases. The design of this pilot study was cross-sectional. Four hundred ninety-one de-identified records from two sources were coded using ICD-10-CM guidelines and codebooks. The findings of this study indicate that healthcare organizations need to assess clinical documentation and identify gaps. In addition, coder proficiency should be assessed prior to ICD-10-CM implementation to determine the need for further education and training in the biomedical sciences, along with training in the new classification system. PMID:22548021

  16. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, L.; De, K. , Draper, P. , Gallas, E. , Li, J. , Sosebee, M. , Stephens, R.W. , White, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO`s WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ``L0`` capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment.

  17. Drumstick leaves as source of vitamin A in ICDS-SFP.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Vanisha S; Bhadalkar, Kalyani; Daxini, Meghana

    2003-05-01

    This pilot study is about to assess the feasibility and acceptability of introducing dehydrated drumstick leaves, (DDL) (Moringa oleifera), as a source of vitamin A, into the salty recipes provided by the supplementary food (SF) component of the Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS) along with nutrition communication (NC). An integrated approach was adapted in this study which included comprehensive training sessions for the staff of the ICDS and Non-government organization (NGO) involved in the SF preparations. Prior to the acceptability trials, data were elicited on the socio-economic profile and knowledge about vitamin A, from 60 children of 1-5 year of age attending two anganwadi centres of the ICDS. From these, 40 children attending one anganwadi were supplemented with pre-tested DDL incorporated recipes (5-7 g DDI/100 g product) along with NC for one month. Spot observations and organoleptic evaluation results indicated high compliance of the DDL-recipes by the children. The results also indicated that the recipes were highly acceptable to the ICDS authorities as well as the NGO staff. The pilot study indicated that integration of NC along with the introduction of unconventional DDL, into the ICDS-SF, was feasible and can be endeavoured for a longer duration in the existing national programmes.

  18. DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11: Identifying children with posttraumatic stress disorder after disasters.

    PubMed

    Danzi, BreAnne A; La Greca, Annette M

    2016-12-01

    Different criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been recommended by the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the proposed 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). Although children are vulnerable to PTSD following disasters, little is known about whether these revised criteria are appropriate for preadolescents, as diagnostic revisions have been based primarily on adult research. This study investigated rates of PTSD using DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11 diagnostic criteria, and their associations with symptom severity, impairment, and PTSD risk factors. Children (7-11 years) exposed to Hurricanes Ike (n = 327) or Charley (n = 383) completed measures 8-9 months postdisaster. Using diagnostic algorithms for DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11, rates of 'probable' PTSD were calculated. Across samples, rates of PTSD were similar. However, there was low agreement across the diagnostic systems, with about a third overlap in identified cases. Children identified only by ICD-11 had higher 'core' symptom severity but lower impairment than children identified only by DSM-IV or DSM-5. ICD-11 was associated with more established risk factors for PTSD than was DSM-5. Findings revealed differences in PTSD diagnosis across major diagnostic systems for preadolescent children, with no clear advantage to any one system. Further research on developmentally sensitive PTSD criteria for preadolescent children is needed. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  19. Comparative Cytotoxic Evaluation of Free and Sodium Alginate Nanoparticle-Encapsulated ICD-85 on Primary Lamb Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas; Moradhaseli, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Current anti-cancer drug therapy results in systemic side effects due to non-specific uptake by normal healthy noncancerous tissues. To alleviate this difficulty, many attempts have been devoted to the development of new delivery systems such as polymeric Nanoparticles (NPs). In this study, we prepared ICD-85 NPs based on sodium alginate and analyzed the cytotoxic activity of ICD-85 NPs relative to free ICD-85 on primary lamb kidney cells. Methods ICD-85 loaded sodium alginate nanoparticles were prepared by ionic gelation method and were characterized by the particle size, size distribution and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and membrane integrity was evaluated by measuring Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. The morphological alterations of untreated and treated cells were assessed by light inverted microscope. Results MTT assay showed that ICD-85 NPs could significantly decrease the in vitro cytotoxicity on primary lamb kidney cells compared to the free ICD-85. The IC10 value at 72 hours was increased from 9±2.7 μg/ml for free ICD-85 to 52±4.3 μg/ml for ICD-85 NPs. LDH assay demonstrated that free ICD-85 had dose-dependent cytotoxicity on primary lamb kidney cells while ICD-85 NPs exhibited significantly decreased cytotoxicity at equivalent concentrations. Moreover, morphological analysis showed no significant difference between control and treated cells with ICD-85 NPs. Conclusion Based on the results obtained in the present study it can be concluded that encapsulation of ICD-85 with sodium alginate nanoparticles can reduce its necrotic effect on primary lamb kidney cells. PMID:25250126

  20. Inappropriate Shock Due to T-Wave Oversensing by a Subcutaneous ICD after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Vincent F; Liebregts, Max; Luermans, Justin G L M; Balt, Jippe C

    2016-03-01

    A 53-year-old female patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) was admitted for alcohol septal ablation (ASA). A subcutaneous internal cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) was implanted for primary prevention. After ASA, the patient developed a right bundle branch block, and the S-ICD delivered a total of five inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing (TWOS). TWOS is a relatively frequent cause of inappropriate shocks in S-ICD patients. After invasive treatment for HOCM, there is a risk of developing intraventricular conduction delay and subsequent changes in QRS and T-wave morphology. This should be taken into consideration when ICD indication is evaluated in HOCM patients.

  1. Wideband Arrhythmia-Insensitive-Rapid (AIR) Pulse Sequence for Cardiac T1 mapping without Image Artifacts induced by ICD

    PubMed Central

    Hong, KyungPyo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wall, T. Scott; Drakos, Stavros G.; Kim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a wideband arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without image artifacts induced by implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Methods We developed a wideband AIR pulse sequence by incorporating a saturation pulse with wide frequency bandwidth (8.9 kHz), in order to achieve uniform T1 weighting in the heart with ICD. We tested the performance of original and “wideband” AIR cardiac T1 mapping pulse sequences in phantom and human experiments at 1.5T. Results In 5 phantoms representing native myocardium and blood and post-contrast blood/tissue T1 values, compared with the control T1 values measured with an inversion-recovery pulse sequence without ICD, T1 values measured with original AIR with ICD were considerably lower (absolute percent error >29%), whereas T1 values measured with wideband AIR with ICD were similar (absolute percent error <5%). Similarly, in 11 human subjects, compared with the control T1 values measured with original AIR without ICD, T1 measured with original AIR with ICD was significantly lower (absolute percent error >10.1%), whereas T1 measured with wideband AIR with ICD was similar (absolute percent error <2.0%). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of a wideband pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without significant image artifacts induced by ICD. PMID:25975192

  2. Frequent Questions about the Manifest Registry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FAQs Including Can I submit multiple form samples to the EPA Registry for approval? Must I submit a continuation sheet sample to the Manifest Registry under section 262.21(d)? Can I typeset the form after I am approved to print the manifest?

  3. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the...

  4. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  5. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  6. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  7. [Implementation of electronic registry in orthodontic clinic].

    PubMed

    Persin, L S; Merzhvinskaya, E I

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes technical and methodological features of electronic registry in orthodontic clinic. The authors elaborated custom made software according to Russian Ministry of Health requirements for medical local nets and databases. The registry allows processing of medical statistics and forming of reports, as well as analyzing medical staff effectiveness and seasonal dynamics of clinical work.

  8. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.

    1993-02-28

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are unique human tissue research programs studying the distribution, dose, and possible biological effects of the actinide elements in man, with the primary goal of assuring the adequacy of radiation protection standards for these radionuclides. The Registries research is based on radiochemical analysis of tissues collected at autopsy from voluntary donors who have documented occupational exposure to the actinides. To date, tissues, or in some cases radioanalytical results only, have been obtained from approximately 300 individuals; another 464 living individuals have volunteered to participate in the Registries research programs and have signed premortem informed consent and autopsy permissions. The Registries originated at the National Plutonium Registry which was started in 1968 as a then Atomic Energy Commission project under the aegis of a prime contractor at the Hanford site. In 1970, the name was changed to the United States Transuranium Registry to reflect a broader involvement with the higher actinides. In 1978, an administratively separate parallel registry, the United States Uranium Registry, was formed to carry out similar studies among uranium fuel cycle workers.

  9. Wearable cardioverter defibrillator: a life vest till the life boat (ICD) arrives.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johnson; Reek, Sven

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a life saving device ensuring protection against life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. But there are certain situations like a recent myocardial infarction where the standard guidelines do not recommend the implantation of an ICD while the patient can still be at a risk of demise due to a life threatening ventricular arrhythmia. There could also be a temporary indication for protection while explanting an infected ICD system. The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is a device which comes to the rescue in such situations. In this brief review, we discuss the historical aspects of the development of a WCD, technical aspects as well as the clinical trial data and real world scenario of its use. Copyright © 2013 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Obsessive compulsive and related disorders: comparing DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Marras, Anna; Fineberg, Naomi; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been recognized as mainly characterized by compulsivity rather than anxiety and, therefore, was removed from the anxiety disorders chapter and given its own in both the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the Beta Draft Version of the 11th revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). This revised clustering is based on increasing evidence of common affected neurocircuits between disorders, differently from previous classification systems based on interrater agreement. In this article, we focus on the classification of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs), examining the differences in approach adopted by these 2 nosological systems, with particular attention to the proposed changes in the forthcoming ICD-11. At this stage, notable differences in the ICD classification are emerging from the previous revision, apparently converging toward a reformulation of OCRDs that is closer to the DSM-5.

  11. Tourette and tic disorders in ICD-11: standing at the diagnostic crossroads.

    PubMed

    Woods, Douglas W; Thomsen, Per H

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects discussion by the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders. After reviewing the historical classification of tic disorders, this article discusses their placement in ICD-11. Existing problems with diagnostic labels and criteria, appropriate placement of the tic disorders category within the ICD-11 system, and pragmatic factors affecting classification are reviewed. The article ends with recommendations to (a) maintain consistency with the DSM-5 diagnostic labels for tic disorders, (b) add a minimum duration guideline for a provisional tic disorder diagnosis, (c) remove the multiple motor tic guideline for the diagnosis of Tourette disorder, and (d) co-parent the tic disorder diagnoses in the disorders of the nervous system and the mental and behavioral disorders categories, with secondary co-parenting in the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders sections.

  12. International variation in the definition of 'main condition' in ICD-coded health data.

    PubMed

    Quan, H; Moskal, L; Forster, A J; Brien, S; Walker, R; Romano, P S; Sundararajan, V; Burnand, B; Henriksson, G; Steinum, O; Droesler, S; Pincus, H A; Ghali, W A

    2014-10-01

    Hospital-based medical records are abstracted to create International Classification of Disease (ICD) coded discharge health data in many countries. The 'main condition' is not defined in a consistent manner internationally. Some countries employ a 'reason for admission' rule as the basis for the main condition, while other countries employ a 'resource use' rule. A few countries have recently transitioned from one of these approaches to the other. The definition of 'main condition' in such ICD data matters when it is used to define a disease cohort to assign diagnosis-related groups and to perform risk adjustment. We propose a method of harmonizing the international definition to enable researchers and international organizations using ICD-coded health data to aggregate or compare hospital care and outcomes across countries in a consistent manner. Inter-observer reliability of alternative harmonization approaches should be evaluated before finalizing the definition and adopting it worldwide.

  13. International variation in the definition of ‘main condition’ in ICD-coded health data

    PubMed Central

    Quan, H.; Moskal, L.; Forster, A.J.; Brien, S.; Walker, R.; Romano, P.S.; Sundararajan, V.; Burnand, B.; Henriksson, G.; Steinum, O.; Droesler, S.; Pincus, H.A.; Ghali, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-based medical records are abstracted to create International Classification of Disease (ICD) coded discharge health data in many countries. The ‘main condition’ is not defined in a consistent manner internationally. Some countries employ a ‘reason for admission’ rule as the basis for the main condition, while other countries employ a ‘resource use’ rule. A few countries have recently transitioned from one of these approaches to the other. The definition of ‘main condition’ in such ICD data matters when it is used to define a disease cohort to assign diagnosis-related groups and to perform risk adjustment. We propose a method of harmonizing the international definition to enable researchers and international organizations using ICD-coded health data to aggregate or compare hospital care and outcomes across countries in a consistent manner. Inter-observer reliability of alternative harmonization approaches should be evaluated before finalizing the definition and adopting it worldwide. PMID:24990594

  14. Automatic ICD-10 coding algorithm using an improved longest common subsequence based on semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, HuiJuan; Li, LanJuan

    2017-01-01

    ICD-10(International Classification of Diseases 10th revision) is a classification of a disease, symptom, procedure, or injury. Diseases are often described in patients’ medical records with free texts, such as terms, phrases and paraphrases, which differ significantly from those used in ICD-10 classification. This paper presents an improved approach based on the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS) and semantic similarity for automatic Chinese diagnoses, mapping from the disease names given by clinician to the disease names in ICD-10. LCS refers to the longest string that is a subsequence of every member of a given set of strings. The proposed method of improved LCS in this paper can increase the accuracy of processing in Chinese disease mapping. PMID:28306739

  15. [Italian Cystic Fibrosis Register - Report 2010].

    PubMed

    Amato, Annalisa; Ferrigno, Luigina; Salvatore, Marco; Toccaceli, Virgilia

    2016-01-01

    The Italian National CF Registry (INCFR) is based on the official agreement between the clinicians of the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis and the researchers of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Center for Rare Diseases; National Center for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Care Promotion). OBJECTIVES The main aim of INCFR is to contribute to the improvement in CF patients health care and clinical management through: i. the estimates of CF prevalence and incidence in Italy; ii. the analyses of medium and long term clinical and epidemiological trends of the disesase; iii. the identification of the main health care needs at regional and national level to contribute to the Health Care programmes and to the distribution of resources. MATERIALS AND METHODS Analyses and results described in the present Report are referred to patients in charge to the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis in 2010. Data were sent by Centers by means of a specific software (Camilla, Ibis Informatica). The Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis sent a total of 5,271 individual records; 1,112 records were excluded from the analyses due to restricted inclusion criteria. The total number of patients included in INCFR for analyses is 4,159. RESULTS INCFR database includes all prevalent cases at 1th January 2010 as well as all new diagnoses done in 2010. The present Report has been organized into 9 sections. 1. Demography: estimated 2010 CF prevalence was 7/100,000 residents in Italy; 52% of the patients were male, CF distribution showed higher frequency in patients aged 7 to 35 years. In 2010, 48.9% of the patients were more than 18 years old. 2. Diagnoses: most of the CF patients were diagnosed before two years of age (66.7%); a significant percentage of patients (11.4%) was diagnosed in adult-age. 3. New diagnoses (2010): new diagnoses were 168. Sixty-five percent of them was diagnosed before the second year of age and 17%in

  16. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  17. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Ramakrishnan, TS; Das, R. C.; Srivastava, K.; Mehta, Suresh; Shashikumar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry. PMID:25535438

  18. Nonverbal Communication among Italian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri-Bernardoni, Joseph M.

    Participant observation and author introspection were used to collect data in this study of nonverbal communication among Italian Americans in three large American cities. Discussion is given to kinesics (gestures and signs), haptics (touch), proxemics (interiors of homes, exteriors of homes, and spatial arrangements at a wedding dinner), and…

  19. ITALIAN IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GILLERS, LILLIAN M.; AND OTHERS

    THE FIRST PART OF THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SUPERVISORS AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS OF ITALIAN IS DEVOTED TO AN EXPLANATION OF THE PHILOSOPHY, OBJECTIVES, COURSE CONTENT, AND METHODS OF TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. IN THE SECOND PART, THE TOPICS TO BE TAUGHT ARE DEVELOPED IN DETAIL. EACH TOPIC FOR THE FIRST, SECOND, AND…

  20. Nonverbal Communication among Italian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri-Bernardoni, Joseph M.

    Participant observation and author introspection were used to collect data in this study of nonverbal communication among Italian Americans in three large American cities. Discussion is given to kinesics (gestures and signs), haptics (touch), proxemics (interiors of homes, exteriors of homes, and spatial arrangements at a wedding dinner), and…

  1. GENERATIVE RULES FOR ITALIAN PHONOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DI PIETRO, ROBERT J.

    TWO MODELS OF DESCRIPTION, GENERATIVE AND NONGENERATIVE, ARE APPLIED TO THE PHONOLOGY OF ITALIAN TO DETERMINE WHICH OF THE TWO OFFERS A SIMPLER YET MORE COMPREHENSIVE STATEMENT. THE NONGENERATIVE MODEL IS GIVEN IN A LISTING OF PHONEMES AND A BRIEF STATEMENT OF THE PHONOTACTICS AND ALLOPHONICS. THE GENERATIVE MODEL STATES THE FACTS IN 11 REWRITE…

  2. Remote sensing of Italian volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Casacchia, R.; Coradini, A.; Duncan, A. M.; Guest, J. E.; Kahle, A.; Lanciano, P.; Pieri, D. C.; Poscolieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a July 1986 remote sensing campaign of Italian volcanoes are reviewed. The equipment and techniques used to acquire the data are described and the results obtained for Campi Flegrei and Mount Etna are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness for the study of active and recently active volcanoes.

  3. Italian telematics initiatives and achievements.

    PubMed

    Pinciroli, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Depending on their legislation, the European countries have different telematics initiatives and different scenarios. Cultural roots cause differences even within a country or a region, and different organisational structures can cause further problems. With regard to the Italian telematics approach, the author intends to explain the basis and the main achievements in Italy and especially in the Lombaria region.

  4. Education and Italian Regional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Liberto, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the connection between growth and human capital in a convergence regression for the panel of Italian regions. We include measures of average primary, secondary and tertiary education. We find that increased education seems to contribute to growth only in the South. Decomposing total schooling into its three constituent…

  5. COPE-ICD: a randomised clinical trial studying the effects and meaning of a comprehensive rehabilitation programme for ICD recipients -design, intervention and population.

    PubMed

    Berg, Selina K; Svendsen, Jesper H; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Pedersen, Birthe D; Preisler, Pernille; Siersbæk-Hansen, Lone; Hansen, Mette B; Nielsen, Rune H; Pedersen, Preben U

    2011-06-17

    Growing evidence exists that living with an ICD can lead to fear and avoidance behaviour including the avoidance of physical activity. It has been suggested that psychological stress can increase the risk of shock and predict death. Small studies have indicated a beneficial effect arising from exercise training and psychological intervention, therefore a large-scale rehabilitation programme was set up. A mixed methods embedded experimental design was chosen to include both quantitative and qualitative measures. A randomised clinical trial is its primary component. 196 patients (power-calculated) were block randomised to either a control group or intervention group at a single centre. The intervention consists of a 1-year psycho-educational component provided by two nurses and a 12-week exercise training component provided by two physiotherapists. Our hypothesis is that the COPE-ICD programme will reduce avoidance behaviour, sexual dysfunction and increase quality of life, increase physical capability, reduce the number of treatment-demanding arrhythmias, reduce mortality and acute re-hospitalisation, reduce sickness leading to absence from work and be cost-effective. A blinded investigator will perform all physical tests and data collection. Most participants are men (79%) with a mean age of 58 (range 20-85). Most ICD implantations are on primary prophylactic indication (66%). 44% is NYHA II. Mean walk capacity (6MWT) is 417 m. Mean perception of General Health (SF-36) is PCS 42.6 and MCS 47.1.A large-scale ICD rehabilitation trial including psycho-educational intervention and exercise training has been initiated and will report findings starting in 2011. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00569478.

  6. Rare diseases in ICD11: making rare diseases visible in health information systems through appropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Aymé, Ségolène; Bellet, Bertrand; Rath, Ana

    2015-03-26

    Because of their individual rarity, genetic diseases and other types of rare diseases are under-represented in healthcare coding systems; this contributes to a lack of ascertainment and recognition of their importance for healthcare planning and resource allocation, and prevents clinical research from being performed. Orphanet was given the task to develop an inventory of rare diseases and a classification system which could serve as a template to update International terminologies. When the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the revision process of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), a Topic Advisory Group for rare diseases was established, managed by Orphanet and funded by the European Commission. So far 5,400 rare diseases listed in the Orphanet database have an endorsed representation in the foundation layer of ICD-11, and are thus provided with a unique identifier in the Beta version of ICD-11, which is 10 times more than in ICD10. A rare disease linearization is also planned. The current beta version is open for public consultation and comments, and to be used for field testing. The adoption by the World Health Assembly is planned for 2017. The overall revision process was carried out with very limited means considering its scope, ambition and strategic significance, and experienced significant hurdles and setbacks. The lack of funding impacted the level of professionalism that could be attained. The contrast between the initially declared goals and the currently foreseen final product is disappointing. In the context of uncertainty around the outcome of the field testing and the potential willingness of countries to adopt this new version, the European Commission Expert Group on Rare Diseases adopted in November 2014 a recommendation for health care coding systems to consider using ORPHA codes in addition to ICD10 codes for rare diseases having no specific ICD10 codes. The Orphanet terminology, classifications and mappings with other

  7. A new algorithm to reduce inappropriate therapy in the S-ICD system.

    PubMed

    Brisben, Amy J; Burke, Martin C; Knight, Bradley P; Hahn, Stephen J; Herrmann, Keith L; Allavatam, Venugopal; Mahajan, Deepa; Sanghera, Rick; Gold, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    The subcutaneous ICD system (S-ICD) has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. This device reliably detects ventricular tachyarrhythmias with a low incidence of inappropriate shocks for supraventricular arrhythmias. However, T-wave oversensing (TWOS) is more common with the S-ICD compared with transvenous systems. We developed a novel discrimination algorithm to reduce TWOS without compromising tachyarrhythmia discrimination. The algorithm was developed using a database of recorded episodes, including 244 appropriate therapies for ventricular arrhythmias and 133 episodes with an inappropriate detection due to TWOS, and using a computer model that simulates the S-ICD system. An independent set of data of 161 TWOS episodes, 137 ventricular and 328 supraventricular episodes, was used to validate the algorithm on actual device hardware. The S-ICD performance with the new algorithm was compared with the S-ICD without the new algorithm. Development results showed a decrease in inappropriate charge due to TWOS by 30.7 ± 18%. All ventricular arrhythmias were appropriately detected and the time to appropriate charge initiation was not increased. System validation showed that the new algorithm avoided an inappropriate charge due to TWOS by 39.8 ± 11.4%. No decrease in ventricular arrhythmia sensitivity and no significant change in supraventricular specificity were observed. A new algorithm that uses correlation of the existing complex to previous complexes reduced TWOS episodes by approximately 40%. The algorithm has potential for a clinically meaningful decrease in inappropriate shocks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Safety of symptom-limited exercise testing in a big cohort of a modern ICD population.

    PubMed

    Voss, Frederik; Schueler, Melanie; Lauterbach, Michael; Bauer, Alexander; Katus, Hugo A; Becker, Ruediger

    2016-01-01

    Exercise may predispose to ventricular arrhythmias especially in patients with congestive heart failure. As therapy with implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has become standard medical care, there is an emerging number of exercise tests that need to be performed in patients with ICDs. In contrast, little is known about the safety of symptom-limited exercise testing in these patients. 400 ICD patients performed symptom-limited exercise treadmill testing. 200 patients performed a ramp protocol with an initial workload of 0 W increased by 15 W every minute. Another 200 ICD patients did a slightly modified ramp protocol with again an initial workload of 0 W but with an increased capacity of 15 W every 2 min. The study population consists mainly of patients with ischemic (63%) and non-ischemic (34%) heart disease. Atrial fibrillation was present in 16% of the subjects. The mean ejection fraction was 28 ± 8, and 78% of the patients had an ejection fraction below 30%. In this cohort of patients, no sustained ventricular arrhythmias and no deaths occurred during or after exercise testing. No inappropriate shock delivery was observed. The modified ramp protocol resulted in a prolonged exercise time with equal exercise capacity but does not result in an enhanced susceptibility for ventricular arrhythmias. Symptom-limited exercise treadmill testing in heart failure patients with ICDs is a safe procedure. The use of a ramp protocol is sufficient in terms of safety and is easy to perform in general practice. The exercise duration in heart failure patients with ICDs does not predict serious adverse events.

  9. Reduction in depressive symptoms in primary prevention ICD scheduled patients - One year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Amiaz, Revital; Asher, Elad; Rozen, Guy; Czerniak, Efrat; Levi, Linda; Weiser, Mark; Glikson, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs), have previously been associated with the onset of depression and anxiety. The aim of this one-year prospective study was to evaluate the rate of new onset psychopathological symptoms after elective ICD implantation. A total of 158 consecutive outpatients who were scheduled for an elective ICD implantation were diagnosed and screened based on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Depression and anxiety were evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression (HAM-D) and Anxiety (HAM-A). Patient's attitude toward the ICD device was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Patients' mean age was 64±12.4years; 134 (85%) were men, with the majority of patients performing the procedure for reasons of 'primary prevention'. According to the MINI diagnosis at baseline, three (2%) patients suffered from major depressive disorder and ten (6%) from dysthymia. Significant improvement in HAM-D mean scores was found between baseline, three months and one year after implantation (6.50±6.4; 4.10±5.3 and 2.7±4.6, respectively F(2100)=16.42; p<0.001). There was a significantly more positive attitude toward the device over time based on the VAS score [F(2122)=53.31, p<0.001]. ICD implantation significantly contributes to the reduction of depressive symptoms, while the overall mindset toward the ICD device was positive and improved during the one-year follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Malignant Mesothelioma Registry from Piedmont. Incidence in 1990-1995].

    PubMed

    Ivaldi, C; Dalmasso, P; Nesti, M; Magnani, C

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes methods and results of the Piedmont Malignant Mesothelioma Registry. The Registry is active since 1990 and collects all histologically confirmed incident cases of malignant mesothelioma (m.m.) occurring in the residents of Piedmont. In the period 1990-95, 346 cases of pleural m.m. (211 males and 135 females) and 41 (28 males and 13 females) of peritoneal m.m. have been observed. Amongst the inhabitants of the Local Health Authority of Casale Monferrato, where manufacturing of cement asbestos has determined serious asbestos exposures both in the work place and general environment, there have been 105 pleural m.m. and 17 peritoneal m.m. (incidence rate were 15.6 for men and 13.0 for women and 3.6 for men and 0.6 for women respectively). Leaving out the Local Health Authority (LHA) of Casale Monferrato, the annual incidence rate in Piedmont (for 10(5) person-years, age standardised on the 1981 Italian population), has been 1.0 in men and 0.6 in women for the pleural m.m. (respectively 154 and 87 cases) and 0.09 and 0.06 for peritoneal m.m. (14 and 10 cases). Possible cases of m.m. (cytological and/or x-ray diagnosis) have been searched in the file of hospital admission and discharges (SDO) in 1994-95: 46 additional cases were found, with a 25% increase in incidence rates. The analysis of incidence according to geographical aggregations (defined according to the LHA borders) has identified, besides some already known important sources of exposures, as Casale Monferrato and the LHA of Lanzo (Balangero mine), other areas with excess of incidence as the LHA's of Galliate and Caluso which show an increased incidence of pleural m.m. in men or Vercelli and Chieri with increased incidence of pleural m.m. in women. These observation deserves further analysis.

  11. [Creating a European registry of patient registries--a service oriented approach].

    PubMed

    Pajić, Vanja; Pristas, Ivan; Meglic, Matic

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare registries in European countries are producing a large amount of data that are difficult to share and which, for the lack of interoperability, do not meet the real needs of data users, i.e. various groups of researchers, professionals and patients. Also, data gathered from healthcare registries are usually considered as isolated islands of information, which makes the task of approaching these data an arduous one. The suggested solution to these problems lies in the service approach to health registries and the data contained within them. Applying the service approach to registries, the healthcare data can escape the narrow confines of health registries in which they reside by transforming them into packages of predefined services in accordance with the end-user needs, which introduces the concept of metadata registries as service catalogues. Such a model of a service-oriented metadata registry as a catalog of services is discussed here as a real possibility and a dire need. The purpose of such a metadata registry is the collection of relevant data from the service provider and delivery of a predefined and reusable set of services to the service consumer. Interoperability thus achieved transcends the traditional problems of data exchange because it comes to grips with the services intended for and defined by the end-user, and not relying solely on data as a final deliverable. At the European Union level, such a metadata registry is currently under development, with the working title PARENT (Patient Registry Initiative) 'Registry of registries'. The mission of this metadata registry is to combine all the relevant European patient registries into such a service-oriented model.

  12. The role of the partner atom and resonant excitation energy in ICD in rare gas dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Patrick; Ripani, Enrico; Bolognesi, Paola; Coreno, Marcello; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Devetta, Michele; Callegari, Carlo; Di Praia, Michele; Prince, Kevin; Richter, Robert; Alagial, Michele; Kivimäkil, Antti

    2014-04-01

    We show experimental evidence for Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) in mixed rare gas dimers following resonant Auger decay. A velocity map imaging apparatus together with a cooled supersonic beam containing Ar2, ArNe and ArKr dimers was used to record electron VMI images in coincidence with two mass selected ions following excitation on five resonances converging to the Ar+ 2p-11/2 and 2p-13/2 thresholds using the synchrotron radiation. The results show that the kinetic energy distribution of the ICD electrons observed in coincidence with the ions from Coulomb explosion of the dimers depends on the partner ion and resonant photon energy.

  13. A4-2: ICD-10 CM Transition across Three Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Suzanne; Allison, Michael; Cleveland, Catherine; Bachman, Don; Yang, Xiuhai; Schmidt, Mark; Bauck, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The United State currently uses version nine (ICD-9) for diagnosis and procedure coding. Federal regulations require that the US adopt the next version (ICD-10) by 10/1/2014. The new version expands the number of diagnosis codes from about 13,000 to 68,000, providing more granularity to classify diseases. Challenges in moving to ICD-10 include: (a) the crosswalk between versions is a many-to-many match; (b) the relationship between the old and the new codes will sometimes be complex; and (c) it will encompass system-level changes such as expanded field sizes and support for alphanumeric characters. Our challenge is to implement the transition across three research centers at Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Southeast and Hawaii. Methods The three research centers need to account for the new ICD-10 code set and any new data structures introduced by either the EMR or Research Data Warehouse. A smooth transition between coding systems requires working with researchers across the three regions. This includes identifying corresponding ICD-10 codes that correctly identify the research cohort members and remediating the existing programing logic. Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research (CHR) has developed a detailed plan to accomplish these two goals. CHR staff are partnering with the Kaiser Health Plan ICD-10 implementation team in the development of our project plans. The standard source to be used for mapping at the three Kaiser Research centers is the General Equivalence Mappings based Crosswalk Query Tool, which Kaiser is implementing to support transition mapping needs. Results The CHR ICD-10 remediation team has completed the Framing and Planning phases including identifying programs/tables affected, sharing remediation solutions across the Kaiser regional research teams, and meeting with the Health Plan to coordinate efforts. We have developed a project remediation checklist and will report on the development of validation testing plans and

  14. [Terminology of lower urinary tract dysfunction and coding in the ICD-10-GM catalogue].

    PubMed

    Finter, F; Petschl, S; Küfer, R; Simon, J; Volkmer, B G

    2008-05-01

    The terminology of lower urinary tract dysfunction was recommended by the AWMF and the German Society of Urology in 2004. However, there is no transfer of this terminology to diagnoses according to the classification of the ICD-10-GM catalogue. This catalogue is of major relevance for remuneration of inpatient and outpatient treatment in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system. This article presents a table showing the correspondence between the current terminology and the ICD-10-GM classification. The correct coding can change the DRG remuneration by a factor of 2 to 3.

  15. AAIDD proposed recommendations for ICD-11 and the condition previously known as mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Tassé, Marc J; Luckasson, Ruth; Nygren, Margaret

    2013-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of seeking input from professional stakeholder groups and consumers regarding the draft proposals of the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) convened a small group of distinguished interdisciplinary expert professionals in intellectual disability to review the ICD-11 proposal regarding revisions of the condition previously known as "mental retardation." This article presents the recommendations made by the AAIDD to the WHO Secretariat regarding the name, definition, diagnostic guidelines, and classification of the condition known today as intellectual disability.

  16. Assessing the Planning and Implementation Strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Transition in Alabama Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Shannon H.; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians’ documentation in health records, coders’ process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers’ reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders’ productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. PMID:23805061

  17. Assessing the planning and implementation strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition in Alabama hospitals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians' documentation in health records, coders' process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers' reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders' productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS.

  18. [Contributions of the epidemiological cancer registries to the evaluation of mammography screening in Germany].

    PubMed

    Urbschat, I; Kieschke, J; Schlanstedt-Jahn, U; von Gehlen, S; Thiel, A; Jensch, P

    2005-07-01

    Before the country-wide introduction of mammography screening, testing of the organised screening took place in Weser-Ems, Bremen and Wiesbaden. Important quality assurance parameters (carcinomas detected during checkup intervals, tumour stage distribution, breast cancer incidence rate, breast cancer mortality rate) are to be evaluated via epidemiological cancer registries. For the model region Weser-Ems (MSWE) the record linkage with the epidemiological cancer registry Lower Saxony (EKN) was successfully accomplished. The technical realisation and first comparison analyses for the development of breast cancer incidence and of tumour size are reported. The target population of the MSWE was 22,600 women aged 50-69 years. They were invited since May 2002 to mammography screening with a screening interval of two years. The record linkage of 12,913 women who participated until February 2004 in the MSWE, was realised by the use of the control number system of the epidemiological cancer registries. The observation time was between 6 and 25 month (median: 15 month). Reference population for comparison analyses were all women between 50 and 69 years of the remaining governmental district Weser-Ems (255,000 women). In the first record linkage 96 screening-cases (ICD-10 C50 + D05) could be identified. Additionally six interval cancers were determined (time between screening and diagnosis in months: median 5.5; mean 7.7). The breast cancer incidence increased in the MSWE area and in the control-area, the rise in the MSWE area being higher. The increase was especially observed with the small tumours. Women with breast cancer diagnosed by screening: 19.8% in-situ-cancer and 18.8% very small tumours < = 10 mm. In the control area Weser-Ems this rate with 5.6% in-situ-cancer and 14.5% very small tumours, was relatively high, indicating the spread of opportunistic mammographies in absence of organised screening. First effects of mammography screening can be evaluated early by

  19. [Leather dust and systematic research on occupational tumors: the national and regional registry TUNS].

    PubMed

    Mensi, Carolina; Sieno, Claudia; Consonni, Dario; Riboldi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The sinonasal cancer (SNC) are a rare tumors characterized by high occupational etiologic fraction. For this reason their incidence and etiology can be actively monitored by a dedicated cancer registry. The National Registry of these tumours is situated at the Italian Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL) and is based on Regional Operating Centres (ROCs). In Lombardy Region the ROC has been established at the end of 2007 with the purpose to make a systematic surveillance and therefore to support in the most suitable way the scientific research and the prevention actions in the high risk working sectors. The aims of this surveillance are: to estimate the regional incidence of SNC, to define different sources of occupational and environmental exposure both known (wood, leather, nickel, chromium) and unknown. The registry collects all the new incident cases of epithelial SNC occurring in residents in Lombardy Region since 01.01.2008. The regional Registry is managed according to National Guidelines. Until January 2010 we received 596 cases of suspected SNC; only 91 (15%) of these were actually incident cases according to the inclusion criteria of the Registry, and they were preferentially adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma. In 2008 the regional age-standardized incidence rate of SNC for males and females, respectively, is 0.8 and 0.5 per 100,000. Occupational or environmental exposure to wood or leather dust is ascertained in over the 50% of cases. The occupational exposure to leather dust was duo to work in shoe factories. Our preliminary findings confirm that occupational exposure to wood and leather dusts are the more relevant risk factors for SNC. The study of occupational sectors and job activity in cases without such exposure could suggest new etiologic hypothesis.

  20. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: epidemiology and registries.

    PubMed

    McGoon, Michael D; Benza, Raymond L; Escribano-Subias, Pilar; Jiang, Xin; Miller, Dave P; Peacock, Andrew J; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Pulido, Tomas; Rich, Stuart; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Suissa, Samy; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-24

    Registries of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have been instrumental in characterizing the presentation and natural history of the disease and provide a basis for prognostication. Since the initial accumulation of data conducted in the 1980s, subsequent registry databases have yielded information about the demographic factors, treatment, and survival of patients and have permitted comparisons between populations in different eras and environments. Inclusion of patients with all subtypes of PAH has also allowed comparisons of these subpopulations. We describe herein the basic methodology by which PAH registries have been conducted, review key insights provided by registries, summarize issues related to interpretation and comparison of the results, and discuss the utility of data to predict survival outcomes. Potential sources of bias, particularly related to the inclusion of incident and/or prevalent patients and missing data, are addressed. A fundamental observation of current registries is that survival in the modern treatment era has improved compared with that observed previously and that outcomes among PAH subpopulations vary substantially. Continuing systematic clinical surveillance of PAH will be important as treatment evolves and as understanding of mechanisms advance. Considerations for future directions of registry studies include enrollment of a broader population of patients with pulmonary hypertension of all clinical types and severity and continued globalization and collaboration of registry databases. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The utility of heart failure registries: a descriptive and comparative study of two heart failure registries.

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Miró, Òscar; Formiga, Francesc; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, Manuel; Jacob, Javier; Quirós-López, Raúl; Herrero Puente, Pablo; Manzano, Luís; Llorens, Pere

    2016-05-01

    Registries are useful to address questions that are difficult to answer in clinical trials. The objective of this study was to describe and compare two heart failure (HF) cohorts from two Spanish HF registries. We compared the RICA and EAHFE registries, both of which are prospective multicentre cohort studies including patients with decompensated HF consecutively admitted to internal medicine wards (RICA) or attending the emergency department (EAHFE). From the latter registry we only included patients who were admitted to internal medicine wards. A total of 5137 patients admitted to internal medicine wards were analysed (RICA: 3287 patients; EAHFE: 1850 patients). Both registries included elderly patients (RICA: mean (SD) age 79 (9) years; EAHFE: mean (SD) age 81 (9) years), with a slight predominance of female gender (52% and 58%, respectively, in the RICA and EAHFE registries) and with a high proportion of patients with preserved ejection fraction (58% and 62%, respectively). Some differences in comorbidities were noted, with diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, chronic renal failure and atrial fibrillation being more frequent in the RICA registry while cognitive and functional impairment predominated in the EAHFE registry. The 30-day mortality after discharge was 3.4% in the RICA registry and 4.8% in the EAHFE registry (p<0.05) and the 30-day readmission rate was 7.5% in the RICA registry (readmission to hospital) and 24.0% in the EAHFE registry (readmission to emergency department) (p<0.001). We found differences in the clinical characteristics of patients admitted to Spanish internal medicine wards for decompensated HF depending on inclusion in either the RICA or EAHFE registry. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  3. Evidence and practice in spine registries.

    PubMed

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the "quality of spine care" from spine registries. To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders.

  4. Derivate Isocorydine (d-ICD) Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell by Downregulating ITGA1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tian, Hua; Li, Hong; Ge, Chao; Zhao, Fangyu; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2017-02-27

    In our previous studies, we found that isocorydine (ICD) could be a potential antitumor agent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Derivate isocorydine (d-ICD), a more effective antitumor agent, has been demonstrated to inhibit proliferation and drug resistance in HCC. In order to investigate the potential role of d-ICD on HCC cell migration and its possible mechanism, wound healing assay, trans-well invasion assay, western blot analysis, and qRT-PCR were performed to study the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells as well as relevant molecular alteration following d-ICD treatment. Results indicated that the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells were suppressed when cultured with d-ICD. Meanwhile, the expression level of ITGA1 was markedly reduced. Furthermore, we found that ITGA1 promotes HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro, and that ITGA1 can partly reverse the effect of d-ICD-induced migration and invasion suppression in HCC cells. In addition, dual luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were used to study the expression regulation of ITGA1, and found that E2F1 directly upregulates ITGA1 expression and d-ICD inhibits E2F1 expression. Taken together, these results reveal that d-ICD inhibits HCC cell migration and invasion may partly by downregulating E2F1/ITGA1 expression.

  5. 77 FR 40620 - AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of Quality Indicators (QIs) - Extension Date for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of... Quality (AHRQ) is seeking nominations for members of approximately 10 multidisciplinary workgroups, to be convened by AHRQ's contractor, on ICD-10-CM/PCS conversion of the AHRQ Quality Indicators (QIs)....

  6. Deriving ICD-11 personality disorder domains from dsm-5 traits: initial attempt to harmonize two diagnostic systems.

    PubMed

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Kongerslev, M; Simonsen, E; Krueger, R F; Mulder, R

    2017-07-01

    The personality disorder domains proposed for the ICD-11 comprise Negative Affectivity, Detachment, Dissociality, Disinhibition, and Anankastia, which are reasonably concordant with the higher-order trait domains in the Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders. We examined (i) whether designated DSM-5 trait facets can be used to describe the proposed ICD-11 trait domains, and (ii) how these ICD-11 trait features are hierarchically organized. A mixed Danish derivation sample (N = 1541) of 615 psychiatric out-patients and 925 community participants along with a US replication sample (N = 637) completed the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Sixteen PID-5 traits were designated to cover features of the ICD-11 trait domains. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analyzes showed that the designated traits were meaningfully organized in the proposed ICD-11 five-domain structure as well as other recognizable higher-order models of personality and psychopathology. Model fits revealed that the five proposed ICD-11 personality disorder domains were satisfactorily resembled, and replicated in the independent US sample. The proposed ICD-11 personality disorder domains can be accurately described using designated traits from the DSM-5 personality trait system. A scoring algorithm for the ICD-11 personality disorder domains is provided in appendix. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Derivate Isocorydine (d-ICD) Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell by Downregulating ITGA1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tian, Hua; Li, Hong; Ge, Chao; Zhao, Fangyu; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies, we found that isocorydine (ICD) could be a potential antitumor agent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Derivate isocorydine (d-ICD), a more effective antitumor agent, has been demonstrated to inhibit proliferation and drug resistance in HCC. In order to investigate the potential role of d-ICD on HCC cell migration and its possible mechanism, wound healing assay, trans-well invasion assay, western blot analysis, and qRT-PCR were performed to study the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells as well as relevant molecular alteration following d-ICD treatment. Results indicated that the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells were suppressed when cultured with d-ICD. Meanwhile, the expression level of ITGA1 was markedly reduced. Furthermore, we found that ITGA1 promotes HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro, and that ITGA1 can partly reverse the effect of d-ICD-induced migration and invasion suppression in HCC cells. In addition, dual luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were used to study the expression regulation of ITGA1, and found that E2F1 directly upregulates ITGA1 expression and d-ICD inhibits E2F1 expression. Taken together, these results reveal that d-ICD inhibits HCC cell migration and invasion may partly by downregulating E2F1/ITGA1 expression. PMID:28264467

  8. Predicting in-hospital mortality of traffic victims: A comparison between AIS-and ICD-9-CM-related injury severity scales when only ICD-9-CM is reported.

    PubMed

    Van Belleghem, Griet; Devos, Stefanie; De Wit, Liesbet; Hubloue, Ives; Lauwaert, Door; Pien, Karen; Putman, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity scores are important in the context of developing European and national goals on traffic safety, health-care benchmarking and improving patient communication. Various severity scores are available and are mostly based on Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) or International Classification of Diseases (ICD). The aim of this paper is to compare the predictive value for in-hospital mortality between the various severity scores if only International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification ICD-9-CM is reported. To estimate severity scores based on the AIS lexicon, ICD-9-CM codes were converted with ICD Programmes for Injury Categorization (ICDPIC) and four AIS-based severity scores were derived: Maximum AIS (MaxAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Exponential Injury Severity Score (EISS). Based on ICD-9-CM, six severity scores were calculated. Determined by the number of injuries taken into account and the means by which survival risk ratios (SRRs) were calculated, four different approaches were used to calculate the ICD-9-based Injury Severity Scores (ICISS). The Trauma Mortality Prediction Model (TMPM) was calculated with the ICD-9-CM-based model averaged regression coefficients (MARC) for both the single worst injury and multiple injuries. Severity scores were compared via model discrimination and calibration. Model comparisons were performed separately for the severity scores based on the single worst injury and multiple injuries. For ICD-9-based scales, estimation of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) ranges between 0.94 and 0.96, while AIS-based scales range between 0.72 and 0.76, respectively. The intercept in the calibration plots is not significantly different from 0 for MaxAIS, ICISS and TMPM. When only ICD-9-CM codes are reported, ICD-9-CM-based severity scores perform better than severity scores based on the conversion to AIS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Renal biopsy in chronic kidney disease: lessons from a large Italian registry.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Bernich, Patrizia; Lupo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Renal biopsy procedure in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) may represent a valid tool to help clinicians in clinical practice. However, the use of this invasive method in CRF is variable and it reflects the hospital biopsy policy. To better define the CRF-related histological patterns and to assess the clinical utility of this procedure in this extensive group, we analyzed biopsy records of 1,185 CRF patients living in a large area of north-east Italy from 1998 to 2010. Data analysis showed that, although the biopsy incidence rate and the histological features were unchanged, the mean age of our CRF patients increased during the study period (R(2) = 0.42, p < 0.01). Primary and secondary glomerulonephritis (SGNs) were the main histological presentations (53.9 and 23%, respectively). SGNs were over-diagnosed in females. Leading histological types were immunoglobulin A nephropathy (22%), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (12.4%), membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN, 7.5%) and nephroangiosclerosis (7.3%). These forms were also highly frequent in CRF patients with elevated proteinuria and moderate/severe renal damage. Elderly patients were primarily affected by MGN. After biopsy, 49.5% of CRF patients with and 34.1% without nephrotic syndrome received immunosuppression therapy. This study demonstrated that renal biopsy in CRF patients, regardless of age and glomerular filtration rates, is safe and essential to achieve a correct diagnosis and to commence the correct therapy. Additionally, it revealed that, even in patients with severe renal damage, it is possible to perform an accurate histological diagnosis and, interestingly, end-stage kidney disease seems not to be the primary form. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Using Semantic Web technology to support icd-11 textual definitions authoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The beta phase of the 11th revision of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) intends to accept public input through a distributed model of authoring. One of the core use cases is to create textual definitions for the ICD categories. The objective of the present study is to design, develop, and evaluate approaches to support ICD-11 textual definitions authoring using Semantic Web technology. We investigated a number of heterogeneous resources related to the definitions of diseases, including the linked open data (LOD) from DBpedia, the textual definitions from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and the formal definitions of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine—Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). We integrated them in a Semantic Web framework (i.e., the Linked Data in a Resource Description Framework [RDF] triple store), which is being proposed as a backend in a prototype platform for collaborative authoring of ICD-11 beta. We performed a preliminary evaluation on the usefulness of our approaches and discussed the potential challenges from both technical and clinical perspectives. PMID:23601451

  11. Detection of Inpatient Health Care Associated Injuries: Comparing Two ICD-9-CM Code Classifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    example, currently the UTIDs database has nine fields for ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes plus a single additional field for an E-code. Some patients...information for physicians on sub-acute thromboses (SAT) and hypersensitivity reactions with use of the Cordis CYPHERTM Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent

  12. AAIDD Proposed Recommendations for "ICD-11" and the Condition Previously Known as Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasse, Marc J.; Luckasson, Ruth; Nygren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of seeking input from professional stakeholder groups and consumers regarding the draft proposals of the 11th edition of the "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD-11"). The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) convened a small group of…

  13. ICF and ICD codes provide a standard language of disability in young children.

    PubMed

    Simeonsson, Rune J; Scarborough, Anita A; Hebbeler, Kathleen M

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the utility of a hierarchical algorithm incorporating codes from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health--ICF (WHO, 2001) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases-ICD (WHO, 1994) to classify reasons for eligibility of young children in early intervention. The database for this study was a nationally representative enrollment sample of more than 5,500 children in a longitudinal study of early intervention. Reasons for eligibility were reviewed and matched to the closest ICF or ICD codes under one of four major categories (Body Functions/Structures, Activities/Participation, Health Conditions, and Environmental Factors). The average number of reasons for eligibility provided per child was 1.5, resulting in a population summary exceeding 100%. A total of 305 ICF and ICD codes were used with most (77%) of the children having codes in the category of Body Function/Structures. Forty-one percent of the sample had codes of Health Conditions, whereas the proportions with codes in the Activities/Partipication and Environmental Categories were 10 and 5%, respectively. The results demonstrate that ICD and ICF can be jointly used as a common language to document disability characteristics of children in early intervention.

  14. Bipolar disorders in the new DSM-5 and ICD-11 classifications.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Consuelo; Goikolea, Jose Manuel; Colom, Francesc; Moreno, Carmen; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    The DSM-5 and ICD-11 classifications, the latter still under development, are aimed at harmonizing the diagnoses of mental disorders. A critical review is presented in the issues that can converge or separate both classifications regarding bipolar disorders, and those conditions–included in depressive disorders–with special relevance for bipolar (e.g. major depressive episode). The main novelties include the incorporation of dimensional parameters to assess the symptoms, as well as the sub-threshold states in the bipolar spectrum, the consideration of new course specifiers such as the mixed symptoms, the elimination of mixed episodes, and a more restrictive threshold for the diagnosis of hypo/mania. The most noticeable points of convergence are the inclusion of bipolar II disorder in ICD-11 and the additional requirement of an increase in activity, besides mood elation or irritability, for the diagnosis of hypo/mania in both classifications. The main differences are, most likely keeping the mixed depression and anxiety disorder diagnostic category, maintaining bereavement as exclusion criterion for the depressive episode, and maintaining the mixed episode diagnosis in bipolar disorder in the forthcoming ICD-11. Since DSM-5 has already been published, changes in the draft of ICD-11, or ongoing changes in DSM-5.1 will be necessary to improve the harmonization of psychiatric diagnoses.

  15. Development of a robust mapping between AIS 2+ and ICD-9 injury codes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Ryan T; Loftis, Kathryn L; Martin, R Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-03-01

    Motor vehicle crashes result in millions of injuries and thousands of deaths each year in the United States. While most crash research datasets use Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) codes to identify injuries, most hospital datasets use the International Classification of Diseases, version 9 (ICD-9) codes. The objective of this research was to establish a one-to-one mapping between AIS and ICD-9 codes for use with motor vehicle crash injury research. This paper presents results from investigating different mapping approaches using the most common AIS 2+ injuries from the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS). The mapping approaches were generated from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) (428,637 code pairs), ICDMAP (2500 code pairs), and the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) (4125 code pairs). Each approach may pair given AIS code with more than one ICD-9 code (mean number of pairs per AIS code: NTDB=211, ICDMAP=7, CIREN=5), and some of the potential pairs are unrelated. The mappings were evaluated using two comparative metrics coupled with qualitative inspection by an expert physician. Based on the number of false mappings and correct pairs, the best mapping was derived from CIREN. AIS and ICD-9 codes in CIREN are both manually coded, leading to more proper mappings between the two. Using the mapping presented herein, data from crash and hospital datasets can be used together to better understand and prevent motor vehicle crash injuries in the future.

  16. AAIDD Proposed Recommendations for "ICD-11" and the Condition Previously Known as Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasse, Marc J.; Luckasson, Ruth; Nygren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of seeking input from professional stakeholder groups and consumers regarding the draft proposals of the 11th edition of the "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD-11"). The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) convened a small group of…

  17. Data management procedures for Tiepoint Registration, pre and post processing, and ICD116

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, B. S.

    1983-01-01

    The data management procedures for tiepoint registration, pre and post processing, and "ICD116' are described. With each procedure description, the pertinent execs are listed and purposes defined. An example run of each of the 32 execs is included with user inputs identified.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain IcdP1 Shows Diverse Catabolic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain IcdP1 is presented here. This organism was shown to degrade a broad range of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides. The sequence data can be used to predict genes for xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism. PMID:26139718

  19. 78 FR 11889 - Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... and Maintenance Committee; Correction SUMMARY: This document corrects a notice that was published in... should read as follows: Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee. The... Coordination and Maintenance Committee (C&M) meeting. Time and Date: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., March 5, 2013. Place...

  20. Accuracy of ICD-9 coding for Clostridium difficile infections: a retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, D B; Hicks, L S; Cook, E F; Schnipper, J L

    2007-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a major nosocomial problem. Epidemiological surveillance of the disease can be accomplished by microbiological or administrative data. Microbiological tracking is problematic since it does not always translate into clinical disease, and it is not always available. Tracking by administrative data is attractive, but ICD-9 code accuracy for C. diff is unknown. By using a large administrative database of hospitalized patients with C. diff (by ICD-9 code or cytotoxic assay), this study found that the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of ICD-9 coding were 71%, 99%, 87%, and 96% respectively (using micro data as the gold standard). When only using symptomatic patients the sensitivity increased to 82% and when only using symptomatic patients whose test results were available at discharge, the sensitivity increased to 88%. C. diff ICD-9 codes closely approximate true C. diff infection, especially in symptomatic patients whose test results are available at the time of discharge, and can therefore be used as a reasonable alternative to microbiological data for tracking purposes.

  1. [MISSCARE Survey - Italian Version: findings from an Italian validation study].

    PubMed

    Sist, Luisa; Contini, Carla; Bandini, Anna; Bandini, Stefania; Massa, Licia; Zanin, Roberta; Maricchio, Rita; Gianesini, Gloria; Bassi, Erika; Tartaglini, Daniela; Palese, Alvisa; Ferraresi, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    The Missed Nursing Care (MNC) refers to nursing interventions that are not completed, partially completed, or postponed. Despite the relevance of MNC, no assessment tools are available in the Italian context, and no data regarding the occurrence of this phenomenon has been documented on a large scale to date. The study aims were: (1) to validate the Italian version of the MISSCARE Survey tool; (2) to measure the prevalence of missed interventions and reasons for missed care as perceived by clinical nurses working in Italian health care settings. After having conducted the forward and backward translation, pre-pilot and pilot phases were developed to ensure face and content validity as well as semantic and conceptual equivalence of the Italian version with the original version. The MISSCARE survey questionnaire was then distributed to 1,233 clinical nurses of whom 1,003 completed the questionnaire. Overall, 979 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires were completed from January to March 2012, by nurses working in medical and surgical hospital departments in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy. Construct validity and internal consistency of the instrument were assessed. The face and content validity were ascertained by a group of experts. The instrument acceptability was good given that 79.4% of respondents replied to all items. Construct validity was investigated by an Exploratory Factor Analysis. Four factors explaining 64.18% of variance emerged: communication, lack of facilities/supplies, lack of staff, and unexpected events. Internal consistency, evaluated with Cronbach a, was 0.94. The nursing interventions omitted with greater frequency were, in order: ambulation (74.8%), passive mobilization (69.6%) and oral care (51.3%). The three main reasons for missed interventions were: an unexpected increase in the number of patients (90.5%), increased instability of the clinical condition (86.1%) and insufficient human resources (85.5%). The Italian version of

  2. Minding the body: situating gender identity diagnoses in the ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy; Winter, Sam

    2012-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) and ICD-11 has an anticipated publication date of 2015. The Working Group on the Classification of Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health (WGSDSH) is charged with evaluating clinical and research data to inform the revision of diagnostic categories related to sexuality and gender identity that are currently included in the mental and behavioural disorders chapter of ICD-10, and making initial recommendations regarding whether and how these categories should be represented in the ICD-11. The diagnostic classification of disorders related to (trans)gender identity is an area long characterized by lack of knowledge, misconceptions and controversy. The placement of these categories has shifted over time within both the ICD and the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), reflecting developing views about what to call these diagnoses, what they mean and where to place them. This article reviews several controversies generated by gender identity diagnoses in recent years. In both the ICD-11 and DSM-5 development processes, one challenge has been to find a balance between concerns related to the stigmatization of mental disorders and the need for diagnostic categories that facilitate access to healthcare. In this connection, this article discusses several human rights issues related to gender identity diagnoses, and explores the question of whether affected populations are best served by placement of these categories within the mental disorders section of the classification. The combined stigmatization of being transgender and of having a mental disorder diagnosis creates a doubly burdensome situation for this group, which may contribute adversely to health status and to the attainment and enjoyment of human rights. The ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Sexual Disorders and

  3. Automatic construction of rule-based ICD-9-CM coding systems

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Richárd; Szarvas, György

    2008-01-01

    Background In this paper we focus on the problem of automatically constructing ICD-9-CM coding systems for radiology reports. ICD-9-CM codes are used for billing purposes by health institutes and are assigned to clinical records manually following clinical treatment. Since this labeling task requires expert knowledge in the field of medicine, the process itself is costly and is prone to errors as human annotators have to consider thousands of possible codes when assigning the right ICD-9-CM labels to a document. In this study we use the datasets made available for training and testing automated ICD-9-CM coding systems by the organisers of an International Challenge on Classifying Clinical Free Text Using Natural Language Processing in spring 2007. The challenge itself was dominated by entirely or partly rule-based systems that solve the coding task using a set of hand crafted expert rules. Since the feasibility of the construction of such systems for thousands of ICD codes is indeed questionable, we decided to examine the problem of automatically constructing similar rule sets that turned out to achieve a remarkable accuracy in the shared task challenge. Results Our results are very promising in the sense that we managed to achieve comparable results with purely hand-crafted ICD-9-CM classifiers. Our best model got a 90.26% F measure on the training dataset and an 88.93% F measure on the challenge test dataset, using the micro-averaged Fβ=1 measure, the official evaluation metric of the International Challenge on Classifying Clinical Free Text Using Natural Language Processing. This result would have placed second in the challenge, with a hand-crafted system achieving slightly better results. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that hand-crafted systems – which proved to be successful in ICD-9-CM coding – can be reproduced by replacing several laborious steps in their construction with machine learning models. These hybrid systems preserve the favourable

  4. Use of Ontology Structure and Bayesian Models to Aid the Crowdsourcing of ICD-11 Sanctioning Rules.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yun; Tu, Samson W; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Chalmers, Robert J G; Musen, Mark A

    2017-02-10

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the de facto standard international classification for mortality reporting and for many epidemiological, clinical, and financial use cases. The next version of ICD, ICD-11, will be submitted for approval by the World Health Assembly in 2018. Unlike previous versions of ICD, where coders mostly select single codes from pre-enumerated disease and disorder codes, ICD-11 coding will allow extensive use of multiple codes to give more detailed disease descriptions. For example, "severe malignant neoplasms of left breast" may be coded using the combination of a "stem code" (e.g., code for malignant neoplasms of breast) with a variety of "extension codes" (e.g., codes for laterality and severity). The use of multiple codes (a process called post-coordination), while avoiding the pitfall of having to pre-enumerate vast number of possible disease and qualifier combinations, risks the creation of meaningless expressions that combine stem codes with inappropriate qualifiers. To prevent that from happening, "sanctioning rules" that define legal combinations are necessary. In this work, we developed a crowdsourcing method for obtaining sanctioning rules for the post-coordination of concepts in ICD-11. Our method utilized the hierarchical structures in the domain to improve the accuracy of the sanctioning rules and to lower the crowdsourcing cost. We used Bayesian networks to model crowd workers' skills, the accuracy of their responses, and our confidence in the acquired sanctioning rules. We applied reinforcement learning to develop an agent that constantly adjusted the confidence cutoffs during the crowdsourcing process to maximize the overall quality of sanctioning rules under a fixed budget. Finally, we performed formative evaluations using a skin-disease branch of the draft ICD-11 and demonstrated that the crowd-sourced sanctioning rules replicated those defined by an expert dermatologist with high precision and recall

  5. The Astronomy Olympiad italian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.; Giacomini, L.

    2011-10-01

    The International Astronomy Olympiad (IAO) is an internationally annual astronomy scientific-educating event, born in 1996, which includes an intellectual competition between students aged between 14 and 17. In Italy, the Olympiad is coorganized since 2007 by INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) and SAiT (Società Astronomica Italiana) becoming every year a more visible and global event in the italian scenario (in 2011, INAF institutes participating to the local activities were 13). Unluckily, the Italian Committee of the Olympiads cannot involve directly nor rely on schools, since astronomy is no longer part of the scholastic programs. For this reason, the Committee needed to develop in the last years a non traditional mediatic approach that allowed in 2011 to reach a participation of more than 500 teenagers to the Olympics. We will give an overview of the Astronomy Olympics project in Italy and of this non conventional mediatic approach.

  6. The history of Italian parasitology.

    PubMed

    Roncalli Amici, R

    2001-07-12

    The history of Italian parasitology can be subdivided into two periods: pre-Redi and post-Redi. The first period includes the contributions to parasitology by savants who operated during the Roman, medieval and Renaissance eras; the second period started in 1668 when Francesco Redi published his experiments to debunk the theory of spontaneous generation; the work of Redi was subsequently continued by Vallisnieri, Spallanzani and others. The latter period includes classic contributions in the field of parasitology provided by veterinarians such as Ercolani, Perroncito, Piana and Rivolta, and by physicians such as Bassi, Grassi, Golgi, and Celli. Also, two outstanding pages of medical parasitology were written during this period--the unraveling and defeat of St. Gotthard's disease and the conquering of malaria on Italian soil--both accomplished through the generous efforts of dedicated individuals.

  7. [Sudden cardiac death in the youth. Is the new subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator S-ICD an alternative solution?].

    PubMed

    Roche, N-C; Stefuriac, M; Dumitrescu, N; Charbonnel, A; Godreuil, C; Bonnevie, L

    2015-02-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is well-recognized therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death. Classic ICD need the use of permanent endocavitary leads, which may cause serious troubles (lead dislodgement, ventricular perforation, lead infections, etc.). The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) is a new device provided by only a subcutaneous lead. It has been developed for the last five years and it is becoming at present a real alternative to classic ICD. We report a clinical case of a 34 y.o. woman who presented a sudden cardiac death and who benefited the implantation of this new technology. This paper deals with the potential indications, usefulness benefits, and problems of the S-ICD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Language Policy and Planning: The Case of Italian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geraci, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Italian Sign Language (LIS) is the name of the language used by the Italian Deaf community. The acronym LIS derives from Lingua italiana dei segni ("Italian language of signs"), although nowadays Italians refers to LIS as Lingua dei segni italiana, reflecting the more appropriate phrasing "Italian sign language." Historically,…

  9. Language Policy and Planning: The Case of Italian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geraci, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Italian Sign Language (LIS) is the name of the language used by the Italian Deaf community. The acronym LIS derives from Lingua italiana dei segni ("Italian language of signs"), although nowadays Italians refers to LIS as Lingua dei segni italiana, reflecting the more appropriate phrasing "Italian sign language." Historically,…

  10. Driving forces push Italian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    The Italian offshore is one of the most active in Europe. Although it cannot be compared with the North Sea in terms of hydrocarbon production or potential, Italy is expending a great deal of effort in order to reduce imported oil and gas from the current level of around 90% of total domestic consumption of 147 million tons of oil equivalent a year. The drilling program, major targets, and development of new oil fields are discussed briefly. (JMT)

  11. New Italian device registration requirements.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2008-01-01

    A medical device manufacturer located outside Europe was informed by an Italian distributor that the European Authorised Representative must designate the distributor as the authorised entity when registering the manufacturer's devices in Italy in a new online data bank. This is incorrect. This article discusses the new requirements for registering medical devices in Italy, together with the steps in the registration process and common problems encountered.

  12. Somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Massidda, Myosotis; Toselli, Stefania; Brasili, Patricia; Calò, Carla M

    2013-09-01

    The somatotyping method is especially helpful in sports in which the body could directly influence the biomechanics of movements and the performance's results. The purpose of this study was to determine the somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts and to compare it in terms of competition levels. The sample comprised 64 elite gymnasts (42 females (F), somatotype 1.4-4.4-3.2; and 22 males (M), somatotype 1.6-6.3-2.1) belonging to the Italian National Artistic Gymnastic Team (2007) at different competition levels: Allieve, Junior, and Senior. Mean whole somatotypes, by competition levels, were not significantly different in both sexes (Female gymnasts: Allieve, 1.3-4.6-3.3; Junior, 1.3-4.2-3.6; Senior, 1.7-4.2-2.7; Male gymnasts: Junior, 1.5-6.3-2.5; Senior, 1.7-6.3-1.6). Male Junior gymnasts exhibited greater ectomorphy than Senior athletes (F1,20 = 7.75, p < 0.01). Compared to other elite athletes male and female gymnasts tend to be less endomorphic and more mesomorphic. This study highlighted the peculiarities of the somatotype of Italian elite gymnasts and their strong homogeneity, evident also from the low values of somatotype attitudinal mean (SAM). The results emphasize the need for a specific somatotype to reach an elite level in sport and the need to integrate the somatotype analysis between the scientific instruments for selecting talent also in artistic gymnastics.

  13. The Accuracy of ICD Codes: Identifying Physical Abuse in 4 Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hooft, Anneka M.; Asnes, Andrea G.; Livingston, Nina; Deutsch, Stephanie; Cahill, Linda; Wood, Joanne N.; Leventhal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), codes in identifying cases of child physical abuse in 4 children’s hospitals. Methods We included all children evaluated by a child abuse pediatrician (CAP) for suspicion of abuse at 4 children’s hospitals from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Subjects included both patients judged to have injuries from abuse and those judged to have injuries from accidents or to have medical problems. The ICD-9-CM codes entered in the hospital discharge database for each child were compared to the decisions made by the CAPs on the likelihood of abuse. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Medical records for discordant cases were abstracted and reviewed to assess factors contributing to coding discrepancies. Results Of 936 cases of suspected physical abuse, 65.8% occurred in children <1 year of age. CAPs rated 32.7% as abuse, 18.2% as unknown cause, and 49.1% as accident/medical cause. Sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes for abuse were 73.5% (95% confidence interval 68.2, 78.4), and 92.4% (95% confidence interval 90.0, 94.0), respectively. Among hospitals, sensitivity ranged from 53.8% to 83.8% and specificity from 85.4% to 100%. Analysis of discordant cases revealed variations in coding practices and physicians’ notations among hospitals that contributed to differences in sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes in child physical abuse. Conclusions Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes in identifying cases of child physical abuse were relatively low, suggesting both an under- and overcounting of abuse cases. PMID:26142071

  14. Protection from outpatient sudden cardiac death following ICD removal using a wearable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Garisto, Juan D; Salow, Arturo; Glad, Joann M; Szymkiewicz, Steve; Saltzman, Heath E; Kutalek, Steven P; Carrillo, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is effective in preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD). Once an ICD is removed and reimplantation is not feasible, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) may be an alternative option. We determined the effectiveness of WCD for SCD prevention in patients who were discharged after ICD removal. A retrospective study was conducted on all WCD (LifeVest, ZOLL, Pittsburgh, PA, USA) patients who underwent ICD removal due to cardiac device infections (CDIs) at two referral centers between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2009. Clinical characteristics, device information, and WCD data were analyzed. Sudden cardiac arrest was defined as all sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation occurring within a single 24-hour period. Ninety-seven patients (mean age 62.8 ± 13.3, male 80.4%) were included in the study. The median duration of antibiotic use was 14.7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 10-30). The median daily WCD use was 20 hours/day and the median length of use was 21 days (IQR 5-47). A total of three patients were shocked by WCD. Two patients had four episodes of sustained VT, successfully terminated by the WCD. A third patient experienced two inappropriate treatments due to oversensitivity of the signal artifact. Three patients experienced sudden death outside the hospital while not wearing the device. Five patients died while hospitalized. WCD can prevent SCD, until ICD reimplantation is feasible in patients who underwent device removals for CDI. However, patient compliance is essential for the effective use of this device. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. THE DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF PREDICTING SOMATIZATION FROM PATIENTS’ ICD-9 DIAGNOSES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert C.; Gardiner, Joseph C.; Luo, Zhehui; Rost, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our earlier study demonstrated that ICD-9 codes and other data from the administrative database (ADB) effectively identified somatization. To further develop this simple screening method, we hypothesized, in a new and different population, that ADB screening would identify somatizing patients by increasing numbers of visits, female gender, and greater percent of ICD-9 primary diagnosis codes in musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, and ill-defined body systems; we labeled these codes as having “somatization potential.” METHODS Using a prospective observational design in a staff model HMO, we evaluated 1364 patients from 18–65 years old who had 8 or more visits yearly in the two years before study. Clinician raters applied a reliable method of medical chart review to identify patients meeting criteria for somatization. We randomly selected 2/3 for the derivation set (N=901) for logistic regression to evaluate the contribution of potential ADB correlates (age, gender, all encounters, primary diagnosis codes [ICD-9], revenue codes, and charges) of a diagnosis of somatization. This prediction rule was then applied to the remaining 1/3 of subjects, the validation set (N=463). RESULTS Patients averaged 47.1 years, 12.8 visits per year, and 71.6% were female; 319 had somatization. Age, visits, and somatization potential were associated with clinician-rated somatization, with a c-statistic 0.719 [95% CI: 0.679, 0.760] in the derivation set and 0.679 [95% CI: 0.625, 0.734] in the validation set. CONCLUSIONS These data support our earlier findings that selected ICD-9 diagnoses in the ADB predict somatization, suggesting their potential in identifying a common, costly, and usually unrecognized problem. The demonstrated stability of ICD-9 codes for diagnosing somatization indicates that the next step in research be taken, as we outline here. PMID:19297310

  16. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  17. Arrhythmia rate distribution and tachyarrhythmia therapy in an ICD population: results from the INTRINSIC RV trial.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Renee M; Russo, Andrea M; Berg, Kellie Chase; Stolen, Kira Q; Seth, Milan; Perschbacher, David; Day, John D; Olshansky, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy for ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) depends, in part, on the programming of tachycardia zones. We assessed events treated with ICD shocks or antitachycardia pacing (ATP) in the Inhibition of Unnecessary RV Pacing with AV Search Hysteresis in ICDs (INTRINSIC RV) trial. ATP and shock episodes from 1530 patients with dual-chamber ICDs were analyzed. For episodes in which electrograms were stored and adjudicated, ATP was delivered for 763 episodes (182 patients), shock-only was delivered for 300 episodes (146 patients), and shock following ATP was delivered for 81 episodes (56 patients). ATP was delivered appropriately for 507 episodes (130 patients), with 93% success, and inappropriately for 256 episodes (89 patients). For ATP episodes, appropriate (VT: 170 ± 28 bpm) and inappropriate (not VT: 165 ± 21 bpm) rates did not differ (P = .16). When the initial therapy was shock, onset rates were higher for appropriate therapy than for inappropriate therapy (224 ± 46 bpm vs 187 ± 31 bpm; P <.001). Inappropriate ATP was more likely to be followed by a shock (odds ratio 2.49; 95% confidence interval 1.56-3.97; P <.001). Fifty-eight percent (225 of 381) of shocked episodes had rates <200 bpm. For episodes between 200 and 250 bpm, 20% (23 of 113) were polymorphic VT or VF, 59% were monomorphic VT, 19% were supraventricular, and <1% was artifact. For episodes >250 bpm, 37% were VF, 28% polymorphic VT, 23% monomorphic VT, 7% supraventricular, and 5% artifact. In a general ICD population, ATP treated VT effectively or obviated the need for shock. Most ventricular arrhythmias <250 bpm were not VF. Proper zone programming may identify and treat VT without shock. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A computer modeling tool for comparing novel ICD electrode orientations in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Matthew; Stinstra, Jeroen; Pieper, Steve; Macleod, Rob; Brooks, Dana H; Cecchin, Frank; Triedman, John K

    2008-04-01

    Use of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in children and patients with congenital heart disease is complicated by body size and anatomy. A variety of creative implantation techniques has been used empirically in these groups on an ad hoc basis. To rationalize ICD placement in special populations, we used subject-specific, image-based finite element models (FEMs) to compare electric fields and expected defibrillation thresholds (DFTs) using standard and novel electrode configurations. FEMs were created by segmenting normal torso computed tomography scans of subjects ages 2, 10, and 29 years and 1 adult with congenital heart disease into tissue compartments, meshing, and assigning tissue conductivities. The FEMs were modified by interactive placement of ICD electrode models in clinically relevant electrode configurations, and metrics of relative defibrillation safety and efficacy were calculated. Predicted DFTs for standard transvenous configurations were comparable with published results. Although transvenous systems generally predicted lower DFTs, a variety of extracardiac orientations were also predicted to be comparably effective in children and adults. Significant trend effects on DFTs were associated with body size and electrode length. In many situations, small alterations in electrode placement and patient anatomy resulted in significant variation of predicted DFT. We also show patient-specific use of this technique for optimization of electrode placement. Image-based FEMs allow predictive modeling of defibrillation scenarios and predict large changes in DFTs with clinically relevant variations of electrode placement. Extracardiac ICDs are predicted to be effective in both children and adults. This approach may aid both ICD development and patient-specific optimization of electrode placement. Further development and validation are needed for clinical or industrial utilization.

  19. Constructing a classification of hypersensitivity/allergic diseases for ICD-11 by crowdsourcing the allergist community.

    PubMed

    Tanno, L K; Calderon, M A; Goldberg, B J; Gayraud, J; Bircher, A J; Casale, T; Li, J; Sanchez-Borges, M; Rosenwasser, L J; Pawankar, R; Papadopoulos, N G; Demoly, P

    2015-06-01

    The global allergy community strongly believes that the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) offers a unique opportunity to improve the classification and coding of hypersensitivity/allergic diseases via inclusion of a specific chapter dedicated to this disease area to facilitate epidemiological studies, as well as to evaluate the true size of the allergy epidemic. In this context, an international collaboration has decided to revise the classification of hypersensitivity/allergic diseases and to validate it for ICD-11 by crowdsourcing the allergist community. After careful comparison between ICD-10 and 11 beta phase linearization codes, we identified gaps and trade-offs allowing us to construct a classification proposal, which was sent to the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) sections, interest groups, executive committee as well as the World Allergy Organization (WAO), and American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) leaderships. The crowdsourcing process produced comments from 50 of 171 members contacted by e-mail. The classification proposal has also been discussed at face-to-face meetings with experts of EAACI sections and interest groups and presented in a number of business meetings during the 2014 EAACI annual congress in Copenhagen. As a result, a high-level complex structure of classification for hypersensitivity/allergic diseases has been constructed. The model proposed has been presented to the WHO groups in charge of the ICD revision. The international collaboration of allergy experts appreciates bilateral discussion and aims to get endorsement of their proposals for the final ICD-11. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Network Models of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Implications for ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Karen S; Wolf, Erika J; Bovin, Michelle J; Lee, Lewina O; Green, Jonathan D; Rosen, Raymond C; Keane, Terence M; Marx, Brian P

    2017-02-13

    Recent proposals for revisions to the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic criteria have argued that the current symptom constellation under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 is unwieldy and includes many symptoms that overlap with other disorders. The newly proposed criteria for the ICD-11 include only 6 symptoms. However, restricting the symptoms to those included in the ICD-11 has implications for PTSD diagnosis prevalence estimates, and it remains unclear whether these 6 symptoms are most strongly associated with a diagnosis of PTSD. Network analytic methods, which assume that psychiatric disorders are networks of interrelated symptoms, provide information regarding which symptoms are most central to a network. We estimated network models of PTSD in a national sample of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In the full sample, the most central symptoms were persistent negative emotional state, efforts to avoid external reminders, efforts to avoid thoughts or memories, inability to experience positive emotions, distressing dreams, and intrusive distressing thoughts or memories; that is, 3 of the 6 most central items to the network would be eliminated from the diagnosis under the current proposal for ICD-11. An empirically defined index summarizing the most central symptoms in the network performed comparably to an index reflecting the proposed ICD-11 PTSD criteria at identifying individuals with an independently assessed DSM-5 defined PTSD diagnosis. Our results highlight the symptoms most central to PTSD in this sample, which may inform future diagnostic systems and treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Less is more? Assessing the validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD across multiple trauma samples

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2015-01-01

    Background In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the symptom profile of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was expanded to include 20 symptoms. An alternative model of PTSD is outlined in the proposed 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that includes just six symptoms. Objectives and method The objectives of the current study are: 1) to independently investigate the fit of the ICD-11 model of PTSD, and three DSM-5-based models of PTSD, across seven different trauma samples (N=3,746) using confirmatory factor analysis; 2) to assess the concurrent validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD; and 3) to determine if there are significant differences in diagnostic rates between the ICD-11 guidelines and the DSM-5 criteria. Results The ICD-11 model of PTSD was found to provide excellent model fit in six of the seven trauma samples, and tests of factorial invariance showed that the model performs equally well for males and females. DSM-5 models provided poor fit of the data. Concurrent validity was established as the ICD-11 PTSD factors were all moderately to strongly correlated with scores of depression, anxiety, dissociation, and aggression. Levels of association were similar for ICD-11 and DSM-5 suggesting that explanatory power is not affected due to the limited number of items included in the ICD-11 model. Diagnostic rates were significantly lower according to ICD-11 guidelines compared to the DSM-5 criteria. Conclusions The proposed factor structure of the ICD-11 model of PTSD appears valid across multiple trauma types, possesses good concurrent validity, and is more stringent in terms of diagnosis compared to the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:26450830

  2. Metrics and tools for consistent cohort discovery and financial analyses post-transition to ICD-10-CM.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Andrew D; Li, Jianrong John; Kenost, Colleen; Joese, Binoy; Yang, Young Min; Kalagidis, Olympia A; Zenku, Ilir; Saner, Donald; Bahroos, Neil; Lussier, Yves A

    2015-05-01

    In the United States, International Classification of Disease Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM, the ninth revision) diagnosis codes are commonly used to identify patient cohorts and to conduct financial analyses related to disease. In October 2015, the healthcare system of the United States will transition to ICD-10-CM (the tenth revision) diagnosis codes. One challenge posed to clinical researchers and other analysts is conducting diagnosis-related queries across datasets containing both coding schemes. Further, healthcare administrators will manage growth, trends, and strategic planning with these dually-coded datasets. The majority of the ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM translations are complex and nonreciprocal, creating convoluted representations and meanings. Similarly, mapping back from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM is equally complex, yet different from mapping forward, as relationships are likewise nonreciprocal. Indeed, 10 of the 21 top clinical categories are complex as 78% of their diagnosis codes are labeled as "convoluted" by our analyses. Analysis and research related to external causes of morbidity, injury, and poisoning will face the greatest challenges due to 41 745 (90%) convolutions and a decrease in the number of codes. We created a web portal tool and translation tables to list all ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes related to the specific input of ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes and their level of complexity: "identity" (reciprocal), "class-to-subclass," "subclass-to-class," "convoluted," or "no mapping." These tools provide guidance on ambiguous and complex translations to reveal where reports or analyses may be challenging to impossible.Web portal: http://www.lussierlab.org/transition-to-ICD9CM/Tables annotated with levels of translation complexity: http://www.lussierlab.org/publications/ICD10to9. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  3. Educational videos to reduce racial disparities in ICD therapy via innovative designs (VIVID): a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kevin L; Zimmer, Louise O; Dai, David; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Allen LaPointe, Nancy M; Peterson, Eric D

    2013-07-01

    Black individuals eligible for an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) are considerably less likely than white individuals to receive one. This disparity may, in part, be explained by racial differences in patient preferences. We hypothesized that a targeted patient-centered educational video could improve knowledge of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and ICDs and reduce racial differences in ICD preferences. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of testing this hypothesis in a randomized trial. We created a video that included animation, physician commentary, and patient testimonials on SCA and ICDs. The primary outcome was the decision to have an ICD implanted as a function of race and intervention. Between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011, 59 patients (37 white and 22 black) were randomized to the video or health care provider counseling/usual care. Relative to white patients, black patients were younger (median age, 55 vs 68 years) and more likely to have attended college or technical school. Baseline SCA and ICD knowledge was similar and improved significantly in both racial groups after the intervention. Black patients viewing the video were as likely as white patients to want an ICD (60.0% vs 79.2%, P = .20); and among those in the usual care arm, black patients were less likely than white patients to want an ICD (42.9% vs 84.6% P = .05). Among individuals eligible for an ICD, a video decision aid increased patient knowledge and reduced racial differences in patient preference for an ICD. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser, or you may try from a different computer. You may also see this problem if you are in a high security environment where this is disabled by a network policy. The Registry will work in JavaScript-enabled ...

  5. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Power Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This GIS dataset contains data on power plants, based on the Energy Information Administration's EIA-860 dataset and supplemented with data from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) compiled from various EPA programs.

  6. Temporal Analysis of Windows MRU Registry Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuandong; Gladyshev, Pavel; James, Joshua

    The Microsoft Windows registry is an important resource in digital forensic investigations. It contains information about operating system configuration, installed software and user activity. Several researchers have focused on the forensic analysis of the Windows registry, but a robust method for associating past events with registry data values extracted from Windows restore points is not yet available. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for analyzing the most recently used (MRU) keys found in consecutive snapshots of the Windows registry. The algorithm compares two snapshots of the same MRU key and identifies data values within the key that have been updated in the period between the two snapshots. User activities associated with the newly updated data values can be assumed to have occurred during the period between the two snapshots.

  7. Sinonasal Cancer and Occupational Exposure in a Population-Based Registry

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Carolina; Sieno, Claudia; Riboldi, Luciano; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We examined occupational exposures among subjects with sinonasal cancer (SNC) recorded in a population-based registry in the Lombardy Region, the most populated and industrialized Italian region. The registry collects complete clinical information and exposure to carcinogens regarding all SNC cases occurring in the population of the region. In the period 2008–2011, we recorded 210 SNC cases (137 men, 73 women). The most frequent occupational exposures were to wood (44 cases, 21.0%) and leather dust (29 cases, 13.8%), especially among men: 39 cases (28.5%) to wood and 23 cases (16.8%) to leather dust. Exposure to other agents was infrequent (<2%). Among 62 subjects with adenocarcinoma, 50% had been exposed to wood dust and 30.7% to leather dust. The proportions were around 10% in subjects with squamous cell carcinoma and about 20% for tumors with another histology. The age-standardized rates (×100,000 person-years) were 0.7 in men and 0.3 in women. Complete collection of cases and their occupational history through a specialized cancer registry is fundamental to accurately monitor SNC occurrence in a population and to uncover exposure to carcinogens in different industrial sectors, even those not considered as posing a high risk of SNC, and also in extraoccupational settings. PMID:24082884

  8. Workload and time management in central cancer registries: baseline data and implication for registry staffing.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Susan A; Mulvihill, Linda; Herrera, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The Workload and Time Management Survey of Central Cancer Registries was conducted in 2011 to assess the amount of time spent on work activities usually performed by cancer registrars. A survey including 39 multi-item questions,together with a work activities data collection log, was sent by email to the central cancer registry (CCR) manager in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Twenty-four central cancer registries (47%) responded to the survey.Results indicate that registries faced reductions in budgeted staffing from 2008-2009. The number of source records and total cases were important indicators of workload. Four core activities, including abstracting at the registry, visual editing,case consolidation, and resolving edit reports, accounted for about half of registry workload. We estimate an average of 12.4 full-time equivalents (FTEs) are required to perform all cancer registration activities tracked by the survey; however,estimates vary widely by registry size. These findings may be useful for registries as a benchmark for their own registry workload and time-management data and to develop staffing guidelines.

  9. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization.

  10. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained by...

  11. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including any...

  12. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained by...

  13. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained by...

  14. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including any...

  15. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov to... prospective vendors voluntarily participating in the Disaster Response Registry can be retrieved using the...

  16. 29 CFR 500.170 - Establishment of registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishment of registry. 500.170 Section 500.170 Labor... SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PR