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Sample records for ice cream formulations

  1. Physicochemical and sensory properties of ice-cream formulated with virgin coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Choo, S Y; Leong, S K; Henna Lu, F S

    2010-12-01

    The substitution of milk fat with virgin coconut oil (VCO) was used to produce nutritious ice cream with pleasant coconut flavor and aroma. Three formulations were developed whereby formulation VCO4, VCO8 and VCO12 was substituted with 4%, 8% and 12% of VCO, respectively. The physicochemical properties of ice creams analyzed include overrun, meltdown, pH, titratable acidity, total solid, protein and fat content. The fatty acids profile of VCO formulated ice creams and their stabilities over 3 and 6 weeks storage were studied respectively using gas chromatography (GC). Qualitative descriptive analysis (QDA) and consumer affective test were performed among the trained and untrained panelists. Significant differences (p < 0.05) of overrun, pH, total solid, protein and fat content between ice cream formulations were observed except titratable acidity. Increased VCO content in ice cream formulations lowered the melting resistance of ice cream. For GC analysis, the major fatty acid identified was lauric acid. Upon storage time, the concentration of unsaturated fatty acid decreased but the concentration of saturated fatty acid increased. The result of QDA showed that formulation VCO4, VCO8 and VCO12 were significantly (p < 0.05) different in attributes of color, firmness and smoothness as compared to the control ice cream. Formulation VCO12 was highly accepted by panelists in terms of the acceptance level of appearance, aroma, texture, flavor and overall acceptability. Hence, it has a potential marketable value.

  2. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    PubMed Central

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Subjects/setting Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Statistical analysis Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Results Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%±8%, 28%±5%, and 31%±9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Conclusions Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium. PMID:19394469

  3. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    PubMed

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  4. Development of formulations and processes to incorporate wax oleogels in ice cream.

    PubMed

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of emulsifiers, waxes, fat concentration, and processing conditions on the application of wax oleogel to replace solid fat content and create optimal fat structure in ice cream. Ice creams with 10% or 15% fat were formulated with rice bran wax (RBW), candelilla wax (CDW), or carnauba wax (CBW) oleogels, containing 10% wax and 90% high-oleic sunflower oil. The ice creams were produced using batch or continuous freezing processes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of ice cream and the ultrastructure of oleogel droplets in ice cream mixes. Among the wax oleogels, RBW oleogel had the ability to form and sustain structure in 15% fat ice creams when glycerol monooleate (GMO) was used as the emulsifier. TEM images revealed that the high degree of fat structuring observed in GMO samples was associated with the RBW crystal morphology within the fat droplet, which was characterized by the growth of crystals at the outer edge of the droplet. Continuous freezing improved fat structuring compared to batch freezing. RBW oleogels established better structure compared to CDW or CBW oleogels. These results demonstrate that RBW oleogel has the potential to develop fat structure in ice cream in the presence of GMO and sufficiently high concentrations of oleogel. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Formulation and characterization of nanoencapsulated curcumin using sodium caseinate and its incorporation in ice cream.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deep Diyuti; Mann, Bimlesh; Pothuraju, Ramesh; Sharma, Rajan; Bajaj, Rajesh; Minaxi

    2016-01-01

    In the present investigation, the preparation and characterization of a curcumin nanoemulsion with milk protein (sodium caseinate) and its incorporation into ice cream were undertaken. Among the different combinations, the most stable formulation was observed using milk fat (8%), medium chain triglycerides (2%), curcumin (0.24%) and sodium caseinate (6%) with a mean particle size of 333.8 ± 7.18 nm, a zeta potential of -44.1 ± 0.72 mV and an encapsulation efficiency of 96.9 ± 0.28%. The effect of different processing conditions (heating, pH and ionic strength) on the particle size distribution and zeta potential of the nanoemulsion was evaluated. During heat treatment, the particle size of the nanoemulsion was increased from 333.8 ± 7.18 to 351.1 ± 4.04 nm. The nanoemulsion was destabilized at pH 4.6 and the particle size increased above and below pH 5.0. However, there was a slight increase in the particle size with a change in the ionic concentration. The release kinetics data suggested that in simulated gastro-intestinal digestion, the nanoemulsion was stable against pepsin digestion (a 5.25% release of curcumin), while pancreatic action led to a 16.12% release of curcumin from the nanoemulsion. Finally, our formulation was successfully incorporated into ice cream and the sensory attributes were evaluated. No significant difference was observed in the scores of the sensory attributes between the control and ice cream prepared with a curcumin nanoemulsion. Moreover, the encapsulation efficiency of the curcumin incorporated into the ice cream was 93.7%, which indicates that it can withstand the processing conditions. The findings suggest that ice cream is a suitable dairy product for the delivery of lipophilic bioactive components (curcumin) which can be used for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Optimization of fat-reduced ice cream formulation employing inulin as fat replacer via response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Pintor, Aurora; Severiano-Pérez, Patricia; Totosaus, Alfonso

    2014-10-01

    The use of new ingredients like inulin for fat replacement is of wide application in the food industry. The aim of the present work was to reduce the fat content on ice cream formulations. It was possible to reduce up to 25% of butyric and vegetable fats with 3% of inulin, with good textural and sensory characteristics of the final product. The substitution of fat with inulin increased the ice cream mix viscosity, improved air incorporation, and produced ice cream with soft and homogeneous textures. Color characteristics were not affected by the replacement. Hedonic sensory analysis showed that optimized fat-reduced inulin ice cream was not perceived different to commercial vanilla ice cream. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Optimization of the new formulation of ice cream with native Iranian seed gums (Lepidium perfoliatum and Lepidium sativum) using response surface methodology (RSM).

    PubMed

    Azari-Anpar, M; Soltani Tehrani, N; Aghajani, N; Khomeiri, M

    2017-01-01

    In this study, effect of Qodume shahri ( Lepidium perfoliatum ) and cress ( Lepidium sativum ) on rheological properties of ice cream were investigated. The gums were added to the ice cream formulation and different quality attributes including pH, acidity, melting characteristics, viscosity, overrun, texture analysis and sensory evaluation were determined. Results showed that ice cream formulations containing both the gums had improved overrun, melting rate, first dripping time, viscosity, hardness and adhesiveness. The gum concentrations beyond 0.2% level led to a negative effect on gumminess and chewiness of ice cream. Both the gums addition to improved quality attributes and textural properties of ice cream.

  8. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  9. The physics of ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Chris

    2003-05-01

    Almost everybody likes ice cream, so it can provide an excellent vehicle for discussing and demonstrating a variety of physical phenomena, such as Newton's law of cooling, Boyle's law and the relationship between microstructure and macroscopic properties (e.g. Young's modulus). Furthermore, a demonstration of freezing point depression can be used to make ice cream in the classroom!

  10. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  11. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream as affected by ice structuring proteins from winter wheat grass.

    PubMed

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2006-01-01

    Ice recrystallization in quiescently frozen sucrose solutions that contained some of the ingredients commonly found in ice cream and in ice cream manufactured under commercial conditions, with or without ice structuring proteins (ISP) from cold-acclimated winter wheat grass extract (AWWE), was assessed by bright field microscopy. In sucrose solutions, critical differences in moisture content, viscosity, ionic strength, and other properties derived from the presence of other ingredients (skim milk powder, corn syrup solids, locust bean gum) caused a reduction in ice crystal growth. Significant ISP activity in retarding ice crystal growth was observed in all solutions (44% for the most complex mix) containing 0.13% total protein from AWWE. In heat-shocked ice cream, ice recrystallization rates were significantly reduced 40 and 46% with the addition of 0.0025 and 0.0037% total protein from AWWE. The ISP activity in ice cream was not hindered by its inclusion in mix prior to pasteurization. A synergistic effect between ISP and stabilizer was observed, as ISP activity was reduced in the absence of stabilizer in ice cream formulations. A remarkably smoother texture for ice creams containing ISP after heat-shock storage was evident by sensory evaluation. The efficiency of ISP from AWWE in controlling ice crystal growth in ice cream has been demonstrated.

  12. Heavy Metal Presence in Two Different Types of Ice Cream: Artisanal Ice Cream (Italian Gelato) and Industrial Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Conficoni, D; Alberghini, L; Bissacco, E; Ferioli, M; Giaccone, V

    2017-03-01

    Ice cream, a popular product worldwide, is usually a milk-based product with other types of ingredients (fruit, eggs, cocoa, dried fruit, additives, and others). Different materials are used to obtain the desired taste, texture, consistency, and appearance of the final product. This study surveyed ice cream products available in Italy for heavy metals (lead, cadmium, chromium, tin, and arsenic). The differences between artisanal and industrial ice cream were also investigated because of the importance in the Italian diet and the diffusion of this ready-to-eat food. Ice cream sampling was performed between October 2010 and February 2011 in the northeast of Italy. A total of 100 samples were randomly collected from different sources: 50 industrial samples produced by 19 different brands were collected in coffee bars and supermarkets; 50 artisanal ice cream samples were gathered at nine different artisanal ice cream shops. Ten wooden sticks of industrial ice cream were analyzed in parallel to the ice cream. All samples were negative for arsenic and mercury. None of the artisanal ice cream samples were positive for lead and tin; 18% of the industrial ice cream samples were positive. All positive lead samples were higher than the legal limit stated for milk (0.02 mg/kg). All industrial ice cream samples were negative for cadmium, but cadmium was present in 10% of the artisanal ice cream samples. Chromium was found in 26% of the artisanal and in 58% of the industrial ice cream samples. The heavy metals found in the wooden sticks were different from the corresponding ice cream, pointing out the lack of cross-contamination between the products. Considering the results and the amount of ice cream consumed during the year, contamination through ice cream is a low risk for the Italian population, even though there is need for further analysis.

  13. Ice cream structure modification by ice-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaleda, Aleksei; Tsanev, Robert; Klesment, Tiina; Vilu, Raivo; Laos, Katrin

    2018-04-25

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs), also known as antifreeze proteins, were added to ice cream to investigate their effect on structure and texture. Ice recrystallization inhibition was assessed in the ice cream mixes using a novel accelerated microscope assay and the ice cream microstructure was studied using an ice crystal dispersion method. It was found that adding recombinantly produced fish type III IBPs at a concentration 3 mg·L -1 made ice cream hard and crystalline with improved shape preservation during melting. Ice creams made with IBPs (both from winter rye, and type III IBP) had aggregates of ice crystals that entrapped pockets of the ice cream mixture in a rigid network. Larger individual ice crystals and no entrapment in control ice creams was observed. Based on these results a model of ice crystals aggregates formation in the presence of IBPs was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of ice-cream-scoop water on the hygiene of ice cream.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, I. G.; Heaney, J. C.; Weatherup, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of unopened ice cream, ice cream in use, and ice-cream-scoop water (n = 91) was conducted to determine the effect of scoop water hygiene on the microbiological quality of ice cream. An aerobic plate count around 10(6) c.f.u. ml-1 was the modal value for scoop waters. Unopened ice creams generally had counts around 10(3)-10(4) c.f.u. ml-1 and this increased by one order of magnitude when in use. Many scoop waters had low coliform counts, but almost half contained > 100 c.f.u. ml-1. E. coli was isolated in 18% of ice creams in use, and in 10% of unopened ice creams. S. aureus was not detected in any sample. Statistical analysis showed strong associations between indicator organisms and increased counts in ice cream in use. EC guidelines for indicator organisms in ice cream were exceeded by up to 56% of samples. PMID:9287941

  15. The effect of ice-cream-scoop water on the hygiene of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I G; Heaney, J C; Weatherup, S T

    1997-08-01

    A survey of unopened ice cream, ice cream in use, and ice-cream-scoop water (n = 91) was conducted to determine the effect of scoop water hygiene on the microbiological quality of ice cream. An aerobic plate count around 10(6) c.f.u. ml-1 was the modal value for scoop waters. Unopened ice creams generally had counts around 10(3)-10(4) c.f.u. ml-1 and this increased by one order of magnitude when in use. Many scoop waters had low coliform counts, but almost half contained > 100 c.f.u. ml-1. E. coli was isolated in 18% of ice creams in use, and in 10% of unopened ice creams. S. aureus was not detected in any sample. Statistical analysis showed strong associations between indicator organisms and increased counts in ice cream in use. EC guidelines for indicator organisms in ice cream were exceeded by up to 56% of samples.

  16. We Scream for Nano Ice Cream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Krebs, Denise L.; Banks, Alton J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a wide range of new products emerging from nanotechnology, and "nano ice cream" is an easy one that you can use to teach topics from surface area to volume applications. In this activity, students learn how ice cream can be made smoother and creamier tasting through nanoscience. By using liquid nitrogen to cool the cream mixture, students…

  17. The Effects of Fat Structures and Ice Cream Mix Viscosity on Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Amador, Julia; Hartel, Rich; Rankin, Scott

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate iciness perception and other sensory textural attributes of ice cream due to ice and fat structures and mix viscosity. Two studies were carried out varying processing conditions and mix formulation. In the 1st study, ice creams were collected at -3, -5, and -7.5 °C draw temperatures. These ice creams contained 0%, 0.1%, or 0.2% emulsifier, an 80:20 blend of mono- and diglycerides: polysorbate 80. In the 2nd study, ice creams were collected at -3 °C draw temperature and contained 0%, 0.2%, or 0.4% stabilizer, a blend of guar gum, locust bean gum, and carrageenan. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine relationships between ice crystal size, destabilized fat, and sensory iciness. In the ice and fat structure study, an inverse correlation was found between fat destabilization and sensory iciness. Ice creams with no difference in ice crystal size were perceived to be less icy with increasing amounts of destabilized fat. Destabilized fat correlated inversely with drip-through rate and sensory greasiness. In the ice cream mix viscosity study, an inverse correlation was found between mix viscosity and sensory iciness. Ice creams with no difference in ice crystal size were perceived to be less icy when formulated with higher mix viscosity. A positive correlation was found between mix viscosity and sensory greasiness. These results indicate that fat structures and mix viscosity have significant effects on ice cream microstructure and sensory texture including the reduction of iciness perception. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream by propylene glycol monostearate.

    PubMed

    Aleong, J M; Frochot, S; Goff, H D

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of propylene glycol monostearate (PGMS) to inhibit ice recrystallization was evaluated in ice cream and frozen sucrose solutions. PGMS (0.3%) dramatically reduced ice crystal sizes in ice cream and in sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer before and after heat shock, but had no effect in quiescently frozen solutions. PGMS showed limited emulsifier properties by promoting smaller fat globule size distributions and enhanced partial coalescence in the mix and ice cream, respectively, but at a much lower level compared to conventional ice cream emulsifier. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy revealed highly irregular crystal morphology in both ice cream and sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer. There was strong evidence to suggest that PGMS directly interacts with ice crystals and interferes with normal surface propagation. Shear during freezing may be required for its distribution around the ice and sufficient surface coverage.

  19. Rheological properties of ice cream mixes and frozen ice creams containing fat and fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Adapa, S; Dingeldein, H; Schmidt, K A; Herald, T J

    2000-10-01

    Ice cream mixes and frozen ice creams at milk fat levels of 12%, 8%, 6%, 6% plus a protein-based fat replacer, and 6% plus a carbohydrate-based fat replacer were evaluated for viscoelastic properties by dynamic testing with sinusoidal oscillatory tests at various frequencies. The storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G"), and tan delta (G"/G') were calculated for all the treatments to determine changes in the viscous and elastic properties of the mixes and frozen ice creams due to fat content. In ice cream mixes, G' and G" exhibited a strong frequency dependence. The G" was higher than G' throughout the frequency range (1 to 8 Hz) examined, without any crossover, except for the 12% mix. Elastic properties of the ice cream mixes decreased as fat content decreased. Tan delta values indicated that fat replacers did not enhance the elastic properties of the ice cream mixes. In all frozen ice creams, G' and G" again showed a frequency dependence throughout the range tested (0.5 to 10 Hz). The amount of fat in ice creams and the degree of fat destabilization affected the elasticity in the frozen product. Even though the ice creams did not have significant elastic properties, when compared as a group the samples with higher fat content had higher elastic properties. The addition of protein-based and carbohydrate-based fat replacers did not enhance the elastic properties of the ice creams but did increase the viscous properties.

  20. Ergonomics investigation of retail ice cream operations.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P G; McGorry, R R; Cotnam, J; Braun, T W

    2000-04-01

    A comprehensive ergonomics evaluation of retail ice cream shops, including field and laboratory data collection, was conducted using a human:workplace model approach to ergonomics practice. The goal of the evaluation was to provide recommendations to enhance the health, safety, and productivity of shop employees. Active and passive surveillance and facility walk-throughs were used to guide the selection of analyses. A primary focus of the investigation was quantifying the task demands of scooping ice cream, which have not been documented in the literature. This goal was accomplished through the use of a custom-designed instrumented ice cream scoop. Data were collected at an ice cream shop under typical conditions, while the laboratory experiment investigated task demands of ice cream scooping over a range of realistic temperatures. Manual materials handling task analyses and anthropometric evaluations comprised the majority of other analyses performed. Recommendations are presented that are applicable to the operation of retail ice cream shops that serve hard (i.e., scooped) ice cream.

  1. Homemade ice cream, à la NASA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Pictured above, Goddard's astrobiology lab makes cookies and cream ice cream using liquid nitrogen at the Science Jamboree. The NASA Goddard Science Jamboree took place on July 16, 2013. The event allowed the different departments at Goddard a chance to showcase their research and projects to other employees and summer interns. #nasa #nasagoddard #icecream Credit: NASA/Goddard Sawyer Rosenstein

  2. Ice cream structural elements that affect melting rate and hardness.

    PubMed

    Muse, M R; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    Statistical models were developed to reveal which structural elements of ice cream affect melting rate and hardness. Ice creams were frozen in a batch freezer with three types of sweetener, three levels of the emulsifier polysorbate 80, and two different draw temperatures to produce ice creams with a range of microstructures. Ice cream mixes were analyzed for viscosity, and finished ice creams were analyzed for air cell and ice crystal size, overrun, and fat destabilization. The ice phase volume of each ice cream were calculated based on the freezing point of the mix. Melting rate and hardness of each hardened ice cream was measured and correlated with the structural attributes by using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Fat destabilization, ice crystal size, and the consistency coefficient of the mix were found to affect the melting rate of ice cream, whereas hardness was influenced by ice phase volume, ice crystal size, overrun, fat destabilization, and the rheological properties of the mix.

  3. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contaminants Buy, Store & Serve Safe Food Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection Share ... it Email Print August 2004 Every year homemade ice cream causes several outbreaks of Salmonella infection with ...

  4. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner prescribed in § 135.110 for ice cream, and complies with all the provisions of § 135.110, except that the...

  5. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner prescribed in § 135.110 for ice cream, and complies with all the provisions of § 135.110, except that the...

  6. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner prescribed in § 135.110 for ice cream, and complies with all the provisions of § 135.110, except that the...

  7. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner prescribed in § 135.110 for ice cream, and complies with all the provisions of § 135.110, except that the...

  8. The impact of wood ice cream sticks' origin on the aroma of exposed ice cream mixes.

    PubMed

    Jiamyangyuen, S; Delwiche, J F; Harper, W J

    2002-02-01

    The effect of volatile compounds in white birch sticks obtained from four different geographical locations on the aroma of ice cream mix was investigated. Sensory evaluation, (specifically, a series of warmed-up paired comparisons) was conducted on stick-exposed ice cream mixes to determine whether aroma differences in those mixes could be detected. Batches of ice cream mix were exposed to the sticks and aged for 6 d at 4 degrees C and then assessed by the panelists by pairwise comparison. Findings suggest that differences in aroma of mixes that have been exposed to white birch sticks from four different geographical origins can be distinguished perceptually.

  9. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner...

  10. Effect of fat level on the perception of five flavor chemicals in ice cream with or without fat mimetics by using a descriptive test.

    PubMed

    Liou, B K; Grün, I U

    2007-10-01

    Fat mimetics are commonly used in the manufacture of low-fat and fat-free ice creams. However, the use of fat mimetics affects flavor and texture characteristics of ice cream, which results in decreased overall acceptability by consumers. The initial objective of this study was to investigate the release behavior of 5 strawberry flavor compounds in ice creams with Simplesse((R)), Litesse((R)), and Litesse((R))/Simplesse((R)) mixes using descriptive analysis. Fat mimetics and flavor formulation significantly influenced the perception of Furaneoltrade mark (cooked sugar flavor), alpha-ionone (violet flavor), and gamma-undecalactone (peach flavor), but there was no interaction between ice cream type and flavor formulation for the 3 flavors. Furaneol and ethyl-3-methyl-3-phenylglycidate (candy flavor) were perceived more strongly in full-fat ice cream, while cis-3-hexen-1-ol (grassy flavor), alpha-ionone, and gamma-undecalactone were perceived more strongly in low-fat ice cream. Ice creams with Simplesse and full-fat ice cream had similar sensory characteristics, while ice creams with Litesse were similar to low-fat ice creams in flavor characteristics, and ice creams with Litesse/Simplesse mixes were closer in flavor profile to low-fat ice cream but had similar texture properties to those of full-fat ice cream. Simplesse was found to be a better fat mimetic for duplicating the flavor profiles and mouthfeel of full-fat ice cream.

  11. Biofilm formation in an ice cream plant.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Gulten Tiryaki; Tuncel, Gunnur

    2006-01-01

    The sites of biofilm formation in an ice cream plant were investigated by sampling both the production line and the environment. Experiments were carried out twice within a 20-day period. First, stainless steel coupons were fixed to surfaces adjacent to food contact surfaces, the floor drains and the doormat. They were taken for the analysis of biofilm at three different production stages. Then, biofilm forming bacteria were enumerated and also presence of Listeria monocytogenes was monitored. Biofilm forming isolates were selected on the basis of colony morphology and Gram's reaction; Gram negative cocci and rod, Gram positive cocci and spore forming isolates were identified. Most of the biofilm formations were seen on the conveyor belt of a packaging machine 8 h after the beginning of the production, 6.5 x 10(3) cfu cm(-2). Most of the Gram negative bacteria identified belong to Enterobacteriaceae family such as Proteus, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Shigella, Escherichia, Edwardsiella. The other Gram negative microflora included Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, Moraxella, Pseudomonas or Alcaligenes spp. were also isolated. Gram positive microflora of the ice cream plant included Staphyloccus, Bacillus, Listeria and lactic acid bacteria such as Streptococcus, Leuconostoc or Pediococcus spp. The results from this study highlighted the problems of spread of pathogens like Listeria and Shigella and spoilage bacteria. In the development of cleaning and disinfection procedures in ice cream plants, an awareness of these biofilm-forming bacteria is essential for the ice cream plants.

  12. Filtrates and Residues: Ice Cream: Delicious Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, James

    1983-01-01

    An experiment involving preparation of ice cream is conducted after students complete units on solutions, atomic structure, molecular architecture, and bonding. The laboratory gives practical illustration of relation of physical properties to bond type and solution theory developed. Materials needed, procedures used, and questions asked are…

  13. Production of functional probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic ice creams.

    PubMed

    Di Criscio, T; Fratianni, A; Mignogna, R; Cinquanta, L; Coppola, R; Sorrentino, E; Panfili, G

    2010-10-01

    In this work, 3 types of ice cream were produced: a probiotic ice cream produced by adding potentially probiotic microorganisms such as Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus; a prebiotic ice cream produced by adding inulin, a prebiotic substrate; and a synbiotic ice cream produced by adding probiotic microorganisms and inulin in combination. In addition to microbial counts, pH, acidity, and physical and functional properties of the ice creams were evaluated. The experimental ice creams preserved the probiotic bacteria and had counts of viable lactic acid bacteria after frozen storage that met the minimum required to achieve probiotic effects. Moreover, most of the ice creams showed good nutritional and sensory properties, with the best results obtained with Lb. casei and 2.5% inulin. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Explaining tolerance for bitterness in chocolate ice cream using solid chocolate preferences

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Meriel L.; Loquasto, Joseph R.; Roberts, Robert F.; Ziegler, Gregory R.; Hayes, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Chocolate ice cream is commonly formulated with higher sugar levels than nonchocolate flavors to compensate for the inherent bitterness of cocoa. Bitterness, however, is an integral part of the complex flavor of chocolate. In light of the global obesity epidemic, many consumers and health professionals are concerned about the levels of added sugars in foods. Once a strategy for balancing undesirable bitterness and health concerns regarding added sugars has been developed, the task becomes determining whether that product will be acceptable to the consumer. Thus, the purpose of this research was to manipulate the bitterness of chocolate ice cream to examine how this influences consumer preferences. The main goal of this study was to estimate group rejection thresholds for bitterness in chocolate ice cream, and to see if solid chocolate preferences (dark vs. milk) generalized to ice cream. A food-safe bitter ingredient, sucrose octaacetate, was added to chocolate ice cream to alter bitterness without disturbing other the sensory qualities of the ice cream samples, including texture. Untrained chocolate ice cream consumers participated in a large-scale sensory test by indicating their preferences for blinded pairs of unspiked and spiked samples, where the spiked sample had increasing levels of the added bitterant. As anticipated, the group containing individuals who prefer milk chocolate had a much lower tolerance for bitterness in their chocolate ice cream compared with the group of individuals who prefer dark chocolate; indeed, the dark chocolate group tolerated almost twice as much added bitterant in the ice cream before indicating a significant preference for the unspiked (control) ice cream. This work demonstrates the successful application of the rejection threshold method to a complex dairy food. Estimating rejection thresholds could prove to be an effective tool for determining acceptable formulations or quality limits when considering attributes that become

  15. Explaining tolerance for bitterness in chocolate ice cream using solid chocolate preferences.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Meriel L; Loquasto, Joseph R; Roberts, Robert F; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hayes, John E

    2013-08-01

    Chocolate ice cream is commonly formulated with higher sugar levels than nonchocolate flavors to compensate for the inherent bitterness of cocoa. Bitterness, however, is an integral part of the complex flavor of chocolate. In light of the global obesity epidemic, many consumers and health professionals are concerned about the levels of added sugars in foods. Once a strategy for balancing undesirable bitterness and health concerns regarding added sugars has been developed, the task becomes determining whether that product will be acceptable to the consumer. Thus, the purpose of this research was to manipulate the bitterness of chocolate ice cream to examine how this influences consumer preferences. The main goal of this study was to estimate group rejection thresholds for bitterness in chocolate ice cream, and to see if solid chocolate preferences (dark vs. milk) generalized to ice cream. A food-safe bitter ingredient, sucrose octaacetate, was added to chocolate ice cream to alter bitterness without disturbing other the sensory qualities of the ice cream samples, including texture. Untrained chocolate ice cream consumers participated in a large-scale sensory test by indicating their preferences for blinded pairs of unspiked and spiked samples, where the spiked sample had increasing levels of the added bitterant. As anticipated, the group containing individuals who prefer milk chocolate had a much lower tolerance for bitterness in their chocolate ice cream compared with the group of individuals who prefer dark chocolate; indeed, the dark chocolate group tolerated almost twice as much added bitterant in the ice cream before indicating a significant preference for the unspiked (control) ice cream. This work demonstrates the successful application of the rejection threshold method to a complex dairy food. Estimating rejection thresholds could prove to be an effective tool for determining acceptable formulations or quality limits when considering attributes that become

  16. Development of technology for manufacture of ragi ice cream.

    PubMed

    Patel, I J; Dharaiya, C N; Pinto, S V

    2015-07-01

    Ragi (Finger millet) improves the nutritional value of ice cream by enhancing the iron and fibre content. Caramel flavoured medium fat ice cream (6 % fat) was prepared by addition of gelatinized malted ragi flour roasted in butter (MRB) @ 8 %, 9 % and 10 % by weight of mix and compared with control (C) i.e. vanilla ice cream containing 10 % fat. The overall acceptability score of product prepared using 9 % MRB was statistically (P > 0.05) at par with the C, hence, it was selected. In the next part of the study, ragi ice cream was prepared using 4 different flavours viz. vanilla, mango, chocolate and caramel. Chocolate flavoured ragi ice cream was adjudged as best, followed by mango, caramel and vanilla ice cream. The iron and fibre content of chocolate flavoured ragi ice cream was found to be 12.8 ppm and 1.36 % respectively. vs. 1.5 ppm and 0.18 % respectively in control (C). Heat shock treatment as well as storage up to 30 days had no adverse effect on the sensory quality of the chocolate flavored ragi ice cream. Incorporation of finger millet in ice cream resulted in reduction in the amount of stabilizer used and effectively functioned as fat replacer in ice cream.

  17. Physical properties of ice cream containing milk protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, V B; Wolters, C L; Vodovotz, Y; Ji, T

    2005-03-01

    Two milk protein concentrates (MPC, 56 and 85%) were studied as substitutes for 20 and 50% of the protein content in ice cream mix. The basic mix formula had 12% fat, 11% nonfat milk solids, 15% sweetener, and 0.3% stabilizer/emulsifier blend. Protein levels remained constant, and total solids were compensated for in MPC mixes by the addition of polydextrose. Physical properties investigated included apparent viscosity, fat globule size, melting rate, shape retention, and freezing behavior using differential scanning calorimetry. Milk protein concentrate formulations had higher mix viscosity, larger amount of fat destabilization, narrower ice melting curves, and greater shape retention compared with the control. Milk protein concentrates did not offer significant modifications of ice cream physical properties on a constant protein basis when substituted for up to 50% of the protein supplied by nonfat dry milk. Milk protein concentrates may offer ice cream manufacturers an alternative source of milk solids non-fat, especially in mixes reduced in lactose or fat, where higher milk solids nonfat are needed to compensate other losses of total solids.

  18. Delicious ice cream, why does salt thaw ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-03-01

    Plain Awful is an imaginary valley on the Andes populated by a highly-imitative, cubical people for which the most criminal offence is to exhibit round objects. The duck family (Scrooge, Donald and nephews) are teaming against Scrooge's worst enemy, Flintheart Glomgold, trying to buy the famous Plain Awful square eggs. Inadvertently, Scrooge violates the taboo, showing his Number One Dime, and is imprisoned in the stone quarries. He can be released only after the presentation of an ice cream soda to the President of Plain Awful. Donald and his nephews fly with Flintheart to deliver it, but Scrooge's enemy, of course, betrays the previous agreement after getting the ice cream, forcing the ducks into making an emergence replacement on the spot. Using dried milk, sugar and chocolate from their ration packs, plus some snow and salt for cooling they are able make the ice cream, and after dressing it with the carbonated water from a fire extinguisher they finally manage to produce the desired dessert. This comic may serve as an introduction to the "mysterious" phenomenon that added salt melts the ice and, even more surprising, does it by lowering the temperature of the mixture.

  19. Connecting the dots between bacterial biofilms and ice cream.

    PubMed

    Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; MacPhee, Cait E

    2015-12-18

    Emerging research is revealing a diverse array of interfacially-active proteins that are involved in varied biological process from foaming horse sweat to bacterial raincoat formation. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to study the molecular and biophysical mechanisms controlling the activity of an unusual bacterial protein called BslA. This protein is needed for biofilm formation and forms a protective layer or raincoat over the bacterial community, but also has a multitude of potential applications in multiphase formulations. Here we document our journey from fundamental research to an examination of the applications for this surface-active protein in ice cream.

  20. Connecting the dots between bacterial biofilms and ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-12-01

    Emerging research is revealing a diverse array of interfacially-active proteins that are involved in varied biological process from foaming horse sweat to bacterial raincoat formation. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to study the molecular and biophysical mechanisms controlling the activity of an unusual bacterial protein called BslA. This protein is needed for biofilm formation and forms a protective layer or raincoat over the bacterial community, but also has a multitude of potential applications in multiphase formulations. Here we document our journey from fundamental research to an examination of the applications for this surface-active protein in ice cream.

  1. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total... has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred... section. For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1...

  2. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total... has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred... section. For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1...

  3. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total... has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred... section. For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1...

  4. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total... has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred... section. For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1...

  5. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total... has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred... section. For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1...

  6. 7 CFR 58.647 - Composition requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Composition requirements for ice cream. 58.647 Section 58.647 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... requirements for ice cream. See § 58.605(a). ...

  7. 7 CFR 58.647 - Composition requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Composition requirements for ice cream. 58.647 Section 58.647 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... requirements for ice cream. See § 58.605(a). ...

  8. 7 CFR 58.647 - Composition requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Composition requirements for ice cream. 58.647 Section 58.647 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... requirements for ice cream. See § 58.605(a). ...

  9. 7 CFR 58.647 - Composition requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Composition requirements for ice cream. 58.647 Section 58.647 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... requirements for ice cream. See § 58.605(a). ...

  10. 7 CFR 58.647 - Composition requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composition requirements for ice cream. 58.647 Section 58.647 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... requirements for ice cream. See § 58.605(a). ...

  11. Increasing the protein content of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Patel, M R; Baer, R J; Acharya, M R

    2006-05-01

    Vanilla ice cream was made with a mix composition of 10.5% milk fat, 10.5% milk SNF, 12% beet sugar, and 4% corn syrup solids. None of the batches made contained stabilizer or emulsifier. The control (treatment 1) contained 3.78% protein. Treatments 2 and 5 contained 30% more protein, treatments 3 and 6 contained 60% more protein, and treatments 4 and 7 contained 90% more protein compared with treatment 1 by addition of whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate powders, respectively. In all treatments, levels of milk fat, milk SNF, beet sugar, and corn syrup solids were kept constant at 37% total solids. Mix protein content for treatment 1 was 3.78%, treatment 2 was 4.90%, treatment 5 was 4.91%, treatments 3 and 6 were 6.05%, and treatments 4 and 7 were 7.18%. This represented a 29.89, 60.05, 89.95, 29.63, 60.05, and 89.95% increase in protein for treatment 2 through treatment 7 compared with treatment 1, respectively. Milk protein level influenced ice crystal size; with increased protein, the ice crystal size was favorably reduced in treatments 2, 4, and 5 and was similar in treatments 3, 6, and 7 compared with treatment 1. At 1 wk postmanufacture, overall texture acceptance for all treatments was more desirable compared with treatment 1. When evaluating all parameters, treatment 2 with added whey protein concentrate and treatments 5 and 6 with added milk protein concentrate were similar or improved compared with treatment 1. It is possible to produce acceptable ice cream with higher levels of protein.

  12. Effect of fat content on the physical properties and consumer acceptability of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Rolon, M Laura; Bakke, Alyssa J; Coupland, John N; Hayes, John E; Roberts, Robert F

    2017-07-01

    Ice cream is a complex food matrix that contains multiple physical phases. Removal of 1 ingredient may affect not only its physical properties but also multiple sensory characteristics that may or may not be important to consumers. Fat not only contributes to texture, mouth feel, and flavor, but also serves as a structural element. We evaluated the effect of replacing fat with maltodextrin (MD) on select physical properties of ice cream and on consumer acceptability. Vanilla ice creams were formulated to contain 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14% fat, and the difference was made up with 8, 6, 4, 2, and 0% maltodextrin, respectively, to balance the mix. Physical characterization included measurements of overrun, apparent viscosity, fat particle size, fat destabilization, hardness, and melting rate. A series of sensory tests were conducted to measure liking and the intensity of various attributes. Tests were also conducted after 19 weeks of storage at -18°C to assess changes in acceptance due to prolonged storage at unfavorable temperatures. Then, discrimination tests were performed to determine which differences in fat content were detectable by consumers. Mix viscosity decreased with increasing fat content and decreasing maltodextrin content. Fat particle size and fat destabilization significantly increased with increasing fat content. However, acceptability did not differ significantly across the samples for fresh or stored ice cream. Following storage, ice creams with 6, 12, and 14% fat did not differ in acceptability compared with fresh ice cream. However, the 8% fat, 6% MD and 10% fat, 4% MD ice creams showed a significant drop in acceptance after storage relative to fresh ice cream at the same fat content. Consumers were unable to detect a difference of 2 percentage points in fat level between 6 and 12% fat. They were able to detect a difference of 4 percentage points for ice creams with 6% versus 10%, but not for those with 8% versus 12% fat. Removing fat and replacing

  13. 7 CFR 58.2825 - United States Standard for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false United States Standard for ice cream. 58.2825 Section... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 United States Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2825 United States Standard for ice cream. (a) Ice cream shall contain at least 1.6 pounds of total solids to the gallon...

  14. 7 CFR 58.2825 - United States Standard for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false United States Standard for ice cream. 58.2825 Section... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 United States Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2825 United States Standard for ice cream. (a) Ice cream shall contain at least 1.6 pounds of total solids to the gallon...

  15. 7 CFR 58.2825 - United States Standard for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false United States Standard for ice cream. 58.2825 Section... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 United States Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2825 United States Standard for ice cream. (a) Ice cream shall contain at least 1.6 pounds of total solids to the gallon...

  16. Ice cream and orbifold Riemann-Roch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Anita; Reid, Miles; Zhou, Shengtian

    2013-06-01

    We give an orbifold Riemann-Roch formula in closed form for the Hilbert series of a quasismooth polarized n-fold (X,D), under the assumption that X is projectively Gorenstein with only isolated orbifold points. Our formula is a sum of parts each of which is integral and Gorenstein symmetric of the same canonical weight; the orbifold parts are called ice cream functions. This form of the Hilbert series is particularly useful for computer algebra, and we illustrate it on examples of {K3} surfaces and Calabi-Yau 3-folds. These results apply also with higher dimensional orbifold strata (see [1] and [2]), although the precise statements are considerably trickier. We expect to return to this in future publications.

  17. Effects of Emulsifier, Overrun and Dasher Speed on Ice Cream Microstructure and Melting Properties.

    PubMed

    Warren, Maya M; Hartel, Richard W

    2018-03-01

    Ice cream is a multiphase frozen food containing ice crystals, air cells, fat globules, and partially coalesced fat globule clusters dispersed in an unfrozen serum phase (sugars, proteins, and stabilizers). This microstructure is responsible for ice cream's melting characteristics. By varying both formulation (emulsifier content and overrun) and processing conditions (dasher speed), the effects of different microstructural elements, particularly air cells and fat globule clusters, on ice cream melt-down properties were studied. Factors that caused an increase in shear stress within the freezer, namely increasing dasher speed and overrun, caused a decrease in air cell size and an increase in extent of fat destabilization. Increasing emulsifier content, especially of polysorbate 80, caused an increase in extent of fat destabilization. Both overrun and fat destabilization influenced drip-through rates. Ice creams with a combination of low overrun and low fat destabilization had the highest drip-through rates. Further, the amount of remnant foam left on the screen increased with reduced drip-through rates. These results provide a better understanding of the effects of microstructure components and their interactions on drip-through rate. Manipulating operating and formulation parameters in ice cream manufacture influences the microstructure (air cells, ice crystals, and fat globule clusters). This work provides guidance on which parameters have most effect on air cell size and fat globule cluster formation. Further, the structural characteristics that reduce melt-down rate were determined. Ice cream manufacturers will use these results to tailor their products for the desired quality attributes. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Evaluating sago as a functional ingredient in dietetic mango ice cream.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish S; Jana, Atanu H; Aparnathi, Kishore D; Pinto, Suneeta V

    2010-10-01

    A low fat mango ice cream (2.4% milk fat) was prepared in a mechanized 'ice and salt' type freezer using powdered sago at 2.5% as a natural bulking agent along with sodium alginate at 0.025% as adjunct. The low fat mango ice cream was compared with control mango ice cream having 10% milk fat and 0.15% sodium alginate as stabilizer. Both control as well as experimental ice creams contained 20% mango pulp solids. To impart richness to low fat mango ice cream, flavour enhancers like Cream Plus and Butter Buds were used at levels of 0.2% and 0.05%, respectively. The dietetic low fat ice creams compared well in sensory colour and appearance, flavour, body and texture, and melting quality to that of control ice cream. Incorporation of 2.5% powdered sago and 0.2% Cream Plus as flavour adjunct is recommended in the manufacture of 'low-fat' mango ice cream. The energy values for control and dietetic mango ice cream was 202.8 and 142.9 kcal/100 g, respectively, which represents about 30% reduction in calorie. The cost of ice cream per liter was Rs 39.9, Rs 37.6 and Rs 49.7 for experimental ice creams containing Cream Plus and Butter Bud, and control, respectively.

  19. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  20. Testing the reliability of ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zonghao; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Chuanbing; Liu, Kai; Xue, Xianghui; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME)'s properties are important to not only the physical scene itself but space-weather prediction. Several models (such as cone model, GCS model, and so on) have been raised to get rid of the projection effects within the properties observed by spacecraft. According to SOHO/ LASCO observations, we obtain the 'real' 3D parameters of all the FFHCMEs (front-side full halo Coronal Mass Ejections) within the 24th solar cycle till July 2012, by the ice-cream cone model. Considering that the method to obtain 3D parameters from the CME observations by multi-satellite and multi-angle has higher accuracy, we use the GCS model to obtain the real propagation parameters of these CMEs in 3D space and compare the results with which by ice-cream cone model. Then we could discuss the reliability of the ice-cream cone model.

  1. The addition of inulin and Lactobacillus casei 01 in sheep milk ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, Celso F; Silva, Hugo L A; Esmerino, Erick A; Rocha, Ramon S; Moraes, Jeremias; Carmo, Mariana A V; Azevedo, Luciana; Camps, Ihosvany; K D Abud, Yuri; Sant'Anna, Celso; Franco, Robson M; Freitas, Mônica Q; Silva, Marcia C; Raices, Renata S L; Escher, Graziela B; Granato, Daniel; Senaka Ranadheera, C; Nazarro, Filomena; Cruz, Adriano G

    2018-04-25

    The effect of the Lactobacillus casei 01 and inulin addition on sheep milk ice cream during storage (-18 °C, 150 days) was investigated. Control, probiotic and synbiotic ice cream (10% w/w sheep milk cream; 10% w/w sheep milk cream, L. casei 01, 6 log CFU/mL; 10% w/w inulin, L. casei 01, 6 log CFU/mL, respectively) were manufactured. Microbiological counts (probiotic count, survival after in vitro gastrointestinal resistance, Caco-2 cell adhesion), bioactivity and microstructure were analysed. Physical and textural characteristics, colour parameters, thermal analysis and organic acids/volatile compounds were also evaluated. All formulations supported L. casei 01 viability and maintained above the minimum therapeutic level (>6 log CFU/mL) during storage. Inulin did not affect L. casei 01 survival after the passage through simulated gastrointestinal tract and adhesion to Caco-2 cells while improved the ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activity. L. casei 01 addition produced several volatile compounds, such as carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Also, scanning electron microscopy showed an interaction between probiotic bacteria and inulin fibre on synbiotic ice cream and the adhesion of L. casei to Caco-2 cells was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 7 CFR 58.2825 - United States Standard for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the weight of the finished ice cream. In calculating the reduction of milk fat and total milk solids... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false United States Standard for ice cream. 58.2825 Section... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 United States Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2825 United States...

  3. 7 CFR 58.2825 - United States Standard for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the weight of the finished ice cream. In calculating the reduction of milk fat and total milk solids... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States Standard for ice cream. 58.2825 Section... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 United States Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2825 United States...

  4. Application of simplex-centroid mixture design to optimize stabilizer combinations for ice cream manufacture.

    PubMed

    BahramParvar, Maryam; Tehrani, Mostafa Mazaheri; Razavi, Seyed M A; Koocheki, Arash

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to obtain the optimum formulation for stabilizers in ice cream that could contest with blends presented nowadays. Thus, different mixtures of three stabilizers, i.e. basil seed gum, carboxymethyl cellulose, and guar gum, at two concentrations (0.15 % & 0.35 %) were studied using mixture design methodology. The influence of these mixtures on some properties of ice cream and the regression models for them were also determined. Generally, high ratios of basil seed gum in mixture developed the apparent viscosity of ice cream mixes and decreased the melting rate. Increasing proportion of this stabilizer as well as guar gum in the mixtures at concentration of 0.15 % enhanced the overrun of samples. Based on the optimization criteria, the most excellent combination was 84.43 % basil seed gum and 15.57 % guar gum at concentration of 0.15 %. This research proved the capability of basil seed gum as a novel stabilizer in ice cream stabilization.

  5. Ice Cream/I Scream for YA Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Don

    2010-01-01

    From a 40-year perspective, Don Gallo examines the field of young adult literature, comparing it to ice cream--its various flavors and levels of richness. The article proclaims the profundity of the field and the quality of its writers, summarizes historical highlights, defends it against its detractors, and explains the importance of helping…

  6. 7 CFR 58.648 - Microbiological requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements for ice cream. The finished product shall contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per gram as determined by the standard plate count, and shall contain not more than 10 coliform organisms per gram for plain and not more than 20 coliform per gram in chocolate, fruit, nut or other flavors in three out of...

  7. 7 CFR 58.648 - Microbiological requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements for ice cream. The finished product shall contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per gram as determined by the standard plate count, and shall contain not more than 10 coliform organisms per gram for plain and not more than 20 coliform per gram in chocolate, fruit, nut or other flavors in three out of...

  8. 7 CFR 58.648 - Microbiological requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements for ice cream. The finished product shall contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per gram as determined by the standard plate count, and shall contain not more than 10 coliform organisms per gram for plain and not more than 20 coliform per gram in chocolate, fruit, nut or other flavors in three out of...

  9. 7 CFR 58.648 - Microbiological requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for ice cream. The finished product shall contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per gram as determined by the standard plate count, and shall contain not more than 10 coliform organisms per gram for plain and not more than 20 coliform per gram in chocolate, fruit, nut or other flavors in three out of...

  10. 7 CFR 58.648 - Microbiological requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements for ice cream. The finished product shall contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per gram as determined by the standard plate count, and shall contain not more than 10 coliform organisms per gram for plain and not more than 20 coliform per gram in chocolate, fruit, nut or other flavors in three out of...

  11. 7 CFR 58.649 - Physical requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Physical requirements for ice cream. 58.649 Section 58.649 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.649 Physical...

  12. 7 CFR 58.649 - Physical requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Physical requirements for ice cream. 58.649 Section 58.649 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.649 Physical...

  13. 7 CFR 58.649 - Physical requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical requirements for ice cream. 58.649 Section 58.649 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.649 Physical...

  14. 7 CFR 58.649 - Physical requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Physical requirements for ice cream. 58.649 Section 58.649 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.649 Physical...

  15. 7 CFR 58.649 - Physical requirements for ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Physical requirements for ice cream. 58.649 Section 58.649 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.649 Physical...

  16. Teaching Process Engineering Principles Using an Ice Cream Maker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaletunc, Gonul; Duemmel, Kevin; Gecik, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The ice cream laboratory experiment is designed to illustrate and promote discussion of several engineering and science topics including material and energy balances, heat transfer, freezing, mass transfer, mixing, viscosity, and freezing point depression in a sophomore level engineering class. A pre-lab assignment requires the students to develop…

  17. Effect of galactooligosaccharide addition on the physical, optical, and sensory acceptance of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, C F; Silva, H L A; Celeguini, R M S; Santos, R; Pastore, G M; Junior, C A Conte; Freitas, M Q; Nogueira, L C; Silva, M C; Cruz, A G

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the addition of galactooligosaccharide (GOS) on the physicochemical, optical, and sensory characteristics of ice cream was investigated. Vanilla ice cream was supplemented with 0, 1.5, and 3.0% (wt/wt) GOS and characterized for pH, firmness, color, melting, overrun, as well as subjected to a discriminative sensory test (triangle test). For comparison purposes, ice creams containing fructooligosaccharide were also manufactured. The GOS ice creams were characterized by increased firmness and lower melting rates. Different perceptions were reported in the sensory evaluation for the 3.0% GOS ice cream when compared with the control, which was not observed for the fructooligosaccharide ice cream. Overall, the findings suggest it is possible to produce GOS ice cream with improved stability in relation to the physicochemical parameters and sensory perception. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Processing effects on physicochemical properties of creams formulated with modified milk fat.

    PubMed

    Bolling, J C; Duncan, S E; Eigel, W N; Waterman, K M

    2005-04-01

    Type of thermal process [high temperature, short time pasteurization (HTST) or ultra-high temperature pasteurization (UHT)] and homogenization sequence (before or after pasteurization) were examined for influence on the physicochemical properties of natural cream (20% milk fat) and creams formulated with 20% low-melt, fractionated butteroil emulsified with skim milk, or buttermilk and butter-derived aqueous phase. Homogenization sequence influenced physicochemical makeup of the creams. Creams homogenized before pasteurization contained more milk fat surface material, higher phospholipid levels, and less protein at the milk fat interface than creams homogenized after pasteurization. Phosphodiesterase I activity was higher (relative to protein on lipid globule surface) when cream was homogenized before pasteurization. Creams formulated with skim milk and modified milk fat had relatively more phospholipid adsorbed at the milk fat interface. Ultra-high-temperature-pasteurized natural and reformulated creams were higher in viscosity at all shear rates investigated compared with HTST-pasteurized creams. High-temperature, short time-pasteurized natural cream was more viscous than HTST-pasteurized reformulated creams at most shear rates investigated. High-temperature, short time-pasteurized creams had better emulsion stability than UHT-pasteurized creams. Cream formulated with buttermilk had creaming stability most comparable to natural cream, and cream formulated with skim milk and modified butteroil was least stable to creaming. Most creams feathered in a pH range of 5.00 to 5.20, indicating that they were moderately stable to slightly unstable emulsions. All processing sequences yielded creams within sensory specifications with the exception of treatments homogenized before UHT pasteurization and skim milk formulations homogenized after UHT pasteurization.

  19. Experimental provocation of 'ice-cream headache' by ice cubes and ice water.

    PubMed

    Mages, Stephan; Hensel, Ole; Zierz, Antonia Maria; Kraya, Torsten; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Background There are various studies on experimentally provoked 'ice-cream headache' or 'headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus' (HICS) using different provocation protocols. The aim of this study was to compare two provocation protocols. Methods Ice cubes pressed to the palate and fast ingestion of ice water were used to provoke HICS and clinical features were compared. Results The ice-water stimulus provoked HICS significantly more often than the ice-cube stimulus (9/77 vs. 39/77). Ice-water-provoked HICS had a significantly shorter latency (median 15 s, range 4-97 s vs. median 68 s, range 27-96 s). There was no difference in pain localisation. Character after ice-cube stimulation was predominantly described as pressing and after ice-water stimulation as stabbing. A second HICS followed in 10/39 (26%) of the headaches provoked by ice water. Lacrimation occurred significantly more often in volunteers with than in those without HICS. Discussion HICS provoked by ice water was more frequent, had a shorter latency, different pain character and higher pain intensity than HICS provoked by ice cubes. The finding of two subsequent HICS attacks in the same volunteers supports the notion that two types of HICS exist. Lacrimation during HICS indicates involvement of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex.

  20. Nutritional composition, glycemic index, glycemic load, and organoleptical quality of glucomannan-enriched soy milk ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa'adah, S.; Candra, O. M.; Nugrahani, G.; Pramono, A.; Afifah, D. N.

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decades, the number of childhood obesity cases has increased significantly, which led to an increase in the number of adults suffering from degenerative diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM). Glucomannan-Enriched Soy Milk Ice Cream (GSMIC) may prevent obesity in children. The aim of the study was to test the level of carbohydrates, protein, fat, dietary fiber, glycemic index, glycemic load, and organoleptic quality of GSMIC. This experiment used a completely randomized design to test three formulations of glucomannan flour and soy milk (0.5%, 1.5%, and 2.5%). The products were tested for nutritional composition, and evaluated on glycemic index, glycemic load, and organoleptic quality. GSMIC 2.5% had higher levels of dietary fiber and high carbohydrate, protein, and fat content compared to ice cream (3.99%, 30.7%, 1.50%, 1.33%, respectively). The glycemic index of ice cream and 2.5% GSMIC were 75.83 (75%) and 51.48 (51%), respectively, while the glycemic load of ice cream and 2.5% GSMIC were 9.04 and 11.61, respectively. Based on the organoleptic analysis, formulation preferred by the panellists was 2.5% glucomannan flour. Glucomannan flour affected the level of carbohydrates, protein, fat, dietary fiber, glycemic index, glycemic load, and organoleptic quality in soy milk ice cream.

  1. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix.

  2. Factors Affecting the Changes of Ice Crystal Form in Ice Cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Toru

    In this study, the shape of ice crystals in ice cream was quantitatively evaluated by introducing fractal analysis. A small droplet of commercial ice cream mix was quickly cooled to about -30°C on the cold stage of microscope. Subsequently, it was heated to -5°C or -10°C and then held for various holding time. Based on the captured images at each holding time, the cross-sectional area and the length of circumference for each ice crystal were measured to calculate fractal dimension using image analysis software. The results showed that the ice crystals were categorized into two groups, e.g. simple-shape and complicated-shape, according to their fractal dimensions. The fractal dimension of ice crystals became lower with increasing holding time and holding temperature. It was also indicated that the growing rate of complicated-shape ice crystals was relatively higher because of aggregation.

  3. Testing the reliability of ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME)'s properties are important to not only the physical scene itself but spaceweather prediction. Several models(such as cone model, GCS model, and so on) have been raised to get rid of the projection effects within the properties observated by spacecraft. According to SOHO/ LASCO observations, we obtain the 'real' 3D parameters of 33 FFHCMEs (front-side full halo Coronal Mass Ejections) within the 24th solar cycle by the ice-cream cone model. Considering that the method to obtain 3D parameters from the CME observations by multi-satellite and multi-angle has higher accuracy, we use the GCS model to obtain the real propagation parameters of these CMEs in 3D space and compare the results with which by ice-cream cone model. It was demonstrated that the correlation coefficient for the speeds by using these both methods is 0.97.

  4. ESR/spin probe study of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Duncan G; Greenley, Katherine R; Sutcliffe, Leslie H

    2006-07-12

    Spin probes based on the 1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yl structure have been used, in conjunction with electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), to study the physical changes occurring in ice cream during freezing and melting. The ESR measurements allowed the rotational correlation times, tau(B), of the spin probes to be determined. Two probes were used together in a given sample of ice cream, namely, 1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yl (TMIO), which samples the fat phase, and the sodium salt of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl-5-sulfonate (NaTMIOS), which samples the aqueous phase. Data from the TMIO probe showed that when ice cream is cooled, the fat phase is a mixture of solid and liquid fat until a temperature of approximately -60 degrees C is reached. The water-soluble probe NaTMIOS showed that the aqueous phase changes completely from liquid to solid within 1 degrees C of -18 degrees C. On cooling further to -24.7 degrees C and then allowing it to warm to +25.0 degrees C, the rotational correlation times of the NaTMIOS were slow to recover to their previous values. For the lipid phase, tau(B)(298) was found to be 65.7 +/- 2.0 ps and the corresponding activation enthalpy, DeltaH, was 32.5 +/- 0.9 kJ mol(-)(1): These values are typical of those expected to be found in the type of fat used to make ice cream. The water phase gave corresponding values of 32.2 +/- 0.5 ps and 24.5 +/- 0.4 kJ mol(-)(1) values, which are those expected for a sucrose concentration of 24%.

  5. Recent advances in the application of microbial transglutaminase crosslinking in cheese and ice cream products: A review.

    PubMed

    Taghi Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad; Koubaa, Mohamed; Barba, Francisco J; Greiner, Ralf; George, Saji; Roohinejad, Shahin

    2018-02-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) has been currently utilized to form new food structures and matrices with high physicochemical stability. Incorporation of this multi-functional enzyme into structural composition of milk protein-based products, such as cheese and ice cream, can not only be a successful strategy to improve their nutritional and technological characteristics through intramolecular cross-linking, but also to reduce the production cost by decreasing fat and stabilizer contents. The recent research developments and promising results of MTGase application in producing functional formulations of cheese and ice cream with higher quality characteristics are reviewed. New interesting insights and future perspectives are also presented. The addition of MTGase to cheese led to significant improvements in moisture, yield, texture, rheology and sensory properties, without changes in the chemical composition. Furthermore, pH value of ice cream is not affected by the MTGase treatment. Compared to untreated ice creams, application of MTGase significantly promotes consistency, fat destabilization, overrun and organoleptic acceptance, while a substantial reduction in firmness and melting rate of samples was observed. The addition of MTGase to cheese and ice cream-milk provides reinforcement to the protein matrix and can be considered as a novel additive for improving the physicochemical and organoleptic properties of final products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of emetic Bacillus cereus in different ice creams in Bavaria.

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Fricker, M; Ehling-Schulz, M; Zucker, R; Wagner, B; Busch, U; Höller, C

    2010-02-01

    In this study, 809 samples of ice cream from different sources were investigated by using cultural methods for the presence of presumptive Bacillus cereus. Isolates from culture-positive samples were examined with a real-time PCR assay targeting a region of the cereulide synthetase gene (ces) that is highly specific for emetic B. cereus strains. The samples were collected from ice cream parlors and restaurants that produced their own ice cream and from international commercial ice cream companies in different regions of Bavaria during the summer of 2008. Presumptive B. cereus was found in 508 (62.7%) ice cream samples investigated, and 24 (4.7%) of the isolates had the genetic background for cereulide toxin production. The level of emetic B. cereus in the positive samples ranged from 0.1 to 20 CFU/g of ice cream.

  7. Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream Containing Fermented Pepper Powder.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Su-Jung; Kim, Ji-Han; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, Woojoon; Kim, Soo-Ki; Seo, Han-Geuk; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the physical and sensory properties of ice cream containing fermented pepper powder. Three ice cream formulas were manufactured: 1, control; 2, supplemented with 0.1% fermented pepper powder; and 3, supplemented with 0.2% fermented pepper powder. Formulas 2 and 3 had significantly higher viscosity and lower overrun than formula 1 ( p <0.05). Additionally, ice creams supplemented with fermented pepper powder were harder and maintained their forms longer than the controls. 0.2% fermented pepper powder added ice cream had no pungency as much as that of control and overall sensory attribute was not significantly different from control. Therefore, ice cream containing fermented pepper powder maintained physical and sensory properties similar to the controls, and maintenance was better. It means fermented pepper powder ice cream can be utilized as the material of functional food (dessert).

  8. Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream Containing Fermented Pepper Powder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Seo, Han-Geuk

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the physical and sensory properties of ice cream containing fermented pepper powder. Three ice cream formulas were manufactured: 1, control; 2, supplemented with 0.1% fermented pepper powder; and 3, supplemented with 0.2% fermented pepper powder. Formulas 2 and 3 had significantly higher viscosity and lower overrun than formula 1 (p<0.05). Additionally, ice creams supplemented with fermented pepper powder were harder and maintained their forms longer than the controls. 0.2% fermented pepper powder added ice cream had no pungency as much as that of control and overall sensory attribute was not significantly different from control. Therefore, ice cream containing fermented pepper powder maintained physical and sensory properties similar to the controls, and maintenance was better. It means fermented pepper powder ice cream can be utilized as the material of functional food (dessert). PMID:28316469

  9. Frequent ice cream consumption is associated with reduced striatal response to receipt of an ice cream-based milkshake.

    PubMed

    Burger, Kyle S; Stice, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Weight gain leads to reduced reward-region responsivity to energy-dense food receipt, and consumption of an energy-dense diet compared with an isocaloric, low-energy-density diet leads to reduced dopamine receptors. Furthermore, phasic dopamine signaling to palatable food receipt decreases after repeated intake of that food, which collectively suggests that frequent intake of an energy-dense food may reduce striatal response to receipt of that food. We tested the hypothesis that frequent ice cream consumption would be associated with reduced activation in reward-related brain regions (eg, striatum) in response to receipt of an ice cream-based milkshake and examined the influence of adipose tissue and the specificity of this relation. Healthy-weight adolescents (n = 151) underwent fMRI during receipt of a milkshake and during receipt of a tasteless solution. Percentage body fat, reported food intake, and food craving and liking were assessed. Milkshake receipt robustly activated the striatal regions, yet frequent ice cream consumption was associated with a reduced response to milkshake receipt in these reward-related brain regions. Percentage body fat, total energy intake, percentage of energy from fat and sugar, and intake of other energy-dense foods were not related to the neural response to milkshake receipt. Our results provide novel evidence that frequent consumption of ice cream, independent of body fat, is related to a reduction in reward-region responsivity in humans, paralleling the tolerance observed in drug addiction. Data also imply that intake of a particular energy-dense food results in attenuated reward-region responsivity specifically to that food, which suggests that sensory aspects of eating and reward learning may drive the specificity.

  10. Skin decontamination cream for radiological contaminants: Formulation development and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Wadood; Kotta, Sabna; Rana, Sudha; Ansari, Shahid Husain; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased use of the radioactive materials in the field of research, medical, nuclear power plant, and industry has increased the risk of accidental exposure. Intentional use of the radioisotopes by terrorist organizations could cause exposure/contamination of a number of the population. In view of the accidental contamination, there is a need to develop self-usable decontamination formulations that could be used immediately after contamination is suspected. Materials and Methods: Present work was planned to optimize and develop self-usable radiation decontamination cream formulation. Various pharmaceutical parameters were characterized. 99mTc-sodium pertechnetate was used as radiocontaminant. Static counts were recorded before and after decontamination using single photon emission computed tomography. Results: Decontamination efficacy of the cream was found to be 42% ± 3% at 0-0.5 h after the exposure. Primary skin irritancy test was satisfactory as no erythema or edema was observed visually after 2 weeks of the formulation application. Conclusion: The decontamination studies proved the potential of EDTA to remove the radiological contaminants effectively. PMID:23799206

  11. An analysis of at-home demand for ice cream in the United States.

    PubMed

    Davis, C G; Blayney, D P; Yen, S T; Cooper, J

    2009-12-01

    Ice cream has been manufactured commercially in the United States since the middle of the 19th century. Ice cream and frozen dessert products comprise an important and relatively stable component of the United States dairy industry. As with many other dairy products, ice cream is differentiated in several dimensions. A censored translog demand system model was employed to analyze purchases of 3 ice cream product categories. The objective of this study was to determine the effect that changes in retail prices and consumer income have on at-home ice cream consumption. The analysis was based on Nielsen 2005 home scan retail data and used marital status, age, race, education, female employment status, and location in the estimations of aggregate demand elasticities. Results revealed that price and consumer income were the main determinants of demand for ice cream products. Calculated own-price elasticities indicated relatively elastic responses by consumers for all categories except for compensated bulk ice cream. All expenditure elasticities were inelastic except for bulk ice cream, and most of the ice cream categories were substitutes. Ongoing efforts to examine consumer demand for these products will assist milk producers, dairy processors and manufacturers, and dairy marketers as they face changing consumer responses to food and diet issues.

  12. Short communication: low-fat ice cream flavor not modified by high hydrostatic pressure treatment of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, J M; Lim, S-Y; Powers, J R; Ross, C F; Clark, S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine flavor binding of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)-treated whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a real food system. Fresh Washington State University (WSU, Pullman) WPC, produced by ultrafiltration of separated Cheddar cheese whey, was treated at 300 MPa for 15 min. Commercial WPC 35 powder was reconstituted to equivalent total solids as WSU WPC (8.23%). Six batches of low-fat ice cream were produced: A) HHP-treated WSU WPC without diacetyl; B) and E) WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl added before HHP; C) WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl added after HHP; D) untreated WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl; and F) untreated commercial WPC 35 with 2 mg/L of diacetyl. The solution of WSU WPC or commercial WPC 35 contributed 10% to the mix formulation. Ice creams were produced by using standard ice cream ingredients and processes. Low-fat ice creams containing HHP-treated WSU WPC and untreated WSU WPC were analyzed using headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography. Sensory evaluation by balanced reference duo-trio test was carried out using 50 untrained panelists in 2 sessions on 2 different days. The headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography analysis revealed that ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU WPC had almost 3 times the concentration of diacetyl compared with ice cream containing untreated WSU WPC at d 1 of storage. However, diacetyl was not detected in ice creams after 14 d of storage. Eighty percent of panelists were able to distinguish between low-fat ice creams containing untreated WSU WPC with and without diacetyl, confirming panelists' ability to detect diacetyl. However, panelists were not able to distinguish between low-fat ice creams containing untreated and HHP-treated WSU WPC with diacetyl. These results show that WPC diacetyl-binding properties were not enhanced by 300-MPa HHP treatment for 15 min, indicating that HHP may not be suitable for such applications. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy

  13. Effect of storage temperature on quality of light and full-fat ice cream.

    PubMed

    Buyck, J R; Baer, R J; Choi, J

    2011-05-01

    Ice cream quality is dependent on many factors including storage temperature. Currently, the industry standard for ice cream storage is -28.9 °C. Ice cream production costs may be decreased by increasing the temperature of the storage freezer, thus lowering energy costs. The first objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of 4 storage temperatures on the quality of commercial vanilla-flavored light and full-fat ice cream. Storage temperatures used were -45.6, -26.1, and -23.3 °C for the 3 treatments and -28.9 °C as the control or industry standard. Ice crystal sizes were analyzed by a cold-stage microscope and image analysis at 1, 19.5, and 39 wk of storage. Ice crystal size did not differ among the storage temperatures of light and full-fat ice creams at 19.5 or 39 wk. An increase in ice crystal size was observed between 19.5 and 39 wk for all storage temperatures except -45.6 °C. Coldness intensity, iciness, creaminess, and storage/stale off-flavor of the light and full-fat ice creams were evaluated at 39 wk of storage. Sensory evaluation indicated no difference among the different storage temperatures for light and full-fat ice creams. In a second study, light and full-fat ice creams were heat shocked by storing at -28.9 °C for 35 wk and then alternating between -23.3 and -12.2 °C every 24h for 4 wk. Heat-shocked ice creams were analyzed at 2 and 4 wk of storage for ice crystal size and were evaluated by the sensory panel. A difference in ice crystal size was observed for light and full-fat ice creams during heat-shock storage; however, sensory results indicated no differences. In summary, storage of light or full-fat vanilla-flavored ice creams at the temperatures used within this research did not affect quality of the ice creams. Therefore, ice cream manufacturers could conserve energy by increasing the temperature of freezers from -28.9 to -26.1 °C. Because freezers will typically fluctuate from the set temperature, usage of -26.1

  14. Effect of okra cell wall and polysaccharide on physical properties and stability of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Yuennan, Pilapa; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Goff, H Douglas

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizers are used in ice cream to increase mix viscosity, promote smooth texture, and improve frozen stability. In this study, the effects of varying concentrations (0.00%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.45%) of okra cell wall (OKW) and its corresponding water-soluble polysaccharide (OKP) on the physical characteristics of ice cream were determined. Ice cream mix viscosity was measured as well as overrun, meltdown, and consumer acceptability. Ice recrystallization was determined after ice cream was subjected to temperature cycling in the range of -10 to -20 °C for 10 cycles. Mix viscosity increased significantly as the concentrations of OKW and OKP increased. The addition of either OKW or OKP at 0.15% to 0.45% significantly improved the melting resistance of ice cream. OKW and OKP at 0.15% did not affect sensory perception score for flavor, texture, and overall liking of the ice cream. OKW and OKP (0.15%) reduced ice crystal growth to 107% and 87%, respectively, as compared to 132% for the control (0.00%). Thus, our results suggested the potential use of OKW and OKP at 0.15% as a stabilizer to control ice cream quality and retard ice recrystallization. OKP, however, at 0.15% exhibited greater effect on viscosity increase and on ice recrystallization inhibition than OKW. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. NMR signal analysis to attribute the components to the solid/liquid phases present in mixes and ice creams.

    PubMed

    Mariette, François; Lucas, Tiphaine

    2005-03-09

    The NMR relaxation signals from complex products such as ice cream are hard to interpret because of the multiexponential behavior of the relaxation signal and the difficulty of attributing the NMR relaxation components to specific molecule fractions. An attribution of the NMR relaxation parameters is proposed, however, based on an approach that combines quantitative analysis of the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times and the signal intensities with characterization of the ice cream components. We have been able to show that NMR can be used to describe the crystallized and liquid phases separately. The first component of the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation describes the behavior of the protons of the crystallized fat in the mix. The amount of fat crystals can then be estimated. In the case of ice cream, only the spin-lattice relaxation signal from the crystallized fraction is relevant. However, it enables the ice protons and the protons of the crystallized fat to be distinguished. The spin-lattice relaxation time can be used to describe the mobility of the protons in the different crystallized phases and also to quantify the amount of ice crystals and fat crystals in the ice cream. The NMR relaxation of the liquid phase of the mix has a biexponential behavior. A first component is attributable to the liquid fraction of the fat and to the sugars, while a second component is attributable to the aqueous phase. Overall, the study shows that despite the complexity of the NMR signal from ice cream, a number of relevant parameters can be extracted to study the influence of the formulation and of the process stages on the ice fraction, the crystallized fat fraction, and the liquid aqueous fraction.

  16. Effect of the fat globule sizes on the meltdown of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Koxholt, M M; Eisenmann, B; Hinrichs, J

    2001-01-01

    The meltdown of ice cream is influenced by its composition and additives and by fat globule size. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of fat globule size and fat agglomerate size on the meltdown stability of ice cream. Therefore, an ice cream mix (10% milk fat) was homogenized at pressures ranging from 0 to 30 MPa in single-stage, double-stage, and selective homogenization processes. The ice cream, produced on a continuous ice cream freezer, was characterized by an optimized meltdown test while, in addition, the fat globule sizes and the free fat content were determined in the mix and the molten ice cream. The meltdown was dependent on the fat agglomerate sizes in the unfrozen serum phase. Agglomerates smaller than a critical diameter led to significantly higher meltdown rates. Homogenization pressures of at least 10 MPa were sufficient to produce a stable ice cream. Furthermore, proof was provided that double-stage homogenization is not necessary for fat contents up to 10% and that selective homogenization is possible to produce stable ice creams. Based on these results a model was deduced describing the stabilizing mechanisms during the meltdown process.

  17. Pectin from Citrus Canning Wastewater as Potential Fat Replacer in Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jianle; Li, Junhui; Wei, Chaoyang; Ye, Xingqian; Shi, John; Chen, Shiguo

    2018-04-17

    Pectin had been recovered from canning wastewater produced by chemical treatment of segment membrane during preparation of canned citrus in our previous research. The purpose of this study was to characterize the extracted pectin from canning wastewater, and to evaluate its application as a fat alternative to replace fat in ice cream. The monosaccharide composition and rheological properties of the pectin were determined. The influences of fat reduction and pectin addition on the physicochemical, rheological and sensory properties of low-fat ice cream were determined. The rheological results showed that pectin solutions were typical pseudoplastic fluids. The addition of pectin in ice cream can cause an increase in viscosity, overrun, and hardness, and a decrease in meltdown of the ice cream. When 0.72% pectin ( w / w ) is incorporated into ice cream, a prototype product of ice cream with 45% lower fat content compared to the control was made. Results indicated that their qualities such as appearance, flavor, and taste were not significantly different. The low-fat ice cream had higher smoothness scores and lower mouth-coating scores. Hence, pectin extracted from citrus canning wastewater can be potentially used as fat replacer in ice cream, which benefits both the environment and the food industry.

  18. Enhancing the functional properties and nutritional quality of ice cream with processed amla (Indian gooseberry).

    PubMed

    Goraya, Rajpreet Kaur; Bajwa, Usha

    2015-12-01

    Amla (Indian gooseberry) and its processed products are rich source of vitamin C, phenols, dietary fibre and antioxidants. In contrast, ice cream is a poor source of these phytochemicals and antioxidants; therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to enhance the functional properties and nutritional quality of ice cream with the incorporation of processed amla. Ice cream was prepared using amla shreds, pulp, preserve and candy at 5 to 20 % and powder at 0.5 to 2.0 % levels in ice cream mix prior to freezing. Inclusion of amla products at augmented levels resulted in significant changes in physico-chemical properties and phytochemical content of ice cream. The total solids decreased on addition of shreds and pulp and increased with preserve, candy and powder in ice cream at increasing levels. The functional constituents i.e. fibre, total phenols, tannins, ascorbic acid and antioxidant activity increased with greater level of inclusion. Incorporation of processed amla raised the melting resistance of ice cream and decreased the overrun. The samples with 5 % shreds and pulp, 10 % preserve and candy and 0.5 % powder were found to have highest overall acceptability scores. Inclusion of amla in all the forms i.e. shreds, pulp, preserve, candy and powder enhanced the functional properties and nutritional value of ice cream.

  19. Sensory acceptance and survival of probiotic bacteria in ice cream produced with different overrun levels.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Juliana L; Cruz, Adriano G; Cadena, Rafael S; Freitas, Monica Q; Pinto, Uelinton M; Carvalho, Celio C; Faria, Jose A F; Bolini, Helena M A

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different overrun levels on the sensory acceptance and survival of probiotic bacteria in ice cream was investigated. Vanilla ice creams supplemented with Lactobacillus acidophilus were processed with overruns of 45%, 60%, and 90%. Viable probiotic bacterial counts and sensory acceptance were assessed. All the ice creams presented a minimum count of 6 log CFU/g at the end of 60 d of frozen storage. However, higher overrun levels negatively influenced cell viability, being reported a decrease of 2 log CFU/g for the 90% overrun treatment. In addition, it was not reported an influence about acceptability with respect to appearance, aroma, and taste of the ice creams (P > 0.05). Overall, the results suggest that lower overrun levels should be adopted during the manufacture of ice cream in order to maintain its probiotic status through the shelf life. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Magnesium enriched lactic acid bacteria as a carrier for probiotic ice cream production.

    PubMed

    Góral, Małgorzata; Kozłowicz, Katarzyna; Pankiewicz, Urszula; Góral, Dariusz

    2018-01-15

    The following strains of bacteria: Lactobacillus rhamnosus B 442, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 1937, and Lactococcus lactis JBB 500 were enriched with magnesium ions using Pulsed Electric Fields. The potentially probiotic strains were added to the mixture in the DVS process and applied for the production of ice cream which were then analyzed physicochemically and microbiologically. Results showed that addition of bacteria enriched with magnesium did not change chemical parameters of the ice cream and did not affect the freezing process, meltability, and hardness. No significant differences were noted in colour of the samples. The ice cream with addition of bacteria enriched with magnesium had higher adhesiveness. The results of viability determination showed that the total number of microorganisms in the ice cream was higher than in the starter cultures. Viability of the bacteria enriched with magnesium in the obtained ice cream was lower in comparison to the control samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. When ice cream was poisonous: adulteration, ptomaines, and bacteriology in the United States, 1850-1910.

    PubMed

    Geist, Edward

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing popularity of ice cream in the nineteenth century, the incidence of foodborne illness attributed to this dessert exploded. Struggling to understand the causes of the mysterious and sometimes lethal ailment called "ice cream poisoning," Victorian doctors and scientists advanced theories including toxic vanilla, galvanism in ice cream freezers, and extreme indigestion. In the late 1880s Victor C. Vaughan's argument that ice cream poisoning could be attributed to the ptomaine "tyrotoxicon" received widespread acceptance. To date historians have neglected the role played by the ptomaine theory of food poisoning in shaping the evolution of both scientific thinking and public health in the late nineteenth century. The case of ice cream poisoning illustrates the emergence, impact, and decline of the ptomaine idea.

  2. Evaluation of rice flour for use in vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Cody, T L; Olabi, A; Pettingell, A G; Tong, P S; Walker, J H

    2007-10-01

    The effects of varying concentrations (2, 4, and 6%) of 2 types of rice flours (RF 1 and RF 2) on the physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of vanilla ice cream samples were assessed at different fat levels (0, 4, and 10%) and storage conditions (control vs. heat-shocked). Fat and total solids were measured as well as hardness, viscosity, and melting rate. Eight trained panelists conducted descriptive sensory analyses of the samples at 0 and 7 wk. The 2% rice flour level and to a certain extent the 4% usage level generally improved texture while affecting to a lesser extent the flavor characteristics of the samples compared with the control. The RF 2 generally had a more significant effect than RF 1, especially on the texture attributes. Although the rice flour reduced the negative impact of temperature abuse on textural properties, the samples still deteriorated in textural properties (more icy) under temperature abuse conditions. In addition, rice starch does lower perceived sweetness and can have a "flour flavor" at high usage levels. The use of rice flour appears to be most advantageous for low fat ice cream samples.

  3. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The provisions...

  4. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The provisions...

  5. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The provisions...

  6. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The provisions...

  7. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The provisions...

  8. A national outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis infections from ice cream. The Investigation Team.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T W; Hedberg, C W; Slutsker, L; White, K E; Besser-Wiek, J M; Moen, M E; Feldman, J; Coleman, W W; Edmonson, L M; MacDonald, K L; Osterholm, M T

    1996-05-16

    In September 1994, the Minnesota Department of Health detected an increase in the number of reports of Salmonella enteritidis infections. After a case-control study implicated a nationally distributed brand of ice cream (Schwan's) in the outbreak, the product was recalled and further epidemiologic and microbiologic investigations were conducted. We defined an outbreak-associated case of S. enteritidis infection as one in which S. enteritidis was cultured from a person who became ill in September or October 1994. We established national surveillance and surveyed customers of the implicated manufacturer. The steps involved in the manufacture of ice cream associated with cases of S. enteritidis infection were compared with those of products not known to be associated with infection matched for the date of manufacture. Cultures for bacteria were obtained from ice cream samples, the ice cream plant, and tanker trailers that had transported the ice cream base (premix) to the plant. We estimate that S. enteritidis gastroenteritis developed in 224,000 persons in the United States after they ate Schwan's ice cream. The attack rate for consumers was 6.6 percent. Ice cream associated with infection contained a higher percentage of premix that had been transported by tanker that had carried nonpasteurized eggs immediately before (P = 0.02). S. enteritidis was isolated from 8 of 226 ice cream products (3 percent), but not from environmental samples obtained from the ice cream plant (n = 157) or tanker trailers (n = 204). This nationwide outbreak of salmonellosis was most likely the result of contamination of pasteurized ice cream premix during transport in tanker trailers that had previously carried nonpasteurized liquid eggs containing S. enteritidis. To prevent further outbreaks, food products not destined for repasteurization should be transported in dedicated containers.

  9. Rheological properties of reduced fat ice cream mix containing octenyl succinylated pearl millet starch.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Singh, Ashish K; Yadav, Deep N

    2017-05-01

    The octenyl succinyl anhydride (OSA) esterified pearl millet ( Pennisetum typhoides ) starch was evaluated as fat replacer in soft serve ice cream in comparison to other fat replacers viz. inulin, whey protein concentrate-70 and commercial starch. During temperature sweep test, the yield stress and flow behaviour index of un-pasteurized ice cream mixes increased as the temperature increased from 40 to 80 °C, while the consistency index decreased. Consistency index of aged ice cream mixes containing 2% fat replacer was higher as compared to mixes with 1% level. The aged ice cream mixes exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour as flow behaviour index values were less than one. Apparent viscosity (at 50 s -1 shear rate) of control as well as ice cream mix containing 1% OSA-esterified pearl millet starch samples was 417 and 415 mPas, respectively and did not differ significantly. The overrun of the ice cream (with 5 and 7.5% fat) containing 1 and 2% of above fat replacers ranged between 29.7 and 34.3% and was significantly lower than control (40.3%). The percent melted ice cream was also low for the ice creams containing 2% of above fat replacers at 5% fat content as compared to control. However, sensory acceptability and rheological characteristics of reduced fat ice creams containing 1.0 and 2.0% OSA-esterified pearl millet starch were at par with other fat replacers under the study. Thus, OSA-esterified pearl millet starch has potential to be used as fat replacer in reduced fat ice cream.

  10. Cold pleasure. Why we like ice drinks, ice-lollies and ice cream.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R; Du-Plessis, L; Dommels, Y; Wilkinson, J E

    2013-12-01

    This review discusses how the ingestion of cold foods and drinks may be perceived as pleasant because of the effects of cooling of the mouth. The case is made that man has originated from a tropical environment and that cold stimuli applied to the external skin may initiate thermal discomfort and reflexes such as shivering and vasoconstriction that defend body temperature, whereas cold stimuli applied to the mouth are perceived as pleasant because of pleasure associated with satiation of thirst and a refreshing effect. Cold water is preferred to warm water as a thirst quencher and cold products such as ice cream may also be perceived as pleasant because oral cooling satiates thirst. The case is made that cold stimuli may be perceived differently in the skin and oral mucosa, leading to different effects on temperature regulation, and perception of pleasure or displeasure, depending on the body temperature and the temperature of the external environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Colour and spreadability of Neem (Azadirachta Indica A. juss) ointment and cream formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiyyah, Azierah; Shamsul Anuar, Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Herbal plants are a major source of raw material for traditional medicines. Recently there has been an increase of interest to study the therapeutic potential of herbal plants as herbal care products. In this study, a preliminary study on the formulation of neem (Azadirachta Indica) ointment and cream have been conducted. The neem leaves were extracted and formulated into ointment and cream. The raw neem extract is added into the ointment and cream bases at four different concentrations (0% w/w, 0.5% w/w, 1% w/w and 2% w/w) and stored at three different storage temperatures (4°C, 25°C and 45°C). The semambu ointment and cream formulated were evaluated in terms of their colour and spreadability. It has been found that the extract content and storage temperature influence the colour and spreadability of the formulated neem ointment and cream.

  12. Studies on Physical and Sensory Properties of Premium Vanilla Ice Cream Distributed in Korean Market

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the difference in physical and sensory properties of various premium ice creams. The physical properties of the various ice creams were compared by manufacturing brand. The water contents of the samples differed, with BR having the highest value at 60.5%, followed by NT and CS at 57.8% and 56.9%, respectively. The higher the water content, the lower Brix and milk fat contents in all samples. The density of the samples showed almost similar values in all samples (p>0.05). The viscosity of each ice cream had no effect on the water content in any of the brands. Before melting of the ice cream, the total color difference was dependent on the lightness, especially in the vanilla ice cream, owing to the reflection of light on the surface of the ice crystals. The CS product melted the fastest. In the sensory test, CS obtained a significantly higher sweetness intensity score but a lower score for color intensity, probably due to the smaller difference in total color, by which consumers might consider the color of CS as less intense. From this study, the cold chain system for ice cream distribution might be important to decide the physical properties although the concentration of milk fat is key factor in premium ice cream. PMID:26761671

  13. Studies on Physical and Sensory Properties of Premium Vanilla Ice Cream Distributed in Korean Market.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Jung; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the difference in physical and sensory properties of various premium ice creams. The physical properties of the various ice creams were compared by manufacturing brand. The water contents of the samples differed, with BR having the highest value at 60.5%, followed by NT and CS at 57.8% and 56.9%, respectively. The higher the water content, the lower Brix and milk fat contents in all samples. The density of the samples showed almost similar values in all samples (p>0.05). The viscosity of each ice cream had no effect on the water content in any of the brands. Before melting of the ice cream, the total color difference was dependent on the lightness, especially in the vanilla ice cream, owing to the reflection of light on the surface of the ice crystals. The CS product melted the fastest. In the sensory test, CS obtained a significantly higher sweetness intensity score but a lower score for color intensity, probably due to the smaller difference in total color, by which consumers might consider the color of CS as less intense. From this study, the cold chain system for ice cream distribution might be important to decide the physical properties although the concentration of milk fat is key factor in premium ice cream.

  14. Antimicrobial Cream Formulated with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extract of Tuberose Flowers Arrests Growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Probir Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Paramita; Das, Satadal

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial potency of herbal extracts is well known. The review of patents and research articles revealed that several herbal extracts have been employed in the formulation of topical products such as creams, exclusive of the cream reported in the present study. 0ur previous study has established antimicrobial potency of supercritical carbon dioxide extracts of tuberose flowers, better known for its sweet fragrance. The present work focuses on formulating a topical antimicrobial herbal cream with methyl eugenol (principal antimicrobial compound) rich - supercritical carbon dioxide extract of tuberose flowers, having good combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies. Supercritical carbon dioxide parameters such as temperature, pressure and time were optimized using full factorial experimental design to obtain methyl eugenol-rich extracts. A cream was formulated using the extract having the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was assayed further for in vitro antimicrobial potency; physiochemical and sensory properties. Two commercial antimicrobial cream samples were used as reference samples in the study. The extract obtained at 40°C, 10 MPa, 135 min at 1 L min-1 flow rate of gaseous C02 showed the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was used for formulation of herbal creams. The cream formulated with 5% w/w of extract arrested growth of the common human skin pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and showed stable physiochemical properties and high sensory appeal for a year. The cream could be considered as a 'finished herbal product&' in compliance with the World Health 0rganization guidelines.

  15. Low-dose irradiation as a measure to improve microbial quality of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A; Warke, R; Kamat, M; Thomas, P

    2000-12-05

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of low-dose irradiation to improve the microbial safety of ice cream. Initially three different flavors (vanilla, strawberry and chocolate) of ice cream were exposed, at -72 degrees C, to doses of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 30 kGy to gamma-radiation. Irradiation at 1 kGy resulted in reduction of microbial population by one log cycle, thus meeting the requirement limits prescribed by Bureau of Indian Standards. Pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes 036, Yersinia enterocoliticta 5692 and Escherichia coli O157:H19, respectively, showed the D10 values 0.38, 0.15 and 0.2 kGy in ice cream at -72 degrees C suggesting the efficacy of low doses (1 kGy) in eliminating them. Sensory evaluation studies of ice cream irradiated at 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy by a 15 member panel demonstrated that doses higher than 2 kGy irradiation induced off-odour and an aftertaste was evident in vanilla ice cream. A radiation dose of 1 kGy was sufficient to eliminate the natural number of pathogens present in the ice cream. No statistically significant differences were observed in the sensory attributes of all the three flavours of ice cream either unirradiated or exposed to 1 kGy (P < 0.05).

  16. The potential of avocado paste (Persea americana) as fat substitute in non-dairy ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervina; Surjawan, I.; Abdillah, E.

    2018-01-01

    Consumer preferences towards plant-based food have shifted significantly due to sustainable and healthy reasons. Dairy products consist of high Saturated Fatty Acid (SFA) and overconsumption of SFA could lead to cardiovascular diseases. Avocado contains high levels of fat dominated by Monounsaturated Fatty Acid (MUFA) and phytosterol that have the potential as a plant-based fat source to substitute dairy-fat in ice cream. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical, rheological and sensorial properties of ice cream substituted with different concentrations of avocado paste ranging from 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% respectively against dairy fat to produce non-dairy fat ice cream. The psychochemical properties and total fat were determined. Sensorial quality and hedonic attributes of ice cream were investigated using 60 semi-trained panelists. There were significant differences (p<0.05) for overrun, melting rate, and viscosity of the ice cream substituted with avocado paste. The addition of avocado paste lead to the increase in viscosity and hardness of the ice cream significantly (p<0.05) while the sensorial properties for airiness and creaminess were perceived the same (p>0.05). The addition of 50% avocado paste was the most preferred among the panelists. Avocado could provide a potential substitution for dairy-fat in ice cream.

  17. Properties of ice-cream fortified with zinc and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Gheisari, Hamid R; Ahadi, Leila; Khezli, Sanaz; Dehnavi, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the possible effects of zinc on physicochemical properties of ice cream and the survival of Lactobacillus casei during a 90 days storage at -18°C was investigated. Samples were divided into four experimental groups as follows: control, zinc fortified ice cream, probiotic ice cream, zinc fortified and probiotic ice cream. The physicochemical, texture, organoleptic properties and the survival of probiotics, were investigated. Results showed that the addition of zinc did not affect the textural properties of ice creams. Viscosity and pH were independently decreased in all groups in the presence of zinc. A significant increase in the lipid oxidation rate especially in the zinc fortified group was also observed. The probiotic counts were maintained above the least advised quantities (106 cfu/g) which were subsequently reduced following the three months of storage. In the zinc fortified samples, the counts were higher compared to the other groups with no zinc addition. The addition of probiotics and zinc had no significant effect on the sensory properties of ice cream. As a final conclusion, the commercial production of zinc fortified ice cream is recommended.

  18. Functionality of kumquat (Fortunella margarita) in the production of fruity ice cream.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçı, Songül; Topdaş, Elif Feyza; Çakır, Yusuf; Kalın, Pınar

    2016-03-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of kumquat (Fortunella margarita) on the quality characteristics of ice cream. Kumquat paste (KP) was added to an ice cream mix at four concentrations, 0 (control), 5, 10 and 15% (w/w), for ice cream production. The increment of KP level caused an increase in acidity, vitamin C content, b* value and overrun value compared with the control ice cream. The apparent viscosity of samples decreased with the addition of KP at concentrations of 5 and 10% compared with the control. Results indicated that lyophilized water extract of KP (LKE) contained remarkable phenolic compounds. It was observed that LKE exhibited moderate in vitro antioxidant capacity. KP enhanced the color, flavor, vitamin C content and Mg and K contents of the ice cream. The addition of KP positively affected the sensory properties. KP may be used as a suitable source of natural color and flavor agent in ice cream production. KP enhanced the vitamin C content and Mg and K contents of ice cream and improved its sensory properties. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum in ice cream for use as a probiotic food.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, S; McMahon, D J

    1992-06-01

    Probiotic ice cream was made by fermenting a standard ice cream mix with Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum cultures and then freezing the mix in a batch freezer. Survival of the L. acidophilus and B. bifidum, as well as beta-galactosidase activity, was monitored during 17 wk of frozen storage at -29 degrees C. After freezing of the fermented mix, bacterial counts were 1.5 x 10(8) cfu/ml for L. acidophilus and 2.5 x 10(8) cfu/ml for B. bifidum. Seventeen weeks after freezing, these counts had decreased to 4 x 10(6) and 1 x 10(7) cfu/ml, respectively. During the same period, beta-galactosidase activity decreased from 1800 to 1300 units/ml. Probiotic ice cream was prepared at pH 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0 to determine consumer preferences and was compared with standard Utah State University "Aggie" ice cream. All samples were strawberry-flavored and were evaluated by 88 judges. The preferred pH of probiotic ice cream, based on overall acceptance, was pH 5.5. We demonstrated that probiotic ice cream is a suitable vehicle for delivering beneficial microorganisms such as L. acidophilus and B. bifidum to consumers. The bacteria can be grown to high numbers in ice cream mix and remain viable during frozen storage.

  20. Application of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA 5) strain in fruit-based ice cream

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, Suraji A; Fernando, Sirimali; Bamunuarachchi, Arthur; Arsekularatne, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed to apply a probiotic strain into fermented ice cream mix with suitable fruit bases to develop a value-added product with a substantial level of viable organisms for a sufficient shelf life. Pure direct vat strain culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA 5) in freeze-dried form was inoculated into a mixture of ice cream, frozen, and the number of viable organisms during frozen storage for a period of time was enumerated, using turbidity measurements with a spectrophotometer. An ice cream sample prepared without the probiotic culture was compared with the test sample for quality, by testing the basic quality parameters for ice cream. Results show a reduction in the over run of the probiotic ice cream compared to the nonprobiotic ice cream. Significantly high level (P < 0.05) of total solids (42%), proteins (16.5%), and titratable acidity (2.2%) was observed in the test sample compared to the nonprobiotic ice cream. Significantly low pH level in the probiotic sample may be due to the lactic acid produced by the probiotic culture. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in the fat content in the two types of ice cream was observed. A significantly low level (P < 0.05) of melting in the probiotic one may have resulted from less over run, than the nonprobiotic sample. Rapid reduction in the viable cells during frozen storage occurred at −18°C and gradual adaptation occurred over the first 4 weeks. At the 10th week, 1.0 × 107 numbers of viable organisms were present in 1 g of the probiotic ice cream. Results show the presence of a sufficient number of viable organisms in the product for the 10-week period, which would be beneficial to consumers. PMID:24804052

  1. Application of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA 5) strain in fruit-based ice cream.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Suraji A; Fernando, Sirimali; Bamunuarachchi, Arthur; Arsekularatne, Mariam

    2013-11-01

    A study was performed to apply a probiotic strain into fermented ice cream mix with suitable fruit bases to develop a value-added product with a substantial level of viable organisms for a sufficient shelf life. Pure direct vat strain culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA 5) in freeze-dried form was inoculated into a mixture of ice cream, frozen, and the number of viable organisms during frozen storage for a period of time was enumerated, using turbidity measurements with a spectrophotometer. An ice cream sample prepared without the probiotic culture was compared with the test sample for quality, by testing the basic quality parameters for ice cream. Results show a reduction in the over run of the probiotic ice cream compared to the nonprobiotic ice cream. Significantly high level (P < 0.05) of total solids (42%), proteins (16.5%), and titratable acidity (2.2%) was observed in the test sample compared to the nonprobiotic ice cream. Significantly low pH level in the probiotic sample may be due to the lactic acid produced by the probiotic culture. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in the fat content in the two types of ice cream was observed. A significantly low level (P < 0.05) of melting in the probiotic one may have resulted from less over run, than the nonprobiotic sample. Rapid reduction in the viable cells during frozen storage occurred at -18°C and gradual adaptation occurred over the first 4 weeks. At the 10th week, 1.0 × 10(7) numbers of viable organisms were present in 1 g of the probiotic ice cream. Results show the presence of a sufficient number of viable organisms in the product for the 10-week period, which would be beneficial to consumers.

  2. In vivo irritation study of Melastoma malabathricum cream formulation on ICR mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Rabiahtul Adarwiyah Mohd; Jemon, Khairunadwa; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md

    2016-11-01

    Melastoma malabathricum is a traditional herb that is used to treat wound on skin. It has also been proven to have antiviral activity against Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In this study, M. malabathricum cream formulation was developed by incorporating M. malabathricum aqueous extract into cream base. The safety and biocompatibility of the formulated cream was investigated by topically applying the cream onto the back of ICR mice skin. Treatment with M. malabathricum was found to accelerate wound contraction with less scar formation. The effect of M. malabathricum has prompted a possibility that M. malabathricum might contribute in enhancing the healing process of cutaneous lesion caused by HSV-1. The formulated cream did not cause any skin irritation or adverse effect to ICR mice when topically applied within seven days of exposure.

  3. A review of modern instrumental techniques for measurements of ice cream characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bahram-Parvar, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing demand of the food industries and research institutes to have means of measurement allowing the characterization of foods. Ice cream, as a complex food system, consists of a frozen matrix containing air bubbles, fat globules, ice crystals, and an unfrozen serum phase. Some deficiencies in conventional methods for testing this product encourage the use of alternative techniques such as rheometry, spectroscopy, X-ray, electro-analytical techniques, ultrasound, and laser. Despite the development of novel instrumental applications in food science, use of some of them in ice cream testing is few, but has shown promising results. Developing the novel methods should increase our understanding of characteristics of ice cream and may allow online testing of the product. This review article discusses the potential of destructive and non-destructive methodologies in determining the quality and characteristics of ice cream and similar products. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Twelve-Hour Duration Testing of Cream Formulations of Three Repellents Against Amblyomma americanum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    methylpiperidinyl-3-cyclohexene - 1-carboxamide (SS220) and 10% and 20% 1- methyl -propyl-2-(hydroxyethyl)-1-piperi- dinecarboxylate (Bayrepel) cream formulations...cyclohexene-1-carboxamide , 1- methyl -propyl-2-(hydroxyethyl)-1-piperidinecarboxylate , N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide , Picaridin . Correspondence: Dr...methylpiperidinyl-3-cyclohexene- 1-carboxamide (SS220) and 10% and 20% 1- methyl -propyl-2-(hydroxyethyl)-1-piperidinecarboxylate (Bayrepel) cream

  5. [Microbiological quality of " ice, ice cream. sorbet" sold on the streets of Phnom Penh; April 1996-April 1997].

    PubMed

    Kruy, S L; Soares, J L; Ping, S; Sainte-Marie, F F

    2001-12-01

    A study of the microbiological quality of ice lice creams/sorbets sold on the streets of Phnom Penh city was conducted from April 1996 to April 1997. Socio-demographic and environmental characteristics with two ice/ice creams samples were collected from vendors selected in the city. A total of 105 vendors and 210 ice/ice creams samples were randomly selected for the study period. Ice/ice cream vendors in the streets of Phnom Penh were adults (mean age: 28 years old) with a male predominance (86.5%). Mean educational level of vendors was 5 years with no training in mass catering. Most ice creams and sorbets (81.7%) were made using traditional methods. Microbiological analysis performed in the laboratory of Pasteur Institute of Cambodia indicated the poor bacteriological quality of the samples. The proportions of samples classified unsafe according to microbiological criteria were 83.3% for total bacterial count at 30 degrees C, 70% for total coliforms, 30% for faecal coliforms, 12.2% for Staphylococcus aureus and 1.9% for presence of Salmonella spp. These bacterial results suggest that many other food products sold in the streets may be similarly poor. Safety measures should be undertaken to avoid potential threats. Regulation of the street food sector should be part of a larger strategy for enhanced food safety and environmental quality in the city.

  6. Sensorial and fatty acid profile of ice cream manufactured with milk of crossbred cows fed palm oil and coconut fat.

    PubMed

    Corradini, S A S; Madrona, G S; Visentainer, J V; Bonafe, E G; Carvalho, C B; Roche, P M; Prado, I N

    2014-11-01

    This work was carried out to study the nutritional quality of milk of cows fed palm oil (PAL) or coconut fat (COC), and the use of that milk as raw material for ice cream production. Three treatments were tested with 23 healthy cows: control (CON), PAL, and COC. The milk was collected at d 21 and 36 of the experimental diet. Proximate composition (moisture, ash, fat, protein, and carbohydrates) and fatty acid composition were evaluated on milk and ice cream, and sensorial analysis, color (lightness, green/red, and blue/yellow), overrun, and texture were evaluated on the ice cream. Fatty acids present in milk and ice cream were determined by gas chromatography. Sensory analysis results showed that the ice cream acceptability index was above 70%. No difference was observed for proximate composition in milk and ice cream. Chromatographic analysis showed an increase in saturated fatty acid concentration in CON and lower levels in PAL; polyunsaturated fatty acid concentration was higher in PAL and lower in CON, in milk and ice cream; monounsaturated fatty acid concentration in milk was higher in PAL and lower in CON but no difference was found in ice cream. Comparing n-3 content in milk and ice cream, we observed that PAL had higher levels than CON and COC. The results indicate that it is feasible to add sources of fat to the animal feed for fatty acid composition modulation of milk and ice cream. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The application of the hazard analysis and control points (HACCP) in an ice cream production plant.

    PubMed

    El-Tawila, M M

    1998-01-01

    The HACCP system is applied in the present study as a preventive food safety approach to control some hazards appearing in one of the ice cream production plants in Egypt. The problem comprised the presence of bacteriological and some chemical contamination in most of the company products. Before applying the HACCP system, the samples examination showed high total mesophilic plat count in 50% of the samples and high coliform count in all samples compared to the level recommended in the Egyptian standards. The highest staphylococcal count (negative for coagulase test) obtained was that of chocolate (1.3 x 10(4) CFU/g) followed by mango ice cream (l.0 x 10(4) CFU/g). Faecal coliform was only positive in mango ice cream. Additionally, the levels of lead, iron and copper have been determined. Copper was higher than the recommended level in all samples and ranged between 0.46 ppm in pistachio ice cream and 2.48 ppm in chocolate ice cream. Most of the CCPs in the ice cream production were mainly due to improper handling and practices throughout the processing steps and also related to the lack of food hygiene knowledge of the workers. The application of HACCP system has successfully reduced the bacteriological hazards in all samples. After applying the corrective actions, the highest total aerobic plate count (8.0 x 10(4)) was that of Swiss chocolate ice cream which corresponds to 50% of the recommended level by the Egyptian standards. Coliform count was less than 10 in all samples except mango ice cream (43 MPN). A significant decrease in staphylococcal count, faecal coliform and trace metal contamination was also recorded in all samples.

  8. Enrichment of functional properties of ice cream with pomegranate by-products.

    PubMed

    Çam, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Fatma; Aslan, Duygu; Dinç, Merve

    2013-10-01

    Pomegranate peel rich in phenolics, and pomegranate seed which contain a conjugated fatty acid namely punicic acid in lipid fraction remain as by-products after processing the fruit into juice. Ice cream is poor in polyunsaturated fatty acids and phenolics, therefore, this study was conducted to improve the functional properties of ice cream by incorporating pomegranate peel phenolics and pomegranate seed oil. Incorporation of the peel phenolics into ice cream at the levels of 0.1% and 0.4% (w/w) resulted in significant changes in the pH, total acidity, and color of the samples. The most prominent outcomes of phenolic incorporation were sharp improvements in antioxidant and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic content of ice creams. Replacement of pomegranate seed oil by milk fat at the levels of 2.0% and 4.0% (w/w) increased the conjugated fatty acid content. However, perception of oxidized flavor increased with the additional seed oil. When one considers the functional and nutritional improvements in the enrichment of the ice cream together with overall acceptability results of the sensory analysis, then it follows from this study that ice creams enriched with pomegranate peel phenolics up to 0.4% (w/w) and pomegranate seed oil up to 2.0% (w/w) could be introduced to markets as functional ice cream. Enrichment of ice creams with pomegranate by-products might provide consumers health benefits with striking functional properties of punicalagins in pomegranate peel, and punicic acid in pomegranate seed oil. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. High hydrostatic pressure modification of whey protein concentrate for improved body and texture of lowfat ice cream.

    PubMed

    Lim, S-Y; Swanson, B G; Ross, C F; Clark, S

    2008-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), particularly at 300 MPa for 15 min, can enhance foaming properties of whey protein concentrate (WPC). The purpose of this research was to determine the practical impact of HHP-treated WPC on the body and texture of lowfat ice cream. Washington State University (WSU)-WPC was produced by ultrafiltration of fresh separated whey received from the WSU creamery. Commercial whey protein concentrate 35 (WPC 35) powder was reconstituted to equivalent total solids as WSU-WPC (8.23%). Three batches of lowfat ice cream mix were produced to contain WSU-WPC without HHP, WSU-WPC with HHP (300 MPa for 15 min), and WPC 35 without HHP. All lowfat ice cream mixes contained 10% WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Overrun and foam stability of ice cream mixes were determined after whipping for 15 min. Ice creams were produced using standard ice cream ingredients and processing. The hardness of ice creams was determined with a TA-XT2 texture analyzer. Sensory evaluation by balanced reference duo-trio test was carried out using 52 volunteers. The ice cream mix containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited the greatest overrun and foam stability, confirming the effect of HHP on foaming properties of whey proteins in a complex system. Ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited significantly greater hardness than ice cream produced with untreated WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Panelists were able to distinguish between ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC and ice cream containing untreated WPC 35. Improvements of overrun and foam stability were observed when HHP-treated whey protein was used at a concentration as low as 10% (wt/wt) in ice cream mix. The impact of HHP on the functional properties of whey proteins was more pronounced than the impact on sensory properties.

  10. Oxidation and textural characteristics of butter and ice cream with modified fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Duncan, S E; O'Keefe, S F; Sumner, S S; Herbein, J H

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate oxidation and firmness of butter and ice cream made with modified milkfat containing enhanced amounts of linoleic acid or oleic acid. The influence of the fatty acid profile of the HO milkfat relating to product properties as compared with the influence the fatty acid profile of the HL milkfat was the main focus of the research. Altering the degree of unsaturation in milkfat may affect melting characteristics and oxidation rates, leading to quality issues in dairy products. Three milkfat compositions (high-oleic, high-linoleic, and control) were obtained by modifying the diets of Holstein cows. Ice cream and butter were processed from milkfat obtained from cows in each dietary group. Butter and ice cream samples were analyzed to determine fatty acid profile and firmness. High-oleic milkfat resulted in a softer butter. Solid fat index of high-oleic and high-linoleic milkfat was lower than the control. Control ice cream mix had higher viscosity compared with high-oleic and high-linoleic, but firmness of all ice creams was similar when measured between -17 and -13 degrees C. Nutritional and textural properties of butter and ice cream can be improved by modifying the diets of cows.

  11. Evaluation of the bacteriological quality of ice cream sold at San Jose, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Windrantz, P; Arias, M L

    2000-09-01

    The presence of total and fecal coliforms, E. coli, Listeria sp and Salmonella sp. was evaluated in 65 samples of both commercial and homemade ice cream. 37.1% of homemade ice cream and 20% of commercial ice cream did not fulfill the international standard for total coliforms. At the same time 82.9% of home made samples and 56.7% of commercial ones presented fecal coliforms. E. coli was found in 51.4% of home made samples and 26.7% of commercial ones. Sixteen Listeria sp. isolates were obtained, 50% corresponded to Listeria monocytogenes and 50% to L. innocua. The overall presence of L. monocytogenes in ice cream samples was of 12.3% and it was isolated in all cases, from homemade ice cream samples. Salmonella was not isolated from the samples analyzed. Although the results obtained show an important improvement in the quality of ice cream, compared with a previous work done also in Costa Rica, further efforts shall be done, in order to offer safe products to consumers.

  12. Perception of melting and flavor release of ice cream containing different types and contents of fat.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, L; Linna, M; Tuorila, H; Dijksterhuis, G

    2003-04-01

    Temporal effects of dairy and vegetable fats (0 to 18%) on perception of strawberry flavor release and melting of ice cream were studied using the time intensity sensory method. Also, aroma and flavor attributes of the ice cream samples were evaluated. Only slight effects of fat on the rate of flavor release and flavor intensity were perceived. A slightly faster flavor release from the vegetable fat compared with dairy fat was noticed. Polydextrose and maltodextrin as bodying agents in the fat-free ice cream significantly increased flavor release and melting rate of the ice cream. Increasing fat content slightly retarded melting of ice cream in the mouth. No significant effect of the fat quality on perceived melting was noticed. Significant differences in aroma and flavor attributes of the fat-free and other samples were perceived. Intensity and sharpness of the strawberry aroma and flavor were greater in fat-free samples and they were perceived as nontypical. Fattiness and creaminess were highly correlated. Maltodextrin and polydextrose increased perceived fattiness and creaminess of fat-free ice cream.

  13. Effect of Porcine Collagen Peptides on the Rheological and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The effects of low molecular-weight collagen peptides derived from porcine skin were investigated on the physicochemical and sensorial properties of chocolate ice cream. Collagen peptides less than 1 kDa in weight were obtained by sub-critical water hydrolysis at a temperature of 300℃ and a pressure of 80 bar. Ice cream was then prepared with gelatin powder and porcine skin hydrolysate (PSH) stabilizers mixed at seven different ratios (for a total of 0.5 wt%). There was no significant difference in color between the resulting ice cream mixtures. The increase in apparent viscosity and shear thinning of the ice cream was more moderate with PSH added than with gelatin. Moreover, the samples containing more than 0.2 wt% PSH had enhanced melting resistance, while the mixture with 0.2 wt% PSH had the lowest storage modulus at -20℃ and the second highest loss modulus at 10℃, indicating that this combination of hydrocolloids leads to relatively softer and creamier chocolate ice cream. Among the seven types of ice creams tested, the mixture with 0.2 wt% PSH and 0.3 wt% gelatin had the best physicochemical properties. However, in sensory evaluations, the samples containing PSH had lower chocolate flavor scores and higher off-flavor scores than the sample prepared with just 0.5 wt% gelatin due to the strong off-flavor of PSH. PMID:26761823

  14. Effect of Porcine Collagen Peptides on the Rheological and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Li, Liying; Kim, Jae-Hyeong; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Min, Sang-Gi; Chun, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The effects of low molecular-weight collagen peptides derived from porcine skin were investigated on the physicochemical and sensorial properties of chocolate ice cream. Collagen peptides less than 1 kDa in weight were obtained by sub-critical water hydrolysis at a temperature of 300℃ and a pressure of 80 bar. Ice cream was then prepared with gelatin powder and porcine skin hydrolysate (PSH) stabilizers mixed at seven different ratios (for a total of 0.5 wt%). There was no significant difference in color between the resulting ice cream mixtures. The increase in apparent viscosity and shear thinning of the ice cream was more moderate with PSH added than with gelatin. Moreover, the samples containing more than 0.2 wt% PSH had enhanced melting resistance, while the mixture with 0.2 wt% PSH had the lowest storage modulus at -20℃ and the second highest loss modulus at 10℃, indicating that this combination of hydrocolloids leads to relatively softer and creamier chocolate ice cream. Among the seven types of ice creams tested, the mixture with 0.2 wt% PSH and 0.3 wt% gelatin had the best physicochemical properties. However, in sensory evaluations, the samples containing PSH had lower chocolate flavor scores and higher off-flavor scores than the sample prepared with just 0.5 wt% gelatin due to the strong off-flavor of PSH.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning outbreak associated with the consumption of ice-cream.

    PubMed

    Fetsch, A; Contzen, M; Hartelt, K; Kleiser, A; Maassen, S; Rau, J; Kraushaar, B; Layer, F; Strommenger, B

    2014-09-18

    In April 2013, a food poisoning outbreak caused by staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in ice-cream occurred in Freiburg, Germany, among the 31 participants of a christening party. Of the 13 cases, seven were hospitalized or obtained ambulatory treatment. Different types of ice-cream, which was freshly produced at the hotel where the party took place, were found to contain SE and high amounts of coagulase positive staphylococci. Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from ice-cream and human cases were of the same spa-type (t127), harboured the sea gene and displayed identical phenotypic resistance-, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy- (FT-IR) and microarray-profiles. Despite the strong microbiological and epidemiological evidence of ice-cream being the incriminated food vehicle of the outbreak, a common source of S. aureus from the ice-cream could not be deduced. As none of the employees carried the outbreak strain, either the equipment used for the production of the ice-cream or a contaminated ingredient is the most likely introduction source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of gum tragacanth on the rheological properties of salep based ice cream mix.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Abdullah; Cengiz, Alime; Kahyaoglu, Talip

    2016-06-05

    The influence of concentration (0-0.5%, w/w) of gum tragacanth (GT) on thixotropy, dynamic, and creep-recovery rheological properties of ice cream mixes prepared with milk or water based were investigated. These properties were used to evaluate the viscoelastic behavior and internal structure of ice cream network. The textural properties of ice cream were also evaluated. Thixotropy values of samples were reduced by increasing GT concentration. The dynamic and creep-recovery analyses exhibited that GT addition increased both ice cream elastic and viscous behaviors. The increasing of Burger's model parameters with GT concentration indicated higher resistance network to the stress and more elastic behavior of samples. The applying of Cox-Merz rule is possible by using shift factor (α). GT also led to an increase in Young's modulus and the stickiness of ice creams. The obtained results highlighted the possible application of GT as a valuable member to promote structural properties of ice cream. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical properties and sensory quality of ice cream fortified with fish protein.

    PubMed

    Shaviklo, Gholam Reza; Thorkelsson, Gudjon; Sveinsdottir, Kolbrun; Rafipour, Fereidon

    2011-05-01

    Fish protein powder is a functional ingredient that can be used for enhancing the nutritional value of food products. In this study the effect of fortification with different levels of fish protein powder (FP) on chemical properties and sensory quality of Persian ice cream with 0, 30 and 50 g kg(-1) FP during storage at - 18 °C for 4 months was investigated. Ice creams fortified with 50 and 30 g kg(-1) FP had significantly higher protein and solid-non-fat content than ice cream with 0% FP or 83, 69 and 51 g kg(-1) protein and 215, 204 and 181 g kg(-1) solid non-fat, respectively. All products had the same levels of fat, lactose, acidity and pH. They had similar sensory quality after production except for colour, but sensory properties of fortified samples changed significantly after 2 months of storage. Colour faded, cohesiveness decreased, sandiness/coarseness increased, sweetness decreased and fish flavour and off-odour increased. The control ice cream scored highest for additives odour and flavour. Development of ice cream fortified with fish protein powder could be an effective way to enhance nutritional and functional value of ice cream. But studies on storage stability, consumers' acceptance and attitudes are recommended if companies are planning to do so. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Effect of milk fat, cocoa butter, and whey protein fat replacers on the sensory properties of lowfat and nonfat chocolate ice cream.

    PubMed

    Prindiville, E A; Marshall, R T; Heymann, H

    2000-10-01

    Lowfat and nonfat chocolate ice creams were made with 2.5% of milk fat, cocoa butter, or one of two whey protein-based fat replacers, Dairy Lo or Simplesse. Polydextrose was added as required so that all formulations contained the same amount of total solids. Ice cream was stored at a control temperature of-30 degrees C. Hardness, viscosity, and melting rate were measured by physical methods. Trained panelists conducted descriptive sensory analyses of the samples at 0, 6, and 12 wk. Attribute ratings were analyzed by analysis o variance with least significant difference mean separation and orthogonal contrasting. Data were also analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance with canonical variate analysis. Consumer acceptance (n = 50) did not differ among the fresh ice creams (wk 0). Ice cream containing milk fat had less intense cocoa flavor and was more resistant to textural changes over time compared with the other ice creams. Simplesse was more similar to milk fat than was Dairy Lo in its effect on brown color, cocoa flavor, cocoa character, and textural stability but was less similar in terms of thickness and mouthcoating.

  19. Response surface optimization of low-fat ice cream production by using resistant starch and maltodextrin as a fat replacing agent.

    PubMed

    Azari-Anpar, Mojtaba; Khomeiri, Morteza; Ghafouri-Oskuei, Hamed; Aghajani, Narjes

    2017-04-01

    In this research, maltodextrin (0, 1 and 2% w/w) and resistant starch (0, 1 and 2% w/w) were used in the formulation of low-fat ice cream (4% fat) and their effects on the physicochemical and sensory properties were investigated. The optimum levels of maltodextrin and resistant starch were determined by response surface methodology. Increment of maltodextrin and resistant starch increased acidity, viscosity, melting rate, time of dripping and overrun but decreased melting rate of ice cream. Results showed that the incorporation of maltodextrin and resistant starch at 0 and 2% w/w respectively, resulted into ice cream with suitable viscosity, melting rate, first dripping time, overrun and acidity.

  20. Cleaning frequency and the microbial load in ice-cream.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sonya; Toma, Ramses B; Reiboldt, Wendy; Newcomer, Chris; Calicchia, Melissa

    2002-07-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of a 62 h cleaning frequency in the manufacturing of ice-cream. Various product and product contact surfaces were sampled progressively throughout the time period between cleaning cycles, and analyzed for microbial growth. The coliform and standard plate counts (SPC) of these samples did not vary significantly over time after 0, 24, 48, or 62 h from Cleaning in Place (CiP). Data for product contact surfaces were significant for the SPC representing sample locations. Some of the variables in cleaning practices had significant influence on microbial loads. An increase in the number of flavors manufactured caused a decrease in SPC within the 24 h interval, but by the 48 h interval the SPC increased. More washouts within the first 24 h interval were favorable, as indicated by decreased SPC. The more frequently the liquefier was sanitized within the 62 h interval, the lower the SPC. This study indicates that food safety was not compromised and safety practices were effectively implemented throughout the process.

  1. Regenerator-based thermoacoustic refrigerator for ice cream storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poese, Matthew E.; Smith, Robert W. M.; Garrett, Steven L.

    2003-10-01

    A regenerator-based chiller has been built in the ``bellows bounce'' style [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 15 (2002)] to replace the vapor compression system in an ice cream sales cabinet. It utilizes a 6-in.-diam metal bellows to form a compliant cavity that contains the dynamic pressure oscillation (>50 kPa). The stiffness of the gas trapped in the bellows is resonated against the mass of the bellows-cap and the mass of a moving-magnet linear motor which is capable of high (>85%) electro-acoustic efficiency. A second resonator, operated well below its natural frequency, uses the gas stiffness of a 1-l volume nested within the bellows and the inertia of an ordinary loudspeaker cone to create the pressure difference across the regenerator that drives gas flow that is in-phase with pressure. The mass of the cone can be adjusted to vary the multiplication factor that is typically 5%-10% greater than the dynamic pressure within the bellows. The loudspeaker cone suffers none of the hydrodynamic losses associated with an acoustic inertance and eliminates problems with dc gas flow in the energy feedback path. The cold heat exchanger forms one surface of the pressure vessel permitting direct contact with any thermal load. [Work supported by Ben and Jerry's Homemade.

  2. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the ice... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy...

  3. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the ice... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy...

  4. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the ice... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy...

  5. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the ice... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy...

  6. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the ice... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy...

  7. Effect of Frozen Storage Temperature on the Quality of Premium Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Geun-Pyo; Davaatseren, Munkhtugs; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The market sales of premium ice cream have paralleled the growth in consumer desire for rich flavor and taste. Storage temperature is a major consideration in preserving the quality attributes of premium ice cream products for both the manufacturer and retailers during prolonged storage. We investigated the effect of storage temperature (-18℃, -30℃, -50℃, and -70℃) and storage times, up to 52 wk, on the quality attributes of premium ice cream. Quality attributes tested included ice crystal size, air cell size, melting resistance, and color. Ice crystal size increased from 40.3 μm to 100.1 μm after 52 wk of storage at -18℃. When ice cream samples were stored at -50℃ or -70℃, ice crystal size slightly increased from 40.3 μm to 57-58 μm. Initial air cell size increased from 37.1 μm to 87.7 μm after storage at -18℃ for 52 wk. However, for storage temperatures of -50℃ and -70℃, air cell size increased only slightly from 37.1 μm to 46-47 μm. Low storage temperature (-50℃ and -70℃) resulted in better melt resistance and minimized color changes in comparison to high temperature storage (-18℃ and -30℃). In our study, quality changes in premium ice cream were gradually minimized according to decrease in storage temperature up to-50℃. No significant beneficial effect of -70℃ storage was found in quality attributes. In the scope of our experiment, we recommend a storage temperature of -50℃ to preserve the quality attributes of premium ice cream.

  8. Effect of Frozen Storage Temperature on the Quality of Premium Ice Cream

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hee; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The market sales of premium ice cream have paralleled the growth in consumer desire for rich flavor and taste. Storage temperature is a major consideration in preserving the quality attributes of premium ice cream products for both the manufacturer and retailers during prolonged storage. We investigated the effect of storage temperature (−18℃, −30℃, −50℃, and −70℃) and storage times, up to 52 wk, on the quality attributes of premium ice cream. Quality attributes tested included ice crystal size, air cell size, melting resistance, and color. Ice crystal size increased from 40.3 μm to 100.1 μm after 52 wk of storage at −18℃. When ice cream samples were stored at −50℃ or −70℃, ice crystal size slightly increased from 40.3 μm to 57-58 μm. Initial air cell size increased from 37.1 μm to 87.7 μm after storage at −18℃ for 52 wk. However, for storage temperatures of −50℃ and −70℃, air cell size increased only slightly from 37.1 μm to 46-47 μm. Low storage temperature (−50℃ and −70℃) resulted in better melt resistance and minimized color changes in comparison to high temperature storage (−18℃ and −30℃). In our study, quality changes in premium ice cream were gradually minimized according to decrease in storage temperature up to−50℃. No significant beneficial effect of −70℃ storage was found in quality attributes. In the scope of our experiment, we recommend a storage temperature of −50℃ to preserve the quality attributes of premium ice cream. PMID:26877639

  9. Structural, compositional, and sensorial properties of United States commercial ice cream products.

    PubMed

    Warren, Maya M; Hartel, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Commercial vanilla ice cream products from the United States (full fat, low fat, and nonfat) were analyzed for their structural, behavioral (i.e., melt rate and drip-through), compositional, and sensorial attributes. Mean size distributions of ice crystals and air cells, drip-through rates, percent partially coalesced fat, percent overrun and total fat, and density were determined. A trained panel carried out sensory analyses in order to determine correlations between ice cream microstructure attributes and sensory properties using a Spectrum(TM) descriptive analysis. Analyses included melt rate, breakdown, size of ice particulates (iciness), denseness, greasiness, and overall creaminess. To determine relationships and interactions, principle component analysis and multivariate pairwise correlation were performed within and between the instrumental and sensorial data. Greasiness and creaminess negatively correlated with drip-through rate and creaminess correlated with percent total fat and percent fat destabilization. Percent fat did not determine the melt rate on a sensorial level. However, drip-through rate at ambient temperatures was predicted by total fat content of the samples. Based on sensory analysis, high-fat products were noted to be creamier than low and nonfat products. Iciness did not correlate with mean ice crystal size and drip-through rate did not predict sensory melt rate. Furthermore, on a sensorial level, greasiness positively correlated with total percent fat destabilization and mean air cell size positively correlated with denseness. These results indicate that commercial ice cream products vary widely in composition, structure, behavior, and sensory properties. There is a wide range of commercial ice creams in the United States market, ranging from full fat to nonfat. In this research we showed that these ice creams vary greatly in their microstructures, behaviors (the melt/drip-though, collapse, and/or stand up properties of ice cream

  10. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  11. Process optimization and oxidative stability of omega-3 ice cream fortified with flaxseed oil microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Avinash; Sharma, Vivek; Goyal, Ankit; Singh, A K; Arora, Sumit

    2018-05-01

    Microencapsulated flaxseed oil powder (MFOP) was supplemented for the fortification of α-linolenic acid (ALA, ω-3 fatty acid) in ice cream. Processing parameters were optimized in terms of the stage of homogenization of ice-cream mix, level of fortification (3, 4 and 5%) and flavors (vanilla, butter scotch and strawberry). Data revealed that free fatty acids increased significantly during first 15 days in all the samples and then remained constant. Peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid value first increased up to 30 and 45 days, respectively; and then decreased followed by a gradual increase up to 120 days. Fatty acids profile showed 18.74-21.38% decrease in ALA content in fortified ice creams after 120 days. A serving of 100 g of freshly prepared functional ice cream was able to meet ~ 45% of the RDA (1.4 g ALA/day), which reduced to 35.37-36.56% on the end of storage i.e. 120 days. Overall, it can be concluded that MFOP was oxidative stable in ice-cream throughout the storage, which could be fortified successfully at 4% (w/w) level.

  12. Reward sensitivity predicts ice cream-related attentional bias assessed by inattentional blindness.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Tao, Qian; Fang, Ya; Cheng, Chen; Hao, Yangyang; Qi, Jianjun; Li, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-06-01

    The cognitive mechanism underlying the association between individual differences in reward sensitivity and food craving is unknown. The present study explored the mechanism by examining the role of reward sensitivity in attentional bias toward ice cream cues. Forty-nine college students who displayed high level of ice cream craving (HICs) and 46 who displayed low level of ice cream craving (LICs) performed an inattentional blindness (IB) task which was used to assess attentional bias for ice cream. In addition, reward sensitivity and coping style were assessed by the Behavior Inhibition System/Behavior Activation System Scales and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire. Results showed significant higher identification rate of the critical stimulus in the HICs than LICs, suggesting greater attentional bias for ice cream in the HICs. It was indicated that attentional bias for food cues persisted even under inattentional condition. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between the attentional bias and reward sensitivity after controlling for coping style, and reward sensitivity predicted attentional bias for food cues. The mediation analyses showed that attentional bias mediated the relationship between reward sensitivity and food craving. Those findings suggest that the association between individual differences in reward sensitivity and food craving may be attributed to attentional bias for food-related cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacture of ice cream with improved microbiological safety by using gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Ham, Jun-Sang; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Jo, Cheorun; Shin, Myung-Gon

    2009-07-01

    Children suffered from leukemia want to eat delicious dishes, such as cake and ice cream. However, it is very difficult to serve these foods to immune-compromised patients without application of any adequate sanitary measures. This study was conducted to evaluate application of irradiation to frozen ready-to-eat food, ice cream. Three ice creams with flavors of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry were manufactured and gamma irradiated at the absorbed doses of 1, 3, and 5 kGy at -70 °C. Total microflora and coliform bacteria were determined, and Listeria spp., Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. were also tested by the use of API 20E Kit. Aerobic bacteria, yeast/mold and coliforms were contaminated in the levels of 2.3 to 3.3, 2.3 to 2.7 and 1.7 to 2.4 log CFU/g, respectively. In samples irradiated at 5 kGy, the growth of any microorganisms could not be observed. Listeria spp. and E. coli were detected at non-irradiated samples, but S. spp. was not existed. D10 values of L. ivanovii and E. coli were 0.75 and 0.31 kGy, respectively, in ice cream. From these results, irradiation technology can reduce the risk by the food-borne pathogens of ice cream.

  14. Determination of CME 3D parameters based on a new full ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2017-08-01

    In space weather forecast, it is important to determine three-dimensional properties of CMEs. Using 29 limb CMEs, we examine which cone type is close to a CME three-dimensional structure. We find that most CMEs have near full ice-cream cone structure which is a symmetrical circular cone combined with a hemisphere. We develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model). In addition, we derive CME mean density (ρmean=Mtotal/Vcone) based on the full ice-cream cone structure. For several limb events, we determine CME mass by applying the Solarsoft procedure (e.g., cme_mass.pro) to SOHO/LASCO C3 images. CME volumes are estimated from the full ice-cream cone structure. From the power-law relationship between CME mean density and its height, we estimate CME mean densities at 20 solar radii (Rs). We will compare the CME densities at 20 Rs with their corresponding ICME densities.

  15. Synbiotic Amazonian palm berry (açai, Euterpe oleracea Mart.) ice cream improved Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG survival to simulated gastrointestinal stress.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mayra Garcia Maia; Ooki, Gabriela Namur; Vieira, Antônio Diogo Silva; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2017-02-22

    The effect of açai pulp ice cream and of its supplementation with inulin (I), whey protein concentrate (WC), and/or whey protein isolate (WI) on the viability and resistance to simulated gastrointestinal stress of the probiotic Lactobacillus (Lb.) rhamnosus GG strain throughout storage at -18 °C for up to 112 days was evaluated and morphological changes during stress were monitored. Lb. rhamnosus GG viability was stable in all formulations for up to 112 days of storage, preserving populations around 9 log CFU g -1 . Compared to the fresh culture, Lb. rhamnosus GG showed higher survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions when incorporated into açai ice cream, indicating that the presence of the food matrix contributed to the microorganism survival. A reduction of at least 5 log cycles of Lb. rhamnosus GG was observed in all formulations after the gastrointestinal simulation in all storage periods assessed. The addition of I, WC, and/or WI did not show any significant effect on the probiotic survival under simulated gastrointestinal stress (p < 0.05). Compared to the fresh culture, fewer morphological changes were observed when the probiotic was added to ice cream. Thus, the açai pulp ice cream was shown to be a suitable matrix for Lb. rhamnosus GG, improving its survival under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

  16. [Tracing to the source of staphylococcus aureus isolates from ice cream].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xu, Dan-Ge; Fang, Ye-Zhen; Gong, Pu; Zhu, Min; Bao, Fang-Zhen

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the contamination of Staphylococcus aureus isolates in ice cream by phenotypic typing and molecular typing. The Staphylococcus aureus isolates were separated from ice cream, filler, cutter, salves and material. The separated isolates were characterized by drug-resistance, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEA-E), SE (A-E, G-J) genes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types. Two Staphylococcus aureus isolates were separated, one from ice cream, another from cutter. Their characteristics of drug-resistance, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEA-E), SE (A-E,G-J) genes and PFGE type were the same. The two Staphylococcus aureus isolates were the same clone. The contaminated Staphylococcus aureus isolates could be traced to the contaminated cutters.

  17. Evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes survival in ice cream mixes flavored with herbal tea using Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ismet; Golec, Adem; Karaman, Safa; Sagdic, Osman; Kayacier, Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the effects of the incorporation of some herbal teas at different concentrations into the ice cream mix on the population of Listeria monocytogenes were studied using Taguchi method. The ice cream mix samples flavored with herbal teas were prepared using green tea and sage at different concentrations. Afterward, fresh culture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated into the samples and the L. monocytogenes was counted at different storage periods. Taguchi method was used for experimental design and analysis. In addition, some physicochemical properties of samples were examined. Results suggested that there was some effect, although little, on the population of L. monocytogenes when herbal tea was incorporated into the ice cream mix. Additionally, the use of herbal tea caused a decrease in the pH values of the samples and significant changes in the color values.

  18. PLC based automatic control of pasteurize mix in ice cream production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xudong; Liang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the automatic control device of pasteurized mix in the ice cream production process.We design a scheme of control system using FBD program language and develop the programmer in the STEP 7-Micro/WIN software, check for any bugs before downloading into PLC .These developed devices will able to provide flexibility and accuracy to control the step of pasteurized mix. The operator just Input the duration and temperature of pasteurized mix through control panel. All the steps will finish automatically without any intervention in a preprogrammed sequence stored in programmable logic controller (PLC). With the help of this equipment we not only can control the quality of ice cream for various conditions, but also can simplify the production process. This control system is inexpensive and can be widely used in ice cream production industry.

  19. Effects of locust bean gum and mono- and diglyceride concentrations on particle size and melting rates of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Cropper, S L; Kocaoglu-Vurma, N A; Tharp, B W; Harper, W J

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how varying concentrations of the stabilizer, locust bean gum (LBG), and different levels of the emulsifier, mono- and diglycerides (MDGs), influenced fat aggregation and melting characteristics of ice cream. Ice creams were made containing MDGs and LBG singly and in combination at concentrations ranging between 0.0% to 0.14% and 0.0% to 0.23%, respectively. Particle size analysis, conducted on both the mixes and ice cream, and melting rate testing on the ice cream were used to determine fat aggregation. No significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between particle size values for experimental ice cream mixes. However, higher concentrations of both LBG and MDG in the ice creams resulted in values that were larger than the control. This study also found an increase in the particle size values when MDG levels were held constant and LBG amounts were increased in the ice cream. Ice creams with higher concentrations of MDG and LBG together had the greatest difference in the rate of melting than the control. The melting rate decreased with increasing LBG concentrations at constant MDG levels. These results illustrated that fat aggregation may not only be affected by emulsifiers, but that stabilizers may play a role in contributing to the destabilization of fat globules. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. The potential application of rice bran wax oleogel to replace solid fat and enhance unsaturated fat content in ice cream.

    PubMed

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-09-01

    The development of structure in ice cream, characterized by its smooth texture and resistance to collapse during melting, depends, in part, on the presence of solid fat during the whipping and freezing steps. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential application of 10% rice bran wax (RBW) oleogel, comprised 90% high-oleic sunflower oil and 10% RBW, to replace solid fat in ice cream. A commercial blend of 80% saturated mono- and diglycerides and 20% polysorbate 80 was used as the emulsifier. Standard ice cream measurements, cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to evaluate the formation of structure in ice cream. RBW oleogel produced higher levels of overrun when compared to a liquid oil ice cream sample, creating a lighter sample with good texture and appearance. However, those results were not associated with higher meltdown resistance. Microscopy revealed larger aggregation of RBW oleogel fat droplets at the air cell interface and distortion of the shape of air cells and fat droplets. Although the RBW oleogel did not develop sufficient structure in ice cream to maintain shape during meltdown when a mono- and diglycerides and polysorbate 80 blend was used as the emulsifier, micro- and ultrastructure investigations suggested that RBW oleogel did induce formation of a fat globule network in ice cream, suggesting that further optimization could lead to an alternative to saturated fat sources for ice cream applications. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Formulation and Evaluation of Antibacterial Creams and Gels Containing Metal Ions for Topical Application

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei X.; Alexander, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skin infections occur commonly and often present therapeutic challenges to practitioners due to the growing concerns regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal strains. The antimicrobial properties of zinc sulfate and copper sulfate are well known and have been investigated for many years. However, the synergistic activity between these two metal ions as antimicrobial ingredients has not been evaluated in topical formulations. Objective. The aims of the present study were to (1) formulate topical creams and gels containing zinc and copper alone or in combination and (2) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of these metal ions in the formulations. Method. Formulation of the gels and creams was followed by evaluating their organoleptic characteristics, physicochemical properties, and in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Results. Zinc sulfate and copper sulfate had a strong synergistic antibacterial activity in the creams and gels. The minimum effective concentration was found to be 3 w/w% for both active ingredients against the two tested microorganisms. Conclusions. This study evaluated and confirmed the synergistic in vitro antibacterial effect of copper sulfate and zinc sulfate in a cream and two gels. PMID:27885352

  2. Lactose digestion from flavored and frozen yogurts, ice milk, and ice cream by lactase-deficient persons.

    PubMed

    Martini, M C; Smith, D E; Savaiano, D A

    1987-10-01

    Lactose digestion from and tolerance to flavored and frozen yogurts, ice cream, and ice milk were evaluated (20 g lactose/meal) in lactase-deficient subjects by use of breath hydrogen techniques. Unflavored yogurt caused significantly less hydrogen production than milk (37 vs 185 delta ppm X h, n = 9). Flavored yogurt was intermediate (77 delta ppm X h). Subjects were free of symptoms after consuming flavored and unflavored yogurts. Of seven commercial yogurts tested, all contained significant levels of microbial beta-galactosidase (beta-gal). In addition, eight subjects were fed meals of milk, ice milk, ice cream, and frozen yogurts with and without cultures containing high levels of beta-gal. Peak hydrogen excretion after consumption of frozen yogurt with high beta-gal was less than one-half of that observed after the other five test meals and intolerance symptoms were absent. Tolerance to frozen yogurt, produced under usual commercial procedures, was found to be similar to that of ice milk and ice cream.

  3. Reduced fat and sugar vanilla ice creams: sensory profiling and external preference mapping.

    PubMed

    Cadena, R S; Cruz, A G; Faria, J A F; Bolini, H M A

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to map sensory attributes of vanilla ice cream with reduced fat and sugar, and (2) to determine drivers of liking by applying external preference mapping and reveal the relationship between descriptive attributes and hedonic judgments using the partial least squares method. Descriptive sensory profiles (n=11) and consumer test (n=117) of 6 samples of vanilla ice cream (3 traditional and 3 with reduced fat and sugar) were determined. The attributes brightness and sweet aftertaste for sample and creaminess (appearance and texture) and sweet aroma contributed positively to the acceptance of ice cream samples. The attributes aeration, powdered milk aroma and flavor, and white chocolate aroma and flavor contributed positively to the acceptance of the ice creams. The attributes hydrogenated fat aroma and flavor were responsible for the lower acceptance of samples. The reduction in fat and sugar did not necessarily cause a decrease in acceptance. The most important factors were selection of the appropriate sweetener system and the use of good quality raw material. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Does Hot Water Freeze Faster Than Cold? Or Why Mpemba's Ice Cream Is a Discrepant Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Bill

    1993-01-01

    A discrepant event is a happening contrary to our current beliefs. Discrepant events are said to be useful in clarifying concepts. This is one of the interesting features of current theories of constructivism. The story of Mpemba's ice cream is quite well known, but it is the educational aspects of the experiment that are of interest in this…

  5. Enrichment of probiotic ice cream with different dietary fibers: Structural characteristics and culture viability.

    PubMed

    Akalın, A S; Kesenkas, H; Dinkci, N; Unal, G; Ozer, E; Kınık, O

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 5 dietary fibers (apple, orange, oat, bamboo, and wheat) on the physicochemical, rheological, and textural characteristics; sensory properties; and culture viability of probiotic ice cream stored at -18°C for 180 d. The presence of orange and apple fibers increased the titratable acidity, decreased the lightness (color) value of the ice creams, and enhanced the red and yellow coloration. Compared with the control sample, the consistency indices and apparent viscosities of the experimental samples increased with the addition of all dietary fibers except oat fiber. The highest viscosity was obtained in the sample fortified with apple fiber, whereas the ice cream containing orange fiber showed the highest hardness after d 60 of storage. The addition of orange and apple fibers significantly increased melting resistance; however, panelists did not generally like these samples in terms of taste-flavor. All ice creams had viable counts of Lactobacillus acidophilus of ≥7 log cfu/g during storage except the samples with orange and bamboo fiber. Bifidobacterium lactis counts were also found to be >6 log cfu/g in those samples until d 150 of storage. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Summertime, and the Choosin' Ain't Easy: An Ice Cream Counting Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Utilizes the problem of determining the number of different ice cream cones and cups that can be made from a choice of 31 flavors to investigate the concepts of combinations and permutations. Provides a set of six related problems with their answers. (MDH)

  7. Effects of Green Banana Flour on the Physical, Chemical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Yangılar, Filiz

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, possible effects of the addition of banana flour at different mass fractions (1 and 2%) are investigated on physical (overrun, viscosity), chemical (dry matter, fat and ash content, acidity, pH, water and oil holding capacity and colour), mineral content (Ca, K, Na, P, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni) and sensory properties of ice cream. Fibre--rich banana pieces were found to contain 66.8 g per 100 g of total dietary fibre, 58.6 g per 100 g of which were insoluble dietary fibre, while 8.2 g per 100 g were soluble dietary fibre. It can be concluded from these results that banana is a valuable dietary fibre source which can be used in food production. Flour obtained from green banana pulp and peel was found to have significant (p<0.05) effect on the chemical composition of ice creams. Sulphur content increased while calcium content decreased in ice cream depending on banana flour content. Sensory results indicated that ice cream sample containing 2% of green banana pulp flour received the highest score from panellists.

  8. Effects of Green Banana Flour on the Physical, Chemical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the present study, possible effects of the addition of banana flour at different mass fractions (1 and 2%) are investigated on physical (overrun, viscosity), chemical (dry matter, fat and ash content, acidity, pH, water and oil holding capacity and colour), mineral content (Ca, K, Na, P, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni) and sensory properties of ice cream. Fibre--rich banana pieces were found to contain 66.8 g per 100 g of total dietary fibre, 58.6 g per 100 g of which were insoluble dietary fibre, while 8.2 g per 100 g were soluble dietary fibre. It can be concluded from these results that banana is a valuable dietary fibre source which can be used in food production. Flour obtained from green banana pulp and peel was found to have significant (p<0.05) effect on the chemical composition of ice creams. Sulphur content increased while calcium content decreased in ice cream depending on banana flour content. Sensory results indicated that ice cream sample containing 2% of green banana pulp flour received the highest score from panellists. PMID:27904363

  9. Development of antioxidative effect in ice cream with Kalakai (Stenochlaena palustris) water extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadhiwaluyo, Kristania; Rahmawati, Della; Gunawan Puteri, Maria D. P. T.

    2017-11-01

    Kalakai (Stenochlaena. palustris) extract was used to develop the ice cream. The antioxidant activity of the extracts and its stability over process and storage were evaluated through various antioxidant assay including DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteau assay and aluminum chloride colorimetric method. In general, the leaves of S. palustris had a significantly higher antioxidant activity (p < 0.05) than the branches and approximately, 0.10 mg/ml S. palustris leaves extract was able to develop antioxidant activity (IC50) with suitable iron content (< 0.3 mg/l) that could be used to produce ice cream without affecting the sensory properties of the ice cream. In addition, the high phenolic and flavonoid content also suggest the more compounds that were capable to act as an antioxidant. The result of the stability test also suggested the ability low temperature storage and processing in maintaining the stability of the antioxidant activity of the extract (p > 0.05) over processing and storage. Thus, this strengthen the feasibility of S. palustris to be used as a potential functional food ingredient that is low cost and easily accessible with an antioxidant activity and safe iron content that is beneficial to increase the quality of food produced including in ice cream.

  10. Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Rietberg, K; Lloyd, J; Melius, B; Wyman, P; Treadwell, R; Olson, G; Kang, M-G; Duchin, J S

    2016-10-01

    Two cases of hospital-acquired listeriosis were linked to a commercially produced, pasteurized ice cream mix. Manufacturers should implement safety measures from the Food Safety Modernization Act to minimize the risk of Listeria contamination. Dietary guidelines for persons at high risk of listeriosis may need revision to recognize the potential risk from pasteurized products.

  11. Modification of fatty acid profile of cow milk by calcium salts of fatty acids and its use in ice cream.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Abdullah, Muhammad; Hussain, Imtiaz; Inayat, Saima

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of calcium salts of fatty acids (CSFA) on fatty acid profile of milk of "Sahiwal" cows and suitability of milk with modified fatty acids in the formulation of ice cream. Fatty acid profile of cow milk was modified by feeding CSFA to eighteen randomly stratified "Sahiwal" cows of first and early lactation divided into three groups. CSFA were offered at two different levels i.e. T1 (150 g per cow per day) T2 (300 g per cow per day) both treatments were compared with a control (T0) without any addition of calcium salts of fatty acids. Iso caloric and iso nitrogenous feeds were given to both experimental groups and control. Concentrations of short chain fatty acids in T0, T1 and T2 were 9.85 ± 0.48a, 8.8 ± 0.24b and 7.1 ± 0.37c %, respectively and the concentrations of C18:1 and C18:2 increased (P < 0.05) from 27.6 ± 1.32b % to 31.7 ± 1.68a % and 2.15 ± 0.09b % to 2.79 ± 0.05a %, respectively, at T2 level. Incorporation of milk fat of T1 and T2 (modified fatty acids profile) in ice cream did not have any adverse effect on pH, acidity and compositional attributes of ice cream. Viscosity of T1 was 67.94 ± 3.77a as compared to (T0) control 68.75 ± 2.46a (CP). Firmness of experimental samples and control were almost similar (P > 0.05) overall acceptability score of T2 was 7.1 ± 0.28b out of 9 (total score) which was more than 78 ± 2.92 %. It was concluded that CSFA may be successfully incorporated up to T2 level (300 g per cow per day) into the feed of "Sahiwal" cows to produce milk with higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and it may be used in the formulation of ice cream with acceptable sensory characteristics and increased health benefits.

  12. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  13. Effects of calcium-fortified ice cream on markers of bone health.

    PubMed

    Ferrar, L; van der Hee, R M; Berry, M; Watson, C; Miret, S; Wilkinson, J; Bradburn, M; Eastell, R

    2011-10-01

    Premenopausal women with low calcium intakes consumed calcium-fortified ice cream daily for 28 days. Bone markers, NTX, CTX and PTH decreased significantly by 7 days, with some evidence of a calcium dose-dependent effect. Bone marker responses were observed within 1 h of consuming ice cream. Body weight remained constant over 28 days. Dietary calcium is important for lifelong bone health. Milk is a good source of bioavailable calcium, but consumption has declined among young adults. The aims were to determine whether calcium-fortified ice cream, a palatable source of calcium, produces significant, sustainable changes in bone turnover markers and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in premenopausal women with calcium intake below recommended UK levels. Eighty women, ages 20-39 years (calcium intake <750 mg/day) were randomised to consume lower saturated fat/sugar ice cream containing 96, 244, 459 or 676 mg calcium daily for 28 days. Urinary NTX/Cr, serum CTX, PINP, 1,25D and PTH were measured (baseline, days 1, 7 and 28). Acute changes in CTX and PTH were measured over 5 h (n = 29 women). There were significant mean decreases by 7 days in NTX/Cr, CTX, PTH and 1,25D and increases in PINP (one sample t tests), with a significant dose-dependent effect on CTX analysis of covariance. Only CTX remained suppressed at 28 days. Serum CTX and PTH decreased within 1 h. Body weight did not change significantly between baseline and 28 days. Daily consumption of calcium-fortified ice cream by premenopausal women may significantly reduce levels of the bone resorption marker serum CTX, without stimulating weight gain. The ice cream could be incorporated into the diet to replace low-calcium snacks and thus help individuals with habitually low calcium intakes to meet recommended intakes. The 244 mg calcium preparation would provide more than a quarter of the UK daily recommended nutrient intake for premenopausal women.

  14. Effects of milk fat, cocoa butter, or selected fat replacers on flavor volatiles of chocolate ice cream.

    PubMed

    Welty, W M; Marshall, R T; Grün, I U; Ellersieck, M R

    2001-01-01

    Selected volatile compounds of chocolate ice creams containing 0.6, 4.0, 6.0, or 9.0% milk fat or containing 2.5% milk fat, cocoa butter, or one of three fat replacers (Simplesse, Dairy Lo, or Oatrim) were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using headspace solid-phase microextraction. The headspace concentration of most of the selected volatile compounds increased with decreasing milk fat concentration. Fat replacers generally increased the concentration of volatiles found in the headspace compared with milk fat or cocoa butter. Few differences in flavor volatiles were found between the ice cream containing milk fat and the ice cream containing cocoa butter. Among the selected volatiles, the concentration of 2,5-dimethyl-3(2-methyl propyl) pyrazine was the most highly correlated (negatively) with the concentration of milk fat, and it best discriminated among ice creams containing milk fat, cocoa butter, or one of the fat replacers.

  15. Some quality attributes of low fat ice cream substituted with hulless barley flour and barley ß-glucan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haleem, Amal M H; Awad, R A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate some quality attributes of low fat ice cream (LFIC) substituted with hulless barley flour (HBF) and barley ß-glucan (BBG). The methodology included in this paper is based on adding HBF (1, 2, 3 and 4 %) as a partial substitution of skim milk powder (SMP) and BBG (0.40 %) as a complete substitution of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC). All mixes and resultant ice cream samples were evaluated for their physicochemical properties as well as the sensory quality attributes.The results indicated that substitution of SMP with HBF significantly increased total solids (TS), fat and crude fiber, while crude protein and ash significantly decreased in ice cream mixes. BBG exhibited the same manner of control. Specific gravity was gradually increased with adding HBFand BBG in the mixes and therefore the overrun percent was significantly changed in the resultant ice cream. Adding HBF in ice cream formula led to significant decrease in acidity with higher freezing point and the product showed higher ability to meltdown. BBG treatment showed the same trend of control. Values of flow time and viscosity significantly increased with increasing HBF in the ice cream mixes, but these values significantly decreased in BBG mix. The time required to freeze ice cream mixes was decreased with increasing the ratio of HBF but, increased in BBG treatment. The substitution of SMP with 1 and 2 % HBF significantly (P ≤ 0.05) enhanced sensory attributes of ice cream samples. While, BBG treatment achieved mild score and acceptability.

  16. Development of a fermented ice-cream as influenced by in situ exopolysaccharide production: Rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory characterization.

    PubMed

    Dertli, Enes; Toker, Omer S; Durak, M Zeki; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Tatlısu, Nevruz Berna; Sagdic, Osman; Cankurt, Hasan

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to investigate the role of in situ exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by EPS(+)Streptococcus thermophilus strains on physicochemical, rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory properties of ice cream in order to develop a fermented and consequently functional ice-cream in which no stabilizers would be required in ice-cream production. For this purpose, the effect of EPS producing strains (control, strain 1, strain 2 and mixture) and fermentation conditions (fermentation temperature; 32, 37 and 42 °C and time; 2, 3 and 4h) on pH, S. thermophilus count, EPS amount, consistency coefficient (K), and apparent viscosity (η50) were investigated and optimized using single and multiple response optimization tools of response surface methodology. Optimization analyses indicated that functional ice-cream should be fermented with strain 1 or strain mixture at 40-42 °C for 4h in order to produce the most viscous ice-cream with maximum EPS content. Optimization analysis results also revealed that strain specific conditions appeared to be more effective factor on in situ EPS production amount, K and η50 parameters than did fermentation temperature and time. The rheological analysis of the ice-cream produced by EPS(+) strains revealed its high viscous and pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid behavior, which demonstrates potential of S. thermophilus EPS as thickening and gelling agent in dairy industry. FTIR analysis proved that the EPS in ice-cream corresponded to a typical EPS, as revealed by the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups with additional α-glycosidic linkages. SEM studies demonstrated that it had a web-like compact microstructure with pores in ice-cream, revealing its application possibility in dairy products to improve their rheological properties. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Natural antioxidant ice cream acutely reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Sanguigni, Valerio; Manco, Melania; Sorge, Roberto; Gnessi, Lucio; Francomano, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of several diseases. Polyphenols have been shown to be beneficial against ROS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a natural antioxidant ice cream on oxidative stress, vascular function, and physical performance. In this controlled, single-blind, crossover study, 14 healthy individuals were randomized to consume 100 g of either antioxidant ice cream containing dark cocoa powder and hazelnut and green tea extracts or milk chocolate ice cream (control ice cream). Participants were studied at baseline and 2 h after ingesting ice cream. Serum polyphenols, antioxidant status (ferric-reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]), nitric oxide (NOx) bioavailability, markers of oxidative stress (determination of reactive oxygen metabolites [d-ROMs] and hydrogen peroxide [H 2 O 2 ]), endothelium function (flow-mediated dilation [FMD] and reactive hyperemia index [RHI]), and exercise tolerance (stress test) were assessed, and the double product was measured. Serum polyphenols (P < 0.001), NOx (P < 0.001), FRAP (P < 0.005), FMD (P < 0.001), and RHI (P < 0.05) increased significantly, oxidative stress decreased (d-Roms, P < 0.001; H 2 O 2 , P < 0.001), and the double product (P < 0.001) was improved only after antioxidant ice cream ingestion. No changes were found after control ice cream ingestion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a natural ice cream rich in polyphenols acutely improved vascular function and physical performance in healthy individuals through a reduction in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the effects of different prebiotic dietary oligosaccharides in sheep milk ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, C F; Silva, H L A; Vieira, A H; Neto, R P C; Cappato, L P; Coimbra, P T; Moraes, J; Andrade, M M; Calado, V M A; Granato, D; Freitas, M Q; Tavares, M I B; Raices, R S L; Silva, M C; Cruz, A G

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different prebiotic dietary oligosaccharides (inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligossacaride, short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide, resistant starch, corn dietary oligosaccharide and polydextrose) in non-fat sheep milk ice cream processing through physical parameters, water mobility and thermal analysis. Overall, the fat replacement by dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides significantly decreased the melting time, melting temperature and the fraction and relaxation time for fat and bound water (T 22 ) while increased the white intensity and glass transition temperature. The replacement of sheep milk fat by prebiotics in sheep milk ice cream constitutes an interesting option to enhance nutritional aspects and develop a functional food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  20. A pilot study on the effects of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Kesavan, Rajesh; Kavitha, K.V.; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in developing countries. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety of using a polyherbal formulation in healing diabetic foot ulcers in comparison with standard silver sulphadiazine cream among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 40 (M:F=29:14) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. They were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each; Group 1 was treated with polyherbal formulation and group 2 with silver sulphadiazine cream. All the patients were followed up for a period of 5 months. The baseline ulcer size was noted and photograph of the wound was taken at the baseline and at each follow up visit. Number of days taken for healing of the wound was recorded. Results: The mean age of patients, duration of diabetes and HbA1c% were similar in both the study groups. The mean length and width of the ulcers was also similar in both the groups at baseline visit. There was a significant decrease in the size of the wound (length and width) in both the study groups (P<0.001). The mean time taken for the healing of the ulcer was around 43 days in both groups. Interpretation & conclusions: Diabetic wound cream prepared by using polyherbal formulation was found to be effective as well as safe in healing diabetic foot ulcers like the standard silver sulphadiazine cream. PMID:21911968

  1. Effects of inulin and oligofructose on the rheological characteristics and probiotic culture survival in low-fat probiotic ice cream.

    PubMed

    Akalin, A S; Erişir, D

    2008-05-01

    The effects of supplementation of oligofructose or inulin on the rheological characteristics and survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in low-fat ice cream stored at -18 degrees C for 90 d were studied. Addition of oligofructose or inulin to ice cream mix significantly increased apparent viscosity and overrun and developed the melting properties in ice cream during storage (P < 0.05). However, the highest increase in firmness, the lowest change in melting properties, and the longest 1st dripping time were obtained in probiotic ice cream containing inulin (P < 0.05). Some textural properties have also improved especially by the end of storage. Freezing process caused a significant decrease in the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 (P < 0.05). Oligofructose significantly improved the viability of L. acidophilus La-5 and B. animalis Bb-12 in ice cream mix (P < 0.05). Although the viable numbers for both bacteria decreased throughout the storage, the minimum level of 10(6) CFU/g was maintained for B. animalis Bb-12 in only ice cream with oligofructose during storage.

  2. Determination of enterotoxigenic and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ice cream.

    PubMed

    Gücükoğlu, Ali; Çadirci, Özgür; Terzi, Göknur; Kevenk, T Onur; Alişarli, Mustafa

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ice creams. After culture-based identification of isolates, the presence of 16S rRNA and nuc was confirmed by mPCR. S. aureus was identified in 18 of 56 fruity (32.1%), 4 of 32 vanilla (12.5%), and 1 of 12 chocolate (8.3%) ice creams. S. aureus was identified as 38 isolates in 23 ice cream samples by culture-based techniques, but only 35 isolates were confirmed by PCR as S. aureus. To determine the enterotoxigenic properties of PCR-confirmed S. aureus isolates, a toxin detection kit was used (SET RPLA®). Of the 12 enterotoxigenic S. aureus isolates, 9 SEB (75%), 1 SED (8.3%), 1 SEB+SED (8.3%), and 1 SEA+SEB+SED (8.3%) expressing isolates were found. The presence of enterotoxin genes (sea, seb, sed) was identified in 13 (37.1%) out of 35 isolates by the mPCR technique. In the ice cream isolates, the sea, seb, and sed genes were detected: 1 sea (7.6%), 9 seb (69.2%), 1 sed (7.6%), 1 seb+sed (7.6%), and 1 sea+seb+sed (7.6%), respectively. The sec gene was not detected in any of these isolates. One of the 35 (2.8%) S. aureus strain was mecA positive. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim, E-mail: nho0512@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.kr

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO )/Sun–Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft ( SOHO or one of STEREO A and B ) and limbmore » ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO ). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO /LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).« less

  4. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-04-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or one of STEREO A and B) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (I.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  5. Effect of calcium chloride addition on ice cream structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, F F; Resende, J V; Abreu, L R; Goff, H D

    2008-06-01

    The influence of calcium fortification by the addition of calcium chloride on quality parameters of ice cream based on physical properties was investigated, as was the effect of kappa-carrageenan at modifying the effects of this calcium fortification. Four ice cream mixes of conventional composition, with added kappa-carrageenan (0 or 0.025%) and added calcium chloride (0 or 4.4 g L(-1) = 40 mM of added Ca(2+)), were prepared. Modulated temperature-differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of calcium chloride on the nucleation temperature, enthalpy of melting, and freezing point depression. The protein composition of 15.4% (wt/wt) reconstituted skim milk powder solutions with or without 4.4 g L(-1) added CaCl(2) and in the supernatant after ultracentrifugation was determined. Fat particle size distributions in ice cream were characterized by light scattering. Ice crystal sizes before and after temperature cycling were determined by cold-stage light microscopy. The results demonstrated that the addition of calcium chloride led to a substantial increase in ice crystal sizes and in fat partial coalescence, which were exacerbated by the addition of kappa-carrageenan. These results can be explained by the interaction between Ca(2+) ions and casein micelles, rather than any effects on freezing point depression. The calcium ions led to a more compact micelle, less serum beta-casein, and high fat destabilization, all of which would be expected to reduce macromolecular structure and volume occupancy in the unfrozen phase, which led to increased rates of ice recrystallization.

  6. Detection of microbial concentration in ice-cream using the impedance technique.

    PubMed

    Grossi, M; Lanzoni, M; Pompei, A; Lazzarini, R; Matteuzzi, D; Riccò, B

    2008-06-15

    The detection of microbial concentration, essential for safe and high quality food products, is traditionally made with the plate count technique, that is reliable, but also slow and not easily realized in the automatic form, as required for direct use in industrial machines. To this purpose, the method based on impedance measurements represents an attractive alternative since it can produce results in about 10h, instead of the 24-48h needed by standard plate counts and can be easily realized in automatic form. In this paper such a method has been experimentally studied in the case of ice-cream products. In particular, all main ice-cream compositions of real interest have been considered and no nutrient media has been used to dilute the samples. A measurement set-up has been realized using benchtop instruments for impedance measurements on samples whose bacteria concentration was independently measured by means of standard plate counts. The obtained results clearly indicate that impedance measurement represents a feasible and reliable technique to detect total microbial concentration in ice-cream, suitable to be implemented as an embedded system for industrial machines.

  7. Whey protein phospholipid concentrate and delactosed permeate: Applications in caramel, ice cream, and cake.

    PubMed

    Levin, M A; Burrington, K J; Hartel, R W

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein phospholipid concentrate (WPPC) and delactosed permeate (DLP) are 2 coproducts of cheese whey processing that are currently underutilized. Past research has shown that WPPC and DLP can be used together as a functional dairy ingredient in foods such as ice cream, soup, and caramel. However, the scope of the research has been limited to a single WPPC supplier. The variability of the composition and functionality of WPPC was previously studied. The objective of this research was to expand on the previous study and examine the potential applications of WPPC and DLP blends in foods. In ice cream, WPPC was added as a natural emulsifier to replace synthetic emulsifiers. The WPPC decreased the amount of partially coalesced fat and increased the drip-through rate. In caramel, DLP and WPPC replaced sweetened condensed skim milk and lecithin. Cold flow increased significantly, and hardness and stickiness decreased. In cake, DLP and WPPC were added as a total replacement of eggs, with no change in yield, color, or texture. Overall, WPPC and DLP can be utilized as functional dairy ingredients at a lower cost in ice cream and cake but not in chewy caramel. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Asymmetric and Ice-cream Cone Models for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, H.; Moon, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are major cause of the geomagnetic storms. To minimize the projection effect by coronagraph observation, several cone models have been suggested: an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model etc. These models allow us to determine the three dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone. In this study, we compare these parameters obtained from different models using 48 well-observed HCMEs from 2001 to 2002. And we obtain the root mean square error (RMS error) between measured projection speeds and calculated projection speeds for both cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with each other (R = 0.86), and the correlation coefficient of angular width is 0.6. The correlation coefficient of the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone is 0.31, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be due to the fact that the source locations of the asymmetric cone model are distributed near the center, while those of the ice-cream cone model are located in a wide range. The average RMS error of the asymmetric cone model (85.6km/s) is slightly smaller than that of the ice-cream cone model (87.8km/s).

  9. Synbiotic yogurt-ice cream produced via incorporation of microencapsulated lactobacillus acidophilus (la-5) and fructooligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Milani, Elnaz; Madadlou, Ashkan; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali; Mokarram, Reza Rezaei; Salarbashi, Davoud

    2014-08-01

    Yogurt-ice cream is a nutritious product with a refreshing taste and durability profoundly longer than that of yogurt. The probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-5) cells either in free or encapsulated form were incorporated into yog-ice cream and their survivability were studied. Fructooligosaccharide (FOS) as a prebiotic compound at three levels (0, 4 & 8 % w/w) was added to yogurt-ice cream mix and its effects on some chemical properties, overrun and firmness of product were evaluated. The higher the incorporated FOS concentration, the lower were the pH value and higher the total solid content of treatments. FOS incorporation (8 %) significantly increased the overrun of treatments and reduced their firmness. The viable counts of free probiotics decreased from ~9.55 to ~7.3 log cfu/g after 60 days of frozen storage while that of encapsulated cells merely decreased less than 1 log cycle. Encapsulation with alginate microbeads protected the probiotic cells against injuries in the freezing stage as well as, during frozen storage.

  10. A novel method for the determination of synthetic colors in ice cream samples.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Meenakshi; Khanna, Subhash K; Das, Mukul

    2004-01-01

    A simple method has been developed for the extraction, separation, and determination of synthetic colors in ice cream samples. The process involves the breakdown of emulsion by neutral detergents (Triton X-100 and Tween 20) followed by extraction with petroleum ether for removal of fat. The aqueous colored solution obtained is treated with 5% acetic acid, and the uptake of color is carried out by a wool-dyeing technique. The color is eluted from the wool with 5% ammonia solution, the solution is evaporated to dryness, and the residue is dissolved in 60% ethanol for paper chromatography using trisodium citrate-ammonia-water (2 + 5 + 95, w/v/v) as the mobile phase. The colored spots from the paper chromatogram are cut and eluted with 60% ethanol, and the absorbance is measured at the respective lambda maximum corresponding to the Rf value of the appropriate standard. The recoveries of 6 colors, including sunset yellow FCF (SSYFCF), tartrazine, carmoisine, ponceau 4R, brilliant blue FCF (BBFCF), and fast green FCF from spiked samples with either detergent were found to be >90%. However, recoveries of erythrosine were 21 and 65% with Triton X-100 and Tween 20, respectively. Indigo carmine could not be recovered at all because of its fugitive property in 5% ammonia solution, which is used to strip the color from the wool. The sensitivity of the method with the use of Tween 20 is 1 ppm (1 microg/g) for the colors in spiked ice cream samples. With this method, we analyzed samples of 20 branded colored ice cream. The results showed the presence of tartrazine (8.4-43.3 ppm), SSYFCF (23.5-117.6 ppm), carmoisine (traces-53.2 ppm), erythrosine (3.5 ppm), and BBFCF (4.1 ppm) in the ice cream samples. Apart from 2 samples of tuttifruity, all of the ice cream samples showed the presence of permitted synthetic colors below the permissible level of 100 ppm established by the Prevention of Food Adulteration Act of India.

  11. Frequent ice cream consumption is associated with reduced striatal response to receipt of an ice cream–based milkshake123

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Background: Weight gain leads to reduced reward-region responsivity to energy-dense food receipt, and consumption of an energy-dense diet compared with an isocaloric, low-energy-density diet leads to reduced dopamine receptors. Furthermore, phasic dopamine signaling to palatable food receipt decreases after repeated intake of that food, which collectively suggests that frequent intake of an energy-dense food may reduce striatal response to receipt of that food. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that frequent ice cream consumption would be associated with reduced activation in reward-related brain regions (eg, striatum) in response to receipt of an ice cream–based milkshake and examined the influence of adipose tissue and the specificity of this relation. Design: Healthy-weight adolescents (n = 151) underwent fMRI during receipt of a milkshake and during receipt of a tasteless solution. Percentage body fat, reported food intake, and food craving and liking were assessed. Results: Milkshake receipt robustly activated the striatal regions, yet frequent ice cream consumption was associated with a reduced response to milkshake receipt in these reward-related brain regions. Percentage body fat, total energy intake, percentage of energy from fat and sugar, and intake of other energy-dense foods were not related to the neural response to milkshake receipt. Conclusions: Our results provide novel evidence that frequent consumption of ice cream, independent of body fat, is related to a reduction in reward-region responsivity in humans, paralleling the tolerance observed in drug addiction. Data also imply that intake of a particular energy-dense food results in attenuated reward-region responsivity specifically to that food, which suggests that sensory aspects of eating and reward learning may drive the specificity. PMID:22338036

  12. Formulation and characterization of a 0.1% rapamycin cream for the treatment of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex-related angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Bouguéon, Guillaume; Lagarce, Frédéric; Martin, Ludovic; Pailhoriès, Hélène; Bastiat, Guillaume; Vrignaud, Sandy

    2016-07-25

    Medicines for the treatment of rare diseases frequently do not attract the interest of the pharmaceutical industry, and hospital pharmacists are thus often requested by physicians to prepare personalized medicines. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a rare disease that causes disfiguring lesions named facial angiofibromas. Various topical formulations of rapamycin (=sirolimus) have been proved effective in treating these changes in small case series. The present study provides for the first time characterization of a 0.1% rapamycin cream formulation presenting good rapamycin solubilisation. The first step of the formulation is solubilisation of rapamycin in Transcutol(®), and the second step is the incorporation of the mixture in an oil-in-water cream. A HPLC stability-indicating method was developed. Rapamycin concentration in the cream was tested by HPLC and confirmed that it remained above 95% of the initial concentration for at least 85days, without characteristic degradation peaks. The preparation met European Pharmacopoeia microbial specifications throughout storage in aluminum tubes, including when patient use was simulated. Odour, appearance and colour of the preparation were assessed and no change was evidenced during storage. The rheological properties of the cream also remained stable throughout storage. To conclude, we report preparation of a novel cream formulation presenting satisfactory rapamycin solubilisation for the treatment of TSC cutaneous manifestations, with stability data. The cream is currently being used by our patients. Efficacy and tolerance will be reported later. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Chocobar Ice Cream Containing Bifidobacterium on Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Daryani, Hemasha; Sharda, Archana J; Asawa, Kailash; Batra, Mehak; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of chocobar ice cream containing bifidobacteria on salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. A double-blind, randomised controlled trial was conducted with 30 subjects (18 to 22 years of age) divided into 2 groups, test (chocobar ice cream with probiotics) and control (chocobar ice cream without probiotics). The subjects were instructed to eat the allotted chocobar ice cream once daily for 18 days. Saliva samples collected at intervals were cultured on Mitis Salivarius agar and Rogosa agar and examined for salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U-test, Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Postingestion in the test group, a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) of salivary mutans streptococci was recorded, but a non-significant trend was seen for lactobacilli. Significant differences were was also observed between follow-ups. Short-term daily ingestion of ice cream containing probiotic bifidobacteria may reduce salivary levels of mutans streptococci in young adults.

  14. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Alsantali, Adel

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group ( p <0.05). The average pain score on the hands where EMLA cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81), whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9) in the ice group. In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated.

  15. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsantali, Adel

    2018-01-01

    Background Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Results Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group (p<0.05). The average pain score on the hands where EMLA cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81), whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9) in the ice group. Conclusion In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated. PMID:29662322

  16. Effect of Encapsulation on Viability of Bifidobacterium longum CFR815j and Physiochemical Properties of Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Ankita; Achi, Sajan C; Halami, Prakash M

    2018-06-01

    The health beneficial attributes of bifidobacteria and its safe association with the host gut has increased its significance as a probiotic. However delivering probiotic bifidobacteria with Minimum Biological Value (MBV) through product has always been a challenge. In the present study, an attempt was made to maintain the viability of native isolate of Bifidobacterium longum CFR 815j and deliver through ice-cream. B. longum CFR815j was microencapsulated in alginate starch capsules by emulsification followed by evaluation of bead stability in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. After incorporation in ice-cream, the effect on chemical properties, sensory parameters and meltdown characteristics of the product were also evaluated. Survival studies of B. longum revealed higher counts than 10 7 in the product which is essential for probiotic bacteria to exhibit beneficial effect. Further, all the properties of this ice-cream were comparable to the regular ice-cream. Our studies conclude that encapsulation was able to maintain the requisite MBV of bifidobacteria in ice-cream without affecting the sensory characteristics.

  17. The performance of probiotic fermented sheep milk and ice cream sheep milk in inhibiting enamel mineral loss.

    PubMed

    Nadelman, P; Frazão, J V; Vieira, T I; Balthazar, C F; Andrade, M M; Alexandria, A K; Cruz, A G; Fonseca-Gonçalves, A; Maia, L C

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of two different sheep milk-based food matrices - fermented sheep milk and ice cream - with added probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei 431) on dental enamel subjected to an in vitro highly cariogenic challenge. Sixty enamel blocks were selected and randomly allocated into five treatment groups (n=12): conventional fermented sheep milk (CFSM), probiotic fermented sheep milk (PFSM), conventional sheep milk ice cream (CSMIC), probiotic sheep milk ice cream (PSMIC) and control using deionized water. The blocks were subjected to highly cariogenic pH cycling and the products were applied (5min), in a blinded way, once a day to simulate a daily use for 8 consecutive days. A microhardness test was performed before and after the treatment to estimate the percentage of microhardness surface loss (% SML). Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was performed to confirm the mineral loss. All groups had lost microhardness after the experiment. However, CFSM and PFSM exhibited the most positive findings when compared to the control in both ice creams. Scanning electron microscopy showed less mineral loss in CFSM and PFSM compared with CSMIC, PSMIC and control after the cariogenic challenge. Overall, fermented milk decreased mineral loss from enamel subjected to a highly cariogenic challenge, regardless of the presence of probiotics in their composition, which had a higher efficacy compared to ice cream. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A customer value analysis of Taiwan ice cream market: a means-end chain approach across consumption situations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Kwang; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Chiu, Fei-Rung

    2015-01-01

    In the highly competitive market, it is increasingly hard for ice cream stores to develop creative marketing strategies to retain existing customers and attract new ones. This study applies the means-end chain approach to identify the customer value, consequences, and attributes of ice cream and to suggest useful information for ice cream sellers to develop differential marketing strategies across various consumption situations (i.e. on a date, gathering with friends, craving for ice cream). This study conducted one-on-one in-depth interviews with participants. The interview content was subsequently analyzed and coded to produce an implication matrix and a hierarchical value map, which was further used to determine customers' value perceptions. The results indicate the terminal values of the highest strength comprised economy, pleasure, and efficiency. Pleasure was emphasized among consumers who were on a date or gathering with friends, whereas satisfaction was emphasized among consumers who craved ice cream. Based on the results, the study also provides suggestions to the industry and future researchers.

  19. Toxigenic genes, spoilage potential, and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Seza; Eyi, Ayla; Küçüksarı, Rümeysa

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus spp. can be recovered from almost every environment. It is also found readily in foods, where it may cause food spoilage and/or food poisoning due to its toxigenic and pathogenic nature, and extracellular enzymes. In this study, 29 Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream were examined for the presence of following virulence genes hblC, nheA, cytK and ces genes, and tested for a range of the extracellular enzymes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. The strains were found to produce extracellular enzymes: proteolytic and lipolytic activity, gelatin hydrolysis and lecithinase production (100%), DNase production (93.1%) and amylase activity (93.1%). Of 29 strains examined, 24 (82.8%) showed hemolytic activity on blood agar. Beta-lactamase enzyme was only produced by 20.7% of B. cereus group. Among 29 B. cereus group from ice cream, nheA was the most common virulence gene detected in 44.8% of the strains, followed by hblC gene with 17.2%. Four (13.8%) of the 29 strains were positive for both hblC gene and nheA gene. Contrarily, cytK and ces genes were not detected in any of the strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility of ice cream isolates was tested to 14 different antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. We detected resistance to penicillin and ampicillin with the same rate of 89.7%. Thirty-one percent of the strains were multiresistant to three or more antibiotics. This study emphasizes that the presence of natural isolates of Bacillus spp. harboring one or more enterotoxin genes, producing extracellular enzymes which may cause spoilage and acquiring antibiotic resistance might hold crucial importance in the food safety and quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coconut and sunflower oil ratios in ice cream influence subsequent food selection and intake.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, G; Masic, U; Harrold, J A; Norton, J E; Halford, J C G

    2016-10-01

    The effect of coconut oil (CO, containing mainly medium chain triglycerides - MCTs) and sunflower oil (SO, containing mainly long chain triglycerides - LCTs) used as fat source (10% fat ice cream) in different ratios (25% CO and 75% SO - 25CO:75SO, 50% CO and 50% SO - 50CO:50SO, 75% CO and 25% SO - 75CO:25SO) was investigated to assess differences in appetite and ad-libitum (evening and snack) food intake using a single blind design. 36 healthy female participants consumed a fixed portion (150g) of ice cream 45min before an ad-libitum dinner and snacks. Appetite sensations were tracked across the day. Participants ate significantly less fat after 75CO:25SO than 25CO:75SO (p=0.007) and there was also a trend for lower fat intake in this condition as compared to 50CO:50SO (p=0.068). High fat savoury snack intake significantly decreased after 75CO:25SO in comparison with both 25CO:75SO (p=0.038) and 50CO:50SO (p=0.008). Calorie intake from snacks was also found to be significantly lower after 25CO:75SO and 50CO:50SO than 75CO:25SO (p=0.021 and 0.030 respectively). There was no effect of condition on appetite or desire ratings over the day. Eating a standard portion of ice cream containing different ratios of MCTs and LCTs can modestly influence acute food selection and intake, with MCTs manifesting their effect earlier and LCTs later due to differences in the absorption and metabolism of these lipids. However, the differences evident in the present study were small, and require further research before firm conclusions can be drawn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-destructive monitoring of creaming of oil-in-water emulsion-based formulations using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Horita, Akihiro; Kuribayashi, Hideto; Okuno, Yoshihide; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-07-01

    A non-destructive method for monitoring creaming of emulsion-based formulations is in great demand because it allows us to understand fully their instability mechanisms. This study was aimed at demonstrating the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, including MR imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS), for evaluating the physicochemical stability of emulsion-based formulations. Emulsions that are applicable as the base of practical skin creams were used as test samples. Substantial creaming was developed by centrifugation, which was then monitored by MRI. The creaming oil droplet layer and aqueous phase were clearly distinguished by quantitative MRI by measuring T1 and the apparent diffusion coefficient. Components in a selected volume in the emulsions could be analyzed using MRS. Then, model emulsions having different hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values were tested, and the optimal HLB value for a stable dispersion was determined. In addition, the MRI examination enables the detection of creaming occurring in a polyethylene tube, which is commonly used for commercial products, without losing any image quality. These findings strongly indicate that MR techniques are powerful tools to evaluate the physicochemical stability of emulsion-based formulations. This study will make a great contribution to the development and quality control of emulsion-based formulations.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of Jatropha curcas Linn. latex in cream formulation on CD68 expression in mice skin wound

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Muhammad Nur; Masyitha, Dian; Harris, Abdul; Balqis, Ummu; Iskandar, Cut Dahlia; Hambal, Muhammad; Darmawi

    2018-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential of Jatropha curcas latex in the cream formulation on CD68 immune expression (macrophages) during inflammatory phase wound healing process in mice skin. Materials and Methods: Amount of 12 two-months-old male mice were used between 30 and 40 g. To surgical procedures, wound skin incision was performed 2.0 cm in length until subcutaneous on the paravertebral of each animal. The treatment was carried under locally anesthetized with procaine cream. The mice were allotted into four groups of each, entire surface of each group wound covered by base cream control, sulfadiazine 0.1% cream, J. curcas latex cream 10% and, 15%, respectively. All experiments were performed twice a day for 3 days. The wound healing was assayed in stained histological sections in immunohistochemical of the wounds. CD68 expression was investigated under a microscope. Results: The results showed that the cream from the 10% and 15% latex of J. curcas revealed moderate immune reaction to CD68 on wound healing. Conclusion: We concluded that the latex cream of J. curcas possesses anti-inflammatory activity in wound healing process of mice skin. PMID:29657387

  3. Comparison of Dry Medium Culture Plates for Mesophilic Aerobic Bacteria in Milk, Ice Cream, Ham, and Codfish Fillet Products

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junghyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the performance of Sanita-Kun dry medium culture plate with those of traditional culture medium and Petrifilm dry medium culture plate for the enumeration of the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet. Mesophilic aerobic bacteria were comparatively evaluated in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet using Sanita-Kun aerobic count (SAC), Petrifilm aerobic count (PAC), and traditional plate count agar (PCA) media. According to the results, all methods showed high correlations of 0.989~1.000 and no significant differences were observed for enumerating the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in the tested food products. SAC method was easier to perform and count colonies efficiently as compared to the PCA and PAC methods. Therefore, we concluded that the SAC method offers an acceptable alternative to the PCA and PAC methods for counting the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet products. PMID:24551829

  4. Modeling of the effect of freezer conditions on the hardness of ice cream using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Ochi, H; Habara, K; Taketsuka, M; Saito, H; Ichihashi, N; Iwatsuki, K

    2009-12-01

    The effect of conventional continuous freezer parameters [mix flow (L/h), overrun (%), drawing temperature ( degrees C), cylinder pressure (kPa), and dasher speed (rpm)] on the hardness of ice cream under varying measured temperatures (-5, -10, and -15 degrees C) was investigated systematically using response surface methodology (central composite face-centered design), and the relationships were expressed as statistical models. The range (maximum and minimum values) of each freezer parameter was set according to the actual capability of the conventional freezer and applicability to the manufacturing process. Hardness was measured using a penetrometer. These models showed that overrun and drawing temperature had significant effects on hardness. The models can be used to optimize freezer conditions to make ice cream of the least possible hardness under the highest overrun (120%) and a drawing temperature of approximately -5.5 degrees C (slightly warmer than the lowest drawing temperature of -6.5 degrees C) within the range of this study. With reference to the structural elements of the ice cream, we suggest that the volume of overrun and ice crystal content, ice crystal size, and fat globule destabilization affect the hardness of ice cream. In addition, the combination of a simple instrumental parameter and response surface methodology allows us to show the relation between freezer conditions and one of the most important properties-hardness-visually and quantitatively on the practical level.

  5. Hydrogel-based ultra-moisturizing cream formulation for skin hydration and enhanced dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Gon; Kim, Sung Rae; Cho, Hye In; Kang, Mean Hyung; Yeom, Dong Woo; Lee, Seo Hyun; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-01-01

    To develop an external vehicle for skin hydration and enhanced dermal drug delivery, a hydrogel-based ultra-moisturizing cream (HUMC) was successfully formulated with carbopol 934P, urea, Tinocare GL, grape seed oil, and other excipients. The HUMC showed plastic flow behavior due to a gel structure with a cream base. Different types of drug-free vehicles such as a hydrogel, conventional cream (CC), and three HUMCs were prepared and subjected to an in vivo skin hydration test on a hairless mouse using a corneometer. Hydration effect (∆AU) was in the order of HUMC2>HUMC1 ≥ CC>HUMC3>hydrogel. Using nile red (NR) and 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-CF) as lipophilic and hydrophilic fluorescent probes, respectively, in vitro skin permeation and accumulation studies were conducted using Franz diffusion cells. The values of steady-state flux (Jss, ng/h/cm(2)) were obtained: 74.8 (CC), 145.6 (HUMC1), and 161.9 (HUMC2) for NR delivery; 6.8 (CC), 8.3 (HUMC1), and 10.9 (HUMC2) for 5-CF delivery. The amounts retained in the skin at 12 h (Qr, ng/cm(2)) were determined: 86.4 (CC) and 102.0 (HUMC2) for NR; and 70.1 (CC) and 195.6 (HUMC2) for 5-CF. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the distribution of the fluorescent probes. NR tended to be localized into the deeper part of the skin with adipose tissue whereas 5-CF localized in the upper layer of the skin. Thus we propose that HUMC2 is an efficacious vehicle for skin hydration and enhances dermal delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-02-07

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stability and sensory characteristics of ice cream. Ice cream samples were prepared by partially replacing the milk fat with olein fraction of chia oil at 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentrations (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Ice cream prepared from 100% milk fat was kept as control. Ice cream samples stored at -18 °C for 60 days were analysed at 0, 30 and 60 days of the storage period. Fatty acid profile, total phenolic contents, total flavonoids, free fatty acids, peroxide value, anisidine value and sensory characteristics of ice cream samples was studied. Concentration of α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in T 4 was 13.24, 0.58, 0.42 and 0.31%, respectively. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were recorded 0.12, 1.65, 3.17, 5.19 and 7.48 mg GAE/mL, respectively. Total flavonoid content of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 0.08, 0.64, 1.87, 3.16 and 4.29 mg Quercetin Equivalent/mL. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 5.61, 17.43, 36.84, 51.17 and 74.91%, respectively. After 60 days of storage period, the highest peroxide value of 1.84 (MeqO 2 /kg) was observed in T 4 , which was much less than allowable limit of 10 (MeqO 2 /kg). Flavour score was non-significant after 30 days of storage period. Supplementation of ice cream with olein fraction of chia oil enhanced the concentration of

  7. [Street-vendor foods: quality of ice creams, sherbets and sorbets sold in the urban agglomeration of Antananarivo].

    PubMed

    Ravaonindrina, N; Rasolomandimby, R; Rajaomiarisoa, E; Rakotoarisoa, R; Andrianantara, L; Rasolofonirina, N; Roux, J F

    1996-01-01

    A survey of selling conditions and bacteriological examinations of ice-cream was carried-out in Antananarivo from June 1996 to May 1997. The way of investigation by vendors and of bacteriological examinations were widely described. Sellers had classic features of a street-vended food vendor: uneducated, no having professional training and mishandling foodstuffs. 202 samples of ice-cream were collected. The contamination prevalence rate was of 95% +/- 3.7%. Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from one sample. Immediate and rigourous measures ought to be put into effect by authorities to right this alarming situation.

  8. Changes in electrical energy requirements to operate an ice cream freezer as a function of sweeteners and gums

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Bakshi, A.S.; Gay, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in electrical energy required to operate a continuous freezer were monitored for various ice cream formulae. Ice cream formulae consisted of nine different combinations of sucrose, 36 DE corn syrup, and 42 high fructose corn syrup as well as two ratios of guar gum to locust bean gum. Within the same sweetening system, a mix high in locust bean gum tended to have a lower energy demand than mix with large amounts of guar gum. This was especially pronounced in mixes with 50% 42 high fructose corn syrup and/or 50% 36 DE corn syrup solids.

  9. Flow behavior characteristics of ice cream mix made with buffalo milk and various stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Kuldip S; Sidhu, Jiwan S; Mudahar, Gurmail S; Singh, A K

    2002-01-01

    Ice cream made with buffalo milk, using optimum levels of various stabilizers of plant origin, was evaluated for its flow behavior characteristics, with the objective of producing an acceptable quality product. The minimum variation in the viscosity of mix was observed at three rates of shear (348.88, 523.33 and 1046.66 S(-1)) for all ice cream mixes. The flow behavior index (n) of all the mixes having optimum levels of various stabilizers was observed to be less than 1; indicating their pseudoplastic nature. Consistency coefficient (m) of sodium alginate was found to be 1.19; highest among all the stabilizers, followed by gelatin (1.17), karaya (1.08), guar gum (0.75), acacia gum (0.70), ghatti gum (0.36), and the control (0.29). The consistency coefficient (m) signifies the apparent viscosity of the pseudoplastic fluid. The viscosity of the mixes having various stabilizers (optimum levels) was found to be in descending order: Sodium alginate, gelatin, karaya, guar gum, acacia, ghatti and control.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes Growth Kinetics in Milkshakes Made from Naturally and Artificially Contaminated Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Joelle K; Bathija, Vriddi M; Carstens, Christina K; Narula, Sartaj S; Shazer, Arlette; Stewart, Diana; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in milkshakes made using the process-contaminated ice cream associated with a listeriosis outbreak in comparison to milkshakes made with artificially contaminated ice cream. For all temperatures, growth kinetics including growth rates, lag phases, maximum populations, and population increases were determined for the naturally and artificially derived contaminants at 5, 10, 15, and 25°C storage for 144 h. The artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes presented lower growth rates and shorter lag phases than the naturally contaminated populations at all temperatures except for 5°C, where the reverse was observed. At 25°C, lag phases of the naturally and artificially contaminated L. monocytogenes were 11.6 and 7.8 h, respectively. The highest increase in population was observed for the artificially inoculated pathogen at 15°C after 96 h (6.16 log CFU/mL) of storage. Growth models for both contamination states in milkshakes were determined. In addition, this study evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness of flavoring agents, including strawberry, chocolate and mint, on the growth of the pathogen in milkshakes during 10°C storage. All flavor additions resulted in decreased growth rates of L. monocytogenes for both contamination states. The addition of chocolate and mint flavoring also resulted in significantly longer lag phases for both contamination states. This study provides insight into the differences in growth between naturally and artificially contaminated L. monocytogenes in a food product.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes Growth Kinetics in Milkshakes Made from Naturally and Artificially Contaminated Ice Cream

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Joelle K.; Bathija, Vriddi M.; Carstens, Christina K.; Narula, Sartaj S.; Shazer, Arlette; Stewart, Diana; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in milkshakes made using the process-contaminated ice cream associated with a listeriosis outbreak in comparison to milkshakes made with artificially contaminated ice cream. For all temperatures, growth kinetics including growth rates, lag phases, maximum populations, and population increases were determined for the naturally and artificially derived contaminants at 5, 10, 15, and 25°C storage for 144 h. The artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes presented lower growth rates and shorter lag phases than the naturally contaminated populations at all temperatures except for 5°C, where the reverse was observed. At 25°C, lag phases of the naturally and artificially contaminated L. monocytogenes were 11.6 and 7.8 h, respectively. The highest increase in population was observed for the artificially inoculated pathogen at 15°C after 96 h (6.16 log CFU/mL) of storage. Growth models for both contamination states in milkshakes were determined. In addition, this study evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness of flavoring agents, including strawberry, chocolate and mint, on the growth of the pathogen in milkshakes during 10°C storage. All flavor additions resulted in decreased growth rates of L. monocytogenes for both contamination states. The addition of chocolate and mint flavoring also resulted in significantly longer lag phases for both contamination states. This study provides insight into the differences in growth between naturally and artificially contaminated L. monocytogenes in a food product. PMID:29416531

  12. Ice cream

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-20

    ISS043E125774 (04/20/2015) --- NASA astronaut Scott Kelly gives the "high sign" on the quality of his snack while taking a break from his work schedule aboard the International Space Station on Apr. 20, 2015. Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (ROSCOSMOS) seems to agree on the tasty factor of the specially prepared space food.

  13. The impact of manufacturing variables on in vitro release of clobetasol 17-propionate from pilot scale cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Fauzee, Ayeshah Fateemah Beebee; Khamanga, Sandile Maswazi; Walker, Roderick Bryan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of different homogenization speeds and times, anchor speeds and cooling times on the viscosity and cumulative % clobetasol 17-propionate released per unit area at 72 h from pilot scale cream formulations. A 2(4) full factorial central composite design for four independent variables were investigated. Thirty pilot scale batches of cream formulations were manufactured using a Wintech® cream/ointment plant. The viscosity and in vitro release of CP were monitored and compared to an innovator product that is commercially available on the South African market, namely, Dermovate® cream. Contour and three-dimensional response surface plots were produced and the viscosity and cumulative % CP released per unit area at 72 h were found to be primarily dependent on the homogenization and anchor speeds. An increase in the homogenization and anchor speeds appeared to exhibit a synergistic effect on the resultant viscosity of the cream whereas an antagonistic effect was observed for the in vitro release of CP from the experimental cream formulations. The in vitro release profiles were best fitted to a Higuchi model and diffusion proved to be the dominant mechanism of drug release that was confirmed by use of the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. The research was further validated and confirmed by the high prognostic ability of response surface methodology (RSM) with a resultant mean percentage error of (±SD) 0.17 ± 0.093 suggesting that RSM may be an efficient tool for the development and optimization of topical formulations.

  14. Enrichment, Development, and Assessment of Indian Basil Oil Based Antiseptic Cream Formulation Utilizing Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Balance Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Pandey, Neelam; Luqman, Suaib; Yadav, Kuldeep Singh; Chanda, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    The present work was aimed to develop an antiseptic cream formulation of Indian basil oil utilizing hydrophilic-lipophilic balance approach. In order to determine the required-hydrophilic lipophilic balance (rHLB) of basil oil, emulsions of basil oil were prepared by phase inversion temperature technique using water, Tween 80, and Span 80. Formulated emulsions were assessed for creaming (BE9; 9.8, BE10; 10.2), droplet size (BE18; 3.22 ± 0.09 μm), and turbidity (BE18; 86.12 ± 2.1%). To ensure correctness of the applied methodology, rHLB of light liquid paraffin was also determined. After rHLB determination, basil oil creams were prepared with two different combinations of surfactants, namely, GMS : Tween 80 (1 : 3.45) and SLS : GMS (1 : 3.68), and evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activity, skin irritation test, viscosity and consistency. The rHLB of basil oil and light liquid paraffin were found to be 13.36 ± 0.36 and 11.5 ± 0.35, respectively. Viscosity, and consistency parameters of cream was found to be consistent over 90 days. Cream formulations showed net zone of growth inhibition in the range of 5.0–11.3 mm against bacteria and 4.3–7.6 mm against fungi. Primary irritation index was found to be between 0.38 and1.05. Conclusively stable, consistent, non-irritant, enriched antiseptic basil oil cream formulations were developed utilizing HLB approach. PMID:23984361

  15. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations. © 2012 The Authors. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Photodegradation of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in topical cream formulations and its photostabilization.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Anna; Marchetti, Nicola; Scalia, Santo

    2011-12-05

    The aim of the study was to examine the photostability of the major catechin of green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which possesses important antioxidant and skin photoprotective properties. In order to simulate realistic conditions of use of topical preparations, the photolysis studies were performed in model creams (oil-in-water emulsions) containing 1% (w/w) EGCG and exposed to a solar simulator at an irradiance corresponding to natural sunlight. The extent of photodegradation was measured by HPLC-UV and HPLC-ESI-MS. EGCG was found to decompose by 68.9±2.3%, after 1h irradiation. Addition of the coantioxidants, vitamin E or butylated hydroxytoluene to the emulsion formulation, significantly enhanced the photolability of the catechin, the EGCG loss reached 85.7±1.3% and 80.5±1.4%, respectively. On the other hand, inclusion of the UVB (290-320nm) filter, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate in the cream produced a small but significant reduction of EGCG photodegradation to 61.0±2.9%, while the UVA (320-400nm) filter, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane was ineffective (EGCG degradation, 67.8±1.5%). A more marked decrease in the light-induced decomposition of EGCG to 51.6±2.7% was achieved, under the same conditions, using the water-soluble UVB filter, benzophenone-4 (BP-4). This effect was concentration dependent, maximal EGCG photostabilization (catechin loss, 29.4±2.2%) was attained in the presence of 2.1% (w/w) BP-4. Therefore, BP-4 represents a useful additive to improve the light stability of EGCG in topical formulations for skin photoprotection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Total flavonoid content and formulation antioxidant cream stem of jatropha multifida l.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Franyoto, Yuvianti; Kusmita, Lia; Mutmainah; Demma Angrena, Riega

    2018-05-01

    Free radical induced oxidative stress that influences the occurrence of various degenerative diseases such as cancer, coronary heart disease and premature aging. Stems of Jatropha multifida L are known to contain flavanoid compounds have antioxidant activity. A study has been carried out to determine antioxidant potential of stems of Jatropha multifida L. Initially, material was macerated gradually with ethanol. The extract obtained was filtered and evaporated. Determination of total flavanoid contents (TFC) using spectrophotometric methods. The antioxidant potential of this extract was evaluated by 2, 2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. In the DPPH radical-scavenging activities, the extract had the antioxidant activity (IC50 = 72 ± 0.01 μg/ml). The results showed the extracts of Jatropha multifida L. could be considered as natural antioxidants and may be useful for curing diseases arising from oxidative deterioration. The formulation comprises with 5% of extract and was formulated using fusion method. The evaluation of the formulated cream showed good results and can be good potential for cosmetic product development.

  18. In vitro gastrointestinal resistance of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in soy and/or milk-based synbiotic apple ice creams.

    PubMed

    Matias, Natalia Silva; Padilha, Marina; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-10-03

    The viability and resistance to simulated gastrointestinal (GI) conditions of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in synbiotic ice creams, in which milk was replaced by soy extract and/or whey protein isolate (WPI) with inulin, were investigated. The ice creams were showed to be satisfactory vehicles for La-5 and Bb-12 (populations around 7.5logCFU/g), even after the whole storage period (84days/-18°C). In all formulations, the propidium monoazide qPCR (PMA-qPCR) analysis demonstrated that probiotics could resist the in vitro GI assay, with significant survival levels, achieving survival rates exceeding 50%. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy images evidenced cells with morphological differences, suggesting physiological changes in response to the induced stress during the in vitro assay. Although all formulations provided resistance to the probiotic strains under GI stress, the variation found in probiotic survival suggests that GI tolerance is indeed affected by the choice of the food matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of solid fat content on structure in ice creams containing palm kernel oil and high-oleic sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kristine K; Goff, H Douglas

    2010-04-01

    The development of a structural fat network in ice cream as influenced by the solid:liquid fat ratio at the time of freezing/whipping was investigated. The solid fat content was varied with blends of a hard fraction of palm kernel oil (PKO) and high-oleic sunflower oil ranging from 40% to 100% PKO. Fat globule size and adsorbed protein levels in mix and overrun, fat destabilization, meltdown resistance, and air bubble size in ice cream were measured. It was found that blends comprising 60% to 80% solid fat produced the highest rates of fat destabilization that could be described as partial coalescence (as opposed to coalescence), lowest rates of meltdown, and smallest air bubble sizes. Lower levels of solid fat produced fat destabilization that was better characterized as coalescence, leading to loss of structural integrity, whereas higher levels of solid fat led to lower levels of fat network formation and thus also to reduced structural integrity. Blends of highly saturated palm kernel oil and monounsaturated high-oleic sunflower oil were used to modify the solid:liquid ratio of fat blends used for ice cream manufacture. Blends that contained 60% to 80% solid fat at freezing/whipping temperatures produced optimal structures leading to low rates of meltdown. This provides a useful reference for manufacturers to help in the selection of appropriate fat blends for nondairy-fat ice cream.

  20. Recovery of biogas as a source of renewable energy from ice-cream production residues and wastewater.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Burak; Orok, Murat; Hot, Elif; Erkişi, Selin; Albükrek, Metin; Onay, Turgut T

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of waste streams and residues from agro-industry is very important to prevent environmental pollution. In particular, the anaerobic co-digestion process can be used as an important tool for safe disposal and energy recovery from agro-industry waste streams and residues. The primary objective of this laboratory-scale study was to determine whether it was possible to recover energy (biogas) from ice-cream production residues and wastewater, through a mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion process. A high methane yield of 0.338 L CH4/gCOD(removed) could be achieved from anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater alone, with almost 70% of methane in biogas, while anaerobic digestion of ice-cream production residue alone did not seem feasible. When wastewater and ice-cream production residue were anaerobically co-digested at a ratio of 9:1 by weight, the highest methane yield of 0.131 L CH4/gCOD(removed) was observed. Buffering capacity seemed to be imperative in energy recovery from these substrates in the anaerobic digestion process.

  1. Using Ice Cream for Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance: An Alternative to the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

    PubMed

    Chanprasertpinyo, Wandee; Bhirommuang, Nattapimon; Surawattanawiset, Titiporn; Tangsermwong, Thanwarin; Phanachet, Pariya; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2017-12-01

    Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a sensitive and reliable test for diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). However, poor patient tolerance of glucose solutions is common. We aim to compare the diagnostic value of an ice cream test with a standard OGTT. A total of 104 healthy adults were randomly assigned to either 75-g OGTT or ice cream, followed by a crossover to the other test. Most patients were females (71%). Mean age was 37 ± 12 years, and body mass index was 24.2 ± 3.9kg/m 2 . Diabetes mellitus and IGT, as diagnosed by 75-g OGTT, were 4.8% and 6.7%, respectively. The 2-hour plasma glucose levels were 110 ± 55.5mg/dL with 75-g glucose and 97.52 ± 40.7mg/dL with ice cream. The correlation coefficient of 2-hour plasma glucose for the 2 tests was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.75-0.87; P < 0.001). Discordant diagnostic results, based on 2-hour plasma glucose levels, were 9.61%. By using a combination of fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose values, the ice cream test would have missed 5.76% of those at high risk for diabetes mellitus (impaired fasting glucose and IGT) or diabetes. An ice cream test may serve as an alternative to a 75-g OGTT. Before applying this test in clinical practice, it needs to be validated in a larger population. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Frozen yogurt and ice cream were less healthy than yogurt, and adding toppings reduced their nutrition value: evidence from 1999-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    An, Ruopeng; Jiang, Ning

    2017-06-01

    It was hypothesized that frozen yogurt and ice cream would be less healthy than yogurt. We examined daily energy and nutrient intake from yogurt, frozen yogurt, and ice cream among US adults. In-person 24-hour dietary recall data (n=6453) came from the 1999-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Regression analyses were performed to examine the differences in energy/nutrient intake from frozen yogurt and ice cream (with/without toppings) in comparison to yogurt. Approximately 5.3%, 0.9%, and 14.3% of US adults consumed yogurt, frozen yogurt, and ice cream on any given day, respectively. Among frozen yogurt and ice cream consumers, 29.7% and 14.8% added toppings to their consumption, respectively. Compared with yogurt, frozen yogurt consumption with and without toppings was associated with increased daily energy intake by 214.6 and 97.9kj, respectively; whereas ice cream consumption with and without toppings was associated with increased daily energy intake by 427.2 and 343.5kj, respectively. Compared with yogurt, frozen yogurt consumption was associated with a decreased intake of most vitamins/minerals under examination, but increased intake of sugar, total/saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, and iron. Adding toppings to frozen yogurt further increased total and saturated fat intake. Compared with yogurt, ice cream consumption was associated with a decreased intake of multiple micronutrients, but increased intake of sugar, total/saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, vitamins A and E, and iron. Adding toppings to ice cream further increased sugar intake. In conclusion, frozen yogurt and ice cream were less healthy than yogurt, and adding toppings made them even less desirable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Klontz, Karl C.; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S.; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M.; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R.; Hammack, Thomas S.; Van Doren, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen. PMID:27869595

  4. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015.

    PubMed

    Pouillot, Régis; Klontz, Karl C; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen.

  5. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  6. A new formulation of cannabidiol in cream shows therapeutic effects in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Galuppo, Maria; Pollastro, Federica; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-10-21

    The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of a new formulation of alone, purified cannabidiol (CBD) (>98 %), the main non-psychotropic cannabinoid of Cannabis sativa, as a topical treatment in an experimental model of autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the most commonly used model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Particularly, we evaluated whether administration of a topical 1 % CBD-cream, given at the time of symptomatic disease onset, could affect the EAE progression and if this treatment could also recover paralysis of hind limbs, qualifying topical-CBD for the symptomatic treatment of MS. In order to have a preparation of 1 % of CBD-cream, pure CBD have been solubilized in propylene glycoland basic dense cream O/A. EAE was induced by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55) in C57BL/6 mice. After EAE onset, mice were allocated into several experimental groups (Naïve, EAE, EAE-1 % CBD-cream, EAE-vehicle cream, CTRL-1 % CBD-cream, CTRL-vehicle cream). Mice were observed daily for signs of EAE and weight loss. At the sacrifice of the animals, which occurred at the 28(th) day from EAE-induction, spinal cord and spleen tissues were collected in order to perform histological evaluation, immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. Achieved results surprisingly show that daily treatment with topical 1 % CBD-cream may exert neuroprotective effects against EAE, diminishing clinical disease score (mean of 5.0 in EAE mice vs 1.5 in EAE + CBD-cream), by recovering of paralysis of hind limbs and by ameliorating histological score typical of disease (lymphocytic infiltration and demyelination) in spinal cord tissues. Also, 1 % CBD-cream is able to counteract the EAE-induced damage reducing release of CD4 and CD8α T cells (spleen tissue localization was quantified about 10,69 % and 35,96 % of positive staining respectively in EAE mice) and expression of the main pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as several other

  7. Effect of double homogenization and whey protein concentrate on the texture of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Ruger, P R; Baer, R J; Kasperson, K M

    2002-07-01

    Ice cream samples were made with a mix composition of 11% milk fat, 11% milk solids-not-fat, 13% sucrose, 3% corn syrup solids (36 dextrose equivalent), 0.28% stabilizer blend, or 0.10% emulsifier and vanilla extract. Mixes were high temperature short time pasteurized at 80 degrees C for 25 s, homogenized at 141 kg/cm2 pressure on the first stage and 35 kg/cm2 pressure on the second, and cooled to 3 degrees C. The study included six treatments from four batches of mix. Mix from batch one contained 0.10% emulsifier. Half of this batch (treatment 1), was subsequently frozen and the other half (upon exiting the pasteurizer) was reheated to 60 degrees C, rehomogenized at 141 kg/cm2 pressure on the first stage and 35 kg/cm2 pressure on the second (treatment 2), and cooled to 3 degrees C. Mix from batch two contained 0.28% stabilizer blend. Half of this batch was used as the control (treatment 3), the other half upon exiting the pasteurizer was reheated to 60 degrees C, rehomogenized at 141 kg/cm2 pressure on the first stage and 35 kg/cm2 pressure on the second (treatment 4), and cooled to 3 degrees C. Batch three, containing 0.10% emulsifier and 1% whey protein concentrate substituted for 1% nonfat dry milk, upon exiting the pasteurizer was reheated to 60 degrees C, rehomogenized at 141 kg/cm2 pressure on the first stage and 35 kg/cm2 pressure on the second (treatment 5), and cooled to 3 degrees C. Batch four, containing 0.28% stabilizer blend and 1% whey protein concentrate substituted for 1% nonfat dry milk, upon exiting the pasteurizer was reheated to 60 degrees C, rehomogenized at 141 kg/ cm2 pressure on the first stage and 35 kg/cm2 pressure on the second (treatment 6), and cooled to 3 degrees C. Consistency was measured by flow time through a pipette. Flow time of treatment 3 was greater than all treatments, and the flow times of treatments 4 and 6 were greater than treatments 1, 2, and 5. Flow time was increased in ice cream mix by the addition of stabilizer

  8. A 4-D dataset for validation of crystal growth in a complex three-phase material, ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockett, P.; Karagadde, S.; Guo, E.; Bent, J.; Hazekamp, J.; Kingsley, M.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Lee, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Four dimensional (4D, or 3D plus time) X-ray tomographic imaging of phase changes in materials is quickly becoming an accepted tool for quantifying the development of microstructures to both inform and validate models. However, most of the systems studied have been relatively simple binary compositions with only two phases. In this study we present a quantitative dataset of the phase evolution in a complex three-phase material, ice cream. The microstructure of ice cream is an important parameter in terms of sensorial perception, and therefore quantification and modelling of the evolution of the microstructure with time and temperature is key to understanding its fabrication and storage. The microstructure consists of three phases, air cells, ice crystals, and unfrozen matrix. We perform in situ synchrotron X-ray imaging of ice cream samples using in-line phase contrast tomography, housed within a purpose built cold-stage (-40 to +20oC) with finely controlled variation in specimen temperature. The size and distribution of ice crystals and air cells during programmed temperature cycling are determined using 3D quantification. The microstructural evolution of three-phase materials has many other important applications ranging from biological to structural and functional material, hence this dataset can act as a validation case for numerical investigations on faceted and non-faceted crystal growth in a range of materials.

  9. Modeling of the effect of freezer conditions on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream by using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Ochi, H; Taketsuka, M; Saito, H; Sakurai, K; Ichihashi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S

    2008-05-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out by using response surface methodology to create a quantitative model of the synergistic effects of conditions in a continuous freezer [mix flow rate (L/h), overrun (%), cylinder pressure (kPa), drawing temperature ( degrees C), and dasher speed (rpm)] on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream [rate of fat destabilization (%), mean air cell diameter (mum), and mean ice crystal diameter (mum)]. A central composite face-centered design was used for this study. Thirty-one combinations of the 5 above-mentioned freezer conditions were designed (including replicates at the center point), and ice cream samples were manufactured and examined in a continuous freezer under the selected conditions. The responses were the 3 variables given above. A quadratic model was constructed, with the freezer conditions as the independent variables and the ice cream characteristics as the dependent variables. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) were greater than 0.9 for all 3 responses, but Q(2), the index used here for the capability of the model for predicting future observed values of the responses, was negative for both the mean ice crystal diameter and the mean air cell diameter. Therefore, pruned models were constructed by removing terms that had contributed little to the prediction in the original model and by refitting the regression model. It was demonstrated that these pruned models provided good fits to the data in terms of R(2), Q(2), and ANOVA. The effects of freezer conditions were expressed quantitatively in terms of the 3 responses. The drawing temperature ( degrees C) was found to have a greater effect on ice cream characteristics than any of the other factors.

  10. A tutorial for developing a topical cream formulation based on the Quality by Design approach.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; Vitorino, Carla; Figueiras, Ana

    2018-06-20

    The pharmaceutical industry has entered in a new era, as there is a growing interest in increasing the quality standards of dosage forms, through the implementation of more structured development and manufacturing approaches. For many decades, the manufacturing of drug products was controlled by a regulatory framework to guarantee the quality of the final product through a fixed process and exhaustive testing. Limitations related to the Quality by Test (QbT) system have been widely acknowledged. The emergence of Quality by Design (QbD) as a systematic and risk-based approach introduced a new quality concept based on a good understanding of how raw materials and process parameters influence the final quality profile. Although the QbD system has been recognized as a revolutionary approach to product development and manufacturing, its full implementation in the pharmaceutical field is still limited. This is particularly evident in the case of semisolid complex formulation development. The present review aims at establishing a practical QbD framework to describe all stages comprised in the pharmaceutical development of a conventional cream in a comprehensible manner. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The implementation of a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point management system in a peanut butter ice cream plant.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ting; Liu, Chi-Te; Peng, I-Chen; Hsu, Chin; Yu, Roch-Chui; Cheng, Kuan-Chen

    2015-09-01

    To ensure the safety of the peanut butter ice cream manufacture, a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan has been designed and applied to the production process. Potential biological, chemical, and physical hazards in each manufacturing procedure were identified. Critical control points for the peanut butter ice cream were then determined as the pasteurization and freezing process. The establishment of a monitoring system, corrective actions, verification procedures, and documentation and record keeping were followed to complete the HACCP program. The results of this study indicate that implementing the HACCP system in food industries can effectively enhance food safety and quality while improving the production management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Prevalence and Level of Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y I; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Pouillot, Régis; Strain, Errol; DE Jesus, Antonio J; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Hua; Ali, Laila; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Zhang, Guodong; Hu, Lijun; Day, James; Kang, Jihun; Sahu, Surasri; Srinivasan, Devayani; Klontz, Karl; Parish, Mickey; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S; Zink, Donald L; Datta, Atin R

    2016-11-01

    A most-probable-number (MPN) method was used to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in 2,320 commercial ice cream scoops manufactured on a production line that was implicated in a 2015 listeriosis outbreak in the United States. The analyzed samples were collected from seven lots produced in November 2014, December 2014, January 2015, and March 2015. L. monocytogenes was detected in 99% (2,307 of 2,320) of the tested samples (lower limit of detection, 0.03 MPN/g), 92% of which were contaminated at <20 MPN/g. The levels of L. monocytogenes in these samples had a geometric mean per lot of 0.15 to 7.1 MPN/g. The prevalence and enumeration data from an unprecedented large number of naturally contaminated ice cream products linked to a listeriosis outbreak provided a unique data set for further understanding the risk associated with L. monocytogenes contamination for highly susceptible populations.

  13. Comparative Study of Probiotic Ice Cream and Probiotic Drink on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Levels in 6-12 Years Age Group Children.

    PubMed

    Mahantesha, Taranatha; Reddy, K M Parveen; Kumar, N H Praveen; Nara, Asha; Ashwin, Devasya; Buddiga, Vinutna

    2015-09-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in the world. Probiotics are one the various preventive methods to reduce dental caries. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of probiotic ice cream and drink on salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in children of 6-12 years age group. A three phase study was carried out in children (n = 50) of 6-12 years age with zero decayed missing filled teeth (dmft)/DMFT. They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva samples were collected before the consumptions of probiotic ice cream and probiotic drink. Colony count obtained was recorded as baseline data. For both groups probiotic ice cream and drink was given randomly for 7 days and a washout period of 90 days were given and then the saliva samples were collected and colony counting was done. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's paired t-test and multiple comparisons by Tukey's honest significant difference test which showed, there is a significant reduction in salivary S. mutans level in both groups after 7 days period. However, after washout period only probiotic ice cream showed reduction whereas drink did not. Also, there was no significant difference between probiotic ice cream and drink. Probiotic organisms definitely have a role in reducing the salivary S. mutans level and ice cream would be a better choice than drink. However, the prolonged use of the agents and their effects on caries is still to be determined.

  14. Vestibular schwannomas: Accuracy of tumor volume estimated by ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced MR images

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsing-Hao; Li, Ya-Hui; Lee, Jih-Chin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Yu, Yi-Lin; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2018-01-01

    Purpose We estimated the volume of vestibular schwannomas by an ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced magnetic resonance images (MRI) and compared the estimation accuracy among different estimating formulas and between different models. Methods The study was approved by a local institutional review board. A total of 100 patients with vestibular schwannomas examined by MRI between January 2011 and November 2015 were enrolled retrospectively. Informed consent was waived. Volumes of vestibular schwannomas were estimated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulas based on a one-component model, and cuboidal, ellipsoidal, Linskey’s, and ice cream cone formulas based on a two-component model. The estimated volumes were compared to the volumes measured by planimetry. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver agreement was tested. Estimation error, including absolute percentage error (APE) and percentage error (PE), was calculated. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), linear regression analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-tests with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results Overall tumor size was 4.80 ± 6.8 mL (mean ±standard deviation). All ICCs were no less than 0.992, suggestive of high intraobserver reproducibility and high interobserver agreement. Cuboidal formulas significantly overestimated the tumor volume by a factor of 1.9 to 2.4 (P ≤ 0.001). The one-component ellipsoidal and spherical formulas overestimated the tumor volume with an APE of 20.3% and 29.2%, respectively. The two-component ice cream cone method, and ellipsoidal and Linskey’s formulas significantly reduced the APE to 11.0%, 10.1%, and 12.5%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Conclusion The ice cream cone method and other two-component formulas including the ellipsoidal and Linskey’s formulas allow for estimation of vestibular schwannoma volume more accurately than all one-component formulas. PMID:29438424

  15. Vestibular schwannomas: Accuracy of tumor volume estimated by ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced MR images.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsing-Hao; Li, Ya-Hui; Lee, Jih-Chin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Yu, Yi-Lin; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2018-01-01

    We estimated the volume of vestibular schwannomas by an ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced magnetic resonance images (MRI) and compared the estimation accuracy among different estimating formulas and between different models. The study was approved by a local institutional review board. A total of 100 patients with vestibular schwannomas examined by MRI between January 2011 and November 2015 were enrolled retrospectively. Informed consent was waived. Volumes of vestibular schwannomas were estimated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulas based on a one-component model, and cuboidal, ellipsoidal, Linskey's, and ice cream cone formulas based on a two-component model. The estimated volumes were compared to the volumes measured by planimetry. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver agreement was tested. Estimation error, including absolute percentage error (APE) and percentage error (PE), was calculated. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), linear regression analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-tests with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Overall tumor size was 4.80 ± 6.8 mL (mean ±standard deviation). All ICCs were no less than 0.992, suggestive of high intraobserver reproducibility and high interobserver agreement. Cuboidal formulas significantly overestimated the tumor volume by a factor of 1.9 to 2.4 (P ≤ 0.001). The one-component ellipsoidal and spherical formulas overestimated the tumor volume with an APE of 20.3% and 29.2%, respectively. The two-component ice cream cone method, and ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas significantly reduced the APE to 11.0%, 10.1%, and 12.5%, respectively (all P < 0.001). The ice cream cone method and other two-component formulas including the ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas allow for estimation of vestibular schwannoma volume more accurately than all one-component formulas.

  16. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from an ice cream plant by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, M K; Björkroth, K J; Korkeala, H J

    1999-02-18

    One dominating strain of serotype 1/2b was found when serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were used for the characterization of 41 Listeria monocytogenes isolates originating from an ice cream plant. Samples were taken from the production environment, equipment and ice cream during the years 1990-1997. Serotyping divided the isolates into two serovars, 1/2b and 4b. Three rare-cutting enzymes (ApaI, AscI and SmaI) were used in the creation of PFGE patterns. AscI resulted in the best restriction enzyme digestion patterns (REDPs) for visual comparison. Eight different AscI REDPs were obtained, whereas ApaI produced six and SmaI seven banding patterns. When one-band differences are taken into account, 12 different PFGE types were distinguished based on information obtained with all three enzymes. The dominant PFGE type was found to have persisted in the ice cream plant for seven years. Improved and precisely targeted cleaning and disinfection practices combined with structural changes making for easier cleaning of the packaging machine, resulted in eradication of L. monocytogenes from this plant.

  17. Aflatoxin M1 contamination of milk and ice cream in Abeokuta and Odeda local governments of Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atanda, Olusegun; Oguntubo, Adenike; Adejumo, Oloyede; Ikeorah, John; Akpan, Iyang

    2007-07-01

    A survey was undertaken to determine the aflatoxin M(1) contamination of milk and some locally produced dairy products in Abeokuta and Odeda local governments of Ogun State, Nigeria. Samples of human and cow milk, yoghurt, "wara", ice cream and "nono" were collected randomly within the local governments and analysed for aflatoxin M(1) using the two-dimensional TLC. Aflatoxin M(1) contamination in the range of 2.04-4.00 microg l(-1) was noticed only in milk and ice cream. In particular, samples of human milk, cow milk and ice cream recorded high scores of 4.0 microg l(-1), 2.04 microg l(-1) and 2.23 microg l(-1), respectively in Abeokuta local governments and a score of 4.0 microg l(-1) for cow milk in Odeda local government. This indicates a high level contamination in the local governments since the weighted mean concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk for African diet is 0.002 microg l(-1). Therefore the concentration of AFB1 in feeds which is transformed to AFM1 in milk should be reduced by good manufacturing and good storage practices. Furthermore, there is need for stringent quality control during processing and distribution of these products.

  18. Identification of Imitation Cheese and Imitation Ice Cream Based on Vegetable Fat Using NMR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Monakhova, Yulia B.; Godelmann, Rolf; Andlauer, Claudia; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable oils and fats may be used as cheap substitutes for milk fat to manufacture imitation cheese or imitation ice cream. In this study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the fat fraction of the products was used in the context of food surveillance to validate the labeling of milk-based products. For sample preparation, the fat was extracted using an automated Weibull-Stoldt methodology. Using principal component analysis (PCA), imitation products can be easily detected. In both cheese and ice cream, a differentiation according to the type of raw material (milk fat and vegetable fat) was possible. The loadings plot shows that imitation products were distinguishable by differences in their fatty acid ratios. Furthermore, a differentiation of several types of cheese (Edamer, Gouda, Emmentaler, and Feta) was possible. Quantitative data regarding the composition of the investigated products can also be predicted from the same spectra using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The models obtained for 13 compounds in cheese (R 2 0.75–0.95) and 17 compounds in ice cream (R 2 0.83–0.99) (e.g., fatty acids and esters) were suitable for a screening analysis. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the routine analysis of dairy products based on milk or on vegetable fat substitutes. PMID:26904597

  19. Intransience of functional components and distinctive properties of amla (Indian gooseberry) ice cream during short-term storage.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Rajpreet Kaur; Bajwa, Usha

    2018-05-01

    Inclusion of processed amla have been found to enhance the functional properties and nutritional value of ice cream by augmenting the fiber content, total phenols, tannins, ascorbic acid and antioxidant activity. The present investigation assessed the changes in these constituents, color values (L, a* and b*), melting rate, sensory scores and microbiological quality of ice cream containing amla shreds, pulp, preserve, candy and powder during 60 days' storage at - 18 to - 20 °C. The total solids increased slightly whereas the antioxidant activity, total phenols, ascorbic acid and tannins decreased on storage. The L values declined whereas a* and b* values amplified, the rate of change being highest in candy containing sample followed by preserve. The first drip time of all the samples increased whereas melting rate decreased. The overall acceptability scores declined non significantly. Standard plate count of all the ice cream samples decreased significantly whereas yeast and molds were not detected throughout the storage. The psychrophiles were not spotted up to 30 days, thereafter, a small increase was observed.

  20. Hygienic Shortcomings of Frozen Dessert Freezing Equipment and Fate of Listeria monocytogenes on Ice Cream-Soiled Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Inuwa, A; Lunt, A; Czuprynski, C; Miller, G; Rankin, S A

    2017-10-19

    Although frozen dairy desserts have a strong record of safety, recent outbreaks of foodborne disease linked to ice creams have brought new attention to this industry. There is concern that small-scale frozen dessert equipment may not comply with or be reviewed against published comprehensive design and construction sanitation specifications (National Sanitation Foundation or 3-A sanitary standards). Equipment sanitary design issues may result in reduced efficacy of cleaning and sanitation, thus increasing the likelihood of postprocess contamination with pathogenic bacteria. In this context, and given that Listeria monocytogenes outbreaks are of great concern for the frozen dessert industry, a complementary study was conducted to evaluate the fate of L. monocytogenes in ice cream mix on a stainless steel surface. Our results showed that L. monocytogenes survived for up to 6 weeks at room temperature and 9 weeks at 4°C in contaminated ice cream on a stainless steel surface. Furthermore, chlorine- and acid-based surface sanitizers had no detrimental effect on the L. monocytogenes when used at a concentration and contact time (1 min) recommended by the manufacturer; significant reduction in CFU required 5 to 20 min of contact time.

  1. Ice cream headache in students and family history of headache: a cross-sectional epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Zierz, Antonia Maria; Mehl, Theresa; Kraya, Torsten; Wienke, Andreas; Zierz, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Headache attributed to ingestion of a cold stimulus (ICHD-3 beta 4.5.1) is also known as ice cream headache (ICH). This cross-sectional epidemiological study included 283 students (10-14-year-olds) attending a grammar school in Germany, their parents (n = 401), and 41 teachers. A self-administered questionnaire was used to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of ICH based on the ICHD classification. Additionally, the association between ICH and other headaches was investigated in students and parents. Prevalence of ICH in students was 62 % without gender difference. In adults, only 36 % of females and 22 % of males reported ICH. There was an increased risk for ICH in students when mother (OR 10.7) or father (OR 8.4) had ICH. Other headaches in parents had no influence on the prevalence of ICH in students. However, in the groups of students and parents itself there was a highly significant association between ICH and other headaches (students: OR 2.4, mothers: OR 2.9, fathers: OR 6.8). There was a decreased risk for ICH when parents and students had no headache at all (OR < 0.4). ICH in students clearly shows a familial disposition by both father and mother. There was also an association between ICH and other headaches within the student and adult groups. The absence of headache history seems to be a protective factor for ICH.

  2. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients’ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (P<0.001), at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects. PMID:27934800

  3. Formulation, stability study, and pre-clinical evaluation of a vaginal cream containing curcumin in a rat model of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Fernandes, Lígia; Amorim, Yuri Martins; Silva, Elton Libério da; Silva, Samuel Calixto; Santos, Alécia Junia Aparecida; Peixoto, Franciele Natália; Pires, Luara Moniele Neves; Sakamoto, Raquel Yumi; Pinto, Flávia do Carmo Horta; Scarpa, Maria Virgínia Costa; Gonzaga de Freitas Araújo, Marcelo

    2018-03-08

    Owing to the growing resistance among isolates of Candida species to usual antifungal agents and the well-known therapeutic potential of curcumin, the purpose of this study was to develop and validate a vaginal formulation containing this substance and to evaluating its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis METHODS: Curcumin was incorporated in a vaginal cream in three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%). The different concentrations of the cream and its controls were intravaginally administered in an immunosuppressed rat model to evaluate the efficacy in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis. Samples of the cream were also subjected to centrifugation and physical stability tests and an analytical method for quantification of curcumin was validated based on HPLC RESULTS: The formulation was stable and the HPLC method could be considered suitable for the quantitative determination of curcumin in the cream. After six days of pre-clinical study, the number of infected animals was 1/6 in all groups treated with curcumin vaginal cream and the fungal burden showed a progressive reduction. Reduction of the inflammatory infiltrate was observed in the group treated with 1.0% cream CONCLUSION: Vaginal cream containing curcumin could be considered a promising effective antifungal medicine in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Enrichment dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes and the associated microbiome from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Andrea; Ramachandran, Padmini; Reed, Elizabeth; White, James R; Hasan, Nur; Subramanian, Poorani; Ryan, Gina; Jarvis, Karen; Grim, Christopher; Daquiqan, Ninalynn; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc; Colwell, Rita; Brown, Eric; Chen, Yi

    2016-11-16

    Microbiota that co-enrich during efforts to recover pathogens from foodborne outbreaks interfere with efficient detection and recovery. Here, dynamics of co-enriching microbiota during recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from naturally contaminated ice cream samples linked to an outbreak are described for three different initial enrichment formulations used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Enrichment cultures were analyzed using DNA extraction and sequencing from samples taken every 4 h throughout 48 h of enrichment. Resphera Insight and CosmosID analysis tools were employed for high-resolution profiling of 16S rRNA amplicons and whole genome shotgun data, respectively. During enrichment, other bacterial taxa were identified, including Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, Serratia, Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Streptococcus spp. Surprisingly, incidence of L. monocytogenes was proportionally greater at hour 0 than when tested 4, 8, and 12 h later with all three enrichment schemes. The corresponding increase in Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus spp.indicated these taxa co-enriched in competition with L. monocytogenes during early enrichment hours. L. monocytogenes became dominant after 24 h in all three enrichments. DNA sequences obtained from shotgun metagenomic data of Listeria monocytogenes at 48 h were assembled to produce a consensus draft genome which appeared to have a similar tracking utility to pure culture isolates of L. monocytogenes. All three methods performed equally well for enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes. The observation of potential competitive exclusion of L. mono by Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus in early enrichment hours provided novel information that may be used to further optimize enrichment formulations. Application of Resphera Insight for high-resolution analysis of 16S amplicon sequences accurately identified L. monocytogenes

  5. Outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing E. coli O145 and O26 infections associated with the consumption of ice cream produced at a farm, Belgium, 2007.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, K; Buvens, G; Possé, B; Van den Branden, D; Oosterlynck, O; De Zutter, L; Eilers, K; Piérard, D; Dierick, K; Van Damme-Lombaerts, R; Lauwers, C; Jacobs, R

    2008-02-14

    In October 2007, an outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O145 and E. coli O26 occurred among consumers of ice cream produced and sold in September 2007 at a farm in the province of Antwerp (Belgium). The ice cream was consumed at two birthday parties and also eaten at the farm. Five children, aged between two and 11 years, developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), and seven other co-exposed persons contracted severe diarrhoea. In three of the five HUS cases VTEC O145 infections were laboratory confirmed, one in association with VTEC O26. Identical isolates of E. coli O145 and O26 were detected with PCR and PFGE in faecal samples of patients and in ice cream leftovers from one of the birthday parties, in faecal samples taken from calves, and in samples of soiled straw from the farm at which the ice cream was produced. Ice cream was made from pasteurised milk and most likely contaminated by one of food handlers.

  6. The role of home-made ice cream as a vehicle of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 infection from fresh shell eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D.; Mawer, S. L.; Harman, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    A family outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis PT4 infection is described in which home-made ice cream was identified as the vehicle of infection. The ice cream contained approximately 10(5) S. enteritidis PT4 organisms per gm and was probably contaminated by an infected shell egg containing between 10(5)-10(8) organisms. The continued relevance of the Chief Medical Officer's warning on the use of raw shell eggs is highlighted. Home-made ice cream using the same recipe as ice cream that had been incriminated as the cause of the family outbreak of S. enteritidis PT4 infection was used to study the growth of the organism that might have occurred in the 3-4 h it took to prepare the product. When the inoculum was in the stationary phase, as it would be from shell or other cross contamination, there was a lag phase of 3 h before growth occurred at room temperature. Even when actively multiplying organisms were introduced, as may be found in an infected egg, there was less than 3 log(10) increase in the salmonella count in 4 h at room temperature. It was, therefore, given the high S. enteritidis count, unlikely that the ice cream was cross-contaminated. By contrast, raspberry sorbet at pH 3.73 proved to be lethal to a large inoculum of S. enteritidis and may be a relatively safe raw egg containing product. PMID:8062876

  7. Salivary mutans streptococci and lactobacilli modulations in young children on consumption of probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5.

    PubMed

    Singh, Richa Polka; Damle, Satyawan Gangaram; Chawla, Amrita

    2011-11-01

    To compare the levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in saliva of school children, before and after consumption of probiotic and control ice-cream. A double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial was carried out in forty, 12-14 year-old children, with no clinically detectable caries. The selected children were randomized equally into two groups I and II. Following an initial run-in period of 1 week, children in group I and II were given ice-creams 'A' and 'B', respectively, for 10 days. Being a cross-over study, the ice-creams were interchanged in the two groups after a 2-week wash-out period. Saliva samples at baseline and follow-up were assessed using Dentocult SM and Dentocult LB kits. On statistical evaluation, it was seen that probiotic ice-cream brought about a statistically significant reduction (p-value = 0.003) in salivary mutans streptococci levels with no significant effect on lactobacilli levels. In conclusion, probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 ATCC27536 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 can reduce the levels of certain caries-associated micro-organisms in saliva.

  8. Short communication: Effect of whey protein addition and transglutaminase treatment on the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Erfan; Goudarzi, Mostafa; Jooyandeh, Hossein

    2017-07-01

    The effects of whey protein addition and transglutaminase treatment, alone and in combination, on the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream were investigated. Adding whey protein with or without enzyme treatment decreased melting rate, overrun, and hardness of the reduced-fat ice cream; however, the enzyme-treated sample had a higher melting rate and overrun and softer texture. Whey protein-fortified samples showed higher melting resistance, but lower overrun and firmer texture compared with the enzyme-treated sample without added whey protein. Whey protein addition with or without transglutaminase treatment caused an increase in apparent viscosity and a decrease in flow index of the reduced-fat ice cream; nevertheless, the flow behavior of full-fat sample was most similar to the enzyme-treated reduced-fat sample with no added whey protein. Descriptive sensory analyses showed that neither whey protein addition nor transglutaminase treatment significantly influenced the flavor and odor of reduced-fat ice cream, but they both noticeably improved the color and texture of the final product. The results of this study suggest that whey protein addition with transglutaminase treatment improves the physical and sensory properties of reduced-fat ice cream more favorably than does whey protein addition or transglutaminase treatment alone. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicochemical, bioactive, and sensory properties of persimmon-based ice cream: technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution to determine optimum concentration.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Safa; Toker, Ömer Said; Yüksel, Ferhat; Çam, Mustafa; Kayacier, Ahmed; Dogan, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, persimmon puree was incorporated into the ice cream mix at different concentrations (8, 16, 24, 32, and 40%) and some physicochemical (dry matter, ash, protein, pH, sugar, fat, mineral, color, and viscosity), textural (hardness, stickiness, and work of penetration), bioactive (antiradical activity and total phenolic content), and sensory properties of samples were investigated. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach was used for the determination of optimum persimmon puree concentration based on the sensory and bioactive characteristics of final products. Increase in persimmon puree resulted in a decrease in the dry matter, ash, fat, protein contents, and viscosity of ice cream mix. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, and lactose were determined to be major sugars in the ice cream samples including persimmon and increase in persimmon puree concentration increased the fructose and glucose content. Better melting properties and textural characteristics were observed for the samples with the addition of persimmon. Magnesium, K, and Ca were determined to be major minerals in the samples and only K concentration increased with the increase in persimmon content. Bioactive properties of ice cream samples improved and, in general, acetone-water extracts showed higher bioactivity compared with ones obtained using methanol-water extracts. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach showed that the most preferred sample was the ice cream containing 24% persimmon puree. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Production and evaluation of mineral and nutrient contents, chemical composition, and sensory properties of ice creams fortified with laboratory-prepared peach fibre

    PubMed Central

    Yangılar, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Background In the coming years, a nutraceutical food may provide both physical and mental benefits that are commonly attributed to the active components of the food. Objective In this study, we determined the nutrient and mineral contents, sensory properties, and physical and chemical characteristics of ice creams manufactured using peach fibre at different concentrations (1 and 2%). Method A total of five experimental groups were formed: two types (from peach peel and pulp) of flour, two fibre concentrations (1 and 2%), and a control group without fibres. Results Flour obtained from peach pulp and peel was found to have a significant (p<0.05) effect on the chemical composition and elemental composition of ice cream samples, especially the rates of Ca, K, Mg, and P, which increased in the samples depending on the content of peach fibre. Sensory ratings and acceptability of ice creams decreased significantly with increasing peach peel fibre, whereas ice creams made with C (control) and B1 (ice creams made from 1% peach pulp fibre) was the highest scored by the panellists. Conclusions Peach fibre concentrates might be used as a good source of nutraceutical ingredients. PMID:27814781

  11. Adapted ice cream as a nutritional supplement in cancer patients: impact on quality of life and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Casas, Francese; León, Concha; Jovell, Esther; Gómez, Joana; Corvitto, Angelo; Blanco, Remei; Alfaro, Jordi; Ángel Seguí, Miguel; Saigí, Eugeni; Massanés, Toni; Sala, Carme; Librán, Anna; Arcusa, Angels

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of adapted ice cream as a dietary supplement on the quality of life (QLQ) of malnourished patients with cancer. We present an exploratory prospective observational study comparing two patterns of nutrition in cancer patients admitted during the study period who presented malnutrition disorders: adapted ice cream (Group I: 39 patients) and nutritional supplements (Group II: 31 patients). Patients were selected from two different hospitals from the same Oncologic Institute. QLQ was evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and QLQ of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ C30). Nutrition was determined by the PG-SGA test. HADS showed significant differences in anxiety (p = 0.023) and depression (p = 0.011) at the end of the study only in Group I. QLQ-C30 revealed statistically significant differences in baseline measures of global dimension between the two groups (Group I: 40.64-56.36 CI; Group II: 25.70-43.11 CI; p = 0.017). Differences were also present in the social dimension (Group I: 77.42-93.51 CI; Group II: 55.85-82.85 CI; p = 0.039). Statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups at the end of the study in the global scale: Group I had 49.36-63.88 CI and Group II had 33.05-51.88 CI (p = 0.016), and in the fatigue scale: Group I had 36.19-53.83 CI and Group II had mean = 65.87, 52.50-79.23 CI (p = 0.007). The administration of ice cream could cover, in part, the social aspect of food and improve QLQ in malnourished cancer patients. These results are encouraging and deserve further confirmation.

  12. The effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition on the chemical and physical characteristics, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral compositions and sensory properties of ice creams.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Arzu Kavaz; Şat, Ihsan Güngör; Yüksel, Mehmet

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition (0.5, 1 and 2 %) on the chemical and physical properties, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral contents and sensory characteristics of ice creams. The total solids, fat, titratable acidity, viscosity, first dripping time and complete melting time values, a (*) and b (*) colour properties, citric, lactic, acetic and butyric acid levels and Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, K, Zn and Na concentrations of ice creams showed an increase with the increment of terebinth coffee amount, while protein, pH, L (*), propionic acid and orotic acid values decreased. However, Al and malic acid were not detected in any of the samples. The overall acceptability scores of the sensory properties showed that the addition of 1 % terebinth coffee to the ice cream was more appreciated by the panellists.

  13. Effect of high-pressure homogenization on droplet size distribution and rheological properties of ice cream mixes.

    PubMed

    Innocente, N; Biasutti, M; Venir, E; Spaziani, M; Marchesini, G

    2009-05-01

    The effect of different homogenization pressures (15/3 MPa and 97/3 MPa) on fat globule size and distribution as well as on structure-property relationships of ice cream mixes was investigated. Dynamic light scattering, steady shear, and dynamic rheological analyses were performed on mixes with different fat contents (5 and 8%) and different aging times (4 and 20 h). The homogenization of ice cream mixes determined a change from bimodal to monomodal particle size distributions and a reduction in the mean particle diameter. Mean fat globule diameters were reduced at higher pressure, but the homogenization effect on size reduction was less marked with the highest fat content. The rheological behavior of mixes was influenced by both the dispersed and the continuous phases. Higher fat contents caused greater viscosity and dynamic moduli. The lower homogenization pressure (15/3 MPa) mainly affected the dispersed phase and resulted in a more pronounced viscosity reduction in the higher fat content mixes. High-pressure homogenization (97/3 MPa) greatly enhanced the viscoelastic properties and the apparent viscosity. Rheological results indicated that unhomogenized and 15/3 MPa homogenized mixes behaved as weak gels. The 97/3 MPa treatment led to stronger gels, perhaps as the overall result of a network rearrangement or interpenetrating network formation, and the fat globules were found to behave as interactive fillers. High-pressure homogenization determined the apparent viscosity of 5% fat to be comparable to that of 8% fat unhomogenized mix.

  14. Extraction and characterization of gelatin from two edible Sudanese insects and its applications in ice cream making.

    PubMed

    Mariod, Abdalbasit Adam; Fadul, Hadia

    2015-07-01

    Three methods were used for extraction of gelatin from two insects, melon bug (Coridius viduatus) and sorghum bug (Agonoscelis versicoloratus versicoloratus). Extraction of insect gelatin using hot water gave higher yield reached up to 3.0%, followed by mild acid extraction which gave 1.5% and distilled water extraction which gave only 1.0%, respectively. The obtained gelatins were characterized by FTIR and the spectra of insect's gelatin seem to be similar when compared with commercial gelatin. Amide II bands of gelatins from melon and sorghum bug appeared around at 1542-1537 cm(-1). Slight differences in the amino acid composition of gelatin extracted from the two insects were observed. Ice cream was made by using 0.5% insect's gelatin and compared with that made using 0.5% commercial gelatin as stabilizing agent. The properties of the obtained ice cream produced using insects gelatin were significantly different when compared with that made using commercial gelatin. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. [A case of anaphylaxis due to rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream with pollen food allergy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kitabayashi, Taeru; Sato, Sayuri; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    We experienced a 10-year-old boy who had anaphylaxis after eating rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream. The patient felt a sense of discomfort in his throat when eating apple, peach, loquat, Japanese pear, and kiwi fruit. Therefore, we measured specific IgE antibodies to allergen components by ImmunoCAP ISAC. Consequently, the patient gave positive results for all PR-10 proteins from birch, alder, hazel, apple, peach, peanut, hazelnut, and soybean, so we diagnosed him with Pollen Food Allergy Syndrome (PFAS) induced by cross reactivity with pollens of birch family and fruits of rose family. When we conducted the skin prick test as is for red rose syrup because of the belief that anaphylaxis was caused by the rose ingredient contained in rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream, the patient gave a strong positive result. However, the results were negative for rose essence and Food Red No. 2 contained. Subsequently, it was found that red rose syrup contained apple juice. Therefore, we conducted the prick-prick test for apple, and the patient was confirmed to be strongly positive to apple. We thus identified apple as the cause of anaphylaxis. Since there is no legal obligation of labeling specific raw materials when directly selling manufactured and processed food products to general consumers, it is possible for general consumers to mistakenly take them in without knowing the containment of allergic substances. It is believed that the labeling method should be improved in the future.

  16. Evaluation of efficacy, pharmacokinetics and tolerability of peptidomimetic aspartic proteinase inhibitors as cream formulation in experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Tringali, Giuseppe; Greco, Maria Cristina; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Calugi, Chiara; Trabocchi, Andrea; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Cauda, Roberto; Cassone, Antonio; Guarna, Antonio; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2014-08-01

    It has been previously shown that the treatment with the two protease inhibitors APG12 and APG19 confers protection in a rat model of mucosal candidiasis; in this study, we examined whether these peptidomimetic inhibitors are also effective as a cream formulation in reducing Candida albicans vaginal infection. These efficacy studies were performed in a rat model of estrogen-dependent rat vaginitis by C. albicans on both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant C. albicans, and on both caspofungin-susceptible and caspofungin-resistant C. albicans strains. In vivo studies were also conducted in female albino rats and rabbits to obtain information about the safety, local tolerability and principal pharmacokinetics parameters of the two compounds. Both hit compounds showed remarkable results within the 48-h range as effective inhibitors of the infection, particularly causing rapid decay of vaginal C. albicans burden. Importantly, the two compounds showed marked acceleration of fungus clearance in the rats challenged with the fluconazole-resistant as well as with the capsofungin-resistant strain of C. albicans. Both compounds showed fast elimination rates when given by the intravenous route, and poor systemic absorption after intravaginal cream administration. Test drugs were also well tolerated in 7-day local tolerability experiments in the rabbit. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. A novel approach for development and characterization of effective mosquito repellent cream formulation containing citronella oil.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Mishra, Nidhi; Sinha, Priyam; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Pal, Anirban; Tripathi, Arun Kumar; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Citronella essential oil (CEO) has been reported as an excellent mosquito repellent; however, mild irritancy and rapid volatility limit its topical application. It was aimed to develop a nonirritant, stable, and consistent cream of CEO with improved residence time on skin using an industrial approach. Phase inversion temperature technique was employed to prepare the cream. It was optimized and characterized based on sensorial evaluation, emulsification, and consistency in terms of softness, greasiness, stickiness, and pH. The optimum batch (B5) was evaluated for viscosity (90249.67±139.95 cP), texture profile with respect to firmness (38.67±0.88 g), spreadability (70.33±0.88 mJ), and extrudability (639.67±8.09±0.1 mJ) using texture analyzer along with two most popular marketed products selected as reference standard. Subsequently, B5 was found to be stable for more than 90 days and showed enhanced duration of mosquito repellency as compared to CEO. HS-GC ensured the intactness of CEO in B5. Investigated primary irritation index (PII 0.45) positioned B5 into the category of irritation barely perceptible. The pronounced texture profile and stability of B5 with extended residence time and less PII revealed its potential application in industry and offered a promising alternative to the marketed products of synthetic origin.

  18. Use of an in vitro human skin permeation assay to assess bioequivalence of two topical cream formulations containing butenafine hydrochloride (1%, w/w).

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amitava; Kim, Nanhye; Spark, Darren; Toner, Frank; Craig, Susan; Roper, Clive; Meyer, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this work was to investigate, using an in vitro human skin permeation study, whether changes in the excipients of butenafine hydrochloride cream would have any effect on bioperformance of the formulation. Such in vitro data would be a surrogate for any requirement of a bioequivalence (BE) study to demonstrate formulation similarity. A LC-MS/MS method for quantitation of butenafine in various matrices was developed and validated. A pilot study was performed to validate the in vitro skin permeation methodology using three cream formulations containing butenafine hydrochloride at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% (w/w). Finally, a definitive in vitro human skin permeation study was conducted, comparing the extent of butenafine hydrochloride permeation from the new formulation to that from the current formulation. The results of the study comparing the two formulations showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the extent of butenafine permeation into human skin. In conclusion, these in vitro data demonstrated that the formulation change is likely to have no significant impact on the bioperformance of 1% (w/w) butenafine hydrochloride cream. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensory Profile, Drivers of Liking, and Influence of Information on the Acceptance of Low-Calorie Synbiotic and Probiotic Chocolate Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Peres, Juliana; Esmerino, Erick; da Silva, Alessandra Lins; Racowski, Ilana; Bolini, Helena

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensory profile and the influence of the information on the acceptance of the symbiotic chocolate ice cream made with sucrose and different sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, neotame, Stevia with 60%, 85%, 95%, and 97% of rebaudioside A) through analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's test, and partial least of square (PLS) regression. Quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) was carried out by 18 assessors, who evaluated the samples in relation to the raised descriptors. Additionally, two acceptance tests (blind/informed) were performed with 120 consumers. The samples sweetened with sucralose and rebaudioside 97% presented similar profile to the control sample, thus having a better potential to replace sucrose in chocolate ice cream. The acceptance test carried out with information had higher scores for the attributes appearance, aroma, flavor, texture, and overall impression. The correlation between data from the acceptance tests and QDA showed that the descriptors "low-energy" and "natural sweetener" claims interfered negatively in the drivers of liking of chocolate ice cream. Therefore, we can conclude that some characteristics unnoticed by consumers were highlighted after providing the information about the product's characteristics. This research is important and contributes to the manufacture and development of low-calorie chocolate ice cream with functional properties, guiding, through suitable sensory and statistical tools, the application of stevia and other artificial sweeteners in products with reduction or total absence of sucrose and highlighting the impact of the labeling of these products on consumer perception. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. A Novel Approach for Development and Characterization of Effective Mosquito Repellent Cream Formulation Containing Citronella Oil

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Mishra, Nidhi; Sinha, Priyam; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Pal, Anirban; Tripathi, Arun Kumar; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Citronella essential oil (CEO) has been reported as an excellent mosquito repellent; however, mild irritancy and rapid volatility limit its topical application. It was aimed to develop a nonirritant, stable, and consistent cream of CEO with improved residence time on skin using an industrial approach. Phase inversion temperature technique was employed to prepare the cream. It was optimized and characterized based on sensorial evaluation, emulsification, and consistency in terms of softness, greasiness, stickiness, and pH. The optimum batch (B5) was evaluated for viscosity (90249.67 ± 139.95 cP), texture profile with respect to firmness (38.67 ± 0.88 g), spreadability (70.33 ± 0.88 mJ), and extrudability (639.67 ± 8.09 ± 0.1 mJ) using texture analyzer along with two most popular marketed products selected as reference standard. Subsequently, B5 was found to be stable for more than 90 days and showed enhanced duration of mosquito repellency as compared to CEO. HS-GC ensured the intactness of CEO in B5. Investigated primary irritation index (PII 0.45) positioned B5 into the category of irritation barely perceptible. The pronounced texture profile and stability of B5 with extended residence time and less PII revealed its potential application in industry and offered a promising alternative to the marketed products of synthetic origin. PMID:25379509

  1. Detection of viable Salmonella in ice cream by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay combining propidium monoazide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Yang, Ming; Liu, Shuchun; Chen, Wanyi; Suo, Biao

    2015-09-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows rapid detection of Salmonella in frozen dairy products, but it might cause a false positive detection result because it might amplify DNA from dead target cells as well. In this study, Salmonella-free frozen ice cream was initially inoculated with heat-killed Salmonella Typhimurium cells and stored at -18°C. Bacterial DNA extracted from the sample was amplified using TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR targeting the invA gene. Our results indicated that DNA from the dead cells remained stable in frozen ice cream for at least 20 days, and could produce fluorescence signal for real-time PCR as well. To overcome this limitation, propidium monoazide (PMA) was combined with real-time PCR. PMA treatment can effectively prevent PCR amplification from heat-killed Salmonella cells in frozen ice cream. The PMA real-time PCR assay can selectively detect viable Salmonella at as low as 10 3  CFU/mL. Combining 18 hours of pre-enrichment with the assay allows for the detection of viable Salmonella at 10 0  CFU/mL and avoiding the false-positive result of dead cells. The PMA real-time PCR assay provides an alternative specifically for detection of viable Salmonella in ice cream. However, when the PMA real-time PCR assay was evaluated in ice cream subjected to frozen storage, it obviously underestimated the contamination situation of viable Salmonella, which might lead to a false negative result. According to this result, the use of enrichment prior to PMA real-time PCR analysis remains as the more appropriate approach. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Reconstruction After Hemipelvectomy With the Ice-Cream Cone Prosthesis: What Are the Short-term Clinical Results?

    PubMed

    Barrientos-Ruiz, Irene; Ortiz-Cruz, Eduardo José; Peleteiro-Pensado, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Reconstruction after internal hemipelvectomy resection likely provides better function than hindquarter amputation. However, many reconstruction methods have been used, complications with these approaches are common, and function often is poor; because of these issues, it seems important to investigate alternative implants and surgical techniques. The purposes of this study were (1) to identify the frequency of surgical site complications and infection associated with the use of the Ice-Cream Cone prosthesis for reconstruction after hemipelvectomy for oncological indications; (2) to evaluate the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) outcomes scores in a small group of patients treated with this implant in the short term; and (3) to quantify the surgical margins and frequency of local recurrence in the short term in this group of patients. Between 2008 and 2013, one center performed a total of 27 internal hemipelvectomies for oncological indications. Of those, 23 (85%) were treated with reconstruction. Our general indications for reconstruction were patients whose pelvic stability was affected by the resection and whose general condition was sufficiently strong to tolerate the reconstructive procedure. Of those patients undergoing reconstruction, 14 (61%) were treated with an Ice-Cream Cone-style implant (Coned ® ; Stanmore Worldwide Ltd, Elstree, UK; and Socincer ® custom-made implant for the pelvis, Gijón, Spain), whereas nine others were treated with other implants or allografts. The indications during this time for using the Ice-Cream Cone implant were pelvic tumors affecting the periacetabular area without iliac wing involvement. Of those 14, 10 were available for followup at a minimum of 2 years (median, 3 years; range, 2-5 years) unless a study endpoint (wound complication, infection, or local recurrence) was observed earlier. Study endpoints were ascertained by chart review performed by one of the authors. Surgical site complications occurred in five

  3. Effect of Probiotic Containing Ice-cream on Salivary Mutans Streptococci (SMS) Levels in Children of 6-12 Years of Age: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Study with Six-months Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    KE, Vijayaprasad; Taranath, Mahanthesh; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Nara, Asha; Sarpangala, Mythri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the caries risk based on the salivary levels of streptococcus mutans in children of 6-12 years of age group before and after consuming probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5. Materials and Methods: A double blind, placebo controlled trial was carried out in 60 children aged between 6 to 12 years with zero decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva sample were collected before the consumption of ice-cream and Streptococcus mutans count was calculated and recorded as baseline data. For the next seven days both the groups were given ice creams marked as A and B. Saliva samples were collected after ice-cream consumption at the end of study period and also after a washout period of 30 days and again after six months. Samples were inoculated and colonies were counted. Results: On statistical evaluation by students paired t-test, probiotic ice-cream brought significant reduction in the Streptococcus mutans count after seven days of ice-cream ingestion (p<0.001) and also after 30 d of washout period (p<0.001). There was no significant reduction (p=0.076) by normal ice-cream consumption. After six months of the study period in both the groups the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans was similar to the baseline. Conclusion: Probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 can cause reduction in caries causative organism. The dosage of the probiotic organisms for the long term or synergetic effect on the oral health are still needed to be explored. PMID:25859515

  4. Effect of Probiotic Containing Ice-cream on Salivary Mutans Streptococci (SMS) Levels in Children of 6-12 Years of Age: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Study with Six-months Follow Up.

    PubMed

    Ashwin, Devasya; Ke, Vijayaprasad; Taranath, Mahanthesh; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Nara, Asha; Sarpangala, Mythri

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the caries risk based on the salivary levels of streptococcus mutans in children of 6-12 years of age group before and after consuming probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5. A double blind, placebo controlled trial was carried out in 60 children aged between 6 to 12 years with zero decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva sample were collected before the consumption of ice-cream and Streptococcus mutans count was calculated and recorded as baseline data. For the next seven days both the groups were given ice creams marked as A and B. Saliva samples were collected after ice-cream consumption at the end of study period and also after a washout period of 30 days and again after six months. Samples were inoculated and colonies were counted. On statistical evaluation by students paired t-test, probiotic ice-cream brought significant reduction in the Streptococcus mutans count after seven days of ice-cream ingestion (p<0.001) and also after 30 d of washout period (p<0.001). There was no significant reduction (p=0.076) by normal ice-cream consumption. After six months of the study period in both the groups the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans was similar to the baseline. Probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 can cause reduction in caries causative organism. The dosage of the probiotic organisms for the long term or synergetic effect on the oral health are still needed to be explored.

  5. Detection and enumeration of Salmonella enteritidis in homemade ice cream associated with an outbreak: comparison of conventional and real-time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Seo, K H; Valentin-Bon, I E; Brackett, R E

    2006-03-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a significant cause of foodborne illnesses in the United States. Consumption of undercooked eggs and egg-containing products has been the primary risk factor for the disease. The importance of the bacterial enumeration technique has been enormously stressed because of the quantitative risk analysis of SE in shell eggs. Traditional enumeration methods mainly depend on slow and tedious most-probable-number (MPN) methods. Therefore, specific, sensitive, and rapid methods for SE quantitation are needed to collect sufficient data for risk assessment and food safety policy development. We previously developed a real-time quantitative PCR assay for the direct detection and enumeration of SE and, in this study, applied it to naturally contaminated ice cream samples with and without enrichment. The detection limit of the real-time PCR assay was determined with artificially inoculated ice cream. When applied to the direct detection and quantification of SE in ice cream, the real-time PCR assay was as sensitive as the conventional plate count method in frequency of detection. However, populations of SE derived from real-time quantitative PCR were approximately 1 log higher than provided by MPN and CFU values obtained by conventional culture methods. The detection and enumeration of SE in naturally contaminated ice cream can be completed in 3 h by this real-time PCR method, whereas the cultural enrichment method requires 5 to 7 days. A commercial immunoassay for the specific detection of SE was also included in the study. The real-time PCR assay proved to be a valuable tool that may be useful to the food industry in monitoring its processes to improve product quality and safety.

  6. Usefulness of the Ice-Cream Cone Pattern in Computed Tomography for Prediction of Angiomyolipoma in Patients With a Small Renal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Yun, Bu Hyeon; Hwang, In Sang; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung; Kim, Jin Woong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A morphologic contour method for assessing an exophytic renal mass as benign versus malignant on the basis of the shape of the interface with the renal parenchyma was recently developed. We investigated the usefulness of this morphologic contour method for predicting angiomyolipoma (AML) in patients who underwent partial nephrectomy for small renal masses (SRMs). Materials and Methods From January 2004 to March 2013, among 197 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy for suspicious renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the medical records of 153 patients with tumors (AML or RCC) ≤3 cm in diameter were retrospectively reviewed. Patient characteristics including age, gender, type of surgery, size and location of tumor, pathologic results, and specific findings of the imaging study ("ice-cream cone" shape) were compared between the AML and RCC groups. Results AML was diagnosed in 18 patients and RCC was diagnosed in 135 patients. Gender (p=0.001), tumor size (p=0.032), and presence of the ice-cream cone shape (p=0.001) showed statistically significant differences between the AML group and the RCC group. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, female gender (odds ratio [OR], 5.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45 to 18.57; p=0.011), tumor size (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.92; p=0.034), and presence of the ice-cream cone shape (OR, 18.12; 95% CI, 4.97 to 66.06; p=0.001) were predictors of AML. Conclusions This study confirmed a high incidence of AML in females. Also, the ice-cream cone shape and small tumor size were significant predictors of AML in SRMs. These finding could be beneficial for counseling patients with SRMs. PMID:23956824

  7. Soft, fortified ice-cream for head and neck cancer patients: a useful first step in nutritional and swallowing difficulties associated with multi-modal management.

    PubMed

    Trinidade, Aaron; Martinelli, Katrina; Andreou, Zenon; Kothari, Prasad

    2012-04-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer have complex swallowing and nutritional concerns. Most patients are malnourished, and treatment modalities within the aerodigestive tract have profound effects on future swallowing and nutrition. The objective of this study is to investigate whether the introduction of fortified soft ice-cream to post-operative head and neck cancer patients would increase compliance with oral-feeding regimes. Using a questionnaire study, an ice-cream machine that produces fortified soft ice-cream was introduced onto our ward, and 30 patients were asked to fill out questionnaires based on their experience in addition to their oral-feeding regime. Results indicate that overall patient satisfaction and compliance with oral-feeding regimes increased: 77% felt that the taste was excellent and also felt that it was easy to eat; 60% felt that it eased the symptoms associated with their symptoms, in particular its cold temperature. We conclude from the results that the inability of patients undergoing multi-modal treatment for upper aerodigestive tract cancer to enjoy normal foods and its effects on their quality of life is underestimated. Providing a food to that is palatable, familiar and acceptable as it is safe and nutritionally sound can increase compliance with oral-feeding regimes. The ice-cream was safe to use in the early post-operative period, especially soothing in patients undergoing upper aerodigestive radiotherapy and high in protein and calorific content. Our practice may have wider benefits, including patients with oral and oropharyngeal infections, the elderly and patients with neurological dysphagia resulting from stroke.

  8. LCA of an ice cream cup of polyethylene coated paper: how does the choice of the end-of-life affect the results?

    PubMed

    Buccino, Carla; Ferrara, Carmen; Malvano, Carmela; De Feo, Giovanni

    2017-11-07

    This study presents an evaluation of the environmental performance of an ice cream cup made of polyethylene (PE)/paper laminate using a life cycle assessment approach 'from cradle to grave'. Two opposite alternative disposal scenarios, as well as their intermediate combinations, were considered: 100% incineration and 100% landfilling. The environmental impacts were calculated using the EPD 2013 evaluation method since the study was developed in an Environmental Product Declaration perspective as well as the method ReCiPe 2008 H at the endpoint level. PE/paper laminate production was the most impactful process since it provided the highest contribution to total impacts in four of six impact categories considered. Ice cream cup production was the second impactful process. The 100% incineration scenario provided negligible contribution to life cycle total impact for all impact categories; while considering the landfilling scenario, the percentage contributions to the total impact provided by the end-of-life phase increased considerably, until to be comparable to the contributions provided by the production processes of the PE/paper laminate and the ice cream cup. The obtained results highlighted that different disposal scenarios can affect significantly the conclusions of a study. At the endpoint level, incineration was more environmentally sound than landfilling for all the ReCiPe damage categories.

  9. Comparative evaluation of direct plating and most probable number for enumeration of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated ice cream products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Pouillot, Régis; S Burall, Laurel; Strain, Errol A; Van Doren, Jane M; De Jesus, Antonio J; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Hua; Ali, Laila; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Zhang, Guodong; Hu, Lijun; Day, James; Sheth, Ishani; Kang, Jihun; Sahu, Surasri; Srinivasan, Devayani; Brown, Eric W; Parish, Mickey; Zink, Donald L; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2017-01-16

    A precise and accurate method for enumeration of low level of Listeria monocytogenes in foods is critical to a variety of studies. In this study, paired comparison of most probable number (MPN) and direct plating enumeration of L. monocytogenes was conducted on a total of 1730 outbreak-associated ice cream samples that were naturally contaminated with low level of L. monocytogenes. MPN was performed on all 1730 samples. Direct plating was performed on all samples using the RAPID'L.mono (RLM) agar (1600 samples) and agar Listeria Ottaviani and Agosti (ALOA; 130 samples). Probabilistic analysis with Bayesian inference model was used to compare paired direct plating and MPN estimates of L. monocytogenes in ice cream samples because assumptions implicit in ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression analyses were not met for such a comparison. The probabilistic analysis revealed good agreement between the MPN and direct plating estimates, and this agreement showed that the MPN schemes and direct plating schemes using ALOA or RLM evaluated in the present study were suitable for enumerating low levels of L. monocytogenes in these ice cream samples. The statistical analysis further revealed that OLS linear regression analyses of direct plating and MPN data did introduce bias that incorrectly characterized systematic differences between estimates from the two methods. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Effectiveness of prerequisites and the HACCP plan in the control of microbial contamination in ice cream and cheese companies.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Eva; Amorós, José Antonio; Escriche, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    In food safety, implementation of prerequisites and application of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) guarantee the control of processes, and microbiological criteria permit validation of their effectiveness. With these aims in mind, this article presents the results obtained by the official control carried out by the Valencian administration in ice cream and cheese companies, located in the Xativa/Ontinyente area (Valencian region, Spain) in the period between 2005 and 2010. The audits of Good Hygienic Practices (GHP) and HACCP show that "Structure & Design" followed by "Hygiene & Cleaning" and "Traceability" were the evaluated items with most nonconformities. Pathogenic microorganisms were not found in any of the final products analyzed. Microorganism indicators of unhygienic conditions were present in 100% of the analyses; however, 87.98% of them had low levels, which did not exceed the microbiological criteria. These results highlight the general good effectiveness of the safety management systems implemented and emphasize that companies and official control must continue working in order to guarantee the consumers' welfare.

  11. Growth of GaAs “nano ice cream cones” by dual wavelength pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamp, C. T.; Jesser, W. A.; Shivaram, B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Harmonic generation crystals inherently offer the possibility of using multiple wavelengths of light in a single laser pulse. In the present experiment, the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelengths from an Nd:YAG laser are focused together on GaAs and GaSb targets for ablation. Incident energy densities up to about 45 J/cm 2 at 10 Hz with substrate temperatures between 25 and 600 °C for durations of about 60 s have been used in an ambient gas pressure of about 10 -6 Torr. The ablated material was collected on electron-transparent amorphous carbon films for TEM analysis. Apart from a high density of isolated nanocrystals, the most common morphology observed consists of a crystalline GaAs cone-like structure in contact with a sphere of liquid Ga, resembling an "ice cream cone", typically 50-100 nm in length. For all of the heterostuctures of this type, the liquid/solid/vacuum triple junction is found to correspond to the widest point on the cone. These heterostructures likely form by preferential evaporation of As from molten GaAs drops ablated from the target. The resulting morphology minimizes the interfacial and surface energies of the liquid Ga and solid GaAs.

  12. Peptide drug stability: The anti-inflammatory drugs Pep19-2.5 and Pep19-4LF in cream formulation.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Nicole; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Gutsmann, Thomas; Goldmann, Torsten; Englisch, Uwe; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2018-03-30

    In previous years, we developed anti-infective drugs based on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have been shown to effectively block severe infections and inflammation in vitro as well as in vivo. Besides systemic application, the occurrence of severe local infections necessitates a topical application for example in the case of severe skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI). Recent investigations show that the synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptide (SALP) Pep19-2.5 (Aspidasept® I) and a variant called Pep19-4LF (Aspidasept® II) are able to supress inflammation reactions also in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, and dendritic cells from the skin. For topical application, a possible formulation represents the drug dispersed into a pharmaceutical cream (DAC base cream). Here, we present investigations on the stability of the peptides using this formulation in dependence on time, which includes the evaluation of the extraction procedure, the quantitative analysis of the peptides after extraction, its sensitivity to protease degradation and its ability to maintain activity against LPS-induced inflammation in vitro. We have developed an extraction procedure for the peptides with an optimum yield and showed that Pep19-2.5 is present as a dimer after extraction from the cream, whereas Pep19-4LF retains its monomeric form. Both peptides show no degradation by chymotrypsin after extraction for at least 1 h, which is indicative for an attachment of constituents of the base cream, inhibiting the cutting into peptidic part structures. The extracted peptides and in particular the dimeric Pep19-2.5 are still able to inhibit the LPS-induced inflammation reaction in human mononuclear cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of major betalain pigments -gomphrenin, betanin and isobetanin from Basella rubra L. fruit and evaluation of efficacy as a natural colourant in product (ice cream) development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Sravan; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Prakash, Maya; Giridhar, P

    2015-08-01

    Basella rubra L. (Basellaceae) commonly known as Malabar spinach is a leafy vegetable which accumulates pigments in its fruits. To find out the feasibility of utilizing pigment rich extracts of its fruit as natural food colourant, fruits at different stages were analysed for pigment profiling, carbohydrate content, physical dimensions and weight. Total betalains content increased rapidly from early (green) through intermediate (half-done red-violet) to matured stage (red-violet). Maximum pigment content was observed in ripened fruits (143.76 mg/100 g fresh weight). The major betalain pigment characterized was gomphrenin I in ripened fruits (26.06 mg), followed by intermediate fruits (2.15 mg) and least in early fruits (0.23 mg) in 100 g of fresh deseeded fruits. Total carbohydrates content and the chroma values (redness) were also increased during ontogeny of B. rubra fruits. The textural characters of developing fruits showed the smoothness of green fruits with lower rupture force (0.16 N/s) than ripe ones (0.38 N/s). The pigment-rich fruit extract was used as natural colourant in ice-cream, to evaluate its effect on physicochemical properties and acceptability of the product. After six months of storage at -20 °C, 86.63 % colour was retained in ice-cream. The ice-cream had good overall sensorial quality and was liked by consumers indicating that addition of B. rubra fruit extract did not alter the sensory quality of the product. The colour values also indicate that there was no significant decrease of this pigment-rich extracts of fruits for its incorporation in food products.

  14. A study on the kinetic behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in ice cream stored under static and dynamic chilling and freezing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gougouli, M; Angelidis, A S; Koutsoumanis, K

    2008-02-01

    The kinetic behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in 2 commercial ice cream products (A and B) that were inoculated and stored under static chilling (4 to 16 degrees C), static freezing (-5 to -33 degrees C), dynamic chilling, and dynamic chilling-freezing conditions was studied, simulating conditions of the aging process and of normal or abuse conditions during distribution and storage. The ice cream products A and B had different compositions but similar pH (6.50 and 6.67, respectively) and water activity (0.957 and 0.965, respectively) values. For both chilling and freezing conditions, the kinetic behavior of the pathogen was similar in the 2 products, indicating that the pH and water activity, together with temperature, were the main factors controlling growth. Under chilling conditions, L. monocytogenes grew well at all temperatures tested. Under freezing conditions, no significant changes in the population of the pathogen were observed throughout a 90-d storage period for either of the inoculum levels tested (10(3) and 10(6) cfu/g). Growth data from chilled storage conditions were fitted to a mathematical model, and the calculated maximum specific growth rate was modeled as a function of temperature by using a square root model. The model was further validated under dynamic chilling and dynamic chilling-freezing conditions by using 4 different storage temperature scenarios. Under dynamic chilling conditions, the model accurately predicted the growth of the pathogen in both products, with 99.5% of the predictions lying within the +/- 20% relative error zone. The results from the chilling-freezing storage experiments showed that the pathogen was able to initiate growth within a very short time after a temperature upshift from freezing to chilling temperatures. This indicates that the freezing conditions did not cause a severe stress in L. monocytogenes cells capable of leading to a significant "additional" lag phase during the subsequent growth of the pathogen at

  15. Determination of the absolute molecular weight averages and molecular weight distributions of alginates used as ice cream stabilizers by using multiangle laser light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Turquois, T; Gloria, H

    2000-11-01

    High-performance size exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering detection (HPSEC-MALLS) was used for characterizing complete molecular weight distributions for a range of commercial alginates used as ice cream stabilizers. For the samples investigated, molecular weight averages were found to vary between 115 000 and 321 700 g/mol and polydispersity indexes varied from 1. 53 to 3.25. These samples displayed a high content of low molecular weights. Thus, the weight percentage of material below 100 000 g/mol ranged between 6.9 and 54.4%.

  16. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; ...

    2016-05-18

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initialmore » contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study.« less

  17. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initialmore » contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study.« less

  18. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S.; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study. PMID:27242775

  19. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study.

  20. Novel and successful free comments method for sensory characterization of chocolate ice cream: A comparative study between pivot profile and comment analysis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernando G A; Esmerino, Erick A; Filho, Elson R Tavares; Ferraz, Juliana P; da Cruz, Adriano G; Bolini, Helena M A

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensory profiling methods have gained space in the sensory evaluation field. Techniques using direct analysis of the terms generated by consumers are considered easy to perform, without specific training requirements, thus improving knowledge about consumer perceptions on various products. This study aimed to determine the sensory profile of different commercial samples of chocolate ice cream, labeled as conventional and light or diet, using the "comment analysis" and "pivot profile" methods, based on consumers' perceptions. In the comment analysis task, consumers responded to 2 separate open questions describing the sensory attributes they liked or disliked in each sample. In the pivot profile method, samples were served in pairs (consisting of a coded sample and pivot), and consumers indicated the higher and lower intensity attributes in the target sample compared with the pivot. We observed that both methods were able to characterize the different chocolate ice cream samples using consumer perception, with high correlation results and configurational similarity (regression vector coefficient=0.917) between them. However, it is worth emphasizing that comment analysis is performed intuitively by consumers, whereas the pivot profile method showed high analytical and discriminative power even using consumers, proving to be a promising technique for routine application when classical descriptive methods cannot be used. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alternative aircraft anti-icing formulations with reduced aquatic toxicity and biochemical oxygen demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Harris; Joback, Kevin; Geis, Steven; Bowman, George; Mericas, Dean; Corsi, Steven R.; Ferguson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The current research was conducted to identify alternative aircraft and pavement deicer and anti-icer formulations with improved environmental characteristics compared to currently used commercial products (2007). The environmental characteristics of primary concern are the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and aquatic toxicity of the fully formulated products. Except when the distinction among products is necessary for clarity, “deicer” will refer to aircraft-deicing fluids (ADFs), aircraft anti-icing fluids (AAFs), and pavementdeicing materials (PDMs).

  2. A novel cream formulation containing nicotinamide 4%, arbutin 3%, bisabolol 1%, and retinaldehyde 0.05% for treatment of epidermal melasma.

    PubMed

    Crocco, Elisete I; Veasey, John V; Boin, Maria F; Lellis, Rute F; Alves, Renata O

    2015-11-01

    Epidermal melasma is a common hyperpigmentation disorder that can be challenging to treat. Although current treatment options for melasma are limited, topical skin-lightening preparations have widely been used as alternatives to hydroquinone. In this prospective, single-arm, open-label study, treatment of epidermal melasma with a novel cream formulation containing nicotinamide 4%, arbutin 3%, bisabolol 1%, and retinaldehyde 0.05% was associated with reductions in Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) scores as well as total melasma surface area as measured by medical imaging software. Treatment outcomes including tolerance and safety profiles as well as patient satisfaction and product appreciation showed this novel cosmetic compound may be valuable in the treatment of epidermal melasma.

  3. Virulence profiling and quantification of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O145:H28 and O26:H11 isolated during an ice cream-related hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak.

    PubMed

    Buvens, Glenn; Possé, Björn; De Schrijver, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Lauwers, Sabine; Piérard, Denis

    2011-03-01

    In September-October 2007, a mixed-serotype outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O145:H28 and O26:H11 occurred in the province of Antwerp, Belgium. Five girls aged between 2 and 11 years developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, and seven other coexposed persons with bloody diarrhea were identified. Laboratory confirmation of O145:H28 infection was obtained for three hemolytic uremic syndrome patients, one of whom was coinfected with O26:H11. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations revealed ice cream as the most likely source of the outbreak. The ice cream was produced at a local dairy farm using pasteurized milk. VTEC of both serotypes with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were isolated from patients, ice cream, and environmental samples. Quantitative analysis of the ice cream indicated concentrations of 2.4 and 0.03 CFU/g for VTEC O145 and O26, respectively. Virulence typing revealed that the repertoire of virulence genes carried by the O145:H28 outbreak strain was comparable to that of O157 VTEC and more exhaustive as compared to the O26:H11 outbreak strain and nonrelated clinical strains belonging to these serotypes. Taken together, these data suggest that O145:H28 played the most important role in this outbreak.

  4. PeoplePersonality: Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream Teaching Anecdotes: Annie Jump Cannon Obituary: György Marx 1927-2002 Starting Out: What Katie did next: part 3 Opinions: What is really important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education PERSONALITY (156) Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream TEACHING ANECDOTES (157) Annie Jump Cannon OBITUARY (158) György Marx 1927-2002 Steven Chapman STARTING OUT (159) What Katie did next: part 3 Katie Pennicott OPINIONS (160) What is really important? Kerry Parker

  5. Creams Formulated with Ocimum gratissimum L. and Lantana camara L. Crude Extracts and Fractions as Mosquito Repellents Against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Keziah, Ezeike Amarachi; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Younoussa, Lame; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the most deadly vectors of parasites that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, and filariasis. In view of the recent increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, the objective of this study was to determine the repellent activity of creams formulated with methanol crude extract (MCE), hexane fraction (HF), and ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of Ocimum gratissimum and Lantana camara leaves in single and combined actions against female Aedes aegypti. Evaluation was carried out in the net cages (30 by 30 by 30 cm) containing 60 blood-starved female mosquitoes each and were assayed in the laboratory condition following World Health Organization 2009 protocol. All formulations (single and mixture) were applied at 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/cm2 in the exposed area of human hands. Only acetone + white soft paraffin served as negative control and odomos (12% DEET) as positive control. All the formulations presented good protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction by the human volunteers. The repellent activity was dependent on the strength of the extracts and fractions. Among the tested formulations, the maximum protection time was observed in MCE (120 min) and EAF (150 min) of O. gratissimum; MCE:MCE (150 min) and HF:HF (120 min) mixtures of both plants. In addition, MCE:MCE and HF:HF mixtures from both plants showed possible synergistic effect. From the results, the combination of O. gratissimum and L. camara to formulate natural mosquito repellent using small amount of extracts can be encouraging to be an alternative to conventional DEET. PMID:25881633

  6. Creams formulated with Ocimum gratissimum L. and Lantana camara L. crude extracts and fractions as mosquito repellents against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Keziah, Ezeike Amarachi; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Younoussa, Lame; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the most deadly vectors of parasites that cause diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, and filariasis. In view of the recent increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, the objective of this study was to determine the repellent activity of creams formulated with methanol crude extract (MCE), hexane fraction (HF), and ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of Ocimum gratissimum and Lantana camara leaves in single and combined actions against female Aedes aegypti. Evaluation was carried out in the net cages (30 by 30 by 30 cm) containing 60 blood-starved female mosquitoes each and were assayed in the laboratory condition following World Health Organization 2009 protocol. All formulations (single and mixture) were applied at 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/cm(2) in the exposed area of human hands. Only acetone + white soft paraffin served as negative control and odomos (12% DEET) as positive control. All the formulations presented good protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction by the human volunteers. The repellent activity was dependent on the strength of the extracts and fractions. Among the tested formulations, the maximum protection time was observed in MCE (120 min) and EAF (150 min) of O. gratissimum; MCE:MCE (150 min) and HF:HF (120 min) mixtures of both plants. In addition, MCE:MCE and HF:HF mixtures from both plants showed possible synergistic effect. From the results, the combination of O. gratissimum and L. camara to formulate natural mosquito repellent using small amount of extracts can be encouraging to be an alternative to conventional DEET. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  7. Unexpectedly increased anorexigenic postprandial responses of PYY and GLP-1 to fast ice cream consumption in adult patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, A E; Bini, S; Grugni, G; Agosti, F; De Col, A; Mallone, M; Cella, S G; Sartorio, A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of eating rate on the release of anorexigenic gut peptides in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a neurogenetic disorder clinically characterized by hyperphagia and excessive obesity, has not been investigated so far. Postprandial PYY and GLP-1 levels to fast (5 min) and slow (30 min) ice cream consumption were measured in PWS adult patients and age-matched patients with simple obesity and normal-weighted subjects. Visual analog scales (VASs) were used to evaluate the subjective feelings of hunger and satiety. Fast ice cream consumption stimulated GLP-1 release in normal subjects, a greater increase being observed with slow feeding. Fast or slow feeding did not change circulating levels of GLP-1 in obese patients, while, unexpectedly, fast feeding (but not slow feeding) stimulated GLP-1 release in PWS patients. Plasma PYY concentrations increased in all groups, irrespective of the eating rate. Slow feeding was more effective in stimulating PYY release in normal subjects, while fast feeding was more effective in PWS patients. Slow feeding evoked a lower hunger and higher satiety compared with fast feeding in normal subjects, this finding being not evident in obese patients. Unexpectedly, fast feeding evoked a lower hunger and higher satiety in PWS patients in comparison with slow feeding. Fast feeding leads to higher concentrations of anorexigenic gut peptides and favours satiety in PWS adult patients, this pattern being not evident in age-matched patients with simple obesity, thus suggesting the existence of a different pathophysiological substrate in these two clinical conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Assessing the genome level diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from contaminated ice cream and environmental samples linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Luo, Yan; Curry, Phillip; Timme, Ruth; Melka, David; Doyle, Matthew; Parish, Mickey; Hammack, Thomas S; Allard, Marc W; Brown, Eric W; Strain, Errol A

    2017-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak in the United States implicated contaminated ice cream produced by one company, which operated 3 facilities. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis on Listeria monocytogenes from food, environmental and clinical sources, identifying two clusters and a single branch, belonging to PCR serogroup IIb and genetic lineage I. WGS Cluster I, representing one outbreak strain, contained 82 food and environmental isolates from Facility I and 4 clinical isolates. These isolates differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 9 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence type (ST) 5 of clonal complex 5 (CC5). WGS Cluster II contained 51 food and environmental isolates from Facility II, 4 food isolates from Facility I and 5 clinical isolates. Among them the isolates from Facility II and clinical isolates formed a clade and represented another outbreak strain. Isolates in this clade differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 3 PFGE profiles and ST5. The only isolate collected from Facility III belonged to singleton ST489, which was in a single branch separate from Clusters I and II, and was not associated with the outbreak. WGS analyses clustered together outbreak-associated isolates exhibiting multiple PFGE profiles, while differentiating them from epidemiologically unrelated isolates that exhibited outbreak PFGE profiles. The complete genome of a Cluster I isolate allowed the identification and analyses of putative prophages, revealing that Cluster I isolates differed by the gain or loss of three putative prophages, causing the banding pattern differences among all 3 AscI-PFGE profiles observed in Cluster I isolates. WGS data suggested that certain ice cream varieties and/or production lines might have contamination sources unique to them. The SNP-based analysis was able to distinguish CC5 as a group from non-CC5 isolates and differentiate among CC5 isolates from

  9. Assessing the genome level diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from contaminated ice cream and environmental samples linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Luo, Yan; Curry, Phillip; Timme, Ruth; Melka, David; Doyle, Matthew; Parish, Mickey; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Brown, Eric W.; Strain, Errol A.

    2017-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak in the United States implicated contaminated ice cream produced by one company, which operated 3 facilities. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis on Listeria monocytogenes from food, environmental and clinical sources, identifying two clusters and a single branch, belonging to PCR serogroup IIb and genetic lineage I. WGS Cluster I, representing one outbreak strain, contained 82 food and environmental isolates from Facility I and 4 clinical isolates. These isolates differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 9 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence type (ST) 5 of clonal complex 5 (CC5). WGS Cluster II contained 51 food and environmental isolates from Facility II, 4 food isolates from Facility I and 5 clinical isolates. Among them the isolates from Facility II and clinical isolates formed a clade and represented another outbreak strain. Isolates in this clade differed by up to 29 SNPs, exhibited 3 PFGE profiles and ST5. The only isolate collected from Facility III belonged to singleton ST489, which was in a single branch separate from Clusters I and II, and was not associated with the outbreak. WGS analyses clustered together outbreak-associated isolates exhibiting multiple PFGE profiles, while differentiating them from epidemiologically unrelated isolates that exhibited outbreak PFGE profiles. The complete genome of a Cluster I isolate allowed the identification and analyses of putative prophages, revealing that Cluster I isolates differed by the gain or loss of three putative prophages, causing the banding pattern differences among all 3 AscI-PFGE profiles observed in Cluster I isolates. WGS data suggested that certain ice cream varieties and/or production lines might have contamination sources unique to them. The SNP-based analysis was able to distinguish CC5 as a group from non-CC5 isolates and differentiate among CC5 isolates from

  10. High glycemic load diet, milk and ice cream consumption are related to acne vulgaris in Malaysian young adults: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of dietary factors in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris is highly controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the association between dietary factors and acne vulgaris among Malaysian young adults. Methods A case–control study was conducted among 44 acne vulgaris patients and 44 controls aged 18 to 30 years from October 2010 to January 2011. Comprehensive acne severity scale (CASS) was used to determine acne severity. A questionnaire comprising items enquiring into the respondent’s family history and dietary patterns was distributed. Subjects were asked to record their food intake on two weekdays and one day on a weekend in a three day food diary. Anthropometric measurements including body weight, height and body fat percentage were taken. Acne severity was assessed by a dermatologist. Results Cases had a significantly higher dietary glycemic load (175 ± 35) compared to controls (122 ± 28) (p < 0.001). The frequency of milk (p < 0.01) and ice-cream (p < 0.01) consumptions was significantly higher in cases compared to controls. Females in the case group had a higher daily energy intake compared to their counterparts in the control group, 1812 ± 331 and 1590 ± 148 kcal respectively (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in other nutrient intakes, Body Mass Index, and body fat percentage between case and control groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris. PMID:22898209

  11. High glycemic load diet, milk and ice cream consumption are related to acne vulgaris in Malaysian young adults: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Noor Hasnani; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Azizan, Noor Zalmy

    2012-08-16

    The role of dietary factors in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris is highly controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the association between dietary factors and acne vulgaris among Malaysian young adults. A case-control study was conducted among 44 acne vulgaris patients and 44 controls aged 18 to 30 years from October 2010 to January 2011. Comprehensive acne severity scale (CASS) was used to determine acne severity. A questionnaire comprising items enquiring into the respondent's family history and dietary patterns was distributed. Subjects were asked to record their food intake on two weekdays and one day on a weekend in a three day food diary. Anthropometric measurements including body weight, height and body fat percentage were taken. Acne severity was assessed by a dermatologist. Cases had a significantly higher dietary glycemic load (175 ± 35) compared to controls (122 ± 28) (p < 0.001). The frequency of milk (p < 0.01) and ice-cream (p < 0.01) consumptions was significantly higher in cases compared to controls. Females in the case group had a higher daily energy intake compared to their counterparts in the control group, 1812 ± 331 and 1590 ± 148 kcal respectively (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in other nutrient intakes, Body Mass Index, and body fat percentage between case and control groups (p > 0.05). Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris.

  12. A Natural Cream-to-Powder Formulation Developed for the Prevention of Diaper Dermatitis in Diaper-Wearing Infants and Children: Barrier Property and In-Use Tolerance Studies.

    PubMed

    Gunt, Hemali B; Levy, Stanley B; Lutrario, Celeste A

    2018-05-01

    Diaper dermatitis is a common condition that develops in the diaper area due to factors such as elevated moisture, increased skin surface pH, and exposure to irritants from urine and feces. These factors suggest interventions to prevent or treat diaper dermatitis such as exposing the skin to air, frequent diaper changes, and thorough cleansing of the diaper area. Barrier creams and powders also have a role in preventing and treating diaper dermatitis. We developed a cream-to-powder product with a formula based on corn starch and other natural ingredients for use in the diaper area. Dye exclusion study: The barrier properties of the cream-to-powder product were assessed using a dye exclusion protocol. Skin color at treated and untreated forearm sites was measured at baseline and after exposure to crystal violet stain. The cream-to-powder product's ability to inhibit the water-soluble dye from reaching the skin was judged by comparing color changes at the treated and untreated sites. Tolerance-in-use study: The safety of the cream-to-powder product was assessed in a four-week tolerance-in-use study conducted in a group of 52 diaper-wearing infants and toddlers. Subjects' parents/guardians applied the cream-to-powder product at each diaper change. A pediatrician judged safety endpoints of erythema, dryness, and edema in the diaper area at baseline and at study end. Parents/guardians also completed a questionnaire at study end. These studies have complied with Good Clinical Practices (GCP/ICH). The cream-to-powder product prevented about 70% of the test dye from reaching the skin surface, demonstrating its ability to supplement the skin barrier. The tolerance-in-use study showed no statistically significant changes in any of the safety endpoints; there were no adverse events. Parents/guardians responses to the cream-to-powder product were overwhelmingly positive. Taken together, these results support that the cream-to-powder formulation is safe and effective for

  13. Sports cream overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Sports creams are creams or ointments used to treat aches and pains. Sports cream overdose can occur if someone uses this ... Two ingredients in sports creams that can be poisonous are: Menthol Methyl salicylate

  14. Pelvic reconstructions following peri-acetabular bone tumour resections using a cementless ice-cream cone prosthesis with dual mobility cup.

    PubMed

    Issa, Samir-Pierre; Biau, David; Babinet, Antoine; Dumaine, Valérie; Le Hanneur, Malo; Anract, Philippe

    2018-01-27

    Despite numerous reconstructive techniques and prosthetic devices, pelvic reconstructions following peri-acetabular malignant tumours resections are highly challenging. In the present study, we describe our experience with the Integra® (Lépine, Genay, France) ice-cream cone prosthesis in such indications. The objective was to assess the mid-term outcomes of this device. Twenty-four patients' chart with peri-acetabular malignant tumours, who underwent types II or II + III peri-acetabular resections according to Enneking and Dunham with subsequent reconstruction using the Integra® prosthesis between February 2009 and February 2015, were reviewed. Seventeen cases were primary surgeries and seven cases were revisions (i.e., failures of previous reconstructions for pelvic tumours). All living patients with the prosthesis implanted were functionally assessed, using the musculoskeletal tumour society (MSTS) and Postel-Merle d'Aubigné (PMA) scores. After a mean follow-up of 49 ± 26 months (range, 8 to 94 months), 21 patients were alive (88%), including 15 patients continuously disease-free (63%). MSTS and PMA scores averaged 72 ± 13% (range, 43 to 87%) and 14.6 ± 2.6 (range, 9 to 18), respectively. Fourteen patients (58%) presented at least one complication during follow-up, including four cases of deep infection (17%), four cases of dislocation (17%), and two mechanical failures (8%). At 5 years, the implant survival rate was 75%. In comparison to previous reconstructive techniques that we used in similar indications, functional and oncologic outcomes were improved with the Integra® implant. However, as commonly observed in pelvic bone tumour surgery, complication rates remain significant. Therapeutic, Level IV-Retrospective Cases Series.

  15. A Hot Knife Through Ice-Cream: Earthflow Response to Channel Incision (Or Channel Response to Earthflows?), Eel River Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, B. H.; Roering, J. J.; McKean, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Abundant glacier-like earthflow features are recognized as a primary erosional process in the highly erodable Franciscan Melange of the Eel River Basin, CA. Despite their prominence in this "melting ice-cream" topography, many questions regarding their effects on the long term sediment flux from this rapidly eroding basin remain unresolved. For example, does an earthflow's basal shear zone propagate vertically downwards with vertical river incision? What controls the upslope and lateral extent of individual earthflows? How does the erosive power of a river influence the rate of earthflow movement, or conversely do earthflow toe deposits regulate the rate of river incision? Here we present preliminary findings derived from study of 200km2 of lidar data (1m resolution) covering hillslopes adjacent to 30km of the Eel River. Lidar allows detailed analysis of the interaction between earthflows and the drainage network, and we document how inferred changes in local base level are propagated throughout adjacent hillslopes via earthflow movement. The most active earthflows (determined by field surveying and analysis of aerial photos rectified using lidar- generated digital topography) coincide with locally steep sections of channel, while downstream of the most active flows we frequently observe less-active or dormant earthflows. This observation supports the idea that the locations of the most active earthflows coincide with headward propagating knickpoints in the channel. The rate of earthflow movement appears to slow when an earthflow exhausts the upslope area of easily mobilized sediment. Earthflow toes can protrude directly into the channel, causing the channel to narrow and steepen, and even undercut the opposite bank. Large resistant boulders (>2m diameter) transported by the earthflow accumulate in the streambed and appear to both act as a check on further channel incision and earthflow movement. In contrast, areas adjacent to active earthflows exhibit smooth

  16. Investigation on the photostability of tretinoin in creams.

    PubMed

    Brisaert, M; Plaizier-Vercammen, J A

    2007-04-04

    In this investigation, the photodegradation of some tretinoin cream formulations was evaluated. Several oils were selected to prepare the cream formulations: olive oil, maize oil, castor oil, isopropyl myristate and Miglyol 812. A solubility study showed that tretinoin is best soluble in castor oil (0.60g/100ml), followed by isopropyl myristate, maize oil, Miglyol 812 and olive oil, respectively, 0.35, 0.30, 0.29 and 0.22g/100ml. The photostability of tretinoin in oils is comparable with the photostability of a tretinoin lotion (ethanol/propylene glycol 50/50), castor oil and olive oil giving slightly better results than the other oils. Investigation of the photodegradation of tretinoin in o/w creams, prepared with the same oils as mentioned above, revealed that tretinoin is far more stable in the cream formulations than in the respective oils, however it is not clear whether this is due to the formulation or due to a different irradiation technique. Tretinoin seemed to be most stable in the olive oil cream, followed by the castor oil cream. However microscopic investigation revealed the presence of tretinoin crystals in the olive oil cream, while the other creams were free of it. As a conclusion, one can say that the cream prepared with castor oil seems to be the most suitable one, in terms of solubility of tretinoin and in terms of photostability.

  17. Dithranol in a cream preparation: disperse or dissolve?

    PubMed

    Prins, M; Swinkels, O Q; Bouwhuis, S; de Gast, M J; Bouwman-Boer, Y; van der Valk, P G; van de Kerkhof, P C

    2000-01-01

    In the search for the ideal dithranol cream preparation for short-contact treatment of psoriasis, we investigated the clinical efficacy, side effects and patient appreciation of two dithranol cream preparations (cream A and B) in a double-blind left-right comparing study. Dithranol was dissolved at preparation in cream A and dispersed in cream B. Cream A is known to have a shelf life of 1 year, while cream B has a much shorter shelf life (several months). Ten patients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis were treated during 7 weeks in a short-contact regimen. The clinical efficacy was monitored by scoring of erythema, induration, scaling and involved area (PASI); skin irritation was scored visually, and patient appreciation was evaluated by means of a multiple-choice questionnaire. Dispersion of dithranol in a cream was associated with less irritation and less discoloration of the skin, and its efficacy was comparable with that of the cream in which the dithranol was dissolved. As the dispersed dithranol formulation is easier to be manufactured, its quality will be less depending on the pharmacist's experience and equipment, and so more reliable. Besides, it will be less expensive to prepare. We advise to use this formulation for short-contact treatment. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Job submission and management through web services: the experience with the CREAM service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Andreetto, P.; Bertocco, S.; Fina, S. D.; Ronco, S. D.; Dorigo, A.; Gianelle, A.; Marzolla, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Sgaravatto, M.; Verlato, M.; Zangrando, L.; Corvo, M.; Miccio, V.; Sciaba, A.; Cesini, D.; Dongiovanni, D.; Grandi, C.

    2008-07-01

    Modern Grid middleware is built around components providing basic functionality, such as data storage, authentication, security, job management, resource monitoring and reservation. In this paper we describe the Computing Resource Execution and Management (CREAM) service. CREAM provides a Web service-based job execution and management capability for Grid systems; in particular, it is being used within the gLite middleware. CREAM exposes a Web service interface allowing conforming clients to submit and manage computational jobs to a Local Resource Management System. We developed a special component, called ICE (Interface to CREAM Environment) to integrate CREAM in gLite. ICE transfers job submissions and cancellations from the Workload Management System, allowing users to manage CREAM jobs from the gLite User Interface. This paper describes some recent studies aimed at assessing the performance and reliability of CREAM and ICE; those tests have been performed as part of the acceptance tests for integration of CREAM and ICE in gLite. We also discuss recent work towards enhancing CREAM with a BES and JSDL compliant interface.

  19. Butoconazole Vaginal Cream

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat yeast infections of the vagina.This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ... comes as a cream to insert into the vagina. It is usually used daily at bedtime. Follow ...

  20. Anti-Pruritic Efficacy of Itch Relief Lotion and Cream in Patients With Atopic History: Comparison With Hydrocortisone Cream.

    PubMed

    Zirwas, Matthew J; Barkovic, Sylvia

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the speed of onset and duration of relief of two ceramide-containing formulations with 1% pramoxine hydroxide (CeraVe® Itch Relief Lotion and Cream,Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Irvine, CA) in patients with atopic history, including those with active flare and the comparative efficacy of CeraVe Itch Relief Cream to hydrocortisone 1% cream and night-time itch relief with continued use. Two double-blind, split-body, randomized studies in 66 male and female subjects, ages 11+ years, with history of atopic dermatitis (AD). Itch severity was assessed on a 10-point scale (where 0=none and 7-9=severe). Study one: single applications of ceramide-containing lotion or cream incorporating 1% pramoxine hydrochloride applied to opposite sides of the body. Study two (part 1): single application of ceramide-containing cream or hydrocortisone 1% cream. Study two (part 2): ceramide-containing pramoxine cream applied up to 4 times in a 24-hour period, over the course of 6 days. Itch relief assessed at baseline, 2, and 5 minutes, 1 (2 in study two), 4, and 8 hours post-application. Efficacy and aesthetic attributes were assessed at the same timepoints. Clinical evaluation of performance and mildness of the ceramide-containing 1% pramoxine hydrochloride cream at day 6 (study two, part 2). Study one: Relief of itching was rapid and long-lasting with significant reductions in severity after 2 minutes, and continued improvement over the 8 hour test period (P less than .001 versus baseline at all timepoints). Mean itch severity scores reduced progressively from 6 (moderate) at baseline to 1-2 (mild) after 8 hours, with all patients experiencing relief from itching. Rapid and long-lasting relief to dry, itchy, irritated skin was confirmed through patient self-assessment. Both lotion and cream formulations were non-greasy, absorbed quickly and easily, and were non-irritating. Study two: Ceramide-containing cream incorporating 1% pramoxine

  1. Increased bioavailability of hydrocortisone dissolved in a cream base.

    PubMed

    Greive, Kerryn A; Barnes, Tanya M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare vasoconstrictor activity and, by inference, the clinical anti-inflammatory effectiveness of hydrocortisone in two different formulations: 1% dissolved hydrocortisone cream and 1% dispersed hydrocortisone cream. Moisturising capacity and safety were also determined. Both topical preparations were applied without occlusion on forearms twice daily for 5 days. An assessment of vasoconstriction was performed in a double-blinded manner pretreatment and then thrice daily for 6 days and once 7 days post-application, using an objective rating scale. For the dissolved preparation only, moisturising capacity was determined by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h, and also by the measurement of water content at 0 and 24 h. Safety was assessed by repeat insult patch tests (RIPT). In all, 10 volunteers completed the vasoconstrictor and moisturising studies, while 52 completed the RIPT. For 1% dissolved hydrocortisone cream and 1% dispersed hydrocortisone cream, respectively, areas under the blanching curves were 1240 and 295; total scores were 129.0 and 31.5; summed % total possible scores were 161.3 and 39.4; Tm/10 mean values were 3.47 and 1.64. The 1% dissolved hydrocortisone cream was found to be statistically more potent than the 1% dispersed hydrocortisone cream. Furthermore, the 1% dissolved hydrocortisone cream was found to be moisturising compared to no treatment. No adverse events were observed. A cream containing 1% dissolved hydrocortisone exhibits greater vasoconstrictor activity than a cream containing 1% dispersed hydrocortisone. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  2. Ivermectin cream for rosacea.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Rosacea is a chronic facial skin disease that mainly occurs in people aged over 30 years. It is common, with an estimated incidence of 1·7 per 1,000 person-years in general practice in the UK.(1,2) Rosacea can cause embarrassment, anxiety, low self-esteem and lack of confidence.(3) A new topical treatment has become available for the treatment of one of the clinical subtypes of rosacea. Ivermectin 10mg/g (1%) cream (Soolantra-Galderma) has received marketing authorisation for the treatment of inflammatory lesions of papulopustular rosacea in adults.(4) Here we review the safety and effectiveness of ivermectin cream in the treatment of rosacea and assess how it compares with standard therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of 0.5% fluorouracil cream and 5% fluorouracil cream applied to each side of the face in patients with actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Loven, Keith; Stein, Linda; Furst, Katharine; Levy, Sharon

    2002-06-01

    A new 0.5% fluorouracil cream has been developed that provides an alternative to the more highly concentrated topical formulations of fluorouracil that are currently available. This was a comparison of the tolerability and efficacy of the 0.5% and 5% fluorouracil creams in the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK). During this single-blind, randomized study, patients with > or =6 AK lesions were treated for 4 weeks with the 0.5% (once daily) and 5% (twice daily) fluorouracil creams applied to opposite sides of the face. After the end of treatment, patients were followed for an additional 4 weeks. Efficacy variables included absolute and percent reductions in AK lesions from baseline and total clearance of AK lesions. A questionnaire was used to evaluate patients' treatment preferences. Tolerability was evaluated through continuous monitoring of adverse events. Treatment with 0.5% fluorouracil cream reduced the number of AK lesions from 11.3 at baseline to 2.5 at the end of the 4-week follow-up phase, compared with a reduction from 10.3 to 4.2 lesions after treatment with 5% fluorouracil cream. The reduction was significantly greater with the 0.5% cream compared with the 5% cream (P = 0.044). The 0.5% cream was as effective as the 5% cream in terms of the percent reduction in AK lesions from baseline (67% and 47%, respectively) and in achieving total clearance of AK lesions (both treatments, approximately 43% of patients). Both treatments were associated with similar degrees of investigator-rated irritation; however, patients preferred the 0.5% cream because they felt it was more tolerable (P = 0.003), easier to apply, and had a once-daily application schedule. Although all patients experienced facial irritation in association with both creams, fewer patients treated with the 0.5% cream reported symptoms of facial irritation. In this study, 0.5% fluorouracil cream once daily was at least as effective as 5% fluorouracil cream twice daily in terms of the percent

  4. Using CREAM and CEMonitor for job submission and management in the gLite middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Andreetto, P.; Bertocco, S.; Dalla Fina, S.; Dorigo, A.; Frizziero, E.; Gianelle, A.; Marzolla, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Miccio, V.; Sgaravatto, M.; Traldi, S.; Zangrando, L.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe the use of CREAM and CEMonitor services for job submission and management within the gLite Grid middleware. Both CREAM and CEMonitor address one of the most fundamental operations of a Grid middleware, that is job submission and management. Specifically, CREAM is a job management service used for submitting, managing and monitoring computational jobs. CEMonitor is an event notification framework, which can be coupled with CREAM to provide the users with asynchronous job status change notifications. Both components have been integrated in the gLite Workload Management System by means of ICE (Interface to CREAM Environment). These software components have been released for production in the EGEE Grid infrastructure and, for what concerns the CEMonitor service, also in the OSG Grid. In this paper we report the current status of these services, the achieved results, and the issues that still have to be addressed.

  5. Terconazole Vaginal Cream, Vaginal Suppositories

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat fungal and yeast infections of the vagina.This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ... a cream and suppository to insert into the vagina. It is usually used daily at bedtime for ...

  6. Topical Allium ampeloprasum subsp Iranicum (Leek) extract cream in patients with symptomatic hemorrhoids: a pilot randomized and controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah; Ghahramani, Leila; Sobhani, Zahra; Haghighi, Ehsan Rahmanian; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2015-04-01

    Allium ampeloprasum subsp iranicum (Leek) has been traditionally used in antihemorrhoidal topical herbal formulations. This study aimed to evaluate its safety and efficacy in a pilot randomized controlled clinical trial. Twenty patients with symptomatic hemorrhoids were randomly allocated to receive the topical leek extract cream or standard antihemorrhoid cream for 3 weeks. The patients were evaluated before and after the intervention in terms of pain, defecation discomfort, bleeding severity, anal itching severity, and reported adverse events. A significant decrease was observed in the grade of bleeding severity and defecation discomfort in both the leek and antihemorrhoid cream groups after the intervention, while no significant change was observed in pain scores. There was no significant difference between the leek and antihemorrhoid cream groups with regard to mean changes in outcome measures. This pilot study showed that the topical use of leek cream can be as effective as a standard antihemorrhoid cream. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Enhancement of human skin facial revitalization by moringa leaf extract cream.

    PubMed

    Ali, Atif; Akhtar, Naveed; Chowdhary, Farzana

    2014-05-01

    Solar ultraviolet exposure is the main cause of skin damage by initiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to skin collagen imperfection and eventually skin roughness. This can be reduced by proper revitalization of skin enhancing younger and healthier appearance. To evaluate the skin facial revitalization effect of a cream formulation containing the Moringa oleifera leaf extract on humans. Active cream containing 3% of the concentrated extract of moringa leaves was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of cream. Base contained no extract. Skin revitalizing parameters, i.e. surface, volume, texture parameters and surface evaluation of the living skin (SELS) were assessed comparatively after application of the base and active cream on human face using Visioscan(®) VC 98 for a period of 3 months. Surface values were increased by the base and decreased by the active cream. Effects produced for the base and active cream were significant and insignificant, respectively, as observed in the case of surface. Unlike the base, the active cream showed significant effects on skin volume, texture parameters (energy, variance and contrast) and SELS, SEr (skin roughness), SEsc (skin scaliness), SEsm (skin smoothness), and SEw (skin wrinkles) parameters. The results suggested that moringa cream enhances skin revitalization effect and supports anti-aging skin effects.

  8. Enhancement of human skin facial revitalization by moringa leaf extract cream

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naveed; Chowdhary, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solar ultraviolet exposure is the main cause of skin damage by initiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to skin collagen imperfection and eventually skin roughness. This can be reduced by proper revitalization of skin enhancing younger and healthier appearance. Aim To evaluate the skin facial revitalization effect of a cream formulation containing the Moringa oleifera leaf extract on humans. Material and methods Active cream containing 3% of the concentrated extract of moringa leaves was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of cream. Base contained no extract. Skin revitalizing parameters, i.e. surface, volume, texture parameters and surface evaluation of the living skin (SELS) were assessed comparatively after application of the base and active cream on human face using Visioscan® VC 98 for a period of 3 months. Results Surface values were increased by the base and decreased by the active cream. Effects produced for the base and active cream were significant and insignificant, respectively, as observed in the case of surface. Unlike the base, the active cream showed significant effects on skin volume, texture parameters (energy, variance and contrast) and SELS, SEr (skin roughness), SEsc (skin scaliness), SEsm (skin smoothness), and SEw (skin wrinkles) parameters. Conclusions The results suggested that moringa cream enhances skin revitalization effect and supports anti-aging skin effects. PMID:25097471

  9. Antimicrobial activity of cream incorporated with silver nanoparticles biosynthesized from Withania somnifera

    PubMed Central

    Marslin, Gregory; Selvakesavan, Rajendran K; Franklin, Gregory; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto CP

    2015-01-01

    We report on the antimicrobial activity of a cream formulation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), biosynthesized using Withania somnifera extract. Aqueous extracts of leaves promoted efficient green synthesis of AgNPs compared to fruits and root extracts of W. somnifera. Biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized for their size and shape by physical-chemical techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After confirming the antimicrobial potential of AgNPs, they were incorporated into a cream. Cream formulations of AgNPs and AgNO3 were prepared and compared for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans) and a plant pathogen (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). Our results show that AgNP creams possess significantly higher antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms. PMID:26445537

  10. Promotion and computation of inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity of herbal cream by incorporating indigenous medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ram Kumar; Roy, Amit; Dwivedi, Jaya; Jha, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Herbal cream imparts a chief role in regulating melanin production of skin. The phytoconstituents present in herbal cream impact biological functions of skin and contribute nutrients required for the healthy skin. In the present study, it was envisaged to prepare three batches of herbal cream (HC1, HC2 and HC3) containing ethanol extracts of Emblica officinalis (fruits), Daucus carota (root), Mangifera indica (leaves), Mentha arvensis (leaves), Terminalia arjuna (bark) and Cucumis sativus (fruits) and investigated the prepared cream for inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity. The herbal cream was formulated by incorporating different ratio of extracts, by using cream base. Each formulation HC1, HC2 and HC3 were segregated into three different formulations (HC1.1, HC1.2, HC1.3, HC2.1, HC2.2, HC2.3, HC3.1, HC3.2 and HC3.3) by incorporating increasing ratio of extract in formulation. The HC3.2 cream produces highest tyrosinase inhibitory effect 65.23 +/- 0.07%, while the HC2.1 exhibited minimum tyrosinase inhibitory effect 26.19 +/- 0.08% compared to other prepared cream. Comparison of the inhibitory activity of the formulations demonstrated that the rank order was HC3.2 > HC3.3 > HC1.2 > HC1.3 > HC3.1 > HC1.1 > HC2.3 > HC2.2 > HC2.1. It has been observed from the result that the formulations of antityrosinase activity were not concentrate dependent. This finding suggests that decrease in antityrosinase activity of HC1 and HC3 might be considering that the incompatibility of the higher extract content with the base of cream. The HC3 produce the maximum inhibitory effects on tyrosinase activity might be due to higher level of polyphenol and flavonoids present in extracts.

  11. The 37-day flight of CREAM during the 2009-2010 austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was launched from McMurdo Station Antarctica on December 1, 2009, an early-launch record for Antarctic Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights. A cumulative exposure of ˜ 156 days was achieved when this 37-day fifth flight of CREAM was terminated over the Ross Ice Shelf on January 8, 2010. Combining a sampling calorimeter for energy measurement with multiple charge detectors for particle identification, CREAM-V provided a large data sample to measure elemental spectra for 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26 in energies above 1014 eV. This was the first time that CREAM was supported with the standard Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) for LDB payloads. The first four flights were supported by the Command and Data Module (CDM) developed by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility for Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights. The instrument performance, results from the ongoing data analysis, and future plans will be presented.

  12. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. 58.715 Section 58.715 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat...

  13. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. 58.715 Section 58.715 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat...

  14. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. 58.715 Section 58.715 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat...

  15. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. 58.715 Section 58.715 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat...

  16. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. 58.715 Section 58.715 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat...

  17. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality of...

  18. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality of...

  19. Investigation of cream and ointment on antimicrobial activity of Mangifera indica extract.

    PubMed

    Awad El-Gied, Amgad A; Abdelkareem, Abdelkareem M; Hamedelniel, Elnazeer I

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have curative properties due to the presence of various complex chemical substance of different composition, which are found as secondary plant metabolites in one or more parts of these plants. Mangifera indica Linn (MI L.) is a species of mango in the Anacardiaceae family. Phytoconstituents in the seed extracts may be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the plant. The purpose of the study was to formulate and evaluate the antimicrobial herbal ointment and cream from extracts of the seeds of mango (MI L.) The formulated ointments containing oleaginous-based showed the best formulation compared to the emulsion water in oil type, the ointment and cream bases in different concentration 1%, 5% and 10%. The formulated ointment and cream of MI L. were subjected to evaluation of Uniformity of Weight, measurement of pH, viscosity, Spreadability, Acute skin irritation study, stability study and antimicrobial activity. Our study shows that MI has high potential as an antimicrobial agent when formulated as ointment and creams for topical use. Thus, the present study concludes that the formulated formulations of the MI are safe and efficient carriers, with potent antimicrobial activity.

  20. Investigation of cream and ointment on antimicrobial activity of Mangifera indica extract

    PubMed Central

    Awad El-Gied, Amgad A.; Abdelkareem, Abdelkareem M.; Hamedelniel, Elnazeer I.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have curative properties due to the presence of various complex chemical substance of different composition, which are found as secondary plant metabolites in one or more parts of these plants. Mangifera indica Linn (MI L.) is a species of mango in the Anacardiaceae family. Phytoconstituents in the seed extracts may be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the plant. The purpose of the study was to formulate and evaluate the antimicrobial herbal ointment and cream from extracts of the seeds of mango (MI L.) The formulated ointments containing oleaginous-based showed the best formulation compared to the emulsion water in oil type, the ointment and cream bases in different concentration 1%, 5% and 10%. The formulated ointment and cream of MI L. were subjected to evaluation of Uniformity of Weight, measurement of pH, viscosity, Spreadability, Acute skin irritation study, stability study and antimicrobial activity. Our study shows that MI has high potential as an antimicrobial agent when formulated as ointment and creams for topical use. Thus, the present study concludes that the formulated formulations of the MI are safe and efficient carriers, with potent antimicrobial activity. PMID:25878974

  1. Commercial aviation icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koegeboehn, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    A short range and long range icing research program was proposed. A survey was made to various industry and goverment agencies to obtain their views of needs for commercial aviation ice protection. Through these responsed, other additional data, and Douglas Aircraft icing expertise; an assessment of the state-of-the-art of aircraft icing data and ice protection systems was made. The information was then used to formulate the icing research programs.

  2. 7 CFR 58.326 - Plastic cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Plastic cream. 58.326 Section 58.326 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.326 Plastic cream. To produce plastic cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  3. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cream cheese. 133.133 Section 133.133 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.133 Cream cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by...

  4. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cream cheese. 133.133 Section 133.133 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.133 Cream cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by...

  5. 7 CFR 58.326 - Plastic cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Plastic cream. 58.326 Section 58.326 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.326 Plastic cream. To produce plastic cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  6. 7 CFR 58.326 - Plastic cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Plastic cream. 58.326 Section 58.326 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.326 Plastic cream. To produce plastic cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  7. 7 CFR 58.326 - Plastic cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Plastic cream. 58.326 Section 58.326 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.326 Plastic cream. To produce plastic cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  8. 7 CFR 58.326 - Plastic cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Plastic cream. 58.326 Section 58.326 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.326 Plastic cream. To produce plastic cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  9. Topical cream-based dosage forms of the macrocyclic drug delivery vehicle cucurbit[6]uril.

    PubMed

    Seif, Marian; Impelido, Michael L; Apps, Michael G; Wheate, Nial J

    2014-01-01

    The macrocycle family of molecules called cucurbit[n]urils are potential drug delivery vehicles as they are able to form host-guest complexes with many different classes of drugs. This study aimed to examine the utility of Cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) in topical cream-based formulations for either localised treatment or for transdermal delivery. Cucurbit[6]uril was formulated into both buffered cream aqueous- and oily cream-based dosage forms. The solid state interaction of CB[6] with other excipients was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the macrocycle's transdermal permeability was determined using rat skin. Significant solid state interactions were observed between CB[6] and the other dosage form excipients. At concentrations up to 32% w/w the buffered aqueous cream maintained its normal consistency and could be effectively applied to skin, but the oily cream was too stiff and is not suitable as a dosage form. Cucurbit[6]uril does not permeate through skin; as such, the results imply that cucurbituril-based topical creams may potentially only have applications for localised skin treatment and not for transdermal drug delivery.

  10. Topical Cream-Based Dosage Forms of the Macrocyclic Drug Delivery Vehicle Cucurbit[6]uril

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Marian; Impelido, Michael L.; Apps, Michael G.; Wheate, Nial J.

    2014-01-01

    The macrocycle family of molecules called cucurbit[n]urils are potential drug delivery vehicles as they are able to form host-guest complexes with many different classes of drugs. This study aimed to examine the utility of Cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) in topical cream-based formulations for either localised treatment or for transdermal delivery. Cucurbit[6]uril was formulated into both buffered cream aqueous- and oily cream-based dosage forms. The solid state interaction of CB[6] with other excipients was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the macrocycle's transdermal permeability was determined using rat skin. Significant solid state interactions were observed between CB[6] and the other dosage form excipients. At concentrations up to 32% w/w the buffered aqueous cream maintained its normal consistency and could be effectively applied to skin, but the oily cream was too stiff and is not suitable as a dosage form. Cucurbit[6]uril does not permeate through skin; as such, the results imply that cucurbituril-based topical creams may potentially only have applications for localised skin treatment and not for transdermal drug delivery. PMID:24454850

  11. Assessment of In vitro Sun Protection Factor of Calendula Officinalis L. (Asteraceae) Essential Oil Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, AK; Mishra, A; Chattopadhyay, P

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to study the sunscreen activity of herbal formulation. There is no evidence of the sun protection factor (SPF) studies on essential oil of Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis L., Asteraceae). The study investigates the in vitro SPF by ultraviolet specrtophotometry method of Calendula flower oil in a cream formulation. Calendula oil was isolated by Clavenger's apparatus, compositions were identified by GC–MS and the cream of calendula flower oil was prepared by homogenization method followed by evaluation for physical parameters. The sun protection factor of cream was evaluated by in vitro method employing UV–visible spectrophotometer (Shimazdu-1600). The SPF of Calendula oil in cream formulation exhibited good activity (SPF = 14.84 ± 0.16). Finding of this study suggested that calendula oil cream can be used to protect the skin from UV radiations in form of sunscreen cream and to maintain the natural pigmentation of the skin. PMID:22523455

  12. Assessment of In vitro Sun Protection Factor of Calendula Officinalis L. (Asteraceae) Essential Oil Formulation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ak; Mishra, A; Chattopadhyay, P

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to study the sunscreen activity of herbal formulation. There is no evidence of the sun protection factor (SPF) studies on essential oil of Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis L., Asteraceae). The study investigates the in vitro SPF by ultraviolet specrtophotometry method of Calendula flower oil in a cream formulation. Calendula oil was isolated by Clavenger's apparatus, compositions were identified by GC-MS and the cream of calendula flower oil was prepared by homogenization method followed by evaluation for physical parameters. The sun protection factor of cream was evaluated by in vitro method employing UV-visible spectrophotometer (Shimazdu-1600). The SPF of Calendula oil in cream formulation exhibited good activity (SPF = 14.84 ± 0.16). Finding of this study suggested that calendula oil cream can be used to protect the skin from UV radiations in form of sunscreen cream and to maintain the natural pigmentation of the skin.

  13. Immunisation against East Coast fever by the infection and treatment method: evaluation of the use of ice baths for field delivery and appraisal of an acid formulation of long-acting tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Marcotty, T; Billiouw, M; Chaka, G; Berkvens, D; Losson, B; Brandt, J

    2001-08-20

    Immunisation by the infection and treatment method using the Katete strain is currently the most efficient prophylactic technique to control East Coast fever (ECF) in the endemic areas of the Eastern Province of Zambia. The maintenance of the cold chain in liquid nitrogen up to the time of inoculation and the cost of the reference long-acting oxytetracycline (Terramycin LA, Pfizer) are the main drawbacks of the method. The work presented in this paper aims at reducing the cost of immunisation against ECF by using an ice bath for the field delivery and a cheaper long-acting oxytetracycline formulation as chemotherapeutic agent. In experimental conditions, the results from 40 calves immunised after various periods of storage on ice ranging from 4 to 32 h indicate that deferred immunisation performed with a stabilate kept on ice for up to 6h after thawing has an efficiency of 90%. Moreover, sporozoites kept on ice were still surviving 32 h after thawing. In a field trial, 91 calves were inoculated with a stabilate kept for 3.5-5.5 h after thawing and dilution whereas 86 calves were immunised using the standard method. Clinical and parasitological reactions to immunisation were monitored as well as the seroconversion. In the field trial, the deferred immunisation was more efficient than the standard method. The acid formulation of oxytetracycline that was tested was found as suitable as the reference alkaline formulation for the chemotherapeutic control of the Katete strain in ECF immunisation. One indoor trial was carried out on 10 animals and a field trial involved 93 calves.

  14. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    PubMed

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  15. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  16. Physical characteristic and irritation index of Syzigium aromaticum essential oil in O/W and W/O creams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safriani, R.; Sugihartini, N.; Yuliani, S.

    2017-11-01

    Essential oil of Syzigium aromaticum has been formulated in O/W and W/O creams as anti-inflammatory dosage form. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical characteristic and irritation index of S. aromaticum essential oil in O/W and W/O creams. The creams were made by fusion method. The creams then were evaluated the physical characteristic including pH, viscosity, spreadability and adhesivity. The irritation index was obtained by irritation skin test in male rabbit. The results showed that the W/O and O/W creams have the value of pH: 6.3 and 6.27; spreadability: 3,18 and 4.17 cm2; adhesivity: 5.59 and 0.07 minutes; viscosity: 4.43 and 2.88 Pa.S, respectively. The irritation test showed that the control enhancer caused mild irritation in both of W/O and O/W creams. These findings indicated that type of cream might influence the physical characteristic and irritation index of S. aromaticum essential oil cream.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a lidocaine and tetracaine (7%/7%) cream for induction of local dermal anesthesia for facial soft tissue augmentation with hyaluronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Gold, Michael H

    2014-10-01

    Injection of dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation is a minimally invasive cosmetic procedure with growing popularity. However, patients often express concern about pain with such procedures. A topical anesthetic cream formulated with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and recently reintroduced to the market for use during superficial dermatological procedures. A Phase 3 study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream versus placebo cream when used to induce local dermal anesthesia during injections with hyaluronic acid. Mean visual analog scale scores significantly favored lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream. A significant percent of subjects also indicated that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream provided adequate pain relief and that they would use lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream again. Investigators also rated lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream significantly better than placebo cream for providing adequate pain relief and on the assessment of pain scale. Lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream was safe and well tolerated with most subjects reporting no erythema, edema, or blanching. No related adverse events were reported with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream; one related adverse event of erythema was reported with placebo cream. The results of this study indicate that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream is efficacious and safe at providing pain relief for soft tissue augmentation with hyaluronic acid.

  18. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of a Lidocaine and Tetracaine (7%/7%) Cream for Induction of Local Dermal Anesthesia for Facial Soft Tissue Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation is a minimally invasive cosmetic procedure with growing popularity. However, patients often express concern about pain with such procedures. A topical anesthetic cream formulated with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and recently reintroduced to the market for use during superficial dermatological procedures. A Phase 3 study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream versus placebo cream when used to induce local dermal anesthesia during injections with hyaluronic acid. Mean visual analog scale scores significantly favored lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream. A significant percent of subjects also indicated that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream provided adequate pain relief and that they would use lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream again. Investigators also rated lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream significantly better than placebo cream for providing adequate pain relief and on the assessment of pain scale. Lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream was safe and well tolerated with most subjects reporting no erythema, edema, or blanching. No related adverse events were reported with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream; one related adverse event of erythema was reported with placebo cream. The results of this study indicate that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream is efficacious and safe at providing pain relief for soft tissue augmentation with hyaluronic acid. PMID:25371769

  19. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1)more » calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.« less

  20. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity of AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream

    PubMed Central

    Nipanikar, Sanjay U.; Nagore, Dheeraj; Chitlange, Soham S.; Buzruk, Devashree

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is almost a widespread disease occurring in all races. Propionibacterium acnes initiate acne and inflammatory mediators aggravate it. Conventional therapies for acne include comedolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-biotic agents. Due to adverse effects of these therapies, people are searching for alternative options. In this context, a polyherbal formulation AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream was developed for the treatment of Acne. Objective: The objective of this study is to study anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream. Materials and Methods: Skin irritation study was conducted on AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream as per OECD guidelines. (1) Anti-inflammatory activity: Anti-inflammatory activity of AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream in comparison with diclofenac sodium cream was assessed in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. (2) Antimicrobial activity for P. acnes: P. acnes were incubated under anaerobic conditions. Aliquots of molten brain–heart infusion with glucose agar were used as the agar base. Formulation and clindamycin (10 mg/ml) were introduced in to the Agar wells randomly. (3) Antimicrobial activity for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus: bacteria were incubated under aerobic conditions at 37°C. Tryptic soy broth with glucose agar was used as the agar base. A volume of 0.5 ml of formulation and clindamycin (10 mg/ml) were introduced in to the wells randomly. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by measuring zones of inhibition (in mm). Results: AHPL/AYTOP/0213 cream is nonirritant. Significant reduction in rat paw edema (43%) was observed with AHPL/AYTOP/0213 which was also comparable to diclofenac sodium cream (56.09%). Zone of inhibition for formulation was 20.68 mm, 28.20 mm, and 21.40 mm for P. acnes, S. epidermidis and S. aureus, respectively, which was comparable to clindamycin. The minimum inhibitory concentration of formulation AHPL/AYTOP/0213 obtained in anti-microbial study was 2.5 mg

  1. Development and evaluation of sunscreen creams containing morin-encapsulated nanoparticles for enhanced UV radiation protection and antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pallavi Krishna; Venuvanka, Venkatesh; Jagani, Hitesh Vitthal; Chethan, Gejjalagere Honnappa; Ligade, Virendra S; Musmade, Prashant B; Nayak, Usha Y; Reddy, Meka Sreenivasa; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Mutalik, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present work was to develop novel sunscreen creams containing polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) of morin. Polymeric NPs containing morin were prepared and optimized. The creams containing morin NPs were also prepared and evaluated. Optimized NPs exhibited particle size of 90.6 nm and zeta potential of −31 mV. The entrapment efficiency of morin, within the polymeric NPs, was found to be low (12.27%). Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed no interaction between morin and excipients. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that the NPs were spherical in shape with approximately 100 nm diameter. Optimized NPs showed excellent in vitro free radical scavenging activity. Skin permeation and deposition of morin from its NPs was higher than its plain form. Different sunscreen creams (SC1–SC8) were formulated by incorporating morin NPs along with nano zinc oxide and nano titanium dioxide. SC5 and SC8 creams showed excellent sun protection factor values (≈40). In vitro and in vivo skin permeation studies of sunscreen creams containing morin NPs indicated excellent deposition of morin within the skin. Morin NPs and optimized cream formulations (SC5 and SC8) did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Vero and HaCaT cells. Optimized sunscreen creams showed excellent dermal safety. SC5 and SC8 creams demonstrated exceptional in vivo antioxidant effect (estimation of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione) in UV radiation-exposed rats. The optimized sunscreen creams confirmed outstanding UV radiation protection as well as antioxidant properties. PMID:26508854

  2. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    PubMed

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Herbal haemorrhoidal cream for haemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Ebru; Ustunova, Savas; Ergin, Bulent; Tan, Nur; Caner, Metin; Tortum, Osman; Demirci-Tansel, Cihan

    2013-10-31

    Although hemorrhoids are one of the most common diseases in the world, the exact etiology underlying the development of hemorrhoids is not clear. Many different ointments are currently used to treat hemorrhoids; however, there is little evidence of the efficacy of these treatments to support their use. The aim of this study was to compare different herbal creams used for the treatment of hemorrhoids. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats, 6-8 weeks old and weighing 160-180 g, were used in this study as 1-control, 2-croton oil, 3-croton oil+fig leaves+artichoke leaves+walnut husks and 4-croton oil+fig leaves+artichoke leaves+walnut husks+horse chestnut fruit. After 3 days of croton oil application, rats were treated with 0.1 ml of cream or saline twice a day for 15 days by syringe. Tissue and blood samples were collected for histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical studies. Statistical significance was determined using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests. Croton oil administration resulted in severe inflammation. The third group showed partial improvement in inflammation; however, the greatest degree of improvement was seen in the fourth group, and some recovered areas were observed. Myeloperoxidase immunoreactivity was found to be decreased in the third and fourth groups compared to the second group. Additionally, biochemical analyses (Myeloperoxidase, Malondyaldehyde, nitrate/nitrite and nitrotyrosine levels and Superoxide Dismutase activity) were in agreement with the histological and immunohistochemical results. In conclusion, croton oil causes inflammation in the anal area and results in hemorrhoids. Treatment with our herbal hemorrhoid creams demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects in this model.

  4. 21 CFR 131.160 - Sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Description. Sour cream results from the souring, by lactic acid producing bacteria, of pasteurized cream... titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid. (b) Optional ingredients. (1...,” section 16.023. (d) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “Sour cream” or alternatively “Cultured sour...

  5. 21 CFR 131.160 - Sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sour cream. 131.160 Section 131.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... Sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized by the...

  6. 21 CFR 131.160 - Sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sour cream. 131.160 Section 131.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... Sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized by the...

  7. 21 CFR 131.160 - Sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sour cream. 131.160 Section 131.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... Sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized by the...

  8. 21 CFR 131.160 - Sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sour cream. 131.160 Section 131.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... Sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized by the...

  9. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  10. 7 CFR 58.321 - Cream storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cream storage tanks. 58.321 Section 58.321 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....321 Cream storage tanks. Cream storage tanks shall meet the requirements of § 58.128(d). Cream storage...

  11. 7 CFR 58.321 - Cream storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cream storage tanks. 58.321 Section 58.321 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....321 Cream storage tanks. Cream storage tanks shall meet the requirements of § 58.128(d). Cream storage...

  12. 7 CFR 58.321 - Cream storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream storage tanks. 58.321 Section 58.321 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....321 Cream storage tanks. Cream storage tanks shall meet the requirements of § 58.128(d). Cream storage...

  13. Evaluation of Vaginal Drug Levels and Safety of a Locally Administered Glycerol Monolaurate Cream in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Rothenberger, Meghan K; Frieberg, Abby; Nephew, Karla; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Schmidt, Thomas; Reimann, Thomas; Haase, Ashley T; Panyam, Jayanth

    2017-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic affects millions of people worldwide. As women are more vulnerable to infection, female-controlled interventions can help control the spread of the disease significantly. Glycerol monolaurate (GML), an inexpensive and safe compound, has been shown to protect against simian immunodeficiency virus infection when applied vaginally. However, on account of its low aqueous solubility, fabrication of high-dose formulations of GML has proven difficult. We describe the development of a vaginal cream that could be loaded with up to 35% GML. Vaginal drug levels and safety of 3 formulations containing increasing concentrations of GML (5%w/w, 15%w/w, and 35%w/w) were tested in rhesus macaques after vaginal administration. GML concentration in the vaginal tissue increased as the drug concentration in the cream increased, with 35% GML cream resulting in tissue concentration of ∼0.5 mg/g, albeit with high interindividual variability. Compared with the vehicle control, none of the GML creams had any significant effect on the vaginal flora and cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein 3α and interleukin 8) levels, suggesting that high-dose GML formulations do not induce local adverse effects. In summary, we describe the development of a highly loaded vaginal cream of GML, and vaginal drug levels and safety after local administration in macaques. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bundled-Up Babies & Dangerous Ice Cream: Correlation Puzzlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenholley, Kathleen H.

    2013-01-01

    The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) in New York City is fourth among all community colleges in awarding degrees to minority students and in awarding degrees to African Americans. The BMCC student body is approximately 37 percent Hispanic, 33 percent black, 15 percent white, and 15 percent Asian. In addition, a significant proportion…

  15. Ice Cream Seminars for Graduate Students: Imparting Chemical Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garritano, Jeremy R.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides information on a chemical information literacy program designed primarily for new graduate students. The full implementation of this program is discussed, including defining its purpose, topics covered, content presented, methods of marketing, and evaluation. The result is a series of voluntary seminars given biweekly…

  16. I Like Chocolate Ice Cream: A Lesson in Thinking Civics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In curricula that encourages philosophy as having an integral role in educational programs, students get the opportunity to wonder and speculate, in a natural state surrounded by questions. A. K. Salmon notes that when thinking becomes a part of a young child's routine, the child becomes more open and responsive to situations that require thinking…

  17. Repellent action of neem cream against mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dua, V K; Nagpal, B N; Sharma, V P

    1995-06-01

    Neem cream was used as mosquito repellent to provide protection against Aedes albopictus, Ae. aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles culicifacies and An. subpictus mosquitoes. The application of neem cream on exposed body parts @2.0 gm/person showed 78 (range 65-95), 89 (range 66-100) and 94.4 (range 66-100) per cent protection against Aedes, Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes respectively. Significant difference was observed between neem cream treated and untreated group of population for Aedes mosquitoes (p < 0.001). Application of neem cream was found to be a safe and suitable alternative to insecticide impregnated coils for personal protection against mosquitoes and one application was 68% effective for four hours.

  18. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting...) used. (c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “cream cheese”. (d) Label declaration. Each of the...

  19. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting...) used. (c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “cream cheese”. (d) Label declaration. Each of the...

  20. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and is subjected to the action of lactic acid-producing bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting...) used. (c) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “cream cheese”. (d) Label declaration. Each of the...

  1. 21 CFR 524.450 - Clotrimazole cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... See 000859 in § 510.600(c). (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Apply 1/4-inch ribbon of cream per... infections of dogs and cats caused by Microsporum canis and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. (3) Limitations...

  2. 21 CFR 524.450 - Clotrimazole cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... See 000859 in § 510.600(c). (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Apply 1/4-inch ribbon of cream per... infections of dogs and cats caused by Microsporum canis and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. (3) Limitations...

  3. 21 CFR 524.450 - Clotrimazole cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... See 000859 in § 510.600(c). (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Apply 1/4-inch ribbon of cream per... infections of dogs and cats caused by Microsporum canis and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. (3) Limitations...

  4. 21 CFR 524.450 - Clotrimazole cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... See 000859 in § 510.600(c). (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Apply 1/4-inch ribbon of cream per... infections of dogs and cats caused by Microsporum canis and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. (3) Limitations...

  5. Development of performance matrix for generic product equivalence of acyclovir topical creams.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Xu, Xiaoming; Rahman, Ziyaur; Yang, Yang; Katragadda, Usha; Lionberger, Robert; Peters, John R; Uhl, Kathleen; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-11-20

    The effect of process variability on physicochemical characteristics and in vitro performance of qualitatively (Q1) and quantitatively (Q2) equivalent generic acyclovir topical dermatological creams was investigated to develop a matrix of standards for determining their in vitro bioequivalence with reference listed drug (RLD) product (Zovirax®). A fractional factorial design of experiment (DOE) with triplicate center point was used to create 11 acyclovir cream formulations with manufacturing variables such as pH of aqueous phase, emulsification time, homogenization speed, and emulsification temperature. Three more formulations (F-12-F-14) with drug particle size representing RLD were also prepared where the pH of the final product was adjusted. The formulations were subjected to physicochemical characterization (drug particle size, spreadability, viscosity, pH, and drug concentration in aqueous phase) and in vitro drug release studies against RLD. The results demonstrated that DOE formulations were structurally and functionally (e.g., drug release) similar (Q3) to RLD. Moreover, in vitro drug permeation studies showed that extent of drug bioavailability/retention in human epidermis from F-12-F-14 were similar to RLD, although differed in rate of permeation. The results suggested generic acyclovir creams can be manufactured to obtain identical performance as that of RLD with Q1/Q2/Q3. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Cream concentrated latex for foam rubber products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksup, R.; Imkaew, C.; Smitthipong, W.

    2017-12-01

    Fresh natural latex (around 40% rubber and 60% water) can be transformed to concentrated natural latex (around 60% rubber and 40% water) in order to realise economical transportation and easier latex product’s preparation. The concentrated natural latex is an extremely valuable material. It can be applied for many types of products, for example, foam rubber as pillow and mattress, elastic band, etc. Industrially, the concentrated natural latex can be prepared by centrifugation which requires an enormous expensive machine. From the eco-friendly products point of view, most of rubber entrepreneurs in the world try to develop a green rubber product. So, the main objective of this study is to prepare the cream concentrated latex without any sophisticated machine. Thus, we work on a simple, cheap and green method that does not use any expensive machine but uses water-based chemical as sodium alginate to prepare the cream concentrated latex. The optimal amount of sodium alginate in the latex was studied. The main characteristics of the cream concentrated latex were tested by various technics, such as alkalinity, total solid content (TSC), dry rubber content (DRC), etc. We found that there are no significant differences of results between fresh natural latex and cream concentrated latex, except for the TSC and DRC. The TSC and DRC of cream latex are higher than those of fresh natural latex. Finally, we propose a model of natural rubber particle and sodium alginate to form the cream concentrated latex.

  7. Efficacy of Advanced Odomos repellent cream (N, N-diethyl-benzamide) against mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Mittal, P K; Sreehari, U; Razdan, R K; Dash, A P; Ansari, M A

    2011-04-01

    Repellents are commonly used personal protection measures to avoid mosquito bites. In the present study, Advanced Odomos cream (12% N, N-diethyl-benzamide) was tested for its efficacy against mosquitoes in comparison to DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methyl benzamide). Bioassays were conducted to assess the repellency of Advanced Odomos and DEET creams against Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. Their efficacy was tested on human volunteers applied with different concentrations of test creams ranging from 1 to 12 mg/cm 2 and by exposing them to mosquitoes at hourly intervals. Field evaluation was also carried out to test the duration of protection of the test creams against Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes during whole night and day time collections, respectively on human volunteers. Mosquito collections were done using torch light and aspirator. Complete (100%) protection was achieved at 10 mg/cm 2 cream formulation of Advanced Odomos (1.2 mg a.i/cm 2 ) dose against An. stephensi and 12 mg/cm 2 (1.44 mg a.i./cm 2 ) against Ae. aegypti on human baits. There was no statistically significant differences in per cent protection against mosquito bites between Advanced Odomos and DEET cream (P>0.05) in respective doses. Complete protection up to 11 h was observed against Anopheles mosquitoes during whole night collections and up to 6 h against Ae. aegypti in day time collections. No adverse reactions such as itching, irritation, vomiting, nausea, etc. were reported by the volunteers. Advanced Odomos cream applied at 10 mg/cm 2 concentration provided 100% protection from Anopheles mosquitoes up to 11 h whereas about 6 h protection was recorded against Ae. aegypti. The laboratory and field trials indicate that for longer protection against Anopheles mosquitoes 10 mg/cm 2 will be appropriate and in case of Ae. aegypti more than 10 mg/cm 2 application is required for complete protection. In conclusion, the Advanced Odomos cream was comparable to the known repellent cream DEET for

  8. Treatment of scabies with 5% permethrin cream: results of a German multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Henning; Beiteke, Ulrike; Höger, Peter H; Seitz, Cornelia S; Thaci, Diamant; Sunderkötter, Cord

    2006-05-01

    Until recently, no prescription drug containing permethrin for the therapy of scabies was available on the German market.Therefore, a 5% permethrin cream formulation (InfectoScab 5%) was tested in a single-arm multi-center study including adults and children from 3 months of age with proven scabies. On day 0, patients were treated once with permethrin cream in the study center. Control examinations including dermatoscopy were performed on day 14+/-2 and on day 28+/-3. Patients who were not considered cured or who had contact to individuals with untreated scabies received one further treatment with permethrin cream on day 14+/-2. Itching and local tolerability of the cream were documented in patients' diaries. Side effects were assessed by history, skin inspection and evaluation of patients' notes. 106 patients in 13 centers were enrolled in the study. Their mean age was 29.2 years (range, 141 days to 71.9 years); 34% of them were children or adolescents. 78.3% of patients were either severely (3 body sites) or very severely (4-5 sites) affected. The cure rate on day 28+/-3 was 95.1% (95% confidence interval, 91.0-99.3%). Pruritus declined markedly and continuously. In general, the cream was well tolerated; side effects were almost invariably mild. Our results support the efficacy and safety of 5% permethrin cream in adults, children and infants suffering from scabies. These results have contributed to the approval of InfectoScab 5% in Germany for the treatment of scabies in October 2004.

  9. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pasteurized vanilla cream pudding as affected by storage temperature and the presence of cinnamon extract.

    PubMed

    Lianou, Alexandra; Moschonas, Galatios; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2018-04-01

    The objective of the present study was the assessment and quantitative description of the growth behavior of Listeria monocytogenes as a function of temperature in vanilla cream pudding, formulated with or without cinnamon extract. Commercially prepared pasteurized vanilla cream pudding, formulated with (0.1% w/w) or without cinnamon extract, was inoculated with a five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ca. 2logCFU/g) and stored aerobically at 4, 8, 12 and 16°C. At appropriate time intervals, L. monocytogenes populations were determined, and the primary model of Baranyi and Roberts was fitted to the derived microbiological data for the estimation of the pathogen's growth kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature on maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) was then modeled for each product type using a square-root-type model, and the developed models were validated using independent growth data generated during storage of inoculated vanilla cream samples under dynamic temperature conditions. Although the kinetic behavior of the pathogen was similar in cream with and without cinnamon extract during storage at higher temperatures, significant (P<0.05) differences were observed between the two product types at 4°C. With regard to secondary modelling, the estimated values of T min for cream with and without cinnamon extract were 0.39°C and -2.54°C, respectively, while the dynamic models exhibited satisfactory performance. Finally, as demonstrated by the findings of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, both temperature and cinnamon extract affected the pathogen's strains dominating during storage. According to the collected data, cinnamon extract exhibits an important potential of enhancing the microbiological safety of vanilla cream pudding, provided that efficient temperature control is in place. The developed models should be useful in quantitative microbial risk assessment regarding the studied cream products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microsphere based improved sunscreen formulation of ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate.

    PubMed

    Gogna, Deepak; Jain, Sunil K; Yadav, Awesh K; Agrawal, G P

    2007-04-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microspheres of ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHM) were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method to improve its photostability and effectiveness as sunscreening agent. Process parameters like stirring speed and aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) concentration were analyzed in order to optimize the formulations. Shape and surface morphology of the microspheres were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Particle size of the microspheres was determined using laser diffraction particle size analyzer. The PMMA microspheres of EHM were incorporated in water-removable cream base. The in vitro drug release of EHM in pH 7.4 was performed using dialysis membrane. Thin layer chromatography was performed to determine photostability of EHM inside the microspheres. The formulations were evaluated for sun protection factor (SPF) and minimum erythema dose (MED) in albino rats. Cream base formulation containing microspheres prepared using EHM:PMMA in ratio of 1:3 (C(3)) showed slowest drug (EHM) release and those prepared with EHM: PMMA in ratio of 1:1 showed fastest release. The cream base formulations containing EHM loaded microspheres had shown better SPF (more than 16.0) as compared to formulation C(d) that contained 3% free EHM as sunscreen agent and showed SPF 4.66. These studies revealed that the incorporation of EHM loaded PMMA microspheres into cream base had greatly increased the efficacy of sunscreen formulation approximately four times. Further, photostability was also shown to be improved in PMMA microspheres.

  11. Cumulative irritation potential of topical retinoid formulations.

    PubMed

    Leyden, James J; Grossman, Rachel; Nighland, Marge

    2008-08-01

    Localized irritation can limit treatment success with topical retinoids such as tretinoin and adapalene. The factors that influence irritant reactions have been shown to include individual skin sensitivity, the particular retinoid and concentration used, and the vehicle formulation. To compare the cutaneous tolerability of tretinoin 0.04% microsphere gel (TMG) with that of adapalene 0.3% gel and a standard tretinoin 0.025% cream. The results of 2 randomized, investigator-blinded studies of 2 to 3 weeks' duration, which utilized a split-face method to compare cumulative irritation scores induced by topical retinoids in subjects with healthy skin, were combined. Study 1 compared TMG 0.04% with adapalene 0.3% gel over 2 weeks, while study 2 compared TMG 0.04% with tretinoin 0.025% cream over 3 weeks. In study 1, TMG 0.04% was associated with significantly lower cumulative scores for erythema, dryness, and burning/stinging than adapalene 0.3% gel. However, in study 2, there were no significant differences in cumulative irritation scores between TMG 0.04% and tretinoin 0.025% cream. Measurements of erythema by a chromameter showed no significant differences between the test formulations in either study. Cutaneous tolerance of TMG 0.04% on the face was superior to that of adapalene 0.3% gel and similar to that of a standard tretinoin cream containing a lower concentration of the drug (0.025%).

  12. Topical vesicular formulations of Curcuma longa extract on recuperating the ultraviolet radiation-damaged skin.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Chanchal Deep; Saraf, Swarnlata

    2011-12-01

      Ultraviolet radiations generate reactive oxygen species, leading to adverse effects on skin properties. Botanical extracts are multifunctional in nature having various properties like photoprotection, anti-aging, moisturizing, antioxidant, astringent, anti-irritant, and antimicrobial activity.   The aim of this study was to formulate creams having Curcuma longa extract loaded novel vesicular systems (liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes) and study their photoprotective effect by assessment of skin hydration (Cutometer) and sebum content (Sebumeter).   The alcoholic C. longa extract loaded liposomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes having 0.5-2.0% w/w extract were prepared, evaluated for size, entrapment efficiency, and incorporated into the cream. Their long-term interaction with skin (6 weeks) was compared in terms of their effects on skin hydration and sebum content.   Vesicular size obtained was in the range 167.3 ± 3.0 to 262.4 ± 2.4 nm with low polydispersity index (0.2-0.3) and high entrapment efficiency. The efficacy was in the order C. longa extract loaded transfersomal creams > C. longa extract loaded ethosomal creams > C. longa extract loaded liposomal creams > C. longa extract loaded creams > Empty transfersome loaded cream > Empty ethosome loaded cream > Empty liposome loaded cream > Base cream.   The photoprotective properties of the constituents of C. longa extract and hydrant, moisturizing lipid components of nano vesicles with better skin penetration resulted in improvement in skin properties like skin hydration and sebum content. The herbal extract loaded nano vesicles incorporated in cream could be used as photoprotective formulations. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ice, Ice, Baby!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an outreach program based on hands-on activities called "Ice, Ice, Baby". These lessons are designed to teach the science principles of displacement, forces of motion, density, and states of matter. These properties are easily taught through the interesting topics of glaciers, icebergs, and sea level rise in K-8 classrooms. The activities are fun, engaging, and simple enough to be used at science fairs and family science nights. Students who have participated in "Ice, Ice, Baby" have successfully taught these to adults and students at informal events. The lessons are based on education standards which are available on our website www.cresis.ku.edu. This presentation will provide information on the activities, survey results from teachers who have used the material, and other suggested material that can be used before and after the activities.

  14. Influence of full cream milk powder on the characteristics of sweet potato puree instant cream soup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyoto, Marleen; Djali, Mohamad; Dwiastuti, Intan Btari

    2018-02-01

    A ready to use food such as instant cream soup become the most suitable choice for those who prefer being practical and also can be applied in any emergency situation such as areas affected by disaster. The adding of milk powder as the main ingredient in cream soup creates a complex bounding of fat and starch which complicates the rehydration process and affects other physical appearance. This research was aimed to find the proper concentration of full cream milk powder concentration to obtain the best characteristics of instant cream soup of dried sweet potato puree. The method used in this research was randomized block design with 6 treatments (12.5%, 15%, 17.5%, 20%, 22.5% and 25%, with an addition of full cream milk powder) and twice repetition. Instant cream soup with 20% of full cream milk powder concentration gave the best physical and chemical characteristics. The physical and chemical characteristic shows that it has 6% water content, 95.47% rehydration value, 18% protein, 20.7% fat, 1080.25 cP viscosity and 30.5% rendement.

  15. 21 CFR 133.134 - Cream cheese with other foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cream cheese with other foods. 133.134 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.134 Cream cheese with other foods. (a) Description. Cream cheese with...

  16. 21 CFR 133.134 - Cream cheese with other foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cream cheese with other foods. 133.134 Section 133...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.134 Cream cheese with other foods. (a) Description. Cream cheese with...

  17. Accelerated stability and bioassay of a new oral α-ketoglutarate formulation for treating cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rahul; Gopalan, Natarajan; Singh, Anil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Yadav, Shiv Kumar; Rao, Pooja; Shrivastava, Saurabh

    2014-02-01

    Due to several limitations of existing cyanide antidotes, α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) has been proposed as a promising treatment for cyanide. This study reports the accelerated stability and bioassay of a new oral α-KG formulation. Amber-colored PVDF bottles containing 100 ml of 10% α-KG in 70% sorbitol, preservative (sodium methyl paraben and sodium propyl paraben), sweetener (sodium saccharine), flavor (American ice-cream soda and peppermint) and color (tartrazine), at pH 7.0-8.0 were stored in stability chamber (40 ± 2 °C and 75 ± 5% humidity) for 6 months in a GMP compliant facility. Various physical (pH, color, evaporation, extractable volume and clarity), chemical (identification and quantification of active ingredient) and microbiological (total aerobic count) analyses, together with protection studies were carried periodically in mice. Acute toxicity of the formulation and bioavailability of α-KG were assessed in rats at the beginning of the experiment. No physical changes and microbiological growth were observed in the formulation. After 6 months, α-KG content in the formulation diminished by ∼24% but its protective efficacy against cyanide remained at 5.9-fold. Protection was further characterized spectrophotometrically by disappearance of α-KG spectrum in the presence of cyanide, confirming cyanohydrin formation. Oral LD50 of α-KG formulation in rats was >7.0 g/kg body weight, and did not produce any acute toxicity of clinical significance. Also, an appreciable amount of α-KG was measured in blood. As per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonization, the new α-KG formulation exhibited satisfactory stability, bioefficacy and safety as cyanide antidote.

  18. Archaeology: formulation of a Roman cosmetic.

    PubMed

    Evershed, R P; Berstan, R; Grew, F; Copley, M S; Charmant, A J H; Barham, E; Mottram, H R; Brown, G

    2004-11-04

    The discovery of a small tin canister in London during archaeological excavations of a Roman temple precinct, dated to the middle of the second century AD, is a landmark in the study of this class of artefact. Such discoveries from the Roman world are rare and this is the only one to be found so far with its lid and contents--a whitish medicinal or cosmetic cream--providing a unique opportunity for us to study the ancient formulation.

  19. Study on the efficacy of ELA-Max (4% liposomal lidocaine) compared with EMLA cream (eutectic mixture of local anesthetics) using thermosensory threshold analysis in adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tang, M B Y; Goon, A T J; Goh, C L

    2004-04-01

    ELA-Max and EMLA cream are topical anesthetics that have been shown to have similar anesthetic efficacy in previous studies. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ELA-Max in comparison with EMLA cream using a novel method of thermosensory threshold analysis. A thermosensory analyzer was used to assess warmth- and heat-induced pain thresholds. No statistically significant difference was found in pain thresholds using either formulation. However, EMLA cream increased the heat-induced pain threshold to a greater extent than ELA-Max. Thermosensory measurement and analysis was well tolerated and no adverse events were encountered. EMLA cream may be superior to ELA-Max for heat-induced pain. This study suggests that thermosensory measurement may be another suitable tool for future topical anesthetic efficacy studies.

  20. 21 CFR 524.2350 - Tolnaftate cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... twice a day for 2 to 4 weeks. The areas to be treated are first cleared of exudate and the hair clipped... surrounding area until the cream is no longer visible. (3) If no response is seen after 2 weeks of treatment with the drug the diagnosis should be reviewed. (4) Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the...

  1. 21 CFR 524.2350 - Tolnaftate cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... twice a day for 2 to 4 weeks. The areas to be treated are first cleared of exudate and the hair clipped... surrounding area until the cream is no longer visible. (3) If no response is seen after 2 weeks of treatment with the drug the diagnosis should be reviewed. (4) Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the...

  2. 21 CFR 131.150 - Heavy cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heavy cream. 131.150 Section 131.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  3. 21 CFR 131.155 - Light cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light cream. 131.155 Section 131.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c...

  4. 21 CFR 131.149 - Dry cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dry cream. 131.149 Section 131.149 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... fruit juice, including concentrated fruit and fruit juice. (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring...

  5. 21 CFR 131.150 - Heavy cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heavy cream. 131.150 Section 131.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  6. 21 CFR 131.155 - Light cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Light cream. 131.155 Section 131.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c...

  7. 21 CFR 131.149 - Dry cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dry cream. 131.149 Section 131.149 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... fruit juice, including concentrated fruit and fruit juice. (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring...

  8. 21 CFR 131.155 - Light cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Light cream. 131.155 Section 131.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c...

  9. 21 CFR 131.155 - Light cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light cream. 131.155 Section 131.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c...

  10. 21 CFR 131.150 - Heavy cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heavy cream. 131.150 Section 131.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 131.150 - Heavy cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heavy cream. 131.150 Section 131.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  12. 21 CFR 131.149 - Dry cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dry cream. 131.149 Section 131.149 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... fruit juice, including concentrated fruit and fruit juice. (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring...

  13. 21 CFR 131.150 - Heavy cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heavy cream. 131.150 Section 131.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  14. 21 CFR 131.155 - Light cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Light cream. 131.155 Section 131.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice). (ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring. (c...

  15. 21 CFR 131.149 - Dry cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dry cream. 131.149 Section 131.149 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...: (1) Emulsifiers. (2) Stabilizers. (3) Anticaking agents. (4) Antioxidants. (5) Nutritive carbohydrate...

  16. Clinical study of sertaconazole 2% cream vs. hydrocortisone 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Rezaee, Elham; Masoudnia, Sima; Raghifar, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is an inflammatory skin disorder affecting the scalp, face, and trunk, however, there are controversies surrounding its treatment. The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of sertaconazole 2% cream with hydrocortisone 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In total, 138 patients suffering from seborrheic dermatitis were studied. Sixty-nine patients received local sertoconazole 2% cream and they were recommended to use the cream twice a day and for 4 weeks. To create a control group, 69 patients received hydrocortisone 1% cream twice a day for four weeks. At the time of referral, and at 2 and 4 weeks after their first visit, the patients were examined by a dermatologist to check the improvement of clinical symptoms. The mean age of patients was 36.45 +/- 13.23. The highest level of satisfaction (85.1%) was observed 28 days after sertaconazole consumption: 76.9% was recorded for the hydrocortisone group. No relapse of the disease one month after stopping treatment was observed in either the sertaconazole 2% group or the hydrocortisone 1% group. Sertaconazole 2% cream may be an excellent alternative therapeutic modality for treating seborrheic dermatitis.

  17. Comparative Effects of Retinoic Acid or Glycolic Acid Vehiculated in Different Topical Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Maia Campos, Patrícia Maria Berardo Gonçalves; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo; Gonçalves, Gisele Mara Silva; Pereira, Lúcia Helena Terenciane Rodrigues; Semprini, Marisa; Lopes, Ruberval Armando

    2015-01-01

    Retinoids and hydroxy acids have been widely used due to their effects in the regulation of growth and in the differentiation of epithelial cells. However, besides their similar indication, they have different mechanisms of action and thus they may have different effects on the skin; in addition, since the topical formulation efficiency depends on vehicle characteristics, the ingredients of the formulation could alter their effects. Thus the objective of this study was to compare the effects of retinoic acid (RA) and glycolic acid (GA) treatment on the hairless mouse epidermis thickness and horny layer renewal when added in gel, gel cream, or cream formulations. For this, gel, gel cream, and cream formulations (with or without 6% GA or 0.05% RA) were applied in the dorsum of hairless mice, once a day for seven days. After that, the skin was analyzed by histopathologic, morphometric, and stereologic techniques. It was observed that the effects of RA occurred independently from the vehicle, while GA had better results when added in the gel cream and cream. Retinoic acid was more effective when compared to glycolic acid, mainly in the cell renewal and the exfoliation process because it decreased the horny layer thickness. PMID:25632398

  18. Determination of capsaicinoids in topical cream by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaale, Eliangiringa; Van Schepdael, Ann; Roets, Eugène; Hoogmartens, Jos

    2002-11-07

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) method has been developed, optimised and validated for the separation and quantitation of capsaicin (CP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHCP) in a topical cream formulation. Sample preparation involves liquid-liquid extraction prior to LC analysis. The method uses a Hypersil C(18) BDS, 5 micrometer, 250x4.6 mm I.D. column maintained at 35 degrees C. The mobile phase comprises methanol, water, acetonitrile (ACN) and acetic acid (47:42:10:1, v/v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. Robustness was evaluated by performing a central composite face-centred design (CCF) experiment. The method shows good selectivity, linearity, sensitivity and repeatability. The conditions allow the separation and quantitation of CP and DHCP without interference from the other substances contained in the cream.

  19. Diaper dermatitis care of newborns human breast milk or barrier cream.

    PubMed

    Gozen, Duygu; Caglar, Seda; Bayraktar, Sema; Atici, Funda

    2014-02-01

    To establish the effectiveness of human breast milk and barrier cream (40% zinc oxide with cod liver oil formulation) applied for the skincare of newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit on the healing process of diaper dermatitis. Diaper dermatitis is the most common dermatological condition in newborns who are cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit. Recently, there are several kinds of complementary skincare methods suggested for newborns, such as sunflower oil, human breast milk, etc. Also, some chemical formulations are still being used in many neonatal intensive care units. Randomised controlled, prospective, experimental. This study was carried out with a population including term and preterm newborns who developed diaper rash while being treated in the neonatal intensive care unit of a university hospital in Istanbul between February-October 2010. On completion of the research, a total of 63 newborns from human breast milk (n = 30) and barrier cream (n = 33) groups were contacted. Genders, mean gestation weeks, feeding method, antibiotic use, diaper area cleansing methods, diaper brands and prelesion scores of newborns in both groups were found to be comparable (p > 0·05). There was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.294) between the groups in terms of mean number of clinical improvement days, but postlesion score of the barrier cream group was statistically significantly lower (p = 0·002) than the human breast milk group. Barrier cream delivers more effective results than treatment with human breast milk, particularly in the treatment of newborns with moderate to severe dermatitis in the result of the study. This study will shed light on nursing care of skin for newborns who are treated in neonatal intensive care unit. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Ethyl ferulate, a component with anti-inflammatory properties for emulsion-based creams.

    PubMed

    Nazaré, Ana C; de Faria, Carolina M Q G; Chiari, Bruna G; Petrônio, Maicon S; Regasini, Luis O; Silva, Dulce H S; Corrêa, Marcos A; Isaac, Vera L B; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2014-06-17

    Ethyl ferulate (FAEE) has been widely studied due to its beneficial heath properties and, when incorporated in creams, shows a high sun protection capacity. Here we aimed to compare FAEE and its precursor, ferulic acid (FA), as free radical scavengers, inhibitors of oxidants produced by leukocytes and the alterations in rheological properties when incorporated in emulsion based creams. The cell-free antiradical capacity of FAEE was decreased compared to FA. However, FAEE was more effective regarding the scavenging of reactive oxygen species produced by activated leukocytes. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that the formulations are more elastic than viscous. The viscoelastic features of the formulations were confirmed in the creep and recovery assay and showed that the FAEE formulation was less susceptive to deformation. Liberation experiments showed that the rate of FAEE release from the emulsion was slower compared to FA. In conclusion, FAEE is more effective than FA as a potential inhibitor of oxidative damage produced by oxidants generated by leukocytes. The rheological alterations caused by the addition of FAEE are indicative of lower spreadability, which could be useful for formulations used in restricted areas of the skin.

  1. The rationale for advancing the formulation of azelaic acid vehicles.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2006-02-01

    When first approved in December 2002, 15% azelaic acid (AzA) gel represented a significant advance over the available 20% AzA cream. Although a smaller amount of AzA was present in the new formulation, the gel medium provided a highly effective system for delivering the active ingredient, thus providing more effective treatment. This article explores the nature of these 2 vehicles and highlights the importance of the formulation in which dermatologic drugs are delivered.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of flurbiprofen microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Ambade, K W; Jadhav, S L; Gambhire, M N; Kurmi, S D; Kadam, V J; Jadhav, K R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the microemulsion formulations for topical delivery of Flurbiprofen (FP) in order to by pass its gastrointestinal adverse effects. The pseudoternary phase diagrams were developed and various microemulsion formulations were prepared using Isopropyl Myristate (IPM), Ethyl Oleate (EO) as oils, Aerosol OT as surfactant and Sorbitan Monooleate as cosurfactant. The transdermal permeability of flurbiprofen from microemulsions containing IPM and EO as two different oil phases was analyzed using Keshary-Chien diffusion cell through excised rat skin. Flurbiprofen showed higher in vitro permeation from IPM as compared to that of from EO microemulsion. Thus microemulsion containing IPM as oil phase were selected for optimization. The optimization was carried out using 2(3) factorial design. The optimized formula was then subjected to in vivo anti-inflammatory study and the performance of flurbiprofen from optimized formulation was compared with that of gel cream. Flurbiprofen from optimized microemulsion formulation was found to be more effective as compared to gel cream in inhibiting the carrageenan induced rat paw edema at all time intervals. Histopathological investigation of rat skin revealed the safety of microemulsion formulation for topical use. Thus the present study indicates that, microemulsion can be a promising vehicle for the topical delivery of flurbiprofen.

  3. Infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for in situ analysis of an imiquimod pharmaceutical preparation presented as cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2014-01-01

    In the present work the homogeneity of a pharmaceutical formulation presented as a cream was studied using infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric methodologies such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). A cream formulation, presented as an emulsion, was prepared using imiquimod as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the excipients: water, vaseline, an emulsifier and a carboxylic acid in order to dissolve the API. After exposure at 45 °C during 3 months to perform accelerated stability test, the presence of some crystals was observed, indicating homogeneity problems in the formulation. PCA exploratory analysis showed that the crystal composition was different from the composition of the emulsion, since the score maps presented crystal structures in the emulsion. MCR-ALS estimated the spectra of the crystals and the emulsion. The crystals presented amine and C-H bands, suggesting that the precipitate was a salt formed by carboxylic acid and imiquimod. These results indicate the potential of infrared imaging spectroscopy in conjunction with chemometric methodologies as an analytical tool to ensure the quality of cream formulations in the pharmaceutical industry.

  4. The effect of additives on release and in vitro skin retention of flavonoids from emulsion and gel semisolid formulations.

    PubMed

    Dyja, R; Jankowski, A

    2017-08-01

    To assess the effect of two different additives (propylene glycol (PG) and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400)) on release and in vitro skin retention of quercetin and chrysin from semisolid bases (amphiphilic creams and acidic carbomer gels). For obtaining semisolid formulations, flavonoids were pre-dissolved in the liquid (PG or PEG 400) or directly suspended in the semisolid base. Three chrysin formulations ('cream 0', 'PG-cream' and 'PEG 400-cream') and five quercetin formulations ('cream 0', 'PG cream', 'PEG 400 cream', 'gel 0' and 'PG gel') were prepared. The release studies were carried out in Franz diffusion cells by means of a cellulose membrane. The porcine ear skin was used in in vitro skin retention studies. The dissolution was a prerequisite to increase the release rates of tested flavonoids from obtained semisolid formulations. The cumulative amount of chrysin released after 6 h from 'PEG 400 cream' containing partly dissolved form of that flavonoid was higher than that from 'cream 0' or 'PG cream' containing its suspended form. The formulations containing quercetin dissolved in PG ('PG cream', 'PG gel') or PEG 400 ('PEG 400 cream') exhibited higher release rates of that flavonoid than corresponding semisolid suspensions ('cream 0' or 'gel 0'). The effects of both liquid additives (PG and PEG 400) on the cumulative amount of quercetin released after 6 h were comparable. However, there was no correlation between the release rate and the skin retention. The amounts of the flavonoids found in the skin were strongly affected by the type of the used solvent. While PG increased the skin retention of both flavonoids, PEG 400 had no effect on chrysin skin retention and delayed quercetin skin absorption. The proper choice of the solvent added to the semisolid base is crucial for enhanced skin delivery of the tested flavonoids. PG is more efficient absorption promoter than PEG 400 of both chrysin and quercetin. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Soci

  5. Ice Bridge Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-21

    Sea ice is seen out the window of NASA's DC-8 research aircraft as it flies 2,000 feet above the Bellingshausen Sea in West Antarctica on Wednesday, Oct., 21, 2009. This was the fourth science flight of NASA’s Operation Ice Bridge airborne Earth science mission to study Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice, and ice shelves. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jane Peterson)

  6. In vitro evaluation of Spirulina platensis extract incorporated skin cream with its wound healing and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Seda; Tamburaci, Sedef; Dalay, Meltem Conk; Deliloglu Gurhan, Ismet

    2017-12-01

    Algae have gained importance in cosmeceutical product development due to their beneficial effects on skin health and therapeutical value with bioactive compounds. Spirulina platensis Parachas (Phormidiaceae) is renowned as a potential source of high-value chemicals and recently used in skincare products. This study develops and evaluates skin creams incorporated with bioactive S. platensis extract. Spirulina platensis was cultivated, the aqueous crude extract was prepared and in vitro cytotoxicity of S. platensis extract in the range of 0.001-1% concentrations for 1, 3 and 7 d on HS2 keratinocyte cells was determined. Crude extracts were incorporated in skin cream formulation at 0.01% (w/w) concentration and in vitro wound healing and genotoxicity studies were performed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine the collagen activity. 0.1% S. platensis extract exhibited higher proliferation activity compared with the control group with 198% of cell viability after 3 d. Skin cream including 1.125% S. platensis crude extract showed enhanced wound healing effect on HS2 keratinocyte cell line and the highest HS2 cell viability % was obtained with this concentration. The micronucleus (MN) assay results indicated that S. platensis extract incorporated creams had no genotoxic effect on human peripheral blood cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that collagen 1 immunoreactivity was improved by increased extract concentration and it was strongly positive in cells treated with 1.125% extract incorporated skin cream. The cell viability, wound healing activity and genotoxicity results showed that S. platensis incorporated skin cream could be of potential value in cosmeceutical and biomedical applications.

  7. Determination of ultraviolet filter activity on coconut oil cosmetic cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyati, Eni

    2017-08-01

    A research on determination of ultraviolet (UV) filter activity of cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material has been done. The cream was made by mixing the oil phase (coconut oil, stearic acid, lanolin and cetyl alcohol) at 70°C and the water phase (glycerin, aquadest and triethanolamine) at 70°C, while stirring until reached a temperature of 35°C. It was made also a cream with inorganic sunscreen TiO2 and organic sunscreen benzophenone-3 as a comparison. To study the UV filter activity, each cream was determined the UV absorption using UV spectrophotometer. The results show that cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material absorbs UV rays in the region of UV-C, whereas the cream with TiO2 absorbs the UV rays from UV-C to UV-A and cream with benzophenone-3 absorbs the UV rays from UV-B to UV-A region. This means that, the cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material has an activity as UV-C filter. If this cream is expected to have an activity as a sunscreen, it must be added an inorganic or organic sunscreen or a mixture of both as an active materials.

  8. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    Sea ice covers vast areas of the polar oceans, with ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 7 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September to approximately 15 x 10(exp 6) sq km in March and ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km in February to approximately 18 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September. These ice covers have major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the polar regions, and so as changes occur in them there are potential widespread consequences. Satellite data reveal considerable interannual variability in both polar sea ice covers, and many studies suggest possible connections between the ice and various oscillations within the climate system, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Antarctic Oscillation, or Southern Annular Mode. Nonetheless, statistically significant long-term trends are also apparent, including overall trends of decreased ice coverage in the Arctic and increased ice coverage in the Antarctic from late 1978 through the end of 2003, with the Antarctic ice increases following marked decreases in the Antarctic ice during the 1970s. For a detailed picture of the seasonally varying ice cover at the start of the 21st century, this chapter includes ice concentration maps for each month of 2001 for both the Arctic and the Antarctic, as well as an overview of what the satellite record has revealed about the two polar ice covers from the 1970s through 2003.

  9. Iodinated curcumin bearing dermal cream augmented drug delivery, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Gagandeep; Sodhi, Rupinder Kaur; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur) exhibits weak microbicidal activity owing to high lipophilicity and low cell permeability. Therefore, in the present investigation, Cur was iodinated using elemental iodine (I 2 ) to synthesise Cur-I 2 powder that was later formulated as Cur-I 2 dermal cream and characterised in vitro for antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Electrophilic addition of I 2 saturated the olefinic bonds of Cur, as confirmed by UV/visible spectroscopy, FT-IR, 1 H NMR and DSC techniques. In addition, in vitro skin permeation and retention analysis indicated that Cur-I 2 cream followed the first order and Higuchi model for drug release through the rat skin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Cur-I 2 powder was measured to be 60 and 90 µg/ml significantly (p < 0.05) lower than 150 and 120 µg/ml of Cur against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. Moreover, Cur-I 2 also exhibited strong antioxidant potential. Cur-I 2 cream warrants further in vivo study to scale up the technology for clinical translation.

  10. Ice Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Ice Stars - August 4th, 2002 Description: Like distant galaxies amid clouds of interstellar dust, chunks of sea ice drift through graceful swirls of grease ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Sea ice often begins as grease ice, a soupy slick of tiny ice crystals on the ocean's surface. As the temperature drops, grease ice thickens and coalesces into slabs of more solid ice. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  11. Norfloxacin and metronidazole topical formulations for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Kamal; Malipeddi, Venkata Ramana; Madan, Jyotsna; Gupta, Gaurav; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Awasthi, Rajendra; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; De Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our various previous findings have shown the suitability of norfloxacin in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds in alone as well as in combination with Curcuma longa in various topical (ointments, gels, and creams) and transdermal drug delivery systems. Aims and methods Keeping these facts in consideration, we have made an another attempt to prepare semisolid formulations containing 1% w/w of norfloxacin and metronidazole with different bases like Carbopol, polyethylene glycol, and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds. The prepared formulations were evaluated for physicochemical parameters, in vitro drug release, antimicrobial activity, and burn wound healing properties. Results The prepared formulations were compared with Silver Sulfadiazine cream 1%, USP. Antimicrobial activity of norfloxacin semisolid formulations was found to be equally effective against both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in comparison to a marketed formulation of Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. Based on the burn wound healing property, the prepared norfloxacin semisolid formulation was found to be in good agreement with marketed Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. Conclusions These findings suggest formulations containing norfloxacin and metronidazole may also prove as an effective alternative for existing remedies in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds. PMID:28386462

  12. The effect of vaginal cream containing ginger in users of clotrimazole vaginal cream on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Sheida; Khalili, Sima; Lorigooini, Zahra; Malekpour, Afsaneh; Heidari-Soureshjani, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most common infections of the genital tract in women that causes many complications. Therefore, we examined the clinical effect of ginger cream along with clotrimazole compared to vaginal clotrimazole alone in this study. This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 67 women admitted to the Gynecology Clinic of Hajar Hospital with vaginal candidiasis. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 33 and 34 people. The diagnosis was made according to clinical symptoms, wet smear, and culture. Ginger-clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% and clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% were administered to groups 1 and 2, respectively, once a day for 7 days and therapeutic effects and symptoms were evaluated in readmission. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22, t -test and Chi-square. The mean value of variables itching ( P > 0.05), burning ( P > 0.05), and cheesy secretion ( P < 0.05) in users of ginger-clotrimazole was less than the other group after the treatment. Recurrence in clotrimazole group was 48.5% and in ginger-clotrimazole group 51.2% during the 1-month follow-up with no significant difference. Study results showed that cream containing ginger and clotrimazole 1% was more effective and may be more useful than the clotrimazole to treat vaginal candidiasis.

  13. Photoprotective Effects of a Multifunctional Hair Care Formulation Containing Botanical Extracts, Vitamins, and UV Filters.

    PubMed

    Leite, Marcella Gabarra Almeida; Maia Campos, Patricia M B G

    2018-05-04

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the efficacy of a multifunctional hair care formulation-Hair BB Cream-containing botanical extracts of Camellia sinensis, Vitis vinifera, and Euterpe orleacea, vitamins, amino acids, UV filters, and silicones for hair treatment and prevention of UV damages. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the botanical extracts was evaluated using the DPPH and chemiluminescence methods. A tensile test, combability, shine, and image analysis were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the formulation. To evaluate protection against UV damage, the hair strands were submitted to UV radiation without and with the application of the Hair BB Cream. The results showed that the application of the Hair BB Cream promoted a reduction in combability values and an increase in break stress and gloss values. After exposure to UV radiation, the hair treated with the BB Cream formulation showed no difference in the mechanical properties test, indicating protection against UV damage. In conclusion, the multifunctional formulation showed several benefits of single product acting in the prevention of UV damage and the treatment of hair damage. Thus, the Hair BB Cream proposed can be suggested as an effective multifunctional hair care product. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Ice Bridge Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-21

    An iceberg is seen out the window of NASA's DC-8 research aircraft as it flies 2,000 feet above the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica on Wednesday, Oct., 21, 2009. This was the fourth science flight of NASA’s Operation Ice Bridge airborne Earth science mission to study Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice, and ice shelves. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jane Peterson)

  15. Broken ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    An area of broken glacier ice seen from the IceBridge DC-8 on Oct. 22, 2012. Credit: NASA / George Hale NASA's Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth's polar ice. For more information about IceBridge, visit: www.nasa.gov/icebridge NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  16. 7 CFR 58.714 - Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. 58.714 Section 58.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.714 Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. These cheeses when mixed with other foods, or used for...

  17. 7 CFR 58.714 - Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. 58.714 Section 58.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.714 Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. These cheeses when mixed with other foods, or used for...

  18. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  19. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  20. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  1. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream...

  7. Mixed ice accretion on aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Zaid A.; Turnbull, Barbara; Hibberd, Stephen; Choi, Kwing-So

    2018-02-01

    Ice accretion is a problematic natural phenomenon that affects a wide range of engineering applications including power cables, radio masts, and wind turbines. Accretion on aircraft wings occurs when supercooled water droplets freeze instantaneously on impact to form rime ice or runback as water along the wing to form glaze ice. Most models to date have ignored the accretion of mixed ice, which is a combination of rime and glaze. A parameter we term the "freezing fraction" is defined as the fraction of a supercooled droplet that freezes on impact with the top surface of the accretion ice to explore the concept of mixed ice accretion. Additionally we consider different "packing densities" of rime ice, mimicking the different bulk rime densities observed in nature. Ice accretion is considered in four stages: rime, primary mixed, secondary mixed, and glaze ice. Predictions match with existing models and experimental data in the limiting rime and glaze cases. The mixed ice formulation however provides additional insight into the composition of the overall ice structure, which ultimately influences adhesion and ice thickness, and shows that for similar atmospheric parameter ranges, this simple mixed ice description leads to very different accretion rates. A simple one-dimensional energy balance was solved to show how this freezing fraction parameter increases with decrease in atmospheric temperature, with lower freezing fraction promoting glaze ice accretion.

  8. Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramwell, Steven T.; Gingras, Michel J. P.; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2013-03-01

    Pauling's model of hydrogen disorder in water ice represents the prototype of a frustrated system. Over the years it has spawned several analogous models, including Anderson's model antiferromagnet and the statistical "vertex" models. Spin Ice is a sixteen vertex model of "ferromagnetic frustration" that is approximated by real materials, most notably the rare earth pyrochlores Ho2Ti2O7, Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Sn2O7. These "spin ice materials" have the Pauling zero point entropy and in all respects represent almost ideal realisations of Pauling's model. They provide experimentalists with unprecedented access to a wide variety of novel magnetic states and phase transitions that are located in different regions of the field-temperature phase diagram. They afford theoreticians the opportunity to explore many new features of the magnetic interactions and statistical mechanics of frustrated systems. This chapter is a comprehensive review of the physics -- both experimental and theoretical -- of spin ice. It starts with a discussion of the historic problem of water ice and its relation to spin ice and other frustrated magnets. The properties of spin ice are then discussed in three sections that deal with the zero field spin ice state, the numerous field-induced states (including the recently identified "kagomé ice") and the magnetic dynamics. Some materials related to spin ice are briefly described and the chapter is concluded with a short summary of spin ice physics.

  9. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter H., E-mail: peter.graham@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less thanmore » 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies.« less

  10. Ex vivo studies for the passive transdermal delivery of low-dose naltrexone from a cream; detection of naltrexone and its active metabolite, 6β-naltrexol, using a novel LC Q-ToF MS assay.

    PubMed

    Dodou, Kalliopi; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Ivan; Wilkinson, Simon; Carr, Kevin; Shattock, Paul; Whiteley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is a long-acting opiate antagonist. Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to formulate NTX into a cream for the delivery of LDN and develop an analytical technique for the quantification of NTX and its active metabolite 6-β-naltrexol (NTXol) during transdermal diffusion cell permeation studies. A 1% w/w NTX cream was formulated and drug permeation was examined over 24 h using static Franz diffusion cells mounted with pig skin. A Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS Q-ToF) method was developed for the detection of NTX and NTXol in the receptor solution, skin membrane and residual cream on the donor chamber after completion of the diffusion studies. The cream formulation exhibited steady state release of NTX over 24 h after an initial lag time of 2.74 h. The bioconversion of NTX to NTXol in the skin membrane was 1.1%. It was concluded that the cream may be an effective formulation for the sustained transdermal delivery of LDN. The novel LC Q-ToF MS method allowed the accurate measurement of NTX and NTXol levels across the diffusion cell assemblies and the quantification of NTX metabolism in the skin.

  11. The treatment of melasma by silymarin cream

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Melasma is an acquired increased pigmentation of the skin characterized by symmetrical and confluent grey-brown patches usually on the areas of the face exposed to the sun. Silymarin strongly prevents photocarcinogenesis, and significantly prevented melanin production. The objectives of this study were the assessment of safety and efficacy of topical Silymain (SM) cream in a double-blind placebo controlled study for treatment of melasma patients. Methods Experimentally on 24 Albino rabbits were randomly divided into 4 equal groups. [A] No treatment, [B] received placebo, [C] treated with SM cream (0.1), & [D] treated by SM (0.2), were applied topically before UV sun light exposure for 30 days, assessed clinically & tissue pathology. Clinically on 96 adults diagnosed with melasma randomized to three equal groups to receive one of the tested drugs applied twice daily for 4 weeks, evaluated by the response; lesion size, melasma area and severity index score, Physician global assessment, and subjective assessment. Results The Clinical and histopathology observations were reduced significantly in SM groups. Clinically; all patients showed significant excellent pigment improvement & lesion size reduction with SM treatments from the 1st week. All patients were fully satisfied 100%. No side effects were observed. Conclusions Silymarin showed tremendous improvement of melasma in a dose-dependent manner, and was effective in prevention of skin damage caused by U.V. sunlight. It is a safe new candidate effective treatment for melasma. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12612000602820 PMID:23031632

  12. In vitro-in vivo correlation study for the dermatopharmacokinetics of terbinafine hydrochloride topical cream.

    PubMed

    Saeheng, Suwadee; Nosoongnoen, Wichit; Varothai, Supenya; Sathirakul, Korbtham

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between dermatopharmacokinetic (DPK) tape stripping from in vitro and in vivo using 1% terbinafine hydrochloride topical cream as the model formulation. In vitro and in vivo tape strippings were conducted on separated pig ear skin used as a biological membrane for franz diffusion cell testing and the non-hairy skin area at the ventral forearms of healthy volunteers, respectively. Terbinafine (1%) topical cream was applied to the skin for 0.5, 2, and 4 h. The drug profiles of terbinafine across the stratum corneum were determined immediately (time 0 h), and at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h after removing the formulation. The amounts of terbinafine were analyzed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. The area under the curve (AUC) and the maximum amounts of terbinafine absorption (Q(max)) were obtained from pharmacokinetic software. Partition coefficient (K(SC/veh)) and diffusion parameter (D/L²) were derived from the Fick's second law equation. During the schedule time of 8 h, the deviations of in vitro and in vivo data were 6.61 and 30.46% for AUC and Q(max), respectively. There was insignificant difference of the K(SC/veh) and the D/L² between excised pig ear and human skin. In addition, K(SC/veh) and D/L² at T(max) of 2 h were used to predict the AUC presented the value of 4.7481 %h whereas the true value calculated from pharmacokinetic software provided the value of 5.9311 %h differing from each other in approximate of 20%. In vitro tape stripping using the separated pig ear skin as a viable membrane of the franz diffusion cell testing demonstrates the potential to represent in vivo tape stripping in human for topical bioavailability/bioequivalence study of terbinafine hydrochloride 1% topical cream.

  13. Electrolyte formulations

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Ye; Strand, Deidre; Cheng, Gang

    2018-05-29

    An electrochemical cell including a silicon-based anode and an electrolyte, where the electrolyte is formulated to contain solvents having cyclic sulfone or cyclic sulfite chemical structure. Specific additional solvent and salt combinations yield superior performance in these electrochemical cells.

  14. Halobetasol Propionate Lotion, 0.05% Provides Superior Hydration Compared to Halobetasol Propionate Cream, 0.05% in a Double-Blinded Study of Occlusivity and Hydration.

    PubMed

    Grove, Gary; Zerweck, Charles; Houser, Tim; Andrasfay, Anthony; Gauthier, Bob; Holland, Charles; Piacquadio, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    This study measured skin hydration and occlusivity of two test products [halobetasol propionate lotion, 0.05% (HBP Lotion) and Ultravate® (halobetasol propionate) cream, 0.05% (HBP Cream)] at 2, 4, and 6 hours after application to skin test sites previously challenged by dry shaving, which was performed to compromise the integrity of the stratum corneum barrier. Trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), an indicator of skin barrier function, was measured using cyberDERM, inc. RG-1 evaporimeter. Skin hydration was evaluated using IBS SkiCon-200 conductance meter. Test products were applied bilaterally on dry-shaved sites on the volar forearm sites, according to a randomization scheme, with two test sites untreated to serve as "dry-shaved" controls. TEWL and conductance were measured at 2, 4, and 6 hours post-treatment. HBP Lotion displayed a significant increase in skin hydration at 2, 4, and 6 hours post-treatment compared to the baseline values and dry-shaved controls (each, P less than 0.001). However, HBP Cream produced statistically significant increased skin hydration only after 6 hours (P less than 0.05). HBP Lotion was significantly more effective than HBP Cream in increasing skin hydration at 2 and 4 hours post-treatment (each, P less than 0.001), and had a directional advantage (not statistically significant) at 6 hours. Neither test product had a significant occlusive effect as measured by TEWL at 2, 4, and 6 hours post-application. Both formulations of HBP (Lotion and Cream) contributed to skin moisturization, as measured by skin conductance. HBP Lotion produced a significantly more rapid onset and higher level of moisturization at 2 and 4 hours post-application compared to HBP Cream. The TEWL results indicate that neither HBP Lotion nor HBP Cream provided any significant occlusivity to the skin.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(2):140-144.

    .

  15. An Examination of the Sea Ice Rheology for Seasonal Ice Zones Based on Ice Drift and Thickness Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Takenobu; Kimura, Noriaki

    2018-02-01

    The validity of the sea ice rheological model formulated by Hibler (1979), which is widely used in present numerical sea ice models, is examined for the Sea of Okhotsk as an example of the seasonal ice zone (SIZ), based on satellite-derived sea ice velocity, concentration and thickness. Our focus was the formulation of the yield curve, the shape of which can be estimated from ice drift pattern based on the energy equation of deformation, while the strength of the ice cover that determines its magnitude was evaluated using ice concentration and thickness data. Ice drift was obtained with a grid spacing of 37.5 km from the AMSR-E 89 GHz brightness temperature using a maximum cross-correlation method. The ice thickness was obtained with a spatial resolution of 100 m from a regression of the PALSAR backscatter coefficients with ice thickness. To assess scale dependence, the ice drift data derived from a coastal radar covering a 70 km range in the southernmost Sea of Okhotsk were similarly analyzed. The results obtained were mostly consistent with Hibler's formulation that was based on the Arctic Ocean on both scales with no dependence on a time scale, and justify the treatment of sea ice as a plastic material, with an elliptical shaped yield curve to some extent. However, it also highlights the difficulty in parameterizing sub-grid scale ridging in the model because grid scale ice velocities reduce the deformation magnitude by half due to the large variation of the deformation field in the SIZ.

  16. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  17. Evaluating tretinoin formulations in the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2014-04-01

    Topical tretinoin has been a standard treatment for acne vulgaris for more than 4 decades. While tretinoin has demonstrated proven efficacy in the treatment of acne lesions, it also is associated with the potential for skin irritation. Newer formulations have been designed to optimize both the drug concentration and the delivery vehicle with the aim to enable clinicians to provide increasingly effective acne treatment that minimizes irritation. These therapies include formulations with varying concentrations of tretinoin and vehicles that utilize a microsponge delivery system, hydrogels and micronized tretinoin, or propolymers. The purpose of this review is to evaluate different formulations and combinations of tretinoin in the treatment of acne vulgaris. While these advanced formulations were designed for controlled release of active ingredient, and have the potential to reduce cutaneous irritation relative to standard tretinoin cream and gel formulations, there is a need for comparative studies to evaluate the relative benefits of each of these advanced tretinoin formulations in optimizing acne treatment.

  18. Three-Arm Randomized Phase III Trial: Quality Aloe and Placebo Cream Versus Powder as Skin Treatment During Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoopfer, Donna; Holloway, Caroline; Gabos, Zsolt; Alidrisi, Maha; Chafe, Susan; Krause, Barbara; Lees, Alan; Mehta, Nirmal; Tankel, Keith; Strickland, Faith; Hanson, John; King, Charlotte; Ghosh, Sunita; Severin, Diane

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of aloe extract in reducing radiation-induced skin injury is controversial. The purpose of the present 3-arm randomized trial was to test the efficacy of quality-tested aloe extract in reducing the severity of radiation-induced skin injury and, secondarily, to examine the effect of a moist cream versus a dry powder skin care regimen. A total of 248 patients with breast cancer were randomized to powder, aloe cream, or placebo cream. Acute skin toxicity was scored weekly and after treatment at weeks 1, 2, and 4 using a modified 10-point Catterall scale. The patients scored their symptom severity using a 6-point Likert scale and kept an acute phase diary. The aloe formulation did not reduce acute skin toxicity or symptom severity. Patients with a greater body mass index were more likely to develop acute skin toxicity. A similar pattern of increased skin reaction toxicity occurred with both study creams compared with the dry powder regimen. No evidence was found to support prophylactic application of quality aloe extract or cream to improve the symptoms or reduce the skin reaction severity. Our results support a dry skin care regimen of powder during radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Doxepin cream vs betamethasone cream for treatment of chronic skin lesions due to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Davoudi, Seyyed Masoud; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Oral doxepin was shown to reduce chronic pruritus due to sulfur mustard. The present study compared the effects of topical doxepin 5% with betamethasone 1% for the treatment of pruritus in veterans exposed to sulfur mustard. This investigator-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted in an outpatient dermatology clinic. Seventy-five men who were exposed to sulfur mustard 23 to 28 years ago during the Iran-Iraq war who complained of pruritus were randomized to receive doxepin cream 5% (n = 40) or betamethasone cream 0.1% (n = 35) twice a day for 6 weeks. Pruritus severity and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were evaluated before and after each treatment. Both groups showed significant improvement regarding pruritus (P < .05), burning sensation, skin dryness (P < .001), and skin scaling (P < 0.05). The lesions of all regions significantly reduced after treatments (P < .05), except those on the head, face, and genitalia. Pruritus, visual analog scores, and DLQI significantly decreased (P < .01, P < .01, and P < .001, respectively) in doxepin- and betamethasone-treated groups, and there was no difference between groups. All DLQI subscores decreased after both type of treatments (P < .01). Equal efficacy of doxepin cream and betamethasone suggest that doxepin is a potential alternative to control pruritus caused by sulfur mustard in exposed veterans.

  20. Treatment of oral dysplasia with 5% imiquimod cream: short communication.

    PubMed

    Mullins, R; Ansell, M; Laverick, S

    2016-11-01

    We report what we think is the first treatment of oral dysplasia with 5% imiquimod cream. A 60-year-old man presented with varying degrees of dysplasia on the soft palate. A cover plate was fabricated and the patient was prescribed 5% imiquimod cream, a topical imunomodulator, for six weeks. The lesion improved and histological examination of an incisional biopsy found no features of dysplasia. This case highlights the efficacy of imiquimod cream in the treatment of dysplasia, and the need for development of a preparation suitable for the oral mucosa. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Ex-Vivo percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin: Comparison of LMOG organogel vs. pentravan cream.

    PubMed

    Kirilov, Plamen; Tran, Van Hung; Ducrotté-Tassel, Alban; Salvi, Jean-Paul; Perrot, Sébastien; Haftek, Marek; Boulieu, Roselyne; Pirot, Fabrice

    2016-02-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin from two base formulations, Pentravan cream and LMOG organogel. Ex-vivo experiments were carried out on pig ear skin. The percutaneous permeation through pig skin of two formulations containing 5 wt% of enrofloxacin was measured and compared using Franz diffusion cells. At appropriate intervals up to 120 h, diffusion samples were taken and analyzed using HPLC assays. Permeation profiles were established and the parameters Tlag and flux values were calculated. In this ex-vivo study, the flux values were 0.35 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for Pentravan and 1.22 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for LMOG organogel, corresponding respectively to 7.9 % and 29.3 % of enrofloxacin absorbed after 120 h by these formulations. The lag time (T lag) of Pentravan and organogel were 6.32 and 0.015 h respectively. The absorption time to reach the antibiotic concentration of enrofloxacin (2 μgmL(-1)) in the receptor was 60 h with Pentravan and 30 h with the organogel, suggesting more effective treatment by the latter. Enrofloxacin contained in organogel could be absorbed through pig ear skin 3.7 times greater than that in Pentravan (commercial formulation). This study demonstrates the perspective of organogel formulations as potential drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ice Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane

    2017-05-05

    Ice is a fundamental solid with important environmental, biological, geological, and extraterrestrial impact. The stable form of ice at atmospheric pressure is hexagonal ice, I h . Despite its prevalence, I h remains an enigmatic solid, in part due to challenges in preparing samples for fundamental studies. Surfaces of ice present even greater challenges. Recently developed methods for preparation of large single-crystal samples make it possible to reproducibly prepare any chosen face to address numerous fundamental questions. This review describes preparation methods along with results that firmly establish the connection between the macroscopic structure (observed in snowflakes, microcrystallites, or etch pits) and the molecular-level configuration (detected with X-ray or electron scattering techniques). Selected results of probing interactions at the ice surface, including growth from the melt, surface vibrations, and characterization of the quasi-liquid layer, are discussed.

  3. Ice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An ice detector is provided for the determination of the thickness of ice on the outer surface on an object (e.g., aircraft) independently of temperature or the composition of the ice. First capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and temperature gauge are embedded in embedding material located within a hollowed out portion of the outer surface. This embedding material is flush with the outer surface to prevent undesirable drag. The first capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and the temperature gauge are respectively connected to first capacitive measuring circuit, second capacitive measuring circuit, and temperature measuring circuit. The geometry of the first and second capacitive gauges is such that the ratio of the voltage outputs of the first and second capacitance measuring circuits is proportional to the thickness of ice, regardless of ice temperature or composition. This ratio is determined by offset and dividing circuit.

  4. ``Peeps,'' cream, heads, and food coloring in a vacuum jar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePino, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    This note describes some methods of adding interest to the standard vacuum jar demonstrations. Marshmallow animals, shaving cream, doll heads, and food coloring add some spark to these demos. These new twists have been well received by the students.

  5. Development, characterization, and evaluation of sunscreen cream containing solid lipid nanoparticles of silymarin.

    PubMed

    Netto MPharm, Gladyston; Jose, Jobin

    2017-12-10

    Most of the sunscreen formulations mainly contain chemicals or synthetic molecules. Nowadays, researchers are mainly focussing on herbal formulations due to toxicity of the synthetic molecules. Silymarin is a natural flavonoids having excellent antioxidant properties. Solid lipid nanoparticles are novel drug carriers which improve the drug stability and tolerance effect and also enhance the permeation effect. This study aimed at the preparation of solid lipid nanoparticles containing silymarin that will be incorporated into a sunscreen cream and determine its sun protection factor. The solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared by micro-emulsion method; here, the glyceryl monostearate was used as lipid, and Tween 80 was used as an emulsifier. The solid lipid nanoparticles were evaluated for drug entrapment, particle size and morphology, zeta potential, and polydispersity index. The dispersion was formulated into sunscreen cream and evaluated for various parameters, such as extrudability, viscosity, spreadability, drug content, in vitro drug release, ex vivo permeation of drug, in vitro and in vivo sun protection factor determination, in vivo skin irritation test, and accelerated stability studies. The results suggested that as the concentration of emulsifier increased, the entrapment efficiency of silymarin increased. In vitro and in vivo sun protection factor determination showed that SPF of 13.80 and 14.1, respectively. Stability studies were performed under accelerated conditions, and it did not show any appreciable change in parameters. These results indicated that the sunscreen containing silymarin solid lipid nanoparticles exhibited better photoprotective action. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of a blend of comfrey root extract (Symphytum officinale L.) and tannic acid creams in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multiclinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Doug B.; Jacobson, Bert H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 2 concentrations of topical, comfrey-based botanical creams containing a blend of tannic acid and eucalyptus to a eucalyptus reference cream on pain, stiffness, and physical functioning in those with primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Forty-three male and female subjects (45-83 years old) with diagnosed primary osteoarthritis of the knee who met the inclusion criteria were entered into the study. The subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: 10% or 20% comfrey root extract (Symphytum officinale L.) or a placebo cream. Outcomes of pain, stiffness, and functioning were done on the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Participants applied the cream 3× a day for 6 weeks and were evaluated every 2 weeks during the treatment. Results Repeated-measures analyses of variance yielded significant differences in all of the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index categories (pain P < .01, stiffness P < .01, daily function P < .01), confirming that the 10% and 20% comfrey-based creams were superior to the reference cream. The active groups each had 2 participants who had temporary and minor adverse reactions of skin rash and itching, which were rapidly resolved by modifying applications. Conclusion Both active topical comfrey formulations were effective in relieving pain and stiffness and in improving physical functioning and were superior to placebo in those with primary osteoarthritis of the knee without serious adverse effects. PMID:22014903

  7. Crystallization mechanisms in cream during ripening and initial butter churning.

    PubMed

    Buldo, Patrizia; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Wiking, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The temperature treatment of cream is the time-consuming step in butter production. A better understanding of the mechanisms leading to partial coalescence, such as fat crystallization during ripening and churning of the cream, will contribute to optimization of the production process. In this study, ripening and churning of cream were performed in a rheometer cell and the mechanisms of cream crystallization during churning of the cream, including the effect of ripening time, were investigated to understand how churning time and partial coalescence are affected. Crystallization mechanisms were studied as function of time by differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and by X-ray scattering. Microstructure formation was investigated by small deformation rheology and static light scattering. The study demonstrated that viscosity measurements can be used to detect phase inversion of the emulsion during churning of the cream in a rheometer cell. Longer ripening time (e.g., 5h vs. 0 h) resulted in larger butter grains (91 vs. 52 µm), higher viscosity (5.3 vs. 1.3 Pa · s), and solid fat content (41 vs. 13%). Both ripening and churning time had an effect on the thermal behavior of the cream. Despite the increase in solid fat content, no further changes in crystal polymorphism and in melting behavior were observed after 1h of ripening and after churning. The churning time significantly decreased after 0.5h of ripening, from 22.9 min for the cream where no ripening was applied to 16.23 min. Therefore, the crystallization state that promotes partial coalescence (i.e., aggregation of butter grains) is obtained within the first hour of cream ripening at 10 °C. The present study adds knowledge on the fundamental processes of crystallization and polymorphism of milk fat occurring during ripening and churning of cream. In addition, the dairy industry will benefit from these insights on the optimization of butter manufacturing. Copyright © 2013 American

  8. Dynamics of coupled ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone: Study of the mesoscale processes and of constitutive equations for sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at the modelling of mesoscale processed such as up/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A 2-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model (f-plane) through interfacial stresses. The constitutive equations of the sea ice are formulated on the basis of the Reiner-Rivlin theory. The internal ice stresses are important only at high ice concentrations (90-100%), otherwise the ice motion is essentially free drift, where the air-ice stress is balanced by the ice-water stress. The model was tested by studying the upwelling dynamics. Winds parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwilling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater that air-ocean momentum flux, and thus the Ekman transport is bigger under the ice than in the open water. The upwelling simulation was extended to include temporally varying forcing, which was chosen to vary sinusoidally with a 4 day period. This forcing resembles successive cyclone passings. In the model with a thin oceanic upper layer, ice bands were formed.

  9. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutu, Stephane

    2005-01-01

    The CREAM instrument was flown on a Long Duration Balloon in Antarctica in December 2004 and January 2005, achieving a flight duration record of nearly 42 days. It detected and recorded cosmic ray primary particles ranging in type from hydrogen to iron nuclei and in energy from 1 TeV to several hundred TeV. With the data collected we will have the world's best measurement of the energy spectra and mass composition of nuclei in the primary cosmic ray flux at these energies, close to the astrophysical knee . The instrument utilized a thin calorimeter, a transition radiation detector and a timing charge detector, which also provided time-of-flight information. The responsibilities of our group have been with the timing charge detector (TCD), and with the data acquisition electronics and ground station support equipment. The TCD utilized fast scintillators to measure the charge of the primary cosmic ray before any interactions could take place within the calorimeter. The data acquisition electronics handled the output of the various detectors, in a fashion fully integrated with the payload bus. A space-qualified flight computer controlled the acquisition, and was used for preliminary trigger information processing and decision making. Ground support equipment was used to monitor the health of the payload, acquire and archive the data transmitted to the ground, and to provide real-time control of the instrument in flight.

  10. Liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric determination of diflucortolone valerate and isoconazole nitrate in creams.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Elif; Cağlayan, Mehmet Gokhan; Palabiyik, Ismail Murat; Onur, Feyyaz

    2011-01-01

    A new RP-LC method and two new spectrophotometric methods, principal component regression (PCR) and first derivative spectrophotometry, are proposed for simultaneous determination of diflucortolone valerate (DIF) and isoconazole nitrate (ISO) in cream formulations. An isocratic system consisting of an ACE C18 column and a mobile phase composed of methanol-water (95 + 5, v/v) was used for the optimal chromatographic separation. In PCR, the concentration data matrix was prepared by using synthetic mixtures containing these drugs in methanol-water (3 + 1, v/v). The absorbance data matrix corresponding to the concentration data matrix was obtained by measuring the absorbances at 29 wavelengths in the range of 242-298 nm for DIF and ISO in the zero-order spectra of their combinations. In first derivative spectrophotometry, dA/dlambda values were measured at 247.8 nm for DIF and at 240.2 nm for ISO in first derivative spectra of the solution of DIF and ISO in methanol-water (3 + 1, v/v). The linear ranges were 4.00-48.0 microg/mL for DIF and 50.0-400 microg/mL for ISO in the LC method, and 2.40-40.0 microg/mL for DIF and 60.0-260 microg/mL for ISO in the PCR and first derivative spectrophotometric methods. These methods were validated by analyzing synthetic mixtures. These three methods were successfully applied to two pharmaceutical cream preparations.

  11. Modelling of Sea Ice Thermodynamics and Biogeochemistry during the N-ICE2015 Expedition in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A.; Duarte, P.; Mork Olsen, L.; Kauko, H.; Assmy, P.; Rösel, A.; Itkin, P.; Hudson, S. R.; Granskog, M. A.; Gerland, S.; Sundfjord, A.; Steen, H.; Jeffery, N.; Hunke, E. C.; Elliott, S.; Turner, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the sea ice regime of the Arctic Ocean over the last decades from a thick perennial multiyear ice to a first year ice have been well documented. These changes in the sea ice regime will affect feedback mechanisms between the sea ice, atmosphere and ocean. Here we evaluate the performance of the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE), a state of the art sea ice model, to predict sea ice physical and biogeochemical properties at time scales of a few weeks. We also identify the most problematic prognostic variables and what is necessary to improve their forecast. The availability of a complete data set of forcing collected during the Norwegian Young sea Ice (N-ICE-2015) expedition north of Svalbard opens the possibility to properly test CICE. Oceanographic, atmospheric, sea ice, snow, and biological data were collected above, on, and below the ice using R/V Lance as the base for the ice camps that were drifting south towards the Fram Strait. Over six months, four different drifts took place, from the Nansen Basin, through the marginal ice zone, to the open ocean. Obtained results from the model show a good performance regarding ice thickness, salinity and temperature. Nutrients and sea ice algae are however not modelled as accurately. We hypothesize that improvements in biogeochemical modeling may be achieved by complementing brine drainage with a diffusion parameterization and biogeochemical modeling with the introduction of an explicit formulation to forecast chlorophyll and regulate photosynthetic efficiency.

  12. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Khamechian, Tahereh; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Mokhtari, Rasoul; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies are needed to help the patients. METHODS The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot. The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. RESULTS Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue repair in DFU rat models. CONCLUSION Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can be recommended in treatment of DFUs. PMID:29651391

  13. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Khamechian, Tahereh; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Mokhtari, Rasoul; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies are needed to help the patients. The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot . The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue repair in DFU rat models. Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can be recommended in treatment of DFUs.

  14. Hydrocortisone Cream to Reduce Perineal Pain after Vaginal Birth: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Manfre, Margaret; Adams, Donita; Callahan, Gloria; Gould, Patricia; Lang, Susan; McCubbins, Holly; Mintz, Amy; Williams, Sommer; Bishard, Mark; Dempsey, Amy; Chulay, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    To determine if the use of hydrocortisone cream decreases perineal pain in the immediate postpartum period. This was a randomized controlled trial (RCT), crossover study design, with each participant serving as their own control. Participants received three different methods for perineal pain management at three sequential perineal pain treatments after birth: two topical creams (corticosteroid; placebo) and a control treatment (no cream application). Treatment order was randomly assigned, with participants and investigators blinded to cream type. The primary dependent variable was the change in perineal pain levels (posttest minus pretest pain levels) immediately before and 30 to 60 minutes after perineal pain treatments. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance, with p < 0.05 considered significant. A total of 27 participants completed all three perineal pain treatments over a 12-hour period. A reduction in pain was found after application of both the topical creams, with average perineal pain change scores of -4.8 ± 8.4 mm after treatment with hydrocortisone cream (N = 27) and -6.7 ± 13.0 mm after treatment with the placebo cream (N = 27). Changes in pain scores with no cream application were 1.2 ± 10.5 mm (N = 27). Analysis of variance found a significant difference between treatment groups (F2,89 = 3.6, p = 0.03), with both cream treatments having significantly better pain reduction than the control, no cream treatment (hydrocortisone vs. no cream, p = 0.04; placebo cream vs. no cream, p = 0.01). There were no differences in perineal pain reduction between the two cream treatments (p = .54). This RCT found that the application of either hydrocortisone cream or placebo cream provided significantly better pain relief than no cream application.

  15. Method to Generate Full-Span Ice Shape on Swept Wing Using Icing Tunnel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Camello, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    There is a collaborative research program by NASA, FAA, ONERA, and university partners to improve the fidelity of experimental and computational simulation methods for swept-wing ice accretion formulations and resultant aerodynamic effects on large transport aircraft. This research utilizes a 65 scale Common Research Model as the baseline configuration. In order to generate the ice shapes for the aerodynamic testing, ice-accretion testing will be conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel utilizing hybrid model from the 20, 64, and 83 spanwise locations. The models will have full-scale leading edges with truncated chord in order to fit the IRT test section. The ice shapes from the IRT tests will be digitized using a commercially available articulated-arm 3D laser scanning system. The methodology to acquire 3D ice shapes using a laser scanner was developed and validated in a previous research effort. Each of these models will yield a 1.5ft span of ice than can be used. However, a full-span ice accretion will require 75 ft span of ice. This means there will be large gaps between these spanwise ice sections that must be filled, while maintaining all of the important aerodynamic features. A method was developed to generate a full-span ice shape from the three 1.5 ft span ice shapes from the three models.

  16. [Determination of fatty acids in natural cream and artificial cream by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruize; Zhou, Ya; Mao, Ting; Jiang, Jie

    2018-01-08

    A method for the determination of 37 fatty acids in natural cream and artificial cream was developed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS). The samples were extracted with toluene and acetyl chloride-methanol (1:9,v/v) solution was added to the extract for fat esterification. Finally, the fatty acids were analyzed by GC×GC-MS. The GC conditions were as follows:a DB-5 column (30 m×0.25 mm×0.25 μm) was set as the 1st dimensional column and a BPX-50 column (2.5 m×0.1 mm×0.25 μm) was the 2nd dimensional column. The primary oven temperature was programmed from 50℃ (held for 2 min) to 180℃ at a rate of 20℃/min, followed by an increase to 250℃ at 2.5℃/min, then raised up to 300℃ (held for 5 min) at 3℃/min. The ion source temperature was 200℃ with auxiliary temperature of 300℃ in scan mode. All fatty acids were separated effectively and determined accurately while the modulation period was 5s and the scan range of MS was m/z 40-385. This procedure was applied to analyze the fatty acids in commercial natural cream and artificial cream from Chinese markets, among which we found the characteristic components in different kinds of samples. Compared with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), GC×GC-MS method was more sensitive and more components of fatty acids were detected. Conclusively, this work suggests a new technical approach in analyzing fatty acids in natural cream and artificial cream, which is meaningful to ensure the quality identification and safety of natural cream.

  17. Comparative trial of Aloe vera/olive oil combination cream versus phenytoin cream in the treatment of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Y; Izadi, M; Sayyadi, N; Rezaee, R; Jonaidi-Jafari, N; Beiraghdar, F; Zamani, A; Sahebkar, A

    2015-10-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that has been traditionally used to accelerate wound healing. Olive oil is also a natural product that may contribute to wound healing owing to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an Aloe vera-olive oil (AVO) combination cream on the healing process of chronic wounds. In this randomised, double-blind, comparator-controlled, parallel-group trial, patients with chronic wounds were treated with either AVO cream or phenytoin cream as the standard treatment for a period of 30 days. Wound healing was evaluated using Bates-Jensen assessment tool and the severity of pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). After initial assessment, 60 patients with chronic wounds (41 with pressure ulcer, 13 with diabetic wounds and 6 with venous ulcers), were recruited and randomised into 2 groups of 30. After 30 days of treatment, significant improvements in the wound size, depth, and edges; necrotic tissue type and amount; exudate type and amount; colour of wound surroundings; and peripheral tissue oedema score were observed in the AVO cream group (p<0.001). The total score of wound healing showed significant improvement with both AVO (p<0.001) and phenytoin (p<0.01) creams, although AVO was more efficacious (p<0.001). Likewise, although both treatments reduced the initial VAS score, the efficacy of AVO was significantly greater (p<0.001). AVO cream significantly accelerates biological healing of chronic wounds and helps to reduce pain severity with a higher efficacy compared with phenytoin cream.

  18. Selection of fragrance for cosmetic cream containing olive oil.

    PubMed

    Parente, María Emma; Gámbaro, Adriana; Boinbaser, Lucía; Roascio, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions of essences for potential use in the development of a line of cosmetic emulsions containing olive oil were studied. Six cream samples prepared with six essences selected in a preliminary study were evaluated for overall liking and intention to purchase by a 63-women sample. A check-all-that-apply (CATA) question consisting of 32 terms was used to gather information about consumer perceptions of fragrance, affective associations, effects on the skin, price, target market, zones of application, and occasions of use. Hierarchical cluster analysis led to the identification of two consumer clusters with different frequency of use of face creams. The two clusters assigned different overall liking scores to the samples and used the CATA terms differently to describe them. A fragrance with jasmine as its principal note was selected for further development of cosmetic creams, as it was awarded the highest overall liking scores by respondents of the two clusters, and was significantly associated with cosmetic features including nourishing, moisturizing, softening, with a delicious and mild smell, and with a natural image, as well as being considered suitable for face and body creams. The use of CATA questions enabled the rapid identification of attributes associated by respondents with a cosmetic cream's fragrance, in addition to contributing relevant information for the definition of marketing and communication strategies.

  19. Stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps: role of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sagitani, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, fatty acid potassium soaps, glycerol and water are essential ingredients in the production of stable cream soaps. In this study, the behavior of these components in solution was investigated to elucidate the stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps. It was determined that the cream soaps were a dispersion of 1:1 acid soap (1:1 molar ratio of potassium soap/fatty acid) crystals in the lamellar gel phase, which has confirmed from the phase behavior diagrams and small angle X-ray scattering data. Glycerol was crucial ingredient in the formation of the lamellar gel phase. The cleansing process of the cream soaps was also evaluated using the same diagrams. The structure of the continuous phase in cream soaps changed from lamellar gel to a micellar aqueous solution upon the addition of water. This structural change during the washing process is important in producing the foaming activity of acid soaps to wash away dirt or excess fats from the skin surface.

  20. Hydroquinone neuropathy following use of skin bleaching creams: case report.

    PubMed

    Karamagi, C; Owino, E; Katabira, E T

    2001-04-01

    A 30-year old black woman presented with gradual onset of weakness of the legs associated with burning sensation in the feet for two months. She had been using two hydroquinone based skin bleaching creams (MGC by M. G. C. International, MEKAKO by Anglo Fabrics BOLTON Ltd) for about four years. Her BP was 80/40 mm Hg supine with un-recordable diastolic pressure on standing. She had decreased power (Grade 3/5), loss of deep tendon reflexes and impairment of deep sensation in the lower limbs. A complete blood count, urinalysis, serum electrolytes, serum creatinine and uric acid were all normal. Oral GTT, VDRL and brucella tests were negative. Chest and abdominal radiographs did not show any abnormalities. A diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy with autonomic neuropathy possibly due to hydroquinone toxicity was made and she was advised to stop using hydroquinone based skin bleaching creams. Four months later she was asymptomatic, her BP was 120/80 mmHg supine and standing, and neurological examination was normal. The case raises the question of whether hydroquinone based skin bleaching creams could be a cause of peripheral neuropathy and underscores the need for research on hydroquinone based skin bleaching creams and neuropathy particularly in black women involved in the sale and/or use of skin bleaching creams.

  1. Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams

    PubMed Central

    Peregrino, Claudia P.; Moreno, Myriam V.; Miranda, Silvia V.; Rubio, Alma D.; Leal, Luz O.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled. PMID:21776243

  2. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    PubMed Central

    Builders, P. F.; Kabele-Toge, B.; Builders, M.; Chindo, B. A.; Anwunobi, Patricia A.; Isimi, Yetunde C.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5) as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05) and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin. PMID:23901160

  3. Ice Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Ice Waves - May 21st, 2001 Description: Along the southeastern coast of Greenland, an intricate network of fjords funnels glacial ice to the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer melting season, newly calved icebergs join slabs of sea ice and older, weathered bergs in an offshore slurry that the southward-flowing East Greenland Current sometimes swirls into stunning shapes. Exposed rock of mountain peaks, tinted red in this image, hints at a hidden landscape. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  4. Breakup of Pack Ice, Antarctic Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Breakup of Pack Ice along the periphery of the Antarctic Ice Shelf (53.5S, 3.0E) produced this mosaic of ice floes off the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strong offshore winds, probably associated with strong katabatic downdrafts from the interior of the continent, are seen peeling off the edges of the ice shelf into long filamets of sea ice, icebergs, bergy bits and growlers to flow northward into the South Atlantic Ocean. 53.5S, 3.0E

  5. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A in cream-filled cake.

    PubMed

    Anunciaçao, L L; Linardi, W R; do Carmo, L S; Bergdoll, M S

    1995-07-01

    Cakes were baked with normal ingredients and filled with cream, inoculated with different size enterotoxigenic-staphylococcal inocula. Samples of the cakes were incubated at room temperature and put in the refrigerator. Samples of cake and filling were taken at different times and analyzed for staphylococcal count and presence of enterotoxin. The smaller the inoculum, the longer the time required for sufficient growth (10(6)) to occur for production of detectable enterotoxin. Enterotoxin added to the cake dough before baking (210 degrees C, 45 min) did not survive the baking. The presence of enterotoxin in the contaminated cream filling indicated this as the cause of staphylococcal food poisoning from cream-filled cakes. Refrigeration of the cakes prevented the growth of the staphylococci.

  6. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  7. 40 CFR 405.50 - Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. 405.50 Section 405.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Cottage Cheese and Cultured Cream Cheese Subcategory § 405.50 Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  8. 40 CFR 405.50 - Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. 405.50 Section 405.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Cottage Cheese and Cultured Cream Cheese Subcategory § 405.50 Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  9. 21 CFR 131.25 - Whipped cream products containing flavoring or sweetening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whipped cream products containing flavoring or sweetening. 131.25 Section 131.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM General Provisions § 131.25 Whipped cream...

  10. 21 CFR 131.25 - Whipped cream products containing flavoring or sweetening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whipped cream products containing flavoring or sweetening. 131.25 Section 131.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM General Provisions § 131.25 Whipped cream...

  11. Herbal creams used for atopic eczema in Birmingham, UK illegally contain potent corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, H M; Goddard, W; Gill, S; Moss, C

    2003-12-01

    To determine whether "herbal creams" reported as being effective for the treatment of childhood atopic eczema contained corticosteroids. Patients attending the paediatric dermatology clinic at Birmingham Children's Hospital, April 2001 to March 2002, and who reported using "herbal creams" with good effect for atopic eczema were asked to submit the cream for analysis. Hydrocortisone, clobetasone butyrate, betamethasone valerate, and clobetasol propionate were analysed by HPLC. Twenty four creams from 19 patients, median (interquartile range) age 3.82 (0.69-7.98) years were analysed. All five creams labelled Wau Wa and the two labelled Muijiza cream contained clobetasol propionate. Thirteen of 17 unnamed creams contained corticosteroids: clobetasol proprionate (n = 4), clobetasol proprionate + hydrocortisone (n = 1), betamethasone valerate (n = 2), clobetasone butyrate (n = 3), and hydrocortisone (n = 2); there was an unidentified peak in one. Further analysis suggested Wau Wa cream contained approximately 20% proprietary Dermovate Cream in a paraffin base. No parents were aware that the creams contained steroid. The majority of herbal creams analysed illegally contained potent or very potent topical steroids. There is an urgent need for tighter regulation of herbal creams and for increased public education about the potential dangers of alternative therapies.

  12. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  13. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  14. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  15. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  16. Vehicle and enhancer effects on human skin penetration of aminophylline from cream formulations: evaluation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Wang, Chia-Chen; Kuo, Su-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The effects of four essential oils (rosemary, ylang, lilacin, and peppermint oils), and three plant oils (jojoba oil, corn germ oil, and olive oil) on the permeation of aminophylline were studied using human skin. The permeation effects of these oils were compared with those of three chemical penetration enhancers. Although all oils enhanced the permeation of aminophylline, their effects were less than that of ethanol. Jojoba oil was found to be the most active, causing about a 32% peak height decrease of N-H bending absorbances in comparison with the control, while peppermint, lilacin, rosemary, and ylang oils caused 28%, 24%, 18%, and 12% peak height decreases, respectively. Microemulsions containing 10% jojoba oil and 30% corn germ oil were found to be superior vehicles for the percutaneous absorption of aminophylline. Comparision with results obtained from high-performance liquid chromatography shows good agreement.

  17. Formulation and Evaluation of Exotic Fat Based Cosmeceuticals for Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandawgade, S. D.; Patravale, Vandana B.

    2008-01-01

    Mango butter was explored as a functional, natural supplement and active skin ingredient in skin care formulations. A foot care cream was developed with mango butter to evaluate its medicinal value and protective function in skin repair. Qualitative comparison and clinical case studies of the product were carried out. Wound healing potential of foot care cream was investigated on the rat excision and incision wound models. Results of the clinical studies demonstrated complete repair of worn and cracked skin in all the human volunteers. Furthermore, foot care cream exhibited significant healing response in both the wound models. The project work could be concluded as establishment of high potential for mango butter to yield excellent emolliency for better skin protection. Improving the product features and medicinal functionality further validate mango butter as a specialty excipient in development of cosmeceuticals and has an immense value for its commercialization. PMID:20046792

  18. Modeling of scattering from ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Michael Ross

    Theoretical research is proposed to study electromagnetic wave scattering from ice surfaces. A mathematical formulation that is more representative of the electromagnetic scattering from ice, with volume mechanisms included, and capable of handling multiple scattering effects is developed. This research is essential to advancing the field of environmental science and engineering by enabling more accurate inversion of remote sensing data. The results of this research contributed towards a more accurate representation of the scattering from ice surfaces, that is computationally more efficient and that can be applied to many remote-sensing applications.

  19. 21 CFR 133.134 - Cream cheese with other foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cream cheese with other foods. 133.134 Section 133.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  20. 21 CFR 133.134 - Cream cheese with other foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cream cheese with other foods. 133.134 Section 133.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  1. 21 CFR 133.134 - Cream cheese with other foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cream cheese with other foods. 133.134 Section 133.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  2. Sertaconazole nitrate cream 2% for the treatment of tinea pedis.

    PubMed

    Ribotsky, Bret M

    2009-05-01

    Tinea pedis, both in its acute and chronic phase, is a common skin condition that often is overlooked but can lead to onychomycosis and acute bacterial cellulitis if left untreated. Therefore, aggressive treatment with a topical antifungal agent is warranted. Sertaconazole nitrate cream 2% is a newer imidazole agent that possesses both fungicidal and fungistatic properties to eradicate existing infections. In addition to antifungal properties, it exhibits anti-inflammatory and antipruritic effects. Controlled clinical trials have confirmed its safety, tolerability, and efficacy in participants with tinea pedis. We report 2 patients with chronic tinea pedis of many years' duration and demonstrate the usefulness of sertaconazole nitrate cream 2% in the clinical setting. Tinea pedis was confirmed by results of a potassium hydroxide preparation. Both patients experienced marked improvement by the second week of twice-daily treatment with sertaconazole nitrate cream 2%. Clinical cure was achieved in both patients. These findings suggest that sertaconazole nitrate cream 2% is an effective option for the treatment of tinea pedis.

  3. Applying the CREAM Strategy for Coaching Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milad, Marine

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluating staff tutors necessitates constant follow-up to ensure that they are in line with the University's mission and vision. This has raised a fundamental educational question: how to coach rather than monitor the tutors. To answer this question, Cottrell's (2008) CREAM (Creative, Reflective, Effective, Active, Motivated)…

  4. 7 CFR 1001.16 - Fluid cream product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Fluid cream product. 1001.16 Section 1001.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE NORTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating...

  5. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid. (b...,” section 16.023. (d) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “Acidified sour cream”. The full name of the...

  6. 21 CFR 131.157 - Light whipping cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Light whipping cream. 131.157 Section 131.157 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  7. 21 CFR 131.157 - Light whipping cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Light whipping cream. 131.157 Section 131.157 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  8. 21 CFR 131.157 - Light whipping cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Light whipping cream. 131.157 Section 131.157 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  9. 21 CFR 131.157 - Light whipping cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light whipping cream. 131.157 Section 131.157 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  10. 21 CFR 131.157 - Light whipping cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... artificial food flavoring. (c) Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light whipping cream. 131.157 Section 131.157 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  11. The formulation of the essential oil of Piper aduncum Linnaeus (Piperales: Piperaceae) increases its efficacy as an insect repellent.

    PubMed

    Mamood, S N H; Hidayatulfathi, O; Budin, S B; Ahmad Rohi, G; Zulfakar, M H

    2017-02-01

    The essential oil (EO) of Piper aduncum Linnaeus, known as 'sireh lada' to locals Malaysian, has the potential to be used as an alternative to synthetic insect repellents such as N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide. However, the EO's efficacy as a repellent decreases after application due to the high volatility of its active ingredients. A number of studies have showed that optimizing the formulation of plant-based EOs can improve their efficacy as repellents. The present study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of 10% P. aduncum EO in ethanol and in three different semisolid formulations: ointment, cream and gel. These formulations were tested on Aedes aegypti under laboratory conditions. Each formulation was applied to the subject's hands, which were then inserted into a cage containing 25 nulliparous A. aegypti. The number of mosquitoes landing on or biting each subject's hand was recorded, and the repellency percentage, landing/biting percentage and protection time for each of the formulations were compared. There were no statistically significant differences between the semisolid EO formulations with regards to the repellency percentage and the landing/biting percentage at 4 h post-application. All three semisolid EO formulations were able to repel >65% of the A. aegypti at 4 h post-application. The EO ointment formulation provided a protection time (182.5 ± 16.01 min) that was statistically significantly longer than that associated with the EO gel formulation (97.5 ± 14.93 min). Meanwhile, the EO cream formulation provided a protection time of 162.5 ± 6.29 min. As the EO cream and ointment formulations displayed better repellent properties than the EO gel formulation, they appear to be the most promising P. aduncum EO formulations to be developed and commercialized as alternatives to synthetic repellents.

  12. ICE CONTROL - Towards optimizing wind energy production during icing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Manfred; Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Beck, Alexander; Wittmann, Christoph; Weidle, Florian; Meier, Florian; Bourgeois, Saskia; Cattin, René; Burchhart, Thomas; Fink, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Forecasts of wind power production loss caused by icing weather conditions are produced by a chain of physical models. The model chain consists of a numerical weather prediction model, an icing model and a production loss model. Each element of the model chain is affected by significant uncertainty, which can be quantified using targeted observations and a probabilistic forecasting approach. In this contribution, we present preliminary results from the recently launched project ICE CONTROL, an Austrian research initiative on measurements, probabilistic forecasting, and verification of icing on wind turbine blades. ICE CONTROL includes an experimental field phase, consisting of measurement campaigns in a wind park in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, in the winters 2016/17 and 2017/18. Instruments deployed during the campaigns consist of a conventional icing detector on the turbine hub and newly devised ice sensors (eologix Sensor System) on the turbine blades, as well as meteorological sensors for wind, temperature, humidity, visibility, and precipitation type and spectra. Liquid water content and spectral characteristics of super-cooled water droplets are measured using a Fog Monitor FM-120. Three cameras document the icing conditions on the instruments and on the blades. Different modelling approaches are used to quantify the components of the model-chain uncertainties. The uncertainty related to the initial conditions of the weather prediction is evaluated using the existing global ensemble prediction system (EPS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Furthermore, observation system experiments are conducted with the AROME model and its 3D-Var data assimilation to investigate the impact of additional observations (such as Mode-S aircraft data, SCADA data and MSG cloud mask initialization) on the numerical icing forecast. The uncertainty related to model formulation is estimated from multi-physics ensembles based on the Weather Research

  13. Terbinafin 1% Cream and Ketoconazole 2% Cream in the Treatment of Pityriasis Versicolor: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Farrokh; Nik-Khoo, Bahram; Yaghmaee, Roxana; Gharibi, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To make a comparison between terbinafine 1% cream and ketoconazole 2% cream in the treatment of pityriasis versicolor. Methods: This randomized single blind study included 110 patients with clinical diagnosis of pityriasis versicolor and positive mycological test for Malassezia furfur. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 used terbinafine cream and group 2 applied ketoconazole cream on the skin lesions for two weeks. Each group consisted of 55 patients. Clinical and mycological examinations were performed at baseline, at the end of the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of starting the treatment regimens. Results: At the end of the 2nd week we achieved cure rates of 72% and 64.3% for group 1 and group 2 respectively. At the end of the 4th week the respective cure rates for group 1 and group 2 were 81.2% and 69%, and at the end of the 8th week 70.8% of the patients in group 1 and 61.9% of the patients in group 2 were cured. Conclusion: The results of this study showed no significant statistical differences between the two groups in regard to cure and recurrence rates. But the numbers of cured patients were higher and recurrent cases were lower in group 1. PMID:25674122

  14. The efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream for dry skin and itch relief: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial- study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moisturisers prevent and treat dry skin. They can also protect sensitive skin, improve skin tone and texture, and mask imperfections. Herbal medicines or their extracts have been available as topical formulations and cosmetics. Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) has been used to treat inflammatory disorders and various skin problems. It could be a candidate herbal medicine for treating dry skin condition. This study aims to establish the efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream containing Arctium lappa L. seed extract, which has been approved by the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety for use in cosmetics. Methods/Designs This study is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with two parallel groups (proposed herbal moisturising cream vs. placebo cream). We will recruit 66 healthy male and female participants, aged 20 to 65 years, who have been diagnosed with dry skin conditions. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive either the proposed herbal moisturising cream or a placebo cream for four weeks. Each participant will be examined for signs and symptoms before and after using the cream. Skin hydration, sebum (oily secretion) levels and transepidermal water loss (TEWL; constitutive loss of water from the skin surface) will be assessed. Participants will also be asked to fill out a health-related quality of life questionnaire. Safety will be assessed using blood tests, urine analysis, a pregnancy test, and the assessment of vital signs. Discussion This trial will utilise high-quality methodologies in accordance with both consolidated standards for reporting trials guidelines and the guidelines for clinical trials of cosmetics products that are aimed at expressions and advertisement approval in Korea. It will evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream containing Arctium lappa L. seed extract to treat dry skin conditions and provide itch relief. Moreover, we will also employ

  15. The efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream for dry skin and itch relief: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial--study protocol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyo; Seo, Eun-Sung; Hong, Jin-Tae; Lee, Gang-Tai; You, Young-Kyoung; Lee, Kun-Kook; Jo, Ga-Won; Kim, Nam-Kwen

    2013-11-25

    Moisturisers prevent and treat dry skin. They can also protect sensitive skin, improve skin tone and texture, and mask imperfections. Herbal medicines or their extracts have been available as topical formulations and cosmetics. Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) has been used to treat inflammatory disorders and various skin problems. It could be a candidate herbal medicine for treating dry skin condition.This study aims to establish the efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream containing Arctium lappa L. seed extract, which has been approved by the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety for use in cosmetics. This study is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with two parallel groups (proposed herbal moisturising cream vs. placebo cream). We will recruit 66 healthy male and female participants, aged 20 to 65 years, who have been diagnosed with dry skin conditions. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive either the proposed herbal moisturising cream or a placebo cream for four weeks. Each participant will be examined for signs and symptoms before and after using the cream. Skin hydration, sebum (oily secretion) levels and transepidermal water loss (TEWL; constitutive loss of water from the skin surface) will be assessed. Participants will also be asked to fill out a health-related quality of life questionnaire. Safety will be assessed using blood tests, urine analysis, a pregnancy test, and the assessment of vital signs. This trial will utilise high-quality methodologies in accordance with both consolidated standards for reporting trials guidelines and the guidelines for clinical trials of cosmetics products that are aimed at expressions and advertisement approval in Korea. It will evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a proposed herbal moisturising cream containing Arctium lappa L. seed extract to treat dry skin conditions and provide itch relief. Moreover, we will also employ health-related quality of life

  16. IceChrono v1: a probabilistic model to compute a common and optimal chronology for several ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrenin, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Polar ice cores provide exceptional archives of past environmental conditions. The dating of ice cores is essential to interpret the paleo records that they contain, but it is a complicated problem since it involves different dating methods. Here I present IceChrono v1, a new probabilistic model to combine different kinds of chronological information to obtain a common and optimized chronology for several ice cores, as well as its uncertainty. It is based on the inversion of three quantities: the surface accumulation rate, the Lock-In Depth (LID) of air bubbles and the vertical thinning function. The chronological information used are: models of the sedimentation process (accumulation of snow, densification of snow into ice and air trapping, ice flow), ice and gas dated horizons, ice and gas dated depth intervals, Δdepth observations (depth shift between synchronous events recorded in the ice and in the air), stratigraphic links in between ice cores (ice-ice, air-air or mix ice-air and air-ice links). The optimization problem is formulated as a least squares problems, that is, all densities of probabilities are assumed gaussian. It is numerically solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and a numerical evaluation of the model's Jacobian. IceChrono is similar in scope to the Datice model, but has differences from the mathematical, numerical and programming point of views. I apply IceChrono on an AICC2012-like experiment and I find similar results than Datice within a few centuries, which is a confirmation of both IceChrono and Datice codes. IceChrono v1 is freely available under the GPL v3 open source license.

  17. The Development of Analytical Method for the Determination of Azelaic Acid Content in Cosmetic Cream Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusianti, E.; Wibowo, R.; Hudiyono, S.

    2018-01-01

    Azelaic acid is one of the substances that has anti-acne and skin lightening effects which is often added to cosmetics. In the acne treatment, the azelaic acid is generally used with a concentration of 20% in cream formulation and 15% in gel. The use at concentrations below 10% is not recommended because it does not work effectively. While the use of above 10% is categorized as a medical treatment. In Indonesia, the Head of the National Agency of Drug and Food Control (BPOM) has issued Regulation No. 18 of 2015 on the Technical Requirements of Cosmetics Ingredients Annex V stating that the azelaic acid is banned in cosmetics. However, until this research began the BPOM has not had a valid method to identify it in cosmetics. Consequently, surveillance of such ingredient in products is hard to do. In this research, the fatty acid standard analysis method of AOAC International was modified and validated to be used in the laboratory. The method of analysis involves heating the cream preparations dissolved with methanol and then added BF3-methanol catalyst, followed by extraction and analysis using GCMS. The validation of method shows that the calibration curve is linear with correlative value of 0.9997. The method is fairly sensitive with 0.02% detection limit, and fairly precision with relative standard deviation (RSD) of between 0.626-0.961% and fairly accurate which the recovery percentage is 99.85% at range 98.27-100.72%. In sum the results demonstrate that the method can be used as a routine analysis method for laboratory testing.

  18. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) Launch and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    We request continued NASA support for the on-going Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) project. The balloon-borne CREAM instrument was flown for 161 days in six flights over Antarctica, the longest known exposure for a single balloon project. Building on the success of those balloon missions, one of the two balloon payloads was successfully transformed for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS) Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM EF). Following completion of its systemlevel qualification and verification, this ISS-CREAM payload was delivered to the NASA Kennedy Space Center in August 2015 to await its launch to the ISS. The ISS-CREAM mission would achieve the primary science objectives of the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS), which was given high priority in the 2001 NRC Decadal Study Report. Its nuclei composition data between 10^12 and 10^15 eV would enable detailed study of the spectral hardening first reported by the CREAM balloon project and recently confirmed for protons and helium by the PAMELA and AMS-02 space missions using permanent magnet spectrometers. In addition, multiTeV energy electron data allow searches for local sources and the signature of darkmatter, etc. The ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with redundant and complementary particle detectors capable of precise measurements of elemental spectra for Z = 1 - 26 nuclei, as well as electrons. The four layers of its finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector provide charge measurements, and its ionization calorimeter provides energy measurements. Its segmented scintillator-based Top and Bottom Counting Detectors separate electrons from nuclei using shower profile differences. Its Boronated Scintillator Detector distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest

  20. IceCube

    Science.gov Websites

    Press and Public Interest IceCube Acronym Dictionary Articles about IceCube "Inside Story the End of the Earth" LBNL CRD Report Education/ Public Interest A New Window on the Universe Ice