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Sample records for ice dynamics joint

  1. Arctic odyssey - Five years of data buoys in AIDJEX. [Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Gillespie, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment of 1975-1976 used data bouys in conjunction with tracking satellites to study the interaction of Arctic Sea ice with the environment, and, more specifically, to define the motion of ice on the perimeter of the area of interest and to measure surface barometeric pressure over the same area. Charts are presented, indicating the position of the buoy array along with a table detailing buoy characteristics. The position fix accuracy of RAMS (Random Access Measurement System) buoys is discussed together with position errors due to the along-track motion of the observing satellites. Polar satellite data collection and tracking efficiency is assessed together with satellite system flexibility concepts.

  2. Arctic odyssey - Five years of data buoys in AIDJEX. [Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Gillespie, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment of 1975-1976 used data bouys in conjunction with tracking satellites to study the interaction of Arctic Sea ice with the environment, and, more specifically, to define the motion of ice on the perimeter of the area of interest and to measure surface barometeric pressure over the same area. Charts are presented, indicating the position of the buoy array along with a table detailing buoy characteristics. The position fix accuracy of RAMS (Random Access Measurement System) buoys is discussed together with position errors due to the along-track motion of the observing satellites. Polar satellite data collection and tracking efficiency is assessed together with satellite system flexibility concepts.

  3. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  4. Stochastic ice stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-09

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  5. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  6. Modelling sea ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, Jens; Kleine, Eckhard

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice remains one of the frontiers of ocean modelling and is of vital importance for the correct forecasts of the northern oceans. At large scale, it is commonly considered a continuous medium whose dynamics is modelled in terms of continuum mechanics. Its specifics are a matter of constitutive behaviour which may be characterised as rigid-plastic. The new developed sea ice dynamic module bases on general principles and follows a systematic approach to the problem. Both drift field and stress field are modelled by a variational property. Rigidity is treated by Lagrangian relaxation. Thus one is led to a sensible numerical method. Modelling fast ice remains to be a challenge. It is understood that ridging and the formation of grounded ice keels plays a role in the process. The ice dynamic model includes a parameterisation of the stress associated with grounded ice keels. Shear against the grounded bottom contact might lead to plastic deformation and the loss of integrity. The numerical scheme involves a potentially large system of linear equations which is solved by pre-conditioned iteration. The entire algorithm consists of several components which result from decomposing the problem. The algorithm has been implemented and tested in practice.

  7. Spin ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph William

    2003-07-01

    Geometrically frustrated magnets (GFMs) are materials in which it is impossible to satisfy all exchange interactions due the geometry of the lattice. The frustration of interactions is the origin of many unique and interesting material properties. GFMs are typified by large ground state degeneracy and will undergo spin fluctuations down to temperatures well below theta W, where un-frustrated materials display long-range order. This results in the development of correlated magnetic states that are analogous to various structural phases of matter such as spin glasses and spin liquids. Very recently, another magnetic-structural analog has been discovered where the magnetic properties show distinct similarities with the structural properties of a common substance that has itself long perplexed scientists, water ice. The aptly named spin ice compounds have been shown to exhibit the same "ground state entropy" as water ice and to be well characterized by consideration in terms of the "ice model". In this thesis, we explore the low temperature dynamics of the spins in the spin ice compound Dy2Ti2O7 through measurements of the magnetization and ac susceptibility. We show that the ground state represents a unique form of glassiness in a dense magnetic system. Our results show the onset of irreversibility and the development of a metastable state where the dynamics are significantly slowed but no long-range order is achieved below Tirr ˜ 650 mK. The system is also shown to display unique properties at higher temperatures with a partial freezing of the ac susceptibility at T ˜ 16 K. This freezing is shown to be thermally activated in nature above Tcross ˜ 12 K below which it is driven by quantum tunneling until it assumes faster than activated behavior at T ice ˜ 4 K. The freezing is shown to occur over a very narrow range of relaxation time constants, similar to that seen in the dielectric constants of ice. Measurements of Dy2-xYxTi2O 7, where the J = 15/2 Dy3+ ions were

  8. Frazil Ice Dynamics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    necessary nd Identify by block number) Crystal growth Ice prevention Crystallization Mathematical analysis Frazil ice Ice *O Ice formation 120. ABSTRACT... growth - and nucleation of new crystals are the major parameters in these equations. Expressions tor the growth rate ot frazil ice N. V, crystals are...described. The growth rate along the major axis is controlled by heat transfer. The heat transfer coefficient * O is a function of crystal size, the fluid

  9. Analysis of sea ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, J.

    1988-01-01

    The ongoing work has established the basis for using multiyear sea ice concentrations from SMMR passive microwave for studies of largescale advection and convergence/divergence of the Arctic sea ice pack. Comparisons were made with numerical model simulations and buoy data showing qualitative agreement on daily to interannual time scales. Analysis of the 7-year SMMR data set shows significant interannual variations in the total area of multiyear ice. The scientific objective is to investigate the dynamics, mass balance, and interannual variability of the Arctic sea ice pack. The research emphasizes the direct application of sea ice parameters derived from passive microwave data (SMMR and SSMI) and collaborative studies using a sea ice dynamics model. The possible causes of observed interannual variations in the multiyear ice area are being examined. The relative effects of variations in the large scale advection and convergence/divergence within the ice pack on a regional and seasonal basis are investigated. The effects of anomolous atmospheric forcings are being examined, including the long-lived effects of synoptic events and monthly variations in the mean geostrophic winds. Estimates to be made will include the amount of new ice production within the ice pack during winter and the amount of ice exported from the pack.

  10. Evaluation of Dynamically Riveted Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    REPORT NO. NADC-77202-30 RE-587 LEVEL7 EVALUJATION OF DYNAMICALLY RIVETED JOINTS by 0 ~Basil P. Leftheris H. Eidirloff*J and R.E. Hooson* 19 9...DYNAMICALLY NIBEPT, JOINTS , RCOTAC 0R GRANT NUMB *S) Bas~ilinf (i ) N62269-77-C-,6478 R. E./Hooson .. RABW~ M IMW 9 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMM AND...VFatigue Interference Fit Fasteners Fatigue Life Joints Fatigue Tests Festened Joints Aluminum Joints IAUSTR ACT (Cmtifbusan ,.yero aid It nmeoeaep

  11. Dynamic Crush Characterization of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    During the space shuttle return-to-flight preparations following the Columbia accident, finite element models were needed that could predict the threshold of critical damage to the orbiter's wing leading edge from ice debris impacts. Hence, an experimental program was initiated to provide crushing data from impacted ice for use in dynamic finite element material models. A high-speed drop tower was configured to capture force time histories of ice cylinders for impacts up to approximately 100 ft/s. At low velocity, the force-time history depended heavily on the internal crystalline structure of the ice. However, for velocities of 100 ft/s and above, the ice fractured on impact, behaved more like a fluid, and the subsequent force-time history curves were much less dependent on the internal crystalline structure.

  12. Investigation of Ice Dynamics in the Marginal Ice Zone.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    far met on two accasiond discussing mainly on MIZEX-83 data and modeling problems. This research project has already been partially producing six...consequence that an ocean dynamics model for the ice margin problems should have an advanced ice dynamics model coupled with it. Such modeling work has...already written for processing MIZEX-83 data. 4. Modeling A final’manuscript was preparedof one-dimenglonal modeling studies of ice drift in the

  13. Does ice immersion influence ankle joint position sense?

    PubMed

    Hopper, D; Whittington, D; Davies, J; Chartier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a fifteen minute ice immersion treatment influenced the normal ankle joint position sense at 40% and 80% range of inversion and to establish the length of treatment effect through monitoring the rewarming process. Forty nine healthy volunteers between the ages of 17 and 28 were tested. Subjects were screened to exclude those with a history of ankle injuries. The subject's skin temperature over antero-lateral aspect of the ankle was measured using a thermocouple device during the fifteen minutes ice intervention and thirty minutes post-intervention. Testing of ankle joint position sense using the pedal goniometer was performed before and after a clinical application of ice immersion. The testing required the subject to actively reposition their ankle at 40% and 80% of their total range of inversion. The majority of subjects experienced numbness of the foot and ankle by the fifth or sixth minute during ice immersion. One minute after immersion skin temperatures averaged 15 degrees C + 1.7 degrees C. Skin temperature was seen to rise relatively rapidly for the first ten minutes and then slowed considerably. Subjects had not returned to the pre-test skin temperatures by thirty minutes. A significant difference in ankle joint position sense (p < 0.0499) following fifteen minutes of ice immersion was found. However, the magnitude of this difference (0.5 degree) would not be deemed significant in clinical practice. The research found no significant difference in joint position sense between 40% and 80% of the range of inversion both before and after cryotherapy. These findings suggest that the clinical application of cryotherapy is not deleterious to joint position sense and assuming normal joint integrity patients may resume exercise without increased risk of injury.

  14. Role of Ice Dynamics in the Sea Ice Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, Jennifer; Geiger, Cathleen; Roberts, Andrew; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Doble, Martin; Forsberg, Rene; Giles, Katharine; Haas, Christian; Hendricks, Stefan; Khambhamettu, Chandra; Laxon, Seymour; Martin, Torge; Pruis, Matthew; Thomas, Mani; Wadhams, Peter; Zwally, H. Jay

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea ice pack has been less extensive and thinner than has been observed during the previous 35 years [e.g., Wadhams and Davis, 2000; Tucker et al., 2001; Rothrock et al., 1999; Parkinson and Cavalieri, 2002; Comiso, 2002]. During the summers of 2007 and 2008, the ice extents for both the Beaufort Sea and the Northern Hemisphere were the lowest on record. Mechanisms causing recent sea ice change in the Pacific Arctic and the Beaufort Sea are under investigation on many fronts [e.g., Drobot and Maslanik, 2003; Shimada et al., 2006]; the mechanisms include increased ocean surface warming due to Pacific Ocean water inflow to the region and variability in meteorological and surface conditions. However, in most studies addressing these events, the impact of sea ice dynamics, specifically deformation, has not been measured in detail.

  15. Frazil ice dynamics in polynyas and leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Andrew; Rees Jones, David

    2016-04-01

    The initial stage of sea ice formation in a turbulent ocean typically involves the growth of a suspension of frazil ice crystals in supercooled waters. In competition with turbulent mixing, these crystals rise buoyantly and eventually settle at the ocean surface. The resulting rapid growth of granular ice has been observed to make up a significant fraction of ice cover in certain locations. Our recent theoretical work suggests that the growth of individual frazil ice crystals may be significantly faster than had commonly been supposed. We here explore the consequences for the dynamics of a suspension of many frazil ice crystals in a well mixed layer. Frazil suspensions are affected by many processes, including the fluid dynamics of suspensions, nucleation, the collision and sintering of crystals, as well as crystal growth. These processes combine to control the evolving distribution of crystal sizes. We apply a model of the crystal size distribution in a well mixed layer to investigate the comparative importance of these mechanisms, quantify the controls on ice growth, and compare to available laboratory data. We complement our theoretical model with two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection with a suspension of resolved crystals, in order to elucidate the fluid dynamical coupling between ocean convection with crystal rise, and its impact on ice precipitation rates.

  16. Initial results from the joint NASA-Lewis/U.S. Army icing flight research tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belte, Daumants; Ranaudo, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Army/NASA joint testing of the various aspects of in-flight and ground-based icing simulation facilities and instrumentation is reviewed. The NASA DN-6 icing research aircraft, the U.S. Army JU-21A aircraft, the portable spray rig, helicopter icing spray system, and icing research tunnel are examined. Natural and artificial icing tests, turbulence measurements, and calibration and icing research tunnel tests are described and test results are reported.

  17. AVHRR imagery reveals Antarctic ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A.; Vornberger, Patricia L.

    1990-01-01

    A portion of AVHRR data taken on December 5, 1987 at 06:15 GMT over a part of Antarctica is used here to show that many of the most significant dynamic features of ice sheets can be identified by a careful examination of AVHRR imagery. The relatively low resolution of this instrument makes it ideal for obtaining a broad view of the ice sheets, while its wide swath allows coverage of areas beyond the reach of high-resolution imagers either currently in orbit or planned. An interpretation is given of the present data, which cover the area of ice streams that drain the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet into the Ross Ice Shelf.

  18. AVHRR imagery reveals Antarctic ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, R.A.; Vornberger, P.L. STX Corp., Lanham, MD )

    1990-06-01

    A portion of AVHRR data taken on December 5, 1987 at 06:15 GMT over a part of Antarctica is used here to show that many of the most significant dynamic features of ice sheets can be identified by a careful examination of AVHRR imagery. The relatively low resolution of this instrument makes it ideal for obtaining a broad view of the ice sheets, while its wide swath allows coverage of areas beyond the reach of high-resolution imagers either currently in orbit or planned. An interpretation is given of the present data, which cover the area of ice streams that drain the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet into the Ross Ice Shelf. 21 refs.

  19. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment 1975-1976. Physical Oceanography Data Report, Salinity, Temperature and Depth Data, Camp Blue Fox. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    LISTING PARAMETERS I DEPTH Depth in meters TEMP Temperature in degrees C PTEMP Potential temperature in degree C SALIN Salinity in parts per thousand SIG ...T Sigma-t density where: I density (p) - 1.0 + (( Sig T) *1000.0) SPVOL Specific volume anomaly (x 10-5 cm3/gm) DYNHT Dynamic height (dynamic meters...to LM b. a w ewe%- ww re mOOc 4" o 0.NWmotvviiOf wt 00 f4Crfl ft -wm o.e. &*1 NO P..w N N o%9 a in - - -da inN 4p m a - U . .......0...V N m

  20. Modeling joint friction in structural dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2005-05-01

    The presence of mechanical joints--typified by the lap joint--in otherwise linear structures has been accommodated in structural dynamics via ad hoc methods for a century. The methods range from tuning linear models to approximate non-linear behavior in restricted load ranges to various methods which introduce joint dissipation in a post-processing stage. Other methods, employing constitutive models for the joints are being developed and their routine use is on the horizon.

  1. The role of ice stream dynamics in deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, Alexander A.; Tziperman, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Since the mid-Pleistocene transition, deglaciation has occurred only after ice sheets have grown large while experiencing several precession and obliquity cycles, indicating that large ice sheets are more sensitive to Milankovitch forcing than small ice sheets are. Observations and model simulations suggest that the development of ice streams in the Laurentide Ice Sheet played an as yet unknown role in deglaciations. In this study, we propose a mechanism by which ice streams may enhance deglaciation and render large ice sheets more sensitive to Milankovitch forcing. We use an idealized configuration of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model that permits the formation of ice streams. When the ice sheet is large and ice streams are sufficiently developed, an upward shift in equilibrium line altitude, commensurate with Milankovitch forcing, results in rapid deglaciation, while the same shift applied to an ice sheet without fully formed ice streams results in continued ice sheet growth or slower deglaciation. Rapid deglaciation in ice sheets with significant streaming behavior is caused by ice stream acceleration and the attendant enhancement of calving and surface melting at low elevations. Ice stream acceleration is ultimately the result of steepening of the ice surface and increased driving stresses in ice stream onset zones, which come about due to the dependence of surface mass balance on elevation. These ice sheet simulations match the broad features of geomorphological observations and add ice stream dynamics that are missing from previous model studies of deglaciation.

  2. Dynamic Analyses Including Joints Of Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    Method for mathematically modeling joints to assess influences of joints on dynamic response of truss structures developed in study. Only structures with low-frequency oscillations considered; only Coulomb friction and viscous damping included in analysis. Focus of effort to obtain finite-element mathematical models of joints exhibiting load-vs.-deflection behavior similar to measured load-vs.-deflection behavior of real joints. Experiments performed to determine stiffness and damping nonlinearities typical of joint hardware. Algorithm for computing coefficients of analytical joint models based on test data developed to enable study of linear and nonlinear effects of joints on global structural response. Besides intended application to large space structures, applications in nonaerospace community include ground-based antennas and earthquake-resistant steel-framed buildings.

  3. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  4. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  5. Dynamics and morphology of Beaufort Sea ice determined from satellites, aircraft, and drifting stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Gloersen, P.; Nordberg, W.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    A series of measurements from drifting stations, aircraft, the ERTS-1, Nimbus 4, and Nimbus 5 satellites have jointly provided a new description of the dynamics and morphology of the ice cover of the Beaufort Sea. The combined analysis of these data show that the eastern Beaufort Sea ice cover is made up of large multiyear floes while the western part is made of small, predominantly first-year floes. The analysis suggests that this distribution might be quasi-steady and that the dynamics and thermodynamics of the region are more complex than hitherto known. The measurements consist of: (1) high resolution ERTS-1 imagery which is used to describe floe size and shape distribution, short term floe dynamics, and lead and polynya dynamics; (2) tracking by Nimbus 4 of IRLS drifting buoys to provide ice drift information which enhances the interpretation of the ERTS-1 imagery; (3) Nimbus 5 microwave (1.55 cm wavelength) imagery which provides synoptic, sequential maps on the distribution of multiyear and first-year ice types; (4) airborne microwave surveys and surface based observations made during 1971 and 1972 in conjunction with the AIDJEX (Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment) program.

  6. Recent advances in understanding ice sheet dynamics [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Shawn J.

    2005-12-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets play a dynamic role in Earth's climate system, influencing regional- and global-scale climate and responding to climate change on time scales from years to millennia. They are also an integral part of Earth's landscape in alpine and polar regions, where they are an active agent in isostatic, tectonic, and Earth surface processes. This review paper summarizes recent progress in understanding and modelling ice sheet dynamics, from the microphysical processes of ice deformation in glaciers to continental-scale processes that influence ice dynamics. Based on recent insights and research directions, it can be expected that a new generation of ice sheet models will soon replace the current standard. Improvements that can be foreseen in the near future include: (i) the addition of internally-consistent evolutionary equations for ice crystal fabric (anisotropic flow laws), (ii) more generalized flow laws that include different deformation mechanisms under different stress regimes, (iii) explicit incorporation of the effects of chemical impurities and grain size (dynamic recrystallization) on ice deformation, (iv) higher-order stress solutions to the momentum balance (Stokes' equation) that governs ice sheet flow, and (v) the continued merger of ice sheet models with increasingly complex Earth systems models, which include fully-coupled subglacial hydrological and geological processes. Examples from the Greenland Ice Sheet and Vatnajökull Ice Cap, Iceland are used to illustrate several of these new directions and their importance to glacier dynamics.

  7. The dynamics of climate-induced deglacial ice stream acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, A.; Tziperman, E.

    2015-12-01

    Geological observations indicate that ice streams were a significant contributor to ice flow in the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum. Conceptual and simple model studies have also argued that the gradual development of ice streams increases the sensitivity of large ice sheets to weak climate forcing. In this study, we use an idealized configuration of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model to explore the role of ice streams in rapid deglaciation. In a growing ice sheet, ice streams develop gradually as the bed warms and the margin expands outward onto the continental shelf. Then, a weak change in equilibrium line altitude commensurate with Milankovitch forcing results in a rapid deglacial response, as ice stream acceleration leads to enhanced calving and surface melting at low elevations. We explain the dynamical mechanism that drives this ice stream acceleration and its broader applicability as a feedback for enhancing ice sheet decay in response to climate forcing. We show how our idealized ice sheet simulations match geomorphological observations of deglacial ice stream variability and previous model-data analyses. We conclude with observations on the potential for interaction between ice streams and other feedback mechanisms within the earth system.

  8. Does buoyancy matter in the melting dynamics of ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jicheng; Ordu, Mustafa; Basu, Soumendra; Bird, James

    2015-11-01

    Ice in a horizontal cylindrical container will melt when placed in a sufficient warm environment. Because of the density difference between the ice and the continuously forming water, the ice can rise close to the boundary, separated by a thin gap of water. The melting dynamics of the ice appear qualitatively similar to the evaporation of a drop under Leidenfrost conditions; however, the extent of the analogy is unclear. Here we investigate the melting dynamics of ice in thin-walled cylindrical containers. Through a combination of experiments and physical modeling, we identify a characteristic melting time and gap thickness, which we compare to evaporating droplets.

  9. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

    2009-07-01

    The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

  10. Changing structures and dynamics of western Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T. O.; Quincey, D. J.; Fricker, H.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last three decades, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves have shown a pattern of sustained retreat, often ending in catastrophic and rapid breakup. This study provides a detailed analysis of the structures and dynamics of three western Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves: Bach, Stange and George VI Ice Shelves. Spatial extent and glaciological surface features were mapped for each ice shelf from 1973 to 2010 using optical and radar satellite images to assess their structural evolution, historical dynamics and stability. InSAR and feature-tracking methods were used to assess the recent dynamic configurations of the ice shelves from 1989 to 2010. Repeat ICESat measurements were used to evaluate their vertical changes from 2003 to 2008. On Bach Ice Shelf, the formation of two large fractures near the ice front is linked to widespread thinning (~2 ma-1) and sustained retreat (~360 km2). It looks likely that iceberg calving along these fractures will alter the frontal geometry sufficiently to promote enhanced, irreversible retreat within the next decade. On George VI Ice Shelf, acceleration is observed at both ice fronts; linked to a release of back-stresses through continued ice loss (1995 km2 in total). The most significant changes are recorded at its southern ice front, with ice flow accelerating up to 360% between ca. 1989 and ca. 2010, coupled with widespread rifting and a mean thinning rate of 2.1 ma-1. On Stange Ice Shelf, shear-induced fracturing was observed between two flow units, also linked to widespread thinning (~4.2 ma-1). A semi-quantitative assessment reveals that the southern margin of George VI Ice Shelf is most susceptible to rapid retreat, whilst its northern ice front, Bach Ice Shelf and the northern front of Stange Ice Shelf are more vulnerable than those situated on the east Antarctic Peninsula.

  11. Laurentide ice sheet dynamics during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Alvarez-Solas, J.; Robinson, A.; Banderas, R.

    2016-12-01

    Heinrich events (HEs) are interpreted as the result of massive large-scale ice discharges from the Laurentice ice sheet (LIS) into the North Atlantic that occurred during the Last Glacial Period (LGP). Classically they have been attributed to internal oscillations of the LIS, a mechanism that has been mimicked using three-dimensional ice-sheet models within the Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA) together with a modified basal sliding parameterisation accounting for enhanced ice-flow over a melting ice bed. However, recent studies using hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf models with more comprehensive dynamics combining the SIA and the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) have proposed an alternative explanation involving the effects of oceanic circulation changes on the ice shelves. Up to now the plausibility of internal LIS instabilities in a hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model combining SSA and SIA has seldom been investigated. Here we address this issue in the framework of the LGP by modifying the dynamics in a hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model to mimick two different levels of complexity. We firstly suppress the binary mode mixture of sheet and stream ice in order to mimick the SIA, and include a basal sliding parameterisation. Under constant external climate forcing, quasi-periodic LIS instabilities are simulated in response to internal basal temperature oscillations. We then consider a more realistic dynamical formulation by incorporating the treatment of ice flow under the SSA. Internal basal temperature oscillations, and thereby LIS instabilities, are found to vanish under constant external forcing. Our results demonstrate how accounting for the longitudinal stresses of the ice streams, which is not possible within the pure SIA, is critical to stabilize ice flow and prevents the occurrence of the binge-purge oscillations.

  12. Equivalent dynamic model of DEMES rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; Xing, Zhiguang; McCoul, David; Niu, Junyang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by a small voltage-induced strain of the dielectric elastomer (DE), so it is a suitable candidate to make a rotary joint for a soft robot. Dynamic analysis is necessary for some applications, but the dynamic response of DEMESs is difficult to model because of the complicated morphology and viscoelasticity of the DE film. In this paper, a method composed of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement is presented to model the dynamic response of a DEMES rotary joint under an alternating voltage. Based on measurements of equivalent driving force and damping of the DEMES, the model can be derived. Some experiments were carried out to validate the equivalent dynamic model. The maximum angle error between model and experiment is greater than ten degrees, but it is acceptable to predict angular velocity of the DEMES, therefore, it can be applied in feedforward-feedback compound control.

  13. Dynamic joint transform correlator of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angervaks, A. E.; Malyi, A. F.; Fedorov, I. U.; Shcheulin, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    In this article principles of operation of a coherent optical image correlator based on a well know optical joint transform correlator are examined. Theoretical predictions and experimental data for of the optical image correlator with a holographic filter recorded on a thin holographic photographic plates PFG - 01 are analyzed. Results of the operation of the dynamic joint transform correlator on the basis of cadmium fluoride crystal, CdF2, with bistable impurity centers are demonstrated. Calculated and experimental correlation peak intensity dependencies with the scale and angular mismatch between an observed and reference objects for static and dynamic joint transform correlators are compared. Tangram figures were used as a test images. In the paper all computations were performed by use of MATLAB 7.0.1 mathematical program.

  14. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; ...

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamicmore » response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  15. Impact of ice-shelf sediment content on the dynamics of plumes under melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.

    2015-12-01

    When a floating ice shelf melts into an underlying warm salty ocean, the resulting fresh meltwater can rise in a buoyant Ice-Shelf-Water plume under the ice. In certain settings, ice flowing across the grounding line carries a basal layer of debris rich ice, entrained via basal freezing around till in the upstream ice sheet. Melting of this debris-laden ice from floating ice shelves provides a flux of dense sediment to the ocean, in addition to the release of fresh buoyant meltwater. This presentation considers the impact of the resulting suspended sediment on the dynamics of ice shelf water plumes, and identifies two key flow regimes depending on the sediment concentration frozen into the basal ice layer. For large sediment concentration, melting of the debris-laden ice shelf generates dense convectively unstable waters that drive convective overturning into the underlying ocean. For lower sediment concentration, the sediment initially remains suspended in a buoyant meltwater plume rising along the underside of the ice shelf, before slowly depositing into the underlying ocean. A theoretical plume model is used to evaluate the significance of the negatively buoyant sediment on circulation strength and the feedbacks on melting rate, along with the expected depositional patterns under the ice shelf.

  16. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0 ‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  17. Coupled ice-ocean dynamics in the marginal ice zones Upwelling/downwelling and eddy generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is aimed at modeling mesoscale processes such as upwelling/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A two-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model through interfacial stresses. The parameters of the ocean model were chosen so that the dynamics would be nonlinear. The model was tested by studying the dynamics of upwelling. Wings parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwelling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater than air-ocean momentum flux; thus the Ekman transport is greater than the ice than in the open water. The stability of the upwelling and downwelling jets is discussed. The downwelling jet is found to be far more unstable than the upwelling jet because the upwelling jet is stabilized by the divergence. The constant wind field exerted on a varying ice cover will generate vorticity leading to enhanced upwelling/downwelling regions, i.e., wind-forced vortices. Steepening and strengthening of vortices are provided by the nonlinear terms. When forcing is time-varying, the advection terms will also redistribute the vorticity. The wind reversals will separate the vortices from the ice edge, so that the upwelling enhancements are pushed to the open ocean and the downwelling enhancements are pushed underneath the ice.

  18. SPH non-Newtonian Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-07-07

    We propose a new three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model to study coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. Most existing ice sheet numerical models use a grid-based Eulerian approach, and are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations of the momentum conservation equation. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, solves the full momentum conservation equation. SPH method also allows modeling of free-surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation without employing complex front-tracking schemes, and does not require re-meshing. As a result, SPH codes are highly scalable. Numerical accuracy of the proposed SPH model is first verified by simulating a plane shear flow with a free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. Next, the SPH model is used to investigate the grounding line dynamics of ice sheet/shelf. The steady position of the grounding line, obtained from our SPH simulations, is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of bedrock slopes, ice-to-fluid density ratios, and flux. We examine the effect of non-Newtonian behavior of ice on the grounding line dynamics. The non-Newtonian constitutive model is based on Glen's law for a creeping flow of a polycrystalline ice. Finally, we investigate the effect of a bedrock geometry on a steady-state position of the grounding line.

  19. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Tommasi, Andrea; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature (≈0.98Tm). Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strain heterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is therefore a model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements at sample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo- Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) provide a solid database for analyzing the relative impact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRX mechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneous dislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of the dislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation between high dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging, subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  20. Dynamics of ice ages on Mars.

    PubMed

    Schorghofer, Norbert

    2007-09-13

    Unlike Earth, where astronomical climate forcing is comparatively small, Mars experiences dramatic changes in incident sunlight that are capable of redistributing ice on a global scale. The geographic extent of the subsurface ice found poleward of approximately +/-60 degrees latitude on both hemispheres of Mars coincides with the areas where ice is stable. However, the tilt of Mars' rotation axis (obliquity) changed considerably in the past several million years. Earlier work has shown that regions of ice stability, which are defined by temperature and atmospheric humidity, differed in the recent past from today's, and subsurface ice is expected to retreat quickly when unstable. Here I explain how the subsurface ice sheets could have evolved to the state in which we see them today. Simulations of the retreat and growth of ground ice as a result of sublimation loss and recharge reveal forty major ice ages over the past five million years. Today, this gives rise to pore ice at mid-latitudes and a three-layered depth distribution in the high latitudes of, from top to bottom, a dry layer, pore ice, and a massive ice sheet. Combined, these layers provide enough ice to be compatible with existing neutron and gamma-ray measurements.

  1. Fluvial Anchor Ice/Sediment Dynamics and Ice Rafting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    Siberia . Journal of Geophysical Research. Eicken, H. et al., in press. Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beafort Seas: increasing...U.S.A.; Kara Sea, Siberia . Journal of Geophysical Research: [refereed]. Kempema, E.W. and Dethleff, D., submitted. The roll of Langmuir

  2. Joint Chance-Constrained Dynamic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J. Bob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel dynamic programming algorithm with a joint chance constraint, which explicitly bounds the risk of failure in order to maintain the state within a specified feasible region. A joint chance constraint cannot be handled by existing constrained dynamic programming approaches since their application is limited to constraints in the same form as the cost function, that is, an expectation over a sum of one-stage costs. We overcome this challenge by reformulating the joint chance constraint into a constraint on an expectation over a sum of indicator functions, which can be incorporated into the cost function by dualizing the optimization problem. As a result, the primal variables can be optimized by a standard dynamic programming, while the dual variable is optimized by a root-finding algorithm that converges exponentially. Error bounds on the primal and dual objective values are rigorously derived. We demonstrate the algorithm on a path planning problem, as well as an optimal control problem for Mars entry, descent and landing. The simulations are conducted using a real terrain data of Mars, with four million discrete states at each time step.

  3. Joint Chance-Constrained Dynamic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J. Bob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel dynamic programming algorithm with a joint chance constraint, which explicitly bounds the risk of failure in order to maintain the state within a specified feasible region. A joint chance constraint cannot be handled by existing constrained dynamic programming approaches since their application is limited to constraints in the same form as the cost function, that is, an expectation over a sum of one-stage costs. We overcome this challenge by reformulating the joint chance constraint into a constraint on an expectation over a sum of indicator functions, which can be incorporated into the cost function by dualizing the optimization problem. As a result, the primal variables can be optimized by a standard dynamic programming, while the dual variable is optimized by a root-finding algorithm that converges exponentially. Error bounds on the primal and dual objective values are rigorously derived. We demonstrate the algorithm on a path planning problem, as well as an optimal control problem for Mars entry, descent and landing. The simulations are conducted using a real terrain data of Mars, with four million discrete states at each time step.

  4. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Monaghan, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is verif;ed by simulating Poiseuille flow, plane shear flow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian fluid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, such that the effect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  5. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  6. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark Torre Jorgenson,; Mikhail Kanevskiy,; Yuri Shur,; Natalia Moskalenko,; Dana Brown,; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Striegl, Robert G.; Koch, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  7. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, M. T.; Kanevskiy, M.; Shur, Y.; Moskalenko, N.; Brown, D. R. N.; Wickland, K.; Striegl, R.; Koch, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  8. A Lagrangian analysis of sea ice dynamics in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szanyi, S.; Lukovich, J. V.; Haller, G.; Barber, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted acceleration in sea ice drift and deformation in the Arctic over the last several decades, underlining the need for improved understanding of sea ice dynamics and dispersion. In this study we present Lagrangian diagnostics to quantify changes in the dynamical characteristics of the Arctic sea ice cover from 1979 to 2012 during the transition from a predominantly multi-year to a first-year ice regime. Examined in particular is the evolution in finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs), which monitor the rate at which neighboring particle trajectories diverge, and stretching rates throughout the Arctic. In this analysis we compute FTLEs for the Arctic ice drift field using National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC) Polar Pathfinder Daily 25 km EASE-Grid weekly sea ice motion vectors for the annual cycle beginning both from the sea ice minimum in September, and maximum in March. Sensitivity analyses show that maximal FTLEs, or ridges, are robust even with the introduction of significant noise. Probability density functions and mean values of FTLEs show a trend towards higher FTLE values characteristic of increased mixing in the Arctic in the last decade, in keeping with a transition to a weaker, thinner ice cover.

  9. Smoluchowski coagulation models of sea ice thickness distribution dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlovitch, D.; Illner, R.; Monahan, A.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential decrease with thickness. This tail characterizes the range of ice thickness produced by mechanical redistribution of ice through the process of ridging, rafting, and shearing. We investigate how well the thickness distribution can be simulated by representing mechanical redistribution as a generalized stacking process. Such processes are naturally described by a well-studied class of models known as Smoluchowski Coagulation Models (SCMs), which describe the dynamics of a population of fixed-mass "particles" which combine in pairs to form a "particle" with the combined mass of the constituent pair at a rate which depends on the mass of the interacting particles. Like observed sea ice thickness distributions, the mass distribution of the populations generated by SCMs has an exponential or quasi-exponential form. We use SCMs to model sea ice, identifying mass-increasing particle combinations with thickness-increasing ice redistribution processes. Our model couples an SCM component with a thermodynamic component and generates qualitatively accurate thickness distributions with a variety of rate kernels. Our results suggest that the exponential tail of the sea ice thickness distribution arises from the nature of the ridging process, rather than specific physical properties of sea ice or the spatial arrangement of floes, and that the relative strengths of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes are key in accurately simulating the rate at which the sea ice thickness tail drops off with thickness.

  10. Investigation of Dynamic Flight Maneuvers With an Iced Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed analysis of two of the dynamic maneuvers, the pushover and elevator doublet, from the NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program are discussed. For this series of flight tests, artificial ice shapes were attached to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer of the NASA Lewis Research Center icing aircraft, a DHC-6 Twin Otter. The purpose of these tests was to learn more about ice-contaminated tailplane stall (ICTS), the known cause of 16 accidents resulting in 139 fatalities. The pushover has been employed by the FAA, JAA and Transport Canada for tailplane icing certification. This research analyzes the pushover and reports on the maneuver performance degradation due to ice shape severity and flap deflection. A repeatability analysis suggests tolerances for meeting the required targets of the maneuver. A second maneuver, the elevator doublet, is also studied.

  11. Smoluchowski Coagulation Models Of Sea Ice Thickness Distribution Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlovitch, D.; Illner, R.; Monahan, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential decrease with thickness. This tail characterises the range of ice thickness produced by mechanical redistribution of ice through the process of ridging, rafting, and shearing. It is possible to simulate thickness distribution dynamics by representing mechanical redistribution as a generalized stacking process. Stacking processes may be described by a class of models known as Smoluchowski Coagulation models, which originated in Statistical Mechanics and describe the dynamics of a population of fixed-mass "particles" which combine in pairs to form a "particle" with the combined mass of the constituent pair at a rate which depends on the mass of the interacting particles. We use SCMs to model sea ice, identifying mass-increasing particle combinations with thickness-increasing ice redistribution processes. Our model couples an SCM component with a thermodynamic component and generates qualitatively accurate thickness distributions. The model behaviour suggests that the exponential tail of the sea ice thickness distribution arises from the nature of the ridging process, rather than specific physical properties of sea ice or the spatial arrangement of floes, and that the relative strengths of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes are key in accurately simulating the rate at which the sea ice thickness tail drops off with thickness.

  12. Dynamics of Ice/Water Confined in Nanoporous Alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Steinhart, Martin; Graf, Robert; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-11-19

    Dielectric (DS), IR spectroscopy, and (1)H MAS NMR are employed in the study of ice/water confined in nanoporous alumina with pore diameters ranging from 400 nm down to 25 nm. Within nanoporous alumina there is a transformation from heterogeneous nucleation of hexagonal ice in the larger pores to homogeneous nucleation of cubic ice in the smaller pores. DS and IR show excellent agreement in the temperature interval and pore size dependence of the transformation. DS further revealed two dynamic processes under confinement. The "fast" and "slow" processes with an Arrhenius temperature dependence are attributed to ice and supercooled water relaxation, respectively. The main relaxation process of ice under confinement ("slow" process) has an activation energy of 44 ± 2 kJ/mol. The latter is in agreement with the reported relaxation times and activation energy of cubic ice prepared following a completely different route (by pressure). (1)H MAS NMR provided new insight in the state of ice structures as well as of supercooled water. Under confinement, a layer of liquid-like water coexists with ice structures. In addition, both ice structures under confinement appear to be more ordered than bulk hexagonal ice. Supercooled water in the smaller pores is different from bulk water. It shows a shift of the signal toward higher chemical shift values which may suggest stronger hydrogen bonding between the water molecules or increasing interactions with the AAO walls.

  13. Impact of bedrock description on modeling ice sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Favier, L.; Zwinger, T.; le Meur, E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent glaciological surveys have revealed a significant increase of ice discharge from polar ice caps into the ocean. In parallel, ice flow models have been greatly improved to better reproduce current changes and forecast the future behavior of ice sheets. For these models, surface topography and bedrock elevation are crucial input parameters that largely control the dynamics and the ensuing overall mass balance of the ice sheet. For obvious reasons of inaccessibility, only sparse and uneven bedrock elevation data is available. This raw data is processed to produce Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) on a regular 5 km grid. These DEMs are used to constrain the basal boundary conditions of all ice sheet models. Here, by using a full-Stokes finite element code, we examine the sensitivity of an ice flow model to the accuracy of the bedrock description. In the context of short-term ice sheet forecast, we show that in coastal regions, the bedrock elevation should be known at a resolution of the order of one kilometer. Conversely, a crude description of the bedrock in the interior of the continent does not affect modeling of the ice outflow into the ocean. These findings clearly indicate that coastal regions should be prioritized during future geophysical surveys. They also indicate that a paradigm shift is required to change the current design of DEMs describing the bedrock below the ice sheets: they must give users the opportunity to incorporate high-resolution bedrock elevation data in regions of interest.

  14. Fracture-induced softening for large-scale ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, T.; Levermann, A.

    2014-04-01

    Floating ice shelves can exert a retentive and hence stabilizing force onto the inland ice sheet of Antarctica. However, this effect has been observed to diminish by the dynamic effects of fracture processes within the protective ice shelves, leading to accelerated ice flow and hence to a sea-level contribution. In order to account for the macroscopic effect of fracture processes on large-scale viscous ice dynamics (i.e., ice-shelf scale) we apply a continuum representation of fractures and related fracture growth into the prognostic Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) and compare the results to observations. To this end we introduce a higher order accuracy advection scheme for the transport of the two-dimensional fracture density across the regular computational grid. Dynamic coupling of fractures and ice flow is attained by a reduction of effective ice viscosity proportional to the inferred fracture density. This formulation implies the possibility of non-linear threshold behavior due to self-amplified fracturing in shear regions triggered by small variations in the fracture-initiation threshold. As a result of prognostic flow simulations, sharp across-flow velocity gradients appear in fracture-weakened regions. These modeled gradients compare well in magnitude and location with those in observed flow patterns. This model framework is in principle expandable to grounded ice streams and provides simple means of investigating climate-induced effects on fracturing (e.g., hydro fracturing) and hence on the ice flow. It further constitutes a physically sound basis for an enhanced fracture-based calving parameterization.

  15. Structural and dynamic characteristics in monolayer square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, YinBo; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2017-07-01

    When water is constrained between two sheets of graphene, it becomes an intriguing monolayer solid with a square pattern due to the ultrahigh van der Waals pressure. However, the square ice phase has become a matter of debate due to the insufficient experimental interpretation and the slightly rhomboidal feature in simulated monolayer square-like structures. Here, we performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to reveal monolayer square ice in graphene nanocapillaries from the perspective of structure and dynamic characteristics. Monolayer square-like ice (instantaneous snapshot), assembled square-rhombic units with stacking faults, is a long-range ordered structure, in which the square and rhombic units are assembled in an order of alternative distribution, and the other rhombic unit forms stacking faults (polarized water chains). Spontaneous flipping of water molecules in monolayer square-like ice is intrinsic and induces transformations among different elementary units, resulting in the structural evolution of monolayer square ice in dynamics. The existence of stacking faults should be attributed to the spontaneous flipping behavior of water molecules under ambient temperature. Statistical averaging results (thermal average positions) demonstrate the inherent square characteristic of monolayer square ice. The simulated data and insight obtained here might be significant for understanding the topological structure and dynamic behavior of monolayer square ice.

  16. Structural and dynamic characteristics in monolayer square ice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, YinBo; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2017-07-28

    When water is constrained between two sheets of graphene, it becomes an intriguing monolayer solid with a square pattern due to the ultrahigh van der Waals pressure. However, the square ice phase has become a matter of debate due to the insufficient experimental interpretation and the slightly rhomboidal feature in simulated monolayer square-like structures. Here, we performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to reveal monolayer square ice in graphene nanocapillaries from the perspective of structure and dynamic characteristics. Monolayer square-like ice (instantaneous snapshot), assembled square-rhombic units with stacking faults, is a long-range ordered structure, in which the square and rhombic units are assembled in an order of alternative distribution, and the other rhombic unit forms stacking faults (polarized water chains). Spontaneous flipping of water molecules in monolayer square-like ice is intrinsic and induces transformations among different elementary units, resulting in the structural evolution of monolayer square ice in dynamics. The existence of stacking faults should be attributed to the spontaneous flipping behavior of water molecules under ambient temperature. Statistical averaging results (thermal average positions) demonstrate the inherent square characteristic of monolayer square ice. The simulated data and insight obtained here might be significant for understanding the topological structure and dynamic behavior of monolayer square ice.

  17. Basal Dynamics and Internal Structure of Ice Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, Michael J.

    The internal structure of ice sheets reflects the history of flow and deformation experienced by the ice mass. Flow and deformation are controlled by processes occurring within the ice mass and at its boundaries, including surface accumulation or ablation, ice rheology, basal topography, basal sliding, and basal melting or freezing. The internal structure and basal environment of ice sheets is studied with ice-penetrating radar. Recently, radar observations in Greenland and Antarctica have imaged large englacial structures rising from near the bed that deform the overlying stratigraphy into anticlines, synclines, and overturned folds. The mechanisms that may produce these structures include basal freeze-on, travelling slippery patches at the ice base, and rheological contrasts within the ice column. In this thesis, I explore the setting and mechanisms that produce large basal stratigraphic structures inside ice sheets. First, I use radar data to map subglacial hydrologic networks that deliver meltwater uphill towards freeze-on structures in East Antarctica. Next, I use a thermomechanical flowline model to demonstrate that trains of alternating slippery and sticky patches can form underneath ice sheets and travel downstream over time. The disturbances to the ice flow field produced by these travelling patches produce stratigraphic folds resembling the observations. I then examine the overturned folds produced by a single travelling sticky patch using a kinematic flowline model. This model is used to interpret stratigraphic measurements in terms of the dynamic properties of basal slip. Finally, I use a simple local one-dimensional model to estimate the thickness of basal freeze-on that can be produced based on the supply of available meltwater, the thermal boundary conditions, ice sheet geometry, and the ice flow regime.

  18. A model of icebergs and sea ice in a joint continuum framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaňková, Irena; Holland, David M.

    2017-04-01

    The ice mélange, a mixture of sea ice and icebergs, often present in front of tidewater glaciers in Greenland or ice shelves in Antarctica, can have a profound effect on the dynamics of the ice-ocean system. The current inability to numerically model the ice mélange motivates a new modeling approach proposed here. A continuum sea-ice model is taken as a starting point and icebergs are represented as thick and compact pieces of sea ice held together by large tensile and shear strength selectively introduced into the sea ice rheology. In order to modify the rheology correctly, a semi-Lagrangian time stepping scheme is introduced and at each time step a Lagrangian grid is constructed such that iceberg shape is preserved exactly. With the proposed treatment, sea ice and icebergs are considered a single fluid with spatially varying rheological properties, mutual interactions are thus automatically included without the need of further parametrization. An important advantage of the presented framework for an ice mélange model is its potential to be easily included in existing climate models.

  19. Gypsum and hydrohalite dynamics in sea ice brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin M.; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Day, Sarah J.; Kennedy, Hilary

    2017-09-01

    Mineral authigenesis from their dissolved sea salt matrix is an emergent feature of sea ice brines, fuelled by dramatic equilibrium solubility changes in the large sub-zero temperature range of this cryospheric system on the surface of high latitude oceans. The multi-electrolyte composition of seawater results in the potential for several minerals to precipitate in sea ice, each affecting the in-situ geochemical properties of the sea ice brine system, the habitat of sympagic biota. The solubility of two of these minerals, gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2O) and hydrohalite (NaCl · 2H2O), was investigated in high ionic strength multi-electrolyte solutions at below-zero temperatures to examine their dissolution-precipitation dynamics in the sea ice brine system. The gypsum dynamics in sea ice were found to be highly dependent on the solubilities of mirabilite and hydrohalite between 0.2 and - 25.0 ° C. The hydrohalite solubility between - 14.3 and - 25.0 ° C exhibits a sharp change between undersaturated and supersaturated conditions, and, thus, distinct temperature fields of precipitation and dissolution in sea ice, with saturation occurring at - 22.9 ° C. The sharp changes in hydrohalite solubility at temperatures ⩽-22.9 °C result from the formation of an ice-hydrohalite aggregate, which alters the structural properties of brine inclusions in cold sea ice. Favourable conditions for gypsum precipitation in sea ice were determined to occur in the region of hydrohalite precipitation below - 22.9 ° C and in conditions of metastable mirabilite supersaturation above - 22.9 ° C (investigated at - 7.1 and - 8.2 ° C here) but gypsum is unlikely to persist once mirabilite forms at these warmer (>-22.9 °C) temperatures. The dynamics of hydrohalite in sea ice brines based on its experimental solubility were consistent with that derived from thermodynamic modelling (FREZCHEM code) but the gypsum dynamics derived from the code were inconsistent with that indicated by its

  20. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  1. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth.

    PubMed

    Kutschan, B; Morawetz, K; Thoms, S

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  2. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschan, B.; Morawetz, K.; Thoms, S.

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  3. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  4. Arctic ice shelves and ice islands: Origin, growth and disintegration, physical characteristics, structural-stratigraphic variability, and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O. )

    1992-08-01

    Ice shelves are thick, floating ice masses most often associated with Antarctica where they are seaward extensions of the grounded Antarctic ice sheet and sources of many icebergs. However, there are also ice shelves in the Arctic, primarily located along the north coast of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. The only ice shelves in North America and the most extensive in the north polar region, the Ellesmere ice shelves originate from glaciers and from sea ice and are the source of ice islands, the tabular icebergs of the Arctic Ocean. The present state of knowledge and understanding of these ice features is summarized in this paper. It includes historical background to the discovery and early study of ice shelves and ice islands, including the use of ice islands as floating laboratories for polar geophysical research. Growth mechanisms and age, the former extent and the twentieth century disintegration of the Ellesmere ice shelves, and the processes and mechanisms of ice island calving are summarized. Surface features, thickness, thermal regime, and the size, shape, and numbers of ice islands are discussed. The structural-stratigraphic variability of ice islands and ice shelves and the complex nature of their growth and development are described. Large-scale and small-scale dynamics of ice islands are described, and the results of modeling their drift and recurrence intervals are presented. The conclusion identifies some unanswered questions and future research opportunities and needs. 97 refs., 18 figs.

  5. Dynamic characterization of bolted joints using FRF decoupling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, Şerife; O¨zgu¨ven, H. Nevzat

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical connections play a significant role in predicting dynamic characteristics of assembled structures. Therefore, equivalent dynamic models for joints are needed. Due to the complexity of joints, it is difficult to describe joint dynamics with analytical models. Reliable models are generally obtained using experimental measurements. In this paper an experimental identification method based on FRF decoupling and optimization algorithm is proposed for modeling joints. In the method the FRFs of two substructures connected with a joint are measured, while the FRFs of the substructures are obtained numerically or experimentally. Then the joint properties are calculated in terms of translational, rotational and cross-coupling stiffness and damping values by using FRF decoupling. In order to eliminate the numerical errors associated with matrix inversion an optimization algorithm is used to update the joint values obtained from FRF decoupling. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated with experimental studies with bolted joints.

  6. Dynamic behaviour of ice streams: the North East Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Jansen, Daniela; Schaufler, Svenja; de Riese, Tamara; Sachau, Till; Weikusat, Ilka

    2017-04-01

    The flow of ice towards the margins of ice sheets is far from homogeneous. Ice streams show much higher flow velocities than their surroundings and may extend, for example the North East Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS), towards the centre of the sheet. The elevated flow velocity inside an ice stream causes marginal shearing and convergent flow, which in turn leads to folding of ice layers. Such folding was documented in the Petermann Glacier in northern Greenland (Bons et al., 2016). 3-dimensional structural modelling using radargrams shows that folding is more intense adjacent to NEGIS than inside it, despite the strong flow perturbation at NEGIS. Analysis of fold amplitude as a function of stratigraphic level indicates that folding adjacent to NEGIS ceased in the early Holocene, while it is currently active inside NEGIS. The presence of folds adjacent of NEGIS, but also at other sites far in the interior of the Greenland Ice Sheet with no direct connection to the present-day surface velocity field, indicates that ice flow is not only heterogeneous in space (as the present-day flow velocity field shows), but also in time. The observations suggest that ice streams are dynamic, ephemeral structures that emerge and die out, and may possibly shift during their existence, but leave traces within the stratigraphic layering of the ice. The dynamic nature of ice streams such as NEGIS speaks against deterministic models for their accelerated flow rates, such as bedrock topography or thermal perturbations at their base. Instead, we suggest that ice streams can also result from strain localisation induced inside the ice sheet by the complex coupling of rheology, anisotropy, grain-size changes and possibly shear heating. Bons, P.D., Jansen, D., Mundel, F., Bauer, C.C., Binder, T., Eisen, O., Jessell, M.W., Llorens, M.-G, Steinbach, F., Steinhage, D. & Weikusat, I. 2016. Converging flow and anisotropy cause large-scale folding in Greenland's ice sheet. Nature Communications 7

  7. Injury Criteria for Dynamic Hyperextension of the Female Elbow Joint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    1 INJURY CRITERIA FOR DYNAMIC HYPEREXTENSION OF THE FEMALE ELBOW JOINT Stefan M. Duma*, Gail A. Hansen, Eric A. Kennedy, Joel D. Stitzel...Laboratory Fort Rucker, AL 36362 ABSTRACT This paper describes an analysis to develop dynamic hyperextension injury criteria for the female elbow ...joint. Dynamic hyperextension tests were performed on 24 female cadaver elbow joints. The energy source was a drop tower utilizing a three-point

  8. Joint effects of wind and ice motion in forcing upwelling in Mackenzie Trough, Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, William J.; Carmack, Eddy C.; Shimada, Koji; Melling, Humfrey; Aagaard, Knut; Macdonald, Robie W.; Grant Ingram, R.

    2006-12-01

    Mackenzie Trough, a cross shelf canyon in the Beaufort Sea shelf, is shown to be a site of enhanced shelf-break exchange via upwelling caused by wind- and ice-driven ocean surface-stresses. To characterize flow within the Trough, we analyze current meter mooring data and concurrent wind and ice velocity data from 1993 to 1996, and show CTD/ADCP sections from 2002. Mackenzie Trough is approximately 400 m deep and 60 km wide, but dynamically it is only 2-3 times the baroclinic Rossby radius at its mouth, and patterns of upwelling and downwelling flow within the canyon are similar to dynamically 'narrow' canyons. Large upwelling events within the canyon are associated with wind in the short ice-free summer season and with ice motion in winter. Ice motion does not necessarily reflect the wind-stress because of internal ice stresses that differentially block downwelling-causing ice motion. The asymmetry between upwelling and downwelling flow within the canyon combined with the predominance of upwelling-causing ice motion, suggests that Mackenzie Trough is a conduit for deeper, nutrient-rich water to the shelf.

  9. Dynamic Ice-Water Interactions Form Europa's Chaos Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Schmidt, B. E.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P.

    2011-12-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. We present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. This model is consistent with key observations of chaos, predicts observables for future missions, and indicates that the surface is likely still active today[1]. We apply lessons from ice-water interaction in the terrestrial cryosphere to hypothesize a dynamic lense-collapse model to for Europa's chaos terrain. Chaos terrain morphology, like that of Conamara chaos and Thera Macula, suggests a four-phase formation [1]: 1) Surface deflection occurs as ice melts over ascending thermal plumes, as regularly occurs on Earth as subglacial volcanoes activate. The same process can occur at Europa if thermal plumes cause pressure melt as they cross ice-impurity eutectics. 2) Resulting hydraulic gradients and driving forces produce a sealed, pressurized melt lense, akin to the hydraulic sealing of subglacial caldera lakes. On Europa, the water cannot escape the lense due to the horizontally continuous ice shell. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid above the lense opens cracks, allowing for the ice to be hydrofractured by pressurized water. Fracture, brine injection and percolation within the ice and possible iceberg toppling produces ice-melange-like granular matrix material. 4) Refreezing of the melt lense and brine-filled pores and cracks within the matrix results in raised chaos. Brine soaking and injection concentrates the ice in brines and adds water volume to the shell. As this englacial water freezes, the now water-filled ice will expand, not unlike the process of forming pingos and other "expansion ice" phenomena on Earth. The refreezing can raise the surface and create the oft-observed matrix "domes" In this presentation, we describe how catastrophic ice-water interactions on Earth have

  10. Glacial transport and local ice dynamics under the Keewatin Ice Divide of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, central Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M.; McMartin, I.

    2009-12-01

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M., Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and GEOTOP, University of Quebec in Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8; McMartin, I., Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A OE8 Recent paleogeographic reconstructions indicate that the Keewatin Ice Divide (KID) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was highly dynamic throughout the last glacial cycle. Extensive field measurements of cross-cutting ice-flow erosional features (striations, grooves) on multi-faceted bedrock outcrops, as well as mapping of streamlined landforms indicate significant displacements (up to 500 km) of this ice flow center during the last glacial cycle. These episodes of ice-flow reorganization likely affected the patterns of glacial transport, but the extent of the reworking of former glacial dispersal trains is often unconstrained in certain regions. Here we report ice-flow directional data and associated glacial-dynamic considerations for an area located 100 km north of Baker Lake, central Nunavut. This area lies underneath the zone of migration of the KID (essentially north of its final position), thus representing a key area for understanding the dynamics of this sector of the LIS. Measurements of ice-flow indicators indicate at least 7 ice-flow directions, going from N, NNW, NW to WNW, NNE, W, SE, and SW to WSW. A relative chronology was established from multiple intersecting striations and geometrical relations between multi-faceted outcrops, starting from older phases to younger ones with W, NW, NNW, and N. Surficial mapping using air-photo and satellite images indicate that this region is characterized by zones of fast and slower ice velocity. The presence in the centre of the study area of a drift-free positive relief formed by resistant NE-SW-oriented Proterozoic quartzite appears to have played an important role on the local ice dynamics by slowing down the velocity of the ice. Local example of varying ice velocity systems is expressed by a glacially

  11. Self-consistent ice-sheet properties: ice dynamics, temperature, accumulation, delta-age and chronologies for ice cores and radar isochrones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, J.; Waddington, E. D.; Conway, H.

    2011-12-01

    Ice sheet behavior has not previously been modeled to force self-consistency, to determine histories of accumulation, temperature, and ice dynamics that incorporate the ice-age/gas-age offset (delta-age) and sparse depth-age measurements from ice cores. An iterative scheme is used to combine several modular components into one self-consistent model. The goal is to determine a suite of histories constrained by the depth-age data from ice cores and ice radar that are part of a physically self-consistent ice sheet. The model is tested using a synthetic data set resembling WAIS divide. Using synthetic data provides proof of concept that histories of accumulation, temperature and ice dynamics can be recovered by the self-consistent model, and that the depth-age from ice cores and ice radar can be matched. Results from synthetic data show we can recover the ice-sheet properties used to generate the data and we can improve the depth-age chronologies by interpolating with an ice-flow model where data are sparse. When this self-consistent model can be applied to field data, results will (1) improve chronologies for ice cores and radar layers, (2) determine histories of accumulation for GCM modelling, and (3) improve estimates of past ice sheet configurations, incorporating data from ice cores and ice radar.

  12. Temporal dynamics of ikaite in experimental sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysgaard, S.; Wang, F.; Galley, R. J.; Grimm, R.; Notz, D.; Lemes, M.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Chaulk, A.; Hare, A. A.; Crabeck, O.; Else, B. G. T.; Campbell, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.

    2014-08-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3 · 6H2O) is a metastable phase of calcium carbonate that normally forms in a cold environment and/or under high pressure. Recently, ikaite crystals have been found in sea ice, and it has been suggested that their precipitation may play an important role in air-sea CO2 exchange in ice-covered seas. Little is known, however, of the spatial and temporal dynamics of ikaite in sea ice. Here we present evidence for highly dynamic ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice grown at an outdoor pool of the Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF) in Manitoba, Canada. During the experiment, ikaite precipitated in sea ice when temperatures were below -4 °C, creating three distinct zones of ikaite concentrations: (1) a millimeter-to-centimeter-thin surface layer containing frost flowers and brine skim with bulk ikaite concentrations of >2000 μmol kg-1, (2) an internal layer with ikaite concentrations of 200-400 μmol kg-1, and (3) a bottom layer with ikaite concentrations of <100 μmol kg-1. Snowfall events caused the sea ice to warm and ikaite crystals to dissolve. Manual removal of the snow cover allowed the sea ice to cool and brine salinities to increase, resulting in rapid ikaite precipitation. The observed ikaite concentrations were on the same order of magnitude as modeled by FREZCHEM, which further supports the notion that ikaite concentration in sea ice increases with decreasing temperature. Thus, varying snow conditions may play a key role in ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice. This could have a major implication for CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and ocean that has not been accounted for previously.

  13. Bed roughness of palaeo-ice streams: insights and implications for contemporary ice sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcini, Francesca; Rippin, David; Selby, Katherine; Krabbendam, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    Bed roughness is the vertical variation of elevation along a horizontal transect. It is an important control on ice stream location and dynamics, with a correspondingly important role in determining the behaviour of ice sheets. Previous studies of bed roughness have been limited to insights derived from Radio Echo Sounding (RES) profiles across parts of Antarctica and Greenland. Such an approach has been necessary due to the inaccessibility of the underlying bed. This approach has led to important insights, such as identifying a general link between smooth beds and fast ice flow, as well as rough beds and slow ice flow. However, these insights are mainly derived from relatively coarse datasets, so that links between roughness and flow are generalised and rather simplistic. Here, we explore the use of DTMs from the well-preserved footprints of palaeo-ice streams, coupled with high resolution models of palaeo-ice flow, as a tool for investigating basal controls on the behaviour of contemporary, active ice streams in much greater detail. Initially, artificial transects were set up across the Minch palaeo-ice stream (NW Scotland) to mimic RES flight lines from past studies in Antarctica. We then explored how increasing data-resolution impacted upon the roughness measurements that were derived. Our work on the Minch palaeo-ice stream indicates that different roughness signatures are associated with different glacial landforms, and we discuss the potential for using these insights to infer, from RES-based roughness measurements, the occurrence of particular landform assemblages that may exist beneath contemporary ice sheets.

  14. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  15. Nonlinear dynamic characteristic analysis of jointed beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Hong-Wei; Liu, Rong-Qiang; Wu, Juan; Kou, Zi-Ming; Deng, Zong-Quan

    2016-12-01

    The impact and elasticity of discontinuous beams with clearance frequently affect the dynamic response of structures used in space missions. This study investigates the dynamic response of jointed beams which are the periodic units of deployable structures. The vibration process of jointed beams includes free-play and impact stages. A method for the dynamic analysis of jointed beams with clearance is proposed based on mode superposition and instantaneous static deformation. Transfer matrix, which expresses the relationship of the responses before and after the impact of jointed beams, is derived to calculate the response of the jointed beams after a critical position. The dynamic responses of jointed beams are then simulated. The effects of various parameters on the displacement and velocity of beams are investigated.

  16. Sensitivity study of a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, D.M.; Mysak, L.A.; Manak, D.K. )

    1993-02-15

    A numerical simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian seas is presented. The sea ice model is extracted from Oberhuber's (1990) coupled sea ice-mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model and is written in spherical coordinates. The advantage of such a model over previous sea ice models is that it can be easily coupled to either global atmospheric or ocean general circulation models written in spherical coordinates. In this model, the thermodynamics are a modification of that of Parkinson and Washington, while the dynamics use the full Hibler viscous-plastic rheology. Monthly thermodynamic and dynamic forcing fields for the atmosphere and ocean are specified. The simulations of the seasonal cycle of ice thickness, compactness, and velocity, for a control set of parameters, compare favorably with the known seasonal characteristics of these fields. A sensitivity study of the control simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover is presented. The sensitivity runs are carried out under three different themes, namely, numerical conditions, parameter values, and physical processes. This last theme refers to experiments in which physical processes are either newly added or completely removed from the model. Approximately 80 sensitivity runs have been performed in which a change from the control run environment has been implemented. Comparisons have been made between the control run and a particular sensitivity run based on time series of the seasonal cycle of the domain-averaged ice thickness, compactness, areal coverage, and kinetic energy. In addition, spatially varying fields of ice thickness, compactness, velocity, and surface temperature for each season are presented for selected experiments. A brief description and discussion of the more interesting experiments are presented. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice cover is shown to be robust. 31 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of ice nucleation by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Yan, J Y; Patey, G N

    2012-07-05

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation in model systems where an electric field acts on water molecules within 10-20 Å of a surface. Two different water models (the six-site and TIP4P/Ice models) are considered, and in both cases, it is shown that a surface field can serve as a very effective ice nucleation catalyst in supercooled water. Ice with a ferroelectric cubic structure nucleates near the surface, and dipole disordered cubic ice grows outward from the surface layer. We examine the influences of temperature and two important field parameters, the field strength and distance from the surface over which it acts, on the ice nucleation process. For the six-site model, the highest temperature where we observe field-induced ice nucleation is 280 K, and for TIP4P/Ice 270 K (note that the estimated normal freezing points of the six-site and TIP4P/Ice models are ∼289 and ∼270 K, respectively). The minimum electric field strength required to nucleate ice depends a little on how far the field extends from the surface. If it extends 20 Å, then a field strength of 1.5 × 10(9) V/m is effective for both models. If the field extent is 10 Å, then stronger fields are required (2.5 × 10(9) V/m for TIP4P/Ice and 3.5 × 10(9) V/m for the six-site model). Our results demonstrate that fields of realistic strength, that act only over a narrow surface region, can effectively nucleate ice at temperatures not far below the freezing point. This further supports the possibility that local electric fields can be a significant factor influencing heterogeneous ice nucleation in physical situations. We would expect this to be especially relevant for ice nuclei with very rough surfaces where one would expect local fields of varying strength and direction.

  18. Slow wave dynamics stalls tropical tropopause ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Krämer, Martina; Borrmann, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    ' into a 'nucleation puzzle'. The 'nucleation puzzle' is currently intensely discussed and other nucleation pathways suppressing, modifying or replacing homogeneous freezing are proposed. All these approaches to explain the TTL ice nucleation are of chemical or microphysical nature. Here, we present intense model studies of ice cloud formation under dynamical conditions typical for the TTL. From direct comparison of model simulations and observations we claim that the special TTL dynamics - namely a superposition of very slow large-scale updraughts with high-frequency short waves - can produce the observed low numbers of ice crystals solely by 'classical' homogeneous freezing. References: Krämer, M., Schiller, C., Afchine, A., Bauer, R., Gensch, I., Mangold, A., Schlicht, S., Spelten, N., Ebert, V., Möhler, O., Saathoff, H., Sitnikov, N., Borrman, S., de Reus, M. and P. Spichtinger, 2009: On Cirrus Cloud Supersaturations and Ice Crystal Numbers. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 3505-3522. Peter T., Marcolli C., Spichtinger, P., Corti, T., Baker M.B., Koop, T., 2006: When dry air is too humid. Science 314 (5804), 1399-1402.

  19. Double symbolic joint entropy in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Symbolizations, the base of symbolic dynamic analysis, are classified as global static and local dynamic approaches which are combined by joint entropy in our works for nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis. Two global static methods, symbolic transformations of Wessel N. symbolic entropy and base-scale entropy, and two local ones, namely symbolizations of permutation and differential entropy, constitute four double symbolic joint entropies that have accurate complexity detections in chaotic models, logistic and Henon map series. In nonlinear dynamical analysis of different kinds of heart rate variability, heartbeats of healthy young have higher complexity than those of the healthy elderly, and congestive heart failure (CHF) patients are lowest in heartbeats' joint entropy values. Each individual symbolic entropy is improved by double symbolic joint entropy among which the combination of base-scale and differential symbolizations have best complexity analysis. Test results prove that double symbolic joint entropy is feasible in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis.

  20. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  1. Doping-enhanced dipolar dynamics in ice V as a precursor of hydrogen ordering in ice XIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, K. W.; Raidt, A.; Fuentes Landete, V.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2016-11-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy measurements are carried out in the temperature range from about 100 to 145 K on nominally pure ice V as well as on crystals doped with KOH and with HCl in order to investigate their reorientation dynamics at ambient pressure. The orientational glass transition temperature of pure ice V is detected at 123 K, in agreement with previous indications from calorimetry. KOH doped ice V displays an about 60-fold enhanced hydrogen dynamics and the dipolar relaxation induced by HCl doping is even by a factor of about 40 000 faster than that of the undoped material. The phase transition of HCl doped ice V to ice XIII is accompanied by a significant reorientational slowdown and a pronounced freeze-out of the electrical susceptibility. The results obtained near this transition are discussed in relation to other order/disorder ice pairs such as ice I/XI and ice XII/XIV.

  2. Dynamics of the Ross Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casassa, Gino; Turner, John

    1991-01-01

    The changing flow of the Ross Ice Shelf is described based on AVHRR data from 18 cloud-free images which evince flow stripes and form the data for a glaciological map. The discharge region of the valley glaciers in the Transantarctic Mountains is found to have curvilinear stripes, and the brightness contrast is enhanced to examine the feature. The map of the region also shows rifts, ridge crests, surface folds, and large-scale lineaments.

  3. Skill improvement of dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikken, Folmer; Schmeits, Maurice; Vlot, Willem; Guemas, Virginie; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2016-05-01

    We explore the error and improve the skill of the outcome from dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice reforecasts using different bias correction and ensemble calibration methods. These reforecasts consist of a five-member ensemble from 1979 to 2012 using the general circulation model EC-Earth. The raw model reforecasts show large biases in Arctic sea ice area, mainly due to a differently simulated seasonal cycle and long term trend compared to observations. This translates very quickly (1-3 months) into large biases. We find that (heteroscedastic) extended logistic regressions are viable ensemble calibration methods, as the forecast skill is improved compared to standard bias correction methods. Analysis of regional skill of Arctic sea ice shows that the Northeast Passage and the Kara and Barents Sea are most predictable. These results show the importance of reducing model error and the potential for ensemble calibration in improving skill of seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice.

  4. Antarctic Ice-Shelf Front Dynamics from ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, John W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Time variable elevation profiles from ICESat Laser Altimetry over the period 2003-2009 provide a means to quantitatively detect and track topographic features on polar ice surfaces. The results of this study provide a measure of the horizontal motion of ice-shelf fronts. We examine the time histories of elevation profiles crossing the ice fronts of the Ross, Ronne, Filchner, Riiser-Larson and Fimbul shelves. This provides a basis for estimating dynamics in two dimensions, i.e. in elevation and horizontally in the along-track direction. Ice front velocities, corrected for ground-track intersection angle, range from nearly static to 1.1 km/yr. In many examples, a decrease in elevation up to 1 m/yr near the shelf frontis also detectable. Examples of tabular calving along shelf fronts are seen in some elevation profiles and are confirmed by corresponding MODIS imagery.

  5. Uncertainties and dynamic problems of bolted joints and other fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, R. A.; Pettit, C. L.

    2005-01-01

    This review article provides an overview of the problems pertaining to structural dynamics with bolted joints. These problems are complex in nature because every joint involves different sources of uncertainty and non-smooth non-linear characteristics. For example, the contact forces are not ideally plane due to manufacturing tolerances of contact surfaces. Furthermore, the initial forces will be redistributed non-uniformly in the presence of lateral loads. This is in addition to the prying loading, which is non-linear tension in the bolt and non-linear compression in the joint. Under environmental dynamic loading, the joint preload experiences some relaxation that results in time variation of the structure's dynamic properties. Most of the reported studies focused on the energy dissipation of bolted joints, linear and non-linear identification of the dynamic properties of the joints, parameter uncertainties and relaxation, and active control of the joint preload. Design issues of fully and partially restrained joints, sensitivity analysis to variations of joint parameters, and fatigue prediction for metallic and composite joints will be discussed.

  6. Thermal Characteristics of Ice Making Plate for Dynamic Ice Harvesting Thermal Storage Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Akiyoshi; Yanadori, Michio; Sakano, Yoshitaka; Miki, Miyuki

    We experimentally examined the characteristics of a heat transfer plate during ice and chilled water making. The stainless steal heat transfer plate was developed for dynamic ice harvesting thermal storage systems. We obtained the following results:(1) The range 1.2×10-4 to 1.7×10-4m3<3/sup>/(sṡm) volume flow rate is the optimum value to obtain the maximum amount of ice during ice making. (2) The estimated history of the ice thickness, which is obtained from the accumulated latent heat, is 0.8 to 0.85 times that of the semi-theoretical value. This is because the weld lines on the heat transfer plate don't contribute ice making plate. (3) The measured surface heat transfer coefficient during chilled water making is about 1.2 times of the calculated value when the volume flow rate is up to 1.6×10-4m3/(sṡm). This is because the falling film on the heat transfer plate is uniform and the heat transfer plate surface with wave contributes to increasing the heat transfer coefficient.

  7. Hydroxyl radicals in ice: insights into local structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Codorniu-Hernández, Edelsys; Kusalik, Peter G

    2012-09-07

    The hydroxyl radical and its reactivity within ice environments are crucial to many important atmospheric reactions. The associated molecular mechanisms are largely unknown due to challenges posed by direct experimental measurements and computational studies of this transient species. Here we report insights into the local structure and behaviour of the hydroxyl radical in bulk ice through an extensive study utilizing Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Interstitial and in-lattice hydroxyl radicals in hexagonal ice were investigated at primarily 190 K. Our findings, utilizing both HCTH/120 and BLYP functionals, show that OH* can exhibit greater mobility than other ice defects (the trapping energy estimated to be only 0.09 eV). We observe the formation of a two-center three-electron hemibond structure between the hydroxyl radical and an in-lattice water molecule; while controversial, such a structure in ice may be amenable to experimental detection due to its relative stability. Our results show that interstitial water molecules can strongly influence the mobility of the hydroxyl radical in bulk ice through the displacement of the radical to an interstitial location. We also demonstrate that the H-transfer reaction from an interstitial water to the radical is a rare event in ice. Together, these results predict that the radical can be a reactive species in bulk ice, as both interstitial and in-lattice OH* can be available for reactions with other species. These microscopic insights should contribute to our understanding of the reactivity of OH* in ice and its implications to atmospheric reactions.

  8. A Dynamic Stability Criterion for Ice Shelves and Tidewater Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.; Fricker, H. A.; Minster, J.

    2006-12-01

    The collapse of the Antarctic ice shelves could have dramatic consequences for the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet and, as a result, sea level rise. It is therefore imperative to improve our knowledge of the mechanisms that lead to ice shelf retreat. The mechanism that has the potential to remove the largest amounts of mass rapidly is iceberg calving. However, the processes and mechanisms that lead to iceberg calving are still poorly understood. Motivated by the complexity of the short-time scale behavior of ice fracture we seek a dynamic stability criterion that predicts the onset of ice shelf retreat based on dimensional analysis. In our approach, rather than attempt to model the initiation and propagation of individual fractures, we look for a non-dimensional number that describes the overall ice shelf stability. We also make the assumption that the same criterion, valid for ice shelves, also applies to tidewater glaciers. This enables us to test our criterion against a larger set of ice shelves and calving glaciers. Our analysis predicts that retreat will occur when a non-dimensional number that we call the "terminus stability number", decreases below a critical value. We show that this criterion is valid for calving glaciers in Alaska, for several glaciers around Greenland as well as for three Antarctic ice shelves. This stability analysis has much in common with classic hydrodynamic stability theory, where the onset of instability is related to non-dimensional numbers that are largely independent of geometry or other situation specific variables.

  9. Dynamics of coupled ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone: Study of the mesoscale processes and of constitutive equations for sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at the modelling of mesoscale processed such as up/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A 2-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model (f-plane) through interfacial stresses. The constitutive equations of the sea ice are formulated on the basis of the Reiner-Rivlin theory. The internal ice stresses are important only at high ice concentrations (90-100%), otherwise the ice motion is essentially free drift, where the air-ice stress is balanced by the ice-water stress. The model was tested by studying the upwelling dynamics. Winds parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwilling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater that air-ocean momentum flux, and thus the Ekman transport is bigger under the ice than in the open water. The upwelling simulation was extended to include temporally varying forcing, which was chosen to vary sinusoidally with a 4 day period. This forcing resembles successive cyclone passings. In the model with a thin oceanic upper layer, ice bands were formed.

  10. Changes in Ice Flow Dynamics of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica and Impacts on Ice Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; An, L.

    2014-12-01

    Totten Glacier, East Antarctica is one of the largest glaciers in Antarctica, draining an area of 5.3*105 km2 and containing ice at an equivalent 9 m sea level rise. Lidar/radar altimetry data from 2003-2009 suggests that the glacier is thinning. Thinning is concentrated in areas of fast flow and therefore indicative of changes in ice dynamics. Here, we employ time series of ice velocity from ERS-1/2, RADARSAT-1, LANDSAT-7, ALOS PALSAR, TanDEM/TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed to measure the glacier velocity from 1996 till present. We find significant temporal changes in ice velocity, especially in 1996-2007, followed by a period of slow decrease in 2010-2013. Comparing the results with RACMO2 surface mass balance in the interior suggests that the glacier mass balance was already negative in 1996 and became more negative into the 2000s. The resulting mass loss and stretching of the ice is compatible with the 1.5 m/yr thinning detected by the radar altimeters near the grounding zone. The grounding zone of the glacier includes a vast 15 km long ice plain where the glacier is only grounded a few 10m above hydrostatic equilibrium. We detect a retreat of the region of partial floatation with time, but not solid migration of the grounding line of the glacier. Inverted bathymetry results from gravity data collected offshore suggest the presence of a paleo subglacial channel conducive to the transfer of surface ocean heat, likely diluted circumpolar deep water, whose transfer to the ice shelf cavity may have affected the glacier stability. We suggest that further transfer of ocean heat to the ice shelf could trigger a rapid glacier retreat in this region.

  11. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  12. Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsen, Christian H.; Memmott, Jeramie; Stewart, Frank J.

    2008-09-01

    The geographic remoteness, the lack of remote sensing capabilities, and the lack of appropriate environmental sensors make the detection of seasonal trends or inter-annual variations in sea-ice microbial biomass or production processes within the pack ice of the Antarctic extremely rare. The evaluation of their inter-annual variability in the context of ice dynamics and trends in regional climate has not been possible. During the late winters of 2001 (July-August) and 2002 (August-September) we assessed sea-ice dynamics, sea-ice characteristics, and biomass of sea-ice microbiota along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. These two winters were marked by large contrasts in the dates of initial ice formation (late June in 2001 and April in 2002), which resulted in differences in the physical pack-ice characteristics. Chlorophyll a (chl a) content in ice cores differed between the study years, with 2002 having 10-fold higher chl a content. The difference in ice-core chl a content is best explained by the timing of ice formation that leads to less phytoplankton scavenging from the water column and a lack of transfer of solar energy into the pack-ice ecosystem. Such a tractable atmosphere ocean-ice-biota coupling may help in evaluating underlying processes responsible for long-term trends in recruitment cycles of upper trophic levels as well as future projections on the response of the Antarctic marine ecosystems to variability in local climate.

  13. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F; van der Veen, Cornelis J; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Simonsen, Sebastian B; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H

    2014-12-30

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993-2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt ⋅ y(-1), equivalent to 0.68 mm ⋅ y(-1) sea level rise (SLR) for 2003-2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004-2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland's outlet glaciers.

  14. Changes in ice dynamics along the northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehaus, Thorsten; Marinsek, Sebastian; Cook, Alison; Van Wessem, Jan-Melchior; Braun, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The climatic conditions along the Antarctic Peninsula have undergone considerable changes during the last 50 years. A period of pronounced air temperature rise, increasing ocean temperatures as well as changes in the precipitation pattern have been reported by various authors. Consequently, the glacial systems showed changes including widespread retreat, surface lowering as well as variations in flow speeds. During the last decades numerous ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula retreated, started to break-up or disintegrated completely. The loss of the buttressing effect caused tributary glaciers to accelerate with increasing ice discharge along the Antarctic Peninsula. Quantification of the mass changes is still subject to considerable errors although numbers derived from the different methods are converging. The aim is to study the reaction of glaciers at the northern Antarctic Peninsula to the changing climatic conditions and the readjustments of tributary glaciers to ice shelf disintegration, as well as to better quantify the ice mass loss and its temporal changes. We analysed time series of various satellite sensors (ERS-1/2 SAR, ENVISAT ASAR, RADARSAT-1, ALOS PALSAR, TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X, ASTER, Landsat) to detect changes in ice dynamics of 74 glacier basins along the northern Antarctic Peninsula (<65°). Intensity feature tracking techniques were applied on data stacks from different SAR satellites over the last 20 years to infer temporal trends in glacier surface velocities. In combination with ice thickness reconstructions and modeled climatic mass balance fields regional imbalances were calculated. Variations in ice front position were mapped based on optical and SAR satellite data sets. Along the west coast of the northern Antarctic Peninsula an increase in flow speeds by 40% between 1992 and 2014 was observed, whereas glaciers on the east side (north of former Prince-Gustav Ice Shelf) showed a strong deceleration. Nearly all former ice shelf

  15. Feedbacks between ice and ocean dynamics at the West Antarctic Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf in future global warming scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeller, Sebastian; Timmermann, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    The ice flow at the margins of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is moderated by large ice shelves. Their buttressing effect substantially controls the mass balance of the WAIS and thus its contribution to sea level rise. The stability of these ice shelves results from the balance of mass gain by accumulation and ice flow from the adjacent ice sheet and mass loss by calving and basal melting due to the ocean heat flux. Recent results of ocean circulation models indicate that warm circumpolar water of the Southern Ocean may override the submarine slope front of the Antarctic Continent and boost basal ice shelf melting. In particular, ocean simulations for several of the IPCC's future climate scenarios demonstrate the redirection of a warm coastal current into the Filchner Trough and underneath the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf within the next decades. In this study, we couple the finite elements ocean circulation model FESOM and the three-dimensional thermomechanical ice flow model RIMBAY to investigate the complex interactions between ocean and ice dynamics at the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. We focus on the impact of a changing ice shelf cavity on ocean dynamics as well as the feedback of the resulting sub-shelf melting rates on the ice shelf geometry and implications for the dynamics of the adjacent marine-based Westantarctic Ice Sheet. Our simulations reveal the high sensitivity of grounding line migration to ice-ocean interactions within the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and emphasize the importance of coupled model studies for realistic assessments of the Antarctic mass balance in future global warming scenarios.

  16. Framework for Control of Dynamic Ice Breakup by River Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    and if ration. Other important characteristics of these wave formation occurs upstream or in a tribu - waves are significant stage increase, short dura...stage must occur to produce the high forces cut River danis for a controlled ice lireakup experi- needed for a dynamic breakup, and very high 1e1it

  17. Dynamics of ice drop explosions in supercooled clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Wildeman, Sander; Sterl, Sebastian; Sun, Chao

    2016-11-01

    The rate at which ice particles are produced in the cold top of natural clouds is crucial in predicting whether a cloud will finally develop precipitation. It has been speculated that ice particles could multiply through freezing and subsequent bursting of supercooled cloud droplets. Here we present high-speed footage of cracking and explosive bursting of spherical water droplets that freeze radially inwards under carefully controlled conditions. We model the processes of freezing, the stress build up in the ice shell, and the fast dynamics following the crack formation. This allows us to predict the time it takes for a freezing droplet to explode and the energy released in this event as a function of the size of the droplet and the temperature of the surroundings. Both predictions are in good agreement with our experiments. The models also predict a minimum droplet radius of approximately 50 μm below which ice explosions are unlikely to occur. This finding has direct consequences in the modeling of cloud microphysics, as the droplet sizes in clouds generally fall in this critical range. Furthermore, we identify several mechanisms, besides the final explosion, by which a freezing drop can shed ice particles. This is important for the formation of ice nucleation avalanches.

  18. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications.

  19. The glaciology of IRD events: warming and ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Heinrich events, the enormous glacial-period ice-rafting episodeshave been posited to be due to large-scale surges of the Laurentide ice-sheet (3). However, more frequent events such as the Bond events are difficult to explain this way. Recently acquired geological evidence (2,4) suggests that climatic perturbations are correlated with some N. Atlantic IRD events. A model (1) which show how climate perturbations can lead to IRD events is reviewed. The model shows how 20-50km retreats induced by ablation rates of 2 m/yr provide sufficient debris flux through the grounding line to produce large sedimentation events. Such ablation would reduce ice-shelf extent markedly, permitting debris to reach the calving front and be transported by icebergs leading to ice-rafted debris (IRD) events. Surges are not necessary conditions for the production of large IRD events. The glacial dynamics of this climate perturbation model is compared with the surge theory, with particular emphasis on the amount of sediment that either method can deliver to the oceans. Consideration of the non-exclusivety and consistency of the two mechanisms is emphasised. (1) R.C.A. Hindmarsh and A. Jenkins, Centurial-millenial ice-rafted debris pulses from ablating marine ice sheets, Geophys Res. Lett 22(12), 2477-2480, 2001; (2) Paul C. Knutz et al. G3 Multidecadal ocean variability and NW European ice sheet surges during the last deglaciation G3 3(12) 17 December 2002 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000351; (3) MacAyeal,D.R. Binge/purge oscillations of the Laurentide ice-sheet as a cause of the North-Atlantic's Heinrich events, Paleoceanography, 8(6), p.775-784, (1993); (4) M. Moros, et. al. Were glacial iceberg surges in the North Atlantic triggered by climatic warming?, Marine Geology, 192(4), 2002, p.393-417

  20. Wrist rhythm during wrist joint motion evaluated by dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tada, Kaoru; Suganuma, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that wrist joint motion involves a "wrist rhythm" similar to the scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, we used a flat-panel detector to evaluate the ratio of radiolunate and capitolunate joint motions during wrist joint motion by dynamic radiography. The subjects were 20 healthy men. Dynamic imaging of the wrist joint was performed during active exercise for a total of ten seconds. In this study, we defined the radiocarpal (RL angle) and midcarpal joint angle (CL angle) as the wrist joint angle in the obtained images and measured the variation of these angles. The average curve was plotted and regression lines calculated from the average curve. The ratio was calculated from the slopes of the regression lines of the RL CL angles. These findings indicated that the ratio of the RL and CL angle motions was approximately 1:4 during palmar flexion and approximately 2:1 during dorsiflexion.

  1. Tunable nonequilibrium dynamics of field quenches in spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Mostame, Sarah; Castelnovo, Claudio; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji L.

    2014-01-01

    We present nonequilibrium physics in spin ice as a unique setting that combines kinematic constraints, emergent topological defects, and magnetic long-range Coulomb interactions. In spin ice, magnetic frustration leads to highly degenerate yet locally constrained ground states. Together, they form a highly unusual magnetic state—a “Coulomb phase”—whose excitations are point-like defects—magnetic monopoles—in the absence of which effectively no dynamics is possible. Hence, when they are sparse at low temperature, dynamics becomes very sluggish. When quenching the system from a monopole-rich to a monopole-poor state, a wealth of dynamical phenomena occur, the exposition of which is the subject of this article. Most notably, we find reaction diffusion behavior, slow dynamics owing to kinematic constraints, as well as a regime corresponding to the deposition of interacting dimers on a honeycomb lattice. We also identify potential avenues for detecting the magnetic monopoles in a regime of slow-moving monopoles. The interest in this model system is further enhanced by its large degree of tunability and the ease of probing it in experiment: With varying magnetic fields at different temperatures, geometric properties—including even the effective dimensionality of the system—can be varied. By monitoring magnetization, spin correlations or zero-field NMR, the dynamical properties of the system can be extracted in considerable detail. This establishes spin ice as a laboratory of choice for the study of tunable, slow dynamics. PMID:24379372

  2. Tunable nonequilibrium dynamics of field quenches in spin ice.

    PubMed

    Mostame, Sarah; Castelnovo, Claudio; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji L

    2014-01-14

    We present nonequilibrium physics in spin ice as a unique setting that combines kinematic constraints, emergent topological defects, and magnetic long-range Coulomb interactions. In spin ice, magnetic frustration leads to highly degenerate yet locally constrained ground states. Together, they form a highly unusual magnetic state--a "Coulomb phase"--whose excitations are point-like defects--magnetic monopoles--in the absence of which effectively no dynamics is possible. Hence, when they are sparse at low temperature, dynamics becomes very sluggish. When quenching the system from a monopole-rich to a monopole-poor state, a wealth of dynamical phenomena occur, the exposition of which is the subject of this article. Most notably, we find reaction diffusion behavior, slow dynamics owing to kinematic constraints, as well as a regime corresponding to the deposition of interacting dimers on a honeycomb lattice. We also identify potential avenues for detecting the magnetic monopoles in a regime of slow-moving monopoles. The interest in this model system is further enhanced by its large degree of tunability and the ease of probing it in experiment: With varying magnetic fields at different temperatures, geometric properties--including even the effective dimensionality of the system--can be varied. By monitoring magnetization, spin correlations or zero-field NMR, the dynamical properties of the system can be extracted in considerable detail. This establishes spin ice as a laboratory of choice for the study of tunable, slow dynamics.

  3. Airborne radar evidence for tributary flow switching in Institute Ice Stream, West Antarctica: Implications for ice sheet configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Kate; Woodward, John; Ross, Neil; Dunning, Stuart A.; Bingham, Robert G.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of ice streaming to the evaluation of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) stability we know little about mid- to long-term dynamic changes within the Institute Ice Stream (IIS) catchment. Here we use airborne radio echo sounding to investigate the subglacial topography, internal stratigraphy, and Holocene flow regime of the upper IIS catchment near the Ellsworth Mountains. Internal layer buckling within three discrete, topographically confined tributaries, through Ellsworth, Independence, and Horseshoe Valley Troughs, provides evidence for former enhanced ice sheet flow. We suggest that enhanced ice flow through Independence and Ellsworth Troughs, during the mid-Holocene to late Holocene, was the source of ice streaming over the region now occupied by the slow-flowing Bungenstock Ice Rise. Although buckled layers also exist within the slow-flowing ice of Horseshoe Valley Trough, a thicker sequence of surface-conformable layers in the upper ice column suggests slowdown more than ~4000 years ago, so we do not attribute enhanced flow switch-off here, to the late Holocene ice-flow reorganization. Intensely buckled englacial layers within Horseshoe Valley and Independence Troughs cannot be accounted for under present-day flow speeds. The dynamic nature of ice flow in IIS and its tributaries suggests that recent ice stream switching and mass changes in the Siple Coast and Amundsen Sea sectors are not unique to these sectors, that they may have been regular during the Holocene and may characterize the decline of the WAIS.

  4. Mertz Ice Shelf Dynamics in the Last Twenty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cheng, X.; Shum, C.

    2013-12-01

    . These parameters extracted from remote sensing and altimetry data will provide additional information for studies of the evolution of iceberg, especially in iceberg tracking system. Mertz Ice Shelf Dynamics in the last 20 years

  5. Dynamic dependence to domain wall propagation through artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2017-03-01

    Domain wall propagation dynamics has been studied in nanostructured artificial kagome spin-ice structures. A stripline circuit has been used to provide localized pulsed magnetic fields within the artificial spin-ice (ASI) structure. This provides control of the system through electrically assisted domain wall nucleation events. Synchronization of the pulsed fields with additional global magnetic fields and the use of a focused magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer allows our experiments to probe the domain wall transit through an extended ASI structure. We find that the propagation distance depends on the driving field revealing field-driven properties of domain walls below their intrinsic nucleation field.

  6. Kinematic Model of River Ice Motion During Dynamic Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    Texas: Gulf Publish- nal of Computational Physics, 101: 130-139. ing Co. Shen, H.T. and Y.C. Chen (1992) Lagrangian discrete Calkins , DJ. (1978...OTIC9 ~jjELECTE0 lV 919 3 AD-A273 141 * Kinematic Model of River Ice Motion During Dynamic Breakup Michael G . Ferrick, Patricia B. Weyrick and David...Bottom) Looking across the river during brash ice motion at about 1 m /s. (Photos by M . Ferrick.) For conversion of SI metric units to U.S./British

  7. Dynamic Control of Topological Defects in Artificial Colloidal Ice

    DOE PAGES

    Libál, A.; Nisoli, C.; Reichhardt, C.; ...

    2017-04-05

    We demonstrate the use of an external field to stabilize and control defect lines connecting topological monopoles in spin ice. For definiteness we perform Brownian dynamics simulations with realistic units mimicking experimentally realized artificial colloidal spin ice systems, and show how defect lines can grow, shrink or move under the action of direct and alternating fields. Asymmetric alternating biasing forces can cause the defect line to ratchet in either direction, making it possible to precisely position the line at a desired location. Such manipulation could be employed to achieve mobile information storage in these metamaterials.

  8. The effects of subglacial volcanism on ice dynamics near the onset of the Siple Coast Ice Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, Nicholas; Christianson, Knut; Conway, Howard; Jacobel, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We examine englacial structures, reflection amplitudes, and subglacial topography imaged by ice-penetrating radar near the onset of Bindschadler and Kamb Ice Streams along the Siple Coast. These data reveal the detailed geometry of Mt. Resnik, a subglacial mountain thought to have formed through subaerial volcanism, and its influence on ice flow. Due to Mt. Resnik's position near the onset of Bindschadler and Kamb Ice Streams, localized, but significant basal melt here could play a role in the initiation of streaming ice flow in this region through its effects on the subglacial water system. This region straddles the subglacial hydrological catchment boundary between Kamb, and Bindschadler Ice Streams. Although the water sourced from the Mt. Resnik region currently flows toward Kamb Ice Stream, we show that subtle changes in surface elevation, like those associated with the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream and the ongoing deceleration of Whillans Ice Stream, may be shifting water flow farther east, towards the Bindschadler Ice Stream catchment. Thus, water sourced from Mt. Resnik may play a role in reinforcing ice-dynamic feedbacks that result in ice-stream stagnation and reactivation cycles. Here we use englacial structures imaged by ice-penetrating radar to assess Mt. Resnik's effect on local surface topography, which in turn affects subglacial hydropotential, and basal melt rate. We interpret a cross-cutting englacial reflector as an angular unconformity that results from enhanced wind erosion as ice flows over the top of this mountain, indicating that the mountain has a local effect on ice thickness and thus also basal water routing. We also identify a prominent internal layer downwarp over an area of locally elevated basal reflectivity. This downwarp is probably the result of local melting at the base of the ice sheet, and provides a constraint for simple ice flow models that can be used to infer the basal melt rate and water production associated with this

  9. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  10. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  11. An elastic-viscous-plastic model for sea ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunke, E.C.; Dukowicz, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    The standard model for sea ice dynamics treats the ice pack as a viscous-plastic material that flows plastically under typical stress conditions but behaves as a linear viscous fluid where strain rates are small and the ice becomes nearly rigid. Because of large viscosities in these regions, implicit numerical methods are necessary for timesteps larger than a few seconds. Current solution methods for these equations use iterative relaxation methods, which are time consuming, scale poorly with mesh resolution, and are not well adapted to parallel computation. To remedy this, we have developed and tested two separate methods. First, by demonstrating that the viscous-plastic rheology can be represented by a symmetric, negative definite matrix operator, we have implemented the faster and better behaved preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Second, realizing that only the response of the ice on time scales associated with wind forcing need be accurately resolved, we have modified the model to reduce to the viscous-plastic model at these time scales; at shorter time scales the adjustment process takes place by a numerically efficient elastic wave mechanism. This modification leads to a fully explicit numerical scheme which further improves the computational efficiency and is an advantage for implementations on parallel machines. Furthermore, we observe that the standard viscous-plastic model has poor dynamic response to forcing on a daily time scale, given the standard time step (1 day) used by the ice modeling community. In contrast, the explicit discretization of the elastic wave mechanism allows the elastic-viscous-plastic model to capture the ice response to variations in the imposed stress more accurately. Thus, the elastic-viscous-plastic model provides more accurate results for shorter time scales associated with physical forcing, reproduces viscous-plastic model behavior on longer time scales, and is computationally more efficient. 49 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Hydrocarbon production concepts for dynamic annual sea ice regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A.T.; Poplin, J.P.; Heure, C.E.

    1995-02-01

    Petroleum production from Russian seas such as the northern Timan-Pechora Basin (Pechora Sea) and the northeastern Sakhalin island Shelf (Sea of Okhotsk) is likely to occur in the near future. Several different types of offshore structures may be needed in the Russian arctic offshore to support development activities. These structures may include: a number of production structures for offshore fields, subsea pipelines, a regional tanker terminal, and ice-breaking tankers. Dynamic first-year sea ice will be a major design consideration for offshore structures considered for use in these areas. Exxon previously performed engineering studies for petroleum development in Norton Sound off the west coast of Alaska. Norton Sound is also an area of dynamic first-year sea ice, so many of the lessons learned and much of the technology developed for that region are considered to be applicable to the Pechora Sea and the Sakhalin Shelf. Several of the concepts for production structures, pipelines, terminals, and tankers are presented along with a discussion of the related ice technology. Field and laboratory studies undertaken to collect environmental data are described along with a probabilistic load calculation procedure for structure design. More recent work by Exxon to enhance technology since the Norton Sound studies is also presented along with a discussion of recommended future work activities.

  13. Investigation of Controls on Ice Dynamics in Northeast Greenland from Ice-Thickness Change Record Using Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, B. M.; Larour, E. Y.; Schenk, A. F.; Schlegel, N.; Duncan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, complete ice thickness change reconstruction of the NE sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet for 1978-2014, partitioned into changes due to surface processes and ice dynamics. Elevation changes are computed from all available stereoscopic DEMs, and laser altimetry data (ICESat, ATM, LVIS). Surface Mass Balance and firn-compaction estimates are from RACMO2.3. Originating nearly at the divide of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), the dynamically active North East Ice Stream (NEGIS) is capable of rapidly transmitting ice-marginal forcing far inland. Thus, NEGIS provides a possible mechanism for a rapid drawdown of ice from the ice sheet interior as marginal warming, thinning and retreat continues. Our altimetry record shows accelerating dynamic thinning of Zachariæ Isstrom, initially limited to the deepest part of the fjord near the calving front (1978-2000) and then extending at least 75 km inland. At the same time, changes over the Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden (N79) Glacier are negligible. We also detect localized large dynamic changes at higher elevations on the ice sheet. These thickness changes, often occurring at the onset of fast flow, could indicate rapid variations of basal lubrication due to rerouting of subglacial drainage. We investigate the possible causes of the observed spatiotemporal pattern of ice sheet elevation changes using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). This work build on our previous studies examining the sensitivity of ice flow within the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS) to key fields, including ice viscosity, basal drag. We assimilate the new altimetry record into ISSM to improve the reconstruction of basal friction and ice viscosity. Finally, airborne geophysical (gravity, magnetic) and ice-penetrating radar data is examined to identify the potential geologic controls on the ice thickness change pattern. Our study provides the first comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness changes for the entire NEGIS drainage basin during

  14. Dynamics analysis of space robot manipulator with joint clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Bai, Zheng Feng

    2011-04-01

    A computational methodology for analysis of space robot manipulator systems, considering the effects of the clearances in the joint, is presented. The contact dynamics model in joint clearance is established using the nonlinear equivalent spring-damp model and the friction effect is considered using the Coulomb friction model. The space robot system dynamic equation of manipulator with clearance is established. Then the dynamics simulation is presented and the dynamics characteristics of robot manipulator with clearance are analyzed. This work provides a practical method to analyze the dynamics characteristics of space robot manipulator with joint clearance and improves the engineering application. The computational methodology can predict the effects of clearance on space robot manipulator preferably, which is the basis of space robot manipulator design, precision analysis and ground test.

  15. EBSD observations of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude; Tommasi, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) strongly affects the evolution of microstructure (grain size and shape) and texture (crystal preferred orientation) in materials during deformation at high temperature. Since texturing leads to anisotropic physical properties, predicting the effect of DRX in metals is essential for industrial applications, in rocks for interpreting geophysical data and modeling geodynamic flows, or in ice for predicting ice sheet flow and climate evolution. Owing to its high viscoplastic anisotropy, ice has long been considered as a "model material". This happens to be particularly true in the case of the understanding of the fundamental of DRX mechanisms as they occur under a relatively easily controlled environment. Creep compression experiments were performed on polycrystalline ice samples in the laboratory in order to observe the evolution of the fabrics and microstructures during DRX. During the tests, performed at temperatures of -5°C and -7°C, under 0.8 MPa compressive stress, dynamic recrystallization was initiated after 1% macroscopic strain and could be followed up to 18% strain on separated samples. Fabrics and microstructures were analysed post-mortem using an Automatic Ice Texture Analyser (AITA, Russell-Head and Wilson 2001) and EBSD measurements with the Crystal Probe of Géosciences Montpellier. Both techniques enable high resolution observations, both in space and orientation (5 to 50 microns, EBSD: 0.7° - AITA: 3°), which is new for DRX observations in ice. While AITA provides only the c-axis orientations, EBSD provides full orientations (c- and a-axes). In particular, we could access to an estimate of a relative dislocation density (from the Nye tensor obtained with EBSD) and its evolution with strain. Fabric evolution with strain is very similar to what was measured by Jacka and Maccagnan (1984) with a strong strengthening toward a few maxima for c- and a-axes. The c-axes maxima are oriented about 30° from the compression

  16. Modeling the tidal ice drift and ice-induced changes in tidal dynamics on the Siberian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, B. A.; Romanenkov, D. A.; Sofina, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    The tidal ice drift is treated as an element of the three-dimensional tidal dynamics in a sea covered by ice. This dynamics is described by the QUODDY-4 finite-element model, and the tidal ice drift is described by a continuous viscous-elastic approximation. We present the results of modeling not only the tidal ice drift ( M 2 wave) (its velocity, direction, and tidal variations in the concentration and pressure of ice compression) but also ice-induced changes in tidal dynamics and the residual tidal ice drift. The modeling results indicate that the maximum velocity of tidal ice drift, which is determined by a combination of various factors responsible for ice evolution and primarily by the horizontal gradient of the level and local tidal velocity, can be higher or lower than the velocity of the surface tidal current in the ice-free sea. This depends on the sign of deviations of tidal sea level elevations in the sea covered by ice from their values in the ice-free sea. In addition, it has been found that ice cover has a stronger effect on the energetics of tides than on their dynamics: the area-mean relative deviations constitute 1.5% for the density of the total tidal energy, 61.5% for the dissipation, 0.1% for the amplitudes of tidal sea level elevations, and 0.9% for the amplitudes of maximum barotropic tidal velocity. In this sense, the conclusion that the role of sea ice is insignificant in the formation of tides can be justified only partially. The main results of this paper are as follows: (1) the development of a module for tidal ice drift, (2) the inclusion of this module into the three-dimensional finite-element hydrothermodynamic model QUODDY-4 to extend its capabilities, and (3) the reproduction (on the basis of the modified model) of qualitative features of the practically important tidal ice drift and ice-induced changes in the tidal dynamics of marginal seas on the Siberian continental shelf.

  17. Insights into the Dynamic Response of Tunnels in Jointed Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E

    2004-11-01

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of pulse shape for a given displacement, and the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rock under dynamic loading.

  18. Dynamic hip joint stiffness in individuals with total hip arthroplasty: relationships between hip impairments and dynamics of the other joints.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Oda, Shingo; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about hip joint stiffness during walking (dynamic joint stiffness) and the effect of hip impairments on biomechanical alterations of other joints in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Twenty-four patients (mean age 61.7 years) who underwent unilateral (n=12) or bilateral total hip arthroplasty (n=12) and healthy subjects (n=12) were recruited. In addition to kinematic and kinetic variables, dynamic hip joint stiffness which was calculated as an angular coefficient of linear regression of the plot of the hip flexion moment vs. hip extension angle during the late stance of gait, was measured. Group differences were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, and relationships between primary hip impairments and secondary gait impairments were found using partial correlation coefficients adjusted for gait speed and stride length. Dynamic hip joint stiffness was 47% higher on the side with the more pronounced limp in patients with bilateral arthroplasty than in healthy controls. In the same patients, increased dynamic hip joint stiffness was significantly associated especially with increased ankle plantarflexion moment on the ipsilateral side. In patients with unilateral arthroplasty, decreased hip power was significantly related to increased ankle plantarflexor power, only on the non-operated side. We found that dynamic hip joint stiffness was an important factor in assessing relationships between hip impairments and dynamics in other joints, especially in patients with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The effects of altering hip joint stiffness on gait biomechanics need to be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Csatho, Beata M.; Schenk, Anton F.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Simonsen, Sebastian B.; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993–2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt⋅y−1, equivalent to 0.68 mm⋅y−1 sea level rise (SLR) for 2003–2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004–2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland’s outlet glaciers. PMID:25512537

  20. Modelling last glacial cycle ice dynamics in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Jouvet, Guillaume; Huss, Matthias; Funk, Martin; Preusser, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The European Alps, cradle of pioneer glacial studies, are one of the regions where geological markers of past glaciations are most abundant and well-studied. Such conditions make the region ideal for testing numerical glacier models based on approximated ice flow physics against field-based reconstructions, and vice-versa. Here, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to model the entire last glacial cycle (120-0 ka) in the Alps, with a horizontal resolution of 1 km. Climate forcing is derived using present-day climate data from WorldClim and the ERA-Interim reanalysis, and time-dependent temperature offsets from multiple paleo-climate proxies, among which only the EPICA ice core record yields glacial extent during marine oxygen isotope stages 4 (69-62 ka) and 2 (34-18 ka) in agreement to geological reconstructions. Despite the low variability of this Antarctic-based climate forcing, our simulation depicts a highly dynamic ice cap, showing that alpine glaciers may have advanced many times over the foreland during the last glacial cycle. Cumulative basal sliding, a proxy for glacial erosion, is modelled to be highest in the deep valleys of the western Alps. Finally, the Last Glacial Maximum advance, often considered synchronous, is here modelled as a time-transgressive event, with some glacier lobes reaching their maximum as early as 27 ka, and some as late as 21 ka. Modelled ice thickness is about 900 m higher than observed trimline elevations, yet our simulation predicts little erosion at high elevation due to cold ice conditions.

  1. A new approach to estimate ice dynamic rates using satellite observations in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenberg, Bianca; Tregoning, Paul; Fabian Hoffmann, Janosch; Hawkins, Rhys; Purcell, Anthony; Allgeyer, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    Mass balance changes of the Antarctic ice sheet are of significant interest due to its sensitivity to climatic changes and its contribution to changes in global sea level. While regional climate models successfully estimate mass input due to snowfall, it remains difficult to estimate the amount of mass loss due to ice dynamic processes. It has often been assumed that changes in ice dynamic rates only need to be considered when assessing long-term ice sheet mass balance; however, 2 decades of satellite altimetry observations reveal that the Antarctic ice sheet changes unexpectedly and much more dynamically than previously expected. Despite available estimates on ice dynamic rates obtained from radar altimetry, information about ice sheet changes due to changes in the ice dynamics are still limited, especially in East Antarctica. Without understanding ice dynamic rates, it is not possible to properly assess changes in ice sheet mass balance and surface elevation or to develop ice sheet models. In this study we investigate the possibility of estimating ice sheet changes due to ice dynamic rates by removing modelled rates of surface mass balance, firn compaction, and bedrock uplift from satellite altimetry and gravity observations. With similar rates of ice discharge acquired from two different satellite missions we show that it is possible to obtain an approximation of the rate of change due to ice dynamics by combining altimetry and gravity observations. Thus, surface elevation changes due to surface mass balance, firn compaction, and ice dynamic rates can be modelled and correlated with observed elevation changes from satellite altimetry.

  2. 3D joint dynamics analysis of healthy children's gait.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Desroches, Guillaume; Cheze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2009-11-13

    The 3D joint moments and 2D joint powers have been largely explored in the literature of healthy children's gait, in particular to compare them with pathologic subjects' gait. However, no study reported on 3D joint power in children which could be due to the difficulties in interpreting the results. Recently, the analysis of the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity vectors has been proposed in order to help 3D joint power interpretation. Our hypothesis is that this 3D angle may help in characterizing the level of gait maturation. The present study explores 3D joint moments, 3D joint power and the proposed 3D angle for both children's and adults' gaits to highlight differences in the strategies used. The results seem to confirm that children have an alternative strategy of mainly ankle stabilization and hip propulsion compared to the adults' strategy of mainly ankle resistance and propulsion and hip stabilization. In the future, the same 3D angle analysis should be applied to different age groups for better describing the evolution of the 3D joint dynamic strategies during the growth.

  3. Modeling ice front Dynamics of Greenland outlet glaciers using ISSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlighem, M.; Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H. L.; Rignot, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The recent increase in the rate of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet is primarily due to the acceleration and thinning of outlet glaciers along the coast. This acceleration is a dynamic response to the retreat of calving fronts, which leads to a loss in resistive stresses. These processes need to be included in ice sheet models in order to be able to accurately reproduce current trends in mass loss, and in the long term reduce the uncertainty in the contribution of ice sheets to sea level rise. Today, the vast majority of ice sheet models that include moving boundaries are one dimensional flow line and vertical flow band models, that are not adapted to the complex geometries of Greenland outlet glaciers, as they do not accurately capture changes in lateral stresses. Here, we use the level set method to track moving boundaries within a 2D plane view model of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), and investigate the sensitivity of Store Glacier, in western Greenland, to the amount of melting occurring at its calving front. We explore different calving laws and obtain the best results with a new simple calving law adapted from von Mises yield criterion. We show that the ocean circulation near the front and the amount of runoff are able to trigger ice front advance and retreat depending on the amount of melting that they produce at the calving face, but the bed topography controls the stable positions of the ice front. The modeled calving front of Store Glacier, for which we have quality bed topography and sea floor bathymetry data, is particularly stable because of the presence of a large sill at the glacier terminus. If the ice front detaches from this stabilizing sill due to larger amounts of melting at the front or due to large calving events, the glacier front starts to retreat as the bed deepens inland, until it finds another stabilizing feature in the bed topography. The new bed topography maps based on mass conservation make it possible to model more

  4. Ice crystal growth in a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Ice crystals were grown in a supersaturated environment produced by a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, which employed two horizontal plates separated by a distance of 2.5 cm. Air was circulated between and along the 1.2 m length of the plates past ice crystals which nucleated and grew from a fiber suspended vertically between the two plates. A zoom stereo microscope with a magnification which ranged from 3X to 80X and both 35 mm still photographs and 16 mm time lapse cine films taken through the microscope were used to study the variation of the shape and linear growth rate of ice crystals as a function of the ambient temperature, the ambient supersaturation, and the forced ventilation velocity. The ambient growth conditions were varied over the range of temperature 0 to -40 C, over the range of supersaturation 4% to 50% with respect to ice, and over the range of forced ventilation velocities 0 cm/s to 20 cm/s.

  5. The role of sea ice dynamics in global climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibler, William D., III

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: general characteristics of sea ice drift; sea ice rheology; ice thickness distribution; sea ice thermodynamic models; equilibrium thermodynamic models; effect of internal brine pockets and snow cover; model simulations of Arctic Sea ice; and sensitivity of sea ice models to climate change.

  6. Dynamic Inland Propagation of Thinning Due to Ice Loss at the Margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei Li; Li, Jun J.; Zwally, H. Jay

    2012-01-01

    Mass-balance analysis of the Greenland ice sheet based on surface elevation changes observed by the European Remote-sensing Satellite (ERS) (1992-2002) and Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (2003-07) indicates that the strongly increased mass loss at lower elevations (<2000 m) of the ice sheet, as observed during 2003-07, appears to induce interior ice thinning at higher elevations. In this paper, we perform a perturbation experiment with a three-dimensional anisotropic ice-flow model (AIF model) to investigate this upstream propagation. Observed thinning rates in the regions below 2000m elevation are used as perturbation inputs. The model runs with perturbation for 10 years show that the extensive mass loss at the ice-sheet margins does in fact cause interior thinning on short timescales (i.e. decadal). The modeled pattern of thinning over the ice sheet agrees with the observations, which implies that the strong mass loss since the early 2000s at low elevations has had a dynamic impact on the entire ice sheet. The modeling results also suggest that even if the large mass loss at the margins stopped, the interior ice sheet would continue thinning for 300 years and would take thousands of years for full dynamic recovery.

  7. Tectonics and ice sheet dynamics of West Antarctic margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    An understanding of the glacial history of the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) and Pine Island Bay (PIB) is essential for proposing models on the future development of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. This requires an understanding of the tectonic history and knowledge of tectonic features such as lineaments, ridges, sills and basins, because basement morphology and inherited erosional features control the flow direction of ice-sheets and the influx of Circum-Polar Deep Water (CDW). This is an attempt to reconstruct the tectonic history with the aim to search for basement features and crustal boundaries which may be correlated to the flow and dynamics of the ice-sheet. The Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica is in a prominent location for a series of tectonic and magmatic events from Paleozoic to Cenozoic times. Seismic, magnetic and gravity data from the embayment and PIB reveal the crustal thickness and significant tectonic features. NE-SW trending magnetic and gravity anomalies and the thin crust indicate a former rift zone which was active during or in the run-up to the breakup process between Chatham Rise and West Antarctica before or at 90 Ma. NW-SE trending gravity and magnetic anomalies, following a prolongation of Peacock Sound, indicate the extensional southern boundary to the Bellingshausen Plate which was active between 79 and 61 Ma. It is likely that the prominent Pine Island Trough follows a structural boundary between the crustal blocks of Ellsworth Land and Marie Byrd Land. Data are shown from the ASE and PIB which can be interpreted in context with the reconstruction of the ice advance and retreat history in this area. Differences in the behaviour of the ice-sheet are shown to exist for the western and eastern parts of PIB due to basement structures affecting the inflow of CDW.

  8. Similar Sea Ice Behavior Dynamics on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P.; Ackley, S. F.; Xie, H.

    2007-12-01

    Sea ice formation on Mars was postulated by Murray et al 2005, based partially on images showing analogous structures to those reported for the Earth's Polar Regions. Further examination of additional high-resolution imagery from HRSC and HiRise have shown features that resemble sea ice pressure ridges and pile-ups that also have been observed in the Earth's sea ice cover. Ridging features with linear, sinuous, and rectilinear characteristics examined, border darker boundaries that are suggested to be older material. Side-by-side comparisons of Earth and Mars image pairs have indicated highly similar structures in both sets of imagery. From these, we have also made characteristic measurements on for example, the lengths and widths of rafting thrust structures, the "wavelengths" of sinuous ridges, and floe sizes. From these statistics of characteristic structures, we suggest strong similarities in the apparent material behavior on the two planets. Particularly important and more characteristic of sea ice than other materials is that small temperature changes in the material near the melting point (<-5 C) cause large phase changes that result in the highly dynamic transition from ductile to brittle behavior. The ridging comparisons indicate that although the measurements differ, these features require the same two-phase processes of ductile to brittle behavior to form these features. Pile-up features for both planets were evaluated by determining the ratio of the pile-up area to the cleared area to give an indication of the pile-up height. A discrete element pile-up simulation model conducted by Hopkins et al., 1999, proposes that although similar mechanisms are attributed to creating these pile-up features, lower gravity and normal force affect the potential energy, which is proportional to the increased pile-up height on Mars. This unique behavior on both planets provides further evidence that sea ice formed on Mars in an earlier epoch.

  9. Results of the US contribution to the joint US/USSR Bering Sea experiment. [atmospheric circulation and sea ice cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Chang, T. C.; Fowler, M. G.; Gloersen, P.; Kuhn, P. M.; Ramseier, R. O.; Ross, D. B.; Stambach, G.; Webster, W. J., Jr.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation which occurred during the Bering Sea Experiment, 15 February to 10 March 1973, in and around the experiment area is analyzed and related to the macroscale morphology and dynamics of the sea ice cover. The ice cover was very complex in structure, being made up of five ice types, and underwent strong dynamic activity. Synoptic analyses show that an optimum variety of weather situations occurred during the experiment: an initial strong anticyclonic period (6 days), followed by a period of strong cyclonic activity (6 days), followed by weak anticyclonic activity (3 days), and finally a period of weak cyclonic activity (4 days). The data of the mesoscale test areas observed on the four sea ice option flights, and ship weather, and drift data give a detailed description of mesoscale ice dynamics which correlates well with the macroscale view: anticyclonic activity advects the ice southward with strong ice divergence and a regular lead and polynya pattern; cyclonic activity advects the ice northward with ice convergence, or slight divergence, and a random lead and polynya pattern.

  10. Evolution of Hydrogen Dynamics in Amorphous Ice with Density.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, A; Shephard, J J; Romanelli, G; Senesi, R; Salzmann, C G; Andreani, C

    2015-06-04

    The single-particle dynamics of hydrogen atoms in several of the amorphous ices are reported using a combination of deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The mean kinetic energies of the hydrogen nuclei are found to increase with increasing density, indicating the weakening of hydrogen bonds as well as a trend toward steeper and more harmonic hydrogen vibrational potential energy surfaces. DINS shows much more pronounced changes in the O-H stretching component of the mean kinetic energy going from low- to high-density amorphous ices than indicated by INS and Raman spectroscopy. This highlights the power of the DINS technique to retrieve accurate ground-state kinetic energies beyond the harmonic approximation. In a novel approach, we use information from DINS and INS to determine the anharmonicity constants of the O-H stretching modes. Furthermore, our experimental kinetic energies will serve as important benchmark values for path-integral Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Dynamic response of an artificial square spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Jungfleisch, M. B.; Zhang, W.; Iacocca, E.; Sklenar, J.; Ding, J.; Jiang, W.; Zhang, S.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Ketterson, J. B.; Heinonen, O.; Hoffmann, A.

    2016-03-02

    Magnetization dynamics in an artficial square spin-ice lattice made of Ni80Fe20 with magnetic field applied in the lattice plane is investigated by broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The experimentally observed dispersion shows a rich spectrum of modes corresponding to different magnetization states. These magnetization states are determined by exchange and dipolar interaction between individual islands, as is confirmed by a semianalytical model. In the low field regime below 400 Oe a hysteretic behavior in the mode spectrum is found. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the origin of the observed spectra is due to the initialization of different magnetization states of individual nanomagnets. Our results indicate that it might be possible to determine the spin-ice state by resonance experiments and are a first step towards the understanding of artificial geometrically frustrated magnetic systems in the high-frequency regime.

  12. Dynamic response of an artificial square spin ice

    DOE PAGES

    Jungfleisch, M. B.; Zhang, W.; Iacocca, E.; ...

    2016-03-02

    Magnetization dynamics in an artficial square spin-ice lattice made of Ni80Fe20 with magnetic field applied in the lattice plane is investigated by broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The experimentally observed dispersion shows a rich spectrum of modes corresponding to different magnetization states. These magnetization states are determined by exchange and dipolar interaction between individual islands, as is confirmed by a semianalytical model. In the low field regime below 400 Oe a hysteretic behavior in the mode spectrum is found. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the origin of the observed spectra is due to the initialization of different magnetization states of individual nanomagnets.more » Our results indicate that it might be possible to determine the spin-ice state by resonance experiments and are a first step towards the understanding of artificial geometrically frustrated magnetic systems in the high-frequency regime.« less

  13. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Dynamical crossover in 'hot' spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, G.; Cornelius, A. L.; Orendác, M.; Kajnaková, M.; Fennell, T.; Bramwell, S. T.; Gardner, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of the spin ice material Ho2Ti2O7 in its paramagnetic ('hot') phase have been investigated by a combination of neutron spin echo and ac-susceptibility techniques. Relaxation at high temperatures (T > 15 K) is proved to occur by a thermally activated single-ion process that is distinct from the process that dominates at lower temperatures (1 K < T < 15 K). It is argued that the low-temperature process must involve quantum mechanical spin tunnelling, as quasi-classical channels of relaxation are exhausted in this temperature range. Our results resolve a mystery in the physics of spin ice: why has a 15 K ac-susceptibility peak been observed in Dy2Ti2O7 but not in Ho2Ti2O7 or Ho2Sn2O7?

  14. Magnetic charge and moment dynamics in artificial kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, A.; Derlet, P. M.; Anghinolfi, L.; Kleibert, A.; Heyderman, L. J.

    2017-08-01

    Spin ice materials represent an intriguing class of frustrated magnetic systems which, through their geometry, admit an exponential number of approximately degenerate configurations. In this paper, the relaxation properties of a thermally active artificial kagome spin ice system are studied. Through application of an external magnetic field, an out-of-equilibrium vertex charge ordered configuration is selected and relaxed under approximate zero-field conditions. Using x-ray photo-emission electron microscopy, the magnetic moment and vertex charge degrees of freedom are followed in space and time, revealing different dynamics to that seen in past athermal equilibration protocols, and a relaxation which is well described by a point-dipolar model system. Furthermore the charge correlations are found to relax with a time scale several times smaller than that of the moment correlations.

  15. Dynamic analysis for planar beam with clearance joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, XiaoGuang; Guo, XiaoSong; Feng, YongBao; Yu, ChuanQiang; Ma, Changlin

    2015-03-01

    An analytical model was presented in this study to describe the dynamic characteristics of a planar rotation beam with clearance joint. The spherical contact model was introduced to calculate the collision forces for the planar revolute joint. Unlike previous research, to acquire an accurate and convergent solution, the second-order coupling term of the beam axial deformation is taken into account. Then, the flexible beam was divided into discrete elements via the finite element method. The dynamic equations of the model were deduced via the Hamilton's principle. Further, the dynamic responses were obtained and analyzed in the non-inertial and inertial coordinates. To prove the validity of the presented methodology, a virtual prototype model with identical conditions was created in ADAMS. A numerical example was simultaneously calculated by the two different approaches. Comparison of the results shows that the two approaches match quite well. Finally, some valuable conclusions describing the inner-joint collision process are extracted and summarized.

  16. Dynamics and control of space robot considering joint friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Li, Hai-Quan; Chen, Yi-Jun; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that friction is an inevitable phenomenon existing in almost all mechanical systems including robotic systems. It can affect dynamic characteristics of mechanical systems and even harm accuracy of manual control. In this paper, we have conducted comprehensive study in detail on dynamics and control of a space robot with joint friction. Dynamic equation of the system is established based on Jourdain's velocity variation principle and the single direction recursive construction method. The Coulomb friction model, the Stribeck friction model and the LuGre friction model are adopted to describe the joint friction. Meanwhile, the calculation method for joint friction is discussed in detail, and the relationship between ideal constraint force and Lagrange multipliers is derived. Moreover, an active controller is designed by the nonlinear decoupling method for the trajectory tracking for the system. The validity of the proposed dynamic model is verified by comparison of numerical simulation results and results obtained from the software ADAMS. And then we carry out a series of simulations in order to observe the influence of joint friction on operating a space robot with different friction models. We also study the interaction between the low-speed motion and joint friction in the process of trajectory tracking.

  17. Astronomical Ice: The Effects of Treating Ice as a Porous Media on the Dynamics and Evolution of Extraterrestrial Ice-Ocean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    With the prevalence of water and ice rich environments in the solar system, and likely the universe, becoming more apparent, understanding the evolutionary dynamics and physical processes of such locales is of great importance. Piqued interest arises from the understanding that the persistence of all known life depends on the presence of liquid water. As in situ investigation is currently infeasible, accurate numerical modeling is the best technique to demystify these environments. We will discuss an evolving model of ice-ocean interaction aimed at realistically describing the behavior of the ice-ocean interface by treating basal ice as a porous media, and its possible implications on the formation of astrobiological niches. Treating ice as a porous media drastically affects the thermodynamic properties it exhibits. Thus inclusion of this phenomenon is critical in accurately representing the dynamics and evolution of all ice-ocean environments. This model utilizes equations that describe the dynamics of sea ice when it is treated as a porous media (Hunke et. al. 2011), coupled with a basal melt and accretion model (Holland and Jenkins 1999). Combined, these two models produce the most accurate description of the processes occurring at the base of terrestrial sea ice and ice shelves, capable of resolving variations within the ice due to environmental pressures. While these models were designed for application to terrestrial environments, the physics occurring at any ice-water interface is identical, and these models can be used to represent the evolution of a variety of icy astronomical bodies. As terrestrial ice shelves provide a close analog to planetary ice-ocean environments, we truth test the models validity against observations of ice shelves. We apply this model to the ice-ocean interface of the icy Galilean moon Europa. We include profiles of temperature, salinity, solid fraction, and Darcy velocity, as well as temporally and spatially varying melt and

  18. A robotic apparatus that dictates torque fields around joints without affecting inherent joint dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oytam, Yalchin; Lloyd, David; Reid, Campbell S; de Rugy, Aymar; Carson, Richard G

    2010-10-01

    This manuscript describes how motor behaviour researchers who are not at the same time expert roboticists may implement an experimental apparatus, which has the ability to dictate torque fields around a single joint on one limb or single joints on multiple limbs without otherwise interfering with the inherent dynamics of those joints. Such an apparatus expands the exploratory potential of the researcher wherever experimental distinction of factors may necessitate independent control of torque fields around multiple limbs, or the shaping of torque fields of a given joint independently of its plane of motion, or its directional phase within that plane. The apparatus utilizes torque motors. The challenge with torque motors is that they impose added inertia on limbs and thus attenuate joint dynamics. We eliminated this attenuation by establishing an accurate mathematical model of the robotic device using the Box-Jenkins method, and cancelling out its dynamics by employing the inverse of the model as a compensating controller. A direct measure of the remnant inertial torque as experienced by the hand during a 50 s period of wrist oscillations that increased gradually in frequency from 1.0 to 3.8 Hz confirmed that the removal of the inertial effect of the motor was effectively complete.

  19. Estimation of Time-Varying, Intrinsic and Reflex Dynamic Joint Stiffness during Movement. Application to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Guarín, Diego L.; Kearney, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic joint stiffness determines the relation between joint position and torque, and plays a vital role in the control of posture and movement. Dynamic joint stiffness can be quantified during quasi-stationary conditions using disturbance experiments, where small position perturbations are applied to the joint and the torque response is recorded. Dynamic joint stiffness is composed of intrinsic and reflex mechanisms that act and change together, so that nonlinear, mathematical models and specialized system identification techniques are necessary to estimate their relative contributions to overall joint stiffness. Quasi-stationary experiments have demonstrated that dynamic joint stiffness is heavily modulated by joint position and voluntary torque. Consequently, during movement, when joint position and torque change rapidly, dynamic joint stiffness will be Time-Varying (TV). This paper introduces a new method to quantify the TV intrinsic and reflex components of dynamic joint stiffness during movement. The algorithm combines ensemble and deterministic approaches for estimation of TV systems; and uses a TV, parallel-cascade, nonlinear system identification technique to separate overall dynamic joint stiffness into intrinsic and reflex components from position and torque records. Simulation studies of a stiffness model, whose parameters varied with time as is expected during walking, demonstrated that the new algorithm accurately tracked the changes in dynamic joint stiffness using as little as 40 gait cycles. The method was also used to estimate the intrinsic and reflex dynamic ankle stiffness from an experiment with a healthy subject during which ankle movements were imposed while the subject maintained a constant muscle contraction. The method identified TV stiffness model parameters that predicted the measured torque very well, accounting for more than 95% of its variance. Moreover, both intrinsic and reflex dynamic stiffness were heavily modulated through the

  20. First principles molecular dynamics study of filled ice hydrogen hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Iitaka, Toshiaki

    2012-08-01

    We investigated structural changes, phase diagram, and vibrational properties of hydrogen hydrate in filled-ice phase C2 by using first principles molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the experimentally reported "cubic" structure is unstable at low temperature and/or high pressure: The "cubic" structure reflects the symmetry at high (room) temperature where the hydrogen bond network is disordered and the hydrogen molecules are orientationally disordered due to thermal rotation. In this sense, the "cubic" symmetry would definitely be lowered at low temperature where the hydrogen bond network and the hydrogen molecules are expected to be ordered. At room temperature and below 30 GPa, it is the thermal effects that play an essential role in stabilizing the structure in "cubic" symmetry. Above 60 GPa, the hydrogen bonds in the framework would be symmetrized and the hydrogen bond order-disorder transition would disappear. These results also suggest the phase behavior of other filled-ice hydrates. In the case of rare gas hydrate, there would be no guest molecules' rotation-nonrotation transition since the guest molecules keep their spherical symmetry at any temperature. On the contrary methane hydrate MH-III would show complex transitions due to the lower symmetry of the guest molecule. These results would encourage further experimental studies, especially nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and neutron scattering, on the phases of filled-ice hydrates at high pressures and/or low temperatures.

  1. Greenland outlet glacier dynamics from Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawbecker, P.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J. D.; Ahn, Y.; Benson, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Time Lapse cameras fill gaps in our observational capabilities: 1. By providing much higher temporal resolution than offered by conventional airborne or satellite remote sensing. 2. While GPS or auto-theodolite observations can provide higher time resolution data than from photogrammetry, survival of these instruments on the hazardous glacier surface is limited, plus, the maintenance of such systems can be more expensive than the maintenance of a terrestrial photogrammetry installation. 3. Imagery provide a high spatial density of observations across the glacier surface, higher than is realistically available from GPS or other in-situ observations. 4. time lapse cameras provide observational capabilities in Eulerian and Lagrangian frames while GPS or theodolite targets, going along for a ride on the glacier, provide only Lagrangian data. Photogrammetry techniques are applied to a year-plus of images from multiple west Greenland glaciers to determine the glacier front horizontal velocity variations at hourly to seasonal time scales. The presentation includes comparisons between glacier front velocities and: 1. surface melt rates inferred from surface air temperature and solar radiation observations; 2. major calving events identified from camera images; 3. surface and near-surface ocean temperature; 4. land-fast sea ice breakup; 5. tidal variations; 6. supra-glacial melt lake drainage events observed in daily optical satellite imagery; and 7.) GPS data. Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) time lapse camera overlooking the Petermann glacier, installed to image glacier dynamics and to capture the predicted ice "island" detachment.

  2. Dynamic effects of linkage joints in electrostatic microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Miller, S.L.; LaVigne, G.F.

    1998-05-01

    The electrostatic micro-engine is one of the major actuators used in MEMS applications. To ensure this MEMS actuator is operated in a fashion that will produce peak performance and long life, the system dynamics must be fully understood. One of the major trade-offs in the micro-engine design is the use of either pin or flexure joints. This paper will develop the equations of motion for flexure-jointed and pin-jointed surface micromachined microengines. An analytical mechanics approach will be used to derive the equations of motion and the appropriate equations of constraint. The effect of the flexure joints on the drive signals of the micro engine is experimentally shown to be significant during static tests.

  3. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is currently not well established. This is largely attributed to the interdependencies of aerosols and cloud microphysical processes, among which primary ice formation contributes to considerable uncertainties. Although it is known that in a large range of thermodynamic conditions aerosol particles are required to initiate ice formation, identifying and characterizing the effect of specific ice nuclei is among current scientific efforts. Here we attempt to quantify the change of cloud properties with varying aerosol background concentrations. We adapt the concept of susceptibilities for mixed-phase and ice clouds, defining the susceptibility as the derivation of a macrophysical quantity with respect to ice nucleating aerosol concentrations. A focus of our study is the use of different model approaches in order to identify the distinct contributions of both cloud microphysics and cloud-dynamical feedbacks to the overall susceptibility. The classical method is the direct comparison of two independent model runs, where the whole range of microphysical and cloud-dynamical feedbacks contributes to different cloud properties in a perturbed simulation. Our alternative method relies on a single simulation which incorporates multiple executions of the microphysical scheme within the same time step, each "perturbed microphysics" scheme with varying aerosol concentrations and an additional set of cloud particle tracers. Since in the latter case the model dynamics are held constant and only microphysical feedbacks contribute to the properties of perturbed clouds, we can distinguish between the pure microphysical effect and the dynamical enhancement or suppression. For a persistent Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud layer which is expected to be particularly sensitive to feedback cycles, we show an enhancement of the cloud susceptibility to ice nucleating particles by dynamics of around 50%, but a decay of the enhancement with time

  4. Joint US/Russian Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wanhainen, J.S.; Tyburski, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    The United States and Russia have agreed to jointly develop a solar dynamic (SD) system for flight demonstration on the Russian orbital station, Mir, starting in late 1997. This project is funded under the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 activities which involve joint US/Russian cooperative efforts to reduce risk and enhance working relationships in preparation for the joint integration of ISS. Of the projects falling under the Phase 1 program, the SD Flight Demonstration (SDFD) project is most complex in terms of the level of interfacing required. This paper provides a brief description of the solar dynamic technology, the project chronology of events, the US/Russian roles on the SDFD project, the project schedule, and project management tools used in dealing with the international team.

  5. A Newly Updated Database of Elevation-changes of the Greenand Ice Sheet to Study Surface Processes and Ice Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. F.; Csatho, B. M.; van den Broeke, M.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports about important upgrades of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface elevation and elevation-change database obtained with our Surface Elevation And Change detection (SERAC) software suite. We have developed SERAC to derive information from laser altimetry data, particularly time series of elevation changes and their partitioning into changes caused by ice dynamics. This allows direct investigation of ice dynamic processes that is much needed for improving the predictive power of ice sheet models. SERAC is different from most other change detection methods. It is based on detecting changes of surface patches, about 1 km by 1 km in size, rather than deriving elevation changes from individual laser points. The current database consists of ~100,000 time series with satellite laser altimetry data from ICESat, airborne laser observations obtained by NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and the Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). The upgrade is significant, because not only new observations from 2013 and 2014 have been added but also a number of improvements lead to a more comprehensive and consistent record of elevation-changes. First, we used the model that gives in addition to ice sheet also information about ice caps and glaciers (Rastner et al., 2012) for deciding if a laser point is on the ice sheet or ice cap. Then we added small gaps that exist in the ICESat GLA12 data set because the ice sheet mask is not wide enough. The new database is now more complete and will facilitate more accurate comparisons of mass balance studies obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment system (GRACE). For determining the part of a time series caused by ice dynamics we used the new firn compaction model and Surface Mass Balance (SMB) estimates from RACMO2.3. The new database spans the time period from 1993 to 2014. Adding new observations amounts to a spatial densification of the old record and at the same time extends the time domain by two

  6. Reconstructing Interlaced High-Dynamic-Range Video Using Joint Learning.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inchang; Baek, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Min H

    2017-11-01

    For extending the dynamic range of video, it is a common practice to capture multiple frames sequentially with different exposures and combine them to extend the dynamic range of each video frame. However, this approach results in typical ghosting artifacts due to fast and complex motion in nature. As an alternative, video imaging with interlaced exposures has been introduced to extend the dynamic range. However, the interlaced approach has been hindered by jaggy artifacts and sensor noise, leading to concerns over image quality. In this paper, we propose a data-driven approach for jointly solving two specific problems of deinterlacing and denoising that arise in interlaced video imaging with different exposures. First, we solve the deinterlacing problem using joint dictionary learning via sparse coding. Since partial information of detail in differently exposed rows is often available via interlacing, we make use of the information to reconstruct details of the extended dynamic range from the interlaced video input. Second, we jointly solve the denoising problem by tailoring sparse coding to better handle additive noise in low-/high-exposure rows, and also adopt multiscale homography flow to temporal sequences for denoising. We anticipate that the proposed method will allow for concurrent capture of higher dynamic range video frames without suffering from ghosting artifacts. We demonstrate the advantages of our interlaced video imaging compared with the state-of-the-art high-dynamic-range video methods.

  7. ERS satellite microwave radar observations of Antarctic sea-ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    1997-01-01

    ERS-1 and ERS-2 scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used to monitor and track large and small scale sea ice dynamics in the Southern Ocean, and in particular in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Sea ice formation in the Weddell Sea regulates vertical and horizontal thermohaline circulation and influences bottom water production rates. Significant seasonal to interannual variability is observed in the sea ice drift dynamics. Coupled model simulations reproduce this variability and indicate that there is significant interannual variability in Weddelll Sea ice formation, drifts and extent on the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) timescale, with a period of approximately eight years. Changes in ice dynamics on these timescales regulate the amount of sea ice divergence and polynya formation. Anomalies in the timing and duration of the opening of the Ronne ice shelf polynya system are closely related to the variability in outflow of Weddell Sea bottom water measured at Joinville Island.

  8. ERS satellite microwave radar observations of Antarctic sea-ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    1997-01-01

    ERS-1 and ERS-2 scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used to monitor and track large and small scale sea ice dynamics in the Southern Ocean, and in particular in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Sea ice formation in the Weddell Sea regulates vertical and horizontal thermohaline circulation and influences bottom water production rates. Significant seasonal to interannual variability is observed in the sea ice drift dynamics. Coupled model simulations reproduce this variability and indicate that there is significant interannual variability in Weddelll Sea ice formation, drifts and extent on the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) timescale, with a period of approximately eight years. Changes in ice dynamics on these timescales regulate the amount of sea ice divergence and polynya formation. Anomalies in the timing and duration of the opening of the Ronne ice shelf polynya system are closely related to the variability in outflow of Weddell Sea bottom water measured at Joinville Island.

  9. Dynamic characteristics of a magnetorheological pin joint for civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun

    2014-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) pin joint is a novel device in which its joint moment resistance can be controlled in real-time by altering the applied magnetic field. The smart pin joint is intended to be used as a controllable connector between the columns and beams of a civil structure to instantaneously shift the structural natural frequencies in order to avoid resonance and therefore to reduce unwanted vibrations and hence prevent structural damage. As an intrinsically nonlinear device, modelling of this MR fluid based device is a challenging task and makes the design of a suitable control algorithm a cumbersome situation. Aimed at its application in civil structure, the main purpose of this paper is to test and characterise the hysteretic behaviour of MR pin joint. A test scheme is designed to obtain the dynamic performance of MR pin joint in the dominant earthquake frequency range. Some unique phenomena different from those of MR damper are observed through the experimental testing. A computationally-efficient model is proposed by introducing a hyperbolic element to accurately reproduce its dynamic behaviour and to further facilitate the design of a suitable control algorithm. Comprehensive investigations on the model accuracy and dependences of the proposed model on loading condition (frequency and amplitude) and input current level are reported in the last section of this paper.

  10. Subglacial roughness of the Greenland Ice Sheet: scale-dependence, anisotropy, and implications for contemporary ice dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Michael; Jordan, Thomas; Bamber, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial roughness has been quantified from bedrock topographic profiles, derived radio-echo sounding, using a variety of different statistical analysis methods. Spectral (frequency-domain) approaches are most commonly applied, but variogram (space-domain) methods better reveal the scale-dependence of subglacial roughness (e.g. power-law scaling behaviour). Previous studies of subglacial roughness beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet are limited, and only describe the broad spatial patterns in topographic roughness, with no rigorous consideration of anisotropy (roughness with respect to flow direction). Consequently, the control that roughness has upon ice dynamics, in particular through its predicted influence on basal traction, has yet to be investigated quantitatively. Moreover, the recent increase in Operation Ice Bridge radio-echo sounding data presents an opportunity for comprehensive ice-sheet-wide analysis. Here, for the first time, we present a framework for anisotropic analysis of subglacial roughness beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet, using a space-domain formulation of roughness. This analysis includes consideration of roughness with respect to ice flow direction (filtering roughness parallel and perpendicular to flow), and velocity flow field characteristics (e.g. regions of flow divergence). A central theme of our approach includes a comparison of roughness at various length-scales, alongside contemporary ice sheet model outputs, presenting a glacier-by-glacier approach where data allows. This allows us to investigate the relationships that have been proposed to exist between subglacial roughness and basal traction and ice velocity.

  11. Simulation of in vivo dynamics during robot assisted joint movement.

    PubMed

    Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Lorenz, Andrea; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2014-12-16

    Robots are very useful tools in orthopedic research. They can provide force/torque controlled specimen motion with high repeatability and precision. A method to analyze dissipative energy outcome in an entire joint was developed in our group. In a previous study, a sheep knee was flexed while axial load remained constant during the measurement of dissipated energy. We intend to apply this method for the investigation of osteoarthritis. Additionally, the method should be improved by simulation of in vivo knee dynamics. Thus, a new biomechanical testing tool will be developed for analyzing in vitro joint properties after different treatments. Discretization of passive knee flexion was used to construct a complex flexion movement by a robot and simulate altering axial load similar to in vivo sheep knee dynamics described in a previous experimental study. The robot applied an in vivo like axial force profile with high reproducibility during the corresponding knee flexion (total standard deviation of 0.025 body weight (BW)). A total residual error between the in vivo and simulated axial force was 0.16 BW. Posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces were detected by the robot as a backlash of joint structures. Their curve forms were similar to curve forms of corresponding in vivo measured forces, but in contrast to the axial force, they showed higher total standard deviation of 0.118 and 0.203 BW and higher total residual error of 0.79 and 0.21 BW for posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces respectively. We developed and evaluated an algorithm for the robotic simulation of complex in vivo joint dynamics using a joint specimen. This should be a new biomechanical testing tool for analyzing joint properties after different treatments.

  12. INSIGHTS INTO THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF TUNNELS IN JOINTED ROCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E; Morris, J P

    2005-02-17

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of peak displacement for a given peak velocity, the effect of pulse peak velocity for a given displacement, the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses, and the effect of repeated loading. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rocks under dynamic loading. The paper concludes with a glimpse into the future. Results are shown for a 3-dimensional discrete element massively parallel simulation with 100 million contact elements, performed with the LLNL LDEC code.

  13. Dynamic Structure of Joint-Action Stimulus-Response Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malone, MaryLauren; Castillo, Ramon D.; Kloos, Heidi; Holden, John G.; Richardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual’s response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis — that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general. PMID:24558467

  14. ICE-VOLC Project: unravelling the dynamics of Antarctica volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, Andrea; Del Carlo, Paola; Giudice, Gaetano; Giuffrida, Giovanni; Larocca, Graziano; Liuzzo, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Melbourne and Rittmann volcanoes are located in the Victoria Land. Whilst Rittmann's last eruption dates probably to Pleistocene, Melbourne's most recent eruption between 1862 and 1922, testifying it is still active. At present, both volcanoes display fumarolic activity. Melbourne was discovered in 1841 by James Clark Ross, Rittmann during the 4th Italian Expedition (1988/1989). Our knowledge on both volcanoes is really little. The position of these volcanoes in the Antarctic region (characterised by absence of anthropic noise) and its proximity with the Italian Mario Zucchelli Station makes them ideal sites for studying volcano seismic sources, geothermal emissions, seismo-acoustic signals caused by cryosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere dynamics, and volcanic gas impact on environment. Hence, the main aim of the ICE-VOLC ("multiparametrIC Experiment at antarctica VOLCanoes: data from volcano and cryosphere-ocean-atmosphere dynamics") project is the study of Melbourne and Rittmann, by acquisition, analysis and integration of multiparametric geophysical, geochemical and thermal data. Complementary objectives include investigation of the relationship between seismo-acoustic activity recorded in Antarctica and cryosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere dynamics, evaluation of the impact of volcanic gas in atmosphere. This project involves 26 researchers, technologists and technicians from University of Perugia and from Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia of Catania, Palermo, Pisa and Rome. In this work, we show the preliminary results obtained after the first expedition in Antarctica, aiming to perform geochemical-thermal surveys in the volcano ice caves, as well as to collect ash samples and to install temporary seismic stations.

  15. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  16. Derwael ice rise and a migrating divide: An archive for changing ice dynamics in eastern Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Reinhard; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Martin, Carlos; Callens, Denis; Pattyn, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Ice rises are grounded topographic highs in the coastal margin of Antarctica. They originate from a locally elevated bedrock topography and are typically enclosed by fast-flowing ice shelves. Near the dome and below the ice divides the internal stratigraphy often arches upwards due to the non-linear ice rheology which stiffens ice at low deviatoric stresses. The arch- (or Raymond Bump-) characteristics allow to deduce the history of the divide position - and with it the history of the flow regime including a potential change in the dynamics of the surrounding ice shelves. We investigate Derwael Ice Rise (70.5°S/26.5°E) which buttresses and deviates the Western Ragnhild Glacier, one of the main ice streams in Dronning Maud Land. In 2010/11 and 2012/13 we collected a suite of high-frequency and low-frequency radar profiles which allow to visualize the bedrock as well as the internal stratigraphy three-dimensionally. We observe a flat bedrock, a spatially varying accumulation as well as multiple isochrone arches with a varying bump-amplitude vs. depth function below the current divide. More importantly, we also observe relict arches in the flanks which indicate that the divide most likely migrated to its current position. Using numerical models (higher-order and full Stokes) together with the radar stratigraphy and the derived accumulation rates we aim to explain the relict arches as a result of changing boundary conditions induced by a changing geometry of the surrounding Roi Baudoin ice shelf. We hypothesize that the relict arches bear witness to a larger scale change in ice flow which may encompass variations of the Western Ragnhild Glacier. If this holds true, this sector of east Antarctica may be more susceptible to changes than previously assumed.

  17. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  18. High latitude changes in ice dynamics and their impact on polar marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Moline, Mark A; Karnovsky, Nina J; Brown, Zachary; Divoky, George J; Frazer, Thomas K; Jacoby, Charles A; Torres, Joseph J; Fraser, William R

    2008-01-01

    Polar regions have experienced significant warming in recent decades. Warming has been most pronounced across the Arctic Ocean Basin and along the Antarctic Peninsula, with significant decreases in the extent and seasonal duration of sea ice. Rapid retreat of glaciers and disintegration of ice sheets have also been documented. The rate of warming is increasing and is predicted to continue well into the current century, with continued impacts on ice dynamics. Climate-mediated changes in ice dynamics are a concern as ice serves as primary habitat for marine organisms central to the food webs of these regions. Changes in the timing and extent of sea ice impose temporal asynchronies and spatial separations between energy requirements and food availability for many higher trophic levels. These mismatches lead to decreased reproductive success, lower abundances, and changes in distribution. In addition to these direct impacts of ice loss, climate-induced changes also facilitate indirect effects through changes in hydrography, which include introduction of species from lower latitudes and altered assemblages of primary producers. Here, we review recent changes and trends in ice dynamics and the responses of marine ecosystems. Specifically, we provide examples of ice-dependent organisms and associated species from the Arctic and Antarctic to illustrate the impacts of the temporal and spatial changes in ice dynamics.

  19. The land-ice contribution to 21st century dynamic sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T.; Ridley, J.; Pardaens, A. K.; Hurkmans, R. T. W. L.; Payne, A. J.; Giesen, R. H.; Lowe, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.; Edwards, T. L.; Oerlemans, J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has the potential to locally influence mean sea level through a number of processes including (but not limited to) thermal expansion of the oceans and enhanced land ice melt. These lead to departures from the global mean sea level change, due to spatial variations in the change of water density and transport, which are termed dynamic sea level changes. In this study we present regional patterns of sea-level change projected by a global coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model forced by projected ice-melt fluxes from three sources: the Antarctic ice sheet, the Greenland ice sheet and small glaciers and ice caps. The largest ice melt flux we consider is equivalent to almost 0.7 m of global sea level rise over the 21st century. Since the ice melt is not constant, the evolution of the dynamic sea level changes is analysed. We find that the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is small, with the largest changes, occurring in the North Atlantic, contributing of order 3 cm above the global mean rise. Furthermore, the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is similar regardless of whether the simulated ice fluxes are applied to a simulation with fixed or changing atmospheric CO2.

  20. Extensive dynamic thinning on the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Hamish D; Arthern, Robert J; Vaughan, David G; Edwards, Laura A

    2009-10-15

    Many glaciers along the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets are accelerating and, for this reason, contribute increasingly to global sea-level rise. Globally, ice losses contribute approximately 1.8 mm yr(-1) (ref. 8), but this could increase if the retreat of ice shelves and tidewater glaciers further enhances the loss of grounded ice or initiates the large-scale collapse of vulnerable parts of the ice sheets. Ice loss as a result of accelerated flow, known as dynamic thinning, is so poorly understood that its potential contribution to sea level over the twenty-first century remains unpredictable. Thinning on the ice-sheet scale has been monitored by using repeat satellite altimetry observations to track small changes in surface elevation, but previous sensors could not resolve most fast-flowing coastal glaciers. Here we report the use of high-resolution ICESat (Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimetry to map change along the entire grounded margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. To isolate the dynamic signal, we compare rates of elevation change from both fast-flowing and slow-flowing ice with those expected from surface mass-balance fluctuations. We find that dynamic thinning of glaciers now reaches all latitudes in Greenland, has intensified on key Antarctic grounding lines, has endured for decades after ice-shelf collapse, penetrates far into the interior of each ice sheet and is spreading as ice shelves thin by ocean-driven melt. In Greenland, glaciers flowing faster than 100 m yr(-1) thinned at an average rate of 0.84 m yr(-1), and in the Amundsen Sea embayment of Antarctica, thinning exceeded 9.0 m yr(-1) for some glaciers. Our results show that the most profound changes in the ice sheets currently result from glacier dynamics at ocean margins.

  1. The role of ice dynamics in shaping vegetation in flowing waters.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Polvi, Lina E; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Ice dynamics is an important factor affecting vegetation in high-altitude and high-latitude streams and rivers. During the last few decades, knowledge about ice in streams and rivers has increased significantly and a respectable body of literature is now available. Here we review the literature on how ice dynamics influence riparian and aquatic vegetation. Traditionally, plant ecologists have focused their studies on the summer period, largely ignoring the fact that processes during winter also impact vegetation dynamics. For example, the freeze-up period in early winter may result in extensive formation of underwater ice that can restructure the channel, obstruct flow, and cause flooding and thus formation of more ice. In midwinter, slow-flowing reaches develop a surface-ice cover that accumulates snow, protecting habitats under the ice from formation of underwater ice but also reducing underwater light, thus suppressing photosynthesis. Towards the end of winter, ice breaks up and moves downstream. During this transport, ice floes can jam up and cause floods and major erosion. The magnitudes of the floods and their erosive power mainly depend on the size of the watercourse, also resulting in different degrees of disturbance to the vegetation. Vegetation responds both physically and physiologically to ice dynamics. Physical action involves the erosive force of moving ice and damage caused by ground frost, whereas physiological effects - mostly cell damage - happen as a result of plants freezing into the ice. On a community level, large magnitudes of ice dynamics seem to favour species richness, but can be detrimental for individual plants. Human impacts, such as flow regulation, channelisation, agriculturalisation and water pollution have modified ice dynamics; further changes are expected as a result of current and predicted future climate change. Human impacts and climate change can both favour and disfavour riverine vegetation dynamics. Restoration of streams

  2. Aerial photographs reveal late-20th-century dynamic ice loss in northwestern Greenland.

    PubMed

    Kjær, Kurt H; Khan, Shfaqat A; Korsgaard, Niels J; Wahr, John; Bamber, Jonathan L; Hurkmans, Ruud; van den Broeke, Michiel; Timm, Lars H; Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Bjørk, Anders A; Larsen, Nicolaj K; Jørgensen, Lars Tyge; Færch-Jensen, Anders; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-08-03

    Global warming is predicted to have a profound impact on the Greenland Ice Sheet and its contribution to global sea-level rise. Recent mass loss in the northwest of Greenland has been substantial. Using aerial photographs, we produced digital elevation models and extended the time record of recent observed marginal dynamic thinning back to the mid-1980s. We reveal two independent dynamic ice loss events on the northwestern Greenland Ice Sheet margin: from 1985 to 1993 and 2005 to 2010, which were separated by limited mass changes. Our results suggest that the ice mass changes in this sector were primarily caused by short-lived dynamic ice loss events rather than changes in the surface mass balance. This finding challenges predictions about the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to increasing global temperatures.

  3. The role of soils and soil heterogeneities in the dynamics and stability of Martian ground ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Hanna Gail

    The dynamical state and equilibrium location of shallow ground ice on Mars have relevance to a variety of science questions, as well as future human and robotic exploration. I investigate the role of soils in the dynamical transport of ground ice and the role of soil heterogeneities in the equilibrium depth of the ice table. First, assuming ice to be in equilibrium with atmospheric water vapor, I develop a multi-dimensional model of ground-ice stability and use it to place quantitative constraints on the response of the ice table to meter-scale rocks, dust lenses, and albedo variations in the current climate. I find that rocks create localized areas of deep ice, producing depressions of a few to 60 cm over a horizontal range of 1-2 rock radii. Patches of dust produce locally shallow ice; however, the magnitude of this effect is small (1-4 cm). I employ these results to investigate the role played by heterogeneities in orbital estimates of ice table depth. I find that surface rocks can account for more than half of the discrepancy between ice table depths inferred from leakage neutron flux and those predicted by ice-stability simulations that utilize thermophysical observations. Turning to considerations of ground-ice dynamics, I present laboratory measurements of the structural properties most relevant to gas transport in five groups of Mars-analog soils. These measurements indicate that diffusive loss of ground ice on Mars can likely proceed up to four times faster than predicted by theoretical studies and that the pore volume in some Mars-analog soils is sufficiently large to explain high volumetric ice abundances inferred from Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer data as simple pore ice. The upcoming Mars Scout Mission Phoenix may provide links between the dynamical and equilibrium views of ground-ice. I combine simulations of ground-ice stability with statistical estimates of the abundance of rocks at the Phoenix landing site to predict the degree of ice table

  4. The effects of ice on methane hydrate nucleation: a microcanonical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2017-07-26

    Although ice powders are widely used in gas hydrate formation experiments, the effects of ice on hydrate nucleation and what happens in the quasi-liquid layer of ice are still not well understood. Here, we used high-precision constant energy molecular dynamics simulations to study methane hydrate nucleation from vapor-liquid mixtures exposed to the basal, prismatic, and secondary prismatic planes of hexagonal ice (ice Ih). Although no significant difference is observed in hydrate nucleation processes for these different crystal planes, it is found, more interestingly, that methane hydrate can nucleate either on the ice surface heterogeneously or in the bulk solution phase homogeneously. Several factors are mentioned to be able to promote the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates, including the adsorption of methane molecules at the solid-liquid interface, hydrogen bonding between hydrate cages and the ice structure, the stronger ability of ice to transfer heat than that of the aqueous solution, and the higher occurrence probability of hydrate cages in the vicinity of the ice surface than in the bulk solution. Meanwhile, however, the other factors including the hydrophilicity of ice and the ice lattice mismatch with clathrate hydrates can inhibit heterogeneous nucleation on the ice surface and virtually promote homogeneous nucleation in the bulk solution. Certainly, the efficiency of ice as a promoter and as an inhibitor for heterogeneous nucleation is different. We estimate that the former is larger than the latter under the working conditions. Additionally, utilizing the benefit of ice to absorb heat, the NVE simulation of hydrate formation with ice can mimic the phenomenon of ice shrinking during the heterogeneous nucleation of hydrates and lower the overly large temperature increase during homogeneous nucleation. These results are helpful in understanding the nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate in the presence of ice.

  5. Mass Balance Changes and Ice Dynamics of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.

    2016-06-01

    During the past few decades the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost ice at accelerating rates, caused by increasing surface temperature. The melting of the two big ice sheets has a big impact on global sea level rise. If the ice sheets would melt down entirely, the sea level would rise more than 60 m. Even a much smaller rise would cause dramatic damage along coastal regions. In this paper we report about a major upgrade of surface elevation changes derived from laser altimetry data, acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite mission (ICESat) and airborne laser campaigns, such as Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). For detecting changes in ice sheet elevations we have developed the Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) method. It computes elevation changes of small surface patches by keeping the surface shape constant and considering the absolute values as surface elevations. We report about important upgrades of earlier results, for example the inclusion of local ice caps and the temporal extension from 1993 to 2014 for the Greenland Ice Sheet and for a comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness and mass changes for the Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  6. The structure and dynamics of amorphous and crystalline phases of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Tulk, C. A.; Svensson, E. C.; Swainson, I.; Loong, C.-K.

    2000-07-14

    The structures of the high and low-density amorphous phases of ice are studied using several techniques. The diffraction patterns of high and low density amorphous ice are analyzed using reverse Monte Carlo methods and compared with molecular dynamics simulations of these phases. The spectra of crystalline and amorphous phases of ice obtained by Raman and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering are analyzed to yield structural features for comparison with the results of molecular dynamics and Reverse Monte Carlo analysis. The structural details obtained indicate that there are significant differences between the structure of liquid water and the amorphous phases of ice.

  7. Ice-shelf Dynamics Near the Front of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Revealed by SAR Interferometry: Model/Interferogram Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAyeal, D. R.; Rignot, E.; Hulbe, C. L.

    1998-01-01

    We compare Earth Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) interferograms with artificial interferograms constructed using output of a finite-element ice-shelf flow model to study the dynamics of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS) near Hemmen Ice Rise (HIR) where the iceberg-calving front itersects Berkener Island (BI).

  8. Changes in ice dynamics and mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Rignot, Eric

    2006-07-15

    The concept that the Antarctic ice sheet changes with eternal slowness has been challenged by recent observations from satellites. Pronounced regional warming in the Antarctic Peninsula triggered ice shelf collapse, which led to a 10-fold increase in glacier flow and rapid ice sheet retreat. This chain of events illustrated the vulnerability of ice shelves to climate warming and their buffering role on the mass balance of Antarctica. In West Antarctica, the Pine Island Bay sector is draining far more ice into the ocean than is stored upstream from snow accumulation. This sector could raise sea level by 1m and trigger widespread retreat of ice in West Antarctica. Pine Island Glacier accelerated 38% since 1975, and most of the speed up took place over the last decade. Its neighbour Thwaites Glacier is widening up and may double its width when its weakened eastern ice shelf breaks up. Widespread acceleration in this sector may be caused by glacier ungrounding from ice shelf melting by an ocean that has recently warmed by 0.3 degrees C. In contrast, glaciers buffered from oceanic change by large ice shelves have only small contributions to sea level. In East Antarctica, many glaciers are close to a state of mass balance, but sectors grounded well below sea level, such as Cook Ice Shelf, Ninnis/Mertz, Frost and Totten glaciers, are thinning and losing mass. Hence, East Antarctica is not immune to changes.

  9. Sea ice thermohaline dynamics and biogeochemistry in the Arctic Ocean: Empirical and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Olsen, Lasse M.; Kauko, Hanna M.; Assmy, Philipp; Rösel, Anja; Itkin, Polona; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Sundfjord, Arild; Steen, Harald; Hop, Haakon; Cohen, Lana; Peterson, Algot K.; Jeffery, Nicole; Elliott, Scott M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Turner, Adrian K.

    2017-07-01

    Large changes in the sea ice regime of the Arctic Ocean have occurred over the last decades justifying the development of models to forecast sea ice physics and biogeochemistry. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) to simulate physical and biogeochemical properties at time scales of a few weeks and to use the model to analyze ice algal bloom dynamics in different types of ice. Ocean and atmospheric forcing data and observations of the evolution of the sea ice properties collected from 18 April to 4 June 2015, during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition, were used to test the CICE model. Our results show the following: (i) model performance is reasonable for sea ice thickness and bulk salinity; good for vertically resolved temperature, vertically averaged Chl a concentrations, and standing stocks; and poor for vertically resolved Chl a concentrations. (ii) Improving current knowledge about nutrient exchanges, ice algal recruitment, and motion is critical to improve sea ice biogeochemical modeling. (iii) Ice algae may bloom despite some degree of basal melting. (iv) Ice algal motility driven by gradients in limiting factors is a plausible mechanism to explain their vertical distribution. (v) Different ice algal bloom and net primary production (NPP) patterns were identified in the ice types studied, suggesting that ice algal maximal growth rates will increase, while sea ice vertically integrated NPP and biomass will decrease as a result of the predictable increase in the area covered by refrozen leads in the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Sea ice thermohaline dynamics and biogeochemistry in the Arctic Ocean: Empirical and model results

    DOE PAGES

    Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Olsen, Lasse M.; ...

    2017-06-08

    Here, large changes in the sea ice regime of the Arctic Ocean have occurred over the last decades justifying the development of models to forecast sea ice physics and biogeochemistry. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) to simulate physical and biogeochemical properties at time scales of a few weeks and to use the model to analyze ice algal bloom dynamics in different types of ice. Ocean and atmospheric forcing data and observations of the evolution of the sea ice properties collected from 18 April to 4 Junemore » 2015, during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition, were used to test the CICE model. Our results show the following: (i) model performance is reasonable for sea ice thickness and bulk salinity; good for vertically resolved temperature, vertically averaged Chl a concentrations, and standing stocks; and poor for vertically resolved Chl a concentrations. (ii) Improving current knowledge about nutrient exchanges, ice algal recruitment, and motion is critical to improve sea ice biogeochemical modeling. (iii) Ice algae may bloom despite some degree of basal melting. (iv) Ice algal motility driven by gradients in limiting factors is a plausible mechanism to explain their vertical distribution. (v) Different ice algal bloom and net primary production (NPP) patterns were identified in the ice types studied, suggesting that ice algal maximal growth rates will increase, while sea ice vertically integrated NPP and biomass will decrease as a result of the predictable increase in the area covered by refrozen leads in the Arctic Ocean.« less

  11. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  12. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  13. The land-ice contribution to 21st-century dynamic sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T.; Ridley, J.; Pardaens, A. K.; Hurkmans, R. T. W. L.; Payne, A. J.; Giesen, R. H.; Lowe, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.; Edwards, T. L.; Oerlemans, J.

    2014-06-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence global mean sea level through a number of processes including (but not limited to) thermal expansion of the oceans and enhanced land ice melt. In addition to their contribution to global mean sea level change, these two processes (among others) lead to local departures from the global mean sea level change, through a number of mechanisms including the effect on spatial variations in the change of water density and transport, usually termed dynamic sea level changes. In this study, we focus on the component of dynamic sea level change that might be given by additional freshwater inflow to the ocean under scenarios of 21st-century land-based ice melt. We present regional patterns of dynamic sea level change given by a global-coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model forced by spatially and temporally varying projected ice-melt fluxes from three sources: the Antarctic ice sheet, the Greenland Ice Sheet and small glaciers and ice caps. The largest ice melt flux we consider is equivalent to almost 0.7 m of global mean sea level rise over the 21st century. The temporal evolution of the dynamic sea level changes, in the presence of considerable variations in the ice melt flux, is also analysed. We find that the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is small, with the largest changes occurring in the North Atlantic amounting to 3 cm above the global mean rise. Furthermore, the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is similar regardless of whether the simulated ice fluxes are applied to a simulation with fixed CO2 or under a business-as-usual greenhouse gas warming scenario of increasing CO2.

  14. Nonlinear dynamic response of a simple ice-structure interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, D.G.; Troesch, A.W.; Wingate, W.C. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The problem addressed in the continuous indentation of a ship or offshore structure into an ice sheet. The impacting ship or offshore structure is represented by a mass-spring-dashpot system having a constant velocity relative to the ice sheet. The dynamic response of this simple analogue model of ice-structure interaction is studied in considerable detail. The complicated, highly nonlinear dynamic response is due to intermittent ice breakage and intermittent contact of the structure with the ice. Periodic motions are found and the periodicity for a particular system is dependent upon initial conditions. For a representative system, a Poincare map is presented showing the fixed points. A description of some of the effects of random variations in system parameters is also presented. Some implications of these findings regarding structural design for ice interaction are discussed.

  15. Seismic Observations on Greenland Ice Sheet By a Joint USA and Japanese Glisn Team (2011-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, G.; Kanao, M.; Tono, Y.; Himeno, T.; Tsuboi, S.; Childs, D.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Anderson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is currently causing melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Recently, a new type of seismic event, referred to as a "glacial earthquake", has been recognized. Such earthquakes are generated by the movements of large masses of ice within the terminal regions of glacier, and represent a new approach for monitoring ice sheet dynamics. In 2009, the GreenLand Ice Sheet monitoring Network (GLISN) was initiated as international project to monitor changes in ice sheet by constructing a large broadband seismological network in and around Greenland. Japan is a partner country from when the GLISN project was launched, and has been sending an expedition team every year from 2011. In 2011, the Japanese GLISN team, together with the USA team, installed the dual seismic-GPS station ICESG-GLS2 in the middle of the Greenland ice cap. In 2012 and 2013, we performed maintenance at the ICESG-GLS2, DY2G-GLS1, and NUUK stations. In August 2014, we plan to participate in maintenance operations on three dual seismic-GPS stations on ice (ICESG-GLS2, DY2G-GLS1, and NEEM-GLS3), as well as two stations on bedrock at East coast (DBG and SOEG). This presentation will summarize our field activities for four years, and show results from preliminary analysis with the retrieved data. The Japanese GLISN team has been supported by JSPS KAKENHI 24403006.

  16. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  17. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  18. Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data with automatic joint constraints and dynamic attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Mooney, M. A.; Karaoulis, M.; Wodajo, L.; Hickey, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Joint inversion and time-lapse inversion techniques of geophysical data are often implemented in an attempt to improve imaging of complex subsurface structures and dynamic processes by minimizing negative effects of random and uncorrelated spatial and temporal noise in the data. We focus on the structural cross-gradient (SCG) approach (enforcing recovered models to exhibit similar spatial structures) in combination with time-lapse inversion constraints applied to surface-based electrical resistivity and seismic traveltime refraction data. The combination of both techniques is justified by the underlying petrophysical models. We investigate the benefits and trade-offs of SCG and time-lapse constraints. Using a synthetic case study, we show that a combined joint time-lapse inversion approach provides an overall improvement in final recovered models. Additionally, we introduce a new approach to reweighting SCG constraints based on an iteratively updated normalized ratio of model sensitivity distributions at each time-step. We refer to the new technique as the Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC) approach. The relevance of the new joint time-lapse inversion process is demonstrated on the synthetic example. Then, these approaches are applied to real time-lapse monitoring field data collected during a quarter-scale earthen embankment induced-piping failure test. The use of time-lapse joint inversion is justified by the fact that a change of porosity drives concomitant changes in seismic velocities (through its effect on the bulk and shear moduli) and resistivities (through its influence upon the formation factor). Combined with the definition of attributes (i.e. specific characteristics) of the evolving target associated with piping, our approach allows localizing the position of the preferential flow path associated with internal erosion. This is not the case using other approaches.

  19. Quantifying Ice-sheet/Ice-shelf Dynamics and Variability with Meter-scale DEM and Velocity Timeseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; Moratto, Z. M.; Porter, C.; Morin, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are losing mass at an increasing rate, although loss due to accelerating flow and dynamic thinning remains poorly understood. We are using complementary data from repeat satellite and airborne observations to investigate the relationship between ice-sheet/ice-shelf dynamics and geometry on seasonal to interannual timescales. High-resolution along-track stereo imagery from commercial satellite vendors DigitalGlobe and GeoEye provides unprecedented spatial (~0.5 m/px with ~17 km swath width) and temporal (weekly/monthly) resolution for these efforts. We have developed an automated pipeline using open-source software to produce orthoimage, DEM, and surface velocity products from DigitalGlobe imagery. High-contrast surface texture (e.g. sastrugi, crevasses) visible at sub-meter resolution provides near-perfect image correlation (~99% success rate) during DEM and velocity map derivation. Elevation data from IceBridge ATM/LVIS, ICESat GLAS, and GPS campaigns are used to correct DEMs and perform accuracy assessment. Preliminary tests over exposed bedrock provide relative vertical accuracy estimates of <1-2 m for Worldview-1/2 DEMs. Velocity data from TerraSAR-X and GPS campaigns provide validation for surface velocity products, with horizontal error estimates of <10 m. Velocity and elevation change products with 2-4 m/px spatial resolution allow for unprecedented 3D dynamic characterization of sub-km flow transition zones (e.g. grounding lines, shear margins), capturing both local and regional variations due to melting and dynamic thinning. We present timeseries for West Greenland (Jakobshavn front - 20 observations, Jakobshavn south catchment - 10) and West Antarctica (Pine Island and Thwaites - 5 each) from 2009-2012. These observations complement ongoing efforts to measure and model outlet glacier dynamics, with implications for future ice-sheet mass balance estimates.

  20. Learning from the past: Antarctic Eemian ice sheet dynamics as an analogy for future warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Johannes; Thoma, Malte; Grosfeld, Klaus; Gierz, Paul; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Facing considerable warming during this century the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is under increasing scrutiny. Recent observations suggest that the marine ice sheet instability of the WAIS has already started . We investigate the dynamic evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the last interglacial, forcing a state of the art 3D ice sheet model with Eemian boundary conditions. We elucidate the role of ocean warming and surface mass balance on the coupled ice sheet/shelf and grounding line dynamics. Special focus lies on an ice sheet modeling assessment of Antarctica's potential contribution to global sea level rise during the Eemian. The transient model runs are forced by time slice experiments of a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean global circulation model, as well as different sets of sea level and bedrock reconstructions. The model result show strong evidences for a severe ice-sheet retreat in West Antartica, leading to substantical contribution to global sea level from the Southern Hemisphere. Additionally we compare future warming scenarios of West Antarctic Ice Sheet dynamics to our paleo ice sheet modeling studies.

  1. Dynamics of landfast sea ice near Jangbogo Antarctic Research Station observed by SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Han, H.

    2015-12-01

    Landfast sea ice is a type of sea ice adjacent to the coast and immobile for a certain period of time. It is important to analyze the temporal and spatial variation of landfast ice because it has significant influences on marine ecosystem and the safe operation of icebreaker vessels. However, it has been a difficult task for both remote sensing and in situ observation to discriminate landfast ice from other types of sea ice, such as pack ice, and also to understand the dynamics and internal strss-strain of fast ice. In this study, we identify landfast ice and its annual variation in Terra Nova Bay (74° 37' 4"S, 164° 13' 7"E), East Antarctica, where Jangbogo Antarctic Research Station has recently been constructed in 2014, by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technology. We generated 38 interferograms having temporal baselines of 1-9 days out of 62 COSMO-SkyMed SAR images over Terra Nova Bay obtained from December 2010 to January 2012. Landfast ice began to melt in November 2011 when air temperature raised above freezing point but lasted more than two month to the end of the study period in January 2012. No meaningful relationship was found between sea ice extent and wind and current. Glacial strain (~67cm/day) is similar to tidal strain (~40 cm) so that they appear similar in one-day InSAR. As glacial stress is cumulative while tidal stress is oscillatory, InSAR images with weekly temporal baseline (7~9 days) revealed that a consistent motion of Campbell Glacier Tongue (CGT) is pushing the sea ice continuously to make interferometric fringes parallel to the glacier-sea ice contacts. Glacial interferometric fringe is parallel to the glacier-sea ice contact lines while tidal strain should be parallel to the coastlines defined by sea shore and glacier tongue. DDInSAR operation removed the consistent glacial strain leaving tidal strain alone so that the response of fast ice to tide can be used to deduce physical properties of sea ice in various

  2. [Dynamic study of the distal radioulnar joint with computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Martelli, A; Zanlungo, M; Egitto, M G; Sibilla, L; Uggetti, C; Zappoli, F

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a CT technique which allows the dynamic study of the inferior radioulnar joint. The examination consists of 4 CT slices, three of them acquired at the same level-i.e., the radioulnar joint- in the prone, intermediate and supine positions, respectively. The last slice is acquired, with the patient in the prone position, at the base of the styloid process where the triangular fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The distal radioulnar ligaments are not directly visible. Nineteen patients complaining of painfully impaired pronation and supination because of previous trauma (11 Colles fractures, 7 distortions and 1 Galeazzi lesion) were examined with this technique. In all patients, both wrists were studied to obtain normal parameters. The radioulnar joint was evaluated superimposing a draft on the dynamic images, which demonstrated that, in healthy limbs, during movement the ulnar epiphysis is always contained between two parallel lines drawn on the volar and dorsal surfaces of the radial epiphysis, respectively. It was also confirmed that supination is possible up to 110-135 degrees from the support plane. CT demonstrated different causes of impaired movements in the affected joints: in 12 cases some fibrous density tissue was seen at the ulnar epiphysis on the volar aspect and considered to be the evolution of a traumatic hematoma; 6 patients presented dorsal subluxation of the ulna during movement; finally, volar subluxation was detected only in one case. In 6 patients the triangular fibrocartilage was detached; in 1 patient an intraarticular fluid collection was demonstrated. In 3 patients CT detected no abnormalities. The fibrous tissue is responsible for impaired movements and causes the detached triangular fibrocartilage to shrink. The authors believe that this simple CT technique can yield useful pieces of information for accurate surgical planning.

  3. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  4. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  5. Improved parameterization of marine ice dynamics and flow instabilities for simulation of the Austfonna ice cap using a large-scale ice sheet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunse, T.; Greve, R.; Schuler, T.; Hagen, J. M.; Navarro, F.; Vasilenko, E.; Reijmer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Austfonna ice cap covers an area of 8120 km2 and is by far the largest glacier on Svalbard. Almost 30% of the entire area is grounded below sea-level, while the figure is as large as 57% for the known surge-type basins in particular. Marine ice dynamics, as well as flow instabilities presumably control flow regime, form and evolution of Austfonna. These issues are our focus in numerical simulations of the ice cap. We employ the thermodynamic, large-scale ice sheet model SICOPOLIS (http://sicopolis.greveweb.net/) which is based on the shallow-ice approximation. We present improved parameterizations of (a) the marine extent and calving and (b) processes that may initiate flow instabilities such as switches from cold to temperate basal conditions, surface steepening and hence, increases in driving stress, enhanced sliding or deformation of unconsolidated marine sediments and diminishing ice thicknesses towards flotation thickness. Space-borne interferometric snapshots of Austfonna revealed a velocity structure of a slow moving polar ice cap (< 10m/a) interrupted by distinct fast flow units with velocities in excess of 100m/a. However, observations of flow variability are scarce. In spring 2008, we established a series of stakes along the centrelines of two fast-flowing units. Repeated DGPS and continuous GPS measurements of the stake positions give insight in the temporal flow variability of these units and provide constrains to the modeled surface velocity field. Austfonna’s thermal structure is described as polythermal. However, direct measurements of the temperature distribution is available only from one single borehole at the summit area. The vertical temperature profile shows that the bulk of the 567m thick ice column is cold, only underlain by a thin temperate basal layer of approximately 20m. To acquire a spatially extended picture of the thermal structure (and bed topography), we used low-frequency (20 MHz) GPR profiling across the ice cap and the

  6. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH. PMID:25008081

  7. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-09-06

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH.

  8. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  9. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-07

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  10. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  11. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Kohler, Jack; Andreassen, Karin

    2016-04-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a draw down of isochrones and cold ice. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in ice viscosity and releases deformation energy that can raise the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. Questions that arise are what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice and whether such past drainage events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on ice dynamics as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a full Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy-gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that a rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, can release considerable amounts of deformational energy, with the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in the horizontal extent of subglacial lakes and slippery patches, compared to the average ice column velocity, can create a traveling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past drainage events with ice penetrating radar.

  12. Modeling brine and nutrient dynamics in Antarctic sea ice: the case of dissolved silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancoppenolle, M.; Goosse, H.; de Montety, A.; Fichefet, T.; Tremblay, B.; Tison, J.

    2009-12-01

    Sea ice ecosystems are characterized by micro-algae living in brine inclusions. The growth rate of ice algae depends on light and nutrient supply. Here, the interactions between nutrients and brine dynamics under the influence of algae are investigated using a one-dimensional model. The model includes snow and ice thermodynamics with brine physics and an idealized sea ice biological component, characterized by one nutrient, namely dissolved silica (DSi). In the model, DSi follows brine motion and is consumed by ice algae. Depending on physical ice characteristics, the brine flow is either advective, diffusive or turbulent. The vertical profiles of ice salinity and DSi concentration are solutions of advection-diffusion equations. The model is configured to simulate the typical thermodynamic regimes of first-year Antarctic pack ice. The simulated vertical profiles of salinity and DSi qualitatively reproduce observations. Analysis of results highlights the role of convection in the lowermost 5-10 cm of ice. Convection mixes saline, nutrient-poor brine with comparatively fresh, nutrient-rich seawater. This implies a rejection of salt to the ocean and a flux of DSi to the ice. In presence of growing algae, the simulated ocean-to-ice DSi flux increases by 0-115% compared to an abiotic situation. In turn, primary production and brine convection act in synergy to form a nutrient pump. The other important processes are the flooding of the surface by seawater and the percolation of meltwater. The former refills nutrients near the ice surface in spring. The latter, if present, tends to expell nutrients from the ice in summer. Sketch of salt (left) and nutrient (right) exchanges at the ice-ocean interface proposed in this paper.

  13. Tropical tropopause ice clouds: a dynamic approach to the mystery of low crystal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, P.; Krämer, M.

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of high, persistent ice supersaturation inside and outside cold cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) remains an enigma that is intensely debated as the "ice supersaturation puzzle". However, it was recently confirmed that observed supersaturations are consistent with very low ice crystal concentrations, which is incompatible with the idea that homogeneous freezing is the major method of ice formation in the TTL. Thus, the tropical tropopause "ice supersaturation puzzle" has become an "ice nucleation puzzle". To explain the low ice crystal concentrations, a number of mainly heterogeneous freezing methods have been proposed. Here, we reproduce in situ measurements of frequencies of occurrence of ice crystal concentrations by extensive model simulations, driven by the special dynamic conditions in the TTL, namely the superposition of slow large-scale updraughts with high-frequency short waves. From the simulations, it follows that the full range of observed ice crystal concentrations can be explained when the model results are composed from scenarios with consecutive heterogeneous and homogeneous ice formation and scenarios with pure homogeneous ice formation occurring in very slow (< 1 cm s-1) and faster (> 1 cm s-1) large-scale updraughts, respectively. This statistical analysis shows that about 80% of TTL cirrus can be explained by "classical" homogeneous ice nucleation, while the remaining 20% stem from heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing occurring within the same environment. The mechanism limiting ice crystal production via homogeneous freezing in an environment full of gravity waves is the shortness of the gravity waves, which stalls freezing events before a higher ice crystal concentration can be formed.

  14. Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Rosen, Paul; Ranson, Jon; Zebker, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council Earth Science Decadal Survey, Earth Science Applications from Space, recommends that DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice), an integrated L-band InSAR and multibeam Lidar mission, launch in the 2010- 2013 timeframe. The mission will measure surface deformation for solid Earth and cryosphere objectives and vegetation structure for understanding the carbon cycle. InSAR has been used to study surface deformation of the solid Earth and cryosphere and more recently vegetation structure for estimates of biomass and ecosystem function. Lidar directly measures topography and vegetation structure and is used to estimate biomass and detect changes in surface elevation. The goal of DESDynI is to take advantage of the spatial continuity of InSAR and the precision and directness of Lidar. There are several issues related to the design of the DESDynI mission, including combining the two instruments into a single platform, optimizing the coverage and orbit for the two techniques, and carrying out the science modeling to define and maximize the scientific output of the mission.

  15. Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Rosen, Paul; Ranson, Jon; Zebker, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council Earth Science Decadal Survey, Earth Science Applications from Space, recommends that DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice), an integrated L-band InSAR and multibeam Lidar mission, launch in the 2010- 2013 timeframe. The mission will measure surface deformation for solid Earth and cryosphere objectives and vegetation structure for understanding the carbon cycle. InSAR has been used to study surface deformation of the solid Earth and cryosphere and more recently vegetation structure for estimates of biomass and ecosystem function. Lidar directly measures topography and vegetation structure and is used to estimate biomass and detect changes in surface elevation. The goal of DESDynI is to take advantage of the spatial continuity of InSAR and the precision and directness of Lidar. There are several issues related to the design of the DESDynI mission, including combining the two instruments into a single platform, optimizing the coverage and orbit for the two techniques, and carrying out the science modeling to define and maximize the scientific output of the mission.

  16. Dynamic cycles, ice streams and their impact on the extent, chronology and deglaciation of the British-Irish ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alun; Bradwell, Tom; Golledge, Nicholas; Hall, Adrian; Patton, Henry; Sugden, David; Cooper, Rhys; Stoker, Martyn

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a suite of forward transient numerical modelling experiments of the British and Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS), consisting of Scottish, Welsh and Irish accumulation centres, spanning the last Glacial period from 38 to 10 ka BP. The 3D thermomechanical model employed uses higher-order physics to solve longitudinal (membrane) stresses and to reproduce grounding-line dynamics. Surface mass balance is derived using a distributed degree-day calculation based on a reference climatology from mean (1961-1990) precipitation and temperature patterns. The model is perturbed from this reference state by a scaled NGRIP oxygen isotope curve and the SPECMAP sea-level reconstruction. Isostatic response to ice loading is computed using an elastic lithosphere/relaxed asthenosphere scheme. A suite of 350 simulations were designed to explore the parameter space of model uncertainties and sensitivities, to yield a subset of experiments that showed close correspondence to offshore and onshore ice-directional indicators, broad BIIS chronology, and the relative sea-level record. Three of these simulations are described in further detail and indicate that the separate ice centres of the modelled BIIS complex are dynamically interdependent during the build up to maximum conditions, but remain largely independent throughout much of the simulation. The modelled BIIS is extremely dynamic, drained mainly by a number of transient but recurrent ice streams which dynamically switch and fluctuate in extent and intensity on a centennial time-scale. A series of binge/purge, advance/retreat, cycles are identified which correspond to alternating periods of relatively cold-based ice, (associated with a high aspect ratio and net growth), and wet-based ice with a lower aspect ratio, characterised by streaming. The timing and dynamics of these events are determined through a combination of basal thermomechanical switching spatially propagated and amplified through longitudinal coupling, but

  17. Dynamic recrystallization during deformation of polycrystalline ice: insights from numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Jansen, Daniela; Roessiger, Jens; Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Weikusat, Ilka

    2017-02-13

    The flow of glaciers and polar ice sheets is controlled by the highly anisotropic rheology of ice crystals that have hexagonal symmetry (ice lh). To improve our knowledge of ice sheet dynamics, it is necessary to understand how dynamic recrystallization (DRX) controls ice microstructures and rheology at different boundary conditions that range from pure shear flattening at the top to simple shear near the base of the sheets. We present a series of two-dimensional numerical simulations that couple ice deformation with DRX of various intensities, paying special attention to the effect of boundary conditions. The simulations show how similar orientations of c-axis maxima with respect to the finite deformation direction develop regardless of the amount of DRX and applied boundary conditions. In pure shear this direction is parallel to the maximum compressional stress, while it rotates towards the shear direction in simple shear. This leads to strain hardening and increased activity of non-basal slip systems in pure shear and to strain softening in simple shear. Therefore, it is expected that ice is effectively weaker in the lower parts of the ice sheets than in the upper parts. Strain-rate localization occurs in all simulations, especially in simple shear cases. Recrystallization suppresses localization, which necessitates the activation of hard, non-basal slip systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Dynamic recrystallization during deformation of polycrystalline ice: insights from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Jansen, Daniela; Roessiger, Jens; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Weikusat, Ilka

    2017-02-01

    The flow of glaciers and polar ice sheets is controlled by the highly anisotropic rheology of ice crystals that have hexagonal symmetry (ice lh). To improve our knowledge of ice sheet dynamics, it is necessary to understand how dynamic recrystallization (DRX) controls ice microstructures and rheology at different boundary conditions that range from pure shear flattening at the top to simple shear near the base of the sheets. We present a series of two-dimensional numerical simulations that couple ice deformation with DRX of various intensities, paying special attention to the effect of boundary conditions. The simulations show how similar orientations of c-axis maxima with respect to the finite deformation direction develop regardless of the amount of DRX and applied boundary conditions. In pure shear this direction is parallel to the maximum compressional stress, while it rotates towards the shear direction in simple shear. This leads to strain hardening and increased activity of non-basal slip systems in pure shear and to strain softening in simple shear. Therefore, it is expected that ice is effectively weaker in the lower parts of the ice sheets than in the upper parts. Strain-rate localization occurs in all simulations, especially in simple shear cases. Recrystallization suppresses localization, which necessitates the activation of hard, non-basal slip systems. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  19. Decadal slowdown of a land-terminating sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet during sustained climate warming - implications for wider ice sheet hydrology-dynamics coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienow, P. W.; Tedstone, A. J.; Gourmelen, N.; Dehecq, A.; Goldberg, D. N.; Hanna, E.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between surface melting and ice motion will affect how the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) responds to climate and the structure of the subglacial drainage system may be crucial in controlling how changing melt-rates impact ice motion. Ice sheet motion varies over seasonal time-scales in response to varying surface meltwater inputs to the ice-sheet bed which lubricate the ice-bed interface, resulting in periods of faster ice motion. However, the impact of hydro-dynamic coupling on ice motion over decadal timescales remains poorly constrained. Here we utilise remotely-sensed optical Landsat imagery to generate a record of annual motion spanning three decades extending back to 1985. Our observations cover an ˜8000 km2 area along ˜170 km of predominantly land-terminating margin of the west GrIS, and extend ˜50 km inland to 1100 m asl. We find that that annual ice motion was 12% slower in 2007-2014 compared to 1985-1994, despite a corresponding 50% increase in surface meltwater production. Less than 1/3 of the observed slowdown can be explained by a reduction in internal deformation caused by marginal ice sheet thinning, and we therefore hypothesise that increases in subglacial drainage efficiency, associated with sustained larger melt volumes, have reduced basal lubrication resulting in slower ice flow. Our findings suggest that hydro-dynamic coupling in this section of the ablation zone resulted in net ice motion slowdown over decadal timescales — not speedup as previously postulated. Increases in meltwater production from projected climate warming may therefore further reduce the motion of land-terminating margins of the ice-sheet indicating such margins are more resilient to the dynamic impacts of enhanced meltwater production than previously thought. The implications of these observations for wider ice sheet hydrology-dynamics coupling are considered.

  20. Integrating terrestrial and marine archives of Late Wisconsinan ice stream dynamics in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakeman, Thomas; Blasco, Steve; MacLean, Brian; Bennett, Robbie; England, John; Hughes Clarke, John; Covill, Bob; Patton, Eric

    2014-05-01

    During Late Wisconsinan glaciation the northern Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets converged over the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This ice sheet complex included several major ice streams, which constituted important dynamical components. Discharging into the Beaufort Sea and Baffin Bay, these ice streams were a primary control on ice sheet mass balance and ice age sedimentation on adjacent continental margins, including the Arctic Ocean basin. This study presents a new compilation of multibeam echosounder data, sub-bottom profiler data, radiocarbon ages, and marine sediment cores acquired primarily during regional surveys with the CCGS Amundsen. These data characterize the nature and thickness of seafloor sediments in Parry Channel (and many of its connecting channels) and Amundsen Gulf. When combined with the results of terrestrial geomorphological mapping of the adjacent islands, this dataset constrains the maximum extent, chronology, and behaviour of former ice streams in M'Clure Strait, Viscount Melville Sound, Lancaster Sound, and Amundsen Gulf. Importantly, these data highlight complex patterns of past ice stream flow during regional deglaciation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the causal mechanisms that occasioned retreat of the terrestrial and marine sectors of the Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets. As well, this study helps to quantify past iceberg fluxes to the Arctic Ocean, which has implications for assessing past climate, and the origin of ice-rafted sediment and deep iceberg scours in the Arctic Ocean basin.

  1. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, M.; Worster, G.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The collapse of an ice shelf can lead to dramatic acceleration and thinning of the ice streams and glaciers that flowed into the former shelf. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  2. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F

    2011-11-22

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century.

  3. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2011-01-01

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  4. Investigating role of ice-ocean interaction on glacier dynamic: Results from numerical modeling applied to Petermann Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, F. M.; van der Veen, C. J.; Vieli, A.; Pattyn, F.; Hubbard, A.; Box, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Calving of icebergs and bottom melting from ice shelves accounts for roughly half the ice transferred from the Greenland Ice Sheet into the surrounding ocean, and virtually all of the ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Petermann Glacier (north Greenland) with its ~17 km wide and ~ 60 km long floating ice-shelf is experiencing high rates of bottom melting. The recent partial disintegration of its shelf (in August 2010) presents a natural experiment to investigate the dynamic response of the ice sheet to its shelf retreat. We apply a numerical ice flow model using a physically-based calving criterion based on crevasse depth to investigate the contribution of processes such as shelf disintegration, bottom melting, sea ice or sikkusak disintegration and surface run off to the mass balance of Petermann Glacier and assess its stability. Our modeling study provides insights into the role of ice-ocean interaction, and on response of Petermann Glacier to its recent massive ice loss.

  5. Full Stokes or shallow ice approximation? Comparing the ice flow dynamics at the Shirase Drainage Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    2012-12-01

    Covering an area of 2 x 105 km2, the Shirase Drainage Basin is located in East Antarctica (37-50° E, 70-78° S). The basin is characterized by the convergence of the ice flow towards the Shirase glacier, one of the fastest flowing glacier in Antarctica. The Shirase glacier flows at a speed of 2.3 km a-1 at the grounding line (Rignot, 2002; Pattyn and Derauw, 2002; Nakamura and others, 2008) and drains about 10 Gt a-1 of ice through a narrow outlet into the Lützow-Holm Bay (Fujii, 1981). With nearly 90% of total ice discharge from the basin being calved by the glacier, the fast flowing nature of the Shirase glacier is important for the investigation of the ice sheet mass budget in this region. The dynamics of the Shirase glacier is investigated by means of the full Stokes equations and the shallow ice approximation. The model Elmer/Ice (http://elmerice.elmerfem.com) is applied to the Shirase Drainage Basin and employs the finite element method to solve the full Stokes equations, the temperature evolution equation and the evolution equation of the free surface. The shallow ice approximation is also implemented into Elmer/Ice so that both the full Stokes and the shallow ice approximation are computed on the same mesh. Data for the present geometry (surface and basal topographies with no shelf) are obtained from the Community Ice Sheet Model, based on the DEM of Bamber and others (2009) and Griggs and Bamber (2009), and on the BEDMAP1-Plus ice sheet basal topography. A mesh of the computational domain is created using an initial footprint which contains elements from 15 km to 500 m horizontal resolution. The footprint is vertically extruded to form a 3D mesh of 240720 elements with 21 equidistant, terrain-following layers. The approach taken in this study is to compare the response of the glacier to dynamical and climate forcings when separately the full Stokes and the shallow ice approximation are employed. The sensitivity experiments are modeled after the Sea

  6. North American ice-sheet dynamics and the onset of 100,000-year glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Bintanja, R; van de Wal, R S W

    2008-08-14

    The onset of major glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere about 2.7 million years ago was most probably induced by climate cooling during the late Pliocene epoch. These glaciations, during which the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets successively expanded and retreated, are superimposed on this long-term climate trend, and have been linked to variations in the Earth's orbital parameters. One intriguing problem associated with orbitally driven glacial cycles is the transition from 41,000-year to 100,000-year climatic cycles that occurred without an apparent change in insolation forcing. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the transition, both including and excluding ice-sheet dynamics. Difficulties in finding a conclusive answer to this palaeoclimatic problem are related to the lack of sufficiently long records of ice-sheet volume or sea level. Here we use a comprehensive ice-sheet model and a simple ocean-temperature model to extract three-million-year mutually consistent records of surface air temperature, ice volume and sea level from marine benthic oxygen isotopes. Although these records and their relative phasings are subject to considerable uncertainty owing to limited availability of palaeoclimate constraints, the results suggest that the gradual emergence of the 100,000-year cycles can be attributed to the increased ability of the merged North American ice sheets to survive insolation maxima and reach continental-scale size. The oversized, wet-based ice sheet probably responded to the subsequent insolation maximum by rapid thinning through increased basal-sliding, thereby initiating a glacial termination. Based on our assessment of the temporal changes in air temperature and ice volume during individual glacials, we demonstrate the importance of ice dynamics and ice-climate interactions in establishing the 100,000-year glacial cycles, with enhanced North American ice-sheet growth and the subsequent merging of the ice sheets being key elements.

  7. Ice cliff dynamics in the Everest region of the Central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Watson, C.; Quincey, Duncan J.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Smith, Mark W.

    2017-02-01

    The importance of ice cliffs for glacier-scale ablation on debris-covered glaciers is now widely recognised. However, a paucity of data exists to describe the spatio-temporal distribution of ice cliffs. In this study we analysed the position and geometry of 8229 ice cliffs and 5582 supraglacial ponds on 14 glaciers in the Everest region between 2000 and 2015. We observed notable ice cliff and pond spatial coincidence. On average across our study glaciers, 77% of supraglacial pond area was associated with an adjacent ice cliff, and 49% of ice cliffs featured an adjacent supraglacial pond. The spatial density of ice cliffs was not directly related to glacier velocity, but did peak within zones of active ice. Furthermore, we found that ice cliff density was glacier-specific, temporally variable, and was positively correlated with surface lowering and decreasing debris thickness for individual glaciers. Ice cliffs predominantly had a north-facing (commonly north-westerly) aspect, which was independent of glacier flow direction, thereby signifying a strong solar radiation control on cliff evolution. Independent field observations indicated that cliff morphology was related to aspect, local debris thickness, and presence of a supraglacial pond, and highlighted the importance of surface runnel formation, which acts as a preferential pathway for meltwater and debris fluxes. Overall, by coupling remote sensing and in-situ observations it has been possible to capture local and glacier-scale ice cliff dynamics across 14 glaciers, which is necessary if explicit parameterisation of ice cliffs in dynamic glacier models is to be achieved.

  8. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Nicholas R; Fogwill, Christopher J; Mackintosh, Andrew N; Buckley, Kevin M

    2012-10-02

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments-a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets.

  9. Heterogeneous Heat Flow and Groundwater Effects on East Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, B. T.; Soderlund, K. M.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results numerical models describing the potential contributions groundwater and heterogeneous heat sources might have on ice dynamics. A two-phase, 1D hydrothermal model demonstrates the importance of groundwater flow in heat flux advection near the ice-bed interface. Typical, conservative vertical groundwater volume fluxes on the order of +/- 1-10 mm/yr can alter vertical heat flux by +/- 50-500 mW/m2 that could produce considerable volumes of meltwater depending on basin geometry and geothermal heat production. A 1D hydromechanical model demonstrates that during ice advance groundwater is mainly recharged into saturated sedimentary aquifers and during retreat groundwater discharges into the ice-bed interface, potentially contributing to subglacial water budgets on the order of 0.1-1 mm/yr during ice retreat. A map of most-likely elevated heat production provinces, estimated sedimentary basin depths, and radar-derived bed roughness are compared together to delineate areas of greatest potential to ice sheet instability in East Antarctica. Finally, a 2D numerical model of crustal fluid and heat flow typical to recently estimated sedimentary basins under the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is coupled to a 2.5D Full Stokes ice sheet model (with simple basal hydrology) to test for the sensitivity of hydrodynamic processes on ice sheet dynamics. Preliminary results show that the enhanced fluid flow can dramatically alter the basal heating of the ice and its temperature profile, as well as, the sliding rate, which heavily alter ice dynamics.

  10. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Buckley, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments—a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets. PMID:22988078

  11. Modelling of subject specific based segmental dynamics of knee joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. H. M.; Ibrahim, B. S. K. K.; Huq, M. S.; Ahmad, M. K. I.

    2017-09-01

    This study determines segmental dynamics parameters based on subject specific method. Five hemiplegic patients participated in the study, two men and three women. Their ages ranged from 50 to 60 years, weights from 60 to 70 kg and heights from 145 to 170 cm. Sample group included patients with different side of stroke. The parameters of the segmental dynamics resembling the knee joint functions measured via measurement of Winter and its model generated via the employment Kane's equation of motion. Inertial parameters in the form of the anthropometry can be identified and measured by employing Standard Human Dimension on the subjects who are in hemiplegia condition. The inertial parameters are the location of centre of mass (COM) at the length of the limb segment, inertia moment around the COM and masses of shank and foot to generate accurate motion equations. This investigation has also managed to dig out a few advantages of employing the table of anthropometry in movement biomechanics of Winter's and Kane's equation of motion. A general procedure is presented to yield accurate measurement of estimation for the inertial parameters for the joint of the knee of certain subjects with stroke history.

  12. Detection and Analysis of Complex Patterns of Ice Dynamics in Antarctica from ICESat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, Gregory Scott

    There remains much uncertainty in estimating the amount of Antarctic ice mass change, its dynamic component, and its spatial and temporal patterns. This work remedies the limitations of previous studies by generating the first detailed reconstruction of total and dynamic ice thickness and mass changes across Antarctica, from ICESat satellite altimetry observations in 2003-2009 using the Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change Detection (SERAC) method. Ice sheet thickness changes are calculated with quantified error estimates for each time when ICESat flew over a ground-track crossover region, at approximately 110,000 locations across the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The time series are partitioned into changes due to surficial processes and ice dynamics. The new results markedly improve the spatial and temporal resolution of surface elevation, volume, and mass change rates for the AIS, and can be sampled at annual temporal resolutions. The results indicate a complex spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic mass loss in Antarctica, especially along individual outlet glaciers, and allow for the quantification of the annual contribution of Antarctic ice loss to sea level rise. Over 5000 individual locations exhibit either strong dynamic ice thickness change patterns, accounting for approximately 500 unique spatial clusters that identify regions likely influenced by subglacial hydrology. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of these regions reveal the complexity and short-time scale variability in the subglacial hydrological system. From the 500 unique spatial clusters, over 370 represent newly identified, and not previously published, potential subglacial water bodies indicating an active subglacial hydrological system over a much larger region than previously observed. These numerous new observations of dynamic changes provide more than simply a larger set of data. Examination of both regional and local scale dynamic change patterns across Antarctica shows newly

  13. The future of the Devon Ice cap: results from climate and ice dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Ruth; Rodehacke, Christian; Boberg, Fredrik

    2017-04-01

    The Devon Ice Cap is an example of a relatively well monitored small ice cap in the Canadian Arctic. Close to Greenland, it shows a similar surface mass balance signal to glaciers in western Greenland. Here we use high resolution (5km) simulations from HIRHAM5 to drive the PISM glacier model in order to model the present day and future prospects of this small Arctic ice cap. Observational data from the Devon Ice Cap in Arctic Canada is used to evaluate the surface mass balance (SMB) data output from the HIRHAM5 model for simulations forced with the ERA-Interim climate reanalysis data and the historical emissions scenario run by the EC-Earth global climate model. The RCP8.5 scenario simulated by EC-Earth is also downscaled by HIRHAM5 and this output is used to force the PISM model to simulate the likely future evolution of the Devon Ice Cap under a warming climate. We find that the Devon Ice Cap is likely to continue its present day retreat, though in the future increased precipitation partly offsets the enhanced melt rates caused by climate change.

  14. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, E.; Humbert, A.; Kleiner, T.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, K.

    2015-07-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a subsequent draw-down of isochrones and cold ice from the surface. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in temperature and ice viscosity, releasing deformation energy which raises the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. A question is what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice, and whether such past events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on the dynamics of a model ice stream as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a Full-Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that the rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, releases large amounts of deformational energy, which has the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature, commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in lake geometry or basal friction create a travelling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past events with ice penetrating radar.

  15. Tropical tropopause ice clouds: a dynamic approach to the mystery of low crystal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, P.; Krämer, M.

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of high, persistent ice supersaturation inside and outside cold cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) remains an enigma that is intensely debated as the "ice supersaturation puzzle". However, it was recently confirmed that observed supersaturations are consistent with very low ice crystal concentrations, which is incompatible with the idea that homogeneous freezing is the major method of ice formation in the TTL. Thus, the tropical tropopause "ice supersaturation puzzle" has become an "ice nucleation puzzle". To explain the low ice crystal concentrations, a number of mainly heterogeneous freezing methods have been proposed. Here, we reproduce in situ measurements of frequencies of occurrence of ice crystal concentrations by extensive model simulations, driven by the special dynamic conditions in the TTL, namely the superposition of slow large-scale updraughts with high-frequency short waves. From the simulations, it follows that the full range of observed ice crystal concentrations can be explained when the model results of the scenarios are mixed for both heterogeneous/homogeneous and pure homogeneous ice formation occurring in very slow (<1 cm s-1) and faster (>1 cm s-1) large-scale updraughts. This statistical analysis shows that about 80% of TTL cirrus can be explained by "classical" homogeneous ice nucleation, while the remaining 20% stem from heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing occurring within the same environment. The mechanism limiting ice crystal production via homogeneous freezing in an environment full of gravity waves is the shortness of the gravity waves, which stalls freezing events before a higher ice crystal concentration can be formed.

  16. Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, Dale G.; Yu, Bingbin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2015-04-01

    To create long-term solutions for offshore wind turbines in a variety of environmental conditions, CAE tools are needed to model the design-driving loads that interact with an offshore wind turbine system during operation. This report describes our efforts in augmenting existing CAE tools used for offshore wind turbine analysis with a new module that can provide simulation capabilities for ice loading on the system. This augmentation was accomplished by creating an ice-loading module coupled to FAST8, the CAE tool maintained by the NREL for simulating land-based and offshore wind turbine dynamics. The new module includes both static and dynamic ice loading that can be applied during a dynamic simulation of the response of an offshore wind turbine. The ice forces can be prescribed, or influenced by the structure’s compliant response, or by the dynamics of both the structure and the ice floe. The new module covers ice failure modes of spalling, buckling, crushing, splitting, and bending. The supporting structure of wind turbines can be modeled as a vertical or sloping form at the waterline. The Inward Battered Guide Structure (IBGS) foundation designed by Keystone Engineering for the Great Lakes was used to study the ice models coupled to FAST8. The IBGS foundation ice loading simulations in FAST8 were compared to the baseline simulation case without ice loading. The ice conditions reflecting those from Lake Huron at Port Huron and Lake Michigan at North Manitou were studied under near rated wind speed of 12 m/s for the NREL 5-MW reference turbine. Simulations were performed on ice loading models 1 through 4 and ice model 6 with their respective sub-models. The purpose of ice model 5 is to investigate ice loading on sloping structures such as ice-cones on a monopile and is not suitable for multi-membered jacketed structures like the IBGS foundation. The key response parameters from the simulations, shear forces and moments from the tower base and IBGS foundation

  17. Joint Model and Parameter Dimension Reduction for Bayesian Inversion Applied to an Ice Sheet Flow Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghattas, O.; Petra, N.; Cui, T.; Marzouk, Y.; Benjamin, P.; Willcox, K.

    2016-12-01

    Model-based projections of the dynamics of the polar ice sheets play a central role in anticipating future sea level rise. However, a number of mathematical and computational challenges place significant barriers on improving predictability of these models. One such challenge is caused by the unknown model parameters (e.g., in the basal boundary conditions) that must be inferred from heterogeneous observational data, leading to an ill-posed inverse problem and the need to quantify uncertainties in its solution. In this talk we discuss the problem of estimating the uncertainty in the solution of (large-scale) ice sheet inverse problems within the framework of Bayesian inference. Computing the general solution of the inverse problem--i.e., the posterior probability density--is intractable with current methods on today's computers, due to the expense of solving the forward model (3D full Stokes flow with nonlinear rheology) and the high dimensionality of the uncertain parameters (which are discretizations of the basal sliding coefficient field). To overcome these twin computational challenges, it is essential to exploit problem structure (e.g., sensitivity of the data to parameters, the smoothing property of the forward model, and correlations in the prior). To this end, we present a data-informed approach that identifies low-dimensional structure in both parameter space and the forward model state space. This approach exploits the fact that the observations inform only a low-dimensional parameter space and allows us to construct a parameter-reduced posterior. Sampling this parameter-reduced posterior still requires multiple evaluations of the forward problem, therefore we also aim to identify a low dimensional state space to reduce the computational cost. To this end, we apply a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) approach to approximate the state using a low-dimensional manifold constructed using ``snapshots'' from the parameter reduced posterior, and the discrete

  18. Updated Position and Ice Velocity for the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment. (AIDJEX) Manned Camps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    FIGURES iv INTRODUCTION 1 DATA ACQUISITION 3 PREPROCESSING 5 KALMAN SMOOTHING 9 RESULTS 16 APPENDIX I Kalman Smoothing Equations 21 APPENDIX 2...measurements have been edited using Kalman smoothing techniques to give the best estimates of position and velocity. (The raw measurements themselves are...V(D C-4 Coj Li, U,) I U,) N >- g -4 UI 0 CDi - Ni I Nj c;0 4;C r- - - --r- - - - % r r r r r * * * . * * . . . . * . * . * * Kalman Smoothing In the

  19. Characterization of sea ice cover, motion and dynamics in Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Beardsley, Robert C.; Owens, W. Brechner

    2011-07-01

    As part of the U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean Program, data from two automatic weather stations (AWSs) on small islets and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) and an upward-looking sonar (ULS) on sub-surface moorings have been analyzed to produce time series of atmospheric forcing, sea ice thickness, sea ice and ocean velocities, and sea ice momentum balances within Marguerite Bay and at mid-shelf on the central west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf for the austral winter-spring seasons of 2001 and 2002. Both years had roughly seven months of nearly complete sea ice cover, but ice onset was about two months earlier in 2002 than 2001 mostly due to extremely cold surface air temperatures in Marguerite Bay during May-June 2002. Sea ice draft was quite variable, but generally thickened with time, reaching ˜2-3 m by the end of September before thinning. In October, 2002, a polynya was observed at one site within Marguerite Bay that lasted for 4 days. The sea ice motion and dynamics in Marguerite Bay were analyzed when sea ice draft was greater than 2 m. Wind stress during these periods was predominantly southward and southeastward. Wind stress, sea ice, and near-surface water motion were partially correlated, with sea ice motion greater than water motion. Large wind stress and sea ice and water motions occurred during short energetic events of a few days or shorter; however, the rms wind stress, sea ice, and water velocities were small, about 0.3 N m -2, 8-16 cm s -1, and 5-7 cm s -1, respectively. Mean sea ice motion was southward, but quite small, of order 2 cm s -1, while mean near-surface water motion was not statistically different from zero. The dominant sea ice momentum balance was between wind and internal ice stresses on time scales of several days and longer, with water stress, Coriolis, and tilt terms playing secondary roles. The mean southward wind stress was balanced, within uncertainty, by the mean northward internal ice stress. The

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of D2O ice photodesorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; Cuppen, H.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    We present results of MD calculations performed to study the photodissociation of D2O in an amorphous ice at different ice temperatures in order to investigate isotope effects on the photodesorption processes. In dense interstellar clouds, small dust particles of micrometer silicates are covered by ice mantles, mainly consisting of H2O and also of CO, CO2. Previous MD calculations of H2O ice at Tice=10-90 K show that the photodesorption of H while OH remains trapped is the main outcome in the first three monolayers (MLs). On the other hand, the H and OH photofragments released recombine or are trapped at separate positions in the deeper MLs and can react with other species in the ice. Desorption and trapping probabilities have been calculated following photoexcitation of D2O amorphous ice at 10, 20, 60 and 90 K, and the main conclusions agree with previous calculations of H2O ice. But, the average D photodesorption probability is smaller than that of the H atom, whereas the average OD radical photodesorption probability is larger than that of OH, and the average D2O photodesorption probability is larger than that for H2O due to the D2O kick-out mechanism. The total (OD + D2O) yield has been compared with experiments and the total (OH + H2O) yield from previous simulations. We find better agreement when we compare experimental yields with calculated yields for D2O ice than when we compare with calculated yields for H2O ice.

  1. Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action

    PubMed Central

    Słowiński, Piotr; Zhai, Chao; Alderisio, Francesco; Salesse, Robin; Gueugnon, Mathieu; Marin, Ludovic; Bardy, Benoit G.; di Bernardo, Mario; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.). We propose here an index of such variability, namely an individual motor signature (IMS) able to capture the subtle differences in the way each of us moves. We show that the IMS of a person is time-invariant and that it significantly differs from those of other individuals. This allows us to quantify the dynamic similarity, a measure of rapport between dynamics of different individuals' movements, and demonstrate that it facilitates coordination during interaction. We use our measure to confirm a key prediction of the theory of similarity that coordination between two individuals performing a joint-action task is higher if their motions share similar dynamic features. Furthermore, we use a virtual avatar driven by an interactive cognitive architecture based on feedback control theory to explore the effects of different kinematic features of the avatar motion on coordination with human players. PMID:27009178

  2. Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action.

    PubMed

    Słowiński, Piotr; Zhai, Chao; Alderisio, Francesco; Salesse, Robin; Gueugnon, Mathieu; Marin, Ludovic; Bardy, Benoit G; di Bernardo, Mario; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-03-01

    Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.). We propose here an index of such variability, namely an individual motor signature (IMS) able to capture the subtle differences in the way each of us moves. We show that the IMS of a person is time-invariant and that it significantly differs from those of other individuals. This allows us to quantify the dynamic similarity, a measure of rapport between dynamics of different individuals' movements, and demonstrate that it facilitates coordination during interaction. We use our measure to confirm a key prediction of the theory of similarity that coordination between two individuals performing a joint-action task is higher if their motions share similar dynamic features. Furthermore, we use a virtual avatar driven by an interactive cognitive architecture based on feedback control theory to explore the effects of different kinematic features of the avatar motion on coordination with human players.

  3. Dynamic Textures Modeling via Joint Video Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xian; Li, Yuanxiang; Shen, Hao; Chen, Fang; Kleinsteuber, Martin; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2017-04-06

    Video representation is an important and challenging task in the computer vision community. In this paper, we consider the problem of modeling and classifying video sequences of dynamic scenes which could be modeled in a dynamic textures (DT) framework. At first, we assume that image frames of a moving scene can be modeled as a Markov random process. We propose a sparse coding framework, named joint video dictionary learning (JVDL), to model a video adaptively. By treating the sparse coefficients of image frames over a learned dictionary as the underlying "states", we learn an efficient and robust linear transition matrix between two adjacent frames of sparse events in time series. Hence, a dynamic scene sequence is represented by an appropriate transition matrix associated with a dictionary. In order to ensure the stability of JVDL, we impose several constraints on such transition matrix and dictionary. The developed framework is able to capture the dynamics of a moving scene by exploring both sparse properties and the temporal correlations of consecutive video frames. Moreover, such learned JVDL parameters can be used for various DT applications, such as DT synthesis and recognition. Experimental results demonstrate the strong competitiveness of the proposed JVDL approach in comparison with state-of-the-art video representation methods. Especially, it performs significantly better in dealing with DT synthesis and recognition on heavily corrupted data.

  4. Changes in ice dynamics along the northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehaus, T.; Braun, M.; Cook, A.; Marinsek, S.

    2016-12-01

    The climatic conditions along the Antarctic Peninsula have undergone considerable changes during the last 50 years. Numerous ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula retreated, started to break-up or disintegrated. The loss of the buttressing effect caused tributary glaciers to accelerate with increasing ice discharge along the Antarctic Peninsula. The aim is to study the reaction of glaciers at the northern Antarctic Peninsula to the changing climatic conditions and the readjustments of tributary glaciers to ice shelf disintegration, as well as to better quantify the ice mass loss and its temporal changes.We analysed time series of various SAR satellite sensors to detect changes in ice flow speed and surface elevation. Intensity feature tracking techniques were applied on data stacks from different SAR satellites over the last 20 years to infer changes in glacier surface velocities. High resolution bi-static TanDEM-X data was used to derive digital elevation models by differential SAR interferometry. In combination with ASTER and SPOT stereo images, changes in surface elevations were determined. Altimeter data from ICESat, CryoSat-2 and NASA operation IceBridge ATM were used for vertical referencing and quality assessment of the digital elevation models. Along the west coast of the northern Antarctic Peninsula an increase in flow speeds by 40% between 1992 and 2014 was observed, whereas glaciers on the east side (north of former Prince-Gustav Ice Shelf) showed a strong deceleration. In total an ice discharge of 17.93±6.22 Gt/a was estimated for 74 glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula north of 65°S. Most of the former ice shelf tributaries showed similar reactions to ice shelf disintegration. At the Sjögren-Inlet a total ice mass loss of -37.5±8.2 Gt and a contribution to sea level rise of 20.9±5.2 Gt were found in the period 1993-2014. The average surface lowering rate in the period 2012-2014 amounts to -2.2 m/a. At Dinsmoor-Bombardier-Edgeworth glacier

  5. A dynamic early East Antarctic Ice Sheet suggested by ice-covered fjord landscapes.

    PubMed

    Young, Duncan A; Wright, Andrew P; Roberts, Jason L; Warner, Roland C; Young, Neal W; Greenbaum, Jamin S; Schroeder, Dustin M; Holt, John W; Sugden, David E; Blankenship, Donald D; van Ommen, Tas D; Siegert, Martin J

    2011-06-02

    The first Cenozoic ice sheets initiated in Antarctica from the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and other highlands as a result of rapid global cooling ∼34 million years ago. In the subsequent 20 million years, at a time of declining atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and an evolving Antarctic circumpolar current, sedimentary sequence interpretation and numerical modelling suggest that cyclical periods of ice-sheet expansion to the continental margin, followed by retreat to the subglacial highlands, occurred up to thirty times. These fluctuations were paced by orbital changes and were a major influence on global sea levels. Ice-sheet models show that the nature of such oscillations is critically dependent on the pattern and extent of Antarctic topographic lowlands. Here we show that the basal topography of the Aurora Subglacial Basin of East Antarctica, at present overlain by 2-4.5 km of ice, is characterized by a series of well-defined topographic channels within a mountain block landscape. The identification of this fjord landscape, based on new data from ice-penetrating radar, provides an improved understanding of the topography of the Aurora Subglacial Basin and its surroundings, and reveals a complex surface sculpted by a succession of ice-sheet configurations substantially different from today's. At different stages during its fluctuations, the edge of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet lay pinned along the margins of the Aurora Subglacial Basin, the upland boundaries of which are currently above sea level and the deepest parts of which are more than 1 km below sea level. Although the timing of the channel incision remains uncertain, our results suggest that the fjord landscape was carved by at least two iceflow regimes of different scales and directions, each of which would have over-deepened existing topographic depressions, reversing valley floor slopes.

  6. Effect of biopolymers on structure and ice recrystallization in dynamically frozen ice cream model systems.

    PubMed

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2002-11-01

    Ice crystal growth and microstructure of sugarsolutions prepared with stabilizers (carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC], xanthan gum, locust bean gum [LBG], and gelatin) with or without milk solids-nonfat (MSNF) after freezing in a scraped surface heat exchanger and temperature cycling (5 cycles from -6 degrees C to -20 degrees C) were studied. Ice crystal growth was calculated from brightfield microscopic images acquired from samples before and after cycling. Freeze-substitution and low-temperature embedding (LR-Gold resin) were sample preparation techniques utilized for structure analyses by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Differential staining for carbohydrates and proteins allowed the identification of stabilizer gel-like structures in LBG, gelatin, and gelatin/MSNF solutions. In the absence of milk proteins, xanthan and LBG were the most effective at retarding recrystallization, while in their presence, only xanthan had an effect. Cryo-gelation of the LBG was observed but is not the only mechanism of stabilizer action. Thermodynamic incompatibility between biopolymers was observed to promote localized high concentrations of milk proteins located at the ice crystal interface, probably exerting a water-holding action that significantly enhanced the stabilizer effect. Qualitatively, solution heterogeneity (phase separation) was directly proportional to ice crystal growth inhibition. It is suggested that water-holding by stabilizer and proteins, and in some cases steric hindrance induced by a stabilizer gel-like network, caused a reduction in the kinetics of the ice recrystallization phenomena and promoted mechanisms of melt-regrow instead of melt-diffuse-grow recrystallization, thus resulting in the preservation of the ice crystal size and in a small span of the ice crystal size distribution.

  7. Order and thermalized dynamics in Heisenberg-like square and Kagomé spin ices.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Pereira, A R; Moura-Melo, W A; de Araujo, C I L

    2015-02-25

    Thermodynamic properties of a spin ice model on a Kagomé lattice are obtained from dynamic simulations and compared with properties in square lattice spin ice. The model assumes three-component Heisenberg-like dipoles of an array of planar magnetic islands situated on a Kagomé lattice. Ising variables are avoided. The island dipoles interact via long-range dipolar interactions and are restricted in their motion due to local shape anisotropies. We define various order parameters and obtain them and thermodynamic properties from the dynamics of the system via a Langevin equation, solved by the Heun algorithm. Generally, a slow cooling from high to low temperature does not lead to a particular state of order, even for a set of coupling parameters that gives well thermalized states and dynamics. At very low temperature, however, square ice is more likely to reach states near the ground state than Kagomé ice, for the same island coupling parameters.

  8. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  9. Dynamic radiostereometric analysis for evaluation of hip joint pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars; de Raedt, Sepp; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Kaptein, Bart; Stilling, Maiken

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic RSA (dRSA) enables non-invasive 3D motion-tracking of bones and may be used to evaluate in-vivo hip joint kinematics including hip pathomechanics such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and the biomechanical effects of arthroscopic cheilectomy and -rim trimming (ACH). The study aim was to evaluate the kinematic changes in the hip joint after ACH. Seven non-FAI affected human cadaveric hips were CT-scanned and CT-bone models were created. dRSA recordings of the hip joints were acquired at five frames/s during passive flexion, adduction to stop, and internal rotation to stop (FADIR). ACH was performed and dRSA was repeated. dRSA images were analyzed using model-based RSA. Hip joint kinematics before and after ACH were compared pairwise. The volume of removed bone was quantified and compared to the postoperative range of motion (ROM). Mean hip internal rotation increased from 19.1 to 21.9° (p = 0.04, Δ2.8°, SD 2.7) after ACH surgery. Mean adduction of 3.9° before and 2.7° after ACH surgery was unchanged (p = 0.48, Δ-1.2°; SD 4.3). Mean flexion angles during dRSA tests were 82.4° before and 80.8° after ACH surgery, which were similar (p = 0.18, Δ-1.6°, SD = 2.7). No correlation between volume of removed bone and ROM was observed. A small increase in internal rotation, but not in adduction, was observed after arthroscopic cheilectomy and -rim trimming in cadaver hips. The hip flexion angle of the FADIR test was reproducible. dRSA kinematic analysis is a new and clinically applicable method with good potential to evaluate hip joint kinematics and to test FAI pathomechanics and other surgical corrections of the hip.

  10. The effect of salt on the melting of ice: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Soo; Yethiraj, Arun

    2008-09-28

    The effect of added salt (NaCl) on the melting of ice is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The equilibrium freezing point depression observed in the simulations is in good agreement with experimental data. The kinetic aspects of melting are investigated in terms of the exchange of water molecules between ice and the liquid phase. The ice/liquid equilibrium is a highly dynamic process with frequent exchange of water molecules between ice and the liquid phase. The balance is disturbed when ice melts and the melting proceeds in two stages; the inhibition of the association of water molecules to the ice surface at short times, followed by the increased dissociation of water molecules from the ice surface at longer times. We also find that Cl(-) ions penetrate more deeply into the interfacial region than Na(+) ions during melting. This study provides an understanding of the kinetic aspects of melting that could be useful in other processes such as the inhibition of ice growth by antifreeze proteins.

  11. The effect of salt on the melting of ice: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Yethiraj, Arun

    2008-09-01

    The effect of added salt (NaCl) on the melting of ice is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The equilibrium freezing point depression observed in the simulations is in good agreement with experimental data. The kinetic aspects of melting are investigated in terms of the exchange of water molecules between ice and the liquid phase. The ice/liquid equilibrium is a highly dynamic process with frequent exchange of water molecules between ice and the liquid phase. The balance is disturbed when ice melts and the melting proceeds in two stages; the inhibition of the association of water molecules to the ice surface at short times, followed by the increased dissociation of water molecules from the ice surface at longer times. We also find that Cl- ions penetrate more deeply into the interfacial region than Na+ ions during melting. This study provides an understanding of the kinetic aspects of melting that could be useful in other processes such as the inhibition of ice growth by antifreeze proteins.

  12. Pyroclastic density current dynamics and associated hazards at ice-covered volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Cowlyn, J.; Kennedy, B.; McAdams, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes by which pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are emplaced is crucial for volcanic hazard prediction and assessment. Snow and ice can facilitate PDC generation by lowering the coefficient of friction and by causing secondary hydrovolcanic explosions, promoting remobilisation of proximally deposited material. Where PDCs travel over snow or ice, the reduction in surface roughness and addition of steam and meltwater signficantly changes the flow dynamics, affecting PDC velocities and runout distances. Additionally, meltwater generated during transit and after the flow has come to rest presents an immediate secondary lahar hazard that can impact areas many tens of kilometers beyond the intial PDC. This, together with the fact that deposits emplaced on ice are rarely preserved means that PDCs over ice have been little studied despite the prevalence of summit ice at many tall stratovolcanoes. At Ruapehu volcano in the North Island of New Zealand, a monolithologic welded PDC deposit with unusually rounded clasts provides textural evidence for having been transported over glacial ice. Here, we present the results of high-resolution multiphase numerical PDC modeling coupled with experimentaly determined rates of water and steam production for the Ruapehu deposits in order to assess the effect of ice on the Ruapehu PDC. The results suggest that the presence of ice significantly modified the PDC dynamics, with implications for assessing the PDC and associated lahar hazards at Ruapehu and other glaciated volcanoes worldwide.

  13. Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition ice dynamics in the Wicklow Mountains, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Lauren; Boston, Clare; Lovell, Harold; Pepin, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of the extent and dynamics of former ice masses in the Wicklow Mountains, Ireland, during the Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition (LGIT; 15-10 ka BP) is currently unresolved. Whilst it is acknowledged that the region hosted a local ice cap within the larger British-Irish Ice Sheet at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 27 ka BP), there has been little consideration of ice cap disintegration to a topographically constrained ice mass during the LGIT. This research has produced the first regional glacial geomorphological map, through remote sensing (aerial photograph and digital terrain model interrogation) and field mapping. This has allowed both the style and extent of mountain glaciation and ice recession dynamics during the LGIT to be established. This geomorphological mapping has highlighted that evidence for local glaciation in the Wicklow Mountains is more extensive than previously recognised, and that small icefields and associated outlet valley glaciers existed during the LGIT following disintegration of the Wicklow Ice Cap. A relative chronology based on morphostratigraphic principles is developed, which indicates complex patterns of ice mass oscillation characterised by periods of both sustained retreat and minor readvance. Variations in the pattern of recession across the Wicklow Mountains are evident and appear to be influenced, in part, by topographic controls (e.g. slope, aspect, glacier hypsometry). In summary, this research establishes a relative chronology of glacial events in the region during the LGIT and presents constraints on ice mass extent, dynamics and retreat patterns, offering an insight into small ice mass behaviour in a warming climate.

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulation of clustering processes in sea-ice floes.

    PubMed

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2011-11-01

    In seasonally ice-covered seas and along the margins of perennial ice pack, i.e., in regions with medium ice concentrations, the ice cover typically consists of separate floes interacting with each other by inelastic collisions. In this paper, hitherto unexplored analogies between this type of ice cover and two-dimensional granular gases are used to formulate a model of ice dynamics at the floe level. The model consists of (i) momentum equations for floe motion between collisions, formulated in the form of a Stokes-flow problem, with floe-size-dependent time constant and equilibrium velocity, and (ii) a hard-disk collision model. The numerical algorithm developed is suitable for simulating particle-laden flow of N disk-shaped floes with arbitrary size distributions. The model is applied to study clustering phenomena in sea ice with power-law floe-size distribution. In particular, the influence of the average ice concentration A on the formation and characteristics of clusters is analyzed in detail. The results show the existence of two regimes, at low and high ice concentrations, differing in terms of the exponents of the cluster-size distribution and of the size of the largest cluster.

  15. Dynamics of ice mass deformation: Linking processes to rheology, texture, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, Sandra; Wilson, Christopher J. L.; Luzin, Vladimir; Brouzet, Christophe; Peternell, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Prediction of glacier and polar ice sheet dynamics is a major challenge, especially in view of changing climate. The flow behavior of an ice mass is fundamentally linked to processes at the grain and subgrain scale. However, our understanding of ice rheology and microstructure evolution based on conventional deformation experiments, where samples are analyzed before and after deformation, remains incomplete. To close this gap, we combine deformation experiments with in situ neutron diffraction textural and grain analysis that allows continuous monitoring of the evolution of rheology, texture, and microstructure. We prepared ice samples from deuterium water, as hydrogen in water ice has a high incoherent neutron scattering rendering it unsuitable for neutron diffraction analysis. We report experimental results from deformation of initially randomly oriented polycrystalline ice at three different constant strain rates. Results show a dynamic system where steady-state rheology is not necessarily coupled to microstructural and textural stability. Textures change from a weak single central c axis maxima to a strong girdle distribution at 35° to the compression axis attributed to dominance of basal slip followed by basal combined with pyramidal slip. Dislocation-related hardening accompanies this switch and is followed by weakening due to new grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. With decreasing strain rate, grain boundary migration becomes increasingly dominant and texture more pronounced. Our observations highlight the link between the dynamics of processes competition and rheological and textural behavior. This link needs to be taken into account to improve ice mass deformation modeling critical for climate change predictions.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of CO2 formation in interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    In dense interstellar clouds where new stars and planets are formed, small dust particles of micrometer silicates are covered by ice mantles, mainly consisting of H2O and also of CO, CO2, CH4 and other molecules. A high flux of UV photons can produce several photodissociative events. Previous MD calculations of H2O ice at Tice=10-90 K show that the photodesorption of H while OH remains trapped is the main outcome following photoexcitation in the first three monolayers (MLs). On the other hand, the H and OH photofragments released following photoexcitation deeper in the ice recombine or are trapped at separate positions, and can then react with other species in the ice. We hope to present results of MD calculations performed to study the photoinduced reaction of OH with CO through photodissociation of H2O in an amorphous COad - H2O ice at 10 K. This reaction pathway is supposed to be a principle route to form CO2 in interstellar ices.

  17. Ice sheet/shelf dynamics at grounding lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robison, R. A.; Huppert, H. E.; Worster, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel experimental and theoretical analysis of the conditions under which an ice sheet loses contact with its basal bed rock to form a floating ice shelf. The experiments consist of modelling the ice sheet by a Newtonian viscous fluid, either glycerine or golden syrup. The `ocean' is represented by a relatively dense solution of aqueous potassium carbonate, made up to be more dense than the viscous fluid of the `ice' shelf. The viscous fluid is input just above the `ocean' surface at a constant flux to propagate in a two-dimensional fashion down an inclined ramp into the `ocean'. The grounding line, at which the viscous fluid leaves the ramp and flows over the aqueous ocean, was observed to approach a steady position dependent on the values of the flux, the bed slope, the kinematic viscosity of the viscous fluid and its density difference from the underlying `ocean'. A simple but powerful, complementary theory was developed, based on balancing horizontal forces at the grounding line, where the differing flow regimes of the ice sheet and ice shelf must match. The theoretical results for the downslope position of the grounding line are in good agreement with our experimental observations. Video sequences of the experiments will be presented.

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Properties of Intermittent Jointed Rock Models Subjected to Cyclic Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent jointed rocks, which exist in a myriad of engineering projects, are extraordinarily susceptible to cyclic loadings. Understanding the dynamic fatigue properties of jointed rocks is necessary for evaluating the stability of rock engineering structures. This study numerically investigated the influences of cyclic loading conditions (i.e., frequency, maximum stress and amplitude) and joint geometric configurations (i.e., dip angle, persistency and interspace) on the dynamic fatigue mechanisms of jointed rock models. A reduction model of stiffness and strength was first proposed, and then, sixteen cyclic uniaxial loading tests with distinct loading parameters and joint geometries were simulated. Our results indicate that the reduction model can effectively reproduce the hysteresis loops and the accumulative plastic deformation of jointed rocks in the cyclic process. Both the loading parameters and the joint geometries significantly affect the dynamic properties, including the irreversible strain, damage evolution, dynamic residual strength and fatigue life. Three failure modes of jointed rocks, which are principally controlled by joint geometries, occur in the simulations: splitting failure through the entire rock sample, sliding failure along joint planes and mixed failure, which are principally controlled by joint geometries. Furthermore, the progressive failure processes of the jointed rock samples are numerically observed, and the different loading stages can be distinguished by the relationship between the number of broken bonds and the axial stress.

  19. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc.

  20. Distributions of ice supersaturation and ice crystals from airborne observations in relation to upper tropospheric dynamical boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Jensen, Jorgen B.; Pan, Laura L.; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Honomichl, Shawn; Bresch, James F.; Bansemer, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    Ice supersaturation (ISS) is the prerequisite condition for cirrus cloud formation. To examine multiscale dynamics' influences on ISS formation, we analyze in situ aircraft observations (~200 m scale) over North America in coordinates relative to dynamical boundaries in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Two case studies demonstrate that ISS formation is likely influenced by mesoscale uplifting, small-scale waves, and turbulence. A collective analysis of 15 flights in April-June 2008 shows that the top layers of ISS and ice crystal distributions are strongly associated with thermal tropopause height. In addition, the average occurrence frequencies of ISS and ice crystals on the anticyclonic side of the jet stream are ~1.5-2 times of those on the cyclonic side. By defining five cirrus evolution phases based on the spatial relationships between ice-supersaturated and in-cloud regions, we find that their peak occurrence frequencies are located at decreasing altitudes with respect to the thermal tropopause: (phase 1) clear-sky ISS around the tropopause, (phase 2) nucleation phase around 2 km below the tropopause, (phases 3 and 4) early and later growth phases around 6 km below the tropopause, and (phase 5) sedimentation/sublimation around 2-6 km below the tropopause. Consistent with this result, chemical tracer correlation analysis shows that the majority (~80%) of the earlier cirrus phases (clear-sky ISS and nucleation) occurs inside the chemical tropopause transition layer, while the later phases happen mostly below that layer. These results shed light on the role of dynamical environment in facilitating cirrus cloud formation and evolution.

  1. Geophysical constraints on the dynamics and retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet as a paleobenchmark for models of marine ice sheet deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Henry; Andreassen, Karin; Bjarnadóttir, Lilja R.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Winsborrow, Monica C. M.; Noormets, Riko; Polyak, Leonid; Auriac, Amandine; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of processes relating to the retreat of marine-based ice sheets, such as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and tidewater-terminating glaciers in Greenland today, is still limited. In particular, the role of ice stream instabilities and oceanographic dynamics in driving their collapse are poorly constrained beyond observational timescales. Over numerous glaciations during the Quaternary, a marine-based ice sheet has waxed and waned over the Barents Sea continental shelf, characterized by a number of ice streams that extended to the shelf edge and subsequently collapsed during periods of climate and ocean warming. Increasing availability of offshore and onshore geophysical data over the last decade has significantly enhanced our knowledge of the pattern and timing of retreat of this Barents Sea ice sheet (BSIS), particularly so from its Late Weichselian maximum extent. We present a review of existing geophysical constraints that detail the dynamic evolution of the BSIS through the last glacial cycle, providing numerical modelers and geophysical workers with a benchmark data set with which to tune ice sheet reconstructions and explore ice sheet sensitivities and drivers of dynamic behavior. Although constraining data are generally spatially sporadic across the Barents and Kara Seas, behaviors such as ice sheet thinning, major ice divide migration, asynchronous and rapid flow switching, and ice stream collapses are all evident. Further investigation into the drivers and mechanisms of such dynamics within this unique paleo-analogue is seen as a key priority for advancing our understanding of marine-based ice sheet deglaciations, both in the deep past and in the short-term future.

  2. Recent ice dynamic and surface mass balance of Union Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Uribe, J. A.; Jaña, R.; Oberreuter, J.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the results of a comprehensive glaciological investigation of Union Glacier (79°46' S/83°24' W) in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), a major outlet glacier within the Ellsworth Mountains. Union Glacier flows into the Ronne Ice Shelf, where recent models have indicated the potential for significant grounding line zone (GLZ) migrations in response to changing climate and ocean conditions. To elaborate a glaciological base line that can help to evaluate the potential impact of this GLZ change scenario, we installed an array of stakes on Union Glacier in 2007. The stake network has been surveyed repeatedly for elevation, velocity, and net surface mass balance. The region of the stake measurements is in near-equilibrium, and ice speeds are 10 to 33 m a-1. Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) have been used to map the subglacial topography, internal structure, and crevasse frequency and depth along surveyed tracks in the stake site area. The bedrock in this area has a minimum elevation of -858 m a.s.l., significantly deeper than shown by BEDMAP2 data. However, between this deeper area and the local GLZ, there is a threshold where the subglacial topography shows a maximum altitude of 190 m. This subglacial condition implies that an upstream migration of the GLZ will not have strong effects on Union Glacier until it passes beyond this shallow ice pinning point.

  3. Modelling the palaeo grounding-line retreat dynamics of the Uummannaq Ice Stream in Western Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Roberts, Dave; Rea, Brice; Lane, Tim; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.

    2013-04-01

    We aim to understand what controlled the retreat pattern of the Uummannaq Ice Stream (UIS) during the last deglaciation. The ice stream was grounded close to the continental shelf edge at the Last Glacial Maximum, and retreated rapidly after 14.8 ka. Cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating on Ubekendt Island at the convergence zone of multiple feeder ice streams show that the ice surface thinned progressively and that the island became ice-free by ca. 12.4 ka. The ice stream then collapsed over the next 1-1.6 kyrs and the ice stream separated into a series of distinct inland arms. However, it is currently unclear what controlled the nonlinear retreat pattern identified in the Uummannaq system. We test the hypothesis that the geometry of the landscape strongly conditions the rate of retreat of the UIS. In order to do this, we constrain a numerical model of ice stream retreat using the marine geophysical data and measurements of sediment strength on the continental shelf. The model has the capability to dynamically and robustly simulate grounding line-retreat behaviour over millennial timescales. We simulate the retreat of the UIS grounding line into the northernmost Rinks system and conduct sensitivity tests to explore its response to a range of forcing patterns. The model is initialised at a steady-state LGM configuration and is subjected to a series of retreat perturbations forced by either rising sea-level, enhanced melting at the ice-ocean interface, or warming climate. We compare the simulated dynamic behaviour of the UIS against the terrestrial record of ice stream retreat to determine why retreat during the last deglaciation was nonlinear.

  4. Nonlinear characteristics of joints as elements of multi-body dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    As the connecting elements in multi-body structures, joints play a pivotal role in the overall dynamic response of these systems. Obviously, the linear stiffness of the joint strongly influences the system frequencies, but the joints are also likely to be the dominant sources of damping and nonlinearities, especially in aircraft and space structures. The general characteristics of such joints will be discussed. Then the state of the art in nonlinear joint characterization techniques will be surveyed. Finally, the impact that joints have on the overall response of structures will be evaluated.

  5. Ice-shelf damming in the glacial Arctic Ocean: dynamical regimes of a basin-covering kilometre-thick ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan; Jakobsson, Martin; Borstad, Chris; Kirchner, Nina; Björk, Göran; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Stranne, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data suggest that a 1 km thick ice shelf extended over the glacial Arctic Ocean during Marine Isotope Stage 6, about 140 000 years ago. Here, we theoretically analyse the development and equilibrium features of such an ice shelf, using scaling analyses and a one-dimensional ice-sheet-ice-shelf model. We find that the dynamically most consistent scenario is an ice shelf with a nearly uniform thickness that covers the entire Arctic Ocean. Further, the ice shelf has two regions with distinctly different dynamics: a vast interior region covering the central Arctic Ocean and an exit region towards the Fram Strait. In the interior region, which is effectively dammed by the Fram Strait constriction, there are strong back stresses and the mean ice-shelf thickness is controlled primarily by the horizontally integrated mass balance. A narrow transition zone is found near the continental grounding line, in which the ice-shelf thickness decreases offshore and approaches the mean basin thickness. If the surface accumulation and mass flow from the continental ice masses are sufficiently large, the ice-shelf thickness grows to the point where the ice shelf grounds on the Lomonosov Ridge. As this occurs, the back stress increases in the Amerasian Basin and the ice-shelf thickness becomes larger there than in the Eurasian Basin towards the Fram Strait. Using a one-dimensional ice-dynamic model, the stability of equilibrium ice-shelf configurations without and with grounding on the Lomonosov Ridge are examined. We find that the grounded ice-shelf configuration should be stable if the two Lomonosov Ridge grounding lines are located on the opposites sides of the ridge crest, implying that the downstream grounding line is located on a downward sloping bed. This result shares similarities with the classical result on marine ice-sheet stability of Weertman, but due to interactions between the Amerasian and Eurasian ice-shelf segments the mass flux at the

  6. Similitude of ice dynamics against scaling of geometry and physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Johannes; Levermann, Anders

    2016-08-01

    The concept of similitude is commonly employed in the fields of fluid dynamics and engineering but rarely used in cryospheric research. Here we apply this method to the problem of ice flow to examine the dynamic similitude of isothermal ice sheets in shallow-shelf approximation against the scaling of their geometry and physical parameters. Carrying out a dimensional analysis of the stress balance we obtain dimensionless numbers that characterize the flow. Requiring that these numbers remain the same under scaling we obtain conditions that relate the geometric scaling factors, the parameters for the ice softness, surface mass balance and basal friction as well as the ice-sheet intrinsic response time to each other. We demonstrate that these scaling laws are the same for both the (two-dimensional) flow-line case and the three-dimensional case. The theoretically predicted ice-sheet scaling behavior agrees with results from numerical simulations that we conduct in flow-line and three-dimensional conceptual setups. We further investigate analytically the implications of geometric scaling of ice sheets for their response time. With this study we provide a framework which, under several assumptions, allows for a fundamental comparison of the ice-dynamic behavior across different scales. It proves to be useful in the design of conceptual numerical model setups and could also be helpful for designing laboratory glacier experiments. The concept might also be applied to real-world systems, e.g., to examine the response times of glaciers, ice streams or ice sheets to climatic perturbations.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the magnetization dynamics of an artificial square spin ice cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlit, Merlin; Stockem, Irina; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Schröder, Christian; Müller, Jens

    2016-10-01

    We study the magnetization dynamics of a spin ice cluster which is a building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition both experimentally and theoretically. The spin ice cluster is composed of twelve interacting Co nanoislands grown directly on top of a high-resolution micro-Hall sensor. By employing micromagnetic simulations and a macrospin model, we calculate the magnetization and the experimentally investigated stray field emanating from a single nanoisland. The parameters determined from a comparison with the experimental hysteresis loop are used to derive an effective single-dipole macrospin model that allows us to investigate the dynamics of the spin ice cluster. Our model reproduces the experimentally observed non-deterministic sequences in the magnetization curves as well as the distinct temperature dependence of the hysteresis loop.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the magnetization dynamics of an artificial square spin ice cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlit, Merlin Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-10-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of a spin ice cluster which is a building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition both experimentally and theoretically. The spin ice cluster is composed of twelve interacting Co nanoislands grown directly on top of a high-resolution micro-Hall sensor. By employing micromagnetic simulations and a macrospin model, we calculate the magnetization and the experimentally investigated stray field emanating from a single nanoisland. The parameters determined from a comparison with the experimental hysteresis loop are used to derive an effective single-dipole macrospin model that allows us to investigate the dynamics of the spin ice cluster. Our model reproduces the experimentally observed non-deterministic sequences in the magnetization curves as well as the distinct temperature dependence of the hysteresis loop.

  9. Semi-brittle rheology and ice dynamics in DynEarthSol3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Liz C.; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo; Tan, Eh; Catania, Ginny A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a semi-brittle rheology and explore its potential for simulating glacier and ice sheet deformation using a numerical model, DynEarthSol3D (DES), in simple, idealized experiments. DES is a finite-element solver for the dynamic and quasi-static simulation of continuous media. The experiments within demonstrate the potential for DES to simulate ice failure and deformation in dynamic regions of glaciers, especially at quickly changing boundaries like glacier termini in contact with the ocean. We explore the effect that different rheological assumptions have on the pattern of flow and failure. We find that the use of a semi-brittle constitutive law is a sufficient material condition to form the characteristic pattern of basal crevasse-aided pinch-and-swell geometry, which is observed globally in floating portions of ice and can often aid in eroding the ice sheet margins in direct contact with oceans.

  10. Skillful seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice retreat and advance dates in a dynamical forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmond, M.; Reader, M. C.; Flato, G. M.; Merryfield, W. J.; Tivy, A.

    2016-12-01

    The need for skillful seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice is rapidly increasing. Technology to perform such forecasts with coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice systems has only recently become available, with previous skill evaluations mainly limited to area-integrated quantities. Here we show, based on a large set of retrospective ensemble model forecasts, that a dynamical forecast system produces skillful seasonal forecasts of local sea ice retreat and advance dates - variables that are of great interest to a wide range of end users. Advance dates can generally be skillfully predicted at longer lead times ( 5 months on average) than retreat dates ( 3 months). The skill of retreat date forecasts mainly stems from persistence of initial sea ice anomalies, whereas advance date forecasts benefit from longer time scale and more predictable variability in ocean temperatures. These results suggest that further investments in the development of dynamical seasonal forecast systems may result in significant socioeconomic benefits.

  11. Modeling of joints for the dynamic analysis of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1987-01-01

    An experimentally-based method for determining the stiffness and damping of truss joints is described. The analytical models use springs and both viscous and friction dampers to simulate joint load-deflection behavior. A least-squares algorithm is developed to identify the stiffness and damping coefficients of the analytical joint models from test data. The effects of nonlinear joint stiffness such as joint dead band are also studied. Equations for predicting the sensitivity of beam deformations to changes in joint stiffness are derived and used to show the level of joint stiffness required for nearly rigid joint behavior. Finally, the global frequency sensitivity of a truss structure to random perturbations in joint stiffness is discussed.

  12. Geological and meteorological controls on icing (aufeis) dynamics (1985 to 2014) in subarctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, P. D.; Wolfe, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Icings are widespread yet poorly understood winter hydrological phenomena that develop over the winter by freezing successive overflows of groundwater to the surface. Groundwater hydrology in arctic regions is constrained by geological setting and permafrost extent, and overflows are possibly driven by cold winters, winter warming intervals, high antecedent autumn rainfall, and low early winter snowfall. Consequently, icings are spatially recurrent but not necessarily annually nor to the same extent. We test the significance of identified meteorological forcing variables against a long-term data set of icing dynamics and distribution we developed for the Great Slave region around Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Climate is regionally consistent, but variable geology and permafrost create hydrological conditions representative of much of the subarctic. We mapped 5500 icings in the study area (21,887 km2) with a semiautomated approach utilizing late spring Landsat archival images (1985 to 2014). Individual icing size, ranging 3 orders of magnitude (1.8 × 10-3 km2 to 4.1 km2), is related to return frequency. Infrequent ice (25% return frequency) accounts for 94% of the total icing area (86 km2). Winter warming intervals (≥5°C; typically over 1-3 days) and autumn rainfall (September and October) explain 28% of icing density interannual variation overall. Interannual icing variation and significant meteorological forcing variables differ among ecoregions where varied geological settings and permafrost conditions influence the hydrological regime. Future icings may develop less frequently due to decreasing winter warming intervals, but increasing autumn rainfall may increase icing density where Canadian Shield leads to strong threshold-mediated runoff generation processes.

  13. Drivers of inorganic carbon dynamics in first-year sea ice: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Sébastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Delille, Bruno; Tison, Jean-Louis; Zhou, Jiayun; Kotovich, Marie; Thomas, David; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Goosse, Hugues

    2015-04-01

    Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halo-thermodynamic sea ice model including gas physics and carbon biogeochemistry. The ice-ocean fluxes, and vertical transport, of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) are represented using fluid transport equations. Carbonate chemistry, the consumption and release of CO2 by primary production and respiration, the precipitation and dissolution of ikaite (CaCO3•6H2O) and ice-air CO2 fluxes, are also included. The model is evaluated using observations from a 6-month field study at Point Barrow, Alaska and an ice-tank experiment. At Barrow, results show that the DIC budget is mainly driven by physical processes, wheras brine-air CO2 fluxes, ikaite formation, and net primary production, are secondary factors. In terms of ice-atmosphere CO2 exchanges, sea ice is a net CO2 source and sink in winter and summer, respectively. The formulation of the ice-atmosphere CO2 flux impacts the simulated near-surface CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), but not the DIC budget. Because the simulated ice-atmosphere CO2 fluxes are limited by DIC stocks, and therefore < 2 mmol m-2 day-1, we argue that the observed much larger CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance retrievals cannot be explained by a sea ice direct source and must involve other processes or other sources of CO2. Finally, the simulations suggest that near surface TA/DIC ratios of ~2, sometimes used as an indicator of calcification, would rather suggest outgassing.

  14. Drivers of inorganic carbon dynamics in first-year sea ice: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Sébastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Delille, Bruno; Tison, Jean-Louis; Zhou, Jiayun; Kotovitch, Marie; Thomas, David N.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Goosse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halothermodynamic sea ice model including gas physics and carbon biogeochemistry. The ice-ocean fluxes, and vertical transport, of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) are represented using fluid transport equations. Carbonate chemistry, the consumption, and release of CO2 by primary production and respiration, the precipitation and dissolution of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) and ice-air CO2 fluxes, are also included. The model is evaluated using observations from a 6 month field study at Point Barrow, Alaska, and an ice-tank experiment. At Barrow, results show that the DIC budget is mainly driven by physical processes, wheras brine-air CO2 fluxes, ikaite formation, and net primary production, are secondary factors. In terms of ice-atmosphere CO2 exchanges, sea ice is a net CO2 source and sink in winter and summer, respectively. The formulation of the ice-atmosphere CO2 flux impacts the simulated near-surface CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), but not the DIC budget. Because the simulated ice-atmosphere CO2 fluxes are limited by DIC stocks, and therefore <2 mmol m-2 d-1, we argue that the observed much larger CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance retrievals cannot be explained by a sea ice direct source and must involve other processes or other sources of CO2. Finally, the simulations suggest that near-surface TA/DIC ratios of ˜2, sometimes used as an indicator of calcification, would rather suggest outgassing.

  15. A new experimental setup to investigate nucleation, dynamic growth and surface properties of single ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Jens; Bieligk, Henner; Niedermeier, Dennis; Clauss, Tina; Chou, Cédric; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of atmospheric ice particles is of importance for both, weather and climate. However, knowledge is still sparse, e.g. when considering the influences of ice particle surface properties on the radiative properties of clouds. Therefore, based on the experiences with our laminar flow tube chamber LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004), we developed a new device to characterize nucleation, dynamic growth and light scattering properties of a fixed single ice crystal in dependence on the prevailing thermodynamic conditions. Main part of the new setup is a thermodynamically controlled laminar flow tube with a diameter of 15 mm and a length of 1.0 m. Connected to the flow tube is a SID3-type (Small Ice Detector, Kaye et al., 2008) instrument called LISA (Leipzig Ice Scattering Apparatus), equipped with an additional optical microscope. For the investigations, a single ice nucleus (IN) with a dry size of 2-5 micrometer is attached to a thin glass fiber and positioned within the optical measuring volume of LISA. The fixed particle is exposed to the thermodynamically controlled air flow, exiting the flow tube. Two mass flow controllers adjusting a dry and a humidified gas flow are applied to control both, the temperature and the saturation ratio over a wide range. The thermodynamic conditions in the experiments were characterized using a) temperature and dew-point measurements, and b) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Dependent on temperature and saturation ratio in the measuring volume, ice nucleation and ice crystal growth/shrinkage can occur. The optical microscope allows a time dependent visualization of the particle/ice crystal, and the LISA instrument is used to obtain 2-D light scattering patterns. Both devices together can be applied to investigate the influence of thermodynamic conditions on ice crystal growth, in particular its shape and surface properties. We successfully performed

  16. [Dynamic loads at knee joint of trans-tibial amputee on different terrains].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Rencheng

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic loads at knee joint of amputee are fundamental for rehabilitation of knee injury and prosthesis design. In this paper, a 3-D model for calculation of dynamic load at knee joint of trans-tibial amputee was developed. Gait analysis was done on three terrains including normal level walking, upstairs and downstairs. Dynamic loads at knee joint were calculated during one gait cycle. The results show that gait patterns and dynamic loads at knee joint were different among these three terrains. Although the general waveforms were about the same, the motion range of knee joint, ground reaction forces and loads at knee joint when walking upstairs or downstairs were larger than those in a normal level walking. The quantitative findings provide the theoretical basis of gait analysis and prosthesis design for trans-tibial amputee.

  17. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, Martin; Worster, Grae; Hindmarsh, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  18. Dynamic influence of pinning points on marine ice-sheet stability: a numerical study in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank; Berger, Sophie; Drews, Reinhard

    2016-11-09

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is likely more stable than its West Antarctic counterpart because its bed is largely lying above sea level. However, the ice sheet in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, contains marine sectors that are in contact with the ocean through overdeepened marine basins interspersed by grounded ice promontories and ice rises, pinning and stabilising the ice shelves. In this paper, we use the ice-sheet model BISICLES to investigate the effect of sub-ice-shelf melting, using a series of scenarios compliant with current values, on the ice-dynamic stability of the outlet glaciers between the Lazarev and Roi Baudouin ice shelves over the next millennium. Overall, the sub-ice-shelf melting substantially impacts the sea-level contribution. Locally, we predict a short-term rapid grounding-line retreat of the overdeepened outlet glacier Hansenbreen, which further induces the transition of the bordering ice promontories into ice rises. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the onset of the marine ice-sheet retreat and subsequent promontory transition into ice rise is controlled by small pinning points, mostly uncharted in pan-Antarctic datasets. Pinning points have a twofold impact on marine ice sheets. They decrease the ice discharge by buttressing effect, and they play a crucial role in initialising marine ice sheets through data assimilation, leading to errors in ice-shelf rheology when omitted. Our results show that unpinning increases the sea-level rise by 10%, while omitting the same pinning point in data assimilation decreases it by 10%, but the more striking effect is in the promontory transition time, advanced by two centuries for unpinning and delayed by almost half a millennium when the pinning point is missing in data assimilation. As a result, pinning points exert a subtle influence on ice dynamics at the kilometre scale, which calls for a better knowledge of the Antarctic margins.

  19. Dynamic influence of pinning points on marine ice-sheet stability: a numerical study in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    DOE PAGES

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank; Berger, Sophie; ...

    2016-11-09

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is likely more stable than its West Antarctic counterpart because its bed is largely lying above sea level. However, the ice sheet in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, contains marine sectors that are in contact with the ocean through overdeepened marine basins interspersed by grounded ice promontories and ice rises, pinning and stabilising the ice shelves. In this paper, we use the ice-sheet model BISICLES to investigate the effect of sub-ice-shelf melting, using a series of scenarios compliant with current values, on the ice-dynamic stability of the outlet glaciers between the Lazarev and Roi Baudouinmore » ice shelves over the next millennium. Overall, the sub-ice-shelf melting substantially impacts the sea-level contribution. Locally, we predict a short-term rapid grounding-line retreat of the overdeepened outlet glacier Hansenbreen, which further induces the transition of the bordering ice promontories into ice rises. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the onset of the marine ice-sheet retreat and subsequent promontory transition into ice rise is controlled by small pinning points, mostly uncharted in pan-Antarctic datasets. Pinning points have a twofold impact on marine ice sheets. They decrease the ice discharge by buttressing effect, and they play a crucial role in initialising marine ice sheets through data assimilation, leading to errors in ice-shelf rheology when omitted. Our results show that unpinning increases the sea-level rise by 10%, while omitting the same pinning point in data assimilation decreases it by 10%, but the more striking effect is in the promontory transition time, advanced by two centuries for unpinning and delayed by almost half a millennium when the pinning point is missing in data assimilation. As a result, pinning points exert a subtle influence on ice dynamics at the kilometre scale, which calls for a better knowledge of the Antarctic margins.« less

  20. Dynamic Influence of Pinning Points on Marine Ice-Sheet Stability: a Numerical Study in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, F.; Favier, L.; Drews, R.; Berger, S.

    2016-12-01

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is likely more stable than its West Antarctic counterpart, because most of its bed lies above sea level. However, the ice sheet in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, contains marine sectors that are in contact with the ocean through overdeepened marine basins interspersed by (more stable) grounded ice promontories and ice rises, pinning and stabilising the ice shelves. In this paper, we use the ice-sheet model BISICLES to investigate the effect of sub-ice shelf melting, using a series of scenarios compliant with current values, on the ice-dynamic stability of the outlet glaciers between the Lazarev and Roi Baudouin ice shelves over the next millennia. Overall, the sub-ice shelf melting substantially impacts the sea level contribution. Locally, we predict a short-term rapid grounding-line retreat of the overdeepened outlet glacier Hansenbreen, which further induces the collapse of the bordering ice promontories into ice rises. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the onset of the marine ice-sheet retreat and subsequent promontory collapse is controlled by small pinning points within the ice shelves, mostly uncharted in pan-Antarctic datasets. Pinning points have a twofold impact on marine ice sheets. They decrease the ice discharge by buttressing effect, and play a crucial role in initialising marine ice sheets through data assimilation, leading to errors in ice-shelf rheology when omitted. Our results show that unpinning has a small effect on the total amount of sea level rise but locally affects the timing of grounding-line migration, advancing the collapse of a promontory by hundreds of years. On the other hand, omitting the same pinning point in data assimilation decreases the sea level contribution by 10% and delays the promontory collapse by almost a millennium. This very subtle influence of pinning points on ice dynamics acts on kilometre scale and calls for a better knowledge of the Antarctic margins that will improve

  1. Dynamic influence of pinning points on marine ice-sheet stability: a numerical study in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank; Berger, Sophie; Drews, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is likely more stable than its West Antarctic counterpart because its bed is largely lying above sea level. However, the ice sheet in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, contains marine sectors that are in contact with the ocean through overdeepened marine basins interspersed by grounded ice promontories and ice rises, pinning and stabilising the ice shelves. In this paper, we use the ice-sheet model BISICLES to investigate the effect of sub-ice-shelf melting, using a series of scenarios compliant with current values, on the ice-dynamic stability of the outlet glaciers between the Lazarev and Roi Baudouin ice shelves over the next millennium. Overall, the sub-ice-shelf melting substantially impacts the sea-level contribution. Locally, we predict a short-term rapid grounding-line retreat of the overdeepened outlet glacier Hansenbreen, which further induces the transition of the bordering ice promontories into ice rises. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the onset of the marine ice-sheet retreat and subsequent promontory transition into ice rise is controlled by small pinning points, mostly uncharted in pan-Antarctic datasets. Pinning points have a twofold impact on marine ice sheets. They decrease the ice discharge by buttressing effect, and they play a crucial role in initialising marine ice sheets through data assimilation, leading to errors in ice-shelf rheology when omitted. Our results show that unpinning increases the sea-level rise by 10 %, while omitting the same pinning point in data assimilation decreases it by 10 %, but the more striking effect is in the promontory transition time, advanced by two centuries for unpinning and delayed by almost half a millennium when the pinning point is missing in data assimilation. Pinning points exert a subtle influence on ice dynamics at the kilometre scale, which calls for a better knowledge of the Antarctic margins.

  2. Measurement and analysis of structural dynamics properties of robotic joint transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiuh-Jer; Chen, Chin-Yih

    1993-02-01

    This study utilizes two techniques to identify the structural dynamic characteristics of each joint transmission system of an ITRI-U type robot. The driving system of each joint is modeled as a mass-spring-damper mechanism that has a second-order dynamic mathematical equation.

  3. Reconstructing the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisling, Benjamin; DeConto, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Today, some outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) are rapidly retreating and may mobilize large volumes of interior ice in the coming centuries. The last period that saw such dramatic, sustained retreat of the GrIS was the last deglaciation, when the ice sheet retreated from its Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) extent. Previous studies have used relative sea level observations to constrain changes in ice thickness and retreat timing during the deglaciation (e.g. Fleming and Lambert 2004, Simpson et al. 2009, Lecavalier et al. 2014). Here we build on these studies by isolating the drivers of ice-sheet retreat, and their spatial and temporal dynamics, during this period. Inclusion of ice-cliff failure and hydrofracturing parameterizations in our model has resulted in a better fit to paleodata for the Antarctic ice sheet, but this modeling approach has not been applied to the GrIS. Here we use a three-dimensional hybrid SSA/SIA ice-sheet model (Pollard et al. 2015) at 10km resolution over Greenland to simulate the last deglaciation. Boundary conditions for the last glacial maximum produce an LGM ice sheet with 3.81 meters sea level equivalent (m s.l.e.) of additional ice. The LGM ice sheet advances to the shelf-break in west, south, and east Greenland with an expansive ice shelf extending across Davis Strait. Applying modern atmospheric and oceanic forcing to the LGM ice sheet yields 1.25 and 1.09 m s.l.e. of melt, respectively, and 1.72 m s.l.e. for both. Ocean warming initially results in a higher rate and magnitude of retreat, but increased surface evaporation over open water results in additional accumulation that offsets losses in 10 kyr simulations. Here, we test the sensitivity of the magnitude of deglacial ice-sheet retreat to uncertainty in bedrock elevation and basal slding coefficients, the applied climate forcing, and the mass balance scheme (positive degree-day or energy balance). We also implement a deglacial climate forcing based on recently

  4. A Dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Miocene and Pliocene: Resolving a Classic Model-Data Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconto, R. M.; Gasson, E.; Pollard, D.

    2015-12-01

    Proxy ice volume and sea-level indicators imply a highly dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Miocene and early-mid Pliocene, especially if the Northern Hemisphere is assumed to be ice-free. Until now, the presumed insensitivity of a fully developed Antarctic Ice Sheet to orbital forcing and a wide range of greenhouse gas concentrations has made Miocene and Pliocene ice volume variability difficult to reconcile. Here, we show how the inclusion of new ice-model physics, more highly resolved atmospheric models, and new ice-climate coupling techniques are reducing the strength of Antarctic Ice Sheet hysteresis, bringing data-model comparisons into better agreement. This is especially true in light of new atmospheric CO2 reconstructions hinting at concentrations higher than previous estimates. The global implications of a more dynamic Antarctic cryosphere in the Neogene will be discussed in light of its potential impact on the atmosphere and global ocean circulation.

  5. The role of the margins in ice stream dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echelmeyer, Keith; Harrison, William

    1993-01-01

    At first glance, it would appear that the bed of the active ice stream plays a much more important role in the overall force balance than do the margins, especially because the ratio of the half-width to depth for a typical ice stream is large (15:1 to 50:1). On the other hand, recent observations indicate that at least part of the ice stream is underlain by a layer of very weak till (shear strength about 2 kPa), and this weak basal layer would then imply that some or all of the resistive drag is transferred to the margins. In order to address this question, a detailed velocity profile near Upstream B Camp, which extends from the center of the ice stream, across the chaotic shear margin, and onto the Unicorn, which is part of the slow-moving ice sheet was measured. Comparison of this observed velocity profile with finite-element models of flow shows several interesting features. First, the shear stress at the margin is on the order of 130 kPa, while the mean value along the bed is about 15 kPa. Integration of these stresses along the boundaries indicates that the margins provide 40 to 50 percent, and the bed, 60 to 40 percent of the total resistive drag needed to balance the gravitational driving stress in this region. (The range of values represents calculations for different values of surface slope.) Second, the mean basal stress predicted by the models shows that the entire bed cannot be blanketed by the weak till observed beneath upstream B - instead there must be a distribution of weak till and 'sticky spots' (e.g., 85 percent till and 15 percent sticky spots of resistive stress equal to 100 kPa). If more of the bed were composed of weak till, then the modeled velocity would not match that observed. Third, the ice must exhibit an increasing enhancement factor as the margins are approached (E equals 10 in the chaotic zone), in keeping with laboratory measurements on ice under prolonged shear strain. Also, there is either a narrow zone of somewhat stiffer ice (E

  6. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII–XIV transition

    PubMed Central

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-01-01

    The pressure–temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases. PMID:26076946

  7. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII-XIV transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases.

  8. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII-XIV transition.

    PubMed

    Köster, K W; Fuentes-Landete, V; Raidt, A; Seidl, M; Gainaru, C; Loerting, T; Böhmer, R

    2015-06-16

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases.

  9. Effect of joint damping and joint nonlinearity on the dynamics of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Mary; Dugundji, John

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of the effect of linear joint characteristics on the vibrations of a free-free, three-joint beam model show that increasing joint damping increases resonant frequencies and increases modal damping but only to the point where the joint gets 'locked up' by damping. This behavior is different from that predicted by modeling joint damping as proportional damping. Nonlinear analyses of the three-joint model with cubic springs at the joints show all the classical single DOF nonlinear response behavior at each resonance of the multiple DOF system: nondoubling of response for a doubling of forcing amplitude, multiple solutions, jump behavior, and resonant frequency shifts. These properties can be concisely quantified by characteristic backbone curves, which show the locus of resonant peaks for increasing forcing amplitude.

  10. Examination of upstream flow dynamics in response to the front retreat of ice shelves with different geometric configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelves fringe ~75% of Antarctica's coastline, nourished by numerous terrestrial glacier systems. The ice-shelf disintegrations in recent decades and the observed thinning trends have revealed their susceptibility to the atmospheric and oceanic changes in the climate warming context. The buttressing effect of an ice shelf constrains the ice discharge of its upstream land ice, thus regulating the contribution to sea level of the terrestrial glaciers. The important role of ice shelves in stabilizing the upstream glacier flow dynamics is emphasized by the rapid accelerations and thinning of the tributary glaciers in response to the collapses of the northern Larsen Ice Shelf in Antarctic Peninsula. However, this buttressing effect is determined by the stress balance conditions of an ice shelf, which is further affected by the ice-shelf geometric configurations. The ice shelves confined by fjords, islands, promontories or seabed topographic highs exert greater buttressing effects than those less confined by the lateral or basal shear stresses. This research aims to assess the influences of different ice-shelf configurations on upstream flow dynamics in response to large ice-shelf retreat events. By using remotely sensed imagery acquired by multiple satellite missions, we derived the time series surface velocity records for the Larsen B glacier-ice shelf system in Antarctic Peninsula during 1995 - 2015 and for the Mertz glacier-ice shelf system in East Antarctica during 1997 - 2015, respectively. The former was well confined in the embayment, while the latter is unconfined by lateral margins. We compared the different temporal variation patterns in flow dynamics between these two sites before and after their large retreating events, i.e. the collapse event of Larsen B Ice Shelf in 2002 and the large calving event of Mertz Ice Shelf in 2010. The surface velocity profiles reveal the less sensitivity of upstream responses to the front retreat for the Mertz Ice Shelf.

  11. Mars together and FIRE and ICE: Report of the joint US/Russian technical working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Cold War's end opened an opportunity for greater cooperation in planetary exploration for the United States and Russia. Two study groups were formed, Mars Together and FIRE and ICE. The Mars Together team developed a concept for a flight in 1998 that merged one U.S. Mars Surveyor 98 mission with the former Russian Mars 96 mission to further understanding of the Mars surface and atmosphere. The FIRE and ICE team developed concepts for a dual-spacecraft mission to the solar corona and for a mission to Pluto. The missions, scientific potential, and open issues are described.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Two-Dimensional Temperature Dynamics Across Ice-Wedge Polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garayshin, Viacheslav V.

    The ice wedges on the North Slope of Alaska have been forming for many millennia, when the ground cracked and the cracks were filled with snowmelt water. The infiltrated water then became frozen and turned into ice. When the annual and summer air temperatures become higher, the depth of the active layer increases. A deeper seasonal thawing may cause melting of ice wedges from their tops. Consequently, the ground starts to settle and a trough begins to form above the ice wedge. The forming trough creates a local temperature anomaly in the surrounding ground, and the permafrost located immediately under the trough starts degrading further. Once the trough is formed, the winter snow cover becomes deeper at the trough area further degrading the permafrost. In this thesis we present a computational approach to study the seasonal temperature dynamics of the ground surrounding an ice wedge and ground subsidence associated with ice wedge degradation. A thermo-mechanical model of the ice wedge based on principles of macroscopic thermodynamics and continuum mechanics was developed and will be presented. The model includes heat conduction and quasi-static mechanical equilibrium equations, a visco-elastic rheology for ground deformation, and an empirical formula which relates unfrozen water content to temperature. The complete system is reduced to a computationally convenient set of coupled equations for temperature, ground displacement and ground porosity in a two-dimensional domain. A finite element method and an implicit scheme in time were utilized to construct a non-linear system of equations, which was solved iteratively. The model employs temperature and moisture content data collected from a field experiment at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) sites in Barrow, Alaska. The model describes seasonal dynamics of temperature and the long-term ground motion near the ice wedges and helps to explain destabilization of the ice wedges north of Alaska's Brooks

  13. Full-field predictions of ice dynamic recrystallisation under simple shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul D.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Evans, Lynn A.; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the flow of ice on the microstructural scale is essential for improving our knowledge of large-scale ice dynamics, and thus our ability to predict future changes of ice sheets. Polar ice behaves anisotropically during flow, which can lead to strain localisation. In order to study how dynamic recrystallisation affects to strain localisation in deep levels of polar ice sheets, we present a series of numerical simulations of ice polycrystals deformed under simple-shear conditions. The models explicitly simulate the evolution of microstructures using a full-field approach, based on the coupling of a viscoplastic deformation code (VPFFT) with dynamic recrystallisation codes. The simulations provide new insights into the distribution of stress, strain rate and lattice orientation fields with progressive strain, up to a shear strain of three. Our simulations show how the recrystallisation processes have a strong influence on the resulting microstructure (grain size and shape), while the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) appears to be less affected. Activation of non-basal slip systems is enhanced by recrystallisation and induces a strain hardening behaviour up to the onset of strain localisation and strain weakening behaviour. Simulations demonstrate that the strong intrinsic anisotropy of ice crystals is transferred to the polycrystalline scale and results in the development of strain localisation bands than can be masked by grain boundary migration. Therefore, the finite-strain history is non-directly reflected by the final microstructure. Masked strain localisation can be recognised in ice cores, such as the EDML, from the presence of stepped boundaries, microshear and grains with zig-zag geometries.

  14. Ice dynamics of Bowdoin tidewater glacier, Northwest Greenland, from borehole measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Funk, Martin; Ryser, Claudia; Jouvet, Guillaume; Bauder, Andreas; Sugiyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    The observed rapid retreat of ocean-terminating glaciers in southern Greenland in the last two decades has now propagated to the northwest. Hence, tidewater glaciers in this area, some of which have remain stable for decades, have started retreating rapidly through iceberg calving in recent years, thus allowing a monitoring and investigation of ice dynamical changes starting from the early stages of retreat. Here, we present an ice dynamical study from Bowdoin Glacier, a tidewater outlet glacier located at the northwestern margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The glacier surface experiences lowering at a rate of 1.5 m/a since 2007. A rapid calving front retreat of 260 m/a was also observed since 2008, while no significant changes occurred during the previous 20 years. From July 2014 to July 2015, we monitored, 2 km upstream from the calving front, subglacial water pressure changes in boreholes, internal ice deformation through tilt sensors at different depths, englacial ice temperature profiles from the glacier bed to the surface, and high resolution surface motion from GPS records. These measurement show that the glacier is temperate-based, yet internal deformation accounts for about 10 % of the annual surface motion. A seasonal increase in both deformation and sliding at the onset of the melt season is associated with a drop in water pressure in part of the subglacial system. These observations are used to calibrate the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) for numerical simulations of ice flow in the Bowdoin Glacier catchment, aiming for a better understanding of iceberg calving processes in relation to changes in internal and basal ice dynamics.

  15. Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Alexei; Fan, Jiwen

    2011-01-01

    Previous modeling studies have shown high sensitivity of mixed-phase clouds to ice number concentration, Ni, with simulated clouds often transitioning from mixed-phase to ice-only regime within a narrow range of Ni. To better understand the mechanisms behind this transition, we analyze several simulations of a mixed-phase stratiform Arctic cloud observed on 26 April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). In the BASE run, Ni is constrained to match the measured value and a persistent mixed-phase cloud is formed, with properties similar to those observed. When Ni is quadrupled (HI_ICE) the liquid water path is reduced by half within two hours. The changes in liquid water are accompanied by diminishing radiative cooling and slowing vertical mixing, exposing complex interactions among microphysics, radiation and dynamics. Deviations of BASE and HI_ICE from a simulation without ice are used to explore the linearity of the model response to variation in Ni. It is shown that early changes in cloud condensate amount and radiative cooling rate are proportional to Ni, while changes in the vertical buoyancy flux and dynamics are qualitatively different in HI_ICE compared to BASE. The nonlinear (with respect to Ni) reduction in buoyancy flux drives the initial response of the mixed layer dynamics to the appearance of ice and subsequently determines the sustainability of liquid water in the cloud in this case. Two additional sensitivity experiments link the decreased buoyancy production to the latent heat release from the depositional ice growth while confirming the importance of the cloud-radiation feedback.

  16. A persistent and dynamic East Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 7.5 million years.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Paul R; Shakun, Jeremy D; Corbett, Lee B; Zimmerman, Susan R; Rood, Dylan H

    2016-12-07

    Climate models show that ice-sheet melt will dominate sea-level rise over the coming centuries, but our understanding of ice-sheet variations before the last interglacial 125,000 years ago remains fragmentary. This is because terrestrial deposits of ancient glacial and interglacial periods are overrun and eroded by more recent glacial advances, and are therefore usually rare, isolated and poorly dated. In contrast, material shed almost continuously from continents is preserved as marine sediment that can be analysed to infer the time-varying state of major ice sheets. Here we show that the East Greenland Ice Sheet existed over the past 7.5 million years, as indicated by beryllium and aluminium isotopes ((10)Be and (26)Al) in quartz sand removed by deep, ongoing glacial erosion on land and deposited offshore in the marine sedimentary record. During the early Pleistocene epoch, ice cover in East Greenland was dynamic; in contrast, East Greenland was mostly ice-covered during the mid-to-late Pleistocene. The isotope record we present is consistent with distinct signatures of changes in ice sheet behaviour coincident with major climate transitions. Although our data are continuous, they are from low-deposition-rate sites and sourced only from East Greenland. Consequently, the signal of extensive deglaciation during short, intense interglacials could be missed or blurred, and we cannot distinguish between a remnant ice sheet in the East Greenland highlands and a diminished continent-wide ice sheet. A clearer constraint on the behaviour of the ice sheet during past and, ultimately, future interglacial warmth could be produced by (10)Be and (26)Al records from a coring site with a higher deposition rate. Nonetheless, our analysis challenges the possibility of complete and extended deglaciation over the past several million years.

  17. A persistent and dynamic East Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 7.5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Paul R.; Shakun, Jeremy D.; Corbett, Lee B.; Zimmerman, Susan R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-12-01

    Climate models show that ice-sheet melt will dominate sea-level rise over the coming centuries, but our understanding of ice-sheet variations before the last interglacial 125,000 years ago remains fragmentary. This is because terrestrial deposits of ancient glacial and interglacial periods are overrun and eroded by more recent glacial advances, and are therefore usually rare, isolated and poorly dated. In contrast, material shed almost continuously from continents is preserved as marine sediment that can be analysed to infer the time-varying state of major ice sheets. Here we show that the East Greenland Ice Sheet existed over the past 7.5 million years, as indicated by beryllium and aluminium isotopes (10Be and 26Al) in quartz sand removed by deep, ongoing glacial erosion on land and deposited offshore in the marine sedimentary record. During the early Pleistocene epoch, ice cover in East Greenland was dynamic; in contrast, East Greenland was mostly ice-covered during the mid-to-late Pleistocene. The isotope record we present is consistent with distinct signatures of changes in ice sheet behaviour coincident with major climate transitions. Although our data are continuous, they are from low-deposition-rate sites and sourced only from East Greenland. Consequently, the signal of extensive deglaciation during short, intense interglacials could be missed or blurred, and we cannot distinguish between a remnant ice sheet in the East Greenland highlands and a diminished continent-wide ice sheet. A clearer constraint on the behaviour of the ice sheet during past and, ultimately, future interglacial warmth could be produced by 10Be and 26Al records from a coring site with a higher deposition rate. Nonetheless, our analysis challenges the possibility of complete and extended deglaciation over the past several million years.

  18. Early springtime dynamics of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) within East Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabant, F.; Carnat, G.; Tison, J.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution profiles of DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) have been measured in a set of sea ice cores from eight stations sampled in the first-year early spring sea ice cover of East Antarctica (ARISE cruise, Sep.-Oct 2003, Australian sector of the Southern Ocean, 63-66° S; 109-118° E). Measurements have been performed following a precise enzymatic reduction method of DMSO originally developed for measuring DMSO in aqueous samples [1] and adapted to produce non-biased results while applied to measuring DMSO in sea ice samples. Sea ice DMSO concentrations measured in this study (6.7-1202 nM; average 73 nM) are higher and more variable than what has been previously measured in Arctic sea ice in the only study over sea ice DMSO concentration to date (1.35-102 nM; average 13.7 nM) [2]. DMSO concentrations are most of the time higher than dimethylsulfoxide (DMS) concentrations but far lower than dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) concentrations. A thorough comparison of DMSO data along with a full set of other physical (ice texture, ice temperature,…), biological (chlorophyll a, algal assemblage composition,…) and biogeochemical variables (brine salinity, DMS, DMSP,…) will be presented. Preliminary results of this study reveal that the composition of the algal assemblage (diatoms vs. dinoflagellates) and the thermodynamics of the sea ice cover (cold and not flooded stations vs. warm and flooded stations) were major factors controlling the DMSO dynamics in East Antarctic sea ice at that period of the year. [1] Hatton et al., 1994. Anal. Chem., 66, 4093-4096. [2] Lee et al., 2001. J. Phycol., 37, 488-499.

  19. Glacier velocities and dynamic ice discharge from the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wychen, Wesley; Burgess, David O.; Gray, Laurence; Copland, Luke; Sharp, Martin; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Benham, Toby J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate an increase in glacier mass loss from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago as a result of warmer summer air temperatures. However, no complete assessment of dynamic ice discharge from this region exists. We present the first complete surface velocity mapping of all ice masses in the Queen Elizabeth Islands and show that these ice masses discharged ~2.6 ± 0.8 Gt a-1 of ice to the oceans in winter 2012. Approximately 50% of the dynamic discharge was channeled through non surge-type Trinity and Wykeham Glaciers alone. Dynamic discharge of the surge-type Mittie Glacier varied from 0.90 ± 0.09 Gt a-1 during its 2003 surge to 0.02 ± 0.02 Gt a-1 during quiescence in 2012, highlighting the importance of surge-type glaciers for interannual variability in regional mass loss. Queen Elizabeth Islands glaciers currently account for ~7.5% of reported dynamic discharge from Arctic ice masses outside Greenland.

  20. Modeling surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics of a seasonally ice-covered hydroelectric reservoir.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Roulet, Nigel T; Strachan, Ian B; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-04-15

    The thermal dynamics of human created northern reservoirs (e.g., water temperatures and ice cover dynamics) influence carbon processing and air-water gas exchange. Here, we developed a process-based one-dimensional model (Snow, Ice, WAater, and Sediment: SIWAS) to simulate a full year's surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for a moderately large (>500km(2)) boreal hydroelectric reservoir in northern Quebec, Canada. There is a lack of climate and weather data for most of the Canadian boreal so we designed SIWAS with a minimum of inputs and with a daily time step. The modeled surface energy fluxes were consistent with six years of observations from eddy covariance measurements taken in the middle of the reservoir. The simulated water temperature profiles agreed well with observations from over 100 sites across the reservoir. The model successfully captured the observed annual trend of ice cover timing, although the model overestimated the length of ice cover period (15days). Sensitivity analysis revealed that air temperature significantly affects the ice cover duration, water and sediment temperatures, but that dissolved organic carbon concentrations have little effect on the heat fluxes, and water and sediment temperatures. We conclude that the SIWAS model is capable of simulating surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for boreal reservoirs in regions where high temporal resolution climate data are not available. SIWAS is suitable for integration into biogeochemical models for simulating a reservoir's carbon cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Flow dynamics and iceberg calving rates of Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, David O.; Sharp, Martin J.; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Benham, Toby J.

    The surface velocity field of Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada, was mapped using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Ascending European Remote-sensing Satellite 1 and 2 (ERS-1/-2) tandem mode data were used for the western and southeast sectors, and 3 day repeat pass ERS-1 imagery for the northeast sector. Speckle-tracking procedures were used with RADARSAT 1 imagery to obtain surface velocities over the terminus of Belcher Glacier (a major calving front) where decorrelation between ERS data occurred. The InSAR data highlight a significant contrast in ice-flow dynamics between the east and west sides of the ice cap. Ice movement west of the main north south divide is dominated by relatively uniform 'sheet' flow, but three fast-flowing outlet glaciers that extend 14 23 km beyond the ice-cap margin also drain this region. Several outlet glaciers that extend up to 60 km inland from the eastern margin drain the eastern side of the ice cap. The dominant ice-flow regimes were classified based on the relationship between the driving stress (averaged over a length scale of ten ice thicknesses) and the ratio of surface velocity to ice thickness. The mapped distribution of flow regimes appears to depict the spatial extent of basal sliding across the ice cap. This is supported by a close relationship between the occurrence of flow stripes on the ice surface and flow regimes where basal sliding was found to be an important component of the glacier motion. Iceberg calving rates were computed using measured surface velocities and ice thicknesses derived from airborne radio-echo sounding. The volume of ice calved between 1960 and 1999 was estimated to be 20.5 ± 4.7 km3 (or 0.57 km3 a-1). Approximately 89% of this loss occurred along the eastern margin. The largest single source is Belcher Glacier, which accounts for ˜50% of the total amount of ice calved.

  2. An Investigation of Mineral Dynamics in Sea Ice by Solubility Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, B.; Kennedy, H.; Papadimitriou, S.

    2016-02-01

    Sea ice is a composite material with a sponge-like structure. The framework of the structure is composed of pure ice, and within the pores exists a concentrated seawater brine. When the temperature is reduced, the volume of this residual brine decreases, while its salinity increases. As a result of the paired changes to temperature and salinity, the brine becomes supersaturated with respect to a mineral at several points when cooling sea ice towards -30°C, creating a sequence of minerals that precipitate. The presence of countless microscopic salt crystals encapsulated within the ice, coupled with changes in brine volume associated with their precipitation/dissolution, results in changes to the optical and structural properties of the medium that contribute to the surface energy balance in sea ice environments. Furthermore, attainment of mineral equilibrium can result in abrupt changes in brine composition and osmotic conditions in the isolated brine pockets, imposing challenging conditions upon the biota that habitat the sea ice environment. Mirabilite (Na2SO4.10H2O), gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) and hydrohalite (NaCl.2H2O) each represent minerals that are understood to exist within sea ice. Previous research has focused upon mineral extraction/detection, and the specific temperature for the onset of each minerals precipitation in sea ice; rather than the overarching dynamics. For this reason, solubility measurements of mirabilite, gypsum and hydrohalite in conditions representative of equilibrium sea ice brines were carried between 0 and -28°C, covering a range of undersaturated and supersaturated conditions for each mineral. Results provide accurate data for the onset of each minerals formation in sea ice, as well as important information on the way in which precipitation and dissolution reactions are affected when sea ice warms or cools. By incorporating the solubility data into a model that simluates the temperature-salinity profiles of first-year sea ice, the

  3. Induced ice melting by the snow flea antifreeze protein from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Todde, Guido; Whitman, Christopher; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-11-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) allow different life forms, insects as well as fish and plants, to survive in subzero environments. AFPs prevent freezing of the physiological fluids. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, the behavior of the small isoform of the AFP found in the snow flea (sfAFP), both in water and at the ice/water interface, of four different ice planes. In water at room temperature, the structure of the sfAFP is found to be slightly unstable. The loop between two polyproline II helices has large fluctuations as well as the C-terminus. Torsional angle analyses show a decrease of the polyproline II helix area in the Ramachandran plots. The protein structure instability, in any case, should not affect its antifreeze activity. At the ice/water interface the sfAFP triggers local melting of the ice surface. Bipyramidal, secondary prism, and prism ice planes melt in the presence of AFP at temperatures below the melting point of ice. Only the basal plane is found to be stable at the same temperatures, indicating an adsorption of the sfAFP on this ice plane as confirmed by experimental evidence.

  4. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A; Fischer, Sean A; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F; Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy.

  5. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; Fischer, Sean A.; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Nagata, Yuki; Frohlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmuser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Poschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-04-22

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. Finally, the freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy.

  6. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; Fischer, Sean A.; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  7. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    DOE PAGES

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; ...

    2016-04-22

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering onmore » the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. Finally, the freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy.« less

  8. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  9. Diffusion of molecules in the bulk of a low density amorphous ice from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ghesquière, P; Mineva, T; Talbi, D; Theulé, P; Noble, J A; Chiavassa, T

    2015-05-07

    The diffusion of molecules in interstellar ice is a fundamental phenomenon to take into account while studying the formation of complex molecules in this ice. This work presents a theoretical study on the diffusion of H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, and H2CO in the bulk of a low density amorphous (LDA) ice, while taking into account the physical conditions prevailing in space, i.e. temperatures below 150 K and extremely low pressure. This study was undertaken by means of molecular dynamics simulations. For CO2 for which no experimental data were available we conducted our own experiments. From our calculations we show that, at low temperatures, the diffusion of molecules in the bulk of a LDA ice is driven by the self-diffusion of water molecules in the ice. With this study we demonstrate that molecular dynamics allows the calculation of diffusion coefficients for small molecules in LDA ice that are convincingly comparable to experimentally measured diffusion coefficients. We also provide diffusion coefficients for a series of molecules of astrochemical interest.

  10. Computational analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice aggregates during viscoplastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Weikusat, Ilka; Bons, Paul; Lebensohn, Ricardo; Evans, Lynn; Piazolo, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Ice is a common mineral at the Earth's surface. How much ice is stored in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets depends on its mechanical properties. Therefore properties of ice directly impact on human society through its role in controlling sea level. The bulk behaviour of large ice masses is the result of the behaviour of the ensemble of individual ice grains. This is strongly influenced by the viscoplastic anisotropy of these grains and their lattice orientation. Numerical modelling provides a better insight into the mechanics of ice from the micro to the ice sheet scale. We present numerical simulations that predict the microstructural evolution of an aggregate of pure ice grains at different strain rates. We simulate co-axial deformation and dynamic recrystallization up to large strain using a full-field approach. The crystal plasticity code (Lebensohn et al., 2009) is used to calculate the response of a polycrystalline aggregate that deforms by purely dislocation glide, applying a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). This code is coupled with the ELLE microstructural modelling platform to include intracrystalline recovery, as well as grain boundary migration driven by the reduction of surface and strain energies. The results show a strong effect of recrystallization on the final microstructure, producing larger and more equiaxed grains, with smooth boundaries. This effect does not significantly modify the single-maximum pattern of c-axes that are distributed at a low angle to the shortening direction. However, in experiments with significant recrystallization the a-axes rotate towards the elongation axis at the same time as the c-axes rotate towards the compression axis. If slip systems on prismatic and/or pyramidal planes are active, it is thought that a-axes gradually concentrate with depth (Miyamoto, 2005). The bulk activity of the slip systems is different depending on the relative activity of deformation versus recrystallization: the non-basal slip systems

  11. Generating Gaits for Biped Robots Using Multiple Dynamic Passivization of Joint Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Minoru; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    In the research field of bipedal locomotion, a central pattern generator (CPG) and passive dynamic walking (PDW) have attracted much attention. In this paper, we describe a motion control system for biped robots based on dynamic joint passivization. Our motion control system is based on a mixture of the CPG and PDW, that is, the multiple dynamic passivization of joint control (MDPJC). Our intention is to make the joint control of the swing leg temporarily passive in the swing leg phase. The important part is the passive phase time and the switch timings of the joint control. We optimize the switch timing parameters using simulated annealing with advanced adaptive neighborhood (SA/AAN). Experiments using the motion control system based on multiple dynamic passivization of joint control successfully generated energy efficient walking and enabled superior gaits.

  12. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Lew, W. S.; Chang, C. H.; Roy, K.

    2015-10-28

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  13. Overview of ICE Project: Integration of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, James D.; Blech, Richard A.; Babrauckas, Theresa L.; Jones, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a prototype integrated environment for interactively exploring, analyzing, and validating information from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations and experiments. The Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project is a first attempt at providing a researcher with a common user interface for control, manipulation, analysis, and data storage for both experiments and simulation. ICE can be used as a live, on-tine system that displays and archives data as they are gathered; as a postprocessing system for dataset manipulation and analysis; and as a control interface or "steering mechanism" for simulation codes while visualizing the results. Although the full capabilities of ICE have not been completely demonstrated, this report documents the current system. Various applications of ICE are discussed: a low-speed compressor, a supersonic inlet, real-time data visualization, and a parallel-processing simulation code interface. A detailed data model for the compressor application is included in the appendix.

  14. Dynamics of the sputtering of water from ice films by collisions with energetic xenon atoms.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Daniel R; Gibson, K D; Yuan, Hanqiu; Becker, James S; Sibener, S J

    2012-04-14

    The flow of energy from the impact site of a heavy, translationally energetic xenon atom on an ice surface leads to several non-equilibrium events. The central focus of this paper is on the collision-induced desorption (sputtering) of water molecules into the gas-phase from the ice surface. Sputtering is strongly activated with respect to xenon translational energy, and a threshold for desorption was observed. To best understand these results, we discuss our findings in the context of other sputtering studies of molecular solids. The sputtering yield is quite small; differential measurements of the energy of xenon scattered from ice surfaces show that the ice efficiently accommodates the collisional energy. These results are important as they quantitatively elucidate the dynamics of such sputtering events, with implications for energetic non-equilibrium processes at interfaces.

  15. Dynamics of CO in amorphous water-ice environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karssemeijer, L. J.; Ioppolo, S.; Van der Avoird, A.; Cuppen, H. M.; Van Hemert, M. C.; Allodi, M. A.; Blake, G. A.

    2014-01-20

    The long-timescale behavior of adsorbed carbon monoxide on the surface of amorphous water ice is studied under dense cloud conditions by means of off-lattice, on-the-fly, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the CO mobility is strongly influenced by the morphology of the ice substrate. Nanopores on the surface provide strong binding sites, which can effectively immobilize the adsorbates at low coverage. As the coverage increases, these strong binding sites are gradually occupied leaving a number of admolecules with the ability to diffuse over the surface. Binding energies and the energy barrier for diffusion are extracted for various coverages. Additionally, the mobility of CO is determined from isothermal desorption experiments. Reasonable agreement on the diffusivity of CO is found with the simulations. Analysis of the 2152 cm{sup –1} polar CO band supports the computational findings that the pores in the water ice provide the strongest binding sites and dominate diffusion at low temperatures.

  16. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM ON JOINTED ROCK FOUNDATION DURING LARGE-SCALE EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yutaka; Horii, Hideyuki; Yazdani, Mahmoud

    Dynamic cracking analysis of concrete gravity dam has been carried out during large-scale earthquake, considering the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation. Firstly, in order to take into account the progressive failure of rock foundation, the constitutive law of jointed rock is assumed and its validity is evaluated by simulation analysis based on the past experimental model. Finally, dynamic cracking analysis of 100-m high dam model is performed, using the previously proposed approach with tangent stiffness-proportional damping to express the propagation behavior of crack and the constitutive law of jointed rock. The crack propagation behavior of dam body and the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation are investigated.

  17. Dynamic evaluation of a traction-drive joint for space telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, Clarence W.; Hankins, Walter W., III

    1988-01-01

    Presented is an analysis and evaluation of a prototype traction-drive joint for robotic manipulators, developed under NASA sponsorship. A dynamic model is developed using the Lagrange formulation. Controllability, observability, dynamic stability, and response characteristics of the joint to test inputs are studied. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) is implemented on the joint model to determine a basis for evaluating the performance of the traction-drive joint under servo control. An evaluation of the results and directions for future investigations are presented.

  18. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-07

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect.

  19. Subglacial Volcanism in West-Antarctica - A Geologic and Ice Dynamical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, S. W.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S.; Renne, P.; Turrin, B. D.; Joughin, I.

    2004-12-01

    Subglacial volcanic eruptions may increase the contribution of the West-Antarctic Ice-Sheet (WAIS) to global sea-level rise in the near-future by enhancing basal melt water production and ice flow lubrication. Geophysical data have led scientists to believe that the ice sheet may be located over an extensive, young volcanic province containing ~1 million cubic kilometers of basalts (Behrendt, 1964; Behrendt et. al., 1991; 1995; 1998). While not all scientists may recognize this theory of widespread subglacial volcanism, so far no scientific paper has challenged its existence. Here we present the first geologic constraints on the presence/absence of widespread Late Cenozoic subglacial volcanism beneath the WAIS and investigate the potential influence of an individual subglacial volcano (Blankenship et. al., 1993) on the flow dynamic of WAIS. Properties of subglacial sediments indicate limited presence of subglacial volcanic rocks. Moreover, the only two basaltic pebbles, recovered from the region, are of Mesozoic-Paleozoic age (~100 to ~500 million years). While these findings reduce the potential for widespread near-future increases in ice discharge from WAIS due to eruptions of subglacial volcanoes, they do not rule out the presence of individual hot spots associated with volcanic centers beneath the WAIS. Fuel for the existence of a proposed volcano (Mt. Casertz) on the Whitmore Mountain Ross Sea Transitional Crust (WRT; Blankenship et. al., 1993), in the southern part of the WAIS, comes from thermo-dynamical modeling in comparison with observed ice velocities. Ice velocities (Joughin et. al., 1999; 2002) downstream of Mt. Casertz indicate significant basal sliding, where thermo-dynamical models suggest that the ice sheet is frozen to its base. Routing of basal melt water, produced in the vicinity of Mt. Casertz, may lubricate the ice base in parts of the WRT, thus enabling basal sliding and enhancing the discharge of ice in this sector of the WAIS. The only

  20. Subglacial Processes and Flow Dynamics of Former Antarctic Ice Streams Reconstructed From Marine Geology and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Cofaigh, C.; Evans, J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Larter, R. D.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recent marine geophysical and geological research from the Antarctic continental margin has resulted in significant advances to our understanding of the extent, timing and dynamic behaviour of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) during the Late Quaternary, as well as the processes and conditions at the former ice-sheet bed. This research indicates an extensive WAIS and APIS at the last glacial maximum (LGM). The ice sheet was positioned at, or close to, the shelf edge around the Peninsula, the Bellingshausen Sea and Pine Island Bay. In all these areas large glacial troughs extend across the continental shelf, and sedimentary and geomorphic evidence from these troughs indicates that they were occupied by grounded paleo-ice streams during, or immediately following, the LGM. This evidence includes elongate subglacial bedforms (mega-scale glacial lineations) that can extend for up to 20 km and which are formed in weak deformation till. Deformation tills have been identified and mapped in all the paleo-ice stream troughs investigated to date. Macro-sedimentological, micromorphological and geotechnical data indicate that pervasive till deformation beneath these ice streams took place over vertical thicknesses of several metres, and that this was associated with significant advection of sediment towards the former grounding line. Subglacial geology appears to have exerted a major control on ice stream development. The transition from crystalline bedrock to a sedimentary substrate within these troughs characteristically marks the onset of streaming flow. However, in Marguerite Trough streaming flow appears to have commenced over the crystalline bedrock by enhanced basal sliding, with the highest flow velocities occurring over the sedimentary substrate further downflow by subglacial deformation. This indicates spatial variation in the mechanism of rapid flow beneath individual ice streams. Subglacial meltwater channels eroded

  1. Towards an annually-resolved record of Lateglacial Patagonian ice sheet dynamics using glaciolacustrine varves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, Jacob; Palmer, Adrain; Thorndycraft, Varyl

    2016-04-01

    Proglacial sedimentary archives, in particular, glaciolacustrine varve sequences, offer the potential for detailed reconstructions of past ice sheet dynamics. Specifically, glaciolacustrine varves (i) allow reconstructions of sediment (and thus meltwater) influx at annual and even sub-annual resolution; and (ii) provide a continuous, annually-resolved chronology to estimate rates of change and/or the duration of significant events in the deglaciation of a basin. In South America, glacial geologists have relied heavily on cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating to construct chronologies for palaeoglaciological activity. Whilst effective, the typical uncertainties associated with boulder dating methods (±10%) preclude the investigation of short-term (e.g. ≤ centennial-scale) glacier and/or climatic change(s), which are shown to be important at modern ice-margins. Moreover, moraine chronologies are fragmentary, and inherently biased towards episodes of positive glacier mass balance (i.e. moraine construction), and thus limit our understanding of ice sheet retreat dynamics. By contrast, long, continuous, high-resolution (i.e. varve) palaeolimnological records have the potential to significantly refine models of ice sheet deglaciation. In this talk, we present data from Valle Fenix Chico, in the Lago Buenos Aires (LBA) basin (-46.57°S -71.07°W), in which ice-contact Glacial Lake Buenos Aires formed as the LBA ice lobe of Patagonian ice sheet withdrew from its innermost LGM moraine (~17.2 ± 0.9 ka). Thick (>40m) sequences of laminated glaciolacustrine sediment were deposited in the palaeolake, and are now exposed in a sub-aerial canyon that was cut when the lake drained. We report on the detailed macro- and micro-facies of the LBA sediments. In particular, we: (1) develop a process model for the formation of silt and clay couplets, which suggests an annual (varve) origin; (2) present varve series for the initial phase (~1kyr) of LBA ice lobe deglaciation.

  2. Migration phenology and seasonal fidelity of an Arctic marine predator in relation to sea ice dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Seth G; Derocher, Andrew E; Thiemann, Gregory W; Lunn, Nicholas J

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how seasonal environmental conditions affect the timing and distribution of synchronized animal movement patterns is a central issue in animal ecology. Migration, a behavioural adaptation to seasonal environmental fluctuations, is a fundamental part of the life history of numerous species. However, global climate change can alter the spatiotemporal distribution of resources and thus affect the seasonal movement patterns of migratory animals. We examined sea ice dynamics relative to migration patterns and seasonal geographical fidelity of an Arctic marine predator, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Polar bear movement patterns were quantified using satellite-linked telemetry data collected from collars deployed between 1991-1997 and 2004-2009. We showed that specific sea ice characteristics can predict the timing of seasonal polar bear migration on and off terrestrial refugia. In addition, fidelity to specific onshore regions during the ice-free period was predicted by the spatial pattern of sea ice break-up but not by the timing of break-up. The timing of migration showed a trend towards earlier arrival of polar bears on shore and later departure from land, which has been driven by climate-induced declines in the availability of sea ice. Changes to the timing of migration have resulted in polar bears spending progressively longer periods of time on land without access to sea ice and their marine mammal prey. The links between increased atmospheric temperatures, sea ice dynamics, and the migratory behaviour of an ice-dependent species emphasizes the importance of quantifying and monitoring relationships between migratory wildlife and environmental cues that may be altered by climate change.

  3. The hierarchical structure of glacial climatic oscillations: Interactions between ice-sheet dynamics and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Paillard, D.

    1995-04-01

    Abrupt climatic oscillations around the North Atlantic have been identified recently in Greenland ice cores as well as in North Atlantic marine sediment cores. The good correlation between the {open_quote}Dansgaard Oeschger events{close_quote} in the ice and the {open_quote}Heinrich events{close_quote} in the ocean suggests climate, in the North Atlantic region, underwent several massive reorganizations in the last glacial period. A characteristic feature seems to be their hierarchical structure. Every 7 to 10-thousand years, when the temperature is close to its minimum, the ice-sheet undergoes a massive iceberg discharge. This Heinrich event is followed by an abrupt warming. then by other oscillations, each lasting between one and two thousand years. These secondary oscillations do not have a clear signature in marine sediments but constitute most of the{open_quote} Dansgaard-Oeschger events{close_quote} found in the ice. A simplified model coupling an ice-sheet and an ocean basin, to illustrate how the interactions between these two components can lead to such a hierarchical structure. The ice-sheet model exhibits internal oscillations composed of growing phases and basal ice melting phases that induce massive iceberg discharges. These fresh water inputs in the ocean stop for a moment the thermohaline circulation, enhancing the temperature contrast between low- and high-latitudes. Just after this event, the thermohaline circulation restarts and an abrupt warming of high-latitude regions is observed. For some parameter values, these warmer temperatures have some influence on the ice-sheet, inducing secondary oscillations similar to those found in paleoclimatic records. Although the mechanism presented here may be too grossly simplified. it nevertheless underlines the potential importance of the coupling between ice-sheet dynamics and oceanic thermohaline circulation on the structure of the climatic records during the last glacial period. 33 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Injuries and disorders among young ice skaters: relationship with generalized joint laxity and tightness

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Shinobu; Wada, Naoki; Tazawa, Masayuki; Sohmiya, Makoto; Ibe, Yoko; Shimizu, Toru; Usuda, Shigeru; Shirakura, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    This study retrospectively investigated 192 teenage speed and figure skaters with prior injuries documented by an athletes’ questionnaire, who underwent a physical examination to assess their muscle tightness and generalized joint laxity. In all athletes, the degree of muscle tightness and joint laxity were measured by a standardized physical examination. A descriptive report of the types of injuries showed a predominance of fractures, ligament injuries, enthesitis, and lower back pain. Approximately 5% of all skaters tested positive for tightness, while 25.8% of figure skaters and 15.2% of speed skaters had generalized ligamentous laxity. Statistical testing showed an association between ankle sprains and muscle tightness, and an association between knee enthesitis and muscle tightness in skating athletes. There was also an association between lower back pain and generalized joint laxity, which held true only for the male skaters. PMID:25177155

  5. Injuries and disorders among young ice skaters: relationship with generalized joint laxity and tightness.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Shinobu; Wada, Naoki; Tazawa, Masayuki; Sohmiya, Makoto; Ibe, Yoko; Shimizu, Toru; Usuda, Shigeru; Shirakura, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    This study retrospectively investigated 192 teenage speed and figure skaters with prior injuries documented by an athletes' questionnaire, who underwent a physical examination to assess their muscle tightness and generalized joint laxity. In all athletes, the degree of muscle tightness and joint laxity were measured by a standardized physical examination. A descriptive report of the types of injuries showed a predominance of fractures, ligament injuries, enthesitis, and lower back pain. Approximately 5% of all skaters tested positive for tightness, while 25.8% of figure skaters and 15.2% of speed skaters had generalized ligamentous laxity. Statistical testing showed an association between ankle sprains and muscle tightness, and an association between knee enthesitis and muscle tightness in skating athletes. There was also an association between lower back pain and generalized joint laxity, which held true only for the male skaters.

  6. Sea ice dynamics as a control for halogen deposition in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaor, Andrea; Plane, John M. C.; Vallelonga, Paul; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Kohler, Jack; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Barbante, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    influence the total bromide flux (arising both from sea salt and Br- from bromine explosions) and its ratio with sodium. A simple 1-D transport model of this scenario is able to reproduce the measured fluxes of bromine and sodium. The seasonal sea ice extent will also alter the surface area available to algal colonization, and hence iodine emission. In support of the Antarctic results, analysis of iodine and bromine in the Svalbard shallow/firn core appears to confirm the linkage between sea ice and these halogens. In particular, changes in I concentration are associated with the extent of sea ice at spring time, while Br, evaluated as enrichment relative to the Br/Na sea water mass ratio, is influenced by changes in the seasonal sea ice area. The Arctic and Antarctic ice core results suggest that sea ice dynamics are arguably the primary driver of halogen fluxes in polar regions and that both halogens could be used to understand the past variability of sea ice.

  7. A Fast and Accurate Scheme for Sea Ice Dynamics with a Stochastic Subgrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinen, C.; Khouider, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sea ice physics is a very complex process occurring over a wide range of scales; such as local melting or large scale drift. At the current grid resolution of Global Climate Models (GCMs), we are able to resolve large scale sea ice dynamics but uncertainty remains due to subgrid physics and potential dynamic feedback, especially due to the formation of melt ponds. Recent work in atmospheric science has shown success of Markov Jump stochastic subgrid models in the representation of clouds and convection and their feedback into the large scales. There has been a push to implement these methods in other parts of the Earth System and for the cryosphere in particular but in order to test these methods, efficient and accurate solvers are required for the resolved large scale sea-ice dynamics. We present a second order accurate scheme, in both time and space, for the sea ice momentum equation (SIME) with a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) solver. SIME is a highly nonlinear equation due to sea ice rheology terms appearing in the stress tensor. The most commonly accepted formulation, introduced by Hibler, allows sea-ice to resist significant stresses in compression but significantly less in tension. The relationship also leads to large changes in internal stresses from small changes in velocity fields. These non-linearities have resulted in the use of implicit methods for SIME and a JFNK solver was recently introduced and used to gain efficiency. However, the method used so far is only first order accurate in time. Here we expand the JFNK approach to a Crank-Nicholson discretization of SIME. This fully second order scheme is achieved with no increase in computational cost and will allow efficient testing and development of subgrid stochastic models of sea ice in the near future.

  8. Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Alexei; Fan, Jiwen

    2011-09-17

    Previous modeling studies have shown a high sensitivity of simulated properties of mixed-phase clouds to ice number concentration, Ni, with many models losing their ability to maintain the liquid phase as Ni increases. Although models differ widely at what Ni the mixed-phase cloud becomes unstable, the transition from a mixed-phase to an ice only cloud in many cases occurs over a narrow range of ice concentration. To gain better understanding of this non-linear model behavior, in this study, we analyze simulations of a mixed-phase stratiform Artic cloud observed on 26 April 2008 during recent Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). The BASE simulation, in which Ni is constrained to match the measured value, produces a long-lived cloud in a quasi steady state similar to that observed. The simulation without the ice (NO_ICE) produces a comparable but slightly thicker cloud because more moisture is kept in the mixed layer due to lack of precipitation. When Ni is quadrupled relative to BASE (HI_ICE), the cloud starts loosing liquid water almost immediately and the liquid water path is reduced by half in less than two hours. The changes in liquid water are accompanied by corresponding reduction in the radiative cooling of the layer and a slow down in the vertical mixing, confirming the important role of interactions among microphysics, radiation and dynamics in this type of clouds. Deviations of BASE and HI_ICE from NO_ICE are used to explore the linearity of the model response to variation in Ni. It is shown that at early stages, changes in liquid and ice water as well as in radiative cooling/heating rates are proportional to the Ni change, while changes in the vertical buoyancy flux are qualitatively different in HI_ICE compared to BASE. Thus, while the positive feedback between the liquid water path and radiative cooling of the cloud layer is essential for glaciation of the cloud at higher Ni, the non-linear (with respect to Ni) reduction in positive

  9. Study of ice cluster impacts on amorphous silica using the ReaxFF reactive force field molecular dynamics simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnamoun, A.; Duin, A. C. T. van

    2016-03-07

    We study the dynamics of the collisions between amorphous silica structures and amorphous and crystal ice clusters with impact velocities of 1 km/s, 4 km/s, and 7 km/s using the ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation method. The initial ice clusters consist of 150 water molecules for the amorphous ice cluster and 128 water molecules for the crystal ice cluster. The ice clusters are collided on the surface of amorphous fully oxidized and suboxide silica. These simulations show that at 1 km/s impact velocities, all the ice clusters accumulate on the surface and at 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, some of the ice cluster molecules bounce back from the surface. At 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, few of the water molecules dissociations are observed. The effect of the second ice cluster impacts on the surfaces which are fully covered with ice, on the mass loss/accumulation is studied. These studies show that at 1 km/s impacts, the entire ice cluster accumulates on the surface at both first and second ice impacts. At higher impact velocities, some ice molecules which after the first ice impacts have been attached to the surface will separate from the surface after the second ice impacts at 7 km/s impact velocity. For the 4 km/s ice cluster impact, ice accumulation is observed for the crystal ice cluster impacts and ice separation is observed for the amorphous ice impacts. Observing the temperatures of the ice clusters during the collisions indicates that the possibility of electron excitement at impact velocities less than 10 km/s is minimal and ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation can predict the chemistry of these hypervelocity impacts. However, at impact velocities close to 10 km/s the average temperature of the impacting ice clusters increase to about 2000 K, with individual molecules occasionally reaching temperatures of over 8000 K and thus it will be prudent to consider the concept of electron excitation at

  10. Study of the dynamic behavior of a bolted joint under heavy loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daouk, Sami; Louf, François; Cluzel, Christophe; Dorival, Olivier; Champaney, Laurent; Audebert, Sylvie

    2017-03-01

    In structural dynamics, the quantification of the quality and reliability of numerical models remains a relevant issue. While the behavior of structures such as beams and plates is generally understood, a large number of industrial structures are bolted assemblies of many components with connections that are not well understood. The main reason for this lack of understanding is that the dynamical behavior of the whole assembly depends critically upon joint conditions, especially under heavy loadings. For the purpose of improving our understanding and the development of pertinent models, a dynamic test bed, based on a bolted structure, is designed and modal testing is performed. The configuration of the bolted joint and the level of the loading are the relevant parameters, related to joint conditions, that are considered in this study. The results of the experimental campaign show the variation of the dissipation in a bolted joint and its apparent stiffness as a function of joint conditions.

  11. Strain localization and dynamic recrystallization in the ice-air aggregate: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D.; Griera, Albert; Jansen, Daniela; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Roessiger, Jens; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-12-01

    We performed numerical simulations on the microdynamics of ice with air inclusions as a second phase. Our aim was to investigate the rheological effects of air inclusions and explain the onset of dynamic recrystallization in the permeable firn. The simulations employ a full-field theory crystal plasticity code coupled to codes simulating dynamic recrystallization processes and predict time-resolved microstructure evolution in terms of lattice orientations, strain distribution, grain sizes and grain-boundary network. Results show heterogeneous deformation throughout the simulations and indicate the importance of strain localization controlled by air inclusions. This strain localization gives rise to locally increased energies that drive dynamic recrystallization and induce heterogeneous microstructures that are coherent with natural firn microstructures from EPICA Dronning Maud Land ice coring site in Antarctica. We conclude that although overall strains and stresses in firn are low, strain localization associated with locally increased strain energies can explain the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization.

  12. Maximum extent and dynamic behaviour of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet west of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Jared Lee; Benetti, Sara; Dunlop, Paul; Ó Cofaigh, Colm

    2015-11-01

    A complete reconstruction of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) is hindered by uncertainty surrounding its offshore extent and dynamic behaviour. This study addresses this problem by reconstructing the depositional history of four sediment cores taken from a series of sinuous glacigenic sediment ridges on the continental shelf west of Ireland. We present new geomorphic, sedimentary and micropaleontological data that record a maximum westward BIIS extent that was at least 80 km farther offshore from any previous estimates. The data suggests that a large ice shelf formed over parts of the shelf prior to retreat. This new data increases the areal extent of grounded BIIS ice by ∼6700 km2 from previous estimates, which represents a ∼3% increase in the Irish Sector of the ice sheet. Three new AMS radiocarbon dates demonstrate for the first time that the BIIS advanced to the shelf edge during last glaciation (Late Midlandian/Late Devensian), with ice advance onto the Porcupine Bank occurring after 24,720 ± 260 yr Cal. BP. Deglaciation was complete by 19,182 ± 155 yr Cal. BP, thus constraining BIIS occupation over the Porcupine Bank to less than 5500 years. Estimated retreat rates of marine-terminating ice across the shelf range from ∼70 to 180 myr-1.

  13. Sensitivity of Barnes Ice Cap, Baffin Island, Canada, to climate state and internal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A.; Flowers, G. E.; Miller, G. H.; Rabus, B. T.; Van Wychen, W.; Gardner, A. S.; Copland, L.

    2016-08-01

    Barnes Ice Cap is a remnant of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, which covered much of northern North America during the Last Glacial Maximum. Barnes reached a quasi-equilibrium state ~2000 years ago and has remained similar in size since then, with a small increase during the Little Ice Age. In this study, we combine historical observations (1960-1980) with more recent satellite and airborne data (1995-2010) to drive a mass balance model coupled to a transient thermomechanical model with an adaptive mesh geometry. The model is used to characterize the current state of the ice cap and to investigate its stability as a function of climate and its own internal dynamics. On millennial time scales we show that ice flow is influenced by adjustment of an unsteady shape, by gently sloping bedrock, and by contrasting viscosities between the Pleistocene and Holocene ice. On shorter time scales, Barnes is affected by surge activity. Sensitivity tests reveal that Barnes experienced climate conditions which enabled its stability 2000 to 3000 years ago but will disappear under current climate conditions in the next millennium.

  14. Future Evolution of Antarctic Bed Topography and Its Implications for Ice Sheet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Larour, E. Y.; Seroussi, H. L.

    2013-12-01

    The recently concluded Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project (Bindschadler et al., 2013; Nowicki et al., 2013) provides some clues regarding the future evolution of Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) in a warming climate. Using the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), we combine the relevant SeaRISE results with possibly the best available GIA ice loading history for the past 21 kyr (Ivins et al., 2013), and provide first-order estimates of future uplift of AIS. While the model predicts minor subsidence in the interior of the east AIS and along the Wilkes Land, we find that the west AIS (Amundsen sea sector, in particular) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters over the next 100 and 500 years, respectively. Such uneven changes in topography imply that the bed slope will be modulated in the future, thereby potentially controlling the grounding line migration and eventually the ice sheet dynamics. Using hydrostatic equilibrium criterion and through high-order modeling of AIS, we demonstrate that proper treatment of GIA response is crucial on centennial timescale, as it promotes systematic, although mild, stability to marine portions of the ice sheet.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of the adsorption of oxalic acid on an ice surface.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Maria; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pal

    2010-12-17

    The adsorption properties of oxalic acid molecules on the surface of hexagonal ice are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations performed at tropospheric temperatures. Although the oxalic acid-water interaction is strong at low coverage, due to the possible formation of a large number of hydrogen bonds between the adsorbed oxalic acid and the surface water molecules, the results of the simulations at finite coverage show the predominant role played by the oxalic acid-oxalic acid lateral interactions in the adsorption/desorption process. These interactions are even stronger than the water-water or water-oxalic acid interactions. With increasing temperature these strong lateral interactions favor the formation of oxalic acid aggregates on the ice surface, with the concomitant departure of water molecules through the ducts in the adsorbed layer created by the aggregation process. These results support conclusions of experimental data on the oxalic acid-ice interactions. Moreover, in comparison to previously obtained results for formic and acetic acid adsorbed on ice, the present study suggests that not only the organic functionality is of importance for atmospheric implications of partially oxidized hydrocarbons (POH) interactions with ice, but also the balance between water-ice, water-POH, and POH-POH interactions.

  16. Highly individualistic rates of plant phenological advance associated with arctic sea ice dynamics.

    PubMed

    Post, Eric; Kerby, Jeffrey; Pedersen, Christian; Steltzer, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    We analysed 12 years of species-specific emergence dates of plants at a Low-Arctic site near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland to investigate associations with sea ice dynamics, a potential contributor to local temperature variation in near-coastal tundra. Species displayed highly variable rates of phenological advance, from a maximum of -2.55 ± 0.17 and -2.93 ± 0.51 d yr(-1) among a graminoid and forb, respectively, to a minimum of -0.55 ± 0.19 d yr(-1) or no advance at all in the two deciduous shrub species. Monthly Arctic-wide sea ice extent was a significant predictor of emergence timing in 10 of 14 species. Despite variation in rates of advance among species, these rates were generally greatest in the earliest emerging species, for which monthly sea ice extent was also the primary predictor of emergence. Variation among species in rates of phenological advance reshuffled the phenological community, with deciduous shrubs leafing out progressively later relative to forbs and graminoids. Because early species advanced more rapidly than late species, and because rates of advance were greatest in species for which emergence phenology was associated with sea ice dynamics, accelerating sea ice decline may contribute to further divergence between early- and late-emerging species in this community. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Water Dynamics, Ice Stability, and Salts in Victoria Valley Soils, Antarctica: An Instructive Analog for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Hallet, B.

    2006-12-01

    Typical of many hyper arid soils of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, soils in Victoria Valley contain ~10% ice (at 0.3 m depth) and ~0.4% salt, mostly calcium and sodium sulfates and chlorides, making them excellent analogs to Martian soils. Vapor diffusion models designed to investigate ground ice dynamics on Mars are not entirely satisfactory because they lead to the unrealistic expectation that soils in Antarctica should be ice free within a 1000 years of being saturated with ice, and yet even ancient soils characteristically contain abundant ice near the surface. Validation of these diffusion models has been limited because of the paucity of field based climate and soil climate data. Moreover the models ignore the significant effects of snow cover, surface melt water and salts on vapor fluxes. To better understand the presence and stability of the shallow subsurface ice we are exploring the effect of snow cover and salts on vapor fluxes. Ice stability was investigated using high-resolution climate and soil temperature data from 2002 to 2005. According to the vapor diffusion model ice sublimates at an average rate of 0.22 mm a-1, corresponding to an ice recession of ~1.3 mm a-1 for soil with 10% ice content. Some of the water vapor is transported to the atmosphere; however, some water vapor accumulates at depth in the soil. Furthermore, snow cover during the summer may substantially reduce annual ice loss. Stable isotopes (δ18O & δD) in ice along a 1.6m vertical soil profile reveal a deuterium excess (-13 to -77 ‰) with the greatest enrichment of heavy isotopes at the top of the ice cement and decreasing with depth to form a concave-down profile. This isotopic profile was interpreted using a quantitative model of H2O transport in perennially frozen soil, including the advection-dispersion of heavy isotope- enriched surface water into the ice-cement. It suggests an average infiltration rate of 0.7 mm a-1 of brine if 2.5% of the H2O present is unfrozen, a

  18. Modelling the dynamics of palaeo ice-stream retreat in Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, S. S.; Vieli, A.; Livingstone, S. J.; Stokes, C. R.; O'Cofaigh, C.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2010-12-01

    The aim is to use numerical models of ice stream behaviour to understand the processes that triggered and controlled the retreat of the Marguerite Bay palaeo ice stream after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This is important because at present a number of marine-based ice streams in Antarctica are rapidly losing mass. Given the consequences of this mass loss for future sea-level rise, it is crucial to improve our understanding and predictive abilities of grounding line retreat of marine-based ice streams. Because contemporary records of grounding line retreat are very short (decades) and may not be representative of behaviour on century or millennial timescales, we focus on the longer-term post-LGM retreat dynamics of the palaeo ice stream as recorded in the marine-geophysical record. Our approach combines numerical modelling with geomorphological mapping in order to understand the processes that triggered and controlled the hypothesized rapid retreat of the Marguerite Bay palaeo ice-stream. Here we describe the numerical model, modelling approach and results of sensitivity testing to understand the behaviour of the Marguerite Bay palaeo ice stream. High-resolution bathymetric data of the Marguerite Bay area has enabled detailed geomorphological mapping and provides a record of grounding line retreat. These mapping data, set into a chronological framework of deglaciation, are used to constrain a 1-dimensional flowline model of the Marguerite palaeo- ice-stream. The numerical model includes basal, lateral and longitudinal stresses and a robust treatment of grounding-line motion through the use of a constantly adjusting spatial grid. We subject the model to a range of external forcing including changes in sea-level, temperature and accumulation in order to reproduce the geomorphological evidence and therefore understand the dynamics of ice stream retreat in this area. We find that slow-downs or re-stabilisations of the grounding line occur in areas of reverse bed

  19. Polar bear population dynamics in the southern Beaufort Sea during a period of sea ice decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; McDonald, Trent L.; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E.; Richardson, Evan S.; Regehr, Eric V.; Douglas, David C.; Durner, George M.; Atwood, Todd C.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    In the southern Beaufort Sea of the United States and Canada, prior investigations have linked declines in summer sea ice to reduced physical condition, growth, and survival of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Combined with projections of population decline due to continued climate warming and the ensuing loss of sea ice habitat, those findings contributed to the 2008 decision to list the species as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Here, we used mark–recapture models to investigate the population dynamics of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea from 2001 to 2010, years during which the spatial and temporal extent of summer sea ice generally declined. Low survival from 2004 through 2006 led to a 25–50% decline in abundance. We hypothesize that low survival during this period resulted from (1) unfavorable ice conditions that limited access to prey during multiple seasons; and possibly, (2) low prey abundance. For reasons that are not clear, survival of adults and cubs began to improve in 2007 and abundance was comparatively stable from 2008 to 2010, with ~900 bears in 2010 (90% CI 606–1212). However, survival of subadult bears declined throughout the entire period. Reduced spatial and temporal availability of sea ice is expected to increasingly force population dynamics of polar bears as the climate continues to warm. However, in the short term, our findings suggest that factors other than sea ice can influence survival. A refined understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying polar bear population dynamics is necessary to improve projections of their future status and facilitate development of management strategies.

  20. A statistical-dynamical approach to represent Greenland ocean-ice sheet interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrette, Mahé; Calov, Reinhard; Ganopolski, Andrey; Robinson, Alex

    2013-04-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet is fundamental, because of its potential to contribute strongly to future sea level rise. In recent years there has been a discussion about the role of the ocean in the Greenland ice sheet's present and future mass balance. The ocean interacts with the ice sheet's outlet glaciers via the water circulation in the fjords and considerably affects melting at the termini of the outlet glaciers. Processes related to this interaction are difficult to represent in Greenland-wide ice-sheet models because grid resolution of such models is typically 10 km, whereas large fjords are more commonly only 1 to 5 km wide. Local refinement techniques (e.g. finite elements with adaptive mesh) can be a way of addressing that problem but are still computationally expensive to run. Here we propose a simpler, statistical-dynamical approach suited for large ensemble simulations over 100- to 1000-year integration times, in the EMIC spirit: the fjord-outlet glacier system is restricted to its most fundamental dynamics, controlled by a handful of parameters describing the major characteristics of the system. The model has a generic structure, i.e., it is designed such that it applies to every Greenland outlet glacier. Some of its parameters are fixed by using the (little) available observational data - e.g. for Helheim, Kangerdlugssuaq and Jakobshavn Isbrae - other parameters may vary depending on location. It is not our aim to simulate every single small outlet glacier in its full accuracy; but we aim to represent, on average, important characteristics like ice discharge and general advance/retreat rate on a regional scale over major catchment areas. Aspects of the coupling strategy with the 3D ice-sheet model (SICOPOLIS) are discussed, e.g., critical issues such as the treatment of mass balance. Preliminary design and results will be presented.

  1. Polar bear population dynamics in the southern Beaufort Sea during a period of sea ice decline.

    PubMed

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Mcdonald, Trent L; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Richardson, Evan S; Regehr, Eric V; Douglas, David C; Durner, George M; Atwood, Todd; Amstrup, Steven C

    2015-04-01

    In the southern Beaufort Sea of the United States and Canada, prior investigations have linked declines in summer sea ice to reduced physical condition, growth, and survival of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Combined with projections of population decline due to continued climate warming and the ensuing loss of sea ice habitat, those findings contributed to the 2008 decision to list the species as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Here, we used mark-recapture models to investigate the population dynamics of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea from 2001 to 2010, years during which the spatial and temporal extent of summer sea ice generally declined. Low survival from 2004 through 2006 led to a 25-50% decline in abundance. We hypothesize that low survival during this period resulted from (1) unfavorable ice conditions that limited access to prey during multiple seasons; and possibly, (2) low prey abundance. For reasons that are not clear, survival of adults and cubs began to improve in 2007 and abundance was comparatively stable from 2008 to 2010, with ~900 bears in 2010 (90% CI 606-1212). However, survival of subadult bears declined throughout the entire period. Reduced spatial and temporal availability of sea ice is expected to increasingly force population dynamics of polar bears as the climate continues to warm. However, in the short term, our findings suggest that factors other than sea ice can influence survival. A refined understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying polar bear population dynamics is necessary to improve projections of their future status and facilitate development of management strategies.

  2. Continuous Ice Formation in a Tube by Using Water-Oil Emulsion for Dynamic-type Ice-Making Cold Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yoshinari; Nakagawa, Shinji; Okada, Masashi; Matsumoto, Koji; Kawagoe, Tetsuo

    Dynamic-type of ice-making cold thermal energy storage systems using water-silicone oil emulsion with an additive, (C2H50)3SiC3H6NH2, has been proposed. Two kinds of heat exchanger were examined and the performances were compared with each other. One type of heat exchanger was a spiral tube and it was immersed in a low temperature thermostatic bath. The other was coil-shaped double tube heat exchanger using two tubes. The emulsion was circulated to make ice continuously. These systems were operated under various cooling conditions (flow rates of the emulsion and brine temperatures). The effects of the tube materials (fluororesin and non-fluororesin) and thickness were also examined. Slurry ice was formed continuously without adhesion of ice to the cooling wall under certain conditions. Using the fluororesin tube prevented ice from the adhesion and it enlarged the range of the cooling conditions under which slurry ice was formed continuously. Furthermore, by making thickness of the tube thinner and increasing the heat transfer coefficient on the outside of the tube, ice was made continuously without lowering the rate of ice formation at a higher brine temperature.

  3. Till Dynamics Underneath Ice Streams with a Nonlocal Dense Granular Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Suckale, J.; Cabrales-Vargas, A.; Damsgaard, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ice streams are narrow bands in ice sheets moving 2 to 3 orders faster than the nearly stagnant confining ice. Ice streams are a major contributor to the rapid mass loss in West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but the processes governing their stability remain incompletely understood. Previous research has led to the insight that ice streaming is enabled by the presence of a non-linearly deforming till bed. The stability of the till layer depends sensitively on pore-water pressure, highlighting that the coupled behavior of sediment deformation and melt-water generation and percolation is important in ice-stream dynamics. Currently, viscous or plastic models are used to approximate the mechanical properties of till. However, the latter typically does not quantify the deformation in the till itself or the sediment transport associated with ice streaming. In this study, we adopt a model of nonlocal dense granular flow to describe till behavior during shearing. This continuum model goes beyond the perfect Coulomb plastic model by introducing a nonlocal rheology, which states that the flow at one point is not only influenced by the local stress but also affected by nearby flows. The model can be coupled with water in two aspects. One is through till shear strength related to effective normal stress. The other one is by adjusting a material constant representing the length of nonlocal stress fluctuations, which itself depends on effective normal stress. We calibrate this material constant from a granular-scale model of sediment deformation computed through the Discrete-Element Method. Linking the two models allows us to integrate insights from the small-scale and computationally intensive Discrete-Element experiments into a larger ice-stream model representation. This upscaling allows us to investigate the delicate coupling between ice streaming, till deformation and water generation and percolation. Our numerical experiments indicate that pore-water pressure not only alters

  4. Submarine glacial landforms record Late Pleistocene ice-sheet dynamics, Inner Hebrides, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Dayton; Arosio, Riccardo; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Howe, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We use ∼7000 km2 of high-resolution swath bathymetry data to describe and map the submarine glacial geomorphology, and reconstruct Late Pleistocene ice sheet flow configurations and retreat dynamics within the Inner Hebrides, western Scotland. Frequently dominated by outcrops of structurally complex bedrock, the seabed also comprises numerous assemblages of well-preserved glacigenic landforms typical of grounded ice sheet flow and punctuated ice-margin retreat. The occurrence and character of the glacially streamlined landforms is controlled in part by the shallow geology and topography, however these factors alone cannot account for the location, orientation, and configuration of the observed landforms. We attribute the distribution of these elongate streamlined landforms to the onset zone of the former Hebrides Ice Stream (HIS) - part of a major ice stream system that drained 5-10% of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). We suggest this geomorphic signature represents the transition from slow 'sheet flow' to 'streaming flow' as ice accelerated out from an environment characterized by numerous bedrock obstacles (e.g. islands, headlands), towards the smooth, sediment dominated shelf. The majority of streamlined landforms associated with the HIS indicate ice sheet flow to the southwest, with regional-scale topography clearly playing a major role in governing the configuration of flow. During maximal glacial conditions (∼29-23 ka) we infer that the HIS merged with the North Channel-Malin Shelf Ice Stream to form a composite ice stream system that ultimately reached the continental shelf edge at the Barra-Donegal Trough-Mouth Fan. Taken collectively however, the pattern of landforms now preserved at seabed (e.g. convergent flow indicators, cross-cutting flow sets) is more indicative of a thinning ice mass, undergoing reorganization during overall ice sheet retreat (during latter stages of Late Weischselian glaciation). Suites of moraines overprinting the

  5. Local Dynamic Joint Stability During Human Treadmill Walking in Response to Lower Limb Segmental Loading Perturbations.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Worden, Timothy A; Kamphuis, Megan; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-09-01

    Our purpose was to quantify changes in local dynamic stability (LDS) of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle in response to changes in lower limb segment mass, as well as to quantify temporal adaptations to segment loading during treadmill walking. Results demonstrate that increased mass distal to a joint yields either the maintenance of, or increased stabilization of, that particular joint relative to the unloaded condition. Increased mass proximal to a particular joint resulted in joint destabilization. The hip and ankle LDS were observed to change temporally, independent of segment loading condition, suggesting adaptation to walking on a treadmill interface.

  6. An exploratory study into the effects of a 20 minute crushed ice application on knee joint position sense during a small knee bend.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jill; Selfe, James; Oliver, Ben; Mee, Daniel; Carter, Alexandra; Scott, Michelle; Richards, Jim; May, Karen

    2016-03-01

    The effect of cryotherapy on joint positioning presents conflicting debates as to whether individuals are at an increased risk of injury when returning to play or activity immediately following cryotherapy application at the knee. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 20 min application of crushed ice at the knee immediately affects knee joint position sense during a small knee bend. Pre- and post-intervention. University movement analysis laboratory. Eleven healthy male participants. Kinematics of the knee were measured during a weight bearing functional task pre and post cryotherapy intervention using three-dimensional motion analysis (Qualisys Medical AB Gothenburg, Sweden). Tissue cooling was measured via a digital thermometer at the knee. Results demonstrated significant reductions in the ability to accurately replicate knee joint positioning in both sagittal (P = .035) and coronal (P = .011) planes during the descent phase of a small knee bend following cryotherapy. In conclusion a 20 min application of crushed ice to the knee has an adverse effect on knee joint repositioning. Team doctors, clinicians, therapists and athletes should consider these findings when deciding to return an athlete to functional weight bearing tasks immediately following ice application at the knee, due to the potential increase risk of injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation and prediction of dynamic human isolated joint strength from lean body mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Abhilash K.; Hasson, Scott M.; Aldridge, Ann M.; Maida, James C.; Woolford, Barbara J.

    1992-01-01

    A relationship between a person's lean body mass and the amount of maximum torque that can be produced with each isolated joint of the upper extremity was investigated. The maximum dynamic isolated joint torque (upper extremity) on 14 subjects was collected using a dynamometer multi-joint testing unit. These data were reduced to a table of coefficients of second degree polynomials, computed using a least squares regression method. All the coefficients were then organized into look-up tables, a compact and convenient storage/retrieval mechanism for the data set. Data from each joint, direction and velocity, were normalized with respect to that joint's average and merged into files (one for each curve for a particular joint). Regression was performed on each one of these files to derive a table of normalized population curve coefficients for each joint axis, direction, and velocity. In addition, a regression table which included all upper extremity joints was built which related average torque to lean body mass for an individual. These two tables are the basis of the regression model which allows the prediction of dynamic isolated joint torques from an individual's lean body mass.

  8. Studies on dynamic characteristics of the joint in the aero-engine rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuguo, Liu; Yanhong, Ma; Dayi, Zhang; Jie, Hong

    2012-05-01

    The joint as a major part of the aero-engine rotating shafts directly influences its rotordynamics and state stability. This paper studies the dynamic effects of structure parameters and the external load on the stiffness and contact state of the rotor joints with nonlinear finite-element method and experiments. And a sensitivity analysis of critical speeds and vibration modes with respect to typical parameters (stiffness of the spline joints) is performed with finite difference methods, through two approaches, i.e. relative sensitivity analysis and absolute sensitivity analysis. The study results show that the stiffness and contact state of joints vary with external loads and geometry structures, and affect the rotor system operating. It is advisable to consider the influence of the position, structural parameter and external load of the rotor joints on aero-engine structure dynamics design.

  9. Oases on Snowball Earth: Confluence of Ice Dynamics Modeling and Geological Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, P. F.; Maloof, A. C.; Halverson, G. P.; Schrag, D. P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent model experiments suggest that marine ice dynamics are important in the initiation and development of a snowball Earth. Ice-line advance is facilitated by the transport of latent heat and freshwater associated with Ekman forcing in the zone of westerlies (Lewis et al., 2002 this meeting) and with equatorward glacial flow of thick, multi-annual, marine ice (Goodman and Pierrehumbert, 2002 this meeting). After ice lines meet at the equator (snowball Earth), continued invasion by marine glaciers from higher latitudes maintains tropical marine ice >2.25 times thicker (<450 m) than static ice at thermal dynamic equilibrium (G & P, 2002). The dynamics imply that the tropical ocean will remain ice covered even after rising atmospheric pCO2 drives tropical sea surface temperatures to the melting point. However, landfast marine ice on low-latitude continental shelves and inland seas that are protected from invasion by marine and terrestrial glaciers will melt away, creating 'oases' on a snowball Earth. Snowball oases should occupy a small fraction (<5%) of the global surface area but they might significantly enhance water vapor transport and accumulation rates of adjacent terrestrial glaciers. Despite acidification by high pCO2, warming may cause critical oversaturation with respect to calcite or dolomite in snowball oases that are buffered by carbonate-rich bedrock and glacial debris (Fairchild, 1994). As snowball oases are small pools of water in contact with a pCO2-rich (>0.1 bar) atmosphere, the carbon isotopic composition of any carbonates they precipitate should evolve accordingly. Initially, oasis water may resemble evolved snowball seawater, which will be dominated by hydrothermal activity buffered by dissolution of sea-floor carbonate (Higgins and Schrag, G-cubed, 2003). Oasis water should evolve rapidly towards equilibrium with the atmospheric reservoir, whose isotopic composition is set by volcanic outgassing, not by the ocean. Oasis carbonate strata

  10. Using Argo Floats to Characterize Sea Ice-Ocean Dynamics in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeman, M. R.; Boebel, O.; Kanzow, T.

    2016-12-01

    Argo floats in the Weddell Sea are equipped with ice-avoidance algorithms, allowing them to record temperature and salinity year-round and revealing previously unobservable ocean dynamics driven by sea ice formation and melt. This study takes a Lagrangian approach to float data collected from 2008-2012 to examine patterns of spatiotemporal variability in seasonal evolution of the sea ice cover and upper ocean hydrography. Warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) flows into the cyclonic Weddell Gyre east of the prime meridian, resulting in a steep thermocline and relatively strong stratification. As a water parcel moves westward along the poleward limb of the gyre, the erosion of core CDW characteristics between 100-300m results in gradual weakening of stratification and deepening of the winter mixed layer, up to about 100m. Annual changes in the salinity budget indicate preferential sea ice formation and export in this region, poleward of approximately 67ºS, with over 150cm of ice forming between March and November in parts of the gyre interior. North of this latitude, the winter mixed layer is deeper (150-200m) and weaker stratification promotes entrainment of warm deep water, contributing to high net volume and rapid rate of sea ice melt, as well as delayed onset of freezing in fall/winter. In addition to its regional significance, the role of sea ice as a driver of Weddell Sea hydrography has important climatic implications, notably as it relates to the export of dense Weddell Sea bottom water present throughout the global ocean.

  11. Late Weichselian ice-sheet dynamics and deglaciation history of the northern Svalbard margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransner, O.; Noormets, R. R. N. N.; Flink, A.; Hogan, K.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2016-12-01

    The glacial evolution of the northern Svalbard margin is poorly known compared with the western margin. Gravity cores, swath bathymetric, sub-bottom acoustic and 2D airgun data are used to investigate the Late Weichselian Svalbard-Barents Ice Sheet history on the northern Svalbard margin. Prograding sequences in Kvitøya and Albertini trough mouths (TMs) indicate ice streaming to the shelf edge multiple times during the Quaternary. While Kvitøya Trough has an associated trough-mouth fan (TMF), Albertini TM is cut back into the shelf edge. Down-faulted bedrock below Albertini TM suggests larger sediment accommodation space there, explaining the absence of a TMF. The bathymetry indicates that ice flow in Albertini Trough was sourced from Duvefjorden and Albertinibukta. Exposed crystalline bedrock likely kept the two ice flows separated before merging north of Karl XII-Øya. Subglacial landforms in Rijpfjorden and Duvefjorden indicate that both fjords accommodated northward-flowing ice streams during the LGM. The deeper fjord basin and higher elongation ratios of landforms in Duvefjorden suggest a more focused and/or larger ice flow there. Easily erodible sedimentary rocks are common in Duvefjorden, which may explain different ice flow dynamics in these fjords. Kvitøya TMF is flanked by gullies, probably formed through erosive downslope gravity flows triggered by sediment-laden meltwater during early deglaciation. Glacial landforms in Albertini Trough comprise retreat-related landforms indicating slow deglaciation. Iceberg scours in Albertini Trough suggest the importance of calving for mass-loss. Sets of De Geer moraines in Rijpfjorden imply that slow, grounded retreat continued in <210 m water depth. Lack of retreat-related landforms in deeper areas of Rijpfjorden and in Duvefjorden indicates floating glacier fronts influenced by calving. 14C ages suggest that deglaciation of inner Rijpfjorden and central Duvefjorden were complete before 10,434 cal a BP and 10

  12. Overview of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance and Dynamics from ICESat Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the ICESat mission was to determine the present-day mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, identify changes that may be occurring in the surface-mass flux and ice dynamics, and estimate their contributions to global sea-level rise. Although ICESat's three lasers were planned to make continuous measurements for 3 to 5 years, the mission was re-planned to operate in 33-day campaigns 2 to 3 times each year following failure of the first laser after 36 days. Seventeen campaigns were conducted with the last one in the Fall of 2009. Mass balance maps derived from measured ice-sheet elevation changes show that the mass loss from Greenland has increased significantly to about 170 Gt/yr for 2003 to 2007 from a state of near balance in the 1990's. Increased losses (189 Gt/yr) from melting and dynamic thinning are over seven times larger'than increased gains (25 gt/yr) from precipitation. Parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Antarctic Peninsula are losing mass at an increasing rate, but other parts of West Antarctica and the East Antarctic ice sheet are gaining mass at an increasing rate. Increased losses of 35 Gt/yr in Pine Island, Thwaites-Smith, and Marie-Bryd.Coast are more than balanced by gains in base of Peninsula and ice stream C, D, & E systems. From the 1992-2002 to 2003-2007 period, the overall mass balance for Antarctica changed from a loss of about 60 Gt/yr to near balance or slightly positive.

  13. Ice-sheet dynamics through the Quaternary on the mid-Norwegian continental margin inferred from 3D seismic data.

    PubMed

    Montelli, A; Dowdeswell, J A; Ottesen, D; Johansen, S E

    2017-02-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of ice sheets is critical to our understanding of the global environmental system, but most detailed palaeo-glaciological reconstructions have hitherto focused on the very recent history of ice sheets. Here, we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the changing nature of ice-sheet derived sedimentary architecture through the Quaternary Ice Age of almost 3 Ma. An extensive geophysical record documents a marine-terminating, calving Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) margin present periodically on the mid-Norwegian shelf since the beginning of the Quaternary. Spatial and temporal variability of the FIS is illustrated by the gradual development of fast-flowing ice streams and associated intensification of focused glacial erosion and sedimentation since that time. Buried subglacial landforms reveal a complex and dynamic ice sheet, with converging palaeo-ice streams and several flow-switching events that may reflect major changes in topography and basal thermal regime. Lack of major subglacial meltwater channels suggests a largely distributed drainage system beneath the marine-terminating part of the FIS. This palaeo-environmental examination of the FIS provides a useful framework for ice-sheet modelling and shows that fragmentary preservation of buried surfaces and variability of ice-sheet dynamics should be taken into account when reconstructing glacial history from spatially limited datasets.

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement versus subgrid friction interpolation in simulations of Antarctic ice dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Cornford, S. L.; Martin, D. F.; Lee, V.; ...

    2016-05-13

    At least in conventional hydrostatic ice-sheet models, the numerical error associated with grounding line dynamics can be reduced by modifications to the discretization scheme. These involve altering the integration formulae for the basal traction and/or driving stress close to the grounding line and exhibit lower – if still first-order – error in the MISMIP3d experiments. MISMIP3d may not represent the variety of real ice streams, in that it lacks strong lateral stresses, and imposes a large basal traction at the grounding line. We study resolution sensitivity in the context of extreme forcing simulations of the entire Antarctic ice sheet, using the BISICLES adaptive mesh ice-sheet model with two schemes: the original treatment, and a scheme, which modifies the discretization of the basal traction. The second scheme does indeed improve accuracy – by around a factor of two – for a given mesh spacing, butmore » $$\\lesssim 1$$ km resolution is still necessary. For example, in coarser resolution simulations Thwaites Glacier retreats so slowly that other ice streams divert its trunk. In contrast, with $$\\lesssim 1$$ km meshes, the same glacier retreats far more quickly and triggers the final phase of West Antarctic collapse a century before any such diversion can take place.« less

  15. Carbon cycling dynamics in the seasonal sea-ice zone of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Nicholas P.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Trull, Thomas W.; Virtue, Patti; Williams, Guy D.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon cycle of the seasonally ice covered region of the southwest Indian Ocean sector of East Antarctica (30°-80°E, 60°-69°S) was investigated during austral summer (January-March 2006). Large variability in the drivers and timing of carbon cycling dynamics were observed and indicated that the study site was a weak net source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere of 0.8 ± 1.6 g C m-2 during the ice-free period, with narrow bands of CO2 uptake observed near the continental margin and north of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front. Continuous surface measurements of dissolved oxygen and the fugacity of CO2 were combined with net community production estimates from oxygen/argon ratios to show that surface heat gain and photosynthesis were responsible for the majority of observed surface water variability. On seasonal timescales, winter sea-ice cover reduced the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere in the study area, followed by biologically driven drawdown of CO2 as the ice retreated in spring-summer highlighting the important role that sea-ice formation and retreat has on the biogeochemical cycling of the region.

  16. Modelling the impact of submarine frontal melting and ice mélange on glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, J.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Weiss, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two mechanisms are generally proposed to explain seasonal variations in the calving front of tidewater glaciers: submarine melting of the calving face and the mechanical back-force applied by the ice mélange. However, the way these processes affect the calving rate and the glacier dynamics remains uncertain. In this study, we used the finite element model Elmer/Ice to simulate the impact of these forcings on more than 200 two dimensional theoretical flowline glacier configurations. The model, which includes calving processes, suggests that frontal melting affects the position of the terminus only slightly (< a few hundred meters) and does not affect the pluriannual glacier mass balance at all. However, the ice mélange has a greater impact on the advance and retreat cycles of the glacier front (more than several 1000 m) and its consequences for the mass balance are not completely negligible, stressing the need for better characterization of forcing properties. We also show that ice mélange forcing against the calving face can mechanically prevent crevasse propagation at sea level and hence prevent calving. Results also revealed different behaviors in grounded and floating glaciers: in the case of a floating extension, the heaviest forcings can disrupt the glacier equilibrium by modifying its buttressing and ice flux at the grounding line.

  17. Free oscillations in a climate model with ice-sheet dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallen, E.; Crafoord, C.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    A study of stable periodic solutions to a simple nonlinear model of the ocean-atmosphere-ice system is presented. The model has two dependent variables: ocean-atmosphere temperature and latitudinal extent of the ice cover. No explicit dependence on latitude is considered in the model. Hence all variables depend only on time and the model consists of a coupled set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The globally averaged ocean-atmosphere temperature in the model is governed by the radiation balance. The reflectivity to incoming solar radiation, i.e., the planetary albedo, includes separate contributions from sea ice and from continental ice sheets. The major physical mechanisms active in the model are (1) albedo-temperature feedback, (2) continental ice-sheet dynamics and (3) precipitation-rate variations. The model has three-equilibrium solutions, two of which are linearly unstable, while one is linearly stable. For some choices of parameters, the stability picture changes and sustained, finite-amplitude oscillations obtain around the previously stable equilibrium solution. The physical interpretation of these oscillations points to the possibility of internal mechanisms playing a role in glaciation cycles.

  18. Dynamic joint and muscle forces during knee isokinetic exercise.

    PubMed

    Wei, S H

    2000-10-01

    Isokinetic exercise has been commonly used in knee rehabilitation, conditioning and research in the past two decades. Although many investigators have used various experimental and theoretical approaches to study the muscle and joint force involved in isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercises, only a few of these studies have actually distinguished between the tibiofemoral joint forces and muscle forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to specify, via an eletromyography(EMG)-driven muscle force model of the knee, the magnitude of the tibiofemoral joint and muscle forces acting during isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercises. Fifteen subjects ranging from 21 to 36 years of age volunteered to participate in this study. A Kin Com exercise machine (Chattecx Corporation, Chattanooga, TN, U.S.A.) was used as the loading device. An EMG-driven muscle force model was used to predict muscle forces, and a biomechanical model was used to analyze two knee joint constraint forces; compression and shear force. The methods used in this study were shown to be valid and reliable (r > 0.84 andp < 0.05). The effects on the tibiofemoral joint force during knee isokinetic exercises were compared with several functional activities that were investigated by earlier researchers. The muscle forces generated during knee isokinetic exercise were also obtained. Based on the findings obtained in this study, several therapeutic justifications for knee rehabilitation are proposed.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of the human knee joint--Part I: Postmortem frequency domain analyses.

    PubMed

    Dortmans, L; Jans, H; Sauren, A; Huson, A

    1991-11-01

    Characteristics results of postmortem experiments on five knee-joint specimens are reported. The experiments were performed to investigate the applicability of a local linearization technique that would make it possible to describe the dynamic behavior of the joint in terms of transfer functions. The results indicate that the stiffness of the bracing wires, attached to muscle tendons to create a static equilibrium position, can be accounted for when determining the stiffness of the joint. Besides the static equilibrium configuration, the magnitude of the dynamic load and the type of dynamic load applied to the joint can be shown to have their influence. As the influence of the dynamic load is significant, it has to be concluded that in essence the knee joint has to be regarded as a nonlinear system, making application of a Local Linearization Technique questionable. However, when the magnitude of the dynamic load is included as an additional measurement parameter, an indication can be obtained about the behavior of the joint and the degree of nonlinearity.

  20. Dynamics of Social Interaction: Kinematic Analysis of a Joint Action.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Quentin; Galvan, Lucie; Nazir, Tatjana A; Paulignan, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Non-verbal social interaction between humans requires accurate understanding of the others' actions. The cognitivist approach suggests that successful interaction depends on the creation of a shared representation of the task, where the pairing of perceptive and motor systems of partners allows inclusion of the other's goal into the overarching representation. Activity of the Mirror Neurons System (MNS) is thought to be a crucial mechanism linking two individuals during a joint action through action observation. The construction of a shared representation of an interaction (i.e., joint action) depends upon sensorimotor cognitive processes that modulate the ability to adapt in time and space. We attempted to detect individuals' behavioral/kinematic change resulting in a global amelioration of performance for both subjects when a common representation of the action is built using a repetitive joint action. We asked pairs of subjects to carry out a simple task where one puts a base in the middle of a table and the other places a parallelepiped fitting into the base, the crucial manipulation being that participants switched roles during the experiment. We aimed to show that a full comprehension of a joint action is not an automatic process. We found that, before switching the interactional role, the participant initially placing the base orientated it in a way that led to an uncomfortable action for participants placing the parallelepiped. However, after switching roles, the action's kinematics by the participant who places the base changed in order to facilitate the action of the other. More precisely, our data shows significant modulation of the base angle in order to ease the completion of the joint action, highlighting the fact that a shared knowledge of the complete action facilitates the generation of a common representation. This evidence suggests the ability to establish an efficient shared representation of a joint action benefits from physically taking our

  1. Dynamics of Social Interaction: Kinematic Analysis of a Joint Action

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Quentin; Galvan, Lucie; Nazir, Tatjana A.; Paulignan, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Non-verbal social interaction between humans requires accurate understanding of the others’ actions. The cognitivist approach suggests that successful interaction depends on the creation of a shared representation of the task, where the pairing of perceptive and motor systems of partners allows inclusion of the other’s goal into the overarching representation. Activity of the Mirror Neurons System (MNS) is thought to be a crucial mechanism linking two individuals during a joint action through action observation. The construction of a shared representation of an interaction (i.e., joint action) depends upon sensorimotor cognitive processes that modulate the ability to adapt in time and space. We attempted to detect individuals’ behavioral/kinematic change resulting in a global amelioration of performance for both subjects when a common representation of the action is built using a repetitive joint action. We asked pairs of subjects to carry out a simple task where one puts a base in the middle of a table and the other places a parallelepiped fitting into the base, the crucial manipulation being that participants switched roles during the experiment. We aimed to show that a full comprehension of a joint action is not an automatic process. We found that, before switching the interactional role, the participant initially placing the base orientated it in a way that led to an uncomfortable action for participants placing the parallelepiped. However, after switching roles, the action’s kinematics by the participant who places the base changed in order to facilitate the action of the other. More precisely, our data shows significant modulation of the base angle in order to ease the completion of the joint action, highlighting the fact that a shared knowledge of the complete action facilitates the generation of a common representation. This evidence suggests the ability to establish an efficient shared representation of a joint action benefits from physically

  2. Reconstruction of Wisconsinan-age ice dynamics and compositions of southern Ontario glacial diamictons, glaciofluvial/lacustrine, and deltaic sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Milan, Alison; Pulleyblank, Coren; Costa, Pedro J. M.; Milner, M. W.

    2014-02-01

    Macrofabric analysis of till sections in south-central Ontario confirms that clast orientation yields information related to changing ice dynamics during the Wisconsinan glaciation. Test stations in six sections yield unimodal to multimodal macrofabrics that indicate ice flow direction, ranging from SE-NW vectors when ice was thin and flowing radially to variable NE-SW, NNE-SSW, and N-S vectors when ice thickened. Ice loci appear to range from the Lake Ontario basin and southern Quebec (thin ice), Labrador Ungava (thicker ice), and Hudson Bay (thickest ice). The north-south fabric may identify the intergrowth of Keewatin-Labrador ice, presumably the maximum ice thickness of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The preliminary data support the theory that topography directed ice movement during preliminary and closing stages of glaciation in southern Ontario, while thick ice generated flow vectors largely unaffected by underlying topography; hence, leading to clast azimuthal variations reflecting changing ice loci with glacier growth. The fabrics analyzed suggest that inferring difference between ductile and brittle lodgement tills is possible as well as to identifying possible glacial tectonic action/overburden loading that disturbs the least friction-fit position of clasts in till. The changing dynamics within till sheets are supported, in part, by variations in glacial crushing seen in SEM imagery that depict a range of microtextures from full-scale fractures under brittle conditions to those indicating less viscous transport under ductile regimes. To some degree, changes in flow direction are further supported by geochemical variations that relate to bedrock/regolith up-glacier controlling Ca-dilution and variable concentrations of Rare Earth Elements (REEs).

  3. Impact of mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic changes in sea ice on the development of low pressure systems in the Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungert, U.; Schlünzen, K. H.; Ries, H.

    2009-09-01

    In polar regions the exchange of heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere depends on the sea ice distribution. Sea ice acts as an insulating layer between the relatively warm ocean water and the mostly cold air. The sea ice concentration can change on time scales from several hours to a few days due to dynamic processes like ice drift or breaking of the ice sheet and thermodynamic processes like melting and freezing. The influence of these mesoscale changes of the ice distribution on the heat exchange at the surface and on atmospheric processes is investigated by numerical simulations for the Fram Strait region. The studies are performed with the model system METRAS/MESIM (Dierer et al., 2005). It consists of the mesoscale atmospheric model METRAS (Lüpkes and Schlünzen, 1996; Schlünzen, 1990) that is interactively coupled with the mesoscale sea ice model MESIM (Birnbaum, 1998). The sea ice model is able to simulate dynamic and thermodynamic processes in the ice jointly and separately. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate the influence of these processes on the ice concentration and the resulting impact on low pressure systems in detail. Two periods are simulated: The first one from 05 to 07 March 2002, and the second one from 12 to 15 March 2002. During the first phase, a trough was passing from East to West through the Fram Strait region. During the second phase, three cyclones were passing in series over Fram Strait (Brümmer et al., 2008). In March 2002, the field experiment FRAMZY 2002 took place in the region of Svalbard and Fram Strait including ship measurements, aircraft measurements and drift buoys (Brümmer et al., 2005). The model results are compared with these measurements and the influence of changes in the sea ice cover on the exchange of heat and momentum at the surface and on the development of the trough (first phase) and the "cyclone family" (second phase) are investigated. For this development dynamically caused changes of the

  4. Biomechanical Model for Evaluation of Pediatric Upper Extremity Joint Dynamics during Wheelchair Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J.; Slavens, Brooke A.; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility using a SmartWheel instrumented handrim system. The bilateral model comprises thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments and includes the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist joints. A single 17 year-old male with a C7 spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated while propelling his wheelchair across a 15-meter walkway. The subject exhibited wrist extension angles up to 60°, large elbow ranges of motion and peak glenohumeral joint forces up to 10% body weight. Statistically significant asymmetry of the wrist, elbow, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints was detected by the model. As demonstrated, the custom bilateral UE pediatric model may provide considerable quantitative insight into UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training, rehabilitation and long-term care of children with orthopaedic disabilities. Further research is warranted to evaluate pediatric wheelchair mobility in a larger population of children with SCI to investigate correlations to pain, function and transitional changes to adulthood. PMID:24309622

  5. Biomechanical model for evaluation of pediatric upper extremity joint dynamics during wheelchair mobility.

    PubMed

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence C; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2014-01-03

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility using a SmartWheel instrumented handrim system. The bilateral model comprises thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments and includes the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist joints. A single 17 year-old male with a C7 spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated while propelling his wheelchair across a 15-meter walkway. The subject exhibited wrist extension angles up to 60°, large elbow ranges of motion and peak glenohumeral joint forces up to 10% body weight. Statistically significant asymmetry of the wrist, elbow, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints was detected by the model. As demonstrated, the custom bilateral UE pediatric model may provide considerable quantitative insight into UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training, rehabilitation and long-term care of children with orthopedic disabilities. Further research is warranted to evaluate pediatric wheelchair mobility in a larger population of children with SCI to investigate correlations to pain, function and transitional changes to adulthood.

  6. A coupled dynamic-thermodynamic model of an ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamics are incorporated into a coupled ice-ocean model in order to investigate wind-driven ice-ocean processes in the marginal zone. Upswelling at the ice edge which is generated by the difference in the ice-air and air-water surface stresses is found to give rise to a strong entrainment by drawing the pycnocline closer to the surface. Entrainment is shown to be negligible outside the areas affected by the ice edge upswelling. If cooling at the top is included in the model, the heat and salt exchanges are further enhanced in the upswelling areas. It is noted that new ice formation occurs in the region not affected by ice edge upswelling, and it is suggested that the high-salinity mixed layer regions (with a scale of a few Rossby radii of deformation) will overturn due to cooling, possibly contributing to the formation of deep water.

  7. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    output which indicates that non-linear retreat, grounding line stability and up-ice surface thinning is heavily influenced by both vertical and lateral constrictions in marine trough systems. While the offshore ice stream corridors are beginning to reveal their dynamic retreat history, knowledge of the inter-stream areas on the continental shelf remains very poor. The western, onshore sector of the GrIS has a much improved deglacial chronology derived from radiocarbon and new cosmogenic surface exposure dating undertaken in the last decade, but the deglacial history of wide swathes of the inner, mid and outer continental shelf remains completely unknown. The Hellefiske moraines on the West Greenland shelf were described in the late 1970's but little is known of ice sheet retreat behaviour across these areas. Understanding the deglacial signature of such regions is important if we are to use palaeo-reconstructions to understand ice sheet collapse/retreat mechanisms and to inform future model predictions.

  8. Dynamic coupling of magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows in ice giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Heimpel, M. H.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the solar system, yet their characteristics are as diverse as the planets themselves. These fields are thought to result from dynamo action driven by thermochemical convection in electrically conducting fluid regions. The multipolar dynamos of Uranus and Neptune provide a unique opportunity to test hypotheses for magnetic field generation. Since no sharp structural boundaries in the ice giants between the ionic ocean and overlying molecular envelope are expected, it is possible that these regions are linked dynamically. Thus, an understanding of the coupling between magnetic fields, heat flow, and atmospheric winds is crucial to determine what controls the strength, morphology, and evolution of giant planet dynamos. Here we present numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical shells to test the hypothesis that poorly organized turbulence will generate ice giant-like magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows. We find that this style of convection leads to small-scale, fluctuating dynamo action that generates a multipolar magnetic field, Hadley-like circulation cells that promote equatorial upwellings to create low latitude peaks in internal heat flux, and homogenized absolute angular momentum that drives three-jet zonal flows. This qualitative agreement with observations suggests that the internal dynamics of ice giant planets may be characterized by three-dimensional convective turbulence with dynamic coupling between the dynamo region and electrically insulating envelope above playing an important role as well.

  9. Sensitivity of simulated englacial isochrones to uncertain subglacial boundary conditions in central West Antarctica: Implications for detecting changes in ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Gail; Jackson, Charles S.; Young, Duncan A.; Quartini, Enrica; Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2017-04-01

    Information about the extent and dynamics of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during past glaciations is preserved inside ice sheets themselves. Ice cores are capable of retrieving information about glacial history, but they are spatially sparse. Ice-penetrating radar, on the other hand, has been used to map large areas of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and can be correlated to ice core chronologies. Englacial isochronous layers observed in ice-penetrating radar are the result of variations in ice composition, fabric, temperature and other factors. The shape of these isochronous surfaces is expected to encode information about past and present boundary conditions and ice dynamics. Dipping of englacial layers, for example, may reveal the presence of rapid ice flow through paleo ice streams or high geothermal heat flux. These layers therefore present a useful testbed for hypotheses about paleo ice sheet conditions. However, hypothesis testing requires careful consideration of the sensitivity of layer shape to the competing forces of ice sheet boundary conditions and ice dynamics over time. Controlled sensitivity tests are best completed using models, however ice sheet models generally do not have the capability of simulating layers in the presence of realistic boundary conditions. As such, modeling 3D englacial layers for comparison to observations is difficult and requires determination of a 3D ice velocity field. We present a method of post-processing simulated 3D ice sheet velocities into englacial isochronous layers using an advection scheme. We then test the sensitivity of layer geometry to uncertain boundary conditions, including heterogeneous subglacial geothermal flux and bedrock topography. By identifying areas of the ice sheet strongly influenced by boundary conditions, it may be possible to isolate the signature of paleo ice dynamics in the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  10. Long-term evolution of a small ice cap in Greenland: a dynamic perspective from numerical flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieli, Andreas; Lane, Timothy; Adamson, Kathryn

    2017-04-01

    Small ice caps at the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet are often close to the limit of existence and are therefore expected to respond more sensitively to climate change than the land-margin of the neighboring ice sheet. However, their past evolution and dynamic behavior is poorly understood and their use as climate indicators therefore remains so far limited. We here aim to provide a long-term dynamic reconstruction of Lyngmarksbraeen, a small (32km2) ice cap on Disko Island in West Greenland, with a particular focus on the little ice age (LIA, since 1200AD). We use a 2-dim. time-dependent numerical flow model (SIA) and a PDD-mass balance model in combination with historical observations, geomorphological mapping and exposure dating to simulate its long-term evolution and dynamic behaviour. We specifically focus on retreat since the LIA, which is well constrained by geomorphological evidence and historical maps and length records of several small outlet glaciers and data from local and regional climate stations (Qeqertarssuaq and Ilulisat). We also explore aspects related to flow dynamics and find that the dynamic state of this ice cap is, at any time, far from being balanced and is highly sensitive to the surface elevation mass balance feedback and results in an asynchronous response of the different outlets and hysteresis-type behaviour. The modelling is able to reproduce the observed LIA-extent and the almost continuous retreat over the last hundred years well. It further indicates that the ice cap was already dynamically inert since the 1960s. Today, the ice cap has lost almost its entire accumulation area and even without any further warming in the future, the ice cap is expected to vanish within a couple of decades.

  11. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water-Xe system.

    PubMed

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I; Pulver, Alexander Yu; Peregudov, Alex; Artyuhov, Igor

    2014-07-21

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We follow the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe·(H2O)21.5 clusters. Simulations of ice-xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice-liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

  12. Dynamics and reactivity of trapped electrons on supported ice crystallites.

    PubMed

    Stähler, Julia; Gahl, Cornelius; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-17

    The solvation dynamics and reactivity of localized excess electrons in aqueous environments have attracted great attention in many areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This manifold attraction results from the importance of water as a solvent in nature as well as from the key role of low-energy electrons in many chemical reactions. One prominent example is the electron-induced dissociation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Low-energy electrons are also critical in the radiation chemistry that occurs in nuclear reactors. Excess electrons in an aqueous environment are localized and stabilized by the local rearrangement of the surrounding water dipoles. Such solvated or hydrated electrons are known to play an important role in systems such as biochemical reactions and atmospheric chemistry. Despite numerous studies over many years, little is known about the microscopic details of these electron-induced chemical processes, and interest in the fundamental processes involved in the reactivity of trapped electrons continues. In this Account, we present a surface science study of the dynamics and reactivity of such localized low-energy electrons at D(2)O crystallites that are supported by a Ru(001) single crystal metal surface. This approach enables us to investigate the generation and relaxation dynamics as well as dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reaction of excess electrons under well-defined conditions. They are generated by photoexcitation in the metal template and transferred to trapping sites at the vacuum interface of crystalline D(2)O islands. In these traps, the electrons are effectively decoupled from the electronic states of the metal template, leading to extraordinarily long excited state lifetimes on the order of minutes. Using these long-lived, low-energy electrons, we study the DEA to CFCl(3) that is coadsorbed at very low concentrations (∼10(12) cm(-2)). Using rate equations and direct measurement of the change of surface dipole moment, we

  13. A physiological dynamic testing machine for the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Johannes; Wendlandt, Robert; Heinritz, Marcus; Schall, Angelika; Schulz, Arndt-Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a test setup combining realistic force transmission with physiological movement patterns at a frequency that mimicked daily use of the elbow, to assess implants in orthopedic joint reconstruction and trauma surgery. In a multidisciplinary approach, an in vitro biomechanical testing machine was developed and manufactured that could simulate the repetitive forceful movement of the human elbow joint. The construction involved pneumatic actuators. An aluminum forearm module enabled movements in 3 degrees of freedom, while motions and forces were replicated via force and angular sensors that were similar to in vivo measurements. In the initial testing, 16 human elbow joint specimens were tested at 35 Nm in up to 5000 cycles at a range of 10° extension to 110° flexion. The transmitted forces led to failure in 9 out of the 16 tested specimens, significantly more often in females and small specimens. It is possible to construct a testing machine to simulate nearly physiological repetitive elbow motions. The prototype has a number of technical deficiencies that could be modified. When testing implants for the human elbow with cadaver specimens, the specimen has to be chosen according to the intended use of the implant under investigation.

  14. Sea ice pCO2 dynamics and air-ice CO2 fluxes during the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment - Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Tison, J.-L.; Ackley, S. F.; Galley, R. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Miller, L. A.; Delille, B.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal evolution of pCO2 profiles in sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica, in October 2007 shows physical and thermodynamic processes controls the CO2 system in the ice. During the survey, cyclical warming and cooling strongly influenced the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of the ice cover. Two sampling sites with contrasting characteristics of ice and snow thickness were sampled: one had little snow accumulation (from 8 to 25 cm) and larger temperature and salinity variations than the second site, where the snow cover was up to 38 cm thick and therefore better insulated the underlying sea ice. We show that each cooling/warming event was associated with an increase/decrease in the brine salinity, total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2), and in situ brine and bulk ice CO2 partial pressures (pCO2). Thicker snow covers reduced the amplitude of these changes: snow cover influences the sea ice carbonate system by modulating the temperature and therefore the salinity of the sea ice cover. Results indicate that pCO2 was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere both in the in situ bulk ice (from 10 to 193 μatm) and brine (from 65 to 293 μatm), causing the sea ice to act as a sink for atmospheric CO2 (up to 2.9 mmol m-2 d-1), despite supersaturation of the underlying seawater (up to 462 μatm).

  15. The dynamics of idealized katabatic flow over a moderate slope and ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfrew, A. Ian

    2004-04-01

    A non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model has been employed to simulate idealized katabatic flows over a moderate slope and adjoining ice shelf. The topography of Coats Land and the adjoining Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica, has been used; this is typical of much of the Antarctic coastline. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System Version 4.3 has been adapted for simulations over compacted snow, most notably through changes to the multi-layer soil model. The simulations are initialized using clear-sky conditions and at rest. On the slope, a shallow katabatic flow develops, the winds becoming approximately steady on the slope by ~ 12 h. The peak downslope winds are about 7 m s-1 at 30 m above the snow surface. The katabatic flow depth ranges from 50 to 100 m down the slope. Over the ice shelf the katabatic flow peters out, while a pool of cold air develops, primarily through sensible-heat loss into the surface and partially balancing the net radiative-heat loss to space. Near-surface and sounding data from the model simulations compare well with archetypal and typical katabatic flow observations, especially after some tuning of the model's turbulence parametrization. An analysis of the downslope flow dynamics shows the buoyancy force is generally balanced by the inertial force, except towards the foot of the slope where it is balanced by upslope forces related to gradients in the potential-temperature deficit and katabatic-layer height, caused by the pool of cold air over the ice shelf. Over time, the cooling of the ice shelf boundary layer leads to an apparent retreat of the katabatic flow from the ice shelf and some way up the slope. The dynamical analysis explains the surface climatology observed, such that the persistent katabatic winds of Coats Land rarely reach the Brunt Ice Shelf. The simulated katabatic flow moves from 'shooting' to 'tranquil' towards the foot of the slope. This transition acts to trigger a train of internal gravity waves which

  16. Analog modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation and ice flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Ravier, Edouard; Mourgues, Régis; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated and overdeepened depressions up to hundreds of kilometers long, several kilometers wide and hundreds of meters deep, found in formerly glaciated areas. These drainage features are interpreted as the result of subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets and constitute a major component of the subglacial drainage system. Although tunnel valleys have been described worldwide in the past decades, their formation is still a matter of debate. Here, we present an innovative experimental approach simulating pressurized water flow in a subglacial environment in order to study the erosional processes occurring at the ice-bed interface. We use a sandbox partially covered by a circular, viscous and transparent lid (silicon putty), simulating an impermeable ice cap. Punctual injection of pressurized water in the substratum at the center of the lid simulates meltwater production beneath the ice cap. Surface images collected by six synchronized cameras allow to monitor the evolution of the experiment through time, using photogrammetry methods and DEM generation. UV markers placed in the silicon are used to follow the silicon flow during the drainage of water at the substratum-lid interface, and give the unique opportunity to simultaneously follow the formation of tunnel valleys and the evolution of ice dynamics. When the water pressure is low, groundwater circulates within the substratum only and no drainage landforms appear at the lid-substratum interface. By contrast, when the water pressure exceeds a threshold that is larger than the sum of glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures, additional water circulation occurs at the lid-substratum interface and drainage landforms develop from the lid margin. These landforms share numerous morphological criteria with tunnel valleys such as undulating longitudinal profiles, U-shaped cross-sectional profiles with flat floors, constant widths and abrupt flanks. Continuous generation of DEMs and flow velocity

  17. Dynamics of the Zemgale Lobe of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet reconstructed from the subglacial landform record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsters, Kristaps; Zelčs, Vitālijs

    2015-04-01

    Deglacial ice dynamics were inferred from the distribution, morphometry and sedimentology of subglacial bedforms such as drumlins, mega-flutes, mega-scale glacial lineations (MSGL), ribbed moraines, from meltwater features such as subglacial channels and eskers, and ice-marginal landforms, which were identified and mapped from the topographical maps and digital elevation models. The Zemgale Lobe operated in the area of the Central Latvian and Lithuanian Lowlands, and it was characterized by the fast ice flow that was sustained by a combination of subglacial deformation and basal sliding. The mosaic ice-bed deformation model is favoured due to observed sediment structures indicating ice/bed coupling and decoupling episodes. The landform record indicates on two major reactivations of the Zemgale Lobe during the overall deglaciation of the Late Weichselian Scandinavian Ice Sheet and may imply surge-type behaviour. The coexistence of subglacial bedform assemblage and overlapping of their morphometry demonstrates subglacial bedform continuum. A significant number of prominent esker chains are distinguished proximally from the marginal ridges of the North Lithuanian deglacial phase with an average spacing of 10 - 15 km. Some of eskers are found within subglacial channels recording change in meltwater discharge. The cores of the many eskers consist of coarse deposits - gravels, cobbles and boulders indicating episodes of high-energy and hyper-concentrated flow conditions. Ribbed moraines are superimposed on streamlined subglacial features, thereby indicating a shift of subglacial conditions, which promoted the shutdown of the SE part of the Zemgale Lobe. The presence of ribbed moraines on the Zemgale Lobe bed proves that they are distributed not only at the central parts of ice sheets but also outside the core areas. The structure or ribbed moraines is glaciotectonically deformed, and comprises multiple units of diamicton and sorted sediments, which formed by repeated

  18. Dynamic Recrystallization in Ice : In-Situ Observation of the Strain Field during Grain Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Tommasi, A.; Vacher, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs in minerals, metals, ice and impact on large scale mechanisms as seismic anisotropy, mechanical properties inside the Earth mantle, material forming and anisotropic flow in polar ice sheet, for instance. In this frame, ice can be considered as a model material due to a strong viscoplastic anisotropy and deformation heterogeneities, which are precursors of the recrystallization. During creep deformation at high temperature, DRX occurs from 1% strain and involves grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. As DRX induces an evolution of microstructure and texture, it strongly affects the mechanical behavior, and it is expected to modify the strain field at the grain and/or the sample scale. Creep test (σ=0.5-0.8 MPa) were performed at high temperature (T/Tf 0,98) on granular polycrystalline ice (grains size 1mm) and columnar polycrystalline ice (microstructure 2D 1/2 in plane grain size 10mm) up to 18 % strain. Columnar ice provides interesting feature as it contains only one grain through the thickness and the columns are parallel. Post-deformation texture analysis with an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and with EBSD (Geoscience Montpellier) were used to investigate DRX impact on texture and microstructure, at different scales. With increasing strain texture evolves to a strong concentrated girdle with a preferential orientation of c-axis close to 35° from the compression axis. During the experiment, local strain field is measured on the surface of the sample by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) with a spatial resolution between 0.2 and 0.5 mm, and a strain resolution between 0.2% to 1%. Grain size being large, we obtain a relatively good intra-granular resolution of the strain field. Thanks to the 2D configuration of the columnar ice samples, we can superimpose the strain field measured by DIC. We will present an overview of the impact of DRX on the texture and microstructure, from the 3D configuration down to a

  19. Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the seasonal ice zone of the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Kanchan; Carroll, JoLynn; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2010-01-01

    The Barents Sea seasonal ice zone (SIZ) is one of the most dynamic areas in the world ocean. This biologically productive area undergoes extreme intra- and inter-annual variabilities in sea ice and water mass transport properties. Here, we investigate seafloor burial processes in three regions of the SIZ with different ice-cover frequencies: predominantly open water (POW), marginally ice-covered (MIC), and predominantly ice-covered (PIC) with approximately 0, 10 and 50% sea ice cover, respectively, in 2002-2003. Down-core sediment profiles of the radionuclides 234Th, 210Pb, and 137Cs, along with sediment carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations are examined in two to three cores from each region. Sedimentation rates and velocities using 210Pb ex (excess 210Pb) profiles and assuming negligible mixing below a surface mixed layer are relatively uniform throughout the study area, averaging 558 ± 154 g m - 2 y - 1 and 1.1 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 ( n = 7). These sedimentation velocities are confirmed using 137Cs (1.0 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 , n = 7). 234Th ex (excess 234Th) derived bioturbation rates are positively correlated with number of benthic individuals per 0.5 m 2 ( R2 = 0.83) and exhibit a pattern of higher rates in the MIC (14.5 ± 2.1 cm - 2 y - 1) relative to both the POW (6.3 ± 2.2 cm - 2 y - 1) and PIC (5.3 ± 1.2 cm - 2 y - 1) ( p < 0.01). 234Th ex inventories are also significantly higher ( p = 0.026) within the MIC, while both 210Pb ex and 137Cs sediment inventories are more regionally uniform. Furthermore, organic carbon (C org) and total nitrogen (N tot) concentrations are relatively high in both the MIC and PIC compared to POW. For this limited data set, higher bioturbation rate coefficients and higher 234Th ex sediment inventories in the MIC relative to the other sampled regions, suggest that the MIC exhibits a greater predominance of marine versus terrestrial sediment sources that support enhanced scavenging and benthic biological activity. These results

  20. Modelling the impact of submarine frontal melting and ice melange on glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, J.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Weiss, J.

    2015-05-01

    Submarine melting of the calving face of tidewater glaciers and the mechanical back force applied by the ice melange layer are two mechanisms generally proposed to explain seasonal variations at the calving front of tidewater glaciers. However, the way these processes affect the calving rate and glacier dynamics remains uncertain. In this study, we used a finite element-based model that solves the full Stokes equations to simulate the impact of these forcings on two-dimensional theoretical flow line glacier configurations. The model, which includes calving processes, suggests that frontal melting affects the position of the terminus only slightly (less than a few hundred metres) and does not affect the multiannual glacier mass balance at all. However, the ice melange has a greater impact on the advance and retreat cycles of the glacier front (more than several kilometres) and its consequences for the mass balance are not completely negligible, stressing the need for better characterization of forcing properties. We also show that ice melange forcing against the calving face can mechanically prevent crevasse propagation at sea level and hence prevent calving. Results also reveal different behaviours in grounded and floating glaciers: in the case of a floating extension, the strongest forcings can disrupt the glacier equilibrium by modifying its buttressing and ice flux at the grounding line.

  1. The dynamic crossover in dielectric relaxation behavior of ice I(h).

    PubMed

    Popov, Ivan; Puzenko, Alexander; Khamzin, Airat; Feldman, Yuri

    2015-01-14

    The main mechanism of the dielectric relaxation process of ordinary hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and its temperature dependence remains unclear. The most interesting and as yet unexplained feature of ice is the presence of the dynamical crossover in relaxation time behavior around Tc = 230 ± 3 K. Since there are no phase transitions in the ice at this temperature (first or second order), we cannot correlate the origin of this crossover with any structural change. Here we present a model according to which the temperature of the crossover is defined by the polarization mechanism. The dielectric relaxation driven by the diffusion of L-D orientational Bjerrum defects (at high temperature, T > Tc) is transformed into a dielectric relaxation dominated by the diffusion of intrinsic ionic H3O(+)/OH(-) defects (at low temperature, T < Tc). In the framework of the model, we propose an analytical equation for the complex dielectric permittivity that takes into account the contribution of both types of defects.

  2. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  3. A finite element approach for the dynamic analysis of joint-dominated structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wu, Shih-Chin

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method to model dynamic structural systems undergoing large rotations is presented. The dynamic systems are composed of rigid joint bodies and flexible beam elements. The configurations of these systems are subject to change due to the relative motion in the joints among interconnected elastic beams. A body fixed reference is defined for each joint body to describe the joint body's displacements. Using the finite element method and the kinematic relations between each flexible element and its corotational reference, the total displacement field of an element, which contains gross rigid as well as elastic effects, can be derived in terms of the translational and rotational displacements of the two end nodes. If one end of an element is hinged to a joint body, the joint body's displacements and the hinge degree of freedom at the end are used to represent the nodal displacements. This results in a highly coupled system of differential equations written in terms of hinge degrees of freedom as well as the rotational and translational displacements of joint bodies and element nodes.

  4. Subglacial hydrology indicates a major shift in dynamics of the West Antarctic Ross Ice Streams within the next two centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeller, S.; Helm, V.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.

    2015-07-01

    The mass export of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is dominated by fast flowing ice streams. Understanding their dynamics is a key to estimate the future integrity of the WAIS and its contributions to global sea level rise. This study focuses on the Ross Ice Streams (RIS) at the Siple Coast. In this sector, observations reveal a high variability of ice stream pathways and velocities which is assumed to be driven by subglacial hydrology. We compute subglacial water pathways for the present-day ice sheet and verify this assumption by finding high correlations between areas of enhanced basal water flow and the locations of the RIS. Moreover, we reveal that the ice flow velocities of the individual ice streams are correlated with the sizes of the water catchment areas draining underneath. The future development of the subglacial hydraulic environment is estimated by applying ice surface elevation change rates observed by ICESat and CryoSat-2 to the present-day ice sheet geometry and thus assessing prognostic basal pressure conditions. Our simulations consistently indicate that a major hydraulic tributary of the Kamb and Whillans Ice Stream (KIS and WIS) will be redirected underneath the Bindschadler Ice Stream (BIS) within the next two centuries. The water catchment area feeding underneath the BIS is estimated to grow by about 50 % while the lower part of the stagnated KIS becomes increasingly separated from its upper hydraulic tributaries. We conclude, that this might be a continuation of the subglacial hydraulic processes which caused the past stagnation of the KIS. The simulated hydraulic rerouting is also capable to explain the observed deceleration of the WIS and indicates a possible future acceleration of the BIS accompanied by an increased ice drainage of the corresponding ice sheet interior.

  5. Response of Antarctic ice shelf melt to SAM trend and possible feedbacks with the ice-dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat-Magnin, Marion; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Gallée, Hubert; Spence, Paul; Cornford, Stephen L.; Le Sommer, Julien; Durand, Gaël

    2017-04-01

    The observed positive trend in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) may warm the Southern Ocean sub-surface through decreased Ekman downward pumping. Subsequent change in ice-shelves melt has been suggested to trigger glacier acceleration in West Antarctica. Here we use a regional ocean model configuration of the Amundsen Sea that includes interactive ice-shelf cavities. Our results show that the inclusion of ice-shelves changes the ocean response to the projected SAM trend, i.e. it typically inhibits a part of the SAM-induced subsurface warming. Heat budget analysis has been used to propose responsible mechanisms. Regarding Thwaites and Pine Island, sub ice-shelf melt increases above 400m by approximately 40% for Thwaites and 10% for Pine Island and decreases by up to 10% below in response to ocean temperature changes driven by the projected SAM trend. The melt sensitivity to poleward shifting winds is nonetheless small compared to the sensitivity to an ice-sheet instability, i.e. to a projected change in the shape of ice-shelf cavities. For instance, the sub ice-shelf melt are doubled near the grounding line of some glaciers in response to the largest grounding line retreat projected for 2100. Large increase in basal melt close to the grounding line could largely impact instability and glacier acceleration. Our work suggests the need for including ice shelves into ocean models, and to couple ocean models to ice-sheet models in climate projections.

  6. Ice-Sheet Dynamics and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability in the North Atlantic across the Middle Pleistocene Transition (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Nicholl, J.

    2013-12-01

    During the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT), the climate system evolved from a more linear response to insolation forcing in the '41-kyr world' to one that was decidedly non-linear in the '100-kyr world'. Smaller ice sheets in the early Pleistocene gave way to larger ice sheets in the late Pleistocene with an accompanying change in ice sheet dynamics. We studied Sites U1308 (49° 52.7'N, 24° 14.3'W; 3871 m) and U1304 (53° 3.4'N, 33° 31.8'W; 3024 m) in the North Atlantic to determine how ice sheet dynamics and millennial-scale climate variability evolved as glacial boundary conditions changed across the MPT. The frequency of ice-rafted detritus (IRD) in the North Atlantic was greater during glacial stages prior to 650 ka (MIS 16), reflecting more frequent crossing of an ice volume threshold when the climate system spent more time in the 'intermediate ice volume' window, resulting in persistent millennial scale variability. The rarity of Heinrich Events containing detrital carbonate and more frequent occurrence of IRD events prior to 650 ka may indicate the presence of 'low-slung, slippery ice sheets' that flowed more readily than their post-MPT counterparts (Bailey et al., 2010). Ice volume surpassed a critical threshold across the MPT that permitted ice sheets to survive boreal summer insolation maxima, thereby increasing ice volume and thickness, lengthening glacial cycles, and activating the dynamical processes responsible for Laurentide Ice Sheet instability in the region of Hudson Strait (i.e., Heinrich events). The excess ice volume during post-MPT glacial maxima provided a large, unstable reservoir of freshwater to be released to the North Atlantic during glacial terminations with the potential to perturb Atlantic Meridional Overtunring Circulation. We speculate that orbital- and millennial-scale variability co-evolved across the MPT and the interaction of processes on orbital and suborbital time scales gave rise to the changing patterns of glacial

  7. Identification of dynamic stiffness matrices of elastomeric joints using direct and inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Scott; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-08-01

    New experiments are designed to permit direct comparison between direct and inverse identification methods of the dynamic stiffness matrices of elastomeric joints, including non-diagonal terms. The joints are constructed with combinations of inclined elastomeric cylinders to control non-diagonal terms in the stiffness matrix. The inverse experiment consists of an elastic metal beam end-supported by elastomeric joints coupling the in-plane transverse and longitudinal beam motion. A prior method is extended to identify the joint dynamic stiffness matrices of dimension 3 from limited modal measurements of the beam. The dynamic stiffness and loss factors of the elastomeric cylinders are directly measured in a commercial elastomer test machine in shear, compression, and inclined configurations and a coordinate transformation is used to estimate the kinematic non-diagonal stiffness terms. Agreement is found for both dynamic stiffness and loss factors between the direct and inverse methods at small displacements. Further, the identified joint properties are employed in a model that successfully predicts the modal parameters and accelerance spectra of the inverse experiment. This article provides valuable insight on the difficulties encountered when comparing system and elastomeric component test results.

  8. On the apparent insignificance of the randomness of flexible joints on large space truss dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, R. M.; Klosner, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Deployable periodic large space structures have been shown to exhibit high dynamic sensitivity to period-breaking imperfections and uncertainties. These can be brought on by manufacturing or assembly errors, structural imperfections, as well as nonlinear and/or nonconservative joint behavior. In addition, the necessity of precise pointing and position capability can require the consideration of these usually negligible and unknown parametric uncertainties and their effect on the overall dynamic response of large space structures. This work describes the use of a new design approach for the global dynamic solution of beam-like periodic space structures possessing parametric uncertainties. Specifically, the effect of random flexible joints on the free vibrations of simply-supported periodic large space trusses is considered. The formulation is a hybrid approach in terms of an extended Timoshenko beam continuum model, Monte Carlo simulation scheme, and first-order perturbation methods. The mean and mean-square response statistics for a variety of free random vibration problems are derived for various input random joint stiffness probability distributions. The results of this effort show that, although joint flexibility has a substantial effect on the modal dynamic response of periodic large space trusses, the effect of any reasonable uncertainty or randomness associated with these joint flexibilities is insignificant.

  9. Asthenospheric ice-load effects in a global dynamical-system model of the Pleistocene climate

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.; Verbitsky, M.Ya.

    1992-10-01

    In a previous dynamical model the late Cenozoic climate variations were simulated, taking into account free and forced variations of atmospheric carbon dioxide acting in concert with changes in global ice mass and the deep ocean thermal state, all under the influence of the known earth-orbital radiative changes. This model is now extended by adding another relevant variable, bedrock/asthenosphere depression, including its associated ice-calving effects. Within the context of this extended model we (1) demonstrate the main results of previous bedrock/ice sheet models in what we believe is the simplest possible manner, (2) show how these previous models can exhibit the mid-Pleistocene transition with the inclusion of CO{sub 2} effects, (3) discuss the limitations of these previous bedrock models, and (4) illustrate the possibility of removing some of these limitations and accounting for further aspects of the paleoclimate record by using the full dynamical system that includes forced and free effects of CO{sub 2}, as well as effects of bedrock depression and Milankovitch forcing. As one example of a new possibility, with bedrock effects included in the full system we can obtain a solution characterized by irregularly spaced, intermittent episodes in which the behavior is dominated either by near-40 kyr period oscillations or by near-100 kyr periods (such as prevailed over the Pleistocene). 27 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Barou, F.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Mainprice, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the `parent' ones suggests the possibility of `spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  11. Nanocluster building blocks of artificial square spin ice: Stray-field studies of thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlit, Merlin Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2015-05-07

    We present measurements of the thermal dynamics of a Co-based single building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition. We employ micro-Hall magnetometry, an ultra-sensitive tool to study the stray field emanating from magnetic nanostructures, as a new technique to access the dynamical properties during the magnetization reversal of the spin-ice nanocluster. The obtained hysteresis loop exhibits distinct steps, displaying a reduction of their “coercive field” with increasing temperature. Therefore, thermally unstable states could be repetitively prepared by relatively simple temperature and field protocols allowing one to investigate the statistics of their switching behavior within experimentally accessible timescales. For a selected switching event, we find a strong reduction of the so-prepared states' “survival time” with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Besides the possibility to control the lifetime of selected switching events at will, we find evidence for a more complex behavior caused by the special spin ice arrangement of the macrospins, i.e., that the magnetic reversal statistically follows distinct “paths” most likely driven by thermal perturbation.

  12. Dynamics of Bound Monopoles in Artificial Spin Ice: How to Store Energy in Dirac Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedmedenko, E. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Dirac strings in spin ices are lines of reversed dipoles joining two quasiparticle excitations. These excitations behave as unbound emergent monopoles if the tension of Dirac strings vanishes. In this Letter, analytical and numerical analysis are used to study the dynamics of two-dimensional dipolar spin ices, artificially created analogs of bulk spin ice, in the regime of bound monopoles. It is shown that, in this regime, strings, rather than monopoles, are effective degrees of freedom explaining the finite-width band of Pauling states. A measurable prediction of path-time dependence of endpoints of a stretched and, then, released Dirac string is made and verified via simulations. It is shown that string dynamics is defined by the characteristic tension-to-mass ratio, which is determined by the fine structure constant and lattice dependent parameter. It is proposed to use string tension to achieve spontaneous magnetic currents. A concept of an energy storing device on the basis of this principle is proposed and illustrated by an experimental demonstration. A scheme of independent measurement at the nanoscale is proposed.

  13. Dynamics of surface melting over Amery and Ross ice shelf in Antarctic using OSCAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothale, R. V.; Rao, P. V. N.; Dutt, C. B. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Antarctic sea ice sheets play an important role in modulating the climate system. The present study investigates the dynamics of melt/freeze over Amery and Ross ice shelf located in Eastern and Southern part of continent using OSCAT, the microwave scatterometer data from OCEANSAT2. The study utilizes the sensitivity of backscatter coefficient values of scatterometer data to presence of liquid water in the snow caused due to melt conditions. The analysis carried out for four austral winters from 2010-2013 and five austral summer from 2009-2014 showed spatial and temporal variations in average backscatter coefficient over Amery and Ross shelf areas. A dynamic threshold based on the austral winter mean and standard deviation of HH polarization is considered for pixel by pixel analysis for the shelf area. There is significant spatio-temporal variability in melt extent, duration and melt index as observed in the analysis. Spatially, the melt over Amery shelf moves from South to North along coast and West towards inner shelf area. Maximum mean melt occurs on 9th January with January 1-15 fortnight accounting for 80 % of the melt. Extreme low melt conditions were observed during summer 2010-11 and 2011-12 indicating cold summer. Summer 2012-13 and 2013-14 were warm summer. Year 2014 experienced melt only in the month of January with entire shelf under melt conditions. Practically no melt was observed over Ross ice shelf.

  14. Dynamics of Bound Monopoles in Artificial Spin Ice: How to Store Energy in Dirac Strings.

    PubMed

    Vedmedenko, E Y

    2016-02-19

    Dirac strings in spin ices are lines of reversed dipoles joining two quasiparticle excitations. These excitations behave as unbound emergent monopoles if the tension of Dirac strings vanishes. In this Letter, analytical and numerical analysis are used to study the dynamics of two-dimensional dipolar spin ices, artificially created analogs of bulk spin ice, in the regime of bound monopoles. It is shown that, in this regime, strings, rather than monopoles, are effective degrees of freedom explaining the finite-width band of Pauling states. A measurable prediction of path-time dependence of endpoints of a stretched and, then, released Dirac string is made and verified via simulations. It is shown that string dynamics is defined by the characteristic tension-to-mass ratio, which is determined by the fine structure constant and lattice dependent parameter. It is proposed to use string tension to achieve spontaneous magnetic currents. A concept of an energy storing device on the basis of this principle is proposed and illustrated by an experimental demonstration. A scheme of independent measurement at the nanoscale is proposed.

  15. Uneven onset and pace of ice-dynamical imbalance in the Amundsen Sea Embayment, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Hannes; Gilbert, Lin; Cornford, Stephen L.; Payne, Antony; Hogg, Anna; Muir, Alan; Shepherd, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We combine measurements acquired by five satellite altimeter missions to obtain an uninterrupted record of ice sheet elevation change over the Amundsen Sea Embayment, West Antarctica, since 1992. Using these data, we examine the onset of surface lowering arising through ice-dynamical imbalance, and the pace at which it has propagated inland, by tracking elevation changes along glacier flow lines. Surface lowering has spread slowest (<6 km/yr) along the Pope, Smith, and Kohler (PSK) Glaciers, due to their small extent. Pine Island Glacier (PIG) is characterized by a continuous inland spreading of surface lowering, notably fast at rates of 13 to 15 km/yr along tributaries draining the southeastern lobe, possibly due to basal conditions or tributary geometry. Surface lowering on Thwaites Glacier (THG) has been episodic and has spread inland fastest (10 to 12 km/yr) along its central flow lines. The current episodes of surface lowering started approximately 10 years before the first measurements on PSK, around 1990 on PIG, and around 2000 on THG. Ice-dynamical imbalance across the sector has therefore been uneven during the satellite record.

  16. A quasi-liquid mediated continuum model of faceted ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshyba, Steven; Adams, Jonathan; Reed, Kelsey; Rowe, Penny M.; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    We present a quasi-liquid mediated continuum model for ice growth consisting of partial differential equations informed by molecular dynamics simulations. The main insight from molecular dynamics is the appearance of periodic variations in the equilibrium vapor pressure and quasi-liquid thickness of the ice/vapor interface. These variations are incorporated in the continuum model as subgrid scale microsurfaces. We show that persistent faceted ice growth in the presence of inhomogeneities in the ambient vapor field is due to a spontaneous narrowing of terraces at facet corners, which compensates for higher ambient water vapor density via feedback between surface supersaturation and quasi-liquid thickness. We argue that this emergent behavior has the mathematical structure of a stable limit cycle and characterize its robustness in terms of ranges of parameters that support it. Because the model is relevant in the high-surface-coverage regime, it serves as a useful complement to the Burton-Cabrera-Frank framework. Quantitative aspects and limitations of the model are also discussed.

  17. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD.

    PubMed

    Chauve, T; Montagnat, M; Barou, F; Hidas, K; Tommasi, A; Mainprice, D

    2017-02-13

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the 'parent' ones suggests the possibility of 'spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. RIMBAY - a multi-approximation 3D ice-dynamics model for comprehensive applications: model description and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Barbi, D.; Determann, J.; Goeller, S.; Mayer, C.; Pattyn, F.

    2014-01-01

    Glaciers and ice caps exhibit currently the largest cryospheric contributions to sea level rise. Modelling the dynamics and mass balance of the major ice sheets is therefore an important issue to investigate the current state and the future response of the cryosphere in response to changing environmental conditions, namely global warming. This requires a powerful, easy-to-use, versatile multi-approximation ice dynamics model. Based on the well-known and established ice sheet model of Pattyn (2003) we develop the modular multi-approximation thermomechanic ice model RIMBAY, in which we improve the original version in several aspects like a shallow ice-shallow shelf coupler and a full 3D-grounding-line migration scheme based on Schoof's (2007) heuristic analytical approach. We summarise the full Stokes equations and several approximations implemented within this model and we describe the different numerical discretisations. The results are cross-validated against previous publications dealing with ice modelling, and some additional artificial set-ups demonstrate the robustness of the different solvers and their internal coupling. RIMBAY is designed for an easy adaption to new scientific issues. Hence, we demonstrate in very different set-ups the applicability and functionality of RIMBAY in Earth system science in general and ice modelling in particular.

  19. RIMBAY - a multi-physics 3-D ice-dynamics model for comprehensive applications: model-description and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Barbi, D.; Determann, J.; Göller, S.; Mayer, C.; Pattyn, F.

    2013-06-01

    Glaciers and ice caps exhibit currently the largest cryospheric contributions to sea level rise. Modelling the dynamics and mass balance of the major ice sheets is therefore an important issue to investigate the current state and the future response of the cryosphere in response to changing environmental conditions, namely global warming. This requires a powerful, easy-to-use, scalable multi-physics ice dynamics model. Based on the well-known and established ice sheet model of Pattyn (2003) we develop the modular multi-physics thermomechanic ice model RIMBAY, in which we improve the original version in several aspects like a shallow-ice-shallow-shelf coupler and a full 3-D-grounding-line migration scheme based on Schoof's (2007) heuristic analytical approach. We summarise the Full-Stokes equations and several approximations implemented within this model and we describe the different numerical discretisations. The results are cross-validated against previous publications dealing with ice modelling, and some additional artificial set-ups demonstrate the robustness of the different solvers and their internal coupling. RIMBAY is designed for an easy adaption to new scientific issues. Hence, we demonstrate in very different set-ups the applicability and functionality of RIMBAY in Earth system science in general and ice modelling in particular.

  20. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  1. Dynamic changes on the Wilkins Ice Shelf during the 2006-2009 retreat derived from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankl, Melanie; Fürst, Johannes Jakob; Humbert, Angelika; Holger Braun, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    The vast ice shelves around Antarctica provide significant restraint to the outflow from adjacent tributary glaciers. This important buttressing effect became apparent in the last decades, when outlet glaciers accelerated considerably after several ice shelves were lost around the Antarctic Peninsula (AP). The present study aims to assess dynamic changes on the Wilkins Ice Shelf (WIS) during different stages of ice-front retreat and partial collapse between early 2008 and 2009. The total ice-shelf area lost in these events was 2135 ± 75 km2 ( ˜ 15 % of the ice-shelf area relative to 2007). Here, we use time series of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite observations (1994-1996, 2006-2010) in order to derive variations in surface-flow speed from intensity-offset tracking. Spatial patterns of horizontal strain-rate, stress and stress-flow angle distributions are determined during different ice-front retreat stages. Prior to the final break up of an ice bridge in 2008, a strong speed up is observed, which is also discernible from other derived quantities. We identify areas that are important for buttressing and areas prone to fracturing using in-flow and first principal strain rates as well as principal stress components. Further propagation of fractures can be explained as the first principal components of strain rates and stresses exceed documented threshold values. Positive second principal stresses are another scale-free indicator for ice-shelf areas, where fractures preferentially open. Second principal strain rates are found to be insensitive to ice-front retreat or fracturing. Changes in stress-flow angles highlight similar areas as the in-flow strain rates but are difficult to interpret. Our study reveals the large potential of modern SAR satellite time series to better understand dynamic and structural changes during ice-shelf retreat but also points to uncertainties introduced by the methods applied.

  2. Control of ocean carbon storage and atmospheric pCO2 by Southern Ocean sea ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakem, E.; Ferreira, D.; Follows, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Change in annual sea ice in the Southern ocean has been proposed as a control on atmospheric pCO2 levels since Antarctic glacial inception around 34 Ma. Sea ice coverage slows or prevents the degassing of carbon-rich upwelled water, increasing ocean carbon storage, though the significance of this process has been doubted due to the coincidental decrease of the biological pump with ice cover. Here we explore the mechanism by which southern ocean sea ice coverage and dynamics drive atmospheric pCO2 levels in the Southern Ocean. To this end, we analyze the biogeochemical output of coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice GCM models with simplified geometry. Bottom water formation rates are controlled by manipulating ice dynamics. We show that the dominant difference in the ocean carbon content between model states is mainly driven by air-sea disequilibrium, rather than by solubility or biological productivity. As bottom water formation strengthens, the overturning cell underneath the sea ice is enriched in DIC at depth, but ice cover prevents outgassing to the atmosphere upon return to the surface. When bottom water is present, the ocean fills with carbon-rich water, driving down atmospheric pCO2. Our results suggest that it is the processes driving sea ice production on Antarctica continental margins such as atmospheric circulation and ice-shelf interaction that influence ocean carbon storage, rather than solely the existence of sea ice. This suggests the mechanism by which the onset of Antarctic Bottom Water formation after the opening of the Southern ocean gateways may have served as a positive feedback to decreasing pCO2 and a cooling climate.

  3. Analysis of Crevasse Patterns as Indicators of Ice Dynamics Using Structural Glaciology and Geostatistical Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Herzfeld, U. C.; Clarke, G. K.

    2001-12-01

    Crevasse patterns are the writings in a glacier's history book --- the movement, strain and deformation frozen in ice. Therefore by analysis of crevasse patterns we can learn about the ice-dynamic processes which the glacier has experienced. Direct measurement of ice movement and deformation is time-consuming and costly, in particular for large glaciers; typically, observations are lacking when sudden changes occur. Analysis of crevasse patterns provides a means to reconstruct past and ongoing deformation processes quantitatively. Crevasse patterns are utilized as a source of geophysical information. Our structural glaciology approach builds on methods adapted from structural geology and continuum mechanics. In slow-moving ice, ductile deformation prevails, and the related processes are largely understood. The dynamics of fast-moving glaciers are much less well understood but manifest themselves in the formation of crevasses. The crevasses result from brittle deformation and are considered cracks in the continuum. Geostatistical crevasse pattern analysis is a subset of geostatistical surface classification, a method designed on the background of the theory of regionalized variables. In a generalization of the well-known variogram, the structure function most commonly used in geostatistics, first- and higher-order vario functions, experimental ``ordinary" and residual vario functions are defined. Crevasse patterns are organized in classes according to principles of structural geology, examples of classes are one-directional, two-directional, rhombic, en-échelon, chaos (geometric classification), extensional, compressional, and shear types (kinematic classification). Parameters extracted from generalized vario functions are combined into feature vectors, and it can be shown that specific feature vectors are characteristic of each of the crevasse classes. Association between geostatistic parameters and feature vectors and crevasse patterns is achieved using

  4. A comparison between dynamic implicit and explicit finite element simulations of the native knee joint.

    PubMed

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid; Janssen, Dennis; Khoshgoftar, Mehdi; Sprengers, Andre; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Van den Boogaard, Ton; Verdonschot, Nico

    2016-10-01

    The finite element (FE) method has been widely used to investigate knee biomechanics. Time integration algorithms for dynamic problems in finite element analysis can be classified as either implicit or explicit. Although previously both static/dynamic implicit and dynamic explicit method have been used, a comparative study on the outcomes of both methods is of high interest for the knee modeling community. The aim of this study is to compare static, dynamic implicit and dynamic explicit solutions in analyses of the knee joint to assess the prediction of dynamic effects, potential convergence problems, the accuracy and stability of the calculations, the difference in computational time, and the influence of mass-scaling in the explicit formulation. The heel-strike phase of fast, normal and slow gait was simulated for two different body masses in a model of the native knee. Our results indicate that ignoring the dynamic effect can alter joint motion. Explicit analyses are suitable to simulate dynamic loading of the knee joint in high-speed simulations, as this method offers a substantial reduction of the computational time with a similar prediction of cartilage stresses and meniscus strains. Although mass-scaling can provide even more gain in computational time, it is not recommended for high-speed activities, in which inertial forces play a significant role.

  5. Strain field evolution during creep on ice. Impact of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, Thomas; Montagnat, Maurine; Barou, Fabrice; Hidas, Karoly; Tommasi, Andréa; Vacher, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Discontinuous Dynamic Recrystallization (DDRX) occurs in minerals, metals, ice and impacts on texture and microstructure evolution during deformation. It therefore impacts on large scale mechanisms as seismic anisotropy, mechanical properties inside the Earth mantle, material forming and anisotropic flow in polar ice sheet, for instance. In this frame, ice can be considered as a model material due to a strong viscoplastic anisotropy inducing strong deformation heterogeneities, that are precursors of recrystallization. During creep deformation at high temperature in the laboratory, DDRX occurs from 1% strain and involves grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. As DDRX induces an evolution of microstructure and texture, it strongly affects the mechanical behavior (1,2), and it is expected to modify the strain field at the grain and/or the sample scale. Compressive creep test (σ=0.5-0.8 MPa) were performed at high temperature (T/Tf 0,98) on granular polycrystalline ice (grains size 1mm) and columnar polycrystalline ice (microstructure 2D 1/2 in plane grain size 10mm) up to 18 % strain. Columnar ice provides interesting feature as it contains only one grain through the thickness and the columns are parallel. Post-deformation texture analyses with an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and with EBSD (CrystalProbe MEB of Geoscience Montpellier) were used to investigate DDRX mechanisms at high resolution, and deduce their impact on texture and microstructure, at different scales. During the experiment, local strain field is measured on the surface of the sample by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) (3) with a spatial resolution between 0.2 and 0.5 mm, and a strain resolution between 0.2% to 1%. Grain size being large, we obtain a relatively good intra-granular resolution of the strain field. Thanks to the 2D configuration of the columnar ice samples, we can superimpose the initial microstructure to the strain field measured by DIC. We will present an overview of

  6. Geothermal Heat Flux: Linking Deep Earth's Interior and the Dynamics of Large-Scale Ice Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Vaughan, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Greenland results from the remanent effects of an Early Cenozoic passage of the lithosphere above the Iceland mantle plume that is implicated in strong thermochemical erosion of the lithosphere and significant long-term effects on the present-day subglacial heat flow pattern and thermodynamic state of the Greenland ice sheet. These observations and our modeling results (Petrunin et al., 2013) show that the present-day thermal state of Greenland and Antarctic lithosphere cannot be well understood without taking into account a long-term tectonic history of these regions. The goal of the IceGeoHeat project is to combine existing independent geophysical data and innovative modeling approaches to comprehensively study the evolution and present state of the lithosphere in Greenland and Antarctica, and assess the role of geothermal heat flux in shaping the present-day ice sheet dynamics. This requires multiple collaborations involving experts across a range of disciplines. The project builds on the IceGeoHeat initiative formed in April 2012 and now including researchers from ten countries in the main core (MC) with expertise in numerical modeling and data assessment in geodynamics, geology, geothermics, cryosphere and (paleo-)climate. Petrunin, A., Rogozhina, I., Vaughan, A. P. M., Kukkonen, I. T., Kaban, M., Koulakov, I., Thomas, M. (2013): Heat flux variations beneath central Greenland's ice due to anomalously thin lithosphere. - Nature Geoscience, 6, 746-750.

  7. Long-term change of a small ice cap in Greenland: a dynamic perspective from numerical flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieli, A.; Adamson, K.; Lane, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Small ice caps at the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet are often close to the limit of existence and therefore respond far more sensitively to climate change than the land-margin of the neighboring ice sheet. However, their past evolution and dynamic behavior is poorly understood and their use as climate indicators therefore remains limited. We here aim to provide a long-term reconstruction of Lyngmarksbreen, a small (32km2) ice cap on Disko Island in West Greenland, from the pre-little ice age (LIA, starting at about 1200 AD) to present. We use a 2-dim. time-dependent numerical flow model (SIA) in combination with geomorphological mapping, exposure dating and historical observations to simulate its long-term evolution. We specifically focus on retreat since the LIA, which is well constrained by geomorphological length records of several small outlet glaciers and data from local and regional climate stations (Qeqertassuaq and Ilulisat). We also explore aspects related to flow dynamics and find that the dynamic state of this ice cap is far from being balanced and is highly sensitive to the surface elevation mass balance feedback resulting in an asynchronous response of the different outlets. This sensitivity can partly be explained by low surface slopes and a very limited elevation extent of the ice cap. Our investigations further suggest that redistribution of snow through wind-drift is strongly affecting the surface mass balance and hence the evolution of the ice cap. Over the last century the ice cap almost continuously retreated and today almost no accumulation area remains. As a consequence, this ice cap will likely vanish within the next few decades.

  8. Adaptive mesh refinement versus subgrid friction interpolation in simulations of Antarctic ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cornford, S. L.; Martin, D. F.; Lee, V.; Payne, A. J.; Ng, E. G.

    2016-05-13

    At least in conventional hydrostatic ice-sheet models, the numerical error associated with grounding line dynamics can be reduced by modifications to the discretization scheme. These involve altering the integration formulae for the basal traction and/or driving stress close to the grounding line and exhibit lower – if still first-order – error in the MISMIP3d experiments. MISMIP3d may not represent the variety of real ice streams, in that it lacks strong lateral stresses, and imposes a large basal traction at the grounding line. We study resolution sensitivity in the context of extreme forcing simulations of the entire Antarctic ice sheet, using the BISICLES adaptive mesh ice-sheet model with two schemes: the original treatment, and a scheme, which modifies the discretization of the basal traction. The second scheme does indeed improve accuracy – by around a factor of two – for a given mesh spacing, but $\\lesssim 1$ km resolution is still necessary. For example, in coarser resolution simulations Thwaites Glacier retreats so slowly that other ice streams divert its trunk. In contrast, with $\\lesssim 1$ km meshes, the same glacier retreats far more quickly and triggers the final phase of West Antarctic collapse a century before any such diversion can take place.

  9. Northern Cordilleran Ice Sheet Dynamics in Coastal Alaska from MIS 3 to the Present: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkrot, M. L.; Jaeger, J. M.; LeVay, L.; St-Onge, G.; Mix, A. C.; Bahlburg, H.; Davies-Walczak, M.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing the timing of northwestern Cordilleran ice sheet (NCIS) advance-retreat cycles in southern Alaska allows for investigation of global synchronicity in glacial-age climate forcing. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 targeted the glacial dynamics of the NCIS in the coastal St. Elias range. Sediment cores from Site U1419 encompass times of global ice advance and retreat from MIS 3 to the present, based on a preliminary age model with 5-kya resolution developed using oxygen isotopes from benthic and planktonic foraminifera and stratigraphic correlation with a previously C-14 dated site survey core (Davies et al., 2011; doi:10.1029/2010PA002051). CT images of cores were used to identify sedimentary facies and relative ice sheet proximity. Six sedimentary facies were identified in the images; massive mud with and without lonestones, laminations with and without lonestones, massive and stratified diamict (>1 clast/cm). Elemental scanning XRF data were used to delineate possible downcore changes in sediment provenance using provenance-sensitive transition metals. Diamict and gravelly mud are the most common facies, indicative of persistent glacial input interpreted as marine-terminating glacial systems. Stratified diamicts are interpreted as periods of maximum ice extent (~18-20 ka), whereas massive mud (~14 ka-present) suggests terminus retreat. Intervals of laminated mud with and without lonestones are interpreted as periods of reduced ice cover, with the most recent (~14.5 kya) coinciding with the Bølling Interstade of northern Europe/Greenland (Davies et al., 2011). Downcore changes in Al-normalized metal XRF counts vary along with sedimentary lithoficies, suggesting changes in sediment provenance that may be related to the quantity of glacigenic sediment delivery to this location.

  10. Last glacial ice-sheet dynamics and deglaciation on Svalbard inferred from fjord records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, Matthias; Baeten, Nicole J.; Bunin, Elizabeth; Hansen, Trude; Kempf, Philipp; Velle, Julie H.; Sverre Laberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Various glacigenic landforms and sedimentary processes identified in the Spitsbergen fjords provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the northwestern parts of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet during the last glacial. Glacial linear features oriented parallel to most fjord axes are identified on swath-bathymetry and high-resolution sub-bottom profiler data. They provide evidence of locally fast-flowing grounded ice draining the northwestern parts of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet to the shelf breaks off north and west Svalbard. Eskers overlying glacial lineations reveal the existence of englacial or sub-glacial drainage systems that developed after the termination of fast ice flow. Iceberg ploughmarks suggest that parts of the deglaciation occurred by iceberg calving. Multiple transverse ridges, e.g. grounding zone wedges and moraines, indicate that multiple halts and/or readvances interrupted the deglaciations of the fjords. This includes relatively small moraines, probably deposited during halts and/or readvances in consecutive winters, thus, allowing the calculation of annual retreat rates of the ice fronts in certain fjord areas. Their regular spacing may suggest that e.g. parts of Billefjorden, Smeerenburgfjorden and Woodfjorden were deglaciated at relatively constant rates of at least 140 m/year. However, the deglaciation of van Keulenfjorden accelerated from approx. 80 m/year to about 190 m/year. Lithological analyses allow the study of sub-glacial, glacier-proximal and glacier-distal sedimentary processes and environments, as well as the identification of influences from various sediment sources. They reveal, furthermore, that the deglaciations of multiple fjords terminated quasi-synchronously around 11,200 cal. years BP, but that significant local delays of up to several thousand years occurred.

  11. A calving law for ice sheet models; Investigating the role of surface melt on dynamics of Greenland outlet glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, F. M.; van der Veen, C. J.; Vieli, A.

    2008-12-01

    alving of icebergs accounts for perhaps as much as half the ice transferred from the Greenland Ice Sheet into the surrounding ocean, and virtually all of the ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. We have formulated a calving model that can be readily incorporated into time-evolving numerical ice-flow models. Our model is based on downward penetration of water-filled surface crevasses and upward propagation of basal crevasses. A calving event occurs when the depth of the surface crevasse (which increases as melting progresses through the summer) reaches the height of the basal crevasse. Our numerical ice sheet model is able to reproduce observed seasonal changes of Greenland outlet glaciers, such as fluctuations in flow speed and terminus positions. We have applied the model to Helheim Glacier on the east coast, and Petermann Glacier in the northwest. Our model suggests that rapid retreat of the claving front is highly affected by the amplified calving rate due to increasing water level in surface crevasses during warmer summers. Our results show little response to seasonally enhanced basal lubrication from surface melt. This modeling study provides insights into the role of surface and basal hydrology to ice sheet dynamics and on how to incorporate calving in ice sheet models and therefore advances our ability to predict future ice sheet change.

  12. Inverse Dynamics Model for the Ankle Joint with Applications in Tibia Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budescu, E.; Merticaru, E.; Chirazi, M.

    The paper presents a biomechanical model of the ankle joint, in order to determine the force and the torque of reaction into the articulation, through inverse dynamic analysis, in various stages of the gait. Thus, knowing the acceleration of the foot and the reaction force between foot and ground during the gait, determined by experimental measurement, there was calculated, for five different positions of the foot, the joint reaction forces, on the basis of dynamic balance equations. The values numerically determined were compared with the admissible forces appearing in the technical systems of osteosynthesis of tibia malleolus fracture, in order to emphasize the motion restrictions during bone healing.

  13. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C.; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S.; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-01-01

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms. PMID:25002464

  14. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms.

  15. Reconstructing the retreat dynamics of the Bjørnøyrenna Ice Stream based on new 3D seismic data from the central Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Emilia D.; Winsborrow, Monica C. M.; Andreassen, Karin; Stokes, Chris R.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of contemporary ice sheets is influenced by the discharge from ice streams - corridors of fast-flowing ice bounded by ice flowing an order of magnitude slower. Reconstructions of palaeo-ice stream dynamics contribute to our understanding of ice stream sensitivity to the ocean-climate system and can aid in the numerical modelling and prediction of future changes in contemporary ice sheets. Here we use 3D seismic data, covering 13,000 km2 in the central Bjørnøyrenna (Bear Island Trough), Barents Sea, to investigate the record of ice streaming preserved on the seafloor and on a buried palaeo-seafloor surface. The unusually broad coverage and high resolution of the dataset, as well as its location in the central area of the trough, enables improved reconstruction of dynamics of the former Bjørnøyrenna Ice Stream in terms of number of streaming events, their trajectory, and their relative age sequence during deglaciation. Our results reveal major changes in the configuration and flow dynamics of the ice stream, with up to 10 flow-switching events identified. For the first time, we also document ice streaming sourced from the eastern Barents Sea around the time of the LGM. This high degree of flow variability is suggested to have resulted from climate-driven changes in ice sheet geometry (and ice divide migration), and variations in topography that influenced calving at the ice stream terminus.

  16. Reconstructing the evolutionary dynamics of former ice sheets using multi-temporal evidence, remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris D.

    Recent advances have been made in the way in which former ice sheets are reconstructed from the fragmentary geomorphological and geological evidence that they leave behind. The use of satellite images to view large scale glacial geomorphology has revealed cross-cutting patterns that record changing flow configurations through time. These flow changes may arise from migrating ice divides, the switching on and off of ice streams, margin retreat or flow patterns from more than one glaciation. Such multi-temporal evidence permits more detailed reconstruction of the evolution of former ice sheets which contrasts with previous reconstructions of just glacial maxima or deglacial retreat. Increased complexity of ice flow and the realisation that evidence may relate to different time-slices of ice sheet history have led to the use of geographical information systems (GIS) to integrate a wide variety of different lines of evidence, to permit the construction of ice dynamic scenarios. The use of remote sensing and GIS for palaeoglaciological reconstruction is reviewed, and its impact assessed. Recommendations for processing of remotely sensed data (optical and radar) for use in glacial geomorphological mapping are outlined. An overall reconstruction strategy which uses remote sensing to acquire ice flow information and a GIS to integrate it with field evidence is suggested. Reconstructions based on geological and geomorphological evidence are now capable of providing rigorous tests for ice sheet modelling experiments. It is anticipated that future links between modelling and ice sheet wide reconstructions will yield major advances in our understanding of both the physics of ice sheets and the behaviour of former ice sheets.

  17. Borehole temperature response for competing models of Laurentide ice sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Robinson, Alex; Montoya-Redondo, Marisa

    2013-04-01

    borehole data (including the corresponding metadata) still have to be collected and need to undergo strict quality control before being used. In addition, a methodological concept fora regional interpretation is missing. In this contribution we will compare the borehole temperature response for two ice sheet models of the Laurentide glaciation, differing in their dynamics. Both were realized by running the hybrid SIA/SSA code GRISLI in different modes. The subsurface temperature anomalies thus generated are significant. Unfortunately the existing deep boreholes in the area are not placed in areas of high sensitivity (e.g., Northern Quebec, Canadian Archipelago). Notwithstanding these difficulties, we will present results for some of these available boreholes in central and northern Canada and Alaska.

  18. Reconstruction of the Greenland ice sheet dynamics in a fully coupled Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Oleg; Volodin, Evgeny; Huybrechts, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are undoubtedly effective tools for studying climate dynamics. Incorporation of evolving ice sheets to ESMs is a challenging task because response times of the climate system and of ice sheets differ by several orders of magnitude. Besides, AO GCMs operate on spatial and temporal resolutions substantially differing from those of ice sheet models (ICMs). Therefore elaboration of an effective coupling methodology of an AO GCM and an ICM is the key problem of an ESM construction and utilization. Several downscaling strategies of varying complexity exist now of data exchange between modeled climate system and ice sheets. Application of a particular strategy depends on the research objectives. In our view, the optimum approach for model studying of significant environmental changes (e.g. glacial/interglacial transitions) when ice sheets undergo substantial evolution of geometry and volume would be an asynchronous coupling. The latter allows simulation in the interactive way of growth and decay of ice sheets in the changing climatic conditions. In the focus of the presentation, is the overview of coupling aspects of an AO GCM INMCM32 elaborated in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (Moscow, Russia) to the Greenland ice sheet model (GrISM, Vrije Uninersiteit Brussel, Belgium). To provide interactive coupling of INMCM32 (spatial resolution 5°×4°, 21 vertical layers and temporal resolution 6 min. in the atmospheric block) and GrISM (spatial resolution 20×20 km, 51 vertical layers and 1 yr temporal resolution), we employ a special energy- and water balance model (EWBM-G), which serves as a buffer providing effective data exchange between INMCM32 and GrISM. EWBM-G operates in a rectangle domain including Greenland. Transfer of daily meanings of simulated climatic variables (air surface temperature and specific humidity) is provided on the lateral boundarias of the domain and inside the domain (sea level air pressure, wind speed and total

  19. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core: climate and ice dynamics of the Ross Sea, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Brook, E.; Blunier, T.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Waddington, E. D.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Conway, H.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Buizert, C.; Fudge, T. J.; Parrenin, F.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cores drilled in Antarctica have proven to be remarkable archives of past climate, but most have been recovered from the remote Antarctic interior. In contrast, little is known about the climate history of coastal ice domes despite their relevance to ocean-ice interaction and sea level rise. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution project (RICE) recovered a 763 m ice core in 2013 from Roosevelt Island, West Antarctica. Located at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf and grounded below sea level, Roosevelt Island is sensitive to oceanic forcing and may provide new information about potential drivers of abrupt interhemispheric climate connections and its location is ideal for exploring the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) from its glacial maximum through the Ross Sea. Here we present a continuous chronology for the RICE Ice Core covering the last 40,000 years with additional evidence of ice dating to at least 80,000 years near the bottom of the core. Both the depth-age relationship and reconstructed profile of annual layer thicknesses can be used to infer changes in climate and the glacial history of the East Ross Sea Embayment. The most striking feature of the record occurred during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. At this time a combination of data including thin annual layers, abrupt lowering of δ15N of N2 and δ40Ar in trapped air, and strongly depleted δD of ice suggest either a pronounced change in cyclonic activity and regional storm tracks and/or adjustment in the configuration of the Ross Ice Sheet during this period of rapid climate change and sea level rise.

  20. Last glacial ice sheet dynamics and deglaciation on Svalbard inferred from fjord records (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Vorren, T. O.; Baeten, N. J.; Hansen, T.; Kempf, P.; Velle, J. H.; Laberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    Swath bathymetry, high-resolution sub-bottom profiles and sediment cores from fjords on north and west Svalbard document a variety of glacigenic landforms and sedimentary processes, providing valuable insights into the dynamics of the northwestern parts of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet during the last glacial. Glacial linear features oriented parallel to most fjord axes are identified on swath-bathymetry and high-resolution sub-bottom profiler data. They provide evidence of locally fast-flowing grounded ice draining the northwestern parts of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet to the shelf breaks off north and west Svalbard. Eskers overlying glacial lineations reveal the existence of englacial or sub-glacial drainage systems that developed after the termination of fast ice flow. Iceberg ploughmarks suggest that parts of the deglaciation occurred by iceberg calving. Multiple transverse ridges, e.g. grounding zone wedges and moraines, indicate that multiple halts and/or readvances interrupted the deglaciations of the fjords. This includes relatively small moraines, probably deposited during halts and/or readvances in consecutive winters, thus, allowing the calculation of annual retreat rates of the ice fronts in certain fjord areas. Their regular spacing may suggest that e.g. parts of Billefjorden, Smeerenburgfjorden and Woodfjorden were deglaciated at relatively constant rates of at least 140 m/year. However, the deglaciation of van Keulenfjorden accelerated from approx. 80 m/year to about 190 m/year. Lithological analyses allow the study of sub-glacial, glacier-proximal and glacier-distal sedimentary processes and environments, as well as the identification of influences from various sediment sources. They reveal, furthermore, that the deglaciations of multiple fjords terminated quasi-synchronously around 11,200 cal. years BP, but that significant local delays of up to several thousand years occurred. We present examples of the above mentioned landforms

  1. Intracardiac Echocardiography (ICE) Measurement of Dynamic Myocardial Stiffness with Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Goswami, Robi; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based methods have been demonstrated to be a viable tool for noninvasively estimating tissue elastic properties, and shear wave velocimetry has been used to quantitatively measure the stiffening and relaxation of myocardial tissue in open-chest experiments. Dynamic stiffness metrics may prove to be indicators for certain cardiac diseases, but a clinically-viable means of remotely generating and tracking transverse wave propagation in myocardium is needed. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter-tip transducers are demonstrated here as a viable tool for making this measurement. ICE probes achieve favorable proximity to the myocardium, enabling the use of shear wave velocimetry from within the right ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. This work describes the techniques used to overcome the challenges of using a small probe to perform ARF-driven shear wave velocimetry, and presents in vivo porcine data showing the effectiveness of this method in the interventricular septum. Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based methods have been demonstrated to be a viable tool for noninvasively estimating tissue elastic properties, and shear wave velocimetry has been used to quantitatively measure the stiffening and relaxation of myocardial tissue in open-chest experiments. Dynamic stiffness metrics may prove to be indicators for certain cardiac diseases, but a clinically-viable means of remotely generating and tracking transverse wave propagation in myocardium is needed. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter-tip transducers are demonstrated here as a viable tool for making this measurement. ICE probes achieve favorable proximity to the myocardium, enabling the use of shear wave velocimetry from within the right ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. This work describes the techniques used to overcome the challenges of using a small probe to perform ARF-driven shear wave velocimetry, and presents in vivo porcine data showing the

  2. DRI Technical Program: Emerging Dynamics of the Marginal Ice Zone Ice, Ocean and Atmosphere Interactions in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone. Year 3 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    and Atmosphere Interactions in the Arctic Marginal...ice mass balance buoys (IMBs), wave buoys (WBs), and Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) in the region north of Alaska. The now deployed arrays have a... Arctic Marginal Ice Zone. Year 3 Annual Report 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  3. Influence of the 3D inverse dynamic method on the joint forces and moments during gait.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Nicol, E; Chèze, L

    2007-10-01

    The joint forces and moments are commonly used in gait analysis. They can be computed by four different 3D inverse dynamic methods proposed in the literature, either based on vectors and Euler angles, wrenches and quaternions, homogeneous matrices, or generalized coordinates and forces. In order to analyze the influence of the inverse dynamic method, the joint forces and moments were computed during gait on nine healthy subjects. A ratio was computed between the relative dispersions (due to the method) and the absolute amplitudes of the gait curves. The influence of the inverse dynamic method was negligible at the ankle (2%) but major at the knee and the hip joints (40%). This influence seems to be due to the dynamic computation rather than the kinematic computation. Compared to the influence of the joint center location, the body segment inertial parameter estimation, and more, the influence of the inverse dynamic method is at least of equivalent importance. This point should be confirmed with other subjects, possibly pathologic, and other movements.

  4. Local dynamic stability of lower extremity joints in lower limb amputees during slope walking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Ling; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb amputees have a higher fall risk during slope walking compared with non-amputees. However, studies on amputees' slope walking were not well addressed. The aim of this study was to identify the difference of slope walking between amputees and non-amputees. Lyapunov exponents λS was used to estimate the local dynamic stability of 7 transtibial amputees' and 7 controls' lower extremity joint kinematics during uphill and downhill walking. Compared with the controls, amputees exhibited significantly lower λS in hip (P=0.04) and ankle (P=0.01) joints of the sound limb, and hip joints (P=0.01) of the prosthetic limb during uphill walking, while they exhibited significantly lower λS in knee (P=0.02) and ankle (P=0.03) joints of the sound limb, and hip joints (P=0.03) of the prosthetic limb during downhill walking. Compared with amputees level walking, they exhibited significantly lower λS in ankle joints of the sound limb during both uphill (P=0.01) and downhill walking (P=0.01). We hypothesized that the better local dynamic stability of amputees was caused by compensation strategy during slope walking.

  5. Relation between ankle joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy in elite volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Ajemian, Stanley V; Wiley, J Preston; Brunet, Jacques A; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2002-09-01

    Ankle joint complex dynamics developed during volleyball spike jumps take-offs and landings were quantified to assess potential relations between these joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy. Three-dimensional kinematic data provided information about movements of the lower limbs, while the kinetic data permitted analysis of ground reaction forces as players took-off and landed from full-speed spike jumps. Simulated volleyball court with net in a biomechanics research laboratory. 10 members of the Canadian Men's National Volleyball Team. From history and physical examination, 3 of the 10 players had patellar tendon pain associated with activity and were diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy at the time of the study. Investigators were blinded about the injury status of the players. None. Three-dimensional kinematics and joint moments of the ankle, knee, and hip joints. Our analysis revealed that maximal external tibial rotation occurred at or near maximal dorsiflexion while maximal internal tibial rotation coincided with maximal plantarflexion. The plantarflexion moment was 3 to 10 times greater than all the other moments measured, with the maximal plantarflexor moment being calculated at 0.4 BWm (360 Nm). In blinded logistic regression analyses, we found one of the dynamics variables (inversion moment during the landing of the spike jump) was a significant predictor of patellar tendinopathy. Coupling the results of the current analysis of ankle joint complex dynamics with previously reported results of knee joint dynamics related to patellar tendinopathy suggests that a cluster of variables linked to patellar tendinopathy includes: high ankle inversion-eversion moments, high external tibial rotation and plantarflexion moments, large vertical ground reaction forces, and high rate of knee extensor moment development.

  6. Present-day dynamics and future evolution of the world's northernmost ice cap, Hans Tausen Iskappe (Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekollari, Harry; Huybrechts, Philippe; Noël, Brice; van de Berg, Willem Jan; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-04-01

    In this study the dynamics of Hans Tausen Iskappe (western Peary Land, Greenland) are investigated with a coupled ice flow - mass balance model. Precipitation is obtained from the Regional Climate Model RACMO 2.3 and the surface mass balance is calculated from a Positive Degree-Day runoff/retention model, for which the input parameters are derived from field observations. For the ice flow a 3-D higher-order thermo-mechanical model is used, which is run at a 250 m resolution. Under 1961-1990 climatic conditions a steady state ice cap is obtained that is overall similar in geometry to the present-day ice cap. Ice thickness, temperature and flow velocity in the interior agree well with observations. For the outlet glaciers a reasonable agreement with temperature and ice thickness measurements can only be obtained with an additional heat source related to infiltrating meltwater. The simulations indicate that the SMB-elevation feedback has a major effect on the ice cap response time and stability. This causes the southern part of the ice cap to be extremely sensitive to a change in climatic conditions and leads to thresholds in the ice cap evolution. Under constant 2005-2014 climatic conditions the entire southern part of the ice cap cannot be sustained and the ice cap loses about 80% of its present-day volume. The future projected loss of surrounding permanent sea-ice and corresponding potential sharp precipitation increase may however lead to an attenuation of the retreat and even potential stabilization of the ice cap for a warming of up to 2-3°C. In a warmer and wetter climate the ice margin will retreat while the interior is projected to grow, leading to a steeper ice cap, in line with the present-day observed trends. For intermediate (+4°C) and high warming scenarios (+8°C) the ice cap is projected to disappear respectively around 2400 and 2200 A.D., almost irrespective of the projected precipitation regime and the simulated present-day geometry.

  7. Dynamic ikaite production and dissolution in sea ice - control by temperature, salinity and pCO2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysgaard, S.; Wang, F.; Galley, R. J.; Grimm, R.; Lemes, M.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Chaulk, A.; Hare, A. A.; Crabeck, O.; Else, B. G. T.; Campbell, K.; Papakyriakou, T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Sievers, J.; Notz, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ikaite is a hydrous calcium carbonate mineral (CaCO3 · 6H2O). It is only found in a metastable state, and decomposes rapidly once removed from near-freezing water. Recently, ikaite crystals have been found in sea ice and it has been suggested that their precipitation may play an important role in air-sea CO2 exchange in ice-covered seas. Little is known, however, of the spatial and temporal dynamics of ikaite in sea ice. Here we present evidence for highly dynamic ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice grown at an out-door pool of the Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF). During the experiment, ikaite precipitated in sea ice with temperatures below -3 °C, creating three distinct zones of ikaite concentrations: (1) a mm to cm thin surface layer containing frost flowers and brine skim with bulk concentrations of > 2000 μmol kg-1, (2) an internal layer with concentrations of 200-400 μmol kg-1 and (3) a~bottom layer with concentrations of < 100 μmol kg-1. Snowfall events caused the sea ice to warm, dissolving ikaite crystals under acidic conditions. Manual removal of the snow cover allowed the sea ice to cool and brine salinities to increase, resulting in rapid ikaite precipitation. The modeled (FREZCHEM) ikaite concentrations were in the same order of magnitude as observations and suggest that ikaite concentration in sea ice increase with decreasing temperatures. Thus, varying snow conditions may play a key role in ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice. This will have implications for CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and ocean.

  8. Non-Linear Dynamics Tools for the Motion Analysis and Condition Monitoring of Robot Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, I.; van Brussel, H.

    2001-11-01

    Time series from non-damaged and three types of damaged robot joints are considered and analysed from the viewpoint of non-linear dynamics. The embedding spaces for the four types of signals are recovered. The application of surrogate data tests is used to prove the presence of non-linearities in the joints. The results suggest a rise in unstable behaviour due to the introduction of backlash in robot joints. The chaotic behaviour gets stronger with the increase of the backlash extent. This is confirmed by the increase of the embedding dimension as well as by the increase of the Lyapunov exponents and the correlation dimension with the backlash increase. A straightforward method for condition monitoring using non-linear dynamics characteristics, based on a classification procedure, is suggested.

  9. Dynamic optical imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Joseph M; Fong, Christopher J; Ginat, Daniel T; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic optical imaging is increasingly applied to clinically relevant areas such as brain and cancer imaging. In this approach, some external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters (e.g., oxy- or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations) are determined. The advantage of this approach is that the prestimulus state can be used as a reference or baseline against which the changes can be calibrated. Here we present the first application of this method to the problem of characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Focusing on three cases studies, we illustrated our major finds. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  10. Phased occupation and retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet in the southern North Sea; geomorphic and seismostratigraphic evidence of a dynamic ice lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Dayton; Evans, David J. A.; Lee, Jonathan R.; Roberts, David H.; Tappin, David R.; Mellett, Claire L.; Long, David; Callard, S. Louise

    2017-05-01

    Along the terrestrial margin of the southern North Sea, previous studies of the MIS 2 glaciation impacting eastern Britain have played a significant role in the development of principles relating to ice sheet dynamics (e.g. deformable beds), and the practice of reconstructing the style, timing, and spatial configuration of palaeo-ice sheets. These detailed terrestrially-based findings have however relied on observations made from only the outer edges of the former ice mass, as the North Sea Lobe (NSL) of the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) occupied an area that is now almost entirely submarine (c.21-15 ka). Compounded by the fact that marine-acquired data have been primarily of insufficient quality and density, the configuration and behaviour of the last BIIS in the southern North Sea remains surprisingly poorly constrained. This paper presents analysis of a new, integrated set of extensive seabed geomorphological and seismo-stratigraphic observations that both advances the principles developed previously onshore (e.g. multiple advance and retreat cycles), and provides a more detailed and accurate reconstruction of the BIIS at its southern-most extent in the North Sea. A new bathymetry compilation of the region reveals a series of broad sedimentary wedges and associated moraines that represent several terminal positions of the NSL. These former still-stand ice margins (1-4) are also found to relate to newly-identified architectural patterns (shallow stacked sedimentary wedges) in the region's seismic stratigraphy (previously mapped singularly as the Bolders Bank Formation). With ground-truthing constraint provided by sediment cores, these wedges are interpreted as sub-marginal till wedges, formed by complex subglacial accretionary processes that resulted in till thickening towards the former ice-sheet margins. The newly sub-divided shallow seismic stratigraphy (at least five units) also provides an indication of the relative event chronology of the NSL. While there

  11. Structure, spectroscopy and dynamics of layered H2O and CO2 ices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of structural, spectroscopic and dynamical properties of mixed water–carbon dioxide (H2O–CO2) ices are discussed over temperature ranges relevant to atmospheric and astrophysical conditions. The simulations employ multipolar force fields to represent electrostatic interactions which are essential for spectroscopic and dynamical investigations. It is found that at the water/CO2 interface the water surface acts as a template for the CO2 component. The rotational reorientation times in both bulk phases agree well with experimental observations. A pronounced temperature effect on the CO2 reorientation time is observed between 100 K and 200 K. At the interface, water reorientation times are nearly twice as long compared to water in the bulk. The spectroscopy of such ices is rich in the far-infrared region of the spectrum and can be related to translational and rotational modes. Furthermore, spectroscopic signatures mediated across the water/CO2 interface are found in this frequency range (around 440 cm−1). These results will be particularly important for new airborne experiments such as planned for SOFIA.

  12. A Dynamic Model for the Evaluation of Aircraft Engine Icing Detection and Control-Based Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Rinehart, Aidan W.; Jones, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Aircraft flying in regions of high ice crystal concentrations are susceptible to the buildup of ice within the compression system of their gas turbine engines. This ice buildup can restrict engine airflow and cause an uncommanded loss of thrust, also known as engine rollback, which poses a potential safety hazard. The aviation community is conducting research to understand this phenomena, and to identify avoidance and mitigation strategies to address the concern. To support this research, a dynamic turbofan engine model has been created to enable the development and evaluation of engine icing detection and control-based mitigation strategies. This model captures the dynamic engine response due to high ice water ingestion and the buildup of ice blockage in the engines low pressure compressor. It includes a fuel control system allowing engine closed-loop control effects during engine icing events to be emulated. The model also includes bleed air valve and horsepower extraction actuators that, when modulated, change overall engine operating performance. This system-level model has been developed and compared against test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine undergoing engine icing studies in an altitude test facility and also against outputs from the manufacturers customer deck. This paper will describe the model and show results of its dynamic response under open-loop and closed-loop control operating scenarios in the presence of ice blockage buildup compared against engine test cell data. Planned follow-on use of the model for the development and evaluation of icing detection and control-based mitigation strategies will also be discussed. The intent is to combine the model and control mitigation logic with an engine icing risk calculation tool capable of predicting the risk of engine icing based on current operating conditions. Upon detection of an operating region of risk for engine icing events, the control mitigation logic will seek to change the

  13. Temperature and magnetic-field driven dynamics in artificial magnetic square ice

    SciTech Connect

    Sophie A. Morley; Stein, Aaron; Rosamond, Mark C.; Venero, Diego Alba; Hrabec, Ales; Shepley, Philippa M.; Im, Mi -Young; Fischer, Peter; Bryan, Matthew T.; Allwood, Dan A.; Steadman, Paul; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2015-08-09

    Artificial spin ices are often spoken of as being realisations of some of the celebrated vertex models of statistical mechanics, where the exact microstate of the system can be imaged using advanced magnetic microscopy methods. The fact that a stable image can be formed means that the system is in fact athermal and not undergoing the usual finite-temperature fluctuations of a statistical mechanical system. In this paper we report on the preparation of artificial spin ices with islands that are thermally fluctuating due to their very small size. The relaxation rate of these islands was determined using variable frequency focused magneto-optic Kerr measurements. We performed magnetic imaging of artificial spin ice under varied temperature and magnetic field using X-ray transmission microscopy which uses X-ray magnetic circular dichroism to generate magnetic contrast. Furthermore, we have developed an on-membrane heater in order to apply temperatures in excess of 700 K and have shown increased dynamics due to higher temperature. Due to the ‘photon-in, photon-out' method employed here, it is the first report where it is possible to image the microstates of an ASI system under the simultaneous application of temperature and magnetic field, enabling the determination of relaxation rates, coercivties, and the analysis of vertex population during reversal.

  14. Temperature and magnetic-field driven dynamics in artificial magnetic square ice

    DOE PAGES

    Sophie A. Morley; Stein, Aaron; Rosamond, Mark C.; ...

    2015-08-09

    Artificial spin ices are often spoken of as being realisations of some of the celebrated vertex models of statistical mechanics, where the exact microstate of the system can be imaged using advanced magnetic microscopy methods. The fact that a stable image can be formed means that the system is in fact athermal and not undergoing the usual finite-temperature fluctuations of a statistical mechanical system. In this paper we report on the preparation of artificial spin ices with islands that are thermally fluctuating due to their very small size. The relaxation rate of these islands was determined using variable frequency focusedmore » magneto-optic Kerr measurements. We performed magnetic imaging of artificial spin ice under varied temperature and magnetic field using X-ray transmission microscopy which uses X-ray magnetic circular dichroism to generate magnetic contrast. Furthermore, we have developed an on-membrane heater in order to apply temperatures in excess of 700 K and have shown increased dynamics due to higher temperature. Due to the ‘photon-in, photon-out' method employed here, it is the first report where it is possible to image the microstates of an ASI system under the simultaneous application of temperature and magnetic field, enabling the determination of relaxation rates, coercivties, and the analysis of vertex population during reversal.« less

  15. Impacts of marine instability across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet on Southern Ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Steven; Fogwill, Christopher; Turney, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations and modelling studies have demonstrated the potential for rapid and substantial retreat of large sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). This has major implications for ocean circulation and global sea level. Here we examine the effects of increasing meltwater from the Wilkes Basin, one of the major marine-based sectors of the EAIS, on Southern Ocean dynamics. Climate model simulations reveal that the meltwater flux rapidly stratifies surface waters, leading to a dramatic decrease in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water formation. The surface ocean cools but, critically, the Southern Ocean warms by more than 1oC at depth. This warming is accompanied by a Southern Oceanwide "domino effect", whereby the warming signal propagates westward with depth. Our results suggest that melting of one sector of the EAIS could result in accelerated warming across other sectors, including the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Thus, localised melting of the EAIS could potentially destabilise the wider Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  16. Outlines and Dynamics of Eurarctic Ice Caps in Anomalous Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, Aleksey; Nikolskiy, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    The present investigation was aimed at studying spatial variability and directional dynamics of inland ice/snow fields in relation to lateral variations of surface gravity at the sub-regional scale of tens to hundreds of kilometres. The main goal was to evidence, both theoretically and empirically, the existence and significance of gravitational impacts and associated atmospheric effects on the status and fluctuations of Eurasia's northernmost insular ice caps using space- borne radar altimetry and interferometry data from the Earth Explorers and Sentinel missions in conjunction with GOCE satellite gradiometry, ground-based meteorological time series and glaciological observations. EO-based geodetic and cryospheric models describing the amount of solid precipitation, snow drift and accumulation, glacier elevation change and ice flow pattern were generated, homogenized and combined in the terrain-following reference frame. The models were then verified and applied to the diagnosis of glacioclimatic differences in arctic lowlands with strong gravity anomalies. It was ascertained that surface gravity gradients modulate the atmospheric circulation and stability thereby influencing the intensity of local precipitation and glacier growth and flow patterns in a cascade fashion.

  17. Orbital Dynamics and Habitability II: Obliquity Forcing and Suppression of the Ice-Albedo Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Rory; Armstrong, J. C.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Breiner, J.; Meadows, V. S.

    2012-05-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We restrict our study to systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 giant planets. We verify that these systems are stable for 100 million years with N-body simulations. We then calculate the obliquity variations induced by the orbital architecture on the Earth-mass planets. We find that in some cases the spin axes can precess through over 100 degrees per thousand years. Next, we run energy balance models (EBM) on the terrestrial planets to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planets' oceans. Finally, we explore differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations compared to fixed obliquity. We run EBM simulations for a range of values for the semi-major axis and find that planets undergoing extreme axial perturbations may be habitable at larger distances than those with static obliquity. This extension arises because the obliquity variations suppress the build-up of ice sheets at the poles, reducing the effectiveness of the ice-albedo-temperature feedback. The dynamical evolution of planetary systems may be a crucial feature in the distribution of life in the galaxy.

  18. Impacts of marine instability across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet on Southern Ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Steven J.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Turney, Christian S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent observations and modelling studies have demonstrated the potential for rapid and substantial retreat of large sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). This has major implications for ocean circulation and global sea level. Here we examine the effects of increasing meltwater from the Wilkes Basin, one of the major marine-based sectors of the EAIS, on Southern Ocean dynamics. Climate model simulations reveal that the meltwater flux rapidly stratifies surface waters, leading to a dramatic decrease in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation. The surface ocean cools but, critically, the Southern Ocean warms by more than 1 °C at depth. This warming is accompanied by a Southern Ocean-wide "domino effect", whereby the warming signal propagates westward with depth. Our results suggest that melting of one sector of the EAIS could result in accelerated warming across other sectors, including the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Thus, localised melting of the EAIS could potentially destabilise the wider Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  19. Defect Dynamics in Artificial Colloidal Ice: Real-Time Observation, Manipulation, and Logic Gate.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-10-14

    We study the defect dynamics in a colloidal spin ice system realized by filling a square lattice of topographic double well islands with repulsively interacting magnetic colloids. We focus on the contraction of defects in the ground state, and contraction or expansion in a metastable biased state. Combining real-time experiments with simulations, we prove that these defects behave like emergent topological monopoles obeying a Coulomb law with an additional line tension. We further show how to realize a completely resettable "nor" gate, which provides guidelines for fabrication of nanoscale logic devices based on the motion of topological magnetic monopoles.

  20. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  1. Documentation for a Two-Level Dynamic Thermodynamic Sea Ice Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    DOCUMENTATION FOR A TWO-LEVEL DYNAMIC THERMODYNAMIC SEA ICE MO--ETCfU) UNCLASSIFIED CRREL-SR-80-8 NL La mIuIIIuuuhuumEllElllllEEEE EIIIIIIIIEI 3 6...ISTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAEBEFORE COMPLETIG FORM AREPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER LE (IM7711"W5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...AND ADDRESS ----- Office of Naval Research F Washington, D.C. 20360C/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration 3 Washington, D.C. 20546

  2. Comparative analysis of methods for estimating arm segment parameters and joint torques from inverse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2011-03-01

    A common problem in the analyses of upper limb unfettered reaching movements is the estimation of joint torques using inverse dynamics. The inaccuracy in the estimation of joint torques can be caused by the inaccuracy in the acquisition of kinematic variables, body segment parameters (BSPs), and approximation in the biomechanical models. The effect of uncertainty in the estimation of body segment parameters can be especially important in the analysis of movements with high acceleration. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relevance of different sources of inaccuracy in inverse dynamics analysis of a planar arm movement. Eight regression models and one water immersion method for the estimation of BSPs were used to quantify the influence of inertial models on the calculation of joint torques during numerical analysis of unfettered forward arm reaching movements. Thirteen subjects performed 72 forward planar reaches between two targets located on the horizontal plane and aligned with the median plane. Using a planar, double link model for the arm with a floating shoulder, we calculated the normalized joint torque peak and a normalized root mean square (rms) of torque at the shoulder and elbow joints. Statistical analyses quantified the influence of different BSP models on the kinetic variable variance for given uncertainty on the estimation of joint kinematics and biomechanical modeling errors. Our analysis revealed that the choice of BSP estimation method had a particular influence on the normalized rms of joint torques. Moreover, the normalization of kinetic variables to BSPs for a comparison among subjects showed that the interaction between the BSP estimation method and the subject specific somatotype and movement kinematics was a significant source of variance in the kinetic variables. The normalized joint torque peak and the normalized root mean square of joint torque represented valuable parameters to compare the effect of BSP estimation methods

  3. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-09-01

    Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Controlled laboratory study. University biomechanics laboratory. A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint.

  4. Chronology and dynamics of the Amundsen Gulf Ice Stream in Arctic Canada during the last glacial-interglacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakeman, T. R.; MacLean, B.; Blasco, S.; Bennett, R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    An extensive ice stream of the Laurentide ice sheet occupied Amundsen Gulf during the Last Glacial Maximum. The grounded ice stream extended northwestward to the margin of the inner shelf in the Beaufort Sea and to a depth of 450 metres. This glacier was one of the largest ice streams to emanate into the Arctic Ocean during the last glaciation and, as such, exerted a primary influence on the dynamics of the northwest Laurentide Ice Sheet. Ice stream retreat from its maximum position began prior to 13,000 cal yr BP. The pattern of extensive sole marks or glacial flutings on the seabed and on the adjacent mainland and islands confirms the direction of flow was from southeast to northwest. In the Gulf these features are imprinted primarily on subglacial sediment deposits. The bathymetry of the Gulf and known extent of the ice stream on land indicates the ice was at least 700 m thick. A series of moraines at the mouth of the Gulf mark temporary positions of the retreating ice stream margin. Early stages of ice retreat may have been associated with meltwater discharge under the ice stream as evidenced by current erosion associated with some sole marks or glacial flutings. Melting at the leading edge of the ice stream resulted in calving of icebergs and the generation of keel-scour marks in the seabed. Retreat of the ice stream was relatively rapid as indicated by thin and spatially discontinuous deglacial glaciomarine sediment in the Gulf. Furthermore, an expansive database of deglacial radiocarbon ages from eastern Banks Island, western Victoria Island, and the adjacent Arctic mainland, indicates that the ice stream had retreated fully from the Gulf by 12,500 cal yr BP. The lack of Holocene sediment draping the sole marks or flutings, and outcrops of exposed bedrock and glaciomarine sediment indicate very low sedimentation rates since ice retreat. The thin veneer of recent fine sediment that has been deposited discontinuously on the seabed in the Gulf indicates little