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Sample records for ice flow patterns

  1. Flow-pattern evolution of the last British Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna L. C.; Clark, Chris D.; Jordan, Colm J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-flow patterns of the last British Ice Sheet from build-up to demise derived from geomorphological evidence. 100 flowsets identified in the subglacial bedform record (drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and ribbed moraine) are combined with ancillary evidence (erratic-transport paths, absolute dates and a semi-independently reconstructed retreat pattern) to define flow patterns, ice divides and ice-sheet margins during build-up, maximum glaciation and retreat. Overprinting and cross-cutting of landform assemblages are used to define the relative chronology of flow patterns and a tentative absolute chronology is presented based on a collation of available dates for ice advance and retreat. The ice-flow configuration of the last British Ice Sheet was not static. Some ice divides were remarkably stable, persisting through multiple stages of the ice-sheet evolution, whereas others were transient features existing for a short time and/or shifting in position 10s km. The 10 reconstructed stages of ice-sheet geometry capture two main modes of operation; first as an integrated ice sheet with a broadly N-S orientated ice divide, and second as a multi-domed ice sheet orientated parallel with the shelf edge. A thick integrated ice sheet developed as ice expanded out of source areas in Scotland to envelop southerly ice caps in northern England and Wales, and connect with the Irish Ice Sheet to the west and the Scandinavian Ice Sheet across the North Sea. Following break-up of ice over the North Sea, ice streaming probably drove mass loss and ice-sheet thinning to create a more complex divide structure, where ice-flow patterns were largely controlled by the form of the underlying topography. Ice surface lowering occurred before separation of, and retreat to, multiple ice centres centred over high ground. We consider this 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-sheet configuration to be the simplest palaeo

  2. Seasonal ice flow patterns as indicators of subglacial hydrology on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Scambos, T.; Joughin, I.; van den Broeke, M.; Klinger, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in satellite coverage of the Greenland Ice Sheet have supported a substantial increase in the spatial and temporal resolution of surface velocity measurements. Previously, with seasonal TerraSAR-X satellite measurements of marine-terminating glaciers across the western and southeastern coasts, we identified three dominant and distinct seasonal velocity patterns. Two patterns likely indicate differences in the development of the subglacial hydrologic system, one suggesting development of efficient subglacial drainage during the summer melt season and the other without. Using this framework, we are now taking advantage of a new velocity record we created from Landsat 8 OLI imagery, which allows for better sampling across space and time, to examine local and regional variations in ice sheet surface velocity. Readily measurable, ice velocity holds strong potential as a proxy for understanding changes in subglacial hydrology, which is much more difficult to observe. We investigate seasonal velocity behavior from glacier termini toward the ice sheet interior and among separate glacier systems across the Greenland Ice Sheet as a way to understand changes in ice motion and ice sheet hydrology.

  3. Amazonian mid- to high-latitude glaciation on Mars: Supply-limited ice sources, ice accumulation patterns, and concentric crater fill glacial flow and ice sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2014-02-01

    Crater deposit thicknesses (~50 m) cannot fill the craters in a time period compatible with the interpreted formation times of the Pedestal Crater mantled ice layers. We use a representative obliquity solution to drive an ice flow model and show that a cyclical pattern of multiply recurring layers can both fill the craters with a significant volume of ice, as well as transport debris from the crater walls out into the central regions of the craters. The cyclical pattern of waxing and waning mantling layers results in a rippled pattern of surface debris extending out into the crater interiors that would manifest itself as an observable concentric pattern, comparable in appearance to concentric crater fill. In this scenario, the formation of mantling sublimation till layers seals the accumulating ice and sequesters it from significant temperature variations at diurnal, annual and spin-axis/orbital cycle time scales, to produce ancient ice records preserved today below CCF crater floors. Lack of meltwater features associated with concentric crater fill provides evidence that the Late Amazonian climate did not exceed the melting temperature in the mid- to high-latitudes for any significant period of time. Continued sequestration of ice with time in CCF and related deposits (lobate debris aprons and lineated valley fill) further reduces the already supply-limited polar ice sources, suggesting that there has been a declining reservoir of available ice with each ensuing glacial period. Together, these deposits represent a candidate library of climate chemistry and global change dating from the Late Amazonian, and a non-polar water resource for future exploration.

  4. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  5. Subglacial conditions and ice-flow patterns reconstructed from petrographic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Ewelina; Szuman, Izabela

    2010-05-01

    Usually the petrographic composition of sediments give a basis to distinguish sediments horizons and correlate them. In this study clasts petrography contributes to reconstruction of subglacial conditions as well. Together with till fabric analysis and geomorphological facts it can also give a valuable evidence for ice-flow patterns. The study concerns the Great Poland region, located in central-western Poland. The research area extnents are 53.149 °N and 51.849 °N paralells and 15.899 °E and 18.249 °E meridians. The area lies within the range of the Last Glacial Maximum phase (in Poland known as the Leszno Phase) and the Poznan Phase, which is the succeeding stage of the Weichselian Ice Sheet in Poland. The purpose of the study was twofold. Firstly, the authors aimed at revealing and reconstructing the vertical diversity of subglacial dynamics. Secondly it was intended to distinguish lower-scale flowline patterns within the major ice streams as well. A set of data was acquired from subglacial tills deposited by an active ice sheet sole (deformation and lodgement till). The data set included results of: lithofacies analysis results, till fabric measurements (a-axes of at least 30 elongated clasts), clasts-compositional data derived from 5-10 mm gravels and grain-size distribution obtained with wet and dry (mechanical) sieving techniques. Changes in the petrographic composition of gravels were investigated in two ways. At first, in parallel profiles, to detect a spatial tendency in the petrographic composition. The latter way concerned vertical profiles within subglacial till horizons with the purpose of revealing some trends induced by vertical changes of subglacial conditions. Subsequently all the textural features were associated with geomorphic traces, demonstrated by subglacial channels and other glacial lineations, obtained from Digital Elevation Model, in order to distinguish ice-flow patterns. The clasts petrography analysed in vertical profiles revealed

  6. Glacial Geomorphology of the Northwestern Weddell Seaf: Shifting Ice Flow Patterns of a Marine-based Ice Sheet During Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Campo, J.; Munoz, Y. P.

    2016-12-01

    During the last glacial maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice carved a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as the ice retreated across the continental shelf. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine terminating glacial environments. The seafloor geomorphic record on the Weddell Sea contrasts with the western side of the peninsula, where ice flow paths are more structurally controlled and thus do not change during retreat.

  7. Reorganization of ice sheet flow patterns in Arctic Canada and the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.; Miller, Gifford H.

    2010-07-01

    Evidence for the evolution of Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) basal thermal regime patterns during successive glaciations is poorly preserved in the geologic record. Here we explore a new approach to constrain the distribution of cold-based ice across central Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic over many glacial-interglacial cycles by combining till geochemistry and cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data. Parts of the landscaped with geomorphic evidence for limited glacial erosion are covered by till characterized by high chemical index of alteration (CIA) values and CRN concentrations requiring complicated burial-exposure histories. Till from regions scoured by glacial erosion have CIA values indistinguishable from local bedrock and CRN concentrations that can be explained by simple exposure following deglaciation. CRN modeling results based on these constraints suggest that the weathered tills were deposited by 1.9 to 1.2 Ma, and by that time the fiorded Baffin Island coastline must have developed close to its modern configuration as piracy of ice flow by the most efficient fiord systems resulted in a major shift in the basal thermal regime across the northeastern LIS. The resultant concentration of ice flow in fewer outlet systems may help explain the cause of the mid-Pleistocene transition from 41- to 100-kyr glacial cycles.

  8. Ice-dammed lake drainage in west Greenland: Drainage pattern and implications on ice flow and bedrock motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Nielsen, Karina; Mouginot, Jeremie

    2017-07-01

    Ice-dammed lakes drain frequently in Greenland, but the impacts of these events differ between sites. Here we study the quasi-cyclic behavior of the 40 km2 Lake Tininnilik in west Greenland and its impact on ice flow and crustal deformation. Data reveal rapid drainage of 1.83 ± 0.17 km3 of water in less than 7 days in 2010, leading to a speedup of the damming glacier, and an instantaneous modeled elastic bedrock uplift of 18.6 ± 0.1 mm confirmed by an independent lakeside GPS record. Since ice-dammed lakes are common on Greenland, our results highlight the importance of including other sources of surface loading in addition to ice mass change, when assessing glacial isostatic adjustment or elastic rebound using geodetic data. Moreover, the results illustrates a linkage between subglacial discharge and ice surface velocity, important for assessing ice flux, and thus mass balance, in a future warming climate.

  9. Greenland Ice Flow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Greenland looks like a big pile of snow seen from space using a regular camera. But satellite radar interferometry helps us detect the motion of ice beneath the snow. Ice starts flowing from the fl...

  10. Ice flow of the Antarctica Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    Ice velocity is fundamental characteristic of the dynamics of ice sheets and is essential to know for calculating the mass budget of ice sheet and for controlling ice sheet numerical models with realistic boundary conditions. Until recently, data were mostly available on a discrete basis over small areas with variable precision. Here, we report on our results of processing ice velocity from the interferometric synthetic-aperture radar data acquired by ALOS PALSAR in 2006 to 2010 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), by ENVISAT ASAR in 2007 to 2009, by RADARSAT-2 in 2009 and 2011, by RADARSAT-1 in 1997 and 2000 and by ERS-1 & -2 in 1996 in the framework of the International Polar Year 2007-2009. The result is the most comprehensive and precise high-resolution digital map of ice motion ever produced on the Antarctic continent. While important surprises are found along the coastline, it is in the interior that this map is revealing the most interesting features. The data reveal widespread, patterned, enhanced flow with tributary glaciers reaching hundreds to thousands of kilometers inland, over the entire continent. We show that the ice motion along these flow features has a strong basal slip component. This has far reaching implications for the modeling of ice sheet flow and evolution. In addition, our multi-year coverage of the coastal sectors reveal the beginning of an acceleration on Thwaites glacier and a wave of accelerated flow propagating inland rapidly on Pine Island Glacier between 2006 and 2010. This work was conducted at the Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's MEaSUREs program.

  11. Reconstructing the flow pattern evolution in inner region of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet by glacial landforms from Gausdal Vestfjell area, south-central Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putniņš, Artūrs; Henriksen, Mona

    2017-05-01

    More than 17 000 landforms from detailed LiDAR data sets have been mapped in the Gausdal Vestfjell area, south-central Norway. The spatial distribution and relationships between the identified subglacial bedforms, mainly streamlined landforms and ribbed moraine ridges, have provided new insight on the glacial dynamics and the sequence of glacial events during the last glaciation. This established evolution of the Late Weichselian ice flow pattern at this inner region of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet is stepwise where a topography independent ice flow (Phase I) are followed by a regional (Phase II) before a strongly channelized, topography driven ice flow (Phase III). The latter phase is divided into several substages where the flow sets are becoming increasingly confined into the valleys, likely separated by colder, less active ice before down-melting of ice took place. A migrating ice divide and lowering of the ice surface seems to be the main reasons for these changes in ice flow pattern. Formation of ribbed moraine can occur both when the ice flow slows down and speeds up, forming respectively broad fields and elongated belts of ribbed moraines.

  12. Ice Flow in the North East Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, Ian; Kwok, Ron; Fahnestock, M.; MacAyeal, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Early observations with ERS-1 SAR image data revealed a large ice stream in North East Greenland (Fahnestock 1993). The ice stream has a number of the characteristics of the more closely studied ice streams in Antarctica, including its large size and gross geometry. The onset of rapid flow close to the ice divide and the evolution of its flow pattern, however, make this ice stream unique. These features can be seen in the balance velocities for the ice stream (Joughin 1997) and its outlets. The ice stream is identifiable for more than 700 km, making it much longer than any other flow feature in Greenland. Our research goals are to gain a greater understanding of the ice flow in the northeast Greenland ice stream and its outlet glaciers in order to assess their impact on the past, present, and future mass balance of the ice sheet. We will accomplish these goals using a combination of remotely sensed data and ice sheet models. We are using satellite radar interferometry data to produce a complete maps of velocity and topography over the entire ice stream. We are in the process of developing methods to use these data in conjunction with existing ice sheet models similar to those that have been used to improve understanding of the mechanics of flow in Antarctic ice streams.

  13. Ice Flow in the North East Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, Ian; Kwok, Ron; Fahnestock, M.; MacAyeal, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Early observations with ERS-1 SAR image data revealed a large ice stream in North East Greenland (Fahnestock 1993). The ice stream has a number of the characteristics of the more closely studied ice streams in Antarctica, including its large size and gross geometry. The onset of rapid flow close to the ice divide and the evolution of its flow pattern, however, make this ice stream unique. These features can be seen in the balance velocities for the ice stream (Joughin 1997) and its outlets. The ice stream is identifiable for more than 700 km, making it much longer than any other flow feature in Greenland. Our research goals are to gain a greater understanding of the ice flow in the northeast Greenland ice stream and its outlet glaciers in order to assess their impact on the past, present, and future mass balance of the ice sheet. We will accomplish these goals using a combination of remotely sensed data and ice sheet models. We are using satellite radar interferometry data to produce a complete maps of velocity and topography over the entire ice stream. We are in the process of developing methods to use these data in conjunction with existing ice sheet models similar to those that have been used to improve understanding of the mechanics of flow in Antarctic ice streams.

  14. Web life: Ice Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-11-01

    Computer and video gamers of a certain vintage will have fond memories of Lemmings, a game in which players must shepherd pixelated, suicidal rodents around a series of obstacles to reach safety. At first glance, Ice Flows is strikingly similar.

  15. Revealing the early ice flow patterns with historical Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photographs back to 1960s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shujie; Liu, Hongxing; Yu, Bailang; Zhou, Guoqing; Cheng, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    The reconnaissance ARGON satellites collected the earliest images of Antarctica from space dating back to the 1960s, providing valuable historical baseline information for studying polar ice sheets. Those photographs are underutilized for ice motion mapping, due to lack of sufficient ground controls for image orthorectification. In this study, we orthorectified the ARGON photographs by fully exploiting the metric qualities of WorldView satellite images: very high spatial resolution and precise geolocation. Through a case study over Larsen Ice Shelf, we demonstrated that the camera model with bundle block adjustment can achieve geolocation accuracy of better than the nominal resolution (140 m) for orthorectifying ARGON images, with WorldView imagery as ground control source. This allowed us to extend the ice velocity records of Larsen Ice Shelf back into 1960s~1970s for the first time. The retrospective analysis revealed that acceleration of the collapsed Larsen B occurred much earlier than previously thought.

  16. Fracture patterns at lava-ice contacts on Kokostick Butte, OR, and Mazama Ridge, Mount Rainier, WA: Implications for flow emplacement and cooling histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Cooling lava commonly develop polygonal joints that form equant hexagonal columns. Such fractures are formed by thermal contraction resulting in an isotropic tensional stress regime. However, certain linear cooling fracture patterns observed at some lava-ice contacts do not appear to fit the model for formation of cooling fractures and columns because of their preferred orientations. These fracture types include sheet-like (ladder-like rectangular fracture pattern), intermediate (pseudo-aligned individual column-bounding fractures), and pseudopillow (straight to arcuate fractures with perpendicular secondary fractures caused by water infiltration) fractures that form the edges of multiple columns along a single linear fracture. Despite the relatively common occurrence of these types of fractures at lava-ice contacts, their significance and mode of formation have not been fully explored. This study investigates the stress regimes responsible for producing these unique fractures and their significance for interpreting cooling histories at lava-ice contacts. Data was collected at Kokostick Butte dacite flow at South Sister, OR, and Mazama Ridge andesite flow at Mount Rainier, WA. Both of these lava flows have been interpreted as being emplaced into contact with ice and linear fracture types have been observed on their ice-contacted margins. Two different mechanisms are proposed for the formation of linear fracture networks. One possible mechanism for the formation of linear fracture patterns is marginal bulging. Melting of confining ice walls will create voids into which flowing lava can deform resulting in margin-parallel tension causing margin-perpendicular fractures. If viewed from the ice-wall, these fractures would be steeply dipping, linear fractures. Another possible mechanism for the formation of linear fracture types is gravitational settling. Pure shear during compression and settling can result in a tensional environment with similar consequences as

  17. Star patterns on lake ice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Victor C; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-06-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice-covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these "lake stars," the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomenon are captured in laboratory experiments.

  18. Star patterns on lake ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Victor C.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice-covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these “lake stars,” the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomenon are captured in laboratory experiments.

  19. Glaciation in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands: Ice accumulation, distribution, flow rates, basal melting, and top-down melting rates and patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2015-02-01

    pattern was disorganized and followed topography, with no radial flow pattern typical of an equilibrium ice sheet. Virtually the entire ice sheet is predicted to be cold-based, and thus the range of wet-based features typically associated with temperate glaciers (e.g., drumlins, eskers, etc.) is not predicted to occur. Wet-based conditions are predicted only locally in the thickest ice (on the floors of the deepest craters), where limited subglacial lakes may have formed. These LNIH regional ice-sheets provide a huge reservoir of potential meltwater as a source for forming the observed fluvial and lacustrine features and deposits. Top-down melting scenarios applied to our LNIH ice sheet model predict that periods of punctuated warming could lead to elevated temperatures sufficient to melt enough snow and ice to readily account for the observed fluvial and lacustrine features and deposits. Our model indicates that such melting should take place preferentially at the margins of the ice sheets, a prediction that can be tested with further analyses.

  20. Are longitudinal ice-surface structures on the Antarctic Ice Sheet indicators of long-term ice-flow configuration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Jennings, S. J. A.; Hambrey, M. J.; Hubbard, B.

    2014-07-01

    Continent-wide mapping of longitudinal ice-surface structures on the Antarctic Ice Sheet reveals that they originate in the interior of the ice sheet and are arranged in arborescent networks fed by multiple tributaries. Longitudinal ice-surface structures can be traced continuously down-ice for distances of up to 1200 km. They are co-located with fast-flowing glaciers and ice streams that are dominated by basal sliding rates above tens of m yr-1 and are strongly guided by subglacial topography. Longitudinal ice-surface structures dominate regions of converging flow, where ice flow is subject to non-coaxial strain and simple shear. Associating these structures with the AIS' surface velocity field reveals (i) ice residence times of ~ 2500 to 18 500 years, and (ii) undeformed flow-line sets for all major flow units analysed except the Kamb Ice Stream and the Institute and Möller Ice Stream areas. Although it is unclear how long it takes for these features to form and decay, we infer that the major ice-flow and ice-velocity configuration of the ice sheet may have remained largely unchanged for several thousand years, and possibly even since the end of the last glacial cycle. This conclusion has implications for our understanding of the long-term landscape evolution of Antarctica, including large-scale patterns of glacial erosion and deposition.

  1. Sea Ice Patterns

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    On July 20, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy steamed south in the Arctic Ocean toward the edge of the sea ice. The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is a NASA shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research took place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Sea Ice Patterns

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    On July 20, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy steamed south in the Arctic Ocean toward the edge of the sea ice. The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is NASA's two-year shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research takes place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen For updates on the five-week ICESCAPE voyage, visit the mission blog at: go.usa.gov/WwU NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Pimentel, Sam

    2014-08-01

    Field data and numerical modeling show that glaciations have the potential either to enhance relief or to dampen topography. We aim to model the effect of the subglacial hydraulic system on spatiotemporal patterns of glacial erosion by abrasion and quarrying on time scales commensurate with drainage system fluctuations (e.g., seasonal to annual). We use a numerical model that incorporates a dual-morphology subglacial drainage system coupled to a higher-order ice-flow model and process-specific erosion laws. The subglacial drainage system allows for a dynamic transition between two morphologies: the distributed system, characterized by an increase in basal water pressure with discharge, and the channelized system, which exhibits a decrease in equilibrium water pressure with increasing discharge. We apply the model to a simple synthetic glacier geometry, drive it with prescribed meltwater input variations, and compute sliding and erosion rates over a seasonal cycle. When both distributed and channelized systems are included, abrasion and sliding maxima migrate ~ 20% up-glacier compared to simulations with distributed drainage only. Power-law sliding generally yields to a broader response of abrasion to water pressure changes along the flowline compared to Coulomb-friction sliding. Multi-day variations in meltwater input elicit a stronger abrasion response than either diurnal- or seasonal variations alone for the same total input volume. An increase in water input volume leads to increased abrasion. We find that ice thickness commensurate with ice sheet outlet glaciers can hinder the up-glacier migration of abrasion. Quarrying patterns computed with a recently published law differ markedly from calculated abrasion patterns, with effective pressure being a stronger determinant than sliding speeds of quarrying rates. These variations in calculated patterns of instantaneous erosion as a function of hydrology-, sliding-, and erosion-model formulation, as well as model

  4. Ice-Confined Basaltic Lava Flows: Review and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I.; Edwards, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Basaltic lavas that are interpreted as having been emplaced in subglacial or ice-confined subaerial settings are known from several localities in Iceland, British Columbia and Antarctica. At least four different types of observations have been used to date to identify emplacement of basaltic lavas in an ice-rich environment: i) gross flow morphology, ii) surface structures, iii) evidence for ice-confined water during emplacement, and iv) lava fracture patterns. Five types of ice-confined lava are identified: sheets, lobes, mounds, linear ridges and sinuous ridges. While the appearance of lavas is controlled by the same factors as in the submarine environment, such as the geometry and configuration of vents and lava tubes, flow rheology and rates, and underlying topography, the presence of ice can lead to distinct features that are specific to the ice-confined setting. Other types have very similar or identical equivalents in submarine environment, albeit with some oversteepening/ice contact surfaces. Ice-confined lavas can form as (1) subaerial or subaqueous lavas emplaced against ice open to the air, (2) subaqueous lavas emplaced into pre-existing sub-ice drainage networks, and (3) subaqueous lavas emplaced into ponded water beneath ice. Their surface structures reflect the relationship between rates of lava flow emplacement at the site of ice-water-lava contact, ice melting and water drainage. Variations in local lava flow rates could be due to lava cooling, constriction, inflation, tube development, ice melting, ice collapse, lava collapse, changes in eruption rate etc. Episodes of higher lava flow rate would favour direct ice contact and plastic compression against the ice, generating oversteepened and/or overthickened chilled margins, cavities in the lava formed by melting of enveloped ice blocks (cryolith cavities) and structures such as flattened pillows and lava clasts embedded into the glassy margins. Melting back of the confining ice generates space to

  5. Granular flow in the marginal ice zone.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Daniel L

    2005-07-15

    The region of sea ice near the edge of the sea ice pack is known as the marginal ice zone (MIZ), and its dynamics are complicated by ocean wave interaction with the ice cover, strong gradients in the atmosphere and ocean and variations in sea ice rheology. This paper focuses on the role of sea ice rheology in determining the dynamics of the MIZ. Here, sea ice is treated as a granular material with a composite rheology describing collisional ice floe interaction and plastic interaction. The collisional component of sea ice rheology depends upon the granular temperature, a measure of the kinetic energy of flow fluctuations. A simplified model of the MIZ is introduced consisting of the along and across momentum balance of the sea ice and the balance equation of fluctuation kinetic energy. The steady solution of these equations is found to leading order using elementary methods. This reveals a concentrated region of rapid ice flow parallel to the ice edge, which is in accordance with field observations, and previously called the ice jet. Previous explanations of the ice jet relied upon the existence of ocean currents beneath the ice cover. We show that an ice jet results as a natural consequence of the granular nature of sea ice.

  6. Flow Regimes of the Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, M.; Burgess, D. O.; Mair, D.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Flow regimes of the Devon ice cap were investigated using a combination of SAR Interferometry (InSAR) and airborne radio echo sounding (RES). The surface velocity field was mapped by InSAR using ascending ERS 1/2 tandem mode data for the western and southeast sectors of the ice cap and 3-day repeat pass ERS 1 imagery for the north-east sector. Over the terminus of the Belcher glacier (a major calving front), where decorrelation between ERS data occurred, surface velocities were obtained from Radarsat 1 imagery using speckle tracking procedures. Airborne RES at 100MHz was used to map the distribution of ice thickness and bed topography across the ice cap. There is a significant contrast in ice flow dynamics between the east and west sides of the ice cap. West of the main north-south divide ice flow is dominantly by relatively uniform `sheet' flow. East of the divide, several outlet glaciers that extend up to 60km inland from the eastern margin drain the ice cap. Four distinct ice flow regimes were recognized from analysis of the patterns of along-flow co-variation between the ratio of surface velocity to ice thickness (V/H) and the driving stress computed using a surface slope averaging length scale of ten ice thicknesses. These regimes are characterized by (i) a positive relationship between V/H and driving stress, (ii) and (iii) a generally inverse relationship between V/H and driving stress, and (iv) high but variable V/H and low driving stress. For a given driving stress, V/H is generally higher in regime (iii) than in regime (ii). Regime (i) is characteristic of the interior and much of the western half of the ice cap, and also of near stagnant, surge-emplaced ice in the south-east of the ice cap. It is inferred to involve flow primarily by ice deformation. Regimes (ii) and (iii) occur in sections of outlet glaciers where flow stripes are actively formed and where the ice surface topography clearly reflects the presence of topographic obstacles on the glacier

  7. Groundwater flow beneath Late Weichselian glacier ice in Nordfjord, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Carolyn A.; Mickelson, D. M.; Anderson, M. P.; Winguth, C.

    Basal water pressure and water flow patterns are significant factors in controlling the behavior of an ice sheet, because they influence ice-sheet thickness, stability and extent. Water produced by basal melting may infiltrate the subsurface, or occur as sheet or channelized flow at the ice/bed interface. We examine subglacial groundwater conditions along a flowline of the Scandinavian ice sheet through Nordfjord, in the western fjords region of southern Norway, using a steady-state, two-dimensional groundwater-flow model. Meltwater input to the groundwater model is calculated by a two-dimensional, time-dependent, thermomechanically coupled ice-flow model oriented along the same flowline. Model results show that the subglacial sediments could not have transmitted all the meltwater out of the fjord during times of ice advance and when the ice sheet was at its maximum position at the edge of the continental shelf. In order for pore-water pressures to remain below the overburden pressure of the overlying ice, other paths of subglacial drainage are necessary to remove excess water. During times of retreat, the subglacial aquifer is incapable of transmitting all the meltwater that was probably generated. Pulses of meltwater reaching the bed could explain non-climatically driven margin readvances during the overall retreat phase.

  8. Leakage of the Greenland Ice Sheet through accelerated ice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.

    2005-12-01

    A map of coastal velocities of the Greenland ice sheet was produced from Radarsat-1 acquired during the background mission of 2000 and combined with radio echo sounding data to estimate the ice discharge from the ice sheet. On individual glaciers, ice discharge was compared with snow input from the interior and melt above the flux gate to determine the glacier mass balance. Time series of velocities on several glaciers at different latitudes reveal seasonal fluctuations of only 7-8 percent so that winter velocities are only 2 percent less than the yearly mean. The results show the northern Greenland glaciers to be close to balance yet losing mass. No change in ice flow is detected on Petermann, 79north and Zachariae Isstrom in 2000-2004. East Greenland glaciers are in balance and flowing steadily north of Kangerdlussuaq, but Kangerdlussuaq, Helheim and all the southeastern glaciers are thinning dramatically. All these glaciers accelerated, Kangerdlussuaq in 2000, Helheim prior to 2004, and southeast Greenland glaciers accelerated 10 to 50 percent in 2000-2004. Glacier acceleration is generally brutal, probably once the glacier reached a threshold, and sustained. In the northwest, most glaciers are largely out of balance. Jakobshavn accelerated significantly in 2002, and glaciers in its immediate vicinity accelerated more than 50 percent in 2000-2004. Less is known about southwest Greenland glaciers due to a lack of ice thickness data but the glaciers have accelerated there as well and are likely to be strongly out of balance despite thickening of the interior. Overall, I estimate the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet to be about -80 +/-10 cubic km of ice per year in 2000 and -110 +/-15 cubic km of ice per year in 2004, i.e. more negative than based on partial altimetry surveys of the outlet glaciers. As climate continues to warm, more glaciers will accelerate, and the mass balance will become increasingly negative, regardless of the evolution of the ice sheet

  9. Patterning flows and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroock, Abraham Duncan

    This thesis presents the use of patterned surfaces for controlling fluid dynamics on a sub-millimeter scale, and for fabricating a new class of polymeric materials. In chapters 1--4, chemical and mechanical structures were used to control the form of flows of fluids in microchannels. This work was done in the context of the development of microfluidic technology for performing chemical tasks in portable, integrated devices. Chapter 1 reviews this work for an audience of chemists who are potential users of these techniques in the development of micro-analytical and micro-synthetic devices. Appendix 1 contains a more general review of microfluidics. Chapter 2 presents experimental results on the use of patterned surface charge density to create new electroosmotic (EO) flows in microchannels; the chapter includes a successful model of the observed flows. In Chapter 3, patterns of topography on the wall of a microchannel were used to generate recirculation in pressure-driven flows. The design and characterization of an efficient mixer based on these flows is presented. A theoretical treatment of these flows is given in Appendix 2. The experimental methods used for the work with both EO and pressure-driven flows are presented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, a pattern of asymmetrical grooves in a heated plate was used to perturb Marangoni-Benard (M-B) convection, a dynamic system that spontaneously forms patterned flows. The interaction of the imposed pattern and the inherent pattern of the M-B convection led to a net flow in the plane of convecting layer of fluid. The direction of this flow depended on the orientation of the asymmetrical grooves, the temperature difference across the layer, and the thickness of the layer. A phenomenological model is presented to explain this ratchet effect in which local recirculation was coupled into a global flow. In Chapter 6, surfaces patterned by microcontact printing were used as a workbench on which to build molecularly thin polymer

  10. Ice patterns and hydrothermal plumes, Lake Baikal, Russia - Insights from Space Shuttle hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Helfert, Michael R.; Helms, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Earth photography from the Space Shuttle is used to examine the ice cover on Lake Baikal and correlate the patterns of weakened and melting ice with known hydrothermal areas in the Siberian lake. Particular zones of melted and broken ice may be surface expressions of elevated heat flow in Lake Baikal. The possibility is explored that hydrothermal vents can introduce local convective upwelling and disrupt a stable water column to the extent that the melt zones which are observed in the lake's ice cover are produced. A heat flow map and photographs of the lake are overlaid to compare specific areas of thinned or broken ice with the hot spots. The regions of known hydrothermal activity and high heat flow correlate extremely well with circular regions of thinned ice, and zones of broken and recrystallized ice. Local and regional climate data and other sources of warm water, such as river inlets, are considered.

  11. Ice patterns and hydrothermal plumes, Lake Baikal, Russia - Insights from Space Shuttle hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Helfert, Michael R.; Helms, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Earth photography from the Space Shuttle is used to examine the ice cover on Lake Baikal and correlate the patterns of weakened and melting ice with known hydrothermal areas in the Siberian lake. Particular zones of melted and broken ice may be surface expressions of elevated heat flow in Lake Baikal. The possibility is explored that hydrothermal vents can introduce local convective upwelling and disrupt a stable water column to the extent that the melt zones which are observed in the lake's ice cover are produced. A heat flow map and photographs of the lake are overlaid to compare specific areas of thinned or broken ice with the hot spots. The regions of known hydrothermal activity and high heat flow correlate extremely well with circular regions of thinned ice, and zones of broken and recrystallized ice. Local and regional climate data and other sources of warm water, such as river inlets, are considered.

  12. Regional Patterns of Stress Transfer in the Ablation Zone of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, L. C.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T.; Catania, G. A.; Luethi, M. P.; Hawley, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Current understanding of the subglacial system indicates that the seasonal evolution of ice flow is strongly controlled by the gradual upstream progression of an inefficient - efficient transition within the subglacial hydrologic system followed by the reduction of melt and a downstream collapse of the efficient system. Using a spatiotemporally dense network of GPS-derived surface velocities from the Pâkitsoq Region of the western Greenland Ice Sheet, we find that this pattern of subglacial development is complicated by heterogeneous bed topography, resulting in complex patterns of ice flow. Following low elevation melt onset, early melt season strain rate anomalies are dominated by regional extension, which then gives way to spatially expansive compression. However, once daily minimum ice velocities fall below the observed winter background velocities, an alternating spatial pattern of extension and compression prevails. This pattern of strain rate anomalies is correlated with changing basal topography and differences in the magnitude of diurnal surface ice speeds. Along subglacial ridges, diurnal variability in ice speed is large, suggestive of a mature, efficient subglacial system. In regions of subglacial lows, diurnal variability in ice velocity is relatively low, likely associated with a less developed efficient subglacial system. The observed pattern suggests that borehole observations and modeling results demonstrating the importance of longitudinal stress transfer at a single field location are likely widely applicable in our study area and other regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet with highly variable bed topography. Further, the complex pattern of ice flow and evidence of spatially extensive longitudinal stress transfer add to the body of work indicating that the bed character plays an important role in the development of the subglacial system; closely matching diurnal ice velocity patterns with subglacial models may be difficult without coupling these

  13. Determining the Orientations of Ice Crystals Using Electron Backscatter Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, D.; Baker, I.; Chang, H.

    2004-05-01

    The presentation will show how electron backscatter diffraction can be employed to determine crystal orientations in ice. The technique involves obtaining and indexing electron back-scatter patterns (EBSPs) from uncoated ice using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a custom-built cold-stage and an Orientation Imaging System. Unlike any of the currently-used methods, the EBSP-based technique has considerably higher angular and spatial resolution and is significantly faster. We also present an orientation image map of a muti-grain region in laboratory-grown ice constructed by automatically indexing the EBSPs using an HKL, Inc Channel 5 Orientation Imaging System and discuss possible applications of the technique to the study of natural ice. Primarily, the focus will be on the characterization of the microstructure of dynamically recrystallized glacier ice whose texture is intrinsically related the flow process. Other applications include obtaining orientation images from frozen water-containing materials, such as clathrate hydrates. This research was supported by Army Research Office grant DAAD 19-03-1-0110 and National Science Foundation grants OPP-9981379 and OPP-0221120.

  14. Siku DEM Simulations of Beaufort Sea-Ice Fracture Pattern.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Hutchings, J. K.; Johnson, J.; Velikhovskiy, G.

    2016-12-01

    Leads are fractures in the ice pack where exposed ocean surface increases heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. These leads are the location of shear in the pack and during winter control the transport of ice around the Beaufort Gyre. Hence prediction of lead direction opening and shear is important in forecasting sea ice drift and weather. Regional ice pack deformation is related to the fracture patterns, and related shear zones. Hence climate models need to simulate these processes to simulate realistic sea-ice transport and mass balance. We have developed a new discrete element method (DEM) model of sea ice, Siku, to forecast lead patterns. Siku is the first sea ice DEM model that takes into account the spherical geometry of the Earth, and allows simulation ranging from basin scale to meter scale without nesting. We present simulations with 2.5km resolution in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, and 25-100km across the rest of the Arctic. The DEM has been shown to reproduce discontinuous dynamics that result in shear patterns in the ice cover. We evaluate these against observed fracture patterns in thermal band satellite imagery. Simulations with differing ice mechanics produce lead pattern differences that are used to evaluate the physical validity of proposed physics of ice-ice and ice-coast contact. We present simulations demonstrating a good match to observations and discuss the implications for continuum modeling, where predicted ice transport along the Alaskan coast is known to be too slow.

  15. Feedback between ice flow, barotropic flow, and baroclinic flow in the presence of bottom topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1987-01-01

    Coupling between externally driven barotropic flow and locally driven baroclinic flow in the presence of an ice cover and topography is studied. The topography is a necessary ingredient in this coupling. This study shows that the observed mesoscale activity of the ice edge seen in satellite imagery does not necessarily reflect the mesoscale baroclinic activity in the ocean. Besides oceanic eddies, the ice cover can trace the topographic changes via the coupling to the barotropic flow. A two-layer ocean model coupled to an ice model is constructed to simulate an ice-ocean system with a varying bottom topography. In the absence of wind, forcing the ice cover reflects the externally driven barotropic ocean response, especially topographically forced Taylor columns by forming ice streamers or meanders. Some of these features propagate (advected with the ocean currents) as a whole downstream, creating an image of eddy propagation even though there is no baroclinic structure underneath. When downwelling favorable winds (ice on the left from the wind direction) are turned on, in addition to this background barotropic flow, the Ekman flow in the ocean (toward the open ocean) will enhance the meandering of the ice edge due to the barotropic flow. During upwelling favorable winds, the ice edge stays rather compact, including the case when a strong baroclinic, cyclonic vortex is developing beneath an ice meander supported by the Taylor column in the ocean.

  16. Creating a new ice sheet geometry of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, for use in high resolution ice flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nias, Isabel; Cornford, Stephen; Payne, Antony

    2017-04-01

    Previous high resolution ice flow modelling studies have shown that interpolation-based products for ice thickness (e.g. Bedmap2) can be inconsistent with the conservation of mass, given observations of velocity, surface mass balance and surface elevation change (Morlighem et al., 2011). For Pine Island Glacier, there is a thickening tendency of order 100 m/yr in the region of the grounding line, which is not observed in the pattern of elevation change. Poor geometric representation has implications for ice sheet stability, when modelling grounding line dynamics. Here we introduce an implicit algorithm to solve an advection-diffusion problem and use it to find an ice thickness field covering the Pine Island Glacier catchment, given observations of velocity and point data of ice thickness obtained from airborne radar surveys. Radar data points falling within the fast flowing region of the grounding line were removed, because basal crevassing in this region has likely resulted in an underestimation of ice thickness here. Our method performs well in fast flowing regions, but is less effective in slow flowing regions, where the algorithm relies on the diffusive term, rather than advection of thickness information downstream. Using the BISICLES ice flow model, we employ the newly created thickness field in an inverse problem to find fields for the basal traction coefficient and viscosity stiffening factor. We then use these fields to run the model forward, and compare the results to simulations using other geometries (Bedmap2 and a relaxed modification).

  17. Origin and dynamic significance of longitudinal structures ("flow stripes") in the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Jennings, S. J. A.; Hambrey, M. J.; Hubbard, B.

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal ice-surface structures in the Antarctic Ice Sheet can be traced continuously down-ice for distances of up to 1200 km. A map of the distribution of ~ 3600 of these features, compiled from satellite images, shows that they mirror the location of fast-flowing glaciers and ice streams that are dominated by basal sliding rates above tens of metres per annum and are strongly guided by subglacial topography. Longitudinal ice-surface structures dominate regions of converging flow, where ice flow is subject to non-coaxial strain and simple shear. They can be traced continuously through crevasse fields and through blue-ice areas, indicating that they represent the surface manifestation of a three-dimensional structure, interpreted as foliation. Flow lines are linear and undeformed for all major flow units described here in the Antarctic Ice Sheet except for the Kamb Ice Stream and the Institute and Möller Ice Stream areas, where areas of flow perturbation are evident. Parcels of ice along individual flow paths on the Lambert Glacier, Recovery Glacier, Byrd Glacier and Pine Island Glacier may reside in the glacier system for ~ 2500 to 18 500 years. Although it is unclear how long it takes for these features to form and decay, we infer that the major ice-flow configuration of the ice sheet may have remained largely unchanged for the last few hundred years, and possibly even longer. This conclusion has implications for our understanding of the long-term landscape evolution of Antarctica, including large-scale patterns of glacial erosion and deposition.

  18. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  19. Glacial geomorphology of terrestrial-terminating fast flow lobes/ice stream margins in the southwest Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David J. A.; Young, Nathaniel J. P.; Ó Cofaigh, Colm

    2014-01-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping of southern Alberta, Canada, reveals landform assemblages that are diagnostic of terrestrial-terminating ice streams/fast flowing outlet glaciers with lobate snouts. Spatial variability in features that comprise the landform assemblages reflects changes in (a) palaeo-ice stream activity (switch on/off); and (b) snout basal thermal regimes associated with climate sensitive, steady state flow. Palaeo-ice stream tracks reveal distinct inset sequences of fan-shaped flowsets indicative of receding lobate ice stream margins. Former ice lobe margins are demarcated by (a) major, often glacially overridden transverse moraine ridges, commonly comprising glacitectonically thrust bedrock; and (b) minor, closely spaced recessional push moraines and hummocky moraine arcs. Details of these landform types are well exhibited around the former southern margins of the Central Alberta Ice Stream, where larger scale, more intensive mapping identifies a complex glacial geomorphology comprising minor transverse ridges (MTR types 1-3), hummocky terrain (HT types 1-3), flutings, and meltwater channels/spillways. The MTR type 1 constitute the summit corrugation patterns of glacitectonic thrust moraines or major transverse ridges and have been glacially overrun and moderately streamlined. The MTR type 2 sequences are recessional push moraines similar to those developing at modern active temperate glacier snouts. The MTR type 3 document moraine construction by incremental stagnation because they occur in association with hummocky terrain. The close association of hummocky terrain with push moraine assemblages indicates that they are the products of supraglacial controlled deposition on a polythermal ice sheet margin, where the HT type 3 hummocks represent former ice-walled lake plains. The ice sheet marginal thermal regime switches indicated by the spatially variable landform assemblages in southern Alberta are consistent with palaeoglaciological

  20. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  1. Holocene Accumulation and Ice Flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T.J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-01-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 thousand years of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 kilometers from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20 percent lower than modern at 9.2 thousand years before present (B.P.), increased by 40 percent from 9.2 to 2.3 thousand years B.P., and decreased by at least 10 percent over the past 2 thousand years B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 kilometers of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  2. Recent changes in the flow of the Ross Ice Shelf, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbe, Christina L.; Scambos, Ted A.; Lee, Choon-Ki; Bohlander, Jennifer; Haran, Terry

    2013-08-01

    Comparison of surface velocities measured during the Ross Ice Shelf Geophysical and Glaciological Survey (RIGGS, 1973 to 1978) and velocities measured via feature tracking between two Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) mosaics (compiled from 2003/4 and 2008/9 images) reveals widespread slowing and minor areas of acceleration in the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) over the approximately 30 year interval. The largest changes (-13 ma) occur near the Whillans and Mercer Ice Streams grounding line in the southernmost part of the ice shelf. Speed has increased over the interval (up to 5 ma) between the MacAyeal Ice Stream grounding line and the shelf front, and along the eastern shelf front. Changes in ice thickness computed using ICESat laser altimetry are used together with a well-tested model of the ice shelf to investigate underlying causes of change in the flow of the ice shelf over time. The observed transients represent a combination of recent forcings and ongoing response to ice stream discharge variations over the past millennium. While evidence of older events may be present, the modern signal is dominated by shorter time scale events, including the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream about 160 years ago, recent changes in basal drag on the Whillans Ice Stream ice plain and, perhaps, iceberg calving. Details in embayment geometry, for example the shallow sea floor below Crary Ice Rise, modulate the spatial pattern of ice shelf response to boundary condition perturbations.

  3. Investigations on the origins and maintenance of the Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area by combined surface wind and ice flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, Thomas; Malm, Torsten; Schäfer, Martina; Martín, Carlos; Moore, John C.

    2015-04-01

    Using the turbulent flow modeling capabilities of the Finite Element code Elmer we model the spatial and temporal distributions of wind impact speeds caused by a katabatic wind front on the by nunataks surrounded glacier valley of Scharffenbergbotnen (SBB), Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. Comparison of these patterns to the steady state mass balance distribution obtained using a prescribed fabric distribution to solve the prognostic ice flow problem with a the full-stress code Elmer/Ice reveal a significant correspondence over the inner part of the valley and in particular the blue ice area (BIA) where the snow and even multi-year firn is removed by very high winds. This leads us to the conclusion that topographically accelerated winds are the dominant factor determining the mass balance of high elevation BIA's. Based on geomorphological evidence we further reconstruct the surface terrain to resemble the situation at the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM), where the ice inside the valley was ~200 m thicker and the nunataks were smoothed out by the ice cover. The same turbulent flow simulation, utilizing the Virtual Multi-Scale (VMS) method, on this altered terrain reveals that the focusing effect of the present day surface did not exist at the LGM. This supports the finding of ice sample ages and flow model results that the inner BIA at SBB was created as a consequence of the lowering ice surface clearly after LGM.

  4. Sea Ice Flows, Sea of Okhotsk, CIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-84-29AL (28 April-6 May 1991) --- This nearly vertical photograph of the North Atlantic, taken outside of the sunglint pattern, illustrates the extreme contrast between highly reflective ice, having a large percentage of between-crystal air space, and the low-reflectance water, which absorbs most of the light that propagates into it from the air. The ice drifts along with the surface currents and wind and may therefore be used as a natural Langranian* tracer. Photographs such as this, taken several times over the course of a mission, may be used to investigate near-surface circulation in high-latitude oceans. *A Langranian tracer is anything that can be tracked as it drifts along with the water, as opposed to staying in one position and measuring how fast the water goes by.

  5. Satellite imagery of the onset of streaming flow of ice streams C and D, West Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodge, S.M.; Doppelhammer, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Five overlapping Landsat multispectral scanner satellite images of the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet were enhanced with principal component analysis, high-pass filtering, and linear contrast stretching and merged into a mosaic by aligning surface features in the overlap areas. The mosaic was registered to geodetic coordinates, to an accuracy of about 1 km, using the five scene centers as control points. The onset of streaming flow of two tributaries of ice stream C and one tributary of ice stream D is visible in the mosaic. The onset appears to occur within a relatively short distance, less than the width of the ice stream, typically at a subglacial topographic feature such as a step or ridge. The ice streams extend farther up into the interior than previously mapped. Ice stream D starts about 150 km from the ice divide, at an altitude of about 1500 m, approximately halfway up the convex-upward dome shape of the interior ice sheet. Ice stream D is relatively much longer than ice stream C, possibly because ice stream D is currently active whereas ice stream C is currently inactive. The grounded portion of the West Antarctic ice sheet is perhaps best conceptualized as an ice sheet in which ice streams are embedded over most of its area, with slow moving ice converging into fast moving ice streams in a widely distributed pattern, much like that of streams and rivers in a hydrologic basin. A relic margin appears to parallel most of the south margin of the tributary of ice stream D, separated from the active shear margin by about 10 km or less for a distance of over 200 km. This means there is now evidence for recent changes having occurred in three of the five major ice streams which drain most of West Antarctica (B, C, and D), two of which (B and D) are currently active.

  6. A cell-centered ICE method for multiphase flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Padial, N.T.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1993-12-01

    The Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) method is a finite-volume scheme that is stable for any value of the Courant number based on the sound speed. In the incompressible limit, the ICE method becomes essentially identical to the Marker and Cell (MAC) method, so the two schemes are closely related. In this article, the classical ICE method is extended to multiple interpenetrating phases, and employed with a single control volume (nonstaggered) mesh framework. The incompressible limit is preserved, so that problems involving equations of state, or those exhibiting constant material densities, can be addressed with the same computer code. The scheme reduces properly to a single-fluid method, enabling benchmarking using well-known test cases. Thus, the numerical issues focus only on those aspects unique to problems having multiple density, velocity and temperature fields. The discussion begins with a derivation of the exact, ensemble-averaged equations. Examples of the most basic closures axe given, and the well-posedness of the equations is demonstrated. The numerical method is described in operator notation, and the discretization is sketched. The flow patterns in a bubble column are computed as an incompressible flow example. For a compressible flow example, the expansion and compression of a bubble formed by high-explosive gases under water is shown. In each case, comparison to experimental data is made.

  7. Seasonal Greenland Ice Sheet ice flow variations in regions of differing bed and surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sole, A. J.; Livingstone, S. J.; Rippin, D. M.; Hill, J.; McMillan, M.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to future sea-level rise is uncertain. Observations reveal the important role of basal water in controlling ice-flow to the ice sheet margin. In Greenland, drainage of large volumes of surface meltwater to the ice sheet bed through moulins and hydrofracture beneath surface lakes dominates the subglacial hydrological system and provides an efficient means of moving mass and heat through the ice sheet. Ice surface and bed topography influence where meltwater can access the bed, and the nature of its subsequent flow beneath the ice. However, no systematic investigation into the influence of topographic variability on Greenland hydrology and dynamics exists. Thus, physical processes controlling storage and drainage of surface and basal meltwater, and the way these affect ice flow are not comprehensively understood. This presents a critical obstacle in efforts to predict the future evolution of the GrIS. Here we present high-resolution satellite mapping of the ice-surface drainage network (e.g. lakes, channels and moulins) and measurements of seasonal variations in ice flow in south west Greenland. The region is comprised of three distinct subglacial terrains which vary in terms of the amplitude and wavelength and thus the degree to which basal topography is reflected in the ice sheet surface. We find that the distribution of surface hydrological features is related to the transfer of bed topography to the ice sheet surface. For example, in areas of thinner ice and high bed relief, moulins occur more frequently and are more uniformly dispersed, indicating a more distributed influx of surface-derived meltwater to the ice sheet bed. We investigate the implications of such spatial variations in surface hydrology on seasonal ice flow rates.

  8. Fast-flowing outlet glaciers on Svalbard ice caps

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdeswell, J.A. ); Collin, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Four well-defined outlet glaciers are present on the 2510 km{sup 2} cap of Vestfonna in Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. Airborne radio echo sounding and aerial-photograph and satellite-image analysis methods are used to analyze the morphology and dynamics of the ice cap and its component outlet glaciers. The heavily crevassed outlets form linear depressions in the ice-cap surface and flow an order of magnitude faster than the ridges of uncrevassed ice between them. Ice flow on the ridges is accounted for by internal deformation alone, whereas rates of outlet glacier flow require basal motion. One outlet has recently switched into and out of a faster mode of flow. Rapid terminal advance, a change from longitudinal compression to tension, and thinning in the upper basin indicate surge behavior. Observed outlet glacier discharge is significantly greater than current inputs of mass of the ice cap, indicating that present rates of flow cannot be sustained under the contemporary climate.

  9. Effects of Inlet Icing on Performance of Axial-flow Turbojet Engine in Natural Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, Loren W; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S

    1950-01-01

    A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted to determine the effect of inlet ice formations on the performance of axial-flow turbojet engines. The results are presented for icing conditions ranging from a liquid-water content of 0.1 to 0.9 gram per cubic meter and water-droplet size from 10 to 27 microns at ambient-air temperature from 13 to 26 degrees F. The data show time histories of jet thrust, air flow, tail-pipe temperature, compressor efficiency, and icing parameters for each icing encounter. The effect of inlet-guide-vane icing was isolated and shown to account for approximately one-half the total reduction in performance caused by inlet icing.

  10. Insights into ice shelf buttressing and ice rheology on Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica, from synoptic-scale observations of tidally driven ice flow variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchew, Brent; Simons, Mark; Riel, Bryan; Millio, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Synoptic-scale observations of the response of ice streams to well-constrained forcing functions provide unique insights into ice stream dynamics and the underlying mechanics of glacier flow. Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica, is one of the few recognized ice streams with strong, observed, periodic ice-flow variability (e.g., Gudmundsson, 2006; Murray et al., 2007); numerous in situ observations of the subglacial environment (e.g., Smith et al., 2015); and extensive modeling efforts focused on understanding the mechanisms that drive the observed variations in glacier flow (e.g. Thompson et al., 2014; Rosier et al., 2014; 2015). Despite these efforts, the processes underlying the ~20% modulation in horizontal ice flow at Msf (14.77-day) periods - which corresponds to the beat frequency of the lunar and solar semi-diurnal ocean tides - remain a mystery. To help resolve the salient processes, we contribute a first-of-its-kind observational dataset that provides ice-stream-scale measurements of 3D secular and time-varying ice flow on Rutford with ~40-m spatial resolution. These data were inferred from 9 months of continuous synthetic aperture radar observations collected with the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation from multiple satellite viewing geometries. The resulting velocity fields provide constraints on ice flow in all three spatial dimensions and in time, making them true 4D surface velocity fields. The time-varying velocity field components elucidate the spatial characteristics of the response of ice flow on Rutford to ocean tidal forcing and agree with collocated GPS measurements. We show that the response of horizontal ice flow to ocean tidal forcing is most pronounced over the ice shelf and subsequently propagates through the grounded ice stream at ~29 km/day, decaying quasi-linearly with distance over ~85 km upstream of the grounding zone. We observe multiple regions over the ice shelf whose motion is consistent with subglacial pinning points and that

  11. Tidal Modulation of Ice-shelf Flow: a Viscous Model of the Ross Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Three stations near the calving front of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, recorded GPS data through a full spring-neap tidal cycle in November 2005. The data revealed a diurnal horizontal motion that varied both along and transverse to the long-term average velocity direction, similar to tidal signals observed in other ice shelves and ice streams. Based on its periodicity, it was hypothesized that the signal represents a flow response of the Ross Ice Shelf to the diurnal tides of the Ross Sea. To assess the influence of the tide on the ice-shelf motion, two hypotheses were developed. The first addressed the direct response of the ice shelf to tidal forcing, such as forces due to sea-surface slopes or forces due to sub-ice-shelf currents. The second involved the indirect response of ice-shelf flow to the tidal signals observed in the ice streams that source the ice shelf. A finite-element model, based on viscous creep flow, was developed to test these hypotheses, but succeeded only in falsifying both hypotheses, i.e. showing that direct tidal effects produce too small a response, and indirect tidal effects produce a response that is not smooth in time. This nullification suggests that a combination of viscous and elastic deformation is required to explain the observations.

  12. Concentrated englacial shear over rigid basal ice, West Antarctica: implications for modelling and ice sheet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Neil; Siegert, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Basal freeze-on, deformation and ice crystal fabric re-organisation have been invoked to explain thick, massive englacial units observed in the lower ice column of both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Whilst recognised as having very different rheological properties to overlying meteoric ice, studies assessing the impact of these basal units on the large-scale flow of an ice sheet have so far been limited. We report the discovery of a previously unknown, extensive (100 km long, more than 25 km wide, and up to 1 km thick) englacial unit of near-basal ice beneath the onset zone of the Institute Ice Stream, West Antarctica. Using radio-echo sounding observations, we describe the form and physical characteristics of this englacial unit, and its impact on the stratigraphy and internal deformation of the overlying ice. The lower englacial unit, characterised by a highly-deformed to massive structure, is inferred to be rheologically distinct from the overlying ice column. The overlying ice contains a series of englacial 'whirlwind' features, which are traceable and exhibit longitudinal continuity between flow-orthogonal radar lines. In our data, these whirlwinds are the representation of englacial layer buckling, and therefore provide robust evidence for enhanced ice flow. The interface between the primary ice units is sharp and abrupt, and at a macro-scale is characterised by a series of high-amplitude long-wavelength undulations. Immediately above this interface, whirlwind features are deformed and display evidence for flow-orthogonal horizontal shear, consistent with the deformation of the overlying ice across the basal ice unit. This phenomenon is not a local process, it is observed above the entirety of the currently mapped extent of the basal ice, nor is it dependent on flight orientation, the direction of shear is consistent regardless of flight orientation. These findings have clear significance for our understanding and ability to realistically model ice

  13. Antarctic Sea Ice Patterns and Its Relationship with Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, S.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic sea ice concentration fields show a strong seasonal and interannual variation closely tied to changes in climate patterns. The Ross, Amundsen, Bellingshausen, and Weddell Seas during Summer-Autumn and the Southern Ocean regions north of these areas during Winter-Spring have the greatest sea ice variability. Principal components analysis in T- mode, Varimax-rotated applied on Antarctic monthly sea ice concentration anomaly (SICA) fields for 1979-2015 (NASA Team algorithm data sets available at nsidc.org) revealed the main spatial characteristics of Antarctic sea ice patterns and their relationship with atmospheric circulation. This analysis yielded five patterns of sea ice for winter-spring and three patterns for summer-autumn, each of which has a positive and negative phase. To understand the links between the SICA patterns and climate, we extracted the mean pressure and temperature fields for the months with high loadings (positive or negative) of the sea ice patterns. The first pattern of winter-spring sea ice concentration is a dipole structure between the Drake Passage and northern regions of the Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas and, the South Atlantic Ocean. The negative phase shows a strong negative SICA over the Atlantic basin. This pattern can be associated with to the atmospheric structures related to a positive SAM index and a wave-3 arrangement around the continent. That is, a strong negative pressure anomaly centered over the Bellingshausen Sea accompanied by three positive pressure anomalies in middle-latitudes. For summer-autumn, the first pattern shows two strong positive SICA areas, in the eastern Weddell Sea and the northwestern Ross Sea. A negative SICA covers the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas and northwest of the Antarctic Peninsula. This pattern, frequently seen in summers since 2008, is associated with cool conditions over the Weddell Sea but warmer temperatures and high surface air pressure west, north and northwest of the Peninsula.

  14. Regular patterns in frictional resistance of ice-stream beds seen by surface data inversion.

    PubMed

    Sergienko, Olga V; Hindmarsh, Richard C A

    2013-11-29

    Fast-flowing glaciers and ice streams are pathways for ice discharge from the interior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to ice shelves, at rates controlled by conditions at the ice-bed interface. Using recently compiled high-resolution data sets and a standard inverse method, we computed basal shear stress distributions beneath Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers, which are currently losing mass at an accelerating rate. The inversions reveal the presence of riblike patterns of very high basal shear stress embedded within much larger areas with zero basal shear stress. Their colocation with highs in the gradient of hydraulic potential suggests that subglacial water may control the evolution of these high-shear-stress ribs, potentially causing migration of the grounding line by changes in basal resistance in its vicinity.

  15. The influence of basal drag on ice flow across Antarctica and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Douglas; Lea, James

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet stability is largely controlled by the sub-glacial ice-bed boundary, but this is currently one of Earth's least understood landscapes. Basal drag is the spatially emergent force that resists ice flow at this boundary. It is affected by roughness of the bed topography and interactions between subglacial hydrology and basal sediments. The behaviour of ice sheets depends on spatial patterns in basal drag, and consequently computer simulations of their dynamics are highly sensitive to how basal drag is prescribed or derived. This is a significant problem, since the derivation of basal drag is computationally expensive, often geographically limited, and poorly constrained by observations. Here, we present a novel, computationally-light method to determine the relative contribution of basal drag to ice sheet dynamics from surface velocity and elevation data without prior knowledge of ice thickness or bed conditions. We apply it across both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to reveal insights into basal drag at high resolution and over unprecedented spatial extents. We identify where ice sheet beds are conducive to ice flow but also locations which accommodate disproportionately high basal resistance thereby controlling non-local / regional ice dynamics. Results are substantiated by independent investigations in regions where evidence is available, and illuminate previously unidentified basal conditions where it is not. We anticipate that our method will provide improved observation-based estimates of basal friction coefficients that will enhance convergence speed and accuracy of 3D ice flow models and it will be a valuable tool for helping focus and plan future geophysical measurement campaigns within vast remaining regions of ice sheets with poorly constrained basal boundary conditions.

  16. Structural map of flow variability and propagation behavior in the Ross Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeDoux, C. M.; Hulbe, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Fracture geometries in the Ross Ice Shelf, observable using visible band satellite imagery from the MODIS Mosaic of Antarctica (MOA) and the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) provide a unique opportunity to study fracture propagation behavior and discharge variability in the ice streams and outlet glaciers feeding the shelf. Propagation is driven by changes in fracture length, near-field stress conditions, and the material properties of the ice. Changes in ice stream discharge and the development of "sticky spots," in both ice streams and within the shelf, lead to redirection of flow, changes in lateral gradients of ice velocity, and the propagation of fractures in response to changes in near-field stresses. The propagation behaviors most commonly observed in the ice shelf are the growth in the transverse direction of a fracture that formed within a shear zone and mechanical interactions between adjacent fracture tips. We use fracture mechanics theory and remote-sensed imagery to categorize fracture patterns and longitudinal zones of fractured ice in the Ross Ice Shelf. Near current sites of formation, simple fracture geometries and principal stresses are used to illustrate physical processes related to the formation and propagation of fractures. To compute flow lines and principal stresses, we derive a velocity map of the Ross Ice Shelf by merging two velocity datasets using a combination of statistical methods. A structural map of fracture geometries, relict shear margins, and structural boundaries is constructed. Using the ice shelf features, present-day flow lines, and principal stresses, we investigate the manner in which principal stresses affect fracture formation and propagation behavior and the variability of ice stream discharge into the shelf.

  17. Cavitation erosion in blocked flow with a ducted ice-class propeller

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, J.M.; Bose, N.; Walker, D.; Jones, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    Ships that operate in ice often encounter momentary increased propeller cavitation because ice pieces block the flow into the propeller. For ducted propellers, this additional cavitation is more significant than it is for open propellers; ice pieces may become lodged against and within the duct and subject the propeller to longer periods of increased cavitation due to the blocked flow. Associated with this blocked flow is the possibility of cavitation erosion on the propeller. An erosion study, using paint films, was conducted in a cavitation tunnel with a model propeller of the type fitted to the Canadian Marine Drilling Ltd. vessel MV Robert LeMeur. A simulated ice blockage was installed ahead of the propeller model and within the duct. Tests were carried out over a range of advance coefficients for various test conditions. The resulting types of cavitation were documented, the erosion patterns were photographed and comparisons between each test were made.

  18. Preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice I ← II transformation and the flow of ice II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, K.; Wenk, H.-R.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The preferred crystallographic orientation developed during the ice I ← II transformation and during the plastic flow of ice II was measured in polycrystalline deuterium oxide (D2O) specimens using low-temperature neutron diffraction. Samples partially transformed from ice I to II under a non-hydrostatic stress developed a preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice II. Samples of pure ice II transformed from ice I under a hydrostatic stress and then when compressed axially, developed a strong preferred orientation of compression axes parallel to (1010). A match to the observed preferred orientation using the viscoplastic self-consistent theory was obtained only when (1010) [0001] was taken as the predominant slip system in ice II.

  19. Convection from Hemispherical and Conical Model Ice Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; Shannon, Timothy A.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2016-01-01

    To improve ice accretion prediction codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. The Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research was used to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. In the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with multiple surfaces or sets of roughness panels, each with a different representation of ice roughness. The sets of roughness panels were constructed using two element distribution patterns that were created based on a laser scan of an iced airfoil acquired in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn. For both roughness patterns, surfaces were constructed using plastic hemispherical elements, plastic conical elements, and aluminum conical elements. Infrared surface thermometry data from tests run in the VIST were used to calculate area averaged heat transfer coefficient values. The values from the roughness surfaces were compared to the smooth control surface, showing convective enhancement as high as 400% in some cases. The data gathered during this study will ultimately be used to improve the physical modeling in LEWICE or other ice accretion codes and produce predictions of in-flight ice accretion on aircraft surfaces with greater confidence.

  20. Flow of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet on the continental margin of the Bellingshausen Sea at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Larter, Rob D.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Pudsey, Carol J.; Evans, Jeffrey; Morris, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Geophysical data show that during the last glaciation the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) drained to the continental shelf edge of the Bellingshausen Sea through a cross-shelf bathymetric trough (Belgica Trough) as a grounded, fast flowing, ice stream. The drainage basin feeding this ice stream probably encompassed southwestern Palmer Land, parts of southern Alexander Island, and the Bryan Coast of Ellsworth Land, with an area exceeding 200,000 km2. On the inner continental shelf, streamlined bedrock and drumlins mapped by swath bathymetry show that the ice stream was fed by convergent ice flow draining from Eltanin Bay and bays to the east, as well as by ice draining the southern part of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet through the Ronne Entrance. The presence of a paleoice stream in Belgica Trough is indicated by megascale glacial lineations formed in soft till and a trough mouth fan on the continental margin. Grounding zone wedges on the inner and midshelf record ice marginal stillstands during deglaciation and imply a staggered pattern of ice sheet retreat. These new data indicate an extensive WAIS at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) on the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which advanced to the shelf edge. In conjunction with ice sheet reconstructions from the Antarctic Peninsula and Pine Island Bay, this implies a regionally extensive ice sheet configuration during the LGM along the Antarctic Peninsula, Bellingshausen Sea, and Amundsen Sea margins, with fast flowing ice streams draining the WAIS and Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet to the continental shelf edge.

  1. West-Antarctic Ice Streams: Analog to Ice Flow in Channels on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1997-01-01

    Sounding of the sea floor in front of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica recently revealed large persistent patterns of longitudinal megaflutes and drumlinoid forms, which are interpreted to have formed at the base of ice streams during the list glacial advance. The flutes bear remarkable resemblance to longitudinal grooves and highly elongated streamlined islands found on the floors of some large martian channels, called outflow channels. ln addition, other similarities exist between Antarctic ice streams and outflow channels. Ice streams are 30 to 80 km wide and hundreds of kilometers long, as are the martian channels. Ice stream beds are below sea level. Floors of many martian outflow channels lie below martian datum, which may have been close to or below past martian sea levels. The Antarctic ice stream bed gradient is flat and locally may go uphill, and surface slopes are exceptionally low. So are gradients of martian channels. The depth to the bed in ice streams is 1 to 1.5 km. At bankful stage, the depth of the fluid in outflow channels would have been 1 to 2 km. These similarities suggest that the martian outflow channels, whose origin is commonly attributed to gigantic catastrophic floods, were locally filled by ice that left a conspicuous morphologic imprint. Unlike the West-Antarctic-ice streams, which discharge ice from an ice sheet, ice in the martian channels came from water erupting from the ground. In the cold martian environment, this water, if of moderate volume, would eventually freeze. Thus it may have formed icings on springs, ice dams and jams on constrictions in the channel path, or frozen pools. Given sufficient thickness and downhill surface gradient, these ice masses would have moved; and given the right conditions, they could have moved like Antarctic ice streams.

  2. The effect of ice packs upon nasal mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Porter, M; Marais, J; Tolley, N

    1991-01-01

    The effect on nasal mucosal blood flow of ice packs on the forehead and ice packs within the mouth was investigated in 16 healthy subjects. The laser Doppler flowmeter was used to record changes in blood flow to the inferior turbinate, as measured by change in the flux. Ice packs within the mouth produced a significant decrease in nasal mucosal blood flow (p less than 0.05). The average fall was 23% (SEM 5.9) compared with the control measurements. No significant change was recorded following the application of ice packs to the forehead. The results of this study question the scientific rationale behind the use of forehead ice packs in clinical practice.

  3. Flow structure at an ice-covered river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Nancy; Biron, Pascale; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    River confluences are known to exhibit complex relationships between flow structure, sediment transport and bed-form development. Flow structure at these sites is influenced by the junction angle, the momentum flux ratio (Mr) and bed morphology. In cold regions where an ice cover is present for most of the winter period, the flow structure is also likely affected by the roughness effect of the ice. However, very few studies have examined the impact of an ice cover on the flow structure at a confluence. The aims of this study are (1) to describe the evolution of an ice cover at a river confluence and (2) to characterize and compare the flow structure at a river confluence with and without an ice cover. The field site is a medium-sized confluence (around 40 m wide) between the Mit is and Neigette Rivers in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region, Quebec (Canada). The confluence was selected because a thick ice cover is present for most of the winter allowing for safe field work. Two winter field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 to obtain ice cover measurements in addition to hydraulic and morphological measurements. Daily monitoring of the evolution of the ice cover was made with a Reconyx camera. Velocity profiles were collected with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to reconstruct the three-dimensional flow structure. Time series of photographs allow the evolution of the ice cover to be mapped, linking the processes leading to the formation of the primary ice cover for each year. The time series suggests that these processes are closely related with both confluence flow zones and hydro-climatic conditions. Results on the thickness of the ice cover from in situ measurements reveal that the ice thickness tends to be thinner at the center of the confluence where high turbulent exchanges take place. Velocity measurements reveal that the ice cover affects velocity profiles by moving the highest velocities towards the center of the profiles. A spatio

  4. Patterning instability on the Mars polar ice caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Felix S. L.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2006-02-01

    We present a mathematical theory to study the origin of large-scale spiral troughs on the Mars residual polar caps, starting with the hypothesis that atmospheric circulation governs the planform of the troughs via an instability that operates in the flow direction of surface winds. This concept can explain why the troughs spiral at each pole in an opposite sense to that expected for Coriolis-deflected winds. The instability arises from interactions on water ice, assumed to contain dust, and depends on how the exchange of atmospheric dust and moisture (H2O) with the polar cap surface controls its albedo and mass and energy balance. Our model predicts spatial patterns to form when moisture is carried by wind over the surface, owing to unstable coupling between the albedo and the H2O-vapor pressure. The resulting albedo pattern causes an alternating ``accumulation-ablation'' mass balance, so that an undulating topography develops which resembles the (dark) troughs and their adjacent (bright) smooth terrains on the polar caps. Because the albedo patterning process is fast, whereas topographic evolution is slow, we suggest that an ancient imprint in the surface albedo preconditions today's trough morphology.

  5. Ribbed bedforms on palaeo-ice stream beds resemble regular patterns of basal shear stress ('traction ribs') inferred from modern ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Chris R.; Margold, Martin; Creyts, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Rapidly-flowing ice streams are an important mechanism through which ice sheets lose mass, and much work has focussed on elucidating the processes that increase or decrease their velocity. Recent work using standard inverse methods has inferred previously-unrecognised regular patterns of high basal shear stress ('sticky spots' >200 kPa) beneath a number of ice streams in Antarctica and Greenland, termed 'traction ribs'. They appear at a scale intermediate between smaller ribbed moraines and much larger mega-ribs observed on palaeo-ice sheet beds, but it is unclear whether they have a topographic expression at the bed. Here, we report observations of rib-like bedforms from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) along palaeo-ice stream beds in western Canada that resemble both the pattern and dimensions of traction ribs. Their identification suggests that traction ribs may have a topographic expression that lies between, and partly overlaps with, ribbed moraines and much larger mega-ribs. These intermediate-sized bedforms support the notion of a ribbed bedform continuum. Their formation remains conjectural, but our observations from palaeo-ice streams, coupled with those from modern ice masses, suggest they are consistent with wave-like instabilities occurring in the coupled flow of ice and till and modulated by subglacial meltwater drainage. Their form and pattern may also involve glaciotectonism of subglacial sediments.

  6. The power and changing pattern of palaeo-ice streams of the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottesen, Dag; Dowdeswell, Julian; Rise, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Morphological interpretation of the sea floor of the Norwegian continental shelf has identified a series of cross-shelf troughs separated by shallower banks. Glacial lineations are found in these troughs, but are not present on the intervening banks. Along the margins of some of the troughs, lateral ridges are inferred to mark the shear margins of palaeo-ice streams. The streamlined bedforms are similar in morphology and scale to streamlined Antarctic bedforms, which are linked to former fast-flowing ice streams on the continental shelves of Antarctica. Generally, cross-shelf troughs are reused by ice streams from one glaciations to the next, but sometimes major switch in ice-stream flow direction between two glaciations can occur. This can be shown by the use of 3D seismic cubes, where deeply buried surfaces can be found with elongated streamlined landforms interpreted as MSGLs. We have identified one such area on the mid-Norwegian shelf where a palaeo-ice stream has changed ice-flow direction from one glaciations to the next. Sediment delivery from the ice streams on the mid-Norwegian shelf has led to the build-up of major depocenters along the outer shelf and to large-scale shelf progradation. More than 1000 m of Quaternary sediments have been deposited in large areas around the outer/upper continental slope and the shelf edge has prograded up to 150 km westwards during the Quaternary.

  7. Flow and fracture of ice and ice mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    Frozen volatiles make up an important volume fraction of the low density moons of the outer solar system. Understanding the tectonic history of the surfaces of these moons, as well as the evolution of their interiors, requires knowledge of the mechanical strength of these icy materials under the appropriate planetary conditions (temperature, hydrostatic pressure, strain rate). Ongoing lab research is being conducted to measure mechanical properties of several different ices under conditions that faithfully reproduce condition both at the moons' surfaces (generally low temperature, to about 100 K, and low pressures) and in the deep interiors (warmer temperatures, pressures to thousands of atmospheres). Recent progress is reported in two different phases of the work: rheology of ices in the NH3-H2O system at temperatures and strain rates lower than ever before explored, with application to the ammonia-rich moons of Saturn and Uranus; and the water ice I yields II phase transformation, which not only applies directly to process deep in the interiors of Ganymede and Callisto, but holds implications for deep terrestrial earthquakes as well.

  8. Cross Flow Effects on Glaze Ice Roughness Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines the impact of large-scale cross flow on the creation of ice roughness elements on the leading edge of a swept wing under glaze icing conditions. A three-dimensional triple-deck structure is developed to describe the local interaction of a 3 D air boundary layer with ice sheets and liquid films. A linear stability analysis is presented here. It is found that, as the sweep angle increases, the local icing instabilities enhance and the most linearly unstable modes are strictly three dimensional.

  9. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  10. Signatures of ice flow, retreat and meltwater delivery in the Gulf of Bothnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Sarah; Clason, Caroline; Nyberg, Johan; Hell, Benjamin; Öiås, Hans; Holmlund, Per; Jakobsson, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Gulf of Bothnia has variably played host to the main ice divide of the Fennoscandian ice sheet, ice stream onset, trunk and retreat zones, marine ice sheet decay into the large proglacial Baltic Ice Lake, and the subsequent development of an 'inland' marine basin. It is likely to have acted as both source and depocentre for the delivery of ice, water and sediment in both subglacial and ice-marginal domains. These domains and dynamics have been largely inferred from terrestrial, peripheral evidence. The submerged terrain has been little investigated and its glacial geological archives are virtually unknown. In recent years large swathes of high resolution multibeam echo-sounding data (5-10 metre grid cells) from the Baltic Sea and Gulf of Bothnia have been collected for the Swedish Maritime Administration. These data reveal, with unprecedented clarity, glacial landforms associated with the flow and retreat of ice in these basins. Multiple generations of glacial lineations associated with Baltic and Finnish ice streams are resolved, and indicate their shifting geometry and evolving dynamics. Grounding line deposits at a variety of scales allow us to characterise the style and possible rates of retreat. Our data further offer a detailed view of a dynamic subglacial hydrological system on a sediment substrate: its locally varying patterns of incision and sediment deposition, the extent and connectivity of channelised networks, and the intimate relationship between meltwater landforms, ice-marginal deposits and subglacial bedforms. Here we present these data and explore some of their implications for processes of landform creation, large-scale sediment redistribution in the Bothnian and Baltic basins, the coupling between the glacial hydrological system and ice flow/retreat dynamics, and the regional palaeo-ice sheet history.

  11. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  12. Examination of upstream flow dynamics in response to the front retreat of ice shelves with different geometric configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelves fringe ~75% of Antarctica's coastline, nourished by numerous terrestrial glacier systems. The ice-shelf disintegrations in recent decades and the observed thinning trends have revealed their susceptibility to the atmospheric and oceanic changes in the climate warming context. The buttressing effect of an ice shelf constrains the ice discharge of its upstream land ice, thus regulating the contribution to sea level of the terrestrial glaciers. The important role of ice shelves in stabilizing the upstream glacier flow dynamics is emphasized by the rapid accelerations and thinning of the tributary glaciers in response to the collapses of the northern Larsen Ice Shelf in Antarctic Peninsula. However, this buttressing effect is determined by the stress balance conditions of an ice shelf, which is further affected by the ice-shelf geometric configurations. The ice shelves confined by fjords, islands, promontories or seabed topographic highs exert greater buttressing effects than those less confined by the lateral or basal shear stresses. This research aims to assess the influences of different ice-shelf configurations on upstream flow dynamics in response to large ice-shelf retreat events. By using remotely sensed imagery acquired by multiple satellite missions, we derived the time series surface velocity records for the Larsen B glacier-ice shelf system in Antarctic Peninsula during 1995 - 2015 and for the Mertz glacier-ice shelf system in East Antarctica during 1997 - 2015, respectively. The former was well confined in the embayment, while the latter is unconfined by lateral margins. We compared the different temporal variation patterns in flow dynamics between these two sites before and after their large retreating events, i.e. the collapse event of Larsen B Ice Shelf in 2002 and the large calving event of Mertz Ice Shelf in 2010. The surface velocity profiles reveal the less sensitivity of upstream responses to the front retreat for the Mertz Ice Shelf.

  13. Topical Menthol, Ice, Peripheral Blood Flow, and Perceived Discomfort

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Robert; Ledford, Elizabeth R.; Jacks, Dean E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injury management commonly includes decreasing arterial blood flow to the affected site in an attempt to reduce microvascular blood flow and edema and limit the induction of inflammation. Applied separately, ice and menthol gel decrease arterial blood flow, but the combined effects of ice and menthol gel on arterial blood flow are unknown. Objectives: To compare radial artery blood flow, arterial diameter, and perceived discomfort before and after the application of 1 of 4 treatment conditions. Design: Experimental crossover design. Setting: Clinical laboratory. Participants or Other Participants: Ten healthy men, 9 healthy women (mean age = 25.68 years, mean height = 1.73 m, mean weight = 76.73 kg). Intervention(s): Four treatment conditions were randomly applied for 20 minutes to the right forearm of participants on 4 different days separated by at least 24 hours: (1) 3.5 mL menthol gel, (2) 0.5 kg of crushed ice, (3) 3.5 mL of menthol gel and 0.5 kg of crushed ice, or (4) no treatment (control). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured right radial artery diameter (cm) and blood flow (mL/min) every 5 minutes for 20 minutes after the treatment was applied. Discomfort with the treatment was documented using a 1-to-10 intensity scale. Results: Radial artery blood flow decreased (P < .05) from baseline in the ice (−20% to −24%), menthol (−17% to −24%), and ice and menthol (−36% to −39%) treatments but not in the control (3% to 9%) at 5, 10, and 15 minutes. At 20 minutes after baseline, only the ice (−27%) and combined ice and menthol (−38%) treatments exhibited reductions in blood flow (P < .05). Discomfort was less with menthol than with the ice treatment at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after application (P < .05). Arterial diameter and heart rate did not change. Conclusions: The application of 3.5 mL of menthol was similar to the application of 0.5 kg of crushed ice in reducing peripheral blood flood. Combining

  14. Topical menthol, ice, peripheral blood flow, and perceived discomfort.

    PubMed

    Topp, Robert; Ledford, Elizabeth R; Jacks, Dean E

    2013-01-01

    Injury management commonly includes decreasing arterial blood flow to the affected site in an attempt to reduce microvascular blood flow and edema and limit the induction of inflammation. Applied separately, ice and menthol gel decrease arterial blood flow, but the combined effects of ice and menthol gel on arterial blood flow are unknown. To compare radial artery blood flow, arterial diameter, and perceived discomfort before and after the application of 1 of 4 treatment conditions. Experimental crossover design. Clinical laboratory. PARTICIPANTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy men, 9 healthy women (mean age = 25.68 years, mean height = 1.73 m, mean weight = 76.73 kg). Four treatment conditions were randomly applied for 20 minutes to the right forearm of participants on 4 different days separated by at least 24 hours: (1) 3.5 mL menthol gel, (2) 0.5 kg of crushed ice, (3) 3.5 mL of menthol gel and 0.5 kg of crushed ice, or (4) no treatment (control). Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured right radial artery diameter (cm) and blood flow (mL/min) every 5 minutes for 20 minutes after the treatment was applied. Discomfort with the treatment was documented using a 1-to-10 intensity scale. Radial artery blood flow decreased (P < .05) from baseline in the ice (-20% to -24%), menthol (-17% to -24%), and ice and menthol (-36% to -39%) treatments but not in the control (3% to 9%) at 5, 10, and 15 minutes. At 20 minutes after baseline, only the ice (-27%) and combined ice and menthol (-38%) treatments exhibited reductions in blood flow (P < .05). Discomfort was less with menthol than with the ice treatment at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after application (P < .05). Arterial diameter and heart rate did not change. The application of 3.5 mL of menthol was similar to the application of 0.5 kg of crushed ice in reducing peripheral blood flood. Combining crushed ice with menthol appeared to have an additive effect on reducing blood flow.

  15. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Gwenn E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow ‘elements’ specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development. PMID:27547082

  16. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Gwenn E

    2015-04-08

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow 'elements' specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development.

  17. (Air flow patterns within buildings)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrje, D.T.

    1990-10-15

    As Annex 20 enters the final year, deliverables in the form of reports, guidelines, and data formats are nearing completion. The Reporting Guidelines for the Measurement of Air Flows and Related Factors in Buildings will be published by the AIVC next month and was presented to the research community at the 11th AIVC Conference. Measurement guidelines and state-of-the-art equipment descriptions are part of a comprehensive manual, Measurement Techniques Related to Air Flow Patterns Within Buildings -- An Application Guide, in the final stages of preparation in Part 2 of Annex 20, together with reports on how to estimate the effects of flow through large openings, as well as contaminant movements in buildings. The Measurement Manual will include the latest information from the AIVC. The next AIVC Conference, in Ottawa, September 1991, will feature more than 12 presentations of Annex 20 results, including the information from Part 1 which has focused on the detailed air flow patterns in a variety of single-room configurations. Both complex modelling (including CFD) and detailed measurements have been completed, and it is now desirable that added tests be made in the next months by the University of Illinois, BERL, representing the US in Part 1 for the first time.

  18. Preferred atmospheric circulation patterns of winter Arctic sea ice decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Binhe; Luo, Dehai; Zhong, Linhao; Wu, Lixin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the impact of the Ural blocking (UB) with the positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO+), negative NAO (NAO-) and neutral NAO on the sea ice variability over the Barents-Kara Sea (BKS) is examined, respectively, to understand what type of atmospheric circulation patterns can lead to the strongest sea ice decline. A water vapor reservoir as a richest moisture region is found to exist over the mid-latitude North Atlantic south of the Gulf Stream Extension due to strong positive sea surface temperature anomalies for the NAO+ winter. When the UB occurs together with the NAO+, the strongest BKS ice decline is seen due to the strongest BKS warming associated with the strongest moisture intrusion because the combined UB and NAO+ pattern is an optimal circulation pattern that favors the moisture intrusion into the BKS from the mid-latitude North Atlantic, as revealed from the trajectory tracking method.

  19. Application of GRACE to the Evaluation of an Ice Flow Model of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Wiese, D. N.; Watkins, M. M.; Larour, E. Y.; Box, J. E.; Fettweis, X.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Morlighem, M.; Boening, C.; Seroussi, H. L.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying Greenland's future contribution to sea level rise is a challenging task and requires accurate estimates of ice flow sensitivity to climate change. Transient ice flow models are promising tools for estimating future ice sheet behavior. However, confidence in these types of future projections is low, especially because evaluation of model historical runs is so challenging due to the scarcity of continental-wide data for validation. For more than a decade, NASA's GRACE has continuously acquired time-variable measurements of the Earth's gravity field and has provided unprecedented surveillance of mass balance of the ice sheets, offering an opportunity for ice sheet model evaluation. Here, we take advantage of a new high-resolution (~300 km) monthly mascon solution for the purpose of mass balance comparison with an independent, historical ice flow model simulation using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). The comparison highlights which regions of the ice sheet differ most from GRACE. Investigation of regional differences in trends and seasonal amplitudes between simulations forced with three different Regional Climate Model (RCM)-based estimates of surface mass balance (SMB) allows us to make conclusions about the relative contributions of various error sources in the model hindcast. This study constitutes the first regional comparison of GRACE data and an ice sheet model. Conclusions will aid in the improvement of RCM SMB estimates as well as ice sheet simulation estimates of present and future rates of sea level rise. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Program and President's and Director's Fund Program.

  20. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  1. Airborne radar evidence for tributary flow switching in Institute Ice Stream, West Antarctica: Implications for ice sheet configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Kate; Woodward, John; Ross, Neil; Dunning, Stuart A.; Bingham, Robert G.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of ice streaming to the evaluation of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) stability we know little about mid- to long-term dynamic changes within the Institute Ice Stream (IIS) catchment. Here we use airborne radio echo sounding to investigate the subglacial topography, internal stratigraphy, and Holocene flow regime of the upper IIS catchment near the Ellsworth Mountains. Internal layer buckling within three discrete, topographically confined tributaries, through Ellsworth, Independence, and Horseshoe Valley Troughs, provides evidence for former enhanced ice sheet flow. We suggest that enhanced ice flow through Independence and Ellsworth Troughs, during the mid-Holocene to late Holocene, was the source of ice streaming over the region now occupied by the slow-flowing Bungenstock Ice Rise. Although buckled layers also exist within the slow-flowing ice of Horseshoe Valley Trough, a thicker sequence of surface-conformable layers in the upper ice column suggests slowdown more than ~4000 years ago, so we do not attribute enhanced flow switch-off here, to the late Holocene ice-flow reorganization. Intensely buckled englacial layers within Horseshoe Valley and Independence Troughs cannot be accounted for under present-day flow speeds. The dynamic nature of ice flow in IIS and its tributaries suggests that recent ice stream switching and mass changes in the Siple Coast and Amundsen Sea sectors are not unique to these sectors, that they may have been regular during the Holocene and may characterize the decline of the WAIS.

  2. Sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet evolution and flow on basal conditions - a parameter study with the PISM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. T.; Hvidberg, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The basal boundary conditions of the Greenland ice sheet have an important control on the ice flow pattern and dynamical evolution of the ice sheet. Basal melting and sliding conditions cannot be observed directly, but observables such as ice thickness, surface velocity and the internal radar layer structure contain indirect information of the basal conditions. The northeast ice stream extend to the interior parts indicating that basal conditions are also important in the interior parts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of the large-scale evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet on millennial to glacial/interglacial time scales to parameters controlling basal sliding and ice flow. In the study, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to examine the response of the ice sheet evolution to the choices of dynamic parameters. The investigated parameters relates to the parameterization of the basal processes and ice viscosity, these includes the enhancement factor, the exponent in the basal sliding relation employed in the model and the parameterization of the basal material. We run the PISM model through the last glacial/interglacial cycle for an ensemble of model parameters sets to obtain the evolution of the ice sheet using the same climate reconstruction as surface boundary conditions in all experiments in order to estimate the sensitivity of the ice sheet evolution to the choices of dynamic parameters alone. The paleo-climatic spinup of the seaRISE experiment is used as surface boundary conditions. The results of the ensemble experiments are compared using time series of global variables and by comparing snapshots of the ice sheet at predefined times. We discuss the regional differences and sensitivity to the model parameters, and further discuss the evaluation of the parameter combinations by comparing the modelled ice flow pattern to observed present day velocities.

  3. Flow speed within the Antarctic ice sheet and its controls inferred from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthern, Robert J.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Williams, C. Rosie

    2015-07-01

    Accurate dynamical models of the Antarctic ice sheet with carefully specified initial conditions and well-calibrated rheological parameters are needed to forecast global sea level. By adapting an inverse method previously used in electric impedance tomography, we infer present-day flow speeds within the ice sheet. This inversion uses satellite observations of surface velocity, snow accumulation rate, and rate of change of surface elevation to estimate the basal drag coefficient and an ice stiffness parameter that influences viscosity. We represent interior ice motion using a vertically integrated approximation to incompressible Stokes flow. This model represents vertical shearing within the ice and membrane stresses caused by horizontal stretching and shearing. Combining observations and model, we recover marked geographical variations in the basal drag coefficient. Relative changes in basal shear stress are smaller. No simple sliding law adequately represents basal shear stress as a function of sliding speed. Low basal shear stress predominates in central East Antarctica, where thick insulating ice allows liquid water at the base to lubricate sliding. Higher shear stress occurs in coastal East Antarctica, where a frozen bed is more likely. Examining Thwaites glacier in more detail shows that the slowest sliding often coincides with elevated basal topography. Differences between our results and a similar adjoint-based inversion suggest that inversion or regularization methods can influence recovered parameters for slow sliding and finer scales; on broader scales we recover a similar pattern of low basal drag underneath major ice streams and extensive regions in East Antarctica that move by basal sliding.

  4. Inspiratory flow pattern in humans.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Minetti, A E; Mognoni, P

    1984-10-01

    The theoretical estimation of the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration at rest is based on the common assumption that the inspiratory airflow wave is a sine function of time. Different analytical studies have pointed out that from an energetic point of view a rectangular wave is more economical than a sine wave. Visual inspection of inspiratory flow waves recorded during exercise in humans and various animals suggests that a trend toward a rectangular flow wave may be a possible systematic response of the respiratory system. To test this hypothesis, the harmonic content of inspiratory flow waves that were recorded in six healthy subjects at rest, during exercise hyperventilation, and during a maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) maneuver were evaluated by a Fourier analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained on sinusoidal and rectangular models. The dynamic work inherent in the experimental waves and in the sine-wave model was practically the same at rest; during exercise hyperventilation and MVV, the experimental wave was approximately 16-20% more economical than the sinusoidal one. It was concluded that even though at rest the sinusoidal model is a reasonably good approximation of inspiratory flow, during exercise and MVV, a physiological controller is probably operating in humans that can select a more economical inspiratory pattern. Other peculiarities of airflow wave during hyperventilation and some optimization criteria are also discussed.

  5. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, S.; Adami, N.; Dubois, C.; Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Darbois-Texier, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4°C for which the water density is maximum. The 4°C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  6. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Dorbolo, S; Adami, N; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4 °C for which the water density is maximum. The 4 °C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  7. Greenland Ice Sheet flow response to runoff variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Laura A.; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah B.; Joughin, Ian; Noël, Brice P. Y.; Broeke, Michiel R.; Herring, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We use observations of ice sheet surface motion from a Global Positioning System network operating from 2006 to 2014 around North Lake in west Greenland to investigate the dynamical response of the Greenland Ice Sheet's ablation area to interannual variability in surface melting. We find no statistically significant relationship between runoff season characteristics and ice flow velocities within a given year or season. Over the 7 year time series, annual velocities at North Lake decrease at an average rate of -0.9 ± 1.1 m yr-2, consistent with the negative trend in annual velocities observed in neighboring regions over recent decades. We find that net runoff integrated over several preceding years has a negative correlation with annual velocities, similar to findings from the two other available decadal records of ice velocity in western Greenland. However, we argue that this correlation is not necessarily evidence for a direct hydrologic mechanism acting on the timescale of multiple years but could be a statistical construct. Finally, we stress that neither the decadal slowdown trend nor the negative correlation between velocity and integrated runoff is predicted by current ice-sheet models, underscoring that these models do not yet capture all the relevant feedbacks between runoff and ice dynamics needed to predict long-term trends in ice sheet flow.

  8. Continuous flow analysis of labile iron in ice-cores.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, William T; Fischer, Hubertus; Bigler, Matthias; Gfeller, Gideon; Leuenberger, Daiana; Mini, Olivia

    2013-05-07

    The important active and passive role of mineral dust aerosol in the climate and the global carbon cycle over the last glacial/interglacial cycles has been recognized. However, little data on the most important aeolian dust-derived biological micronutrient, iron (Fe), has so far been available from ice-cores from Greenland or Antarctica. Furthermore, Fe deposition reconstructions derived from the palaeoproxies particulate dust and calcium differ significantly from the Fe flux data available. The ability to measure high temporal resolution Fe data in polar ice-cores is crucial for the study of the timing and magnitude of relationships between geochemical events and biological responses in the open ocean. This work adapts an existing flow injection analysis (FIA) methodology for low-level trace Fe determinations with an existing glaciochemical analysis system, continuous flow analysis (CFA) of ice-cores. Fe-induced oxidation of N,N'-dimethyl-p-pheylenediamine (DPD) is used to quantify the biologically more important and easily leachable Fe fraction released in a controlled digestion step at pH ~1.0. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of labile Fe in ice-core samples collected from the Antarctic Byrd ice-core and the Greenland Ice-Core Project (GRIP) ice-core.

  9. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pickett, Mark T.; Sheldon, David W.

    1994-01-01

    A series of studies have been conducted to determine the flow quality in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. The primary purpose of these studies was to document airflow characteristics, including flow angularity, in the test section and tunnel loop. A vertically mounted rake was used to survey total and static pressure and two components of flow angle at three axial stations within the test section (test section inlet, test plane, and test section exit; 15 survey stations total). This information will be used to develop methods of improving the aerodynamic and icing characteristics within the test section. The data from surveys made in the tunnel loop were used to determine areas where overall tunnel flow quality and efficiency can be improved. A separate report documents similar flow quality surveys conducted in the diffuser section of the Icing Research Tunnel. The flow quality studies were conducted at several locations around the tunnel loop. Pressure, velocity, and flow angularity measurements were made by using both fixed and translating probes. Although surveys were made throughout the tunnel loop, emphasis was placed on the test section and tunnel areas directly upstream of the test section (settling chamber, bellmouth, and cooler). Flow visualization, by video recording smoke and tuft patterns, was also used during these studies. A great deal of flow visualization work was conducted in the area of the drive fan. Information gathered there will be used to improve the flow quality upstream and downstream of the fan.

  10. Driving Stresses in Mars Polar Ice Caps and Conditions for Ice Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the topography of the North polar ice cap by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) show that the ice cap is 2950 +/- 200 meters thick. The volume of the cap is about 1.2 x 10(exp 6) cu km covering an area of 1.04 x 10(exp 6) sq km, which is about 40 percent of the Greenland ice sheet in volume and 62 percent in area. The composition of the Northern cap was previously concluded to be predominately H2O, rather than CO2 ice, based on thermodynamic considerations of the insustainablity of CO2 during summer. Principal questions about the cap are: does the ice move and at what rate, is the cap currently growing or depleting in volume, and how and when was the cap formed? Recent research on terrestrial ice sheets indicates that rates of ice deformation at the low stress values characteristic of ice sheets are significantly higher than the rates given by the classic viscous-plastic flow laws commonly used.

  11. Instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Norihiro; Naito, Kensuke; Yokokawa, Miwa

    2015-04-01

    It is known that plane water-ice interface becomes unstable to evolve into a train of waves. The underside of ice formed on the water surface of rivers are often observed to be covered with ice ripples. Relatively steep channels which discharge melting water from glaciers are characterized by beds covered with a series of steps. Though the flowing agent inducing instability is not water but gas including water vapor, a similar train of steps have been recently observed on the Polar Ice Caps on Mars (Spiral Troughs). They are expected to be caused by the instability of water-ice interface induced by flowing fluid on ice. There have been some studies on this instability in terms of linear stability analysis. Recently, Caporeale and Ridolfi (2012) have proposed a complete linear stability analysis in the case of laminar flow, and found that plane water-ice interface is unstable in the range of sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, and that the important parameters are the Reynolds number, the slope angle, and the water surface temperature. However, the flow inducing instability on water-ice interface in the field should be in the turbulent regime. Extension of the analysis to the case of fully developed turbulent flow with larger Reynolds numbers is needed. We have performed a linear stability analysis on the instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow conditions with the use of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the mixing length turbulent model, the continuity equation of flow, the diffusion/dispersion equation of heat, and the Stefan equation. In order to reproduce the accurate velocity distribution and the heat transfer in the vicinity of smooth walls with the use of the mixing length model, it is important to take into account of the rapid decrease in the mixing length in the viscous sublayer. We employ the Driest model (1956) to the formulation. In addition, as the thermal boundary condition at the water surface, we describe the

  12. Reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries triggers century-scale reorganization of Siple Coast ice flow in West Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Price, S. F.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S. P.

    2015-10-21

    Ongoing, centennial-scale flow variability within the Ross ice streams of West Antarctica suggests that the present-day positive mass balance in this region may reverse in the future. Here we use a three-dimensional ice sheet model to simulate ice flow in this region over 250 years. The flow responds to changing basal properties, as a subglacial till layer interacts with water transported in an active subglacial hydrological system. We show that a persistent weak bed beneath the tributaries of the dormant Kamb Ice Stream is a source of internal ice flow instability, which reorganizes all ice streams in this region, leading to a reduced (positive) mass balance within decades and a net loss of ice within two centuries. This hitherto unaccounted for flow variability could raise sea level by 5 mm this century. Furthermore, better constraints on future sea level change from this region will require improved estimates of geothermal heat flux and subglacial water transport.

  13. Reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries triggers century-scale reorganization of Siple Coast ice flow in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Price, S. F.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S. P.

    2015-10-01

    Ongoing, centennial-scale flow variability within the Ross ice streams of West Antarctica suggests that the present-day positive mass balance in this region may reverse in the future. Here we use a three-dimensional ice sheet model to simulate ice flow in this region over 250 years. The flow responds to changing basal properties, as a subglacial till layer interacts with water transported in an active subglacial hydrological system. We show that a persistent weak bed beneath the tributaries of the dormant Kamb Ice Stream is a source of internal ice flow instability, which reorganizes all ice streams in this region, leading to a reduced (positive) mass balance within decades and a net loss of ice within two centuries. This hitherto unaccounted for flow variability could raise sea level by 5 mm this century. Better constraints on future sea level change from this region will require improved estimates of geothermal heat flux and subglacial water transport.

  14. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2014-06-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological time scales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes-flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model has a larger impact on the erosion rate, with variations of almost an order of magnitude. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered that are greater than 30%, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long-time scales, these results suggest that consideration of higher-order glacial physics may be necessary, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  15. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological timescales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model yields erosion rates that vary spatially and by almost an order of magnitude from those of the SIA model. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered area that are greater than 30% those of the SIA model, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long timescales, these results suggest that higher-order glacial physics should be considered, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  16. Assessing the Influence of Tributary Glaciers on Ice Properties and Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Rupper, S.; McBride, J. H.; Ritter, S.; Tingey, D. G.; McKean, A.; Parks, E.

    2009-12-01

    Ice flow models designed to simulate glacier changes in response to changes in climatic forcing, past or present, must accurately predict glacier flow rates, which can only be determined if ice rheology is well constrained. In the commonly used flow-law models that assume strain rates are proportional to a power-law dependence on stress, the flow-law parameters are dependent upon numerous ice properties, some of which include temperature, impurities, liquid water fraction, crystal size and fabric. The aim of this study is to measure the ice properties between tributary glaciers within a single glacier system and assess the impact of the differences in these properties on the flow rates of the system as a whole. The preliminary study was done on the Gornergletscher, located in Valais, Switzerland. The Gornergletscher is the second largest glacier system in the European Alps, and results from the confluence of several tributary glaciers. Forty-three shallow ice cores (.30-3 m) were drilled in the ablation zone down-flow of the confluence of two of the tributary glaciers in the Gornergletscher system - fifteen ice cores on Grenzgletscher and twenty-eight on Zwillingsgletscher. Physical (density, grain size), chemical (stable isotopes, solutes, dust), and thermal (temperature) properties of ice were measured in all cores. Preliminary chemical analyses indicate statistically significant differences in the isotopic composition of the ice. In particular, there is a 20‰ difference in the mean δD between the two glaciers which can not be easily explained by isotopic lapse rates and elevation differences of the source regions. The isotopic difference may be evidence of flow pattern differences giving rise to differences in surface ice ages between the adjacent glaciers. In addition to the ice cores, a ground-penetrating radar survey using a 200-MHz bistatic antenna in continuous mode with a fixed transmitter-receiver offset was completed extending 1200 meters down

  17. Late Wisconsinan ice sheet flow across northern and central Vermont, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of over 2000 glacial striation azimuths across northern and central Vermont, northeastern USA, provides the basis for interpreting a sequence of ice flow directions across this area. The oldest striations indicate widespread ice flow to the southeast, obliquely across the mountains. Similarly oriented striations between northern Vermont and the ice sheet's terminus in the Gulf of Maine suggest that a broad area of southeast ice flow existed at the Last Glacial Maximum. Younger striations with more southerly azimuths on both the mountain ridgelines and within adjacent valleys indicate that ice sheet flow trajectories in most areas rotated from southeast to south, parallel to the North-South alignment of the mountains, as the ice sheet thinned. This transition in ice flow direction was time transgressive from south to north with the Green Mountains eventually separating a thick south-flowing lobe of ice in the Champlain Valley from a much thinner lobe of south-flowing ice east of the mountains. While this transition was taking place yet ice was still thick enough to flow across the mountains, ice flow along a narrow ∼65 km long section of the Green Mountains shifted to the southwest such that ice was flowing into the Champlain Valley. The most likely process driving this change was a limited period of fast ice flow in the Champlain Valley, a short-lived ice streaming event, that drew down the ice surface in the valley. The advancing ice front during this period of fast ice flow may be responsible for the Luzerne Readvance south of Glens Falls, New York. Valley-parallel striations across the area indicate strong topographic control on ice flow as the ice sheet thinned.

  18. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  19. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  20. A test bed for investigating the flow of outlet glaciers and ice streams embedded in the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calov, Reinhard; Rückamp, Martin; Schlegel, Rebecca; Ganopolski, Andrey; Humbert, Angelika

    2016-04-01

    Here, we define a test bed for fast flow regions and its vicinity embedded in an ice sheet. This test bed is designed for outlet glaciers and ice streams of the Greenland ice sheet. It consists of a fine resolution part with a manufactured basal trough over which the professional software COMSOL (Multiphysics Modeling Software) operates as a full-Stokes model. Results by COMSOL are compared with coarse resolution simulations with the ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS operating in shallow-ice-approximation mode and using parameterizations of the fast flow effects. For simplification, in this preliminary approach, both models run in isothermal mode. Definition of surface mass balance follows the EISMINT intercomparison project with parameters adapted to the Greenland ice sheet. In particular, we inspect with this test bed upstream and lateral flow effects of ice streams and outlet glaciers. We present first simulations with this approach, although presentation of the test bed itself is the main emphasis of this presentation.

  1. Investigation of the Velocity Field and Flow Regime of David Glacier and Drygalski Ice Tongue, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, J.; Jezek, K. C.

    2005-12-01

    Recent observations of outlet glaciers in both Greenland and Antarctica show surprising and unexpectedly rapid changes in flow velocities. Outlet glaciers drain the majority of the polar ice sheets and consequently these changes threaten their stability and can lead to rising sea levels. It is therefore important to investigate their flow governing processes and document changes. We measured surface velocity over large portions of David Glacier and its floating seaward extension Drygalski Ice Tongue. This is the largest outlet glacier on the Scott Coast draining a section of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet into the Ross Sea. Giant iceberg B15-A recently collided with the ice tongue and broke off a significant section. To obtain velocities we used combinations of intensity feature tracking, interferometric speckle tracking and phase interferometry using RADARSAT-1 images acquired during the AMM-1 and MAMM missions. We compare short term velocities, 3-year averaged velocities and earlier studies to analyze spatial and temporal variability of the surface velocity field. We use obtained velocities, in combination with isostatically derived ice thickness from ICESat data, to estimate basal melting along the glacier. Also we investigate the role of lateral drag through force-budget theory and determine the equilibrium profile of the ice tongue. Unlike for example the West Antarctic Ice Streams and Jakobshavn Isbrae, our data suggests that the David Glacier velocity field has remained relatively constant from about 1991 - 2000 and likely much longer. The pattern of melting and freezing along the base of the glacier is consistent with an ice pump mechanism. In the fjord lateral drag opposes approximately 90% of the driving stress; this gradually drops to the point where most resistance comes from longitudinal stress gradients. We find the modeled and ICESat derived profile agree favorably suggesting steady state conditions

  2. Changes in Ice Flow Dynamics of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica and Impacts on Ice Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; An, L.

    2014-12-01

    Totten Glacier, East Antarctica is one of the largest glaciers in Antarctica, draining an area of 5.3*105 km2 and containing ice at an equivalent 9 m sea level rise. Lidar/radar altimetry data from 2003-2009 suggests that the glacier is thinning. Thinning is concentrated in areas of fast flow and therefore indicative of changes in ice dynamics. Here, we employ time series of ice velocity from ERS-1/2, RADARSAT-1, LANDSAT-7, ALOS PALSAR, TanDEM/TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed to measure the glacier velocity from 1996 till present. We find significant temporal changes in ice velocity, especially in 1996-2007, followed by a period of slow decrease in 2010-2013. Comparing the results with RACMO2 surface mass balance in the interior suggests that the glacier mass balance was already negative in 1996 and became more negative into the 2000s. The resulting mass loss and stretching of the ice is compatible with the 1.5 m/yr thinning detected by the radar altimeters near the grounding zone. The grounding zone of the glacier includes a vast 15 km long ice plain where the glacier is only grounded a few 10m above hydrostatic equilibrium. We detect a retreat of the region of partial floatation with time, but not solid migration of the grounding line of the glacier. Inverted bathymetry results from gravity data collected offshore suggest the presence of a paleo subglacial channel conducive to the transfer of surface ocean heat, likely diluted circumpolar deep water, whose transfer to the ice shelf cavity may have affected the glacier stability. We suggest that further transfer of ocean heat to the ice shelf could trigger a rapid glacier retreat in this region.

  3. Analogue modelling of the influence of ice shelf collapse on the flow of ice sheets grounded below sea-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, Giacomo; Zeoli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The sudden breakup of ice shelves is expected to result in significant acceleration of inland glaciers, a process related to the removal of the buttressing effect exerted by the ice shelf on the tributary glaciers. This effect has been tested in previous analogue models, which however applied to ice sheets grounded above sea level (e.g., East Antarctic Ice Sheet; Antarctic Peninsula and the Larsen Ice Shelf). In this work we expand these previous results by performing small-scale laboratory models that analyse the influence of ice shelf collapse on the flow of ice streams draining an ice sheet grounded below sea level (e.g., the West Antarctic Ice Sheet). The analogue models, with dimensions (width, length, thickness) of 120x70x1.5cm were performed at the Tectonic Modelling Laboratory of CNR-IGG of Florence, Italy, by using Polydimethilsyloxane (PDMS) as analogue for the flowing ice. This transparent, Newtonian silicone has been shown to well approximate the rheology of natural ice. The silicone was allowed to flow into a water reservoir simulating natural conditions in which ice streams flow into the sea, terminating in extensive ice shelves which act as a buttress for their glaciers and slow their flow. The geometric scaling ratio was 10(-5), such that 1cm in the models simulated 1km in nature; velocity of PDMS (a few mm per hour) simulated natural velocities of 100-1000 m/year. Instability of glacier flow was induced by manually removing a basal silicone platform (floating on water) exerting backstresses to the flowing analogue glacier: the simple set-up adopted in the experiments isolates the effect of the removal of the buttressing effect that the floating platform exerts on the flowing glaciers, thus offering insights into the influence of this parameter on the flow perturbations resulting from a collapse event. The experimental results showed a significant increase in glacier velocity close to its outlet following ice shelf breakup, a process similar to what

  4. Two-dimensional prognostic experiments for fast-flowing ice streams from the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Yuri V.; Nagornov, Oleg V.

    2017-04-01

    Prognostic experiments for fast-flowing ice streams on the southern side of the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap on Komsomolets Island, Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, were undertaken in this study. The experiments were based on inversions of basal friction coefficients using a two-dimensional flow-line thermocoupled model and Tikhonov's regularization method. The modeled ice temperature distributions in the cross sections were obtained using ice surface temperature histories that were inverted previously from borehole temperature profiles derived at the summit of the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap and the elevational gradient of ice surface temperature changes (about 6.5 °C km-1). Input data included interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) ice surface velocities, ice surface elevations, and ice thicknesses obtained from airborne measurements, while the surface mass balance was adopted from previous investigations for the implementation of both the forward and inverse problems. The prognostic experiments revealed that both ice mass and ice stream extent declined for the reference time-independent surface mass balance. Specifically, the grounding line retreated: (a) along the B-B' flow line from ˜ 40 to ˜ 30 km (the distance from the summit), (b) along the C-C' flow line from ˜ 43 to ˜ 37 km, and (c) along the D-D' flow line from ˜ 41 to ˜ 32 km, when considering a time period of 500 years and assuming a time-independent surface mass balance. Ice flow velocities in the ice streams decreased with time and this trend resulted in the overall decline of the outgoing ice flux. Generally, the modeled glacial evolution was in agreement with observations of deglaciation of the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago.

  5. Two-dimensional prognostic experiments for fast-flowing ice streams from the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Y. V.; Nagornov, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic experiments for fast-flowing ice streams on the southern side of the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap in the Komsomolets Island, Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, are implemented in this study. These experiments are based on inversions of basal friction coefficients using a two-dimensional flow-line thermo-coupled model and the Tikhonov’s regularization method. The modeled ice temperature distributions in the cross-sections were obtained using the ice surface temperature histories that were inverted previously from the borehole temperature profile derived at the summit of the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap and employing elevational gradient of ice surface temperature changes, which is equal to about 6.5 °C km-1. Input data included InSAR ice surface velocities, ice surface elevations, and ice thicknesses obtained from airborne measurements and the surface mass balance, were adopted from previous investigations for the implementation of both the forward and inverse problems. The prognostic experiments reveal that both ice mass and ice stream extents decline for the reference time-independent surface mass balance. Specifically, the grounding line retreats (a) along the B–B‧ flow line from ∼40 km to ∼30 km (the distance from the summit), (b) along the C–C‧ flow line from ∼43 km to ∼37 km, and (c) along the D–D‧ flow line from ∼41 km to ∼32 km considering a time period of 500 years and assuming time-independent surface mass balance. Ice flow velocities in the ice streams decrease with time and this trend results in the overall decline of the outgoing ice flux. Generally, the modeled evolution is in agreement with observations of deglaciation of Severnaya Zemlya archipelago.

  6. Comparison of Ice-shelf Creep Flow Simulations with Ice-front Motion of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Detected by SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulbe, C. L.; Rignot, E.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison between numerical model ice-shelf flow simulations and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferograms is used to study the dynamics at the Hemmen Ice Rise (HIR) and Lassiter Coast (LC) corners of the iceberg-calving front of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS).

  7. Comparison of Ice-shelf Creep Flow Simulations with Ice-front Motion of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Detected by SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulbe, C. L.; Rignot, E.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison between numerical model ice-shelf flow simulations and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferograms is used to study the dynamics at the Hemmen Ice Rise (HIR) and Lassiter Coast (LC) corners of the iceberg-calving front of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS).

  8. Multiphase flow of the late Wisconsinan Cordilleran ice sheet in Western Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, A.J.; Broster, B.E.; Levson, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    In central British Columbia, ice flow during the late Wisconsinan Fraser glaciation (ca. 25-10 ka) occurred in three phases. The ice expansion phase occurred during an extended period when glaciers flowed westward to the Pacific Ocean and east-southeastward onto the Nechako Plateau from ice centers in the Skeena, Hazelton, Coast, and Omineca Mountains. Initially, glacier flow was confined by topography along major valleys, but eventually piedmont and montane glaciers coalesced to form an integrated glacier system, the Cordilleran ice sheet. In the maximum phase, a Cordilleran ice divide developed over the Nechako Plateau to 300 km inland from the Pacific coast. At this time, the surface of the ice sheet extended well above 2500 m above sea level, and flowed westward over the Skeena, Hazelton, and Coast Mountains onto the continental shelf, and eastward across the Rocky Mountains into Alberta. In the late glacial phase, a rapid rise of the equilibrium line caused ice lobes to stagnate in valleys, and restricted accumulation centers to high mountains. Discordant directions in ice flow are attributed to fluctuations of the ice divide representing changes in the location of accumulation centers and ice thickness. Ice centers probably shifted in response to climate, irregular growth in the ice sheet, rapid calving, ice streaming, and drainage of proglacial and subglacial water bodies. Crosscutting ice-flow indicators and preservation of early (valley parallel) flow features in areas exposed to later (cross-valley) glacier erosion indicate that the ice expansion phase was the most erosive and protracted event.

  9. Flow resistance of ice slurry in bends and elbow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko, B.; Żelasko, J.

    2014-08-01

    The present paper covers the flow of ice slurry made of a 10.6% ethanol solution through small-radius bends and elbow pipes. The paper presents the results of experimental research on the flow resistances of Bingham-fluid ice slurry in bends and elbows. The research, performed for three pipe diameters and a relative bend radius of 1<=D/di<=2, has made it possible to take into consideration the influence of friction resistances as well the of the flow geometry on the total local resistance coefficients. The study attempts to make the local resistance coefficient dependent on the Dean number defined for a generalized Reynolds number according to Metzner-Reade

  10. Atmospheric circulation patterns which promote winter Arctic sea ice decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Binhe; Luo, Dehai; Wu, Lixin; Zhong, Linhao; Simmonds, Ian

    2017-05-01

    The impact of winter atmospheric blocking over the Ural Mountains region (UB) coincident with different phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the sea ice variability over the Barents and Kara Seas (BKS) in winter is investigated. It is found that the UB in conjunction with the positive phase of the NAO (NAO+) leads to the strongest sea ice decline. During this phase composites and trajectory analyses reveal an efficient moisture pathway to the BKS from the mid-latitude North Atlantic near the Gulf Stream Extension region where water vapor is abundant due to high sea surface temperatures. The NAO+-UB combination is an optimal circulation pattern that significantly increases the BKS water vapor that plays a major role in the BKS warming and sea ice reduction, while the increased sensible and latent heat fluxes play secondary roles. By contrast, much fewer dramatic impacts on the BKS are observed when the UB coincides with the neutral or negative phases of the NAO. Our results present new insights into the complex processes involved with Arctic sea ice reduction and warming. The mechanisms highlighted here potentially offer a perspective into the mechanisms behind Arctic multi-decadal climate variability.

  11. An ice-rich flow origin for the banded terrain in the Hellas basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, X.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Guallini, L.; Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.; Thomas, N.; Sutton, S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of Hellas Basin displays a complex landscape and a variety of geomorphological domains. One of these domains, the enigmatic banded terrain covers much of the northwestern part of the basin. We use high-resolution (Context Camera and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) Digital Terrain Models to show that most of the complex viscous flowing behavior exhibited by the banded terrain is controlled by topography and flow-like interactions between neighboring banded terrain. Furthermore, the interior of the basin hosts several landforms suggestive of the presence of near-surface ice, which include polygonal patterns with elongated pits, scalloped depressions, isolated mounds, and collapse structures. We suggest that thermal contraction cracking and sublimation of near-surface ice are responsible for the formation and the development of most of the ice-related landforms documented in Hellas. The relatively pristine form, lack of superposed craters, and strong association with the banded terrain, suggest an Amazonian (<3 Ga) age of formation for these landforms. Finally, relatively high surface pressures (above the triple point of water) expected in Hellas and summertime temperatures often exceeding the melting point of water ice suggest that the basin may have recorded relatively "temperate" climatic conditions compared to other places on Mars. Therefore, the potentially ice-rich banded terrain may have deformed with lower viscosity and stresses compared to other locations on Mars, which may account for its unique morphology.

  12. Englacial Structures as Indicators of the Controls on Ice Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, N.; Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Direct sampling of the subglacial environment is costly, and will therefore never supply the spatial coverage needed to determine the basal boundary conditions required for large-scale ice-sheet modeling. Studies of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) show that the frictional and rheologic properties of the bed are a leading control on the evolution of the system, so developing geophysical methods to help constrain the basal characteristics of WAIS will reduce uncertainty in predictions of the timing and magnitude of future sea-level rise. Radar-imaged structures within the ice are an attractive data set for this pursuit, as they contain information about the flow dynamics that transform the horizontally deposited layers to their modern configuration; however, they can be challenging to interpret, given the number of processes acting to deform the internal layers and the difficulty in automating their analysis. In this study, we move away from the layer-tracing paradigm in favor of an automated slope extraction algorithm. This has several advantages: it does not require feature-continuity, providing a more stable result in regions of intense deformation, and it results in a data product that maps directly to model output. For steady-state features, layer slopes reflect the horizontal and vertical velocity structure, making quantitative comparison of the model and observations simple compared to the more qualitative, particle tracer comparisons done in the past. Using a higher order ice-flow model, we attempt to refine our understanding of basal properties using reflector slope fields at the grounding line of Whillans Ice Stream and the shear margin of the North East Greenland Ice Stream, with the hope of eventually using this method for basin-scale inversions.

  13. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F; van der Veen, Cornelis J; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Simonsen, Sebastian B; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H

    2014-12-30

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993-2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt ⋅ y(-1), equivalent to 0.68 mm ⋅ y(-1) sea level rise (SLR) for 2003-2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004-2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland's outlet glaciers.

  14. Ice flow velocities and elevation change at Fleming Glacier, Wordie Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, A.; Wendt, J.; Bown, F.; Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Bravo, C.; Casassa, G.

    2009-04-01

    Glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula have been responding to the pronounced atmospheric warming in the region (Vaughan et al. 2003) with frontal retreat (Cook et al. 2005), ice shelf collapse (Rott et al. 1996) and ice flow acceleration and thinning (Rignot et al. 2004; Shepherd et al. 2003; Pritchard & Vaughan 2007). These trends have progressively migrated southwards along the Antarctic Peninsula causing, for instance, a substantial retreat of Wilkins Ice Shelf (70.2˚ S) in 2008. At 69.3˚ S, but 300 km to the east, Wordie Ice Shelf experienced a major reduction in size in the 1980s (Doake & Vaughan 1991). Available information about this ice shelf and its feeding glaciers dates back to the 1970s when ice thickness and velocity measurements were carried out on Fleming Glacier (Doake 1975). Although initially it was thought that the post-collapse conditions of the feeding glaciers remained unchanged (Vaughan 1993), more recent evidence shows that glaciers accelerated after the ice shelf collapse and substantial glacier thinning has occurred (Rignot et al. 2005). We present data acquired during two field expeditions to Fleming Glacier. During the first season in November 2007, we installed an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) and a permanent GPS site. Additional data including a local GPS network, ground penetrating radar measurements and snow densities were collected. In December 2008, during the second field campaign, surface elevation data were acquired using an airborne laser scanner along a trajectory between Gibbs Glacier and Airy Glacier, along the ice divide between both sides of the Peninsula and on Fleming Glacier. The AWS was found protruding only 20 cm above the snow surface, demonstrating the high snow accumulation in the area, which was sufficient to cover the 4 m high tower installed in 2007 and that annual variability in the mass accumulation is significant. The station collected data for 250 days. The permanent GPS stopped collecting data after

  15. Interpreting ancient ice in a shallow ice core from the South Yamato (Antarctica) blue ice area using flow modeling and compositional matching to deep ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John C.; Nishio, Fumihiko; Fujita, Shuji; Narita, Hideki; Pasteur, Elizabeth; Grinsted, Aslak; Sinisalo, Anna; Maeno, Norikazu

    2006-08-01

    We explore methods of dating a 101 m ice core from a bare ice ablation area in the Yamato Mountains, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. There are two unknowns, the age of the ice at the surface and the age spanned by the core. The ice crystal growth rate was used to estimate the age span of the core at about 5 kyr. CO2, CH4 and N2O data on the core were compared with well-dated records from deep cores, leading to two plausible matches, both within isotope stage C. Detailed comparison of high-resolution DEP records from this core and the Dome Fuji core support the 55-61 kyr BP fit best. Oxygen isotope values in the core were then used to constrain the source elevation of the snow in the core, and hence the velocities in a simple flow line model. We inverted the ice core surface age, age span and origin site and their confidence intervals in a sensitivity study of flow model parameter space. The flow line model predicts good matches to the core by reducing glacial flow rates to 70% of present-day, accumulation rates by 45% with 10% confidence intervals. The modeled surface age for the whole meteorite field yields maximum surface ages of about 90 kyr, which is consistent with known, but poorly constrained, tephra dating, meteorite terrestrial ages and the frequency of meteorite discoveries. This approach can be used quite generally to link deep ice cores to surface outcrops on blue ice fields.

  16. Geomorphological Evidence for Pervasive Ground Ice on Ceres from Dawn Observations of Craters and Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Chilton, H.; Hughson, K.; Scully, J. E. C.; Russell, C. T.; Sizemore, H. G.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Bland, M. T.; Schenk, P.; Hiesinger, H.; Jaumann, R.; Byrne, S.; Schorghofer, N.; Ammannito, E.; Marchi, S.; O'Brien, D. P.; Sykes, M. V.; Le Corre, L.; Capria, M. T.; Reddy, V.; Raymond, C. A.; Mest, S. C.; Feldman, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Five decades of observations of Ceres' albedo, surface composition, shape and density suggest that Ceres is comprised of both silicates and tens of percent of ice. Historical suggestions of surficial hydrated silicates and evidence for water emission, coupled with its bulk density of ~2100 kg/m3 and Dawn observations of young craters containing high albedo spots support this conclusion. We report geomorphological evidence from survey data demonstrating that evaporative and fluid-flow processes within silicate-ice mixtures are prevalent on Ceres, and indicate that its surface materials contain significant water ice. Here we highlight three classes of features that possess strong evidence for ground ice. First, ubiquitous scalloped and "breached" craters are characterized by mass wasting and by the recession of crater walls in asymmetric patterns; these appear analogous to scalloped terrain on Mars and protalus lobes formed by mass wasting in terrestrial glaciated regions. The degradation of crater walls appears to be responsible for the nearly complete removal of some craters, particularly at low latitudes. Second, several high latitude, high elevation craters feature lobed flows that emanate from cirque-shaped head walls and bear strikingly similar morphology to terrestrial rock glaciers. These similarities include lobate toes and indications of furrows and ridges consistent with ice-cored or ice-cemented material. Other lobed flows persist at the base of crater walls and mass wasting features. Many flow features evidently terminate at ramparts. Third, there are frequent irregular domes, peaks and mounds within crater floors that depart from traditional crater central peaks or peak complexes. In some cases the irregular domes show evidence for high albedo or activity, and thus given other evidence for ice, these could be due to local melt and extrusion via hydrologic gradients, forming domes similar to pingos. The global distribution of these classes of features

  17. Old ice investigation along the Dome C ridge using a 2.5D thermomecanical ice flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Parrenin, Frédéric; Gagliardini, Olivier; Ritz, Catherine; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien

    2015-04-01

    One of the main present-day challenges in ice core sciences, as fixed by the IPICS (International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences), consists in finding a continuous ice archive as old as 1.5 million year. This would allow to study the MPT, a transition which occurred ~900,000 yr ago from low amplitude 40,000 yr cycles to high amplitude 100,000 yr cycles. The previous oldest ice core was drilled at Dome C, on the East Antarctic plateau (800,000 years), and some observations seem to indicate that even older ice could be retrieved in the vicinity of the dome. Fourty kilometers from the dome lies a bedrock relief that makes the ice thinner (~2700 m), so that the bottom ice could be prevented from encountering basal melting. We show that due to a ridge configuration leading to low horizontal velocities, the ice at this possible drilling site mainly comes from ~15 km upstream only, so that some assumptions of the model (no basal sliding and uniform geothermal flux) have less impact on the computed results. The presented model consist in a 2D steady-state ice flow along the ridge to Vostok, that accounts for the widening of the flow tube (2.5D model), anisotropy of the ice, thermal advection and diffusion. The poorly-known parameters of the ice rheology are inversed to minimize the gap between the computed isochrones and observed internal layers. We discuss the possibility that very old ice could lie above the bedrock, depending on the geothermal flux value and the rheological parameters. Our results corroborate those of a recent simple 1D thermo-kinetic ice flow model which inverses the internal layers along a flow line as well and shows that there could be some 1 million year-old ice at ~40 km south-west of the dome.

  18. Radar polarimetry at Crary Ice Rise, Antarctica, reveals details of ice-flow reorganization over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Carlos; Hillebrand, Trevor; Conway, Howard; Winberry, Paul; Koutnik, Michelle; Corr, Hugh; Nicholls, Keith; Stewart, Craig; kingslake, Jonathan; Brisbourne, Alex

    2017-04-01

    Ice rises are locally grounded areas in floating ice shelves. It has been suggested that they form during deglaciation, as the surrounding grounded ice begins to float, but at Crary Ice Rise there is evidence of the opposite, that its formation is a consequence of local grounding of floating ice in the Ross Ice Shelf. Here we use ground-based polarimetric radar measurements using a phase-sensitive system (ApRES) to extract information about englacial crystalline textures at Crary Ice Rise. These textures are flow-induced and contain a record of the dynamics of the area. We observe a sharp transition in the direction of alignment of the crystalline texture that, across our measurement sites, varies in depth but is consistent in direction. Our interpretation is that ice was floating and fast-flowing along the direction of drainage of Whillans Ice Stream and then it grounded: 1000 +/- 200 yr ago in the east ridge and 500 +/- 100 yr ago in the west ridge. After grounding, the ice flow changed direction by nearly 90 degrees, across the local ridges, establishing the present ice-rise flow. Since the time of grounding, the ice has thickened by about 30 m on the east ridge, and by up to 100 m on the west ridge. Our study raises questions about a progressive retreat of the grounding line from the last glacial maximum, and demonstrates a method using polarimetric radar data that can be applied to infer recent changes in ice-flow direction at other sites.

  19. Two-dimensional numerical ice flow modelling of an empirically reconstructed martian glacier-like form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brough, Stephen; Hubbard, Bryn; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    Although a substantial reservoir of glacier ice has been identified in the mid-latitudes of Mars, debate still persists regarding the formation, current and former extent, and dynamic evolution of these ice masses. Here we present initial results from a higher-order, two-dimensional (2D) numerical model of ice flow for an empirically reconstructed glacier-like form (GLF), a distinctive ice related landform, similar in planform appearance to valley or debris-covered glaciers on Earth, in eastern Hellas Planitia, Mars (˜38.65 oS and 113.16 oE). The main aim of this study is to investigate the long-term temperature requirement to yield surface ice flow rates consistent with those recently reconstructed from boulder trails observed in a comparable GLF. We apply our numerical model to the GLF's central flowline under steady-state conditions and vary the viscosity related rate factor parameter, A, for a range of temperatures from 0 to -100 oC for our three reconstruction scenarios (lower [12 kPa], mean [22 kPa] and upper [38 kPa]; Karlsson et al. [2015] Geophys. Res. Lett., 42[8]). The model converges for all realistic temperatures yielding a range of 2D stress and strain configurations for our reconstructed GLF. The mean annual surface velocities across the three reconstruction scenarios show a similar pattern, with motion recorded at temperatures ranging from 0 oC to ˜ -70 oC, below which motion reduces to <10-5 m a-1. In order to simulate flow rates to 7.5 mm a-1 (Hubbard et al. [2014] The Cryosphere, 8), as determined for other martian GLFs, the model experiments reveal a required ice temperature for the GLF of between ˜ -7.5 and -27 oC.

  20. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  1. Experimental Configuration Effects on ICE Tumble Flow Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Bryan; Puzinauskas, Paulius

    2014-11-01

    The generation of ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) in-cylinder charge motions, such as swirl and tumble, have shown positive effects on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emission levels at partial engine loads. Tumble flow is commonly measured utilizing a steady-flow rig and two-dimensional PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) systems, among others. In order to optimize the tumble flow, it is important to retrieve accurate measurements. The tumble flow values could be affected by variations in the geometry and/or design of the steady-flow rig utilized during flow tests. In this research, a four-valve per cylinder head was tested on a steady flow bench, varying several aspects of the configuration to evaluate how they influence bulk momentum as well as PIV measurements. The configuration variations included symmetrical, asymmetrical and runner-fed configurations throughout testing. Volumetric flow rate and tumble strength flow measurements were retrieved at the selected L/D ratios. Additionally, several PIV seeding particles were characterized for size and shape. Corresponding PIV flow measurements using each type of seeding were made to evaluate how the particles influence the results. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported Bryan Santana Rivera as an REU student.

  2. Paleo-ice flow directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet based upon a new synthesis of seabed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, C.; Domack, E. W.; Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Larter, R. D.; Schenke, H.-W.; Yoo, K. C.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new seafloor map for the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP), including swath multibeam data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the examination and interpretation of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes) on the AP continental shelf. The results show a flow bifurcation as ice exits the Larsen-B embayment. Flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) is directed toward the southeast, then eastward as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" is directed toward the southeast then southward, as ice overflowed the tip of the Jason Peninsula to reach the southern perimeter of the embayment. Our reconstruction also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which, in turn, serve to delineate seven broad regions where contemporaneous ice domes must have been centered on the continental shelf during the LGM time interval. Our reconstruction is more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel.

  3. Ice melting and downward transport of meltwater by two-phase flow in Europa's ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousová, Klára; Souček, Ondřej; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël.; Čadek, Ondřej

    2014-03-01

    With its young surface, very few impact craters, and the abundance of tectonic and cryovolcanic features, Europa has likely been subjected to relatively recent endogenic activity. Morphological analyses of chaos terrains and double ridges suggest the presence of liquid water within the ice shell a few kilometers below the surface, which may result from enhanced tidal heating. A major issue concerns the thermal/gravitational stability of these water reservoirs. Here we investigate the conditions under which water can be generated and transported through Europa's ice shell. We address particularly the downward two-phase flow by solving the equations for a two-phase mixture of water ice and liquid water in one-dimensional geometry. In the case of purely temperate ice, we show that water is transported downward very efficiently in the form of successive porosity waves. The time needed to transport the water from the subsurface region to the underlying ocean varies between ˜1 and 100 kyr, depending mostly on the ice permeability. We further show that water produced in the head of tidally heated hot plumes never accumulates at shallow depths and is rapidly extracted from the ice shell (within less than a few hundred kiloyears). Our calculations indicate that liquid water will be largely absent in the near subsurface, with the possible exception of cold conductive regions subjected to strong tidal friction. Recently active double ridges subjected to large tidally driven strike-slip motions are perhaps the most likely candidates for the detection of transient water lenses at shallow depths on Europa.

  4. Modeling of Ice Flow and Internal Layers Along a Flow Line Through Swiss Camp in West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. L.; Zwally, H. Jay; Abdalati, W.; Luo, S.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An anisotropic ice flow line model is applied to a flow line through Swiss Camp (69.57 N, 49.28 W) in West Greenland to estimate the dates of internal layers detected by Radio-Echo Sounding measurements. The effect of an anisotropic ice fabric on ice flow is incorporated into the steady state flow line model. The stress-strain rate relationship for anisotropic ice is characterized by an enhancement factor based on the laboratory observations of ice deformation under combined compression and shear stresses. By using present-day data of accumulation rate, surface temperature, surface elevation and ice thickness along the flow line as model inputs, a very close agreement is found between the isochrones generated from the model and the observed internal layers with confirmed dates. The results indicate that this part of Greenland ice sheet is primarily in steady state.

  5. Ice cliff recession on Kilimanjaro: patterns and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Moelg, T.; Pfeffer, T.; Kaser, G.

    2009-12-01

    On Kilimanjaro’s summit plateau (3°04’S, 37°21’E) tabular-shaped plateau glaciers are a distinct feature on the flat ash ground. Their margins consist of near-vertical ice cliffs with heights ranging from 3 to more than 40 meters. They have been persistent at least since the late 19th century when first visitors documented them. Snow can accumulate only on the flat parts of the plateau glaciers but not on the cliffs, where deposition of water vapour alone accounts for moderate mass gain. Ice ablation through sublimation and melt overcompensates deposition on the cliffs and, as a consequence, they are forced to retreat as soon as they are established. Recent studies have shown that glacier retreat on Africa’s highest peak is closely linked to the recession of these cliffs. In order to extract climate change details from areal changes of the plateau glaciers, the sensitivity of the ice cliffs to climate fluctuations must be understood. Point measurements of the retreat rates on a south-facing cliff reveal a strong linkage of the recession pattern and the annual cycle of solar radiation. The examination of the diurnal and annual illumination patterns shows that the cliff is not hit by direct shortwave radiation from March to October. During this time insufficient energy is provided to make melting possible. Only sublimation occurs and recession rates are low. From November to February the cliff is exposed to direct shortwave radiation 12 hours a day and its surface temperature can reach the melting point during some hours, although air temperature is almost always below the freezing point. As melting is a much more energy-efficient ablation process than sublimation, the cliff retreats 20-30 times faster during the sunlit period than during the shaded period. Multi-temporal photogrammetrical surveys have been carried out in order to get an areal picture of the retreat rates, to map small scale differences in aspect and slope, and to estimate the roughness of

  6. Ice-flow reorganization in West Antarctica 2.5 kyr ago dated using radar-derived englacial flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Martín, Carlos; Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; King, Edward C.

    2016-09-01

    We date a recent ice-flow reorganization of an ice divide in the Weddell Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a novel combination of inverse methods and ice-penetrating radars. We invert for two-dimensional ice flow within an ice divide from data collected with a phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar while accounting for the effect of firn on radar propagation and ice flow. By comparing isochronal layers simulated using radar-derived flow velocities with internal layers observed with an impulse radar, we show that the divide's internal structure is not in a steady state but underwent a disturbance, potentially implying a regional ice-flow reorganization, 2.5 (1.8-2.9) kyr B.P. Our data are consistent with slow ice flow in this location before the reorganization and the ice divide subsequently remaining stationary. These findings increase our knowledge of the glacial history of a region that lacks dated constraints on late-Holocene ice-sheet retreat and provides a key target for models that reconstruct and predict ice-sheet behavior.

  7. Unraveling flow patterns through nonlinear manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Flavia; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    From climatology to biofluidics, the characterization of complex flows relies on computationally expensive kinematic and kinetic measurements. In addition, such big data are difficult to handle in real time, thereby hampering advancements in the area of flow control and distributed sensing. Here, we propose a novel framework for unsupervised characterization of flow patterns through nonlinear manifold learning. Specifically, we apply the isometric feature mapping (Isomap) to experimental video data of the wake past a circular cylinder from steady to turbulent flows. Without direct velocity measurements, we show that manifold topology is intrinsically related to flow regime and that Isomap global coordinates can unravel salient flow features.

  8. Ice and thermal cameras for stream flow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Flow measurements are instrumental to establish discharge rating curves and to enable flood risk forecast. Further, they are crucial to study erosion dynamics and to comprehend the organization of drainage networks in natural catchments. Flow observations are typically executed with intrusive instrumentation, such as current meters or acoustic devices. Alternatively, non-intrusive instruments, such as radars and microwave sensors, are applied to estimate surface velocity. Both approaches enable flow measurements over areas of limited extent, and their implementation can be costly. Optical methods, such as large scale particle image velocimetry, have proved beneficial for non-intrusive and spatially-distributed environmental monitoring. In this work, a novel optical-based approach is utilized for surface flow velocity observations based on the combined use of a thermal camera and ice dices. Different from RGB imagery, thermal images are relatively unaffected by illumination conditions and water reflections. Therefore, such high-quality images allow to readily identify and track tracers against the background. Further, the optimal environmental compatibility of ice dices and their relative ease of preparation and storage suggest that the technique can be easily implemented to rapidly characterize surface flows. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, we present a set of experiments performed on the Brenta stream, Italy. In the experimental setup, the axis of the camera is maintained perpendicular with respect to the water surface to circumvent image orthorectification through ground reference points. Small amounts of ice dices are deployed onto the stream water surface during image acquisition. Particle tracers' trajectories are reconstructed off-line by analyzing thermal images with a particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) algorithm. Given the optimal visibility of the tracers and their low seeding density, PTV allows for efficiently following tracers' paths in

  9. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  10. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Csatho, Beata M.; Schenk, Anton F.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Simonsen, Sebastian B.; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993–2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt⋅y−1, equivalent to 0.68 mm⋅y−1 sea level rise (SLR) for 2003–2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004–2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland’s outlet glaciers. PMID:25512537

  11. (abstract) Three Dimensional Ice-Flow Velocity Estimation Using Satellite Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Kwok, R.; Fahnestock, M.

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of the flow dynamics of an ice sheet's outlet glaciers and ice streams requires knowledge of their flow velocity and strain rates (i.e., velocity gradients). Prior to the recent advent of satellite radar interferometry, it was not possible to measure detailed ice-flow velocity over the vast featureless areas that comprise most of the ice sheets. Since the launch of ERS-1, the use of satellite radar interferometry data for making densly sampled ice-flow velocity measurements has been firmly established by several studies. We have combined data from nonparallel orbits with surface slope information to make vector ice-flow measurements for the Ryder Glacier, Greenland. Our results for the Ryder are promising and indicate that repeat-pass interferometric data can be used to make vector measurements of ice velocity.

  12. Flow of ices in the Ammonia-Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently deformed crystalline hydrates and partial melts of the water-rich end of the NH3-H2O system, with the aim of improving our understanding of physical processes occurring in icy moons of the outer solar system. Deformation experiments were carried out at constant strain rate. The range of experimental variables are given. Phase relationships in the NH3-H2O system indicate that water ice and ammonia dihydrate, NH3-2H2O, are the stable phases under our experiment conditions. X-ray diffraction of our samples usually revealed these as the dominant phases, but we have also observed an amorphous phase (in unpressurized samples only) and occasionally significant ammonia monohydrate, NH3-H2O. The onset of partial melting at the peritectic temperature at about 176 K appeared as a sharp transition in strength observed in samples of x(sub NH3) = 0.05 and 0.01, the effect of melt was less pronounced. For any given water ice + dihydrate alloy in the subsolidus region, we observed one rheological law over the entire temperature range from 175 K to about 140 K. Below 140 K, a shear instability similar to that occurring in pure water ice under the same conditions limited our ability to measure ductile flow. The rheological laws for the several alloys vary systematically from that of pure ice to that of dihydrate. Pure dihydrate is about 4 orders of magnitude less viscous than water ice just below the peritectic temperature, but because of a very pronounced temperature dependence in dihydrate (100 kJ/mol versus 43 kJ/mol for water ice) the viscosity of dihydrate equals or exceeds that of water ice at T less than 140 K. The large variation in viscosity of dihydrate with relatively small changes in temperature may be helpful in explaining the rich variety of tectonic and volcanic features seen on the surfaces of icy moons in the outer solar system.

  13. Flow of ices in the Ammonia-Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently deformed crystalline hydrates and partial melts of the water-rich end of the NH3-H2O system, with the aim of improving our understanding of physical processes occurring in icy moons of the outer solar system. Deformation experiments were carried out at constant strain rate. The range of experimental variables are given. Phase relationships in the NH3-H2O system indicate that water ice and ammonia dihydrate, NH3-2H2O, are the stable phases under our experiment conditions. X-ray diffraction of our samples usually revealed these as the dominant phases, but we have also observed an amorphous phase (in unpressurized samples only) and occasionally significant ammonia monohydrate, NH3-H2O. The onset of partial melting at the peritectic temperature at about 176 K appeared as a sharp transition in strength observed in samples of x(sub NH3) = 0.05 and 0.01, the effect of melt was less pronounced. For any given water ice + dihydrate alloy in the subsolidus region, we observed one rheological law over the entire temperature range from 175 K to about 140 K. Below 140 K, a shear instability similar to that occurring in pure water ice under the same conditions limited our ability to measure ductile flow. The rheological laws for the several alloys vary systematically from that of pure ice to that of dihydrate. Pure dihydrate is about 4 orders of magnitude less viscous than water ice just below the peritectic temperature, but because of a very pronounced temperature dependence in dihydrate (100 kJ/mol versus 43 kJ/mol for water ice) the viscosity of dihydrate equals or exceeds that of water ice at T less than 140 K. The large variation in viscosity of dihydrate with relatively small changes in temperature may be helpful in explaining the rich variety of tectonic and volcanic features seen on the surfaces of icy moons in the outer solar system.

  14. Reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream tributaries triggers century-scale reorganization of Siple Coast ice flow in West Antarctica

    DOE PAGES

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Price, S. F.; ...

    2015-10-21

    Ongoing, centennial-scale flow variability within the Ross ice streams of West Antarctica suggests that the present-day positive mass balance in this region may reverse in the future. Here we use a three-dimensional ice sheet model to simulate ice flow in this region over 250 years. The flow responds to changing basal properties, as a subglacial till layer interacts with water transported in an active subglacial hydrological system. We show that a persistent weak bed beneath the tributaries of the dormant Kamb Ice Stream is a source of internal ice flow instability, which reorganizes all ice streams in this region, leadingmore » to a reduced (positive) mass balance within decades and a net loss of ice within two centuries. This hitherto unaccounted for flow variability could raise sea level by 5 mm this century. Furthermore, better constraints on future sea level change from this region will require improved estimates of geothermal heat flux and subglacial water transport.« less

  15. Rapid ice flow rearrangement induced by subglacial drainage in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Cooper W.; Suckale, Jenny

    2016-11-01

    Ice streams are corridors of rapid ice flow draining the ice sheets. They can exhibit astonishing spatial variability on annual to centennial time scales. We propose that changes in the subglacial drainage of meltwater could induce these sudden rearrangements of ice streams. We develop a two-dimensional, thermomechanical model representing an ice stream cross section and couple it to a plastically deforming bed with spatially variable meltwater influx. We find that where ice flows over deformable sediments and lacks significant topographic control, the efficiency of subglacial water drainage exerts direct control on the velocity, location, and width of ice streams. This implies that meltwater percolation at the meter scale could have a significant effect on the short-term variability in ice loss from a continental-scale ice sheet. We verify our model against previous analytical results and validate it against surface observations from the Siple Coast of West Antarctica.

  16. The Flow of Buoyant Meltwater Next to Ice Shelves and Icebergs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A. J.; Worster, G.

    2008-12-01

    Melting at the base of an ice shelf can play a significant role in the polar oceans, contributing to the mass balance of the ice shelf and leading to the formation of Ice Shelf Water. Fresh meltwater is relatively buoyant compared to the surrounding ocean and can rise along the ice surface, with the strength of this flow depending critically on the heat and salt fluxes from the ocean to the ice. We justify a simplified theoretical model that describes the coupling of heat and salt fluxes with the buoyancy- driven flow of meltwater, next to both vertical and sloping ice surfaces. The flow develops with distance along the ice surface, and different flow regimes can be obtained depending on the length and the slope of the ice surface. Both the heat and salt fluxes differ between the two regimes. On moderate scales the flow is controlled by buoyancy in a narrow region close to the ice surface. This predicts that the melting rate is independent of distance along the ice surface, consistent with previous laboratory scale measurements of heat transfer. This regime may be important for ablation at the sides of tabular icebergs, and under some regions of ice shelves. Further downstream, the flow is dominated by buoyancy located further from the wall, and can be described by a model similar to those often used to model ice-shelf-water plumes. This predicts that the melting rate increases with distance along the ice surface. Simple analytic solutions are also derived for flow in an unstratified fluid, which indicate the possible sensitivity of the ablation rate to changes in ocean temperature. The predicted variation of the heat and salt fluxes with distance along the ice surface may have important consequences for more complex models of ice-shelf-water flow.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis and Variational Data Assimilation for ice flow - Application to the Mertz ice-tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N.; Monnier, J.

    2012-12-01

    To be confident in the accuracy of the modelling of ice flows requires to con- front numerical experiments to actual observations. This type of flow is strongly sensitive to its input parameters such as rheological parameters and boundary conditions like the friction on the bedrock. Using optimal control theory, we build a global 4D-Var algorithm using direct and adjoint model of the variational problem thus providing local sensitivity analysis and data assimilation (see [1]). In order to compute approximation of these flows, one consider the non newtonian velocity- pressure Stokes system described using mixed finite element method. The treat- ment of the free surface is performed using an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian de- scription with robus elastic deformation and the adjoint method is constructed by algorithmic differentiation of the direct code using Tapenade software (INRIA). We lean on prior developments of the software DassFlow (see [2]). One of the major question for inverse methods in glaciology is to infer the fric- tion coefficient at bottom through data assimilation because it cannot be measured. In other respect, our first results based on real data shows that the rheological expo- nent and/or the thermal coefficient of the constitutive law (distributed parameter) has the same type of influence (see Figure 1) and can be inferred as well. Another modeling issue lies in the dynamic of the grounding line when con- sidering the floating part of the ice domain. Then, sensitivity analysis of the model response with respect to this grounding line dynamic leads to a better understand- ing of this unstable process and its empirical modelling. We present a real data application on the Mertz ice-shelf (Antarctica). Topography and surface velocities data are being provided by B. Legrésy (see [3]). References [1] Martin, N. and Monnier, J. : A three fields finite elements solver for viscoplas- tic free surface flows and variational data assimilation. In

  18. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Albright, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for predicting minimum flow rates required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge fluid ice protection system. The predicted flow rates compare with an average error of less than 10 percent to six experimentally determined flow rates from tests in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel on a general aviation wing section.

  19. The Next Step in Ice Flow Measurement from Optical Imagery: Comprehensive Mapping Of Ice Sheet Flow in Landsat 8 Imagery Using Spatial Frequency Filtering, Enabled by High Radiometric Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Scambos, T. A.; Klinger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of large area satellite coverage in the visible spectrum enabled satellite-based tracking of ice sheet flow just over twenty years ago. Following this, rapid development of techniques for imaging radar data enabled the wide-area mapping and time series coverage that SAR has brought to the documentation of changing ice discharge. We report on the maturation of feature tracking in visible-band satellite imagery of the ice sheets enabled by the high radiometric resolution and accurate geolocation delivered by Landsat 8, and apply this to mapping ice flow in the interiors of Antarctica and Greenland. The high radiometric resolution of Landsat 8 enables one to track subtle patterns on the surface of the ice sheet, unique at spatial scales of a few hundred meters, between images separated by multiple orbit cycles. In areas with significant dynamic topography generated by ice flow, this requires use of simple spatial filtering techniques first applied by Scambos et al. 1992. The result is densely sampled maps of surface motion that begin to rival the coverage available from SAR speckle tracking and interferometry. Displacement accuracy can approach one tenth of a pixel for reasonable chip sizes using conventional normalized cross-correlation; this can exceed the geolocation accuracy of the scenes involved, but coverage is sufficient to allow correction strategies based on very slow moving ice. The advance in radiometry, geo-location, and tracking tools is augmented by an increased rate of acquisition by Landsat 8. This helps mitigate the issue of cloud cover, as much of every 16-day orbit cycle over ice is acquired, maximizing the acquisition of clear-sky scenes. Using the correlation techniques common to IMCORR and later software, modern libraries, and single-cpu hardware, we are able to process full Landsat 8 scene pairs in a few minutes, allowing comprehensive analysis of ~1K available ice sheet image pairs in a few days.

  20. Seismic evidence for complex sedimentary control of Greenland Ice Sheet flow.

    PubMed

    Kulessa, Bernd; Hubbard, Alun L; Booth, Adam D; Bougamont, Marion; Dow, Christine F; Doyle, Samuel H; Christoffersen, Poul; Lindbäck, Katrin; Pettersson, Rickard; Fitzpatrick, Andrew A W; Jones, Glenn A

    2017-08-01

    The land-terminating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet has slowed down in recent decades, although the causes and implications for future ice flow are unclear. Explained originally by a self-regulating mechanism where basal slip reduces as drainage evolves from low to high efficiency, recent numerical modeling invokes a sedimentary control of ice sheet flow as an alternative hypothesis. Although both hypotheses can explain the recent slowdown, their respective forecasts of a long-term deceleration versus an acceleration of ice flow are contradictory. We present amplitude-versus-angle seismic data as the first observational test of the alternative hypothesis. We document transient modifications of basal sediment strengths by rapid subglacial drainages of supraglacial lakes, the primary current control on summer ice sheet flow according to our numerical model. Our observations agree with simulations of initial postdrainage sediment weakening and ice flow accelerations, and subsequent sediment restrengthening and ice flow decelerations, and thus confirm the alternative hypothesis. Although simulated melt season acceleration of ice flow due to weakening of subglacial sediments does not currently outweigh winter slowdown forced by self-regulation, they could dominate over the longer term. Subglacial sediments beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet must therefore be mapped and characterized, and a sedimentary control of ice flow must be evaluated against competing self-regulation mechanisms.

  1. Seismic evidence for complex sedimentary control of Greenland Ice Sheet flow

    PubMed Central

    Kulessa, Bernd; Hubbard, Alun L.; Booth, Adam D.; Bougamont, Marion; Dow, Christine F.; Doyle, Samuel H.; Christoffersen, Poul; Lindbäck, Katrin; Pettersson, Rickard; Fitzpatrick, Andrew A. W.; Jones, Glenn A.

    2017-01-01

    The land-terminating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet has slowed down in recent decades, although the causes and implications for future ice flow are unclear. Explained originally by a self-regulating mechanism where basal slip reduces as drainage evolves from low to high efficiency, recent numerical modeling invokes a sedimentary control of ice sheet flow as an alternative hypothesis. Although both hypotheses can explain the recent slowdown, their respective forecasts of a long-term deceleration versus an acceleration of ice flow are contradictory. We present amplitude-versus-angle seismic data as the first observational test of the alternative hypothesis. We document transient modifications of basal sediment strengths by rapid subglacial drainages of supraglacial lakes, the primary current control on summer ice sheet flow according to our numerical model. Our observations agree with simulations of initial postdrainage sediment weakening and ice flow accelerations, and subsequent sediment restrengthening and ice flow decelerations, and thus confirm the alternative hypothesis. Although simulated melt season acceleration of ice flow due to weakening of subglacial sediments does not currently outweigh winter slowdown forced by self-regulation, they could dominate over the longer term. Subglacial sediments beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet must therefore be mapped and characterized, and a sedimentary control of ice flow must be evaluated against competing self-regulation mechanisms. PMID:28835915

  2. Patterns and dynamics in transitional shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette

    2009-11-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in fluid dynamics is surely transition to turbulence. The classic shear flows -- channel, plane Couette and pipe flow -- while linearly stable, undergo sudden transition to 3D turbulence. In recent years, transition has been attacked with an arsenal of weapons from dynamical systems theory, such as low-dimensional chaos, unstable periodic orbits, heteroclinic connections, fractal basin boundaries. At the same time, 3D physical mechanisms such as streamwise vorticity and streaks have supplanted the 2D picture of linear instability long promoted by Squire's theorem. A striking recent discovery by experimentalists at CEA-Saclay is that large-aspect-ratio plane Couette flow near transition actually takes the form of a steady pattern of wide turbulent and laminar bands, with a fixed angle and wavelength. We have been able to reproduce these remarkable flows in numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. Simulations display a rich variety of variants of these patterns, including spatio-temporal intermittency, branching and travelling states, and localized states analogous to spots. Because similar patterns have since also been observed in Taylor-Couette, channel and pipe flow, it appears that they are inevitable intermediate states on the route from turbulent to laminar flow in large aspect-ratio shear flows. In addition to their intrinsic interest, these patterns provide clues to the transition to turbulence.

  3. Flow Pattern Characterization for a Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a model for characterizing the flow pattern of a centrifugal impeller attending to the severity of the reverse flow. The model assumes 1) a definition of an escaping particle as the one that flows in every operational point from the trailing edge towards the leading edge of the impeller blades, and 2) a characterization of flow where an operational point is said to have a theoretical flow pattern if it is not possible to establish a fully-reversed escaping particle on it. Therefore, the first part of the article is focused on defining an escaping particle for a centrifugal compressor. The model locates over the map of a centrifugal impeller the line that splits the map in two regions: the region on the right hand side, where a theoretical flow pattern can exist, and the region on the left, where a theoretical flow pattern cannot exist. Therefore, the locus of this line marks a frontier where the expected performance of the impeller cannot be sustained as high as expected. The second part of the article uses a high-performance commercial centrifugal impeller wheel for contrasting the model. A qualitative characterization of the surge line, conclusions and discussions are presented.

  4. Modelling tidal modulations in flow of the entire Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and adjoining ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, Sebastian; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2017-04-01

    Ocean tides are known to affect the flow of ice shelves and ice streams, even far upstream of their grounding lines. In many places around the Weddel Sea, which is characterised by strong semidiurnal tides, this flow modulation is strongest at a fortnightly period that is absent in the tidal forcing. Explaining the distances that these signals can penetrate and the change in frequency from their tidal origins can provide unique insights into ice rheology and subglacial processes. We present results from a new 3D full-Stokes viscoelastic model of the entire Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and its major adjoining ice streams. We employ an inverse Robin approach to invert for basal slipperiness beneath grounded ice. By modelling the entire ice shelf we can include, for the first time, the complete rotating tidal system in a unified way that will implicitly include phase behaviour such as tidal tilting. This model enables us to test whether our current understanding of tidal modulation of ice flow is sufficient to reproduce the complex spatial variations that we observe with an extensive array of both old and new GPS data.

  5. Kilimanjaro ice cliff recession patterns derived from terrestrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Michael; Tad Pfeffer, W.; Hanke, Klaus; Cullen, Nicolas J.; Kaser, Georg

    2010-05-01

    Ice cliffs are intriguing features of glaciers around the world, but little is known about mechanisms of their formation and maintenance. Ice cliffs also characterize the plateau glaciers on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania (3° S, 37° E). Their heights range from 3 to more than 40 meters and they have at least persisted since the late 19th century when early explorers documented them. Snow accumulation is only possible on the flat parts of the plateau glaciers but not on the vertical or near-vertical cliffs. Dry calving due to ice dynamics is unlikely and ice ablation through sublimation and melt by far out weighs the negligible mass gain by deposition of water vapour. Consequently, as soon as the cliffs are established, they are forced to retreat and thus, the areal shrinkage of the glaciers on Africa's highest peak is closely linked to the existence of these cliffs. In order to extract climate change details from the glaciers on Kilimanjaro, the sensitivity of the ice cliffs to climate fluctuations must be understood. Strikingly, the cliffs are mainly either north- or south-facing which entails at this near-equatorial site that direct sunlight either always hits the cliff faces from dawn till dusk, or not at all. The examination of the annual insolation patterns at a 25m high, south-facing sample cliff shows that it is not hit by direct shortwave radiation from March to October. During this time not enough energy is available for melting and only sublimation occurs. From November to February the cliff is sunlit 12 hours a day and its surface temperature can reach 0° C. Melting sometimes occurs during some hours, although air temperature is almost always below freezing. Point measurements at the sample cliff reveal a 20-30 times faster retreat during the sunlit period because melting is a much more energy-efficient ablation process than sublimation. Repeat terrestrial photogrammetric surveys have been carried out at the transition dates from the shaded to the sunlit

  6. Carbon flows through the microbial food web of first-year ice in resolute passage (Canadian High Arctic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vézina, Alain F.; Demers, Serge; Laurion, Isabelle; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Kim Juniper, S.; Devine, Laure

    1997-02-01

    Ice algal communities are host to thriving populations of microheterotrophs whose trophic role remains poorly understood. We report here an inverse modelling analysis of the microbial food web associated with the spring bloom of ice algae at Resolute Passage in the High Arctic. Carbon flows among microbial components (ice algae, autotrophic and heterotrophic nanoflagellates, microflagellates and ciliates) and their exchanges with particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC) were inferred from the observed changes in standing stocks of these compartments between 13 April and 22 May 1992. Calculations were made for three phases of the bloom's development and for two sites under thin and thick snow cover. Observed DOC accumulations within the bottom ice originated largely from the ice algae. However, calculated production rates were too high to result strictly from normal physiological exudation. Mechanical or physiological stresses that disrupt the integrity of the cells and grazing by zooplankton at the ice-water interface may well be involved in this process. Inverse modelling confirmed field and experimental evidence that nanoflagellates may directly assimilate DOC to support their growth. Patterns in trophic flows between sites with thin and thick snow cover were similar. In contrast, trophic interactions changed as the bloom progressed: production of DOC and detritus from the ice algae were the only significant carbon flows during the early phase; bacterivory developed and peaked during the middle phase and was superseded by DOC utilization and herbivory by flagellates and ciliates during the late phase. Only ca. 20% of the DOC produced was utilized by the microheterotrophs. Direct links from DOC and ice algae to protists potentially increase the efficiency of C transfers within the ice-associated microbial food web; on the other hand, low recovery efficiency limits the role of the microbial loop in recycling DOC.

  7. Overview of the Icing and Flow Quality Improvements Program for the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.; Kevdzija, Susan L.; Sheldon, David W.; Spera, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Major upgrades were made in 1999 to the 6- by 9-Foot (1.8- by 2.7-m) Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These included replacement of the electronic controls for the variable-speed drive motor, replacement of the heat exchanger, complete replacement and enlargement of the leg of the tunnel containing the new heat-exchanger, the addition of flow-expanding and flow-contracting turning vanes upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, respectively, and the addition of fan outlet guide vanes (OGV's). This paper describes the rationale behind this latest program of IRT upgrades and the program's requirements and goals. An overview is given of the scope of work undertaken by the design and construction contractors, the scale-model IRT (SMIRT) design verification program, the comprehensive reactivation test program initiated upon completion of construction, and the overall management approach followed.

  8. Flow Pattern Phenomena in Two-Phase Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Simon, William E.

    2004-02-01

    Space transportation systems require high-performance thermal protection and fluid management techniques for systems ranging from cryogenic fluid management devices to primary structures and propulsion systems exposed to extremely high temperatures, as well as for other space systems such as cooling or environment control for advanced space suits and integrated circuits. Although considerable developmental effort is being expended to bring potentially applicable technologies to a readiness level for practical use, new and innovative methods are still needed. One such method is the concept of Advanced Micro Cooling Modules (AMCMs), which are essentially compact two-phase heat exchangers constructed of microchannels and designed to remove large amounts of heat rapidly from critical systems by incorporating phase transition. The development of AMCMs requires fundamental technological advancement in many areas, including: (1) development of measurement methods/systems for flow-pattern measurement/identification for two-phase mixtures in microchannels; (2) development of a phenomenological model for two-phase flow which includes the quantitative measure of flow patterns; and (3) database development for multiphase heat transfer/fluid dynamics flows in microchannels. This paper focuses on the results of experimental research in the phenomena of two-phase flow in microchannels. The work encompasses both an experimental and an analytical approach to incorporating flow patterns for air-water mixtures flowing in a microchannel, which are necessary tools for the optimal design of AMCMs. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: (1) design and construction of a sensitive test system for two-phase flow in microchannels, one which measures ac and dc components of in-situ physical mixture parameters including spatial concentration using concomitant methods; (2) data acquisition and analysis in the amplitude, time, and frequency domains; and (3) analysis of results

  9. Improved parameterization of marine ice dynamics and flow instabilities for simulation of the Austfonna ice cap using a large-scale ice sheet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunse, T.; Greve, R.; Schuler, T.; Hagen, J. M.; Navarro, F.; Vasilenko, E.; Reijmer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Austfonna ice cap covers an area of 8120 km2 and is by far the largest glacier on Svalbard. Almost 30% of the entire area is grounded below sea-level, while the figure is as large as 57% for the known surge-type basins in particular. Marine ice dynamics, as well as flow instabilities presumably control flow regime, form and evolution of Austfonna. These issues are our focus in numerical simulations of the ice cap. We employ the thermodynamic, large-scale ice sheet model SICOPOLIS (http://sicopolis.greveweb.net/) which is based on the shallow-ice approximation. We present improved parameterizations of (a) the marine extent and calving and (b) processes that may initiate flow instabilities such as switches from cold to temperate basal conditions, surface steepening and hence, increases in driving stress, enhanced sliding or deformation of unconsolidated marine sediments and diminishing ice thicknesses towards flotation thickness. Space-borne interferometric snapshots of Austfonna revealed a velocity structure of a slow moving polar ice cap (< 10m/a) interrupted by distinct fast flow units with velocities in excess of 100m/a. However, observations of flow variability are scarce. In spring 2008, we established a series of stakes along the centrelines of two fast-flowing units. Repeated DGPS and continuous GPS measurements of the stake positions give insight in the temporal flow variability of these units and provide constrains to the modeled surface velocity field. Austfonna’s thermal structure is described as polythermal. However, direct measurements of the temperature distribution is available only from one single borehole at the summit area. The vertical temperature profile shows that the bulk of the 567m thick ice column is cold, only underlain by a thin temperate basal layer of approximately 20m. To acquire a spatially extended picture of the thermal structure (and bed topography), we used low-frequency (20 MHz) GPR profiling across the ice cap and the

  10. Arctic sea ice loss - two distinct spatial and seasonal patterns related to the ocean state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onarheim, Ingrid; Eldevik, Tor; Smedsrud, Lars H.; Stroeve, Julienne

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover has decreased dramatically in recent decades. Typically focus has been on September when decreasing trends are largest and sea ice extent is at the minimum. However, decreasing sea ice trends are now significant for all months. By examining satellite observations of sea ice concentration since 1979 and an observational-based reconstruction of sea ice extent since 1850, we assess ongoing and past change in regional sea ice variability throughout the year. We find two distinct spatial and seasonal patterns of Northern Hemisphere sea ice variability throughout the observational record: summer variability and change inside the Arctic Ocean, and winter variability and change in the seas further south. In regions with largest summer variability, the recent ice loss is typically larger in spring than fall. The enhanced ice retreat in spring appears accelerated by the ice albedo feedback, while rapid fall freeze-up may be due to the strong salinity stratification. The winter variability in the seas further south, being less stratified and more affected by convection, have larger trends in fall than spring, indicating delayed and reduced ice formation in fall. These two patterns of Northern Hemisphere sea ice variability thus appear largely affected by the ocean state.

  11. Graft compliance and anastomotic flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Guo, G X; Tu, R; Hwang, N H

    1990-01-01

    The oscillatory flow patterns at the venous anastomosis of a hemodialysis angioaccess loop graft system were studied using two new compliant vascular prostheses: a longitudinally compliant polytetrafluoroethylene-composite (Baxter Ultraflex PTFE-Plus) graft (BA) and a radially compliant ultrafine polyester fiber (TORAY-UFPF) graft (TR). A non-compliant Gore-Tex polytetrafluoroethylene graft was used as the control. The experimental grafts were 8 mm inside diameter x 25 cm long. Flow experiments were done in a transparent, elastic bench-top flow model; fabrication was based on silicone rubber casts obtained from femoral-to-femoral arteriovenous loop grafts surgically implanted in dogs. The loop graft constructed in the dog model was made to mimic the branchial-to-cephalic angioaccess loop graft commonly used in hemodialysis patients. The flow model was connected to a pulse generator, an adjustable arterial afterload, and a venous afterload. Under identical input conditions, the pressure and flow waveforms were monitored simultaneously at the proximal and distal ends of both the arterial and venous anastomoses. For each graft studied, the anastomotic flow field was visualized using laser illuminated hydrogen bubbles as tracers. At pulse rates of 60 and 90 beats/min, graft flow rates were 2.2 and 2.5 L/min, respectively. Among the grafts studied, measurable differences in pressure and flow wave attenuation and their respective phase lags resulted in characteristically dissimilar flow patterns at the venous anastomosis. Growth of the separation zone at the toe of the anastomosis, and the pattern of retrograde flow in the distal vein are visibly different in all three grafts.

  12. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, M.; Worster, G.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The collapse of an ice shelf can lead to dramatic acceleration and thinning of the ice streams and glaciers that flowed into the former shelf. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  13. Ultra-sensitive Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) determination of calcium in ice cores at ppt level.

    PubMed

    Traversi, R; Becagli, S; Castellano, E; Maggi, V; Morganti, A; Severi, M; Udisti, R

    2007-07-02

    A Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) spectrofluorimetric method for calcium determination in ice cores was optimised in order to achieve better analytical performances which would make it suitable for reliable calcium measurements at ppt level. The method here optimised is based on the formation of a fluorescent compound between Ca and Quin-2 in buffered environment. A careful evaluation of operative parameters (reagent concentration, buffer composition and concentration, pH), influence of interfering species possibly present in real samples and potential favourable effect of surfactant addition was carried out. The obtained detection limit is around 15 ppt, which is one order of magnitude lower than the most sensitive Flow Analysis method for Ca determination currently available in literature and reproducibility is better than 4% for Ca concentrations of 0.2 ppb. The method was validated through measurements performed in parallel with Ion Chromatography on 200 samples from an alpine ice core (Lys Glacier) revealing an excellent fit between the two chemical series. Calcium stratigraphy in Lys ice core was discussed in terms of seasonal pattern and occurrence of Saharan dust events.

  14. Do Europa's Mountains Have Roots? Modeling Flow Along the Ice-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, B. B.; Goodman, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Are topographic features on the surface of Europa and other icy worlds isostatically compensated by variations in shell thickness (Airy isostasy)? This is only possible if variations in shell thickness can remain stable over geologic time. In this work we demonstrate that local shell thickness perturbations will relax due to viscous flow in centuries. We present a model of Europa's ice crust which includes thermal conduction, viscous flow of ice, and a mobile ice/water interface: the topography along the ice-water interface varies in response to melting, freezing, and ice flow. Temperature-dependent viscosity, conductivity, and density lead to glacier-like flow along the base of the ice shell, as well as solid-state convection in its interior. We considered both small scale processes, such as an isostatically-compensated ridge or lenticula, or heat flux from a hydrothermal plume; and a larger model focusing on melting and flow on the global scale. Our local model shows that ice-basal topographic features 5 kilometers deep and 4 kilometers wide can be filled in by glacial flow in about 200 years; even very large cavities can be infilled in 1000 years. "Hills" (locally thick areas) are removed faster than "holes". If a strong local heat flux (10x global average) is applied to the base of the ice, local melting will be prevented by rapid inflow of ice from nearby. On the large scale, global ice flow from the thick cool pole to the warmer and thinner equator removes global-scale topography in about 1 Ma; melting and freezing from this process may lead to a coupled feedback with the ocean flow. We find that glacial flow at the base of the ice shell is so rapid that Europa's ice-water interface is likely to be very flat. Local surface topography probably cannot be isostatically compensated by thickness variations: Europa's mountains may have no roots.

  15. Flow-separation patterns on symmetric forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.

    1986-01-01

    Flow-visualization studies of ogival, parabolic, and conical forebodies were made in a comprehensive investigation of the various types of flow patterns. Schlieren, vapor-screen, oil-flow, and sublimation flow-visualization tests were conducted over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg. to 88 deg., over a Reynolds-number range from 0.3X10(6) to 2.0X10(6) (based on base diameter), and over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 2. The principal effects of angle of attack, Reynolds number, and Mach number on the occurrence of vortices, the position of vortex shedding, the principal surface-flow-separation patterns, the magnitude of surface-flow angles, and the extent of laminar and turbulent flow for symmetric, asymmetric, and wake-like flow-separation regimes are presented. It was found that the two-dimensional cylinder analogy was helpful in a qualitative sense in analyzing both the surface-flow patterns and the external flow field. The oil-flow studies showed three types of primary separation patterns at the higher Reynolds numbers owing to the influence of boundary-layer transition. The effect of angle of attack and Reynolds number is to change the axial location of the onset and extent of the primary transitional and turbulent separation regions. Crossflow inflectional-instability vortices were observed on the windward surface at angles of attack from 5 deg. to 55 deg. Their effect is to promote early transition. At low angles of attack, near 10 deg., an unexpected laminar-separation bubble occurs over the forward half of the forebody. At high angles of attack, at which vortex asymmetry occurs, the results support the proposition that the principal cause of vortex asymmetry is the hydrodynamic instability of the inviscid flow field. On the other hand, boundary-layer asymmetries also occur, especially at transitional Reynolds numbers. The position of asymmetric vortex shedding moves forward with increasing angle of attack and with increasing Reynolds number, and moves

  16. Consistent patterns of Antarctic ice sheet interannual variations from ENVISAT radar altimetry and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Martin; Legrésy, Benoît.; Blarel, Fabien; Rémy, Frédérique; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    By observing temporal volume and mass changes, respectively, satellite radar altimetry (RA) and satellite gravimetry are complementary tools for ice sheet mass balance studies. We compare and jointly interpret results from ENVISAT RA and GRACE. The underlying RA products were generated with the Along-Track Satellite Radar Altimetry approach which exploits all observations along the repeat track and accounts for time-variable volume echo effects through analyzing the temporal variations of the radar echo shape. The used GRACE products are the CNES/GRGS 10-daily global gravity solutions obtained with a regularisation during processing and requiring no additional filtering. In order to render the spatial resolution of both datasets comparable we rigorously describe the spatial filtering of geophysical signals that is inherent to the GRACE processing. We then apply the same filtering to the maps of altimetric height changes. After correction for glacial isostatic adjustment, the spatial patterns of linear trends shown by RA and GRACE over a common period agree well, not only for the extreme ice losses in the Amundsen Sea Sector of West Antarctica but also for an alternating sequence of gains and losses along the East Antarctic coast. Differences between ENVISAT ice sheet thickness changes and GRACE equivalent ice thickness changes are primarily due to the lack of RA coverage and secondarily due to changes in the firn density structure associated with surface mass balance fluctuations as well as due to errors in either observational data sets. Moreover, the general patterns of year-to-year nonlinear variations on top of the trends agree between the two data sets. This agreement gives confidence in the interannual variations of both data sets. As a consequence, the high-resolution patterns provided by RA can be used to relate the interannual mass variations observed by GRACE to either flow variations or surface mass balance (SMB) variations and to validate atmospheric

  17. Analog modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation and ice flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Ravier, Edouard; Mourgues, Régis; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated and overdeepened depressions up to hundreds of kilometers long, several kilometers wide and hundreds of meters deep, found in formerly glaciated areas. These drainage features are interpreted as the result of subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets and constitute a major component of the subglacial drainage system. Although tunnel valleys have been described worldwide in the past decades, their formation is still a matter of debate. Here, we present an innovative experimental approach simulating pressurized water flow in a subglacial environment in order to study the erosional processes occurring at the ice-bed interface. We use a sandbox partially covered by a circular, viscous and transparent lid (silicon putty), simulating an impermeable ice cap. Punctual injection of pressurized water in the substratum at the center of the lid simulates meltwater production beneath the ice cap. Surface images collected by six synchronized cameras allow to monitor the evolution of the experiment through time, using photogrammetry methods and DEM generation. UV markers placed in the silicon are used to follow the silicon flow during the drainage of water at the substratum-lid interface, and give the unique opportunity to simultaneously follow the formation of tunnel valleys and the evolution of ice dynamics. When the water pressure is low, groundwater circulates within the substratum only and no drainage landforms appear at the lid-substratum interface. By contrast, when the water pressure exceeds a threshold that is larger than the sum of glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures, additional water circulation occurs at the lid-substratum interface and drainage landforms develop from the lid margin. These landforms share numerous morphological criteria with tunnel valleys such as undulating longitudinal profiles, U-shaped cross-sectional profiles with flat floors, constant widths and abrupt flanks. Continuous generation of DEMs and flow velocity

  18. Valles Marineris, Mars: Wet debris flows and ground ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed study of the Valles Marineris equatorial troughs suggests that the landslides in that area contained water and probably were gigantic wet debris flows: one landslide complex generated a channel that has several bends and extends for 250 km. Further support for water or ice in debris masses includes rounded flow lobes and transport of some slide masses in the direction of the local topographic slope. Differences in speed and emplacement efficiency between Martian and terrestrial landslides can be attributed to the entrainment of volatiles on Mars, but they can also be explained by other mechanisms. Support that the wall rock contained water comes from the following observations: (1) the water within the landslide debris must have been derived from wall rock; (2) debris appears to have been transported through tributary canyons; (3) locally, channels emerged from the canyons; (4) the wall rock apprarently disintegrated and flowed easily; and (5) fault zones within the troughs are unusually resistant to erosion. The study further suggests that, in the equatorial region of Mars, material below depths of 400-800 m was not desiccated during the time of landslide activity (within the last billion years of Martian history). Therefore the Martian ground-water or groundice reservoir, if not a relic from ancient times, must have been replenished. ?? 1987.

  19. Surface melt-induced acceleration of Greenland ice-sheet flow.

    PubMed

    Zwally, H Jay; Abdalati, Waleed; Herring, Tom; Larson, Kristine; Saba, Jack; Steffen, Konrad

    2002-07-12

    Ice flow at a location in the equilibrium zone of the west-central Greenland Ice Sheet accelerates above the midwinter average rate during periods of summer melting. The near coincidence of the ice acceleration with the duration of surface melting, followed by deceleration after the melting ceases, indicates that glacial sliding is enhanced by rapid migration of surface meltwater to the ice-bedrock interface. Interannual variations in the ice acceleration are correlated with variations in the intensity of the surface melting, with larger increases accompanying higher amounts of summer melting. The indicated coupling between surface melting and ice-sheet flow provides a mechanism for rapid, large-scale, dynamic responses of ice sheets to climate warming.

  20. Winter Northern Hemisphere weather patterns remember summer Arctic sea-ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jennifer A.; Chan, Weihan; Leathers, Daniel J.; Miller, James R.; Veron, Dana E.

    2009-04-01

    The dramatic decline in Arctic summer sea-ice cover is a compelling indicator of change in the global climate system and has been attributed to a combination of natural and anthropogenic effects. Through its role in regulating the exchange of energy between the ocean and atmosphere, ice loss is anticipated to influence atmospheric circulation and weather patterns. By combining satellite measurements of sea-ice extent and conventional atmospheric observations, we find that varying summer ice conditions are associated with large-scale atmospheric features during the following autumn and winter well beyond the Arctic's boundary. Mechanisms by which the atmosphere “remembers” a reduction in summer ice cover include warming and destabilization of the lower troposphere, increased cloudiness, and slackening of the poleward thickness gradient that weakens the polar jet stream. This ice-atmosphere relationship suggests a potential long-range outlook for weather patterns in the northern hemisphere.

  1. Converging flow and anisotropy cause large-scale folding in Greenland's ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Jansen, Daniela; Mundel, Felicitas; Bauer, Catherine C.; Binder, Tobias; Eisen, Olaf; Jessell, Mark W.; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Steinbach, Florian; Steinhage, Daniel; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    The increasing catalogue of high-quality ice-penetrating radar data provides a unique insight in the internal layering architecture of the Greenland ice sheet. The stratigraphy, an indicator of past deformation, highlights irregularities in ice flow and reveals large perturbations without obvious links to bedrock shape. In this work, to establish a new conceptual model for the formation process, we analysed the radar data at the onset of the Petermann Glacier, North Greenland, and created a three-dimensional model of several distinct stratigraphic layers. We demonstrate that the dominant structures are cylindrical folds sub-parallel to the ice flow. By numerical modelling, we show that these folds can be formed by lateral compression of mechanically anisotropic ice, while a general viscosity contrast between layers would not lead to folding for the same boundary conditions. We conclude that the folds primarily form by converging flow as the mechanically anisotropic ice is channelled towards the glacier.

  2. Converging flow and anisotropy cause large-scale folding in Greenland's ice sheet

    PubMed Central

    Bons, Paul D.; Jansen, Daniela; Mundel, Felicitas; Bauer, Catherine C.; Binder, Tobias; Eisen, Olaf; Jessell, Mark W.; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Steinbach, Florian; Steinhage, Daniel; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-01-01

    The increasing catalogue of high-quality ice-penetrating radar data provides a unique insight in the internal layering architecture of the Greenland ice sheet. The stratigraphy, an indicator of past deformation, highlights irregularities in ice flow and reveals large perturbations without obvious links to bedrock shape. In this work, to establish a new conceptual model for the formation process, we analysed the radar data at the onset of the Petermann Glacier, North Greenland, and created a three-dimensional model of several distinct stratigraphic layers. We demonstrate that the dominant structures are cylindrical folds sub-parallel to the ice flow. By numerical modelling, we show that these folds can be formed by lateral compression of mechanically anisotropic ice, while a general viscosity contrast between layers would not lead to folding for the same boundary conditions. We conclude that the folds primarily form by converging flow as the mechanically anisotropic ice is channelled towards the glacier. PMID:27126274

  3. Blood flow patterns underlie developmental heart defects.

    PubMed

    Midgett, Madeline; Thornburg, Kent; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Although cardiac malformations at birth are typically associated with genetic anomalies, blood flow dynamics also play a crucial role in heart formation. However, the relationship between blood flow patterns in the early embryo and later cardiovascular malformation has not been determined. We used the chicken embryo model to quantify the extent to which anomalous blood flow patterns predict cardiac defects that resemble those in humans and found that restricting either the inflow to the heart or the outflow led to reproducible abnormalities with a dose-response type relationship between blood flow stimuli and the expression of cardiac phenotypes. Constricting the outflow tract by 10-35% led predominantly to ventricular septal defects, whereas constricting by 35-60% most often led to double outlet right ventricle. Ligation of the vitelline vein caused mostly pharyngeal arch artery malformations. We show that both cardiac inflow reduction and graded outflow constriction strongly influence the development of specific and persistent abnormal cardiac structure and function. Moreover, the hemodynamic-associated cardiac defects recapitulate those caused by genetic disorders. Thus our data demonstrate the importance of investigating embryonic blood flow conditions to understand the root causes of congenital heart disease as a prerequisite to future prevention and treatment.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Congenital heart defects result from genetic anomalies, teratogen exposure, and altered blood flow during embryonic development. We show here a novel "dose-response" type relationship between the level of blood flow alteration and manifestation of specific cardiac phenotypes. We speculate that abnormal blood flow may frequently underlie congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Ground-based portable radar interferometer for imaging glacier flow, ocean-glacier ice interactions, and river ice breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Cassotto, R.; Truffer, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last 18 months we have deployed new 17 GHz imaging radars from Gamma Remote Sensing to document flow on land terminating and tidewater glaciers in Greenland and Alaska; to image glacier response to tides and calving; to track floating ice in fjords; and to document river ice movement, ice jams, and associated flooding during breakup on the Tanana River in Alaska. During these deployments we have learned much about atmospheric influences on interferometric measurements; combination of flow direction determinations from feature tracking in amplitude imagery with short-term flow variability from interferometry. We show examples documenting measurement capabilities and limitations from each of these deployments. These radars represent unique tools for study of rapid changes in dynamic parts of the cryosphere.

  5. Circulation pattern and ice mass exchange for different water compositions in Lake Vostok, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, C.; Grosfeld, K.; Siegert, M. J.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Vostok, Antarctica's largest known subglacial lake, isolated from direct exchange with the atmosphere or oceans for several million years due to its thick ice cover, provides a unique and so far inaccessible habitat. By implementing the newest available information about the lake geometry into a 3-dimensional fluid-dynamics model the lake circulation was investigated for different water compositions. In the case of fresh water, thermally driven circulation is predicted, as a result of the pressure-dependent melting point at the inclined ice-water interface, in agreement with other investigators. Ice pumping from north to south provides a steady supply of glacial water to the lake, whereby no unsusual geothermal conditions are required for maintaining the circulation and the melting/refreezing balance. The rather weak circulation is driven by very small, temperature determined, density contrasts between the resident lake water and the fresh melt water. The circulation pattern, however, is determined by the strongly structured trough geometry of the lake. For slightly saline water conditions, the circulation pattern is also influenced by the salinity impact on the equation of state and hence on the lake density. This results in a partly increased flow but influences the turnover time scale not significantly. Now, the freshwater flux due to melting of glacial ice stabilizes the stratification of the lake leading to a more pronounced temperature gradient over the water column. Colder water now overrides warmer water portions near bottom, which to a certain degree isolates the resident water mass from the circulation driven by meltig and freezing. In either saline or fresh water conditions approximately 200 m of refrozen ice accumulates beneath Vostok Station, which suggests either possibility is plausible under the current state of knowledge regarding the lake cavity and the hydrochemnistry. Our model results, however, show that the habitat of Lake Vostok will be

  6. Bimodal pattern of seismicity detected at the ocean margin of an Antarctic ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Denis; Benoit, Lionel; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Martin, Olivier; Meynard, Christophe; Thom, Christian

    2016-08-01

    In Antarctica, locally grounded ice, such as ice rises bordering floating ice shelves, plays a major role in the ice mass balance as it stabilizes the ice sheet flow from the hinterland. When in direct contact with the ocean, the ice rise buttressing effect may be altered in response of changing ocean forcing. To investigate this vulnerable zone, four sites near the boundary of an ice shelf with an ice rise promontory in Dronning Maud Land, East-Antarctica were monitored for a month in early 2014 with new instruments that include both seismic and GPS sensors. Our study indicated that this transition zone experiences periodic seismic activity resulting from surface crevassing during oceanic tide-induced flexure of the ice shelf. The most significant finding is the observation of apparent fortnightly tide-modulated low-frequency, long-duration seismic events at the seaward front of the ice rise promontory. A basal origin of these events is postulated with the ocean water surge at each new spring tide triggering basal crevassing or basal slip on a local bedrock asperity. Detection and monitoring of such seismicity may help identifying ice rise zones vulnerable to intensified ocean forcing.

  7. Spatial patterns in backscatter strength across the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the physical properties of the Greenland ice sheet and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected from aircraft and from ERS-1 is addressed. Limited aircraft data are combined with a description of the glacier surface to predict qualitatively the spatial and seasonal variation in backscatter strength across the ice sheet. In particular the model predicts relatively low backscatter near the ice edge where scattering is dominated by rough surface effects. Backscatter increases through the lake zone as volume scattering becomes important. Strongest backscatter is found in the percolation facies where volume scatter from snow grains and volume scatter from large, buried ice bodies becomes important. Backscatter weakens in the interior ice sheet where fine grained snow is the only mechanism producing backscatter.

  8. Insights on the formation of longitudinal surface structures on ice sheets from analysis of their spacing, spatial distribution, and relationship to ice thickness and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, J. C.; Clark, C. D.; Ng, F. S. L.; Spagnolo, M.

    2017-04-01

    Longitudinal surface structures (LSSs) are prevalent upon the ice streams, ice shelves, and outlet glaciers of ice sheets. These features inform our understanding of past and present ice sheet behavior. However, consensus regarding their genesis has not been reached. Here we analyze 42,311 LSS segments mapped across Antarctica together with geophysical data to determine their morphological and glaciological properties. Most LSSs are spaced 450 to 1500 m apart, a distance positively correlated with the width of the ice flow unit on which they occur. The start points (upstream end locations) of LSSs have diverse ice thicknesses and velocities. The majority of LSSs occur where ice flow is converging or broadly parallel, and they are prominent at ice confluences. Some occur at slow-flowing ice stream onsets. Occasionally, LSSs relate to sudden variations in basal shear stress due to basal perturbations. From these observations, we argue that LSSs are the consequence of increased strain which occurs during the lateral compression and longitudinal extension of ice: (i) converging/flowing into a channel (this scenario characterizes most LSSs), (ii) at the onset of ice streaming, (iii) at flow unit confluence, and (iv) as ice flows over and around a basal perturbation.

  9. A Radial Pattern of Six Paleo Ice Streams Emanating from the Bruce Plateau Ice Dome, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet: Constraints from Multibeam Bathymetry and GPS Rebound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, M.; Domack, E.; Canals, M.; Casamor, J.; King, M.

    2008-12-01

    We reconstructed ice thicknesses along six paleo ice streams emanating out of the Bruce Plateau in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula. This was done in order to generate models of potential isostatic rebound along the flow paths since the LGM and thereby provide a theoretical test for empirical observations of vertical displacement (rebound) as measured by seven coastal GPS stations (to be deployed during the current IPY- LARISSA project). This study is pertinent to realizing the effect of moderate ice sheet size during collapse and resulting sea level rise. The Palmer, Vernadsky, Hugo Island and Gerlache and Boyd Strait ice stream paths (flow lines) were highlighted on the Western side of the Peninsula. The Drygalski, Crane and Hektoria ice streams were studied on the Eastern side. Using detailed and near complete swath bathymetry data available for the Western Peninsula coastal region and partial swath mapping data generated at the site of the former Larsen B ice shelf (and Roberston Trough), we constructed hypothetical longitudinal profiles of all six ice streams along precisely located flow paths. These profiles extended from the accumulation zones in the upper elevations of the Bruce Plateau to the terminus along the continental shelf edge. The profiles included detailed elevations of the bedrock and hypothetical ice thickness values along the ice streams as they would have been during the Last Glacial Maximum (~ 16 ka). Ice thickness values were based on the elevations of bedrock, trim lines, surrounding topography, influence of surrounding glaciers and previous estimates of LGM ice thickness values around the Antarctic Peninsula. Using the components of the hypothetical longitudinal profiles, total isostatic rebound since the LGM can be calculated for the region (assuming reasonable mantle viscosities). In all the profiles reconstructed ice thicknesses are characterized by an order of magnitude increase across inner shelf troughs (such as the Palmer Deep and

  10. Proposed Ice Flow, Given 200m and 400m Additional Ice in the Allan Hills Region, Antarctica: Implications for Meteorite Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub-Metlay, S.; Cassidy, W. A.

    1992-07-01

    The Allan Hills-David Glacier region contains some of the most highly populated meteorite stranding surfaces in Antarctica. Nearly 2000 meteorites have to date been collected from the icefields associated with the Allan Hills, and nearly 1500 from areas around Elephant Moraine. While much attention has been focused on the current geological and glaciological conditions of these stranding surfaces, less work has been done concerning what they may have looked like in the past, when ice thicknesses may have been greater. In this study, conjectural maps of the current Allan Hills area with 200 meters and 400 meters of additional ice cover each are analyzed for probable regional and local ice flow patterns. A dramatic decrease in ice thickness over a relatively brief period of time could result either from climatic change or a geologically rapid regional uplift. Delisle and Sievers (1991) noted that the valley between the Allan Hills Main Icefield and the Allan Hills resembles a half-graben resulting from east-west extensional tectonics, and that the mesa-like bedrock features associated with the Near Western and Mid Western Icefields resemble fault blocks. They concluded that the Allan Hills area icefields may have become active stranding surfaces as a result of a regional uplift within the past 1-2 million years, assuming a current rate of uplift in the Allan Hills region of ~100 meters/million years. Whether the cause was climatic or tectonic, generalized maps of current ice contours plus 400 and 200 meters ice may provide views of what the Allan Hills region looked like just before activation of the modern meteorite stranding surfaces (Figs. 1 and 2). At an ice thickness greater by 400 meters, ice could flow smoothly over the Allan Hills and would drain down to the Mawson Glacier via the Odell Glacier, east of the Allan Hills; down the Manhaul Bay depression between the east and west arms of Allan Hills; and down the half-graben discovered by Delisle and Sievers

  11. Patterns of Macrozooplankton and Fish Occurrence Beneath McMurdo Sound Fast Ice during Spring/Summer 2014/2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, B. T.; Daly, K. L.; Kim, S.; Ainley, D. G.; Ballard, G.

    2016-02-01

    McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, represents a unique environment for study of trophic interactions, where a full complement of marine predators thrive. As part of a greater study of McMurdo Sound food web interactions, including ocean and ice physics, algal characterization, and predator behavior, macrozooplankton and fish were surveyed using bioacoustics and video using a specially-designed under-ice ROV. Acoustic returns from 82 under-ice surveys were divided into classes consisting of krill, silverfish, and weak scatters. Krill were scarce during surveys in late November, but increased in abundance in association with increasing chlorophyll a in December and early January when surveys ended. The greatest concentrations of krill were found near Ross Island in the eastern Sound, where southerly currents move high-productivity waters beneath the fast ice. Conversely, silverfish, especially schools of juveniles, were found in greater abundance toward the west where currents flow northward and platelet ice typically blocked light from surface waters. Silverfish were rare toward the end of the survey in late December/early January, but possibly had moved deeper than the acoustic instrument could detect. Overall, krill were less abundant and occurred deeper in the water column within 2 km of the fast ice edge, which was accessible by air-breathing predators, suggesting that predation pressure helped structure krill abundance or distribution. Acoustic returns from weak scatters, which included observed jellies, pteropods, detached ice algae and potentially other mesoplankton in high abundance such as copepods, also increased during the study period and co-occurred with chlorophyll a. The patterns of macrozooplankton and fish observed in McMurdo Sound raise important questions about source-sink dynamics, overwinter strategies of mid-trophic organisms, prey-predator dynamics, and sea-ice structuring of ecosystems.

  12. Flow and evolution of ice-sucrose crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; Oppong, Felix K.; Farr, Robert S.

    2017-04-01

    We study the rheology of suspensions of ice crystals at moderate to high volume fractions in a sucrose solution in which they are partially soluble, a model system for a wide class of crystal mushes or slurries. Under step changes in shear rate, the viscosity changes to a relaxed value over several minutes, in a manner well fitted by a single exponential. The behavior of the relaxed viscosity is power-law shear thinning with shear rate, with an exponent of -1.76 ±0.25 , so that shear stress falls with increasing shear rate. On longer time scales, the crystals ripen (leading to a falling viscosity) so that the mean radius increases with time to the power 0.14 ±0.07 . We speculate that this unusually small exponent is due to the interaction of classical ripening dynamics with abrasion or breakup under flow. We compare the rheological behavior to mechanistic models based on flow-induced aggregation and breakup of crystal clusters, finding that the exponents can be predicted from liquid phase sintering and breakup by brittle fracture.

  13. Accuracy improvement of the ice flow rate measurements on Antarctic ice sheet by DInSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiramizu, Kaoru; Doi, Koichiro; Aoyama, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is an effective tool to measure the flow rate of slow flowing ice streams on Antarctic ice sheet with high resolution. In the flow rate measurement by DInSAR method, we use Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at two times in the estimating process. At first, we use it to remove topographic fringes from InSAR images. And then, it is used to project obtained displacements along Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction to the actual flow direction. ASTER-GDEM widely-used for InSAR prosessing of the data of polar region has a lot of errors especially in the inland ice sheet area. Thus the errors yield irregular flow rates and directions. Therefore, quality of DEM has a substantial influence on the ice flow rate measurement. In this study, we created a new DEM (resolution 10m; hereinafter referred to as PRISM-DEM) based on ALOS/PRISM images, and compared PRISM-DEM and ASTER-GDEM. The study area is around Skallen, 90km south from Syowa Station, in the southern part of Sôya Coast, East Antarctica. For making DInSAR images, we used ALOS/PALSAR data of 13 pairs (Path633, Row 571-572), observed during the period from November 23, 2007 through January 16, 2011. PRISM-DEM covering the PALSAR scene was created from nadir and backward view images of ALOS/PRISM (Observation date: 2009/1/18) by applying stereo processing with a digital mapping equipment, and then the automatically created a primary DEM was corrected manually to make a final DEM. The number of irregular values of actual ice flow rate was reduced by applying PRISM-DEM compared with that by applying ASTER-GDEM. Additionally, an averaged displacement of approximately 0.5cm was obtained by applying PRISM-DEM over outcrop area, where no crustal displacement considered to occur during the recurrence period of ALOS/PALSAR (46days), while an averaged displacement of approximately 1.65 cm was observed by applying ASTER-GDEM. Since displacements over outcrop area are considered

  14. Constraints on martian lobate debris apron evolution and rheology from numerical modeling of ice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Reid A.; Nimmo, Francis; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2011-07-01

    Radar observations in the Deuteronilus Mensae region by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have constrained the thickness and dust concentration found within mid-latitude ice deposits, providing an opportunity to more accurately estimate the rheology of ice responsible for the formation of lobate debris aprons based on their apparent age of ˜100 Myr. We developed a numerical model simulating ice flow under martian conditions using results from ice deformation experiments, theory of ice grain growth based on terrestrial ice cores, and observational constraints from radar profiles and laser altimetry. By varying the ice grain size, the ice temperature, the subsurface slope, and the initial ice volume we determine the combination of parameters that best reproduce the observed LDA lengths and thicknesses over a period of time comparable to the apparent ages of LDA surfaces (90-300 Myr). We find that an ice temperature of 205 K, an ice grain size of 5 mm, and a flat subsurface slope give reasonable ages for many LDAs in the northern mid-latitudes of Mars. Assuming that the ice grain size is limited by the grain boundary pinning effect of incorporated dust, these results limit the dust volume concentration to less than 4%. However, assuming all LDAs were emplaced by a single event, we find that there is no single combination of grain size, temperature, and subsurface slope which can give realistic ages for all LDAs, suggesting that some or all of these variables are spatially heterogeneous. Based on our model we conclude that the majority of northern mid-latitude LDAs are composed of clean (⩽4 vol%), coarse (⩾1 mm) grained ice, but regional differences in either the amount of dust mixed in with the ice, or in the presence of a basal slope below the LDA ice must be invoked. Alternatively, the ice temperature and/or timing of ice deposition may vary significantly between different mid-latitude regions. Either eventuality can be tested with future observations.

  15. Will ice flow in land-terminating regions of the Greenland ice sheet accelerate under future climate warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, S. H.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations and modelling studies investigating the dynamic response of land-terminating regions of the Greenland ice sheet to a warmer climate remain at best unreconciled and at worst equivocal and contradictory. Some studies suggest that ice flow will be regulated over annual time scales by the development of efficient subglacial drainage. Others suggest that such self-regulation processes may not be effective at higher elevations and that the recent and projected expansion of supraglacial lakes further into the ice sheet interior has lead to increased ice flow at high elevations. On the other hand, the observation that rapid in situ supraglacial lake drainage events may be triggered by precursory basal motion have led to the argument that, by inference, such lake drainage in the interior may be impossible, or at least hindered, by reduced strain rates and lack of surface crevasses in these regions. The response of the Greenland ice sheet to a warmer, wetter climate, in which late summer and autumnal cyclonic weather events drive widespread melt, rainfall and transient accelerations may also need to be accounted for in assessments of future Greenland ice mass loss if predicted changes in Greenland's climate are realised. This talk will critically assess recent insights gained into this topic, attempt to resolve some of them, and suggest directions for future research.

  16. Elastic fingering patterns in confined lifting flows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2016-09-01

    The elastic fingering phenomenon occurs when two confined fluids are brought into contact, and due to a chemical reaction, the interface separating them becomes elastic. We study elastic fingering pattern formation in Newtonian fluids flowing in a lifting (time-dependent gap) Hele-Shaw cell. Using a mode-coupling approach, nonlinear effects induced by the interplay between viscous and elastic forces are investigated and the weakly nonlinear behavior of the fluid-fluid interfacial patterns is analyzed. Our results indicate that the existence of the elastic interface allows the development of unexpected morphological behaviors in such Newtonian fluid flow systems. More specifically, we show that depending on the values of the governing physical parameters, the observed elastic fingering structures are characterized by the occurrence of either finger tip splitting or side branching. The impact of the elastic interface on finger-competition events is also discussed.

  17. Micromechanics of emergent patterns in plastic flows.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Santidan; Grant, Martin; Samajdar, Indradev; Haldar, Arunansu; Sain, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline solids undergo plastic deformation and subsequently flow when subjected to stresses beyond their elastic limit. In nature most crystalline solids exist in polycrystalline form. Simulating plastic flows in polycrystalline solids has wide ranging applications, from material processing to understanding intermittency of earthquake dynamics. Using phase field crystal (PFC) model we show that in sheared polycrystalline solids the atomic displacement field shows spatio-temporal heterogeneity spanning over several orders of length and time scales, similar to that in amorphous solids. The displacement field also exhibits localized quadrupolar patterns, characteristic of two dislocations of the opposite sign approaching each other. This is a signature of crystallinity at microscopic scale. Polycrystals being halfway between single crystals and amorphous solids, in terms of the degree of structural order, descriptions of solid mechanics at two widely different scales, namely continuum plastic flow and discrete dislocation dynamics turns out to be necessary here.

  18. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  19. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, Martin; Worster, Grae; Hindmarsh, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  20. Fives decades of strong temporal variability in the flow of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar; Nagler, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Brunt Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, is a complex conglomerate of meteoric and marine ice, weakly connected to the much larger and faster-flowing Stancomb Wills Glacier Tongue to the east, and pinned down to the seabed in a small area around the McDonalds Ice Rumples in the north. The ice shelf is home to the UK research station Halley, from which changes to the ice shelf have been monitored closely since the 1960s. A unique 50-year record of the flow speed and an intense surveying programme over the past 10 years, have revealed a strong temporal variability in the flow. In particular, the speed of the ice shelf has increased by 10% each year over the past few years. In order to understand these rapid changes, we use a state-of-the-art flow model in combination with a range of satellite, ground-based and airborne radar data, to accurately simulate the historical flow and recent changes. In particular, we model the effects of a recently formed rift that is propagating at a speed of up to 600m/day and threatens to dislodge the ice shelf from its pinning point at the McDonalds Ice Rumples. We also report on the recent reactivation of a large chasm which has prompted the relocation of the station during the 2016/17 austral summer.

  1. Pressure Drop in Cold Water Flow in Beds Packed with Several Kinds of Crushed Ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanadori, Michio; Ohira, Akiyoshi

    This paper deals with the pressure drop in cold water flow in the beds packed with crushed ice. 1n each case, ice-packed beds were filled with sevral kinds of crushed ice, and friction-loss coefficients were examined. The following results were obtained. (1) The friction factor of rectangular-type ice-packed beds is smaller than that of ideal sphere beds by about 1/4 to 1/2. (2) The friction factor of small-stone-type ice-packed beds is about twice as large as that of ideal sphere beds. (3) It is difficult to compare the flow model of water in restricted channel of particle-type ice-packed beds with that of ideal packed beds.

  2. Organization of ice flow by localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, M. L.; Galton-Fenzi, B. K.; Roberts, J. L.; Watson, C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux on ice sheet dynamics is largely unknown. Simulations of ice dynamics are produced using poorly resolved and low-resolution estimates of geothermal heat flux. Observations of crustal heat production within the continental crust underneath the Lambert-Amery glacial system in East Antarctica indicate that high heat flux regions of at least 120 mW m-2 exist. Here we investigate the influence of simulated but plausible, localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux on ice dynamics using a numerical ice sheet model of the Lambert-Amery glacial system. We find that high heat flux regions have a significant effect across areas of slow-moving ice with the influence extending both upstream and downstream of the geothermal anomaly, while fast-moving ice is relatively unaffected. Our results suggest that localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux may play an important role in the organization of ice sheet flow.

  3. Genetic profiling links changing sea-ice to shifting beluga whale migration patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Andrew R.; Suydam, Robert; Quakenbush, Lori; Whiting, Alex; Lowry, Lloyd; Harwood, Lois

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern over how Arctic fauna will adapt to climate related changes in sea-ice. We used long-term sighting and genetic data on beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in conjunction with multi-decadal patterns of sea-ice in the Pacific Arctic to investigate the influence of sea-ice on spring migration and summer residency patterns. Substantial variations in sea-ice conditions were detected across seasons, years and sub-regions, revealing ice–ocean dynamics more complex than Arctic-wide trends suggest. This variation contrasted with a highly consistent pattern of migration and residency by several populations, indicating that belugas can accommodate widely varying sea-ice conditions to perpetuate philopatry to coastal migration destinations. However, a number of anomalous migration and residency events were detected and coincided with anomalous ice years, and in one case with an increase in killer whale (Orcinus orca) sightings and reported predation on beluga whales. The behavioural shifts were likely driven by changing sea-ice and associated changes in resource dispersion and predation risk. Continued reductions in sea-ice may result in increased predation at key aggregation areas and shifts in beluga whale behaviour with implications for population viability, ecosystem structure and the subsistence cultures that rely on them.

  4. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  5. Ice flow dynamics forced by water pressure variations in subglacial granular beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Beem, Lucas H.; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Siegfried, Matthew R.

    2016-12-01

    Glaciers and ice streams can move by deforming underlying water-saturated sediments, and the nonlinear mechanics of these materials are often invoked as the main reason for initiation, persistence, and shutdown of fast-flowing ice streams. Existing models have failed to fully explain the internal mechanical processes driving transitions from stability to slip. We performed computational experiments that show how rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive the mechanical transitions. Cyclic variations in pore water pressure give rise to rate-dependent creeping motion at stress levels below the point of failure, while disruption of the force chain network induces fast rate-independent flow above it. This finding contrasts previous descriptions of subglacial sediment mechanics, which either assume rate dependence regardless of mechanical state or unconditional stability before the sediment yield point. Our new micromechanical computational approach is capable of reproducing important transitions between these two end-member models and can explain multimodal velocity patterns observed in glaciers, landslides, and slow-moving tremor zones.

  6. Characterizing the seasonal cycle of upper-ocean flows under multi-year sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Timmermans, M.-L.

    2017-05-01

    Observations in the Arctic Ocean suggest that upper-ocean dynamics under sea ice might be significantly weaker than in the temperate oceans. In particular, observational evidence suggests that currents developing under sea ice present weak or absent submesoscale (O(1) Rossby number) dynamics, in contrast with midlatitude oceans typically characterized by more energetic dynamics at these scales. Idealized numerical model results of the upper ocean under multi-year sea ice, subject to realistic forcing, are employed to describe the evolution of the submesoscale flow field. During both summer and winter under multi-year sea ice, the simulated submesoscale flow field is typically much less energetic than in the midlatitude ice-free oceans. Rossby numbers under sea ice are generally consistent with geostrophic dynamics (Ro ∼ O(10-3)). During summer, ice melt generates a shallow mixed layer (O(1) m) which isolates the surface from deeper, warmer and saltier waters. The Ekman balance generally dominates the mixed layer, although inertial waves are present in the simulations during weakening and reversals of the ice-ocean stress. During winter, mixed-layer deepening (to about 40 m depth), is associated with convection driven by sea-ice growth, as well as ice-ocean shear-driven entrainment at the base of the mixed layer. Submesoscale activity is observed to develop only rarely, when winter convective mixing is laterally inhomogeneous (i.e., in the presence of sea-ice leads or spatially inhomogeneous sea-ice thickness) and when this coincides with weak ice-ocean shear-driven mixing. These submesoscale features are diagnosed with particular focus on their implications for ocean-to-ice heat fluxes.

  7. An improved continuous flow analysis system for high-resolution field measurements on ice cores.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Patrik R; Federer, Urs; Hutterli, Manuel A; Bigler, Matthias; Schüpbach, Simon; Ruth, Urs; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) is a well-established method to obtain information about impurity contents in ice cores as indicators of past changes in the climate system. A section of an ice core is continuously melted on a melter head supplying a sample water flow which is analyzed online. This provides high depth and time resolution of the ice core records and very efficient sample decontamination as only the inner part of the ice sample is analyzed. Here we present an improved CFA system which has been totally redesigned in view of a significantly enhanced overall efficiency and flexibility, signal quality, compactness, and ease of use. These are critical requirements especially for operations of CFA during field campaigns, e.g., in Antarctica or Greenland. Furthermore, a novel deviceto measure the total air content in the ice was developed. Subsequently, the air bubbles are now extracted continuously from the sample water flow for subsequent gas measurements.

  8. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed method of analytically predicting the minimum fluid flow rate required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge system on a wing under a given set of flight conditions is presented. Results of the proposed method are compared with the actual results of an icing test of a real wing section in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel.

  9. Amplified melt and flow of the Greenland ice sheet driven by late-summer cyclonic rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Samuel H.; Hubbard, Alun; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Box, Jason E.; van As, Dirk; Scharrer, Kilian; Meierbachtol, Toby W.; Smeets, Paul C. J. P.; Harper, Joel T.; Johansson, Emma; Mottram, Ruth H.; Mikkelsen, Andreas B.; Wilhelms, Frank; Patton, Henry; Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Bryn

    2015-08-01

    Intense rainfall events significantly affect Alpine and Alaskan glaciers through enhanced melting, ice-flow acceleration and subglacial sediment erosion, yet their impact on the Greenland ice sheet has not been assessed. Here we present measurements of ice velocity, subglacial water pressure and meteorological variables from the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet during a week of warm, wet cyclonic weather in late August and early September 2011. We find that extreme surface runoff from melt and rainfall led to a widespread acceleration in ice flow that extended 140 km into the ice-sheet interior. We suggest that the late-season timing was critical in promoting rapid runoff across an extensive bare ice surface that overwhelmed a subglacial hydrological system in transition to a less-efficient winter mode. Reanalysis data reveal that similar cyclonic weather conditions prevailed across southern and western Greenland during this time, and we observe a corresponding ice-flow response at all land- and marine-terminating glaciers in these regions for which data are available. Given that the advection of warm, moist air masses and rainfall over Greenland is expected to become more frequent in the coming decades, our findings portend a previously unforeseen vulnerability of the Greenland ice sheet to climate change.

  10. The role of ice dynamics in shaping vegetation in flowing waters.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Polvi, Lina E; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Ice dynamics is an important factor affecting vegetation in high-altitude and high-latitude streams and rivers. During the last few decades, knowledge about ice in streams and rivers has increased significantly and a respectable body of literature is now available. Here we review the literature on how ice dynamics influence riparian and aquatic vegetation. Traditionally, plant ecologists have focused their studies on the summer period, largely ignoring the fact that processes during winter also impact vegetation dynamics. For example, the freeze-up period in early winter may result in extensive formation of underwater ice that can restructure the channel, obstruct flow, and cause flooding and thus formation of more ice. In midwinter, slow-flowing reaches develop a surface-ice cover that accumulates snow, protecting habitats under the ice from formation of underwater ice but also reducing underwater light, thus suppressing photosynthesis. Towards the end of winter, ice breaks up and moves downstream. During this transport, ice floes can jam up and cause floods and major erosion. The magnitudes of the floods and their erosive power mainly depend on the size of the watercourse, also resulting in different degrees of disturbance to the vegetation. Vegetation responds both physically and physiologically to ice dynamics. Physical action involves the erosive force of moving ice and damage caused by ground frost, whereas physiological effects - mostly cell damage - happen as a result of plants freezing into the ice. On a community level, large magnitudes of ice dynamics seem to favour species richness, but can be detrimental for individual plants. Human impacts, such as flow regulation, channelisation, agriculturalisation and water pollution have modified ice dynamics; further changes are expected as a result of current and predicted future climate change. Human impacts and climate change can both favour and disfavour riverine vegetation dynamics. Restoration of streams

  11. Flow Regulation for Controlled River-Ice Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Owa = hwa (Ta - T) (14) Equations I and 2, on substituting eq 7 through 9,can be written symbolically where hwa is the heat transfer coefficient at the...on the top surface of the ice cover, Assigned k = thermal conductivity of ice, and Empirical coefficient Symbol value hwi = heat transfer coefficient ...first and second terms on the righthand side ofeq progression Fmax 0.09 Heat- transfer coefficient at air/ice interface his 20 W/m2/C 29 are ice-sheet

  12. Pattern and timing of retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris D.; Hughes, Anna L. C.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Jordan, Colm; Sejrup, Hans Petter

    2012-06-01

    During the last glacial the ice sheet that subsumed most of Britain, Ireland and the North Sea attained its maximum extent by 27 ka BP and with an ice volume sufficient to raise global sea level by ca 2.5 m when it melted. We reconstruct the demise of this British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) and present palaeo-glaciological maps of retreat stages between 27 and 15 ka BP. The whole land area was investigated using remote sensing data and we present maps of moraines, meltwater channels, eskers, and drumlins and a methodology of how to interpret and bring them together. For the continental shelf, numerous large moraines were discovered recording an extensive pattern of retreat stretching from SW Ireland to the Shetland Isles. From an integration of this new mapping of glacial geomorphology (>26,000 landforms) with previously published evidence, compiled in the BRITICE database, we derive a pattern of retreat for the whole BIIS. We review and compile relevant dates (881 examples) that constrain the timing of retreat. All data are held within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and are deciphered to produce a best-estimate of the combined pattern and timing of retreat. Pattern information reveals an ice sheet mainly comprised of a shelf-parallel configuration from SW Ireland to NE Scotland but it spread far enough to the south to incorporate outlying ice domes over Wales, the Lake District and Kerry. Final disintegration was into a number of separate ice caps, rather than reduction as a single mass, and paradoxically, retreat was not always back to high ground. By 23 ka BP ice withdrew along its northern boundaries at the same time as the southern margins were expanding, including transient ice streaming down the Irish Sea and advances of lobes in the Cheshire Basin, Vale of York and east coast of England. Ice divides migrated south. By 19 ka the ice sheet was in crisis with widespread marine-based ice losses, particularly in the northern North Sea and the Irish Sea

  13. Generation of pyroclastic flows by explosive interaction of lava flows with ice/water-saturated substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Behncke, Boris; Belousova, Marina

    2011-04-01

    We describe a new type of secondary rootless phreatomagmatic explosions observed at active lava flows at volcanoes Klyuchevskoy (Russia) and Etna (Italy). The explosions occurred at considerable (up to 5 km) distances from primary volcanic vents, generally at steep (15-35°) slopes, and in places where incandescent basaltic or basaltic-andesitic lava propagated over ice/water-saturated substrate. The explosions produced high (up to 7 km) vertical ash/steam-laden clouds as well as pyroclastic flows that traveled up to 2 km downslope. Individual lobes of the pyroclastic flow deposits were up to 2 m thick, had steep lateral margins, and were composed of angular to subrounded bomb-size clasts in a poorly sorted ash-lapilli matrix. Character of the juvenile rock clasts in the pyroclastic flows (poorly vesiculated with chilled and fractured cauliflower outer surfaces) indicated their origin by explosive fragmentation of lava due to contact with external water. Non-juvenile rocks derived from the substrate of the lava flows comprised up to 75% in some of the pyroclastic flow deposits. We suggest a model where gradual heating of a water-saturated substrate under the advancing lava flow elevates pore pressure and thus reduces basal friction (in the case of frozen substrate water is initially formed by thawing of the substrate along the contact with lava). On steep slope this leads to gravitational instability and sliding of a part of the active lava flow and water-saturated substrate. The sliding lava and substrate disintegrate and intermix, triggering explosive "fuel-coolant" type interaction that produces large volume of fine-grained clastic material. Relatively cold steam-laden cloud of the phreatomagmatic explosion has limited capacity to transport upward the produced clastic material, thus part of it descends downslope in the form of pyroclastic flow. Similar explosive events were described for active lava flows of Llaima (Chile), Pavlof (Alaska), and Hekla (Iceland

  14. Flow dynamics and iceberg calving rates of Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, David O.; Sharp, Martin J.; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Benham, Toby J.

    The surface velocity field of Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada, was mapped using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Ascending European Remote-sensing Satellite 1 and 2 (ERS-1/-2) tandem mode data were used for the western and southeast sectors, and 3 day repeat pass ERS-1 imagery for the northeast sector. Speckle-tracking procedures were used with RADARSAT 1 imagery to obtain surface velocities over the terminus of Belcher Glacier (a major calving front) where decorrelation between ERS data occurred. The InSAR data highlight a significant contrast in ice-flow dynamics between the east and west sides of the ice cap. Ice movement west of the main north south divide is dominated by relatively uniform 'sheet' flow, but three fast-flowing outlet glaciers that extend 14 23 km beyond the ice-cap margin also drain this region. Several outlet glaciers that extend up to 60 km inland from the eastern margin drain the eastern side of the ice cap. The dominant ice-flow regimes were classified based on the relationship between the driving stress (averaged over a length scale of ten ice thicknesses) and the ratio of surface velocity to ice thickness. The mapped distribution of flow regimes appears to depict the spatial extent of basal sliding across the ice cap. This is supported by a close relationship between the occurrence of flow stripes on the ice surface and flow regimes where basal sliding was found to be an important component of the glacier motion. Iceberg calving rates were computed using measured surface velocities and ice thicknesses derived from airborne radio-echo sounding. The volume of ice calved between 1960 and 1999 was estimated to be 20.5 ± 4.7 km3 (or 0.57 km3 a-1). Approximately 89% of this loss occurred along the eastern margin. The largest single source is Belcher Glacier, which accounts for ˜50% of the total amount of ice calved.

  15. Patterns and flow in frictional fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sandnes, B.; Flekkøy, E.G.; Knudsen, H.A.; Måløy, K.J.; See, H.

    2011-01-01

    Pattern-forming processes in simple fluids and suspensions have been studied extensively, and the basic displacement structures, similar to viscous fingers and fractals in capillary dominated flows, have been identified. However, the fundamental displacement morphologies in frictional fluids and granular mixtures have not been mapped out. Here we consider Coulomb friction and compressibility in the fluid dynamics, and discover surprising responses including highly intermittent flow and a transition to quasi-continuodynamics. Moreover, by varying the injection rate over several orders of magnitude, we characterize new dynamic modes ranging from stick-slip bubbles at low rate to destabilized viscous fingers at high rate. We classify the fluid dynamics into frictional and viscous regimes, and present a unified description of emerging morphologies in granular mixtures in the form of extended phase diagrams. PMID:21505444

  16. On the main flow pattern in hydrocyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.C.; Shen, H.Q.; Zhu, G.; Khonsari, M.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the prediction of the main flow pattern in hydrocyclones. The model regards the main body of the cyclone as inviscid and includes provisions for the fluid underflow in cyclones. The governing equations are solved analytically in closed form. To verify the results, a laboratory-scale conically-shaped hydrocyclone was designed, built, and tested. Experimental measurements for axial and tangential velocities are presented with a series of test solely devoted to the effect of underflow. The theoretical and experimental results are shown to be in good agreement. It is concluded that such an inviscid model gives an adequate representation of the main flow field in a cyclone.

  17. Historical Dates of Ice-Affected Flows for 18 Rivers in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Caldwell, James M.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Historical dates of ice-affected flows for 18 rivers in New England were compiled and are presented in this report. The length of this record for the rivers ranges from 48 to 71 years, with an average of 62 years. The minimum number of days of ice-affected flow in a water year (October 1 to September 30) ranged from zero on three rivers in south-coastal Maine and coastal New Hampshire to 110 on the Allagash River in northern Maine. The maximum number of days of ice-affected flow in a water year ranged from 106 on the Royal River in south-coastal Maine to 171 on the Allagash River in northern Maine. Six streamflow-< gaging stations in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont had their latest days of ice-affected flow in the spring of 1939.

  18. Full Stokes or shallow ice approximation? Comparing the ice flow dynamics at the Shirase Drainage Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    2012-12-01

    Covering an area of 2 x 105 km2, the Shirase Drainage Basin is located in East Antarctica (37-50° E, 70-78° S). The basin is characterized by the convergence of the ice flow towards the Shirase glacier, one of the fastest flowing glacier in Antarctica. The Shirase glacier flows at a speed of 2.3 km a-1 at the grounding line (Rignot, 2002; Pattyn and Derauw, 2002; Nakamura and others, 2008) and drains about 10 Gt a-1 of ice through a narrow outlet into the Lützow-Holm Bay (Fujii, 1981). With nearly 90% of total ice discharge from the basin being calved by the glacier, the fast flowing nature of the Shirase glacier is important for the investigation of the ice sheet mass budget in this region. The dynamics of the Shirase glacier is investigated by means of the full Stokes equations and the shallow ice approximation. The model Elmer/Ice (http://elmerice.elmerfem.com) is applied to the Shirase Drainage Basin and employs the finite element method to solve the full Stokes equations, the temperature evolution equation and the evolution equation of the free surface. The shallow ice approximation is also implemented into Elmer/Ice so that both the full Stokes and the shallow ice approximation are computed on the same mesh. Data for the present geometry (surface and basal topographies with no shelf) are obtained from the Community Ice Sheet Model, based on the DEM of Bamber and others (2009) and Griggs and Bamber (2009), and on the BEDMAP1-Plus ice sheet basal topography. A mesh of the computational domain is created using an initial footprint which contains elements from 15 km to 500 m horizontal resolution. The footprint is vertically extruded to form a 3D mesh of 240720 elements with 21 equidistant, terrain-following layers. The approach taken in this study is to compare the response of the glacier to dynamical and climate forcings when separately the full Stokes and the shallow ice approximation are employed. The sensitivity experiments are modeled after the Sea

  19. Analysing subglacial geology hidden beneath the ice streams flowing into the Weddell Sea (West Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; King, O.; Jordan, T. A.; Ross, N.; Bingham, R. G.; Le Brocq, A. M.; Smith, A.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.; Siegert, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial geology provides important controls on the onset and maintenance of fast glacial flow in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). Widespread subglacial sediments deposited within deep rift basins, thinner drapes of marine sediments within the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and high geothermal heat flux associated with Cenozoic magmatism have been previously identified as key geological controls that can modulate ice sheet dynamics. Here, we compile a suite of new and vintage aeromagnetic and airborne gravity observations to examine the large-scale geological setting of several major ice streams flowing into the Weddell Sea Embayment and assess the role of geological controls on subglacial topography and WAIS flow regimes. We focus on the subglacial geology beneath the Institute and Moeller ice streams, the Rutford ice stream and the Evans ice stream. We show that the Moeller ice stream is underlain by a major strike-slip fault system, which is part of the tectonic boundary between East and West Antarctica. A set of en-echelon subglacial basins formed along the strike-slip fault and these basins appear to steer enhanced flow far inland. Deep sedimentary basins are not present along this fault system, however, suggesting that subglacial sediments are not necessarily a geological template for the onset of fast glacial flow. The recently identified Robin Subglacial Basin that underlies the fast flowing coastal region of the Institute ice stream contains 1-3 km of sedimentary infill and smooth bedrock topography. Enhanced flow in the tributaries of the Institute ice stream cuts across the Ellsworth Mountains and is controlled by basement faults displacing metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Prominent magnetic anomalies overlie outcrops of Jurassic granitic intrusions and enable us to trace their subglacial extent beneath the catchments of Institute, Moeller and Rutford ice streams. These large granitoid bodies form topographic highs that appear to divert

  20. Non-basal dislocations should be accounted for in simulating ice mass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Piazolo, S.; Journaux, B.; Wheeler, J.; Barou, F.; Mainprice, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Prediction of ice mass flow and associated dynamics is pivotal at a time of climate change. Ice flow is dominantly accommodated by the motion of crystal defects - the dislocations. In the specific case of ice, their observation is not always accessible by means of the classical tools such as X-ray diffraction or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Part of the dislocation population, the geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) can nevertheless be constrained using crystal orientation measurements via electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) associated with appropriate analyses based on the Nye (1950) approach. The present study uses the Weighted Burgers Vectors, a reduced formulation of the Nye theory that enables the characterization of GNDs. Applied to ice, this method documents, for the first time, the presence of dislocations with non-basal [ c ] or < c + a > Burgers vectors. These [ c ] or < c + a > dislocations represent up to 35% of the GNDs observed in laboratory-deformed ice samples. Our findings offer a more complex and comprehensive picture of the key plasticity processes responsible for polycrystalline ice creep and provide better constraints on the constitutive mechanical laws implemented in ice sheet flow models used to predict the response of Earth ice masses to climate change.

  1. Optimising ice flow law parameters using borehole deformation measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David; Hubbard, Bryn; Hubbard, Alun; Murray, Tavi; Rippin, David

    2008-06-01

    Internal ice strain rates have been measured along two boreholes drilled through Glacier de Tsanfleuron, Switzerland. Differences between these measurements and the output from a 3D numerical model of glacier motion have been minimized by a scheme that optimizes three rheological parameters in the constitutive equation for ice creep: the stress exponent n, the rate factor A, and a Lower Zone (basal ice) enhancement factor E LZ . Results suggest that a linear rheology dominated by diffusion creep (n = 1) is more appropriate for modelling ice flow in this relatively thin (generally <80 m thick) glacier than the conventional n = 3, and that E LZ is ~2. For n = 1, the predicted ice crystal size and value of E LZ are both consistent with measurements made on ice cores recovered from the glacier, providing independent support for the optimization technique and the linear creep model.

  2. Self-regulation of ice flow varies across the ablation area in south-west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wal, R. S. W.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.; Boot, W.; Stoffelen, M.; van Kampen, R.; Doyle, S. H.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Reijmer, C. H.; Oerlemans, J.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-04-01

    The concept of a positive feedback between ice flow and enhanced melt rates in a warmer climate fuelled the debate regarding the temporal and spatial controls on seasonal ice acceleration. Here we combine melt, basal water pressure and ice velocity data. Using 20 years of data covering the whole ablation area, we show that there is not a strong positive correlation between annual ice velocities and melt rates. Annual velocities even slightly decreased with increasing melt. Results also indicate that melt variations are most important for velocity variations in the upper ablation zone up to the equilibrium line altitude. During the extreme melt in 2012, a large velocity response near the equilibrium line was observed, highlighting the possibility of meltwater to have an impact even high on the ice sheet. This may lead to an increase of the annual ice velocity in the region above S9 and requires further monitoring.

  3. Self-regulation of ice flow varies across the ablation area in South-West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wal, R. S. W.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.; Boot, W.; Stoffelen, M.; van Kampen, R.; Doyle, S.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Reijmer, C. H.; Oerlemans, J.; Hubbard, A.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of a positive feedback between ice flow and enhanced melt rates in a warmer climate fuelled the debate regarding the temporal and spatial controls on seasonal ice acceleration. Here we combine melt, basal water pressure, and ice velocity data. We show using twenty years of data covering the whole ablation area that there is no strong feedback between annual ice velocities and melt rates. Annual velocities even slightly decreased with increasing melt. Results also indicate that melt variations are most important for velocity variations in the upper ablation zone up to the equilibrium line altitude. During the extreme melt in 2012 a large velocity response near the equilibrium line was observed, highlighting the possibility of rapidly changing bed conditions in this part of the ice sheet that may lead to a doubling of the annual ice velocity.

  4. Increased ice flow in Western Palmer Land linked to ocean melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Anna E.; Shepherd, Andrew; Cornford, Stephen L.; Briggs, Kate H.; Gourmelen, Noel; Graham, Jennifer A.; Joughin, Ian; Mouginot, Jeremie; Nagler, Thomas; Payne, Antony J.; Rignot, Eric; Wuite, Jan

    2017-05-01

    A decrease in the mass and volume of Western Palmer Land has raised the prospect that ice speed has increased in this marine-based sector of Antarctica. To assess this possibility, we measure ice velocity over 25 years using satellite imagery and an optimized modeling approach. More than 30 unnamed outlet glaciers drain the 800 km coastline of Western Palmer Land at speeds ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 m/d, interspersed with near-stagnant ice. Between 1992 and 2015, most of the outlet glaciers sped up by 0.2 to 0.3 m/d, leading to a 13% increase in ice flow and a 15 km3/yr increase in ice discharge across the sector as a whole. Speedup is greatest where glaciers are grounded more than 300 m below sea level, consistent with a loss of buttressing caused by ice shelf thinning in a region of shoaling warm circumpolar water.

  5. Optimization of high-resolution continuous flow analysis for transient climate signals in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto; Vallelonga, Paul; Nielsen, Maibritt E; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2011-05-15

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high-resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features a depth resolution in the ice of a few millimeters which is considerably better than other CFA systems. Thus, the new system can resolve ice strata down to 10 mm thickness and has the potential of identifying annual layers in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores throughout the last glacial cycle.

  6. What makes a good descriptor for heterogeneous ice nucleation on OH-patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedevilla, Philipp; Fitzner, Martin; Michaelides, Angelos

    2017-09-01

    Freezing of water is arguably one of the most common phase transitions on Earth and almost always happens heterogeneously. Despite its importance, we lack a fundamental understanding of what makes substrates efficient ice nucleators. Here we address this by computing the ice nucleation (IN) ability of numerous model hydroxylated substrates with diverse surface hydroxyl (OH) group arrangements. Overall, for the substrates considered, we find that neither the symmetry of the OH patterns nor the similarity between a substrate and ice correlate well with the IN ability. Instead, we find that the OH density and the substrate-water interaction strength are useful descriptors of a material's IN ability. This insight allows the rationalization of ice nucleation ability across a wide range of materials and can aid the search and design of novel potent ice nucleators in the future.

  7. Heterogeneous Heat Flow and Groundwater Effects on East Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, B. T.; Soderlund, K. M.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results numerical models describing the potential contributions groundwater and heterogeneous heat sources might have on ice dynamics. A two-phase, 1D hydrothermal model demonstrates the importance of groundwater flow in heat flux advection near the ice-bed interface. Typical, conservative vertical groundwater volume fluxes on the order of +/- 1-10 mm/yr can alter vertical heat flux by +/- 50-500 mW/m2 that could produce considerable volumes of meltwater depending on basin geometry and geothermal heat production. A 1D hydromechanical model demonstrates that during ice advance groundwater is mainly recharged into saturated sedimentary aquifers and during retreat groundwater discharges into the ice-bed interface, potentially contributing to subglacial water budgets on the order of 0.1-1 mm/yr during ice retreat. A map of most-likely elevated heat production provinces, estimated sedimentary basin depths, and radar-derived bed roughness are compared together to delineate areas of greatest potential to ice sheet instability in East Antarctica. Finally, a 2D numerical model of crustal fluid and heat flow typical to recently estimated sedimentary basins under the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is coupled to a 2.5D Full Stokes ice sheet model (with simple basal hydrology) to test for the sensitivity of hydrodynamic processes on ice sheet dynamics. Preliminary results show that the enhanced fluid flow can dramatically alter the basal heating of the ice and its temperature profile, as well as, the sliding rate, which heavily alter ice dynamics.

  8. Paleo-Ice Sheet/Stream Flow Directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Based Upon New Synthesis of Multibeam Seabed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Lavoie, C.; Scambos, T. A.; Pettit, E. C.; Schenke, H. W.; Yoo, K. C.; Larter, R. D.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-12-01

    We provide a new map of swath bathymetry for the northern Antarctic Peninsula, including data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the compilation and examination of Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes). The results show a flow divergence in Larsen B embayment, between flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) that directed ice in a southeast direction, then easterly as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" directed ice southeasterly then southward, as ice overflowed the Jason Peninsula to reach the Jason Trough, the southern perimeter of the embayment. This reconstruction is far more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel. Our reconstitution also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which in turn serve to delineate seven broad regions where ice domes must have been centered across the continental shelf during the LGM.

  9. Antarctic subglacial groundwater: measurement concept and potential influence on ice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Siegert, Martin; Bougamont, Marion; Christoffersen, Poul; Key, Kerry; Andersen, Kristoffer; Booth, Adam; Smith, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Is groundwater abundant in Antarctica and does it modulate ice flow? Answering this question matters because ice streams flow by gliding over a wet substrate of till. Water fed to ice-stream beds thus influences ice-sheet dynamics and, potentially, sea-level rise. It is recognised that both till and the sedimentary basins from which it originates are porous and could host a reservoir of mobile groundwater that interacts with the subglacial interfacial system. According to recent numerical modelling up to half of all water available for basal lubrication, and time lags between hydrological forcing and ice-sheet response as long as millennia, may have been overlooked in models of ice flow. Here, we review evidence in support of Antarctic groundwater and propose how it can be measured to ascertain the extent to which it modulates ice flow. We present new seismoelectric soundings of subglacial till, and new magnetotelluric and transient electromagnetic forward models of subglacial groundwater reservoirs. We demonstrate that multi-facetted and integrated geophysical datasets can detect, delineate and quantify the groundwater contents of subglacial sedimentary basins and, potentially, monitor groundwater exchange rates between subglacial till layers. We thus describe a new area of glaciological investigation and how it should progress in future.

  10. The effect of rock particles and D2O replacement on the flow behaviour of ice.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Ceri A; Grindrod, Peter M; Sammonds, Peter R

    2017-02-13

    Ice-rock mixtures are found in a range of natural terrestrial and planetary environments. To understand how flow processes occur in these environments, laboratory-derived properties can be extrapolated to natural conditions through flow laws. Here, deformation experiments have been carried out on polycrystalline samples of pure ice, ice-rock and D2O-ice-rock mixtures at temperatures of 263, 253 and 233 K, confining pressure of 0 and 48 MPa, rock fraction of 0-50 vol.% and strain-rates of 5 × 10(-7) to 5 × 10(-5) s(-1) Both the presence of rock particles and replacement of H2O by D2O increase bulk strength. Calculated flow law parameters for ice and H2O-ice-rock are similar to literature values at equivalent conditions, except for the value of the rock fraction exponent, here found to be 1. D2O samples are 1.8 times stronger than H2O samples, probably due to the higher mass of deuterons when compared with protons. A gradual transition between dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive deformation at the lowest strain-rates in ice and ice-rock samples is suggested. These results demonstrate that flow laws can be found to describe ice-rock behaviour, and should be used in modelling of natural processes, but that further work is required to constrain parameters and mechanisms for the observed strength enhancement.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  11. The effect of rock particles and D2O replacement on the flow behaviour of ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Ceri A.; Grindrod, Peter M.; Sammonds, Peter R.

    2017-02-01

    Ice-rock mixtures are found in a range of natural terrestrial and planetary environments. To understand how flow processes occur in these environments, laboratory-derived properties can be extrapolated to natural conditions through flow laws. Here, deformation experiments have been carried out on polycrystalline samples of pure ice, ice-rock and D2O-ice-rock mixtures at temperatures of 263, 253 and 233 K, confining pressure of 0 and 48 MPa, rock fraction of 0-50 vol.% and strain-rates of 5 × 10-7 to 5 × 10-5 s-1. Both the presence of rock particles and replacement of H2O by D2O increase bulk strength. Calculated flow law parameters for ice and H2O-ice-rock are similar to literature values at equivalent conditions, except for the value of the rock fraction exponent, here found to be 1. D2O samples are 1.8 times stronger than H2O samples, probably due to the higher mass of deuterons when compared with protons. A gradual transition between dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive deformation at the lowest strain-rates in ice and ice-rock samples is suggested. These results demonstrate that flow laws can be found to describe ice-rock behaviour, and should be used in modelling of natural processes, but that further work is required to constrain parameters and mechanisms for the observed strength enhancement. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  12. Patterns and stability of a whirlpool flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, Luis; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.; María López-Herrera, José

    2017-04-01

    This numerical study reveals stable multi-eddy patterns of a steady axisymmetric air-water flow driven by the rotating bottom disk in a vertical sealed cylindrical container. As rotation strength Re increases, eddies emerge, coalesce, separate, and disappear in both air and water. The topological scenario varies with water volume fraction H w according to the results obtained for H w = 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. Interesting features are: (a) zipper-like chains of air and water eddies forming as the interface bends and (b) bubble-ring air eddies existing in the Re ranges specified in the paper. The stability analysis, performed with the help of a novel efficient technique for two-fluid flows, shows that these multi-eddy motions are stable. The shear-layer instability develops as the interface approaches either the top or bottom of the container and some eddies vanish. The physical reasoning behind the eddy formation and the flow instability is provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can have applications in bioreactors.

  13. Tropically driven and externally forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change: reconciling observed and modeled trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, David P.; Deser, Clara

    2017-09-01

    Recent work suggests that natural variability has played a significant role in the increase of Antarctic sea ice extent during 1979-2013. The ice extent has responded strongly to atmospheric circulation changes, including a deepened Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), which in part has been driven by tropical variability. Nonetheless, this increase has occurred in the context of externally forced climate change, and it has been difficult to reconcile observed and modeled Antarctic sea ice trends. To understand observed-model disparities, this work defines the internally driven and radiatively forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change and exposes potential model biases using results from two sets of historical experiments of a coupled climate model compared with observations. One ensemble is constrained only by external factors such as greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone, while the other explicitly accounts for the influence of tropical variability by specifying observed SST anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific. The latter experiment reproduces the deepening of the ASL, which drives an increase in regional ice extent due to enhanced ice motion and sea surface cooling. However, the overall sea ice trend in every ensemble member of both experiments is characterized by ice loss and is dominated by the forced pattern, as given by the ensemble-mean of the first experiment. This pervasive ice loss is associated with a strong warming of the ocean mixed layer, suggesting that the ocean model does not locally store or export anomalous heat efficiently enough to maintain a surface environment conducive to sea ice expansion. The pervasive upper-ocean warming, not seen in observations, likely reflects ocean mean-state biases.

  14. Investigation of the flow in the diffuser section of the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The flow in the diffuser section of the Icing Research Wind Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center is investigated using both tunnel calibration measurements and numerical simulation techniques. Local pressure and temperature measurements are made to establish velocity and temperature profiles in the diffuser of the tunnel. These profiles are compared with similar measurements made prior to renovating the equipment which generates the tunnel's icing cloud. This comparison indicates the manner in which this change affected the flow. The measured data were also compared with a numerical simulation of the flow to help understand how such changes may favorably alter the tunnel flow.

  15. A model for spiral flows in basal ice and the formation of subglacial flutes based on a Reiner-Rivlin rheology for glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoof, Christian G.; Clarke, Garry K. C.

    2008-05-01

    Flutes are elongated sediment ridges formed at the base of glaciers and ice sheets. In this paper, we show that flutes can be the product of a corkscrew-like spiral flow in basal ice that removes sediment from troughs between flutes and deposits it at their crests, as first suggested by Shaw and Freschauf. In order to generate the type of basal ice flow required for this mechanism, the viscous rheology of ice must allow for the generation of deviatoric normal stresses transverse to the main flow direction. This type of behavior, which is commonly observed in real nonlinearly viscous and viscoelastic fluids, can be described by a Reiner-Rivlin rheology. Here, we develop a mathematical model that describes the role of these transverse stresses in generating spiral flows in basal ice and investigate how these flows lead to the amplification of initially small basal topography and the eventual formation of assemblies of evenly spaced subglacial flutes.

  16. Detection and Analysis of Complex Patterns of Ice Dynamics in Antarctica from ICESat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, Gregory Scott

    There remains much uncertainty in estimating the amount of Antarctic ice mass change, its dynamic component, and its spatial and temporal patterns. This work remedies the limitations of previous studies by generating the first detailed reconstruction of total and dynamic ice thickness and mass changes across Antarctica, from ICESat satellite altimetry observations in 2003-2009 using the Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change Detection (SERAC) method. Ice sheet thickness changes are calculated with quantified error estimates for each time when ICESat flew over a ground-track crossover region, at approximately 110,000 locations across the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The time series are partitioned into changes due to surficial processes and ice dynamics. The new results markedly improve the spatial and temporal resolution of surface elevation, volume, and mass change rates for the AIS, and can be sampled at annual temporal resolutions. The results indicate a complex spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic mass loss in Antarctica, especially along individual outlet glaciers, and allow for the quantification of the annual contribution of Antarctic ice loss to sea level rise. Over 5000 individual locations exhibit either strong dynamic ice thickness change patterns, accounting for approximately 500 unique spatial clusters that identify regions likely influenced by subglacial hydrology. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of these regions reveal the complexity and short-time scale variability in the subglacial hydrological system. From the 500 unique spatial clusters, over 370 represent newly identified, and not previously published, potential subglacial water bodies indicating an active subglacial hydrological system over a much larger region than previously observed. These numerous new observations of dynamic changes provide more than simply a larger set of data. Examination of both regional and local scale dynamic change patterns across Antarctica shows newly

  17. Radar Evidence For Past Ice Flow on Gemina Lingula in the North Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Koutnik, M. R.; Waddington, E. D.; Holt, J. W.; Smith, I.; Pathare, A.; Byrne, S.; King, B.; Knott, R.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the occurrence and significance of ice flow in the Martian polar layered deposits is fundamental to decoding any records of climate they may contain. The shape of surface topography between troughs on Gemina Lingula (GL) corresponds closely to the generic shape set by ice dynamics when flow equilibrates surface accumulation at higher elevations and ablation at lower elevations. This indicates ice flow in the past, with evidence preserved in 'relict topography' between troughs, which is nearly unaltered since the time of flow (Winebrenner et al., Icarus 195, 90-105, 2008). This scenario predicts two properties of near-surface stratigraphy, when traced along putative paths of past ice flow: (1) layers do not intersect the topographic surface in the past accumulation zone; and (2) layers may intersect relict topographic surfaces in the past ablation zone. The first prediction, in conjunction with the shape of surface topography, is a strong test: observation of layer/surface intersections in the putative past accumulation area disproves the scenario. Here we present observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar (SHARAD) that support both predictions. At higher elevations on GL, we trace layers in the upper few hundred meters around closed contours formed by radar ground-tracks, and fit a low-order polynomial to the noisy layer elevations, to estimate layer elevations on putative paths of past ice flow. We find no evidence for layer/surface intersections in the past accumulation zone indicated by our earlier interpretation of surface topography. Fortuitously, ice flow paths and radar-ground tracks at lower elevations on GL are, in several instances, nearly parallel and overlapping. We find several instances of layers intersecting the surface of relict topography (as indicated by our earlier interpretation), in the putative area of past ablation. We interpret these observations as further evidence for past ice flow on Gemina Lingula in

  18. New evidence for ice shelf flow across the Alaska and Beaufort margins, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Jennifer L.

    The Arctic Ocean may act as a lynchpin for global climate change due to its unique physiography as a mediterranean sea located in polar latitudes. In our modern warming climate, debate over the bounds of natural versus anthropogenically-induced climate variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of Arctic ice extent and configuration over the last interglacial cycle. Longstanding controversy exists as to the volume, timing, and flow trajectories of ice in the Arctic Ocean during glacial maxima when continental ice sheets mantled circum-arctic landmasses. As a result of the Science Ice Exercise surveys of the Arctic Ocean in 1999, new evidence for ice grounding at depths down to 980 m on the Lomonosov Ridge and 750 m on the Chukchi Borderland indicates the likelihood that large ice shelves flowed into the ocean from both the Barents/Kara Sea and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago or eastern Alaska. Sidescan imagery of ˜14100 km2 of seafloor along the Alaska and Beaufort margins in water depths from 250--2800 m maps a repetitive association of recognizable sub-glacially generated bedforms, ice carved-bathymerry, and ice-marginal turbidite gullies over a 640 km stretch of the margin between Point Barrow and the MacKenzie River delta. Glaciogenic bedforms occur across the surface of a flattened bathymetric bench or 'second shelf break' that is interpreted to have been formed by an ice shelf eroding the continental slope. The glacial geology of surrounding areas suggests that an ice shelf on the Alaska and Beaufort margins likely flowed from the mouths of overdeepened glacial troughs in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago westward and across the Chukchi Borderland due to an obstruction in the central Canadian basin. Evidence for an ice shelf along the Alaska and Beaufort margins supports an expanded interpretation of ice volume and extent during Pleistocene glacial periods. This has far-reaching implications for Arctic climate studies, ocean circulation, sediment

  19. Flow-induced mixing in the GRIP basal ice deduced from the CO2 and CH4 records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchez, R.; Lemmens, M.; Chappellaz, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper documents a larger degree of mixing in ice near the bottom of an ice sheet than described, or suspected, previously. It shows, thanks to favourable circumstances due to CO2 and CH4 production underneath the ice, that flow-induced mixing within the basal ice has taken place at the scale of a few centimeters in the GRIP core. Such a mechanism must be considered when interpreting the ice properties in the bottom part of ice sheets and must be taken into account as a potential process of layer disruption in the low levels of the Central Greenland ice cores.

  20. Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Marchant, David R.; Kowalewski, Douglas E.; Head, James W., III

    2010-08-01

    Viscous flow lobes are common throughout the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica. These features have been described as rock glaciers, gelifluction lobes, solifluction lobes, talus mobilized by pore ice and/or segregation ice, and debris-covered glaciers. We investigate the origin, modification, and flow of a 2-km-long lobe (East Stocking Lobe or ESL) along the north wall of central Taylor Valley using field mapping techniques, shallow seismic surveys, time-dependent displacement surveys, and isotopic analyses of buried-ice samples. On the basis of these integrated analyses, we show that the ESL is cored with remnant glacier ice, most probably derived from an advance of nearby Stocking Glacier ˜ 130 kyr BP. Seismic data, coupled with results from ice-flow modeling assuming plastic flow of clean ice, suggest that the buried core of glacier ice is ˜ 14- to 30-m thick. Near its terminus, the ESL flows at a rate of ˜ 2.4 to 6.7 mm a - 1 . The loose drift that caps the buried ice (typically < 1 m thick) is composed of moderately stratified sand- and gravel-sized clasts; it is dry (1-3% soil gravimetric water content; GWC), except near ephemeral stream channels and the margins of melting snow banks (6-25% GWC). Stable isotopic analyses of samples from the upper 30 cm of the ice lie on a slope of ˜ 5.8 (when plotted on a δD vs. δ18O graph), well below the local meteoric water line of 7.75, suggesting modification by freeze/thaw processes and evaporation/sublimation. Measured air and soil temperatures show that intermittent melting is most likely possible during summer months where buried ice is ≤ 35 cm below the ground surface. Morphological comparisons with ice-cored deposits in upland regions of the Dry Valleys, e.g., Mullins and Beacon Valleys (30 km inland and ˜ 500 m higher in elevation), and near the coast (40 km distant and ˜ 500 m lower) reveal marked contrasts in the style of near-surface ice degradation and cryoturbation. From these morphological

  1. A Numerical Evaluation of Icing Effects on a Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, James J.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    As a part of CFD code validation efforts within the Icing Branch of NASA Glenn Research Center, computations were performed for natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoil, NLF-0414. with 6 and 22.5 minute ice accretions. Both 3-D ice castings and 2-D machine-generated ice shapes were used in wind tunnel tests to study the effects of natural ice is well as simulated ice. They were mounted in the test section of the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) at NASA Langley that the 2-dimensionality of the flow can be maintained. Aerodynamic properties predicted by computations were compared to data obtained through the experiment by the authors at the LTPT. Computations were performed only in 2-D and in the case of 3-D ice, the digitized ice shape obtained at one spanwise location was used. The comparisons were mainly concentrated on the lift characteristics over Reynolds numbers ranging from 3 to 10 million and Mach numbers ranging from 0.12 to 0.29. WIND code computations indicated that the predicted stall angles were in agreement with experiment within one or two degrees. The maximum lift values obtained by computations were in good agreement with those of the experiment for the 6 minute ice shapes and the minute 3-D ice, but were somewhat lower in the case of the 22.5 minute 2-D ice. In general, the Reynolds number variation did not cause much change in the lift values while the variation of Mach number showed more change in the lift. The Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model was the best performing model for the airfoil with the 22.5 minute ice and the Shear Stress Turbulence (SST) turbulence model was the best for the airfoil with the 6 minute ice and also for the clean airfoil. The pressure distribution on the surface of the iced airfoil showed good agreement for the 6 minute ice. However, relatively poor agreement of the pressure distribution on the upper surface aft of the leading edge horn for the 22.5 minute ice suggests that improvements are needed in the grid or

  2. Injury patterns and outcomes of ice-fishing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thiels, Cornelius A; Hernandez, Matthew C; Zielinski, Martin D; Aho, Johnathon M

    2016-07-01

    Fishing is a common pastime. In the developed world, it is commonly performed as a recreational activity. We aim to determine injury patterns and outcomes among patients injured while ice fishing. Data on initial emergency department visits from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) from 2009-2014 were analyzed. All patients with fishing related injuries were included. Primary endpoint was rate of admission or transfer. Secondary endpoints were defined a priori anatomical injury categories and patients were assigned into groups. Descriptive and power analysis was performed between patients with ice-fishing and traditional fishing related injuries. We identified 8220 patients who sustained fishing related injuries, of which n=85 (1%) involved ice fishing. Ice fishing injuries occurred primarily in males (88%) with a mean age of 39.4years ±17.5 (std dev). The most common injuries related to ice fishing were: orthopedic/musculoskeletal (46%), minor trauma (37%), and major trauma (6%). Hot thermal injuries (burns) were the fourth most common type of ice-fishing injury (5%) but rarely occurred in warmer fishing months (<1%, P=.004). Cold thermal injuries (1%) and hypothermia (0%) were rare among ice-fishing injuries and immersion/drowning occurred in 5% of cases. The rate of admission/transfer was significantly greater in ice-fishing (11%) than the traditional fishing patients 3%, (P<.001), power was 90%. Ice fishing is associated with more severe injury patterns and more thermal injuries and immersion injuries than traditional fishing. Providers and participants should be aware of the potential risks and benefits and counseled appropriately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Injury Patterns and Outcomes of Ice-Fishing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Thiels, Cornelius A.; Hernandez, Matthew C.; Zielinski, Martin D.; Aho, Johnathon M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fishing is a common pastime. In the developed world, it is commonly performed as a recreational activity. We aim to determine injury patterns and outcomes among patients injured while ice fishing. Methods Data on initial emergency department visits from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) from 2009-2014 were analyzed. All patients with fishing related injuries were included. Primary endpoint was rate of admission or transfer. Secondary endpoints were defined a priori anatomical injury categories and patients were assigned into groups. Descriptive and power analysis was performed between patients with ice-fishing and traditional fishing related injuries. Results We identified 8220 patients who sustained fishing related injuries, of which n=85 (1%) involved ice fishing. Ice fishing injuries occurred primarily in males (88%) with a mean age of 39.4 years ± 17.5 (std dev). The most common injuries related to ice fishing were: orthopedic/musculoskeletal (46%), minor trauma (37%), and major trauma (6%). Hot thermal injuries (burns) were the fourth most common type of ice-fishing injury (5%) but rarely occurred in warmer fishing months (<1%, p=0.004). Cold thermal injuries (1%) and hypothermia (0%) were rare among ice-fishing injuries and immersion/drowning occurred in 5% of cases. The rate of admission/transfer was significantly greater in ice-fishing (11%) than the traditional fishing patients 3%, p<0.001), power was 89.7%. Conclusion Ice fishing is associated with more severe injury patterns and more thermal injuries and immersion injuries than traditional fishing. Providers and participants should be aware of the potential risks and benefits and counseled appropriately. PMID:27117462

  4. Oil-flow separation patterns on an ogive forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Oil flow patterns on a symmetric tangent ogive forebody having a fineness ratio of 3.5 are presented for angles of attack up to 88 deg at a transitional Reynolds number of 8 million (based on base diameter) and a Mach number of 0.25. Results show typical surface flow separation patterns, the magnitude of surface flow angles, and the extent of laminar and turbulent flow for symmetric, asymmetric, and wakelike flow regimes.

  5. Pattern palette for complex fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandnes, B.

    2012-04-01

    From landslides to oil and gas recovery to the squeeze of a toothpaste tube, flowing complex fluids are everywhere around us in nature and engineering. That is not to say, though, that they are always well understood. The dissipative interactions, through friction and inelastic collisions, often give rise to nonlinear dynamics and complexity manifested in pattern formation on large scales. The images displayed on this poster illustrate the diverse morphologies found in multiphase flows involving wet granular material: Air is injected into a generic mixture of granular material and fluid contained in a 500 µm gap between two parallel glass plates. At low injection rates, friction between the grains - glass beads averaging 100 µm in diameter - dominates the rheology, producing "stick-slip bubbles" and labyrinthine frictional fingering. A transition to various other morphologies, including "corals" and viscous fingers, emerges for increasing injection rate. At sufficiently high granular packing fractions, the material behaves like a deformable, porous solid, and the air rips through in sudden fractures.

  6. Air flow patterns in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Howorth, F H

    1980-04-01

    Bacteria-carrying particles and exhaled anaesthetic gases are the two contaminants found in the air flow patterns of operating rooms. Their origin, direction and speed were illustrated by a motion picture using Schlieren photography and smoke tracers. Compared with a conventionally well air conditioned operating theatre, it was shown that a downward flow of clean air reduced the number of bacteria-carrying particles at the wound site by sixty times. The Exflow method of achieving this without the restriction of any side panels or floor obstruction was described. The total body exhaust worn by the surgical team was shown to reduce the bacteria count by a further eleven times. Clinical results show that when both these systems are used together, patient infection was reduced from 9 per cent to between 0.3 per cent and 0.5 per cent, even when no pre-operative antibiotics were used. Anaesthetic gas pollution was measured and shown to be generally 1000 p.p.m. at the head of the patient, in induction, operating and recovery rooms, also in dental and labour rooms. A high volume low pressure active scavenging system was described together with its various attachments including one specially for paediatric scavenging. Results showed a reduction of nitrous oxide pollution to between zero and 3 p.p.m. The economy and cost effectiveness of both these pollution control systems was shown to be good due to the removal of health hazards from patients and theatre staff.

  7. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  8. Ice crystal patterns in artificial gels of extracellular matrix macromolecules after quick-freezing and freeze-substitution.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, A L; Kraemer, T G

    1989-04-01

    Artificial gels, composed of collagen with or without hyaluronate (HA), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were prepared and quick-frozen for the purpose of studying the influence of composition and concentration on ice patterns. Dilute gels were spread on coverslips, plunged into a slush of 30% isopentane/70% propane (-185 degrees C), freeze-substituted, and examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Ice patterns were revealed as "ice cavities" in the gel after freeze-substitution. Ice morphology in the gels was gel-type-specific, suggesting that composition in dilute gels can influence ice pattern formation. Crystallization patterns reflecting high, intermediate, and low rates of freezing were observed in all gel types. Intermediate freezing in differentiating gel-type-specific ice patterns. Gels which included hyaluronate (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) altered the ice crystal pattern commonly observed in collagen gels. Ice structure in collagen gels consisted predominantly of long, parallel crystals in the herringbone pattern. Ice crystals separated gel into thin, unbranched fibers with a primary spacing of approximately 2 microns. Ice morphology in HA gels formed a mosaic consisting of packets of ice crystals. Contiguous packets were often oriented at right angles to each other. Periodic crossbridges interconnect primary gel fibers of HA gels and interrupt the lengthwise growth of ice crystals. Smooth beads were visible on primary strands in HA gels frozen at intermediate velocities. The addition of CS to collagen gels resulted in formation of randomly oriented ice crystals in gels frozen at intermediate rates. CS has little influence on ice morphology at low freezing velocities. Primary strands in CS gels were decorated with rough-surfaced, osmiophilic aggregates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Ridge-forming, ice-bounded lava flows at Mount Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescinsky, D. T.; Sisson, T. W.

    1998-04-01

    Large (0.3 4 km3) andesite and dacite lava flows at Mount Rainier, Washington, sit atop or are perched along the sides of high ridges separating deep valleys. Early researchers proposed that these ridge-forming lavas flowed into paleovalleys and displaced rivers to their margins; entrenchment of the rivers then left the lavas atop ridges. On the basis of exceptional flow thickness, ice-contact features, and eruption age measurements, we propose that the lavas flowed beside and between valley glaciers that filled the adjacent valleys in the Pleistocene. When the glaciers retreated, the flows were left high on the adjacent ridges. These lavas were never situated at valley floors and do not represent products of reversed topography. Instead, ridge-forming and perched lava flows at Mount Rainier and at many other high stratovolcanoes illustrate the ability of ice to dam, deflect, and confine flowing lava.

  10. The Importance of Ice Flow at the North Pole of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sori, M. M.; Byrne, S.; Hamilton, C. W.; Landis, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the importance of ice flow at the north pole of Mars for features only recently discovered by HiRISE. We use a combination of image analysis and finite element modeling to quantify flow and discuss implications for NPLD evolution.

  11. Sensitivity experiments with a one-dimensional coupled plume - ice flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Perrette, Mahé; Beyer, Sebastian; Calov, Reinhard; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades net mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet quadrupled, caused by enhanced surface melting and speedup of the marine-terminating outlet glaciers. This speedup has been related, among other factors, to enhanced submarine melting, which in turn is caused by warming of the surrounding ocean and by increased subglacial discharge. For the future and recent mass balance changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet, ice-ocean processes potentially play an important role, yet they are not properly represented in contemporary Greenland Ice Sheet models. In this work we performed numerical experiments with a one-dimensional plume model coupled to a one-dimensional model of outlet glacier. We investigate the response of a coupled ice-flow plume model to possible outcomes of climate change. In particularly, we examine the transient and equilibrium response of the outlet glaciers to changes in ocean temperature and subglacial discharge which affects both: glacier geometry and submarine melt rates.

  12. Application of composite flow laws to grain size distributions derived from polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Tobias; de Bresser, Hans; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka; Garbe, Christoph; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2014-05-01

    Apart from evaluating the crystallographic orientation, focus of microstructural analysis of natural ice during the last decades has been to create depth-profiles of mean grain size. Several ice flow models incorporated mean grain size as a variable. Although such a mean value may coincide well with the size of a large proportion of the grains, smaller/larger grains are effectively ignored. These smaller/larger grains, however, may affect the ice flow modeling. Variability in grain size is observed on centimeter, meter and kilometer scale along deep polar ice cores. Composite flow laws allow considering the effect of this variability on rheology, by weighing the contribution of grain-size-sensitive (GSS, diffusion/grain boundary sliding) and grain-size-insensitive (GSI, dislocation) creep mechanisms taking the full grain size distribution into account [1]. Extraction of hundreds of grain size distributions for different depths along an ice core has become relatively easy by automatic image processing techniques [2]. The shallow ice approximation is widely adopted in ice sheet modeling and approaches the full-Stokes solution for small ratios of vertical to horizontal characteristic dimensions. In this approximation shear stress in the vertical plain dominates the strain. This assumption is not applicable at ice divides or dome structures, where most deep ice core drilling sites are located. Within the upper two thirds of the ice column longitudinal stresses are not negligible and ice deformation is dominated by vertical strain. The Dansgaard-Johnsen model [3] predicts a dominating, constant vertical strain rate for the upper two thirds of the ice sheet, whereas in the lower ice column vertical shear becomes the main driver for ice deformation. We derived vertical strain rates from the upper NEEM ice core (North-West Greenland) and compared them to classical estimates of strain rates at the NEEM site. Assuming intervals of constant accumulation rates, we found a

  13. Observed anomalous atmospheric patterns in summers of unusual Arctic sea ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Erlend M.; Orsolini, Yvan J.; Furevik, Tore; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic sea ice retreat has accelerated over the last decade. The negative trend is largest in summer, but substantial interannual variability still remains. Here we explore observed atmospheric conditions and feedback mechanisms during summer months of anomalous sea ice melt in the Arctic. Compositing months of anomalous low and high sea ice melt over 1979-2013, we find distinct patterns in atmospheric circulation, precipitation, radiation, and temperature. Compared to summer months of anomalous low sea ice melt, high melt months are characterized by anomalous high sea level pressure in the Arctic (up to 7 hPa), with a corresponding tendency of storms to track on a more zonal path. As a result, the Arctic receives less precipitation overall and 39% less snowfall. This lowers the albedo of the region and reduces the negative feedback the snowfall provides for the sea ice. With an anticyclonic tendency, 12 W/m2 more incoming shortwave radiation reaches the surface in the start of the season. The melting sea ice in turn promotes cloud development in the marginal ice zones and enhances downwelling longwave radiation at the surface toward the end of the season. A positive cloud feedback emerges. In midlatitudes, the more zonally tracking cyclones give stormier, cloudier, wetter, and cooler summers in most of northern Europe and around the Sea of Okhotsk. Farther south, the region from the Mediterranean Sea to East Asia experiences significant surface warming (up to 2.4°C), possibly linked to changes in the jet stream.

  14. The Annual Glaciohydrology Cycle in the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Part 2. Observed and Modeled Ice Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, William Terence; Rajaram, Harihar; Anderson, Robert S.; Steffen, Konrad; Zwally, H. Jay; Phillips, Thomas; Abdalati, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    Ice velocities observed in 2005/06 at three GPS stations along the Sermeq Avannarleq flowline, West Greenland, are used to characterize an observed annual velocity cycle. We attempt to reproduce this annual ice velocity cycle using a 1-D ice-flow model with longitudinal stresses coupled to a 1-D hydrology model that governs an empirical basal sliding rule. Seasonal basal sliding velocity is parameterized as a perturbation of prescribed winter sliding velocity that is proportional to the rate of change of glacier water storage. The coupled model reproduces the broad features of the annual basal sliding cycle observed along this flowline, namely a summer speed-up event followed by a fall slowdown event. We also evaluate the hypothesis that the observed annual velocity cycle is due to the annual calving cycle at the terminus. We demonstrate that the ice acceleration due to a catastrophic calving event takes an order of magnitude longer to reach CU/ETH ('Swiss') Camp (46km upstream of the terminus) than is observed. The seasonal acceleration observed at Swiss Camp is therefore unlikely to be the result of velocity perturbations propagated upstream via longitudinal coupling. Instead we interpret this velocity cycle to reflect the local history of glacier water balance.

  15. Unsaturated Zone Flow Patterns and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers

    2001-10-17

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents the development of an expected-case model for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport that will be described in terms of the representativeness of models of the natural system. The expected-case model will provide an evaluation of the effectiveness of the natural barriers, assess the impact of conservatism in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), and support the development of further models and analyses for public confidence building. The present models used in ''Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation'' (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) 2000 [1532461]) underestimate the natural-barrier performance because of conservative assumptions and parameters and do not adequately address uncertainty and alternative models. The development of an expected case model for the UZ natural barrier addresses issues regarding flow-pattern analysis and modeling that had previously been treated conservatively. This is in line with the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS) philosophy of treating conservatively those aspects of the UZ flow and transport system that are not important for achieving regulatory dose (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153246], Section 1.1.1). The development of an expected case model for the UZ also provides defense-in-depth in areas requiring further analysis of uncertainty and alternative models. In general, the value of the conservative case is to provide a more easily defensible TSPA for behavior of UZ flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This AMR has been prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) 2001 [155051], Section 1.3 - Work Package 4301213UMG). The work scope is to examine the data and current models of flow and transport in the Yucca Mountain UZ to identify models and analyses where conservatism may be reduced and

  16. Regulation of ice stream flow through subglacial formation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsborrow, Monica; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Patton, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers are a primary control on ice sheet stability, yet comprehensive understanding of the key processes operating at the ice-bed interface remains elusive. Basal resistance is critical, especially sticky spots--localized zones of high basal traction--for maintaining force balance in an otherwise well-lubricated/high-slip subglacial environment. Here we consider the influence of subglacial gas-hydrate formation on ice stream dynamics, and its potential to initiate and maintain sticky spots. Geophysical data document the geologic footprint of a major palaeo-ice-stream that drained the Barents Sea-Fennoscandian ice sheet approximately 20,000 years ago. Our results reveal a ~250 km2 sticky spot that coincided with subsurface shallow gas accumulations, seafloor fluid expulsion and a fault complex associated with deep hydrocarbon reservoirs. We propose that gas migrating from these reservoirs formed hydrates under high-pressure, low-temperature subglacial conditions. The gas hydrate desiccated, stiffened and thereby strengthened the subglacial sediments, promoting high traction--a sticky spot--that regulated ice stream flow. Deep hydrocarbon reservoirs are common beneath past and contemporary glaciated areas, implying that gas-hydrate regulation of subglacial dynamics could be a widespread phenomenon.

  17. Ice Flows: A Game-based Learning approach to Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brocq, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Game-based learning allows people to become immersed in an environment, and learn how the system functions and responds to change through playing a game. Science and gaming share a similar characteristic: they both involve learning and understanding the rules of the environment you are in, in order to achieve your objective. I will share experiences of developing and using the educational game "Ice Flows" for science communication. The game tasks the player with getting a penguin to its destination, through controlling the size of the ice sheet via ocean temperature and snowfall. Therefore, the game aims to educate the user about the environmental controls on the behaviour of the ice sheet, whilst they are enjoying playing a game with penguins. The game was funded by a NERC Large Grant entitled "Ice shelves in a warming world: Filchner Ice Shelf system, Antarctica", so uses data from the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet to generate unique levels. The game will be easily expandable to other regions of Antarctica and beyond, with the ultimate aim of giving a full understanding to the user of different ice flow regimes across the planet.

  18. Simulation of flow and habitat conditions under ice, Cache la Poudre River - January 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) to describe the extent and thickness of ice cover, (2) simulate depth and velocity under ice at the study site for observed and reduced flows, and (3) to quantify fish habitat in this portion of the mainstem Cache la Poudre River for the current winter release schedule as well as for similar conditions without the 0.283 m3/s winter release.

  19. Geothermal Heating, Convective Flow and Ice Thickness on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, N. D.; Travis, B. J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Our 3D calculations suggest that hydrothermal circulation may occur in the martian regolith and may significantly thin the surface ice layer on Mars at some locations due to the upwelling of warm convecting fluids driven solely by background geothermal heating. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Spatial and temporal patterns of sea ice variations in Vilkitsky strait, Russian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, T.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been greatly affected by climate change. Future predications show an even more drastic reduction of the ice cap which will open new areas for the exploration of natural resources and maritime transportation.Shipping through the Arctic Ocean via the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could save about 40% of the sailing distance from Asia (Yokohama) to Europe (Rotterdam) compared to the traditional route via the Suez Canal. Vilkitsky strait is the narrowest and northest portion of the Northern Sea Route with heaviest traffic between the Taimyr Peninsular and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago. The preliminary results of sea ice variations are presented by using moderate-resolution imaging spectro radiometer(MODIS) data with 250-m resolution in the Vilkitsky strait during 2009-2012. Temporally, the first rupture on sea ice in Vilkitsky strait usually comes up in April and sea ice completely break into pieces in early June. The strait would be ice-free between August and late September. The frequency of ice floes grows while temperature falls down in October. There are always one or two months suitable for transport. Spatially, Sea ice on Laptev sea side breaks earlier than that of Kara sea side while sea ice in central of strait breaks earlier than in shoreside. The phenomena are directly related with the direction of sea wind and ocean current. In summmary, study on Spatial and temporal patterns in this area is significant for the NSR. An additional research issue to be tackled is to seeking the trends of ice-free duration in the context of global warming. Envisat ASAR data will also be used in this study.

  1. Flow behavior of ice mélange modeled at the laboratory-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. C.; Amundson, J. M.; Cassotto, R.; Burton, J. C.; Dennin, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ice mélange, composed of icebergs from iceberg calving and sea ice, is a large-scale, quasi-two dimensional granular system that may affect glacier stability by resisting iceberg calving. The motion of ice mélange is a result of inter-particle interactions between icebergs which are affected by ice mélange composition, fjord geometry, and driving forces. One of the significant features of this highly complex system is stick-slip flow that occurs as icebergs slide past each other. Here, we report on laboratory simulations of ice mélange motion. Plastic particles of various geometries are placed on the water surface in a meter-long channel and forced down the channel by a moving barrier. Our studies are focused on the impact of particle shapes, size distributions, and channel geometry on the flow behavior. The velocity fields of the experiments are analyzed and compared to numerical simulations and field observations. We relate the flow behavior to the back-stress provided by ice mélange, and find that it depends strongly on particle shape and channel geometry.

  2. A New Attempt of 2-D Numerical Ice Flow Model to Reconstruct Paleoclimate from Mountain Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candaş, Adem; Akif Sarıkaya, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    A new two dimensional (2D) numerical ice flow model is generated to simulate the steady-state glacier extent for a wide range of climate conditions. The simulation includes the flow of ice enforced by the annual mass balance gradient of a valley glacier. The annual mass balance is calculated by the difference of the net accumulation and ablation of snow and (or) ice. The generated model lets users to compare the simulated and field observed ice extent of paleoglaciers. As a result, model results provide the conditions about the past climates since simulated ice extent is a function of predefined climatic conditions. To predict the glacier shape and distribution in two dimension, time dependent partial differential equation (PDE) is solved. Thus, a 2D glacier flow model code is constructed in MATLAB and a finite difference method is used to solve this equation. On the other hand, Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) is used to regenerate paleoglaciers in the same area where the MATLAB code is applied. We chose the Mount Dedegöl, an extensively glaciated mountain in SW Turkey, to apply both models. Model results will be presented and discussed in this presentation. This study was supported by TÜBİTAK 114Y548 project.

  3. Detached-Eddy Simulations of Separated Flow Around Wings With Ice Accretions: Year One Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K. (Technical Monitor); Thompson, David; Mogili, Prasad

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation was performed to assess the effectiveness of Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) as a tool for predicting icing effects. The AVUS code, a public domain flow solver, was employed to compute solutions for an iced wing configuration using DES and steady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation methodologies. The configuration was an extruded GLC305/944-ice shape section with a rectangular planform. The model was mounted between two walls so no tip effects were considered. The numerical results were validated by comparison with experimental data for the same configuration. The time-averaged DES computations showed some improvement in lift and drag results near stall when compared to steady RANS results. However, comparisons of the flow field details did not show the level of agreement suggested by the integrated quantities. Based on our results, we believe that DES may prove useful in a limited sense to provide analysis of iced wing configurations when there is significant flow separation, e.g., near stall, where steady RANS computations are demonstrably ineffective. However, more validation is needed to determine what role DES can play as part of an overall icing effects prediction strategy. We conclude the report with an assessment of existing computational tools for application to the iced wing problem and a discussion of issues that merit further study.

  4. Subglacial Processes and Flow Dynamics of Former Antarctic Ice Streams Reconstructed From Marine Geology and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Cofaigh, C.; Evans, J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Larter, R. D.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recent marine geophysical and geological research from the Antarctic continental margin has resulted in significant advances to our understanding of the extent, timing and dynamic behaviour of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) during the Late Quaternary, as well as the processes and conditions at the former ice-sheet bed. This research indicates an extensive WAIS and APIS at the last glacial maximum (LGM). The ice sheet was positioned at, or close to, the shelf edge around the Peninsula, the Bellingshausen Sea and Pine Island Bay. In all these areas large glacial troughs extend across the continental shelf, and sedimentary and geomorphic evidence from these troughs indicates that they were occupied by grounded paleo-ice streams during, or immediately following, the LGM. This evidence includes elongate subglacial bedforms (mega-scale glacial lineations) that can extend for up to 20 km and which are formed in weak deformation till. Deformation tills have been identified and mapped in all the paleo-ice stream troughs investigated to date. Macro-sedimentological, micromorphological and geotechnical data indicate that pervasive till deformation beneath these ice streams took place over vertical thicknesses of several metres, and that this was associated with significant advection of sediment towards the former grounding line. Subglacial geology appears to have exerted a major control on ice stream development. The transition from crystalline bedrock to a sedimentary substrate within these troughs characteristically marks the onset of streaming flow. However, in Marguerite Trough streaming flow appears to have commenced over the crystalline bedrock by enhanced basal sliding, with the highest flow velocities occurring over the sedimentary substrate further downflow by subglacial deformation. This indicates spatial variation in the mechanism of rapid flow beneath individual ice streams. Subglacial meltwater channels eroded

  5. Martian Polar Caps: Folding, Faulting, Flowing Glaciers of Multiple Interbedded Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    The Martian south polar cap (permanent CO2 cap and polar layered deposits), exhibit abundant, varied, and widespread deformational phenomena. Folding and boudinage are very common. Strike-slip or normal faults are rarer. Common in the vicinity of major troughs and scarps are signs of convergent flow tectonics manifested as wrinkle-ridge-like surface folds, thrust faults, and viscous forebulges with thin-skinned extensional crevasses and wrinkle-ridge folds. Such flow convergence is predicted by theory. Boudinage and folding at the 300-m wavelength scale, indicating rheologically contrasting materials, is widely exposed at deep levels along erosional scarps. Independent morphologic evidence indicates south polar materials of contrasting volatility. Hence, the south polar cap appears to be a multiphase structure of interbedded ices. The north polar cap locally also exhibits flow indicators, though they are neither as common nor as varied as in the south. The large-scale quasi-spiral structure of the polar caps could be a manifestation of large-scale boudinage. According to this scenario, deep-level boudinage continuously originates under the glacial divide (the polar cap summit). Rod-like boudin structures are oriented transverse to flow and migrate outward with the large-scale flow field. Troughs develop over areas between major boudins. A dynamic competition, and possibly a rough balance, develops between the local flow field in the vicinity of a trough (which tends to close the trough by lateral closure and upwelling flow) and sublimation erosion (which tends to widen and deepen them). Over time, the troughs flow to the margins of the polar cap where they, along with other polar structures, are destroyed by sublimation. Major ice types contributing to rheological and volatility layering may include, in order of highest to lowest mechanical strength, CO2 clathrate hydrate, water ice containing inert/insoluble dust, pure water ice, water ice containing traces of

  6. Simulating ice layer formation under the presence of preferential flow in layered snowpacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, Nander; Würzer, Sebastian; Fierz, Charles; Lehning, Michael

    2016-11-01

    For physics-based snow cover models, simulating the formation of dense ice layers inside the snowpack has been a long-time challenge. Their formation is considered to be tightly coupled to the presence of preferential flow, which is assumed to happen through flow fingering. Recent laboratory experiments and modelling techniques of liquid water flow in snow have advanced the understanding of conditions under which preferential flow paths or flow fingers form. We propose a modelling approach in the one-dimensional, multilayer snow cover model SNOWPACK for preferential flow that is based on a dual domain approach. The pore space is divided into a part that represents matrix flow and a part that represents preferential flow. Richards' equation is then solved for both domains and only water in matrix flow is subjected to phase changes. We found that preferential flow paths arriving at a layer transition in the snowpack may lead to ponding conditions, which we used to trigger a water flow from the preferential flow domain to the matrix domain. Subsequent refreezing then can form dense layers in the snowpack that regularly exceed 700 kg m-3. A comparison of simulated density profiles with biweekly snow profiles made at the Weissfluhjoch measurement site at 2536 m altitude in the Eastern Swiss Alps for 16 snow seasons showed that several ice layers that were observed in the field could be reproduced. However, many profiles remain challenging to simulate. The prediction of the early snowpack runoff also improved under the consideration of preferential flow. Our study suggests that a dual domain approach is able to describe the net effect of preferential flow on ice layer formation and liquid water flow in snow in one-dimensional, detailed, physics-based snowpack models, without the need for a full multidimensional model.

  7. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  8. Under the Sea Ice: Exploration of the Relationships Between Sea Ice Patterns and Foraging Movements of a Marine Predator in East Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, S.; Sallee, J. B.; Fraser, A. D.; Massom, R. A.; Reid, P.; Sumner, M.; Guinet, C.; Harcourt, R.; Bailleul, F.; Hindell, M.; Charrassin, J. B.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating ecological relationships between top predators and their environment is essential to understand the response of marine ecosystems to climate variability. Specifically, variability and changes in sea ice, which is known as an important habitat for marine ecosystems, presents complex patterns in East Antarctic. The impact for ecosystems of such changes of their habitat is however still unknown. Acting as an ecological double-edged sword, sea ice can impede access to marine resources while harboring a rich ecosystem during winter. Here, we investigated which type of sea ice habitat is used by male and female southern elephant seals during winter and examine if and how the spatio-temporal variability of sea ice concentration (SIC) influence their foraging strategies. We also examined over a 10 years time-series the impact of SIC and sea ice advance anomaly on foraging activity. To do this, we studied 46 individuals equipped with Satellite linked data recorders between 2004 and 2014, undertaking post-moult trips in winter from Kerguelen to the peri-Antarctic shelf. The general patterns of sea ice use by males and females are clearly distinct; while females tended to follow the sea ice edge as it extended northward, males remained on the continental shelf. Female foraging activity was higher in late autumn in the outer part of the pack ice in concentrated SIC and spatially stable. They remained in areas of variable SIC over time and low persistence. The seal hunting time, a proxy of foraging activity inferred from the diving behaviour, was much higher during earlier advance of sea ice over female time-series. The females were possibly taking advantage of the ice algal autumn bloom sustaining krill and an under ice ecosystem without being trapped in sea ice. Males foraging activity increased when they remained deep inside sea ice over the shelf using variable SIC in time and space, presumably in polynyas or flaw leads between fast and pack ice. This strategy

  9. Uptake Study of Acetone On Ice Using A Vertical Coated Wall Flow Tube. Atmos Pheric Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peybernès, N.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.

    The upper troposphere defines a region of the atmosphere (between 8 and 12 km) characterised by its low temperatures (-45 to -85 °C) and where cirrus clouds cover a substantial portion (~25 %) of the earth's surface . Some measurements in the upper troposphere showed the presence of high acetone concentrations (up to 3000 pptv) which lead to an enhanced abundance of HOX and likely modify the ozone cycles in this region of the atmosphere. The goal of this work is then to measure uptake coefficients of acetone on ice and to determine its surface coverage. The low pressure and low temperature flow tube (1-5 Torr) has been adapted to study the gas-ice interactions of atmospheric interest. By using this technique, it is possible to study kinetics of chemical reactions on ice which can be doped by adding chemical species 3, 4. This new set-up is coupled with a Mass Spectrometer which allows product identification and quantification. The vertical flow tube has a movable injector which permits to change the reaction distance and then the reaction time. The ice surface is prepared by totally wetting the inner wall of the flow tube with pure water which is then rapidly cooled down to ­20°C. The ice temperature is then regulated between -40°C and -80°C by circulating cool ethanol through a double jacket surrounding the flow tube. Our results permit to estimate the ratio of acetone molecules adsorbed by ice surface to the number of acetone molecules in the gas phase. One can then estimate the influence of its adsorption on ice on its atmospheric lifetime in the upper troposphere. 1Salomon et al., J. Geophys. Res. 102, 21411, (1997). 2S.A. Mckeen et al. Geophys. res. Lett. 24, 3177, (1997). 3 J.P.D. Abbatt et al., J. Geophys. Res. 97, 15819, (1992). 4 D.R. Hanson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 96, 2682, (1992).

  10. The dynamics of idealized katabatic flow over a moderate slope and ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfrew, A. Ian

    2004-04-01

    A non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model has been employed to simulate idealized katabatic flows over a moderate slope and adjoining ice shelf. The topography of Coats Land and the adjoining Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica, has been used; this is typical of much of the Antarctic coastline. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System Version 4.3 has been adapted for simulations over compacted snow, most notably through changes to the multi-layer soil model. The simulations are initialized using clear-sky conditions and at rest. On the slope, a shallow katabatic flow develops, the winds becoming approximately steady on the slope by ~ 12 h. The peak downslope winds are about 7 m s-1 at 30 m above the snow surface. The katabatic flow depth ranges from 50 to 100 m down the slope. Over the ice shelf the katabatic flow peters out, while a pool of cold air develops, primarily through sensible-heat loss into the surface and partially balancing the net radiative-heat loss to space. Near-surface and sounding data from the model simulations compare well with archetypal and typical katabatic flow observations, especially after some tuning of the model's turbulence parametrization. An analysis of the downslope flow dynamics shows the buoyancy force is generally balanced by the inertial force, except towards the foot of the slope where it is balanced by upslope forces related to gradients in the potential-temperature deficit and katabatic-layer height, caused by the pool of cold air over the ice shelf. Over time, the cooling of the ice shelf boundary layer leads to an apparent retreat of the katabatic flow from the ice shelf and some way up the slope. The dynamical analysis explains the surface climatology observed, such that the persistent katabatic winds of Coats Land rarely reach the Brunt Ice Shelf. The simulated katabatic flow moves from 'shooting' to 'tranquil' towards the foot of the slope. This transition acts to trigger a train of internal gravity waves which

  11. Glacial geomorphology and past ice flows in the Larsen A embayment, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, J.; Wellner, J. S.; Lavoie, C.

    2012-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet was grounded on the continental shelf in the Northwestern Weddell Sea at least 10 km past the modern grounding line. The grounded ice of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet sculpted a suite of characteristic geomorphic features onto the shelf - features that were uncovered upon the retreat of the ice sheet, indicating flow direction and style. The break up of the Larsen A Ice Shelf in recent decades has continued to expose more areas of the inner shelf. A US. Antarctic Program cruise aboard the NB Palmer, completed in April of this year as part of the LARISSA program, collected multibeam swath bathymetric data and 3.5 kHz chirp sub-bottom sediment profiler data in the Larsen A embayment. New multibeam data close to the shoreline, particularly in Drygalski Trough and Bombardier Bay, has been merged with existing swath data from the U.S. and British programs to permit mapping and interpretation of ice flow from the tributaries and across the shelf. Initial observations of chirp data suggest little marine or glaciomarine sediment has accumulated in these tributary fjords, hinting that glacial retreat there occurred relatively recently. All sediment volumes for which profiles were collected occur above the glacial unconformity carved by the post-glacial retreat. Interpretation of chirp data is ongoing for volume calculations and mapping of discrete units. Ongoing work is currently being completed to measure volumes of sediment accumulation, which will then be correlated to sediment cores studied by project collaborators. The multibeam data is being analyzed in ArcGIS to determine the changes in length/width scales of the geomorphic features. As expected, the subglacial features on the outer shelf are elongated compared to the linear features on the inner shelf. Based on Evans, et al. [2005] combined with data collected this year, we have mapped ice flow form the tributaries and out through

  12. Continuous flow analysis of total organic carbon in polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Ice cores are a widely used archive to reconstruct past changes of the climate system. This is done by measuring the concentration of substances in the ice and in the air of bubbles enclosed in ice. Some species pertaining to the carbon cycle (e.g., CO2, CH4) are routinely measured. However, information about the organic fraction of the impurities in polar ice is still very limited. Therefore, we developed a new method to determine the content of total organic carbon (TOC) in ice cores using a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The method is based on photochemical oxidation of TOC and the electrolytic quantification of the CO2 produced during oxidation. The TOC instrument features a limit of detection of 2 ppbC and a response time of 60 s at a sample flow rate of 0.7 mL/min and a linear measurement range of 2-4000 ppbC. First measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome, Antarctica, reveal TOC concentrations varying between 80 and 360 ppbC in the 20 m section presented.

  13. Ice Flow, Isostasy and Gravity Anomaly of the Permanent North Polar H2O Ice Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, R.; klemann, V.; Wolf, D.

    2000-08-01

    The flow of the permanent north polar H20 ice cap of Mars and the isostatic depression of the underlying bedrock are investigated with the 3-d dynamic/thermodynamic ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS (1) coupled to a two-layer visco-elastic model for the lithosphere/mantle system [2,31. SICOPOLIS describes the ice as a density-preserving, heat-conducting power-law fluid with thermo-mechanical coupling due to the strong temperature dependence of the ice viscosity, and computes three-dimensionally the temporal evolution of ice extent, thickness, temperature, water content and age as a response to external forcing. The tatter must be specified by (1) the mean annual air temperature above the ice, (2) the surface mass balance (ice accumulation minus melting and evaporation), (3) the global sea level (not relevant for Martian applications) and (4) the geothermal heat flux from below into the ice body. However, owing to the now well-known surface topography on the one hand, but the shortage of information about the surface mass balance on the other, here the inverse strategy of prescribing the topography and computing the surface mass balance required to sustain the topography is pursuited. Following further the approach of, we use a conceptional, paraboloid-like ice cap, growing and shrinking between the present minimum extent within 80.5 deg north and an assumed past maximum extent southward to 75 deg north with a period of 1.3 Myr (first modulation of obliquity cycle), vary the surface temperature with the same period between its measured present distribution and a 30 C warming coinciding with the maximum ice extent, and apply a geothermal heat flux of 35 mW m-2. The lithosphere/mantle model displace comprises an elastic lithosphere of constant thickness, underlain by a Maxwell-viscoelastic half-space mantle. Both layers are treated as incompressible, and we apply terrestrial standard values for the rheological parameters: density of the lithosphere and of the mantle rho1

  14. Flow in geothermal wells. Part IV. Transition criteria for two-phase flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed considerations justifying the criteria for transitions between flow patterns are presented. The following are covered: transition from bubble to plug (or slug) flow, transition from plug flow to froth flow, transition from froth to annular mist flow, and model comparisons. (MHR)

  15. Till Dynamics Underneath Ice Streams with a Nonlocal Dense Granular Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Suckale, J.; Cabrales-Vargas, A.; Damsgaard, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ice streams are narrow bands in ice sheets moving 2 to 3 orders faster than the nearly stagnant confining ice. Ice streams are a major contributor to the rapid mass loss in West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but the processes governing their stability remain incompletely understood. Previous research has led to the insight that ice streaming is enabled by the presence of a non-linearly deforming till bed. The stability of the till layer depends sensitively on pore-water pressure, highlighting that the coupled behavior of sediment deformation and melt-water generation and percolation is important in ice-stream dynamics. Currently, viscous or plastic models are used to approximate the mechanical properties of till. However, the latter typically does not quantify the deformation in the till itself or the sediment transport associated with ice streaming. In this study, we adopt a model of nonlocal dense granular flow to describe till behavior during shearing. This continuum model goes beyond the perfect Coulomb plastic model by introducing a nonlocal rheology, which states that the flow at one point is not only influenced by the local stress but also affected by nearby flows. The model can be coupled with water in two aspects. One is through till shear strength related to effective normal stress. The other one is by adjusting a material constant representing the length of nonlocal stress fluctuations, which itself depends on effective normal stress. We calibrate this material constant from a granular-scale model of sediment deformation computed through the Discrete-Element Method. Linking the two models allows us to integrate insights from the small-scale and computationally intensive Discrete-Element experiments into a larger ice-stream model representation. This upscaling allows us to investigate the delicate coupling between ice streaming, till deformation and water generation and percolation. Our numerical experiments indicate that pore-water pressure not only alters

  16. Tropical to mid-latitude snow and ice accumulation, flow and glaciation on Mars.

    PubMed

    Head, J W; Neukum, G; Jaumann, R; Hiesinger, H; Hauber, E; Carr, M; Masson, P; Foing, B; Hoffmann, H; Kreslavsky, M; Werner, S; Milkovich, S; van Gasselt, S

    2005-03-17

    Images from the Mars Express HRSC (High-Resolution Stereo Camera) of debris aprons at the base of massifs in eastern Hellas reveal numerous concentrically ridged lobate and pitted features and related evidence of extremely ice-rich glacier-like viscous flow and sublimation. Together with new evidence for recent ice-rich rock glaciers at the base of the Olympus Mons scarp superposed on larger Late Amazonian debris-covered piedmont glaciers, we interpret these deposits as evidence for geologically recent and recurring glacial activity in tropical and mid-latitude regions of Mars during periods of increased spin-axis obliquity when polar ice was mobilized and redeposited in microenvironments at lower latitudes. The data indicate that abundant residual ice probably remains in these deposits and that these records of geologically recent climate changes are accessible to future automated and human surface exploration.

  17. Tropical to mid-latitude snow and ice accumulation, flow and glaciation on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Head, J.W.; Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Hiesinger, H.; Hauber, E.; Carr, M.; Masson, P.; Foing, B.; Hoffmann, H.; Kreslavsky, M.; Werner, S.; Milkovich, S.; Van Gasselt, S.

    2005-01-01

    Images from the Mars Express HRSC (High-Resolution Stereo Camera) of debris aprons at the base of massifs in eastern Hellas reveal numerous concentrically ridged lobate and pitted features and related evidence of extremely ice-rich glacier-like viscous flow and sublimation. Together with new evidence for recent ice-rich rock glaciers at the base of the Olympus Mons scarp superposed on larger Late Amazonian debris-covered piedmont glaciers, we interpret these deposits as evidence for geologically recent and recurring glacial activity in tropical and mid-latitude regions of Mars during periods of increased spin-axis obliquity when polar ice was mobilized and redeposited in microenvironments at lower latitudes. The data indicate that abundant residual ice probably remains in these deposits and that these records of geologically recent climate changes are accessible to future automated and human surface exploration.

  18. The influence of meltwater on the thermal structure and flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinar, Kristin

    As the climate has warmed over the past decades, the amount of melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased, and areas higher on the ice sheet have begun to melt regularly. This increase in melt has been hypothesized to enhance ice flow in myriad ways, including through basal lubrication and englacial refreezing. By developing and interpreting thermal ice-sheet models and analyzing remote sensing data, I evaluate the effect of these processes on ice flow and sea-level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet. I first develop a thermal ice sheet model that is applicable to western Greenland. Key components of this model are its treatment of multiple phases (solid ice and liquid water) and its viscosity-dependent velocity field. I apply the model to Jakobshavn Isbrae, a fast-flowing outlet glacier. This is an important benchmark for my model, which I next apply to the topics outlined above. I use the thermal model to calculate the effect of englacial latent-heat transfer (meltwater refreezing within englacial features such as firn and crevasses) on ice dynamics in western Greenland. I find that in slow-moving areas, this can significantly warm the ice, but that englacial latent heat transfer has only a minimal effect on ice motion (60%) of the ice flux into the ocean, evidence of deep englacial warming is virtually absent. Thus, the effects of englacial latent heat transfer on ice motion are likely limited to slow-moving regions, which limits its importance to ice-sheet mass balance. Next, I couple a model for ice fracture to a modified version of my thermal model to calculate the depth and shape evolution of water-filled crevasses that form in crevasse fields. At most elevations and for typical water input volumes, crevasses penetrate to the top ~200--300 meters depth, warm the ice there by ~10°C, and may persist englacially, in a liquid state, for multiple decades. The surface hydrological network limits the amount of water that can reach most crevasses. We find that

  19. Can we derive ice flow from surface mass balance and surface elevation change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, M. H.; Olefs, M.

    2010-12-01

    Most likely we can not, or not exactly. The difference “delta” of surface mass balance and changes in surface elevation at one point or at one elevation band is the net result of two dimensional convergence of ice flow, advection of ice thickness by basal sliding, vertically integrated changes of firn density including creation and closing of voids in the ice, and basal melting. Here we present a series of delta values for 100 m elevation bands of Hintereisferner of the years 1953, 68, 79, 97, 2006. We believe that surface mass balance b and flow divergence du/dx dominate delta values in the accumulation area where surface elevation stayed constant within 10 m and we present evidence that basal melting has become important under the tongue since 1979. This is in accordance with a simultaneous, exponential decay of ice flow by one order of magnitude for Hintereisferner and other glaciers in the Alps. Based on observed delta values and measured ice thickness we attempt an extrapolation of thickness and area changes into coming years and calculate the associated melt water production for glaciers of various sizes.

  20. Recent mass balance of polar ice sheets inferred from patterns of global sea-level change.

    PubMed

    Mitrovica, J X; Tamisiea, M E; Davis, J L; Milne, G A

    2001-02-22

    Global sea level is an indicator of climate change, as it is sensitive to both thermal expansion of the oceans and a reduction of land-based glaciers. Global sea-level rise has been estimated by correcting observations from tide gauges for glacial isostatic adjustment--the continuing sea-level response due to melting of Late Pleistocene ice--and by computing the global mean of these residual trends. In such analyses, spatial patterns of sea-level rise are assumed to be signals that will average out over geographically distributed tide-gauge data. But a long history of modelling studies has demonstrated that non-uniform--that is, non-eustatic--sea-level redistributions can be produced by variations in the volume of the polar ice sheets. Here we present numerical predictions of gravitationally consistent patterns of sea-level change following variations in either the Antarctic or Greenland ice sheets or the melting of a suite of small mountain glaciers. These predictions are characterized by geometrically distinct patterns that reconcile spatial variations in previously published sea-level records. Under the--albeit coarse--assumption of a globally uniform thermal expansion of the oceans, our approach suggests melting of the Greenland ice complex over the last century equivalent to -0.6 mm yr(-1) of sea-level rise.

  1. Coupled ice-flow/ocean circulation modeling in the Amundsen Sea Embayment using ISSM and MITgcm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, E. Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Schodlok, M.

    2014-12-01

    the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is thought to be prone to marine instability in which prolonged grounding line retreat could occur due to inland downwards sloping bedrocks. However, this instability is difficult to model in part due to the absence of good parameterizations for melt-rates under ice-shelves, in particular near or at the grounding-line, where a complex interplay between butressing, melt-rate, water-pressure and internal stresses in the ice develops. In order to simulate such melt rates accurately, ice-sheet models need to be fully coupled to ocean models, in order to capture the feedback mechanisms between heat-flux at the ice/ocean interface and cavity shape driven by grounding-line retreat.Here, we show an example of such a coupling between the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) and the MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm). The goal is to run sensitivity studies of the evolution of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. We quantify the impact of feedbacks between both systems by running short transients (20-100 years) of the coupled ice-sheet flow/ocean circulation model. We vary inputs such as far-field temperature of the Circumpolar Deep-Water, surface temperature of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, and far-field surface ice-flow velocity. Preliminary insights into the variability of the system are presented, as well as quantified impacts of variations in model inputs.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  2. Morphometry and pattern of a large sample (>20,000) of Canadian eskers and implications for subglacial drainage beneath ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrar, Robert D.; Stokes, Chris R.; Evans, David J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ice sheet flow is strongly influenced by the nature and quantity of meltwater entering the subglacial system. Accessing and monitoring contemporary drainage systems beneath ice sheets is notoriously difficult, but it is possible to utilise the exposed beds of palaeo-ice sheets. In particular, eskers record deposition in glacial drainage channels and are widespread on the exposed beds of former ice sheets. However, unlike some other common glacial landforms (e.g. drumlins) there have been relatively few attempts to investigate and quantify their characteristics at the ice sheet scale. This paper presents data on the distribution, pattern, and morphometry of a large (>20,000) sample of eskers in Canada, formed under the Laurentide Ice Sheet, including quantification of their length, fragmentation, sinuosity, lateral spacing, number of tributaries, and downstream elevation changes. Results indicate that eskers are typically very long (hundreds of km) and often very straight (mean sinuosity approximates 1). We interpret these long esker systems to reflect time-transgressive formation in long, stable conduits under hydrostatic pressure. The longest eskers (in the Keewatin sector) are also the least fragmented, which we interpret to reflect formation at an ice margin experiencing stable and gradual retreat. In many locations, the lateral distance between neighbouring eskers is remarkably consistent and results indicate a preferred spacing of around 12 km, consistent with numerical models which predict esker spacing of 8-25 km. In other locations, typically over soft sediments, eskers are rarer and their patterns are more chaotic, reflecting fewer large R-channels and rapidly changing ice sheet dynamics. Comparison of esker patterns with an existing ice margin chronology reveals that the meltwater drainage system evolved during deglaciation: eskers became more closely spaced with fewer tributaries as deglaciation progressed, which has been interpreted to reflect increased

  3. Basal ice flow regime influenced by glacial lake formation in Rhonegletscher, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, D.; Tsutaki, S.; Sugiyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    After the retreat of glacier terminus over a bedrock bump, a glacial lake has formed in front of Rhonegletscher, Switzerland. It is suspected that ice flow regime is now significantly influenced by the lake water. To investigate the impact of lake formation on glacier dynamics, we carried out surface and borehole observations in the terminus region of Rhonegletscher. In 2008 and 2009 summer seasons, we drilled more than 20 boreholes to measure borehole deformation by repeated inclinometry. Ice surface speed was measured by surveying stakes installed nearby the boreholes. We used a borehole televiewer to measure basal sliding speed by tracking stones and markers at the bottom of the boreholes. We also measured basal sediment layer thickness by hammering a penetrometer at the bottom of the boreholes. Our measurements showed clear decrease in the ice deformation rate near the lake (Fig. 1). Ice deformation accounted for 60-80% in the upper part of our study site (e.g. boreholes 1 and 5), whereas it is less than 10% near the lake (e.g. boreholes 7, 10 and 11). This result suggests that the basal ice flow near the lake is enhanced by the lake water. According to the basal sliding speed measurement in borehole 2, sliding accounted for less than 10% of basal flow speed from 2 to 31 August 2009. Deformation of a subglacial sediment layer is thus important in this region. The penetrometer measurement confirmed that the study site is underlain by a subglacial sediment layer whose thickness was in a range of 0-70 m. Fig.1 Terminus of Rhonegletscher and proglacial lakes indicated by the shaded areas. The columns show ice surface and deformation speeds measured at each borehole site from 9 July to 5 September in 2009. Ice deformation speed was negligibly small at boreholes 7, 10, and 11. Surface contour spacing is 20 m.

  4. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; McQuillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  5. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; Mcquillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  6. Analysis of Crevasse Patterns as Indicators of Ice Dynamics Using Structural Glaciology and Geostatistical Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Herzfeld, U. C.; Clarke, G. K.

    2001-12-01

    Crevasse patterns are the writings in a glacier's history book --- the movement, strain and deformation frozen in ice. Therefore by analysis of crevasse patterns we can learn about the ice-dynamic processes which the glacier has experienced. Direct measurement of ice movement and deformation is time-consuming and costly, in particular for large glaciers; typically, observations are lacking when sudden changes occur. Analysis of crevasse patterns provides a means to reconstruct past and ongoing deformation processes quantitatively. Crevasse patterns are utilized as a source of geophysical information. Our structural glaciology approach builds on methods adapted from structural geology and continuum mechanics. In slow-moving ice, ductile deformation prevails, and the related processes are largely understood. The dynamics of fast-moving glaciers are much less well understood but manifest themselves in the formation of crevasses. The crevasses result from brittle deformation and are considered cracks in the continuum. Geostatistical crevasse pattern analysis is a subset of geostatistical surface classification, a method designed on the background of the theory of regionalized variables. In a generalization of the well-known variogram, the structure function most commonly used in geostatistics, first- and higher-order vario functions, experimental ``ordinary" and residual vario functions are defined. Crevasse patterns are organized in classes according to principles of structural geology, examples of classes are one-directional, two-directional, rhombic, en-échelon, chaos (geometric classification), extensional, compressional, and shear types (kinematic classification). Parameters extracted from generalized vario functions are combined into feature vectors, and it can be shown that specific feature vectors are characteristic of each of the crevasse classes. Association between geostatistic parameters and feature vectors and crevasse patterns is achieved using

  7. Patterns and rates of riverbank erosion involving ice-rich permafrost (yedoma) in northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskiy, Mikhail; Shur, Yuri; Strauss, Jens; Jorgenson, Torre; Fortier, Daniel; Stephani, Eva; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Yedoma, a suite of syngenetically frozen silty ice- and organic-rich deposits with large ice wedges that accumulated during the late Pleistocene, is vulnerable to thermal degradation and erosion because of the extremely high ice contents. This degradation can result in significant surface subsidence and retreat of coastal bluffs and riverbanks with large consequences to landscape evolution, infrastructure damage, and water quality. We used remote sensing and field observations to assess patterns and rates of riverbank erosion at a 35-m-high active yedoma bluff along the Itkillik River in northern Alaska. The total volumetric ground-ice content-including wedge, segregated, and pore ice-was estimated to be 86%. The process of riverbank erosion and stabilization include three main stages typical of the areas with ice-rich permafrost: (1) thermal erosion combined with thermal denudation, (2) thermal denudation, and (3) slope stabilization. Active riverbank erosion at the main study site started in July 1995, when the Itkillik River changed its channel. The total retreat of the riverbank during 1995-2010 within different segments of the bluff varied from 180 to 280 m; the average retreat rate for the most actively eroded part of the riverbank was almost 19 m/y. From August 2007 to August 2011, the total retreat varied from 10 to almost 100 m. The average retreat rate for the whole 680-m-long bluff was 11 m/y. For the most actively eroded central part of the bluff (150 m long) it was 20 m/y, ranging from 16 to 24 m/y. More than 180,000 m3 of ground ice and organic-rich frozen soil, or almost 70,000 metric tons (t) of soil solids including 880 t of organic carbon, were transported to the river from the retreating bank annually. This study reports the highest long-term rates of riverbank erosion ever observed in permafrost regions of Eurasia and North America.

  8. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  9. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Centers Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  10. Patterns in flowing sand: understanding the physics of granular flow.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Ecke, Robert E; McElwaine, Jim N

    2009-10-23

    Dense granular flows are often unstable and form inhomogeneous structures. Although significant advances have been recently made in understanding simple flows, instabilities of such flows are often not understood. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes that arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding pluglike regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material--a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  11. Flow-like features in Valles Marineris, Mars: Possible ice-driven creep processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. P.; Komatsu, G.; Kargel, J. S.

    1999-09-01

    Recent high resolution MOC images have revealed the presence of deformed impact craters on flow-like features characterized by narrow bands of alternating light and dark material on the walls of Valles Marineris. The maximum crater elongations are consistent with the flow directions. Moreover the directions of these flows follow the topography downslope. In some cases, the flows emanate from cirque-like depressions, and the flows are divided by sharp ridges similar to arête. These landforms have resemblance to (1) alpine-type glacier morphology, including cirques, arêtes, and glaciers containing medial moraines; and (2) Grand Canyon-type sapping and mass wasting features. Certain aspects of the features in Valles Marineris seem more consistent with the first hypothesis involving a viscous rheology of the flows driven by ice-assisted creep processes. This hypothesis includes direct analogies to glaciers and rock glaciers. In the case of rock glaciers, flow is produced by freeze-thaw and by internal deformation of ice cores or lenses, whereas in the case of glaciers, movement occurs by internal deformation plus basal sliding in some cases where the glacier is melted at its bed. The amounts and roles of ice in the genesis of the Martian glacier-type landforms in Valles Marineris are not clear at this point. The population density of undeformed fresh impact craters on these flows appears to be low compared with the surrounding plateau areas. This may indicate relatively recent ages of the flow processes. Despite the limited coverage of the MOC images, the occurrence of the flow-like features associated by the deformed impact craters is common in most areas of Valles Marineris that have been imaged. We currently are working on the systematic survey of these flow-like features. We are also in the process of analyzing MOLA data in order to constrain the geometry of these landforms.

  12. The Extent of Channelized Basal Water Flow Under the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, J.; Johnson, J. V.; Harper, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial ice flows due to a combination of deformation and basal sliding, with sliding accounting for most of the fastest ice flow. Basal sliding is controlled by the transport of water at the glacier's bed, which can be accomplished through both high pressure, low discharge, distributed flow, or low pressure, high discharge, channelized flow. Higher pressures are generally associated with more complete decoupling of a glacier from its bed and faster flow. As the intensity of summer melt in Greenland has increased, our poor understanding of the drainage network's discharge capacity and its coupling to sliding has generated fundamental questions, such as: will larger fluxes of liquid water promote or inhibit basal sliding? To investigate this question we have implemented a model of distributed and channelized flow developed by Werder et. al 2013. The sensitivity of the modeled channel network to basal and surface geometry, melt rate, boundary conditions, and other parameters is examined in a sequence of experiments using synthetic geometries. Expanding on these experiments, we run the model with realistic surface and bedrock data from Issunguata Sermia in Western Central Greenland. These experiments benefit from a wealth of in-situ data, including observations of basal water pressure. Our results suggest that the development of large channels is limited to the margins of the ice sheet, and that higher pressures continue to prevail in the interior.

  13. Modelling debris transport within glaciers by advection in a full-Stokes ice flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirbel, Anna; Jarosch, Alexander H.; Nicholson, Lindsey

    2017-04-01

    As mountain glaciers recede worldwide, an increasing proportion of the remaining glacierized area is expected to become debris covered. The spatio-temporal development of a surface debris cover has profound effects on the glacier behaviour and meltwater generation, yet little is known about how glacier dynamics influence the spatial distribution of an emerging debris cover. Motivated by this lack of understanding, we present a coupled model to simulate advection and resulting deformation of debris features within glaciers. The finite element model developed in python consists of an advection scheme coupled to a full-Stokes ice flow model, using FEniCS as the numerical framework. We show results from numerical tests that demonstrate its suitability to model advection-dominated transport of concentration in a divergence-free velocity field. The capabilities of the coupled model are demonstrated by simulating transport of debris features of different initial size, shape and location through modelled velocity fields of representative mountain glaciers. The results indicate that deformation of initial debris inputs, as a consequence of being transported through the glacier, plays an important role in determining the location and rate of debris emergence at the glacier surface. The presented work lays the foundation for comprehensive simulations of realistic patterns of debris cover, their spatial and temporal variability and the timescales over which debris covers can form.

  14. Flow properties of ice cream mix prepared from palm oil: anhydrous milk fat blends.

    PubMed

    Rosnani, A I Wan; Aini, I Nor; Yazid, A M M; Dzulkifly, M H

    2007-05-15

    Ice cream mixes containing 33.4% total solids including 10% fat, 11.1% milk solid-non fat (MSNF), 12% sugar, 0.35% commercial blend of emulsifier/ stabiliser and water were produced. The blending of PO with AMF were conducted at three different ratios 30: 70, 50: 50 and 70: 30, respectively. The experimental ice cream mixes were compared with a control ice cream mix prepared from AMF. The flow properties were measured after ageing at 0, 1, 1.5, 2 and 24 h and determined using a controlled stress rheometer (Haake RS 100). The Power Law and Casson equation was employed to estimate the yield stress of an ice cream mixes. The regression coefficients (r) was represented well by the Casson model (r > 0.99) for all the samples, indicating goodness of fit. The profiles of the consistency coefficients (K(c)) were quite similar for all experimental samples, which could be attributed to the fact that all the samples exhibited similar viscoelastic behaviour. The flow behaviour index (n) of an ice cream mix prepared from PO and their blends with AMF were less then 1.0 (range 0.04-0.08) indicating that they were psuedoplastic fluid. The eta(o) at shear rate 20(-1) indicated higher degree of viscosity in AMF.

  15. Patterns and instability of grannular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Borzsonyi, Tamas; Mcelwaine, Jim N

    2009-01-01

    Dense granular flows are often observed to become unstable and form inhomogeneous structures in nature or industry. Although recently significant advances have been made in understanding simple flows, instabilities are often not understood in detail. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes. These arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding plug-like regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material -- a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  16. Pattern of CsICE1 expression under cold or drought treatment and functional verification through analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z T; Li, C; Shi, H; Wang, H; Wang, Y

    2015-09-22

    CsICE1 is thought to be involved in hardiness resistance of tea plants. Using seedling cuttings of biennial Wuniuzao in this study, the pattern of CsICE1 expression under cold temperature (4°, -5°C), drought [20% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-6000)], and plant hormone [200 mg/L abscisic acid (ABA), 1 mg/L brassinolide (BR)] treatment was studied by real-time quantitative PCR. Additionally, stress resistance, such as the freezing resistance of CsICE1, was studied using Arabidopsis lines transformed with sense or anti-sense CsICE1 via Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Our results showed that CsICE1 mRNA could be induced under -5°C, PEG, ABA, or BR treatment, although the pattern of expression differed for all treatments. Compared to wild type (WT) and anti-sense ICE1 transgenic lines, sense lines displayed higher relative germination rates under salt and drought stress. After freezing treatment, the sense transgenic lines over-expressing CsICE1 showed a higher survival rate, increased levels of proline, and decreased levels of malonaldehyde. Conversely, compared with WT, anti-sense ICE1 transgenic lines had lower proline levels and higher malonaldehyde levels under freezing conditions. Our study indicates that CsICE1 is an important anti-freezing gene and that over-expression of CsICE1 can improve cold resistance and enhance salt and drought tolerance of transgenic lines.

  17. Active subglacial lakes and channelized water flow beneath the Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Seo, Ki-Weon; Lee, Won Sang; Scambos, Ted

    2016-12-01

    We identify two previously unknown subglacial lakes beneath the stagnated trunk of the Kamb Ice Stream (KIS). Rapid fill-drain hydrologic events over several months are inferred from surface height changes measured by CryoSat-2 altimetry and indicate that the lakes are probably connected by a subglacial drainage network, whose structure is inferred from the regional hydraulic potential and probably links the lakes. The sequential fill-drain behavior of the subglacial lakes and concurrent rapid thinning in a channel-like topographic feature near the grounding line implies that the subglacial water repeatedly flows from the region above the trunk to the KIS grounding line and out beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. Ice shelf elevation near the hypothesized outlet is observed to decrease slowly during the study period. Our finding supports a previously published conceptual model of the KIS shutdown stemming from a transition from distributed flow to well-drained channelized flow of subglacial water. However, a water-piracy hypothesis in which the KIS subglacial water system is being starved by drainage in adjacent ice streams is also supported by the fact that the degree of KIS trunk subglacial lake activity is relatively weaker than those of the upstream lakes.

  18. Uncertainty in counting ice nucleating particles with continuous flow diffusion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sarvesh; Rothenberg, Daniel A.; Wolf, Martin J.; David, Robert O.; Kanji, Zamin A.; Wang, Chien; Rösch, Michael; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the measurement of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations and sizing of crystals using continuous flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs). CFDCs have been deployed for decades to measure the formation of INPs under controlled humidity and temperature conditions in laboratory studies and by ambient aerosol populations. These measurements have, in turn, been used to construct parameterizations for use in models by relating the formation of ice crystals to state variables such as temperature and humidity as well as aerosol particle properties such as composition and number. We show here that assumptions of ideal instrument behavior are not supported by measurements made with a commercially available CFDC, the SPectrometer for Ice Nucleation (SPIN), and the instrument on which it is based, the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (ZINC). Non-ideal instrument behavior, which is likely inherent to varying degrees in all CFDCs, is caused by exposure of particles to different humidities and/or temperatures than predicated from instrument theory of operation. This can result in a systematic, and variable, underestimation of reported INP concentrations. We find here variable correction factors from 1.5 to 9.5, consistent with previous literature values. We use a machine learning approach to show that non-ideality is most likely due to small-scale flow features where the aerosols are combined with sheath flows. Machine learning is also used to minimize the uncertainty in measured INP concentrations. We suggest that detailed measurement, on an instrument-by-instrument basis, be performed to characterize this uncertainty.

  19. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pickett, Mark T.; Sheldon, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose was to document the airflow characteristics in the diffuser of the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel and to determine the effects of vortex generators on the flow quality in the diffuser. The results were used to determine how to improve the flow in this portion of the tunnel so that it can be more effectively used as an icing test section and such that overall tunnel efficiency can be improved. The demand for tunnel test time and the desire to test models that are too large for the test section were two of the drivers behind this diffuser study. For all vortex generator configurations tested, the flow quality was improved.

  20. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  1. Two- phase flow patterns and heat transfer in parallel microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosyak, A.; Segal, Z.; Pogrebnyak, E.; Hetsroni, G.

    2002-11-01

    Microchannel heat sinks with two-phase flow can satisfy the increasing heat removal requirements of modern micro electronic devices. One of the important aspects associated with two- phase flows in microchannels is to study the bubble behavior. However, in the literature most of the reports present data of only a single channel. This does not account for flow mixing and hydrodynamic instability that occurs in parallel microchannels, connected by common inlet and outlet collectors. In the present study, experiments were performed for air- water and steam- water flow in parallel triangular microchannels with a base of 200 300 µ m. The experimental study is based on systematic measurements of temperature and flow pattern by infrared radiometry and high-speed digital video imaging. In air-water flow, different flow patterns were observed simultaneously in the various microchannels at a fixed values of water and gas flow rates. In steam-water flow, instability in uniformly heated microchannels was observed. This work develops a practical modeling approach for two-phase microchannel heat sinks and considers discrepancy between flow patterns of air- water and steam- water flow in microchannels.

  2. Circumpolar patterns of ground-fast lake ice and landscape development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Annett; Pointner, Georg; Leibmann, Marina; Dvornikov, Yuri; Khomutov, Artem

    2017-04-01

    Shallow lakes in the Arctic are often associated with thermokarst processes which are characteristic for permafrost environments. They partially or completely freeze-up during winter time what can be observed from space using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Spatial patterns of ground-fast and floating ice relate to geomorphological and hydrological processes, but no circumpolar account of this phenomenon is currently available due to challenges when dealing with the varying observation geometry typical for SAR. An approach using ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath data (approximately 120 m resolution) has been developed supported by bathymetric measurements in Siberia and eventually applied across the entire Arctic for late winter 2008. In total about 2 Million lake objects have been analyzed considering the boundaries of the Last Glacial Maximum, permafrost zones and soil organic carbon content. Distinct patterns of ground-fast lake ice fraction can be found across the Arctic. Clusters of variable fractions of ground-fast ice occur especially in Yedoma regions of Eastern Siberia and Alaska. This reflects the nature of thaw lake dynamics. Analyses of lake depth measurements from several sites (Alaskan North Slope, Richards Island in Canada, Yamal Peninsula and Lena Delta) suggest that the used method yields the potential to utilize ground-fast lake ice information over larger areas with respect to landscape development, but results need to be treated with care, specifically for larger lakes and along river courses. A combination of general lake features and ground-fast ice fraction may lead to an advanced understanding of landscape patterns and development. Ground-fast ice fraction information may support to some extent the identification of landscape units, for example areas of adjacent lakes with similar patterns (terraces) or areas with mixed ground-fast fractions which indicate different lake development stages. This work was supported by the Austrian Science Fund

  3. Flow pattern visualization in a mimic anaerobic digester using CFD.

    PubMed

    Vesvikar, Mehul S; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2005-03-20

    Three-dimensional steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in mimic anaerobic digesters to visualize their flow pattern and obtain hydrodynamic parameters. The mixing in the digester was provided by sparging gas at three different flow rates. The gas phase was simulated with air and the liquid phase with water. The CFD results were first evaluated using experimental data obtained by computer automated radioactive particle tracking (CARPT). The simulation results in terms of overall flow pattern, location of circulation cells and stagnant regions, trends of liquid velocity profiles, and volume of dead zones agree reasonably well with the experimental data. CFD simulations were also performed on different digester configurations. The effects of changing draft tube size, clearance, and shape of the tank bottoms were calculated to evaluate the effect of digester design on its flow pattern. Changing the draft tube clearance and height had no influence on the flow pattern or dead regions volume. However, increasing the draft tube diameter or incorporating a conical bottom design helped in reducing the volume of the dead zones as compared to a flat-bottom digester. The simulations showed that the gas flow rate sparged by a single point (0.5 cm diameter) sparger does not have an appreciable effect on the flow pattern of the digesters at the range of gas flow rates used.

  4. Flow and fracture of ices, with application to icy satellites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, W. B.; Stern, L. A.; Pathare, A.; Golding, N.

    2013-12-01

    Exploration of the outer planets and their satellites by spacecraft over the past 4 decades has revealed that the prevailing low temperatures in the outer solar system have not produced "dead" cryoworlds of generic appearance. Rather, there is an extraordinary diversity in average densities, presence/absence and compositions of atmospheres and planetary rings, average albedos and their seasonal changes, near-surface compositions, and surface records of impact cratering and endogenic tectonic and igneous processes. One reason for this diversity is that the icy minerals present in abundance on many of these worlds are now or once were at significant fractions of their melting temperatures. Hence, a host of thermally activated processes related to endogenic activity (such as crystal defect migration, mass diffusion, surface transport, solid-solid changes of state, and partial melting) may occur that can enable inelastic flow on the surfaces and in the interiors of these bodies. Planetary manifestations include viscous crater relaxation in ice-rich terrain, cryovolcanism, the presence of a stable subsurface ocean, and the effects of solid-ice convection in deep interiors. We make the connection between theoretical mechanisms of deformation and planetary geology through laboratory experiment. Specifically, we develop quantitative constitutive flow laws (strain rate vs. stress) that describe the effects of relevant environmental variables (hydrostatic pressure, temperature, phase composition, chemical impurities). Our findings speak to topics including (1) the behavior of an outer ice I layer, its thickness, the depth to which a stagnant lid might extend, and possibility of wholesale overturn; (2) softening effects of dissolved species such as ammonia and perchlorate; (3) hardening effects of enclathration and of rock dust; and (4) effects of grain size on strength and factors affecting grain size. Other applications of lab data include dynamics of the deep interiors of

  5. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; Van Zante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and ow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  6. Disruption of intracardiac flow patterns in the newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Groves, Alan M; Durighel, Giuliana; Finnemore, Anna; Tusor, Nora; Merchant, Nazakat; Razavi, Reza; Hajnal, Jo V; Edwards, A David

    2012-04-01

    Consistent patterns of rotational intracardiac flow have been demonstrated in the healthy adult human heart. Intracardiac rotational flow patterns are hypothesized to assist in the maintenance of kinetic energy of inflowing blood, augmenting cardiac function. Newborn cardiac function is known to be suboptimal secondary to decreased receptor number and sympathetic innervation, increased afterload, and increased reliance on atrial contraction to support ventricular filling. Patterns of intracardiac flow in the newborn have not previously been examined. Whereas 5 of the 13 infants studied showed significant evidence of rotational flow within the right atrium, 8 infants showed little or no rotational flow. Presence or absence of rotational flow was not related to gestational age, birth weight, postnatal age, atrial size, or image quality. Despite absence of intra-atrial rotational flow, atrioventricular valve flow into the left and right ventricles later in the cardiac cycle could be seen, suggesting that visualization techniques were adequate. While further study is required to assess its exact consequences on cardiac mechanics and energetics, disruption to intracardiac flow patterns could be another contributor to the multifactorial sequence that produces newborn circulatory failure. We studied 13 newborn infants, using three-dimensional (3D) cardiac magnetic resonance phase-contrast imaging (spatial resolution 0.84 mm, temporal resolution 22.6 ms) performed without sedation/anesthesia.

  7. The importance of particulate texture to the flow strength of ice + dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    W. B. Durham,; N. Golding,; Stern, Laura A.; A. Pathare,; D. L. Goldsby,; D. Prior,

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary experimental surveys of the flow of dilute mixtures of ice plus hard particulates under planetary conditions indicate a strengthening effect with respect to pure ice, but with dependencies on environmental conditions (temperature, stress, grain size) that vary widely from study to study [1-4]. With the expectation that the textural character of the particulate fraction (size, shape, spatial distribution of particulates; relationship of particulates to ice grain boundaries, etc.) also influences rheological behavior, we have begun a more systematic investigation of the effect of particulates on strength. We rely extensively on cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM) and to maximize planetary relevance we focus on behavior at low stress and small grain size.

  8. Flow Interference between a Circular (Upstream) and a Square Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Jayalakshmi; R, Ajith Kumar; Kumar, Nithin S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream circular cylinder and a square cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two circular cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a circular-square configuration is investigated. No such studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the circular-square configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study is very much relevant in the context of possible interference effects occuring in engineering structures such as buildings, heat exchanger tubes etc.

  9. Flow Interference between a Square (Upstream) and a Circular Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nithin S.; R, Ajith Kumar; Mohan, Jayalakshmi

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream square cylinder and a circular cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two square cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a square-circular configuration is investigated. No such systematic studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the square-circular configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study bears considerable practical relevance in the context of possible interference effects occurring in engineering structures such as buildings, bridges etc.

  10. Improved methodologies for continuous-flow analysis of stable water isotopes in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tyler R.; White, James W. C.; Steig, Eric J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Morris, Valerie; Gkinis, Vasileios; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.

    2017-02-01

    Water isotopes in ice cores are used as a climate proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation as well as evaporative conditions in moisture source regions. Traditional measurements of water isotopes have been achieved using magnetic sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, a number of recent studies have shown that laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) performs as well or better than IRMS. The new LAS technology has been combined with continuous-flow analysis (CFA) to improve data density and sample throughput in numerous prior ice coring projects. Here, we present a comparable semi-automated LAS-CFA system for measuring high-resolution water isotopes of ice cores. We outline new methods for partitioning both system precision and mixing length into liquid and vapor components - useful measures for defining and improving the overall performance of the system. Critically, these methods take into account the uncertainty of depth registration that is not present in IRMS nor fully accounted for in other CFA studies. These analyses are achieved using samples from a South Pole firn core, a Greenland ice core, and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The measurement system utilizes a 16-position carousel contained in a freezer to consecutively deliver ˜ 1 m × 1.3 cm2 ice sticks to a temperature-controlled melt head, where the ice is converted to a continuous liquid stream and eventually vaporized using a concentric nebulizer for isotopic analysis. An integrated delivery system for water isotope standards is used for calibration to the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) scale, and depth registration is achieved using a precise overhead laser distance device with an uncertainty of ±0.2 mm. As an added check on the system, we perform inter-lab LAS comparisons using WAIS Divide ice samples, a corroboratory step not taken in prior CFA studies. The overall results are important for substantiating data obtained from LAS

  11. Spontaneous generation of pure ice streams via flow instability: Role of longitudinal shear stresses and subglacial till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayag, Roiy; Tziperman, Eli

    2008-05-01

    A significant portion of the ice discharge in ice sheets is drained through ice streams, with subglacial sediment (till) acting as a lubricant. The known importance of horizontal friction in shear margins to ice stream dynamics suggests a critical role of longitudinal stresses. The effects of subglacial till and longitudinal stresses on the stability of an ice sheet flow are studied by linear stability analysis of an idealized ice-till model in two horizontal dimensions. A power law-viscous constitutive relation is used, explicitly including longitudinal shear stresses. The till, which has compressible viscous rheology, affects the ice flow through bottom friction. We examine the possibility that pure ice streams develop via a spontaneous instability of ice flow. We demonstrate that this model can be made intrinsically unstable for a seemingly relevant range of parameters and that the wavelengths and growth rates that correspond to the most unstable modes are in rough agreement with observed pure ice streams. Instabilities occur owing to basal friction and meltwater production at the ice-till interface. The most unstable wavelength arise because of selective dissipation of both short and long perturbation scales. Longitudinal stress gradients stabilize short transverse wavelengths, while Nye diffusion stabilizes long transverse wavelengths. The selection of an intermediate unstable wavelength occurs, however, only for certain parameter and perturbation structure choices. These results do not change qualitatively for a Newtonian ice flow law, indicating no significant role to shear thinning, although this may very well be due to the restrictive assumptions of the model and analysis.

  12. MEANS FOR VISUALIZING FLUID FLOW PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, F.E.; Palmer, L.D.; Poppendick, H.F.; Winn, G.M.

    1961-05-16

    An apparatus is given for determining both the absolute and relative velocities of a phosphorescent fluid flowing through a transparent conduit. The apparatus includes a source for exciting a narrow trsnsverse band of the fluid to phosphorescence, detecting means such as a camera located downstream from the exciting source to record the shape of the phosphorescent band as it passes, and a timer to measure the time elapsed between operation of the exciting source and operation of the camera.

  13. Design flow automation for variable-shaped beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, Martin; Ballhorn, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    Raster scan pattern generators have been used in the photomask industry for many years. Methods and software tools for data preparation for these pattern generators are well established and have been integrated into design flows with a high degree of automation. But the growing requirements for pattern fidelity have lead to the introduction of 50 kV variable shaped beam pattern generators. Due to their different writing strategy these tools use proprietary data formats and in turn require an optimized data preparation. As a result the existing design flow has to be adopted to account for these requirements. Due to the fact that cycle times have grown severely over the last years the automation of this adopted design flow will not only enhance the design flow quality by avoiding errors during manual operations but will also help to reduce turn-around times. We developed and implemented an automated design flow for a variable shaped beam pattern generator which had to fulfill two conflicting requirements: Well established automated tools originally developed for raster scan pattern generators had to be retained with only slight modifications to avoid the (re)implementation and the concurrent usage of two systems while on the other hand data generation especially during fracturing had to be optimized for a variable shaped beam pattern generator.

  14. The ability to survive intracellular freezing in nematodes is related to the pattern and distribution of ice formed.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Méliane R; Wharton, David A

    2016-07-01

    A few species of nematodes can survive extensive intracellular freezing throughout all their tissues, an event that is usually thought to be fatal to cells. How are they able to survive in this remarkable way? The pattern and distribution of ice formed, after freezing at -10°C, can be observed using freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy, which preserves the former position of ice as white spaces. We compared the pattern and distribution of ice formed in a nematode that survives intracellular freezing well (Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1), one that survives poorly (Panagrellus redivivus) and one with intermediate levels of survival (Plectus murrayi). We also examined Panagrolaimus sp. in which the survival of freezing had been compromised by starvation. Levels of survival were as expected and the use of vital dyes indicated cellular damage in those that survived poorly (starved Panagrolaimus sp. and P. murrayi). In fed Panagrolaimus sp. the intracellular ice spaces were small and uniform, whereas in P. redivivus and starved Panagrolaimus sp. there were some large spaces that may be causing cellular damage. The pattern and distribution of ice formed was different in P. murrayi, with a greater number of individuals having no ice or only small intracellular ice spaces. Control of the size of the ice formed is thus important for the survival of intracellular freezing in nematodes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Velocity-vorticity patterns in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelz, R.B.; Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S.A.; Shtilman, L.; Levich, E.

    1985-06-10

    Direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is used for the investigation of local helicity fluctuations in plane Poiseuille (channel) and Taylor-Green vortex flows. It is shown that in regions of high dissipation, the cosine of the angle between velocity and vorticity is evenly distributed; in regions of low dissipation, the velocity and vorticity vectors have a tendency to align. It is also shown that near the central part of the channel, velocity and vorticity vectors have a strong tendency to be aligned, while in the buffer region, all angles are nearly equally probable.

  16. Flow Quality Studies of the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel Circuit (1995 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of conducting the flow-field surveys described in this report was to more fully document the flow quality in several areas of the tunnel circuit in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel. The results from these surveys provide insight into areas of the tunnel that were known to exhibit poor flow quality characteristics and provide data that will be useful to the design of flow quality improvements and a new heat exchanger for the facility. An instrumented traversing mechanism was used to survey the flow field at several large cross sections of the tunnel loop over the entire speed range of the facility. Flow-field data were collected at five stations in the tunnel loop, including downstream of the fan drive motor housing, upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, and upstream and downstream of the spraybars located in the settling chamber upstream of the test section. The data collected during these surveys greatly expanded the data base describing the flow quality in each of these areas. The new data matched closely the flow quality trends recorded from earlier tests. Data collected downstream of the heat exchanger and in the settling chamber showed how the configuration of the folded heat exchanger affected the pressure, velocity, and flow angle distributions in these areas. Smoke flow visualization was also used to qualitatively study the flow field in an area downstream of the drive fan and in the settling chamber/contraction section.

  17. Cold basal conditions during surges control flow of fringing Arctic ice caps in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Samuel; Christoffersen, Poul; Todd, Joe; Palmer, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Fringing ice caps separated from larger ice sheets are rarely studied, yet they are an important part of earth's cryosphere, which has become the largest source of global sea-level rise. Understanding marginal ice caps is crucial for being able to predict sea-level change as they are responsible for up to 20% of Greenland's mass loss for 2003-2008. Studies of fringing ice caps can furthermore provide useful insights into processes operating on glaciers that surge. Surging has been the focus of much recent glaciological work, especially with reference to thermal evolution of polythermal glaciers in High Mountain Asia and the High Arctic. This has shown that the classic divide between hydrologically-controlled surges ('hard-bed') in Alaska and thermally-regulated ('soft-bed') surges elsewhere is less stark than previously assumed. Studying marginal ice caps can therefore be valuable in several ways. The largest fringing ice cap in Greenland is Flade Isblink. Previous work has established that this ice cap is showing a range of dynamic behaviour, including subglacial lake drainage and varied patterns of mass-balance change. In particular, a substantial surge, assumed to be caused by a version of the thermally-regulated mechanism, occurred between 1996 and 2000, making the ice cap a useful case study for investigating this process. Here we investigate the surge on Flade Isblink using the open-source, Full-Stokes model Elmer/Ice to invert for basal conditions and englacial temperatures using the adjoint method. We specifically study steady-state conditions representative of the active surge phase in 2000, and the subsequent quiescent phase, using patterns of surface velocity observed in 2000, 2005, 2008 and 2015. Under constant geometry, temperature and geothermal heat, it is shown that surging increases basal freezing rates by over 60% across an area that is twice as large as the area over which the bed freezes in the quiescent phase. The process responsible for this

  18. Probability of laminar flow loss because of ice crystal encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A method for combining the cloud detector observation results from the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) with Knollenberg probe observations of cloud particle concentration from other programs to derive estimates of the ambient concentration of particles larger than a given size was developed. The method was applied to estimate the probability of encountering particle concentrations which would degrade the performance of laminar flow control (LFC) aircraft. It is concluded that LF loss should occur only about one percent of the time in clear air and that flight within clouds should always result in a significant loss of LF, with 90 percent LF loss occurring about one percent of the time. Preliminary estimates of cloud encounter probability are presented for four airline routes, and conclusions are presented as to the best altitudes for cloud avoidance in extratropical and tropical latitudes.

  19. Flow Quality Measurements in an Aerodynamic Model of NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve the aerodynamic flow characteristics of the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), a modular scale model of the facility was fabricated. This 1/10th-scale model was used to gain further understanding of the flow characteristics in the IRT. The model was outfitted with instrumentation and data acquisition systems to determine pressures, velocities, and flow angles in the settling chamber and test section. Parametric flow quality studies involving the insertion and removal of a model of the IRT's distinctive heat exchanger (cooler) and/or of a honeycomb in the settling chamber were performed. These experiments illustrate the resulting improvement or degradation in flow quality.

  20. Measurements of natural ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a continuous flow diffusion chamber technique for measuring the atmospheric concentrations of natural C-F nuclei. It is noted that the same device can also measure deposition nuclei; these two modes can thus be separated and compared. The laminar flow characteristics allow the temperature and supersaturation to be calculated with a high degree of precision and confidence. The method avoids the problems of a supporting substrate and of concentrating the sample into a small volume (as for membrane filters). The present measurements of natural ice nucleus concentrations at +1 percent water supersaturation are found to be comparable to research aircraft measurements of ice crystal concentrations in winter cap clouds over Elk Mountain, Wyoming (Vali et al., 1982).

  1. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Winkler, G.; Birk, S.

    2016-05-01

    Preferential flow patterns in the subsurface are of great importance for the availability and the quality of water resources. However, knowledge of their spatial structure is still behind their importance, so that understanding the nature of preferential flow patterns is a major issue in subsurface hydrology. Comparing the statistics of river catchment sizes and spring discharges, we found that the morphology of preferential subsurface flow patterns is probably scale invariant and similar to that of dendritic river networks. This result is not limited to karstic aquifers where the occurrence of dendritic structures has been known at least qualitatively for a long time. The scale invariance even seems to be independent of the lithology of the aquifer. However, scale invariance of river patterns seems to be only limited by the continental scale, while scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns breaks down at much smaller scales. The upper limit of scale invariance in subsurface flow patterns is highly variable. We found a range from thousands of square kilometers for limestone aquifers down to less than 1 km2 in the weathered zone and debris accumulations of crystalline rocks.

  2. Pattern formation induced by a differential shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi, L.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2013-02-01

    Fluid flow advecting one substance while others are immobilized can generate an instability in a homogeneous steady state of a reaction-diffusion-advection system. This differential-flow instability leads to the formation of steady spatial patterns in a moving reference frame. We study the effects of shear flow on this instability by considering two layers of fluid moving independently from each other, but allowing the substances to diffuse along and across the layers. We find that shear flow can generate instabilities even if the average flow velocity is zero for both substances. These instabilities are strongly dependent on which substance is advected by the shear flow. We explain these effects using the results of Taylor dispersion, where an effective diffusivity is enhanced by shear flow.

  3. Dynamic coupling of magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows in ice giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Heimpel, M. H.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the solar system, yet their characteristics are as diverse as the planets themselves. These fields are thought to result from dynamo action driven by thermochemical convection in electrically conducting fluid regions. The multipolar dynamos of Uranus and Neptune provide a unique opportunity to test hypotheses for magnetic field generation. Since no sharp structural boundaries in the ice giants between the ionic ocean and overlying molecular envelope are expected, it is possible that these regions are linked dynamically. Thus, an understanding of the coupling between magnetic fields, heat flow, and atmospheric winds is crucial to determine what controls the strength, morphology, and evolution of giant planet dynamos. Here we present numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical shells to test the hypothesis that poorly organized turbulence will generate ice giant-like magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows. We find that this style of convection leads to small-scale, fluctuating dynamo action that generates a multipolar magnetic field, Hadley-like circulation cells that promote equatorial upwellings to create low latitude peaks in internal heat flux, and homogenized absolute angular momentum that drives three-jet zonal flows. This qualitative agreement with observations suggests that the internal dynamics of ice giant planets may be characterized by three-dimensional convective turbulence with dynamic coupling between the dynamo region and electrically insulating envelope above playing an important role as well.

  4. Basic cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in ventricular catheters prototypes.

    PubMed

    Galarza, Marcelo; Giménez, Ángel; Valero, José; Pellicer, Olga; Martínez-Lage, Juan F; Amigó, José M

    2015-06-01

    A previous study by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of the three-dimensional (3-D) flow in ventricular catheters (VC) disclosed that most of the total fluid mass flows through the catheter's most proximal holes in commercially available VC. The aim of the present study is to investigate basic flow patterns in VC prototypes. The general procedure for the development of a CFD model calls for transforming the physical dimensions of the system to be studied into a virtual wire-frame model which provides the coordinates for the virtual space of a CFD mesh, in this case, a VC. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, a system of strongly coupled, nonlinear, partial differential conservation equations governing the motion of the flow field, are then solved numerically. New designs of VC, e.g., with novel hole configurations, can then be readily modeled, and the corresponding flow pattern computed in an automated way. Specially modified VCs were used for benchmark experimental testing. Three distinct types of flow pattern in prototype models of VC were obtained by varying specific parameters of the catheter design, like the number of holes in the drainage segments and the distance between them. Specifically, we show how to equalize and reverse the flow pattern through the different VC drainage segments by choosing appropriate parameters. The flow pattern in prototype catheters is determined by the number of holes, the hole diameter, the ratio hole/segment, and the distance between hole segments. The application of basic design principles of VC may help to develop new catheters with better flow circulation, thus reducing the possibility of becoming occluded.

  5. Assessing Geometric Controls on Tidewater Glacier Sensitivity to Frontal Perturbations Using a Numerical Ice Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, E. M.; Howat, I. M.

    2010-12-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers worldwide have undergone rapid changes in their dynamics in response to external forcing. Observations from the Greenland coast, however, reveal that outlet glaciers in close proximity to each other, likely sharing a similar external forcing, can exhibit dramatically different behavior. These behavioral differences may result from differences in glacier shape, such as the presence of basal overdeepenings and lateral constrictions near the terminus. Understanding how shape influences glacier response to forcing at the terminus is critical for predicting future change. The dependence of ice flow on shape is non-linear and complex and, therefore, best examined using numerical methods. We employ a numerical ice flow model to investigate how the shape of marine-terminating glaciers (i.e. basal topography, thickness and width) influences the dynamic response to perturbations in the stress boundary condition at the front caused by front retreat and thinning. Governing model equations are compiled from various numerical models derived for a lightly grounded outlet glaciers, grounded retreat through basal over-deepenings, and calving of marine-terminating outlet glaciers. The model is designed for tidewater glaciers confined to narrow channels so that the stress balance components consist of substantial longitudinal and lateral stresses in addition to basal drag. Emphasis is placed on conditions at the grounding zone, as it is particularly sensitive to changes in basal drag and longitudinal stress. The effect of ice softening at the shear margins as a result of glacial acceleration is also considered. Boundary conditions at the front are categorized by two different calving criteria: (1) the buoyancy stress criterion prescribed by Durand et al. (2009), and (2) the modified flotation criterion derived by Vieli et al. (2001). The model is applied to a range of glacier bed and width geometries and perturbed from steady state by prescribing increased

  6. Ice front configuration and torrential flow features of the Late Wisconsinan interlobate region of southcentral Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    A large re-entrant, bordered on three sides by ice of the Michigan, Saginaw and Huron-Erie lobes, developed over a five-county area in southcentral Michigan during ice retreat of the Port Bruce Stade of the Woodfordian Substage. At this time, ice occupied positions marked by the Sturgies, Tekonsha, and Kalamazoo Moraines. The presence of numerous boulder beds within outwash deposits attests to frequent episodes of torrential flow. A major source of the discharge was the draining of short-lived proglacial and subglacial lakes identified by lacustrine deposits which occur at different altitudes within moraine belts. Tunnel valleys, meltwater channels, and narrow chutes carried the high discharges of water that were partly responsible for the Kankakee torrent of northeastern Illinois. The configuration of abandoned meltwater channels in eastern Calhoun and western jackson counties, between the Kalamazoo Moraine on the northeast and the Tekonsha Moraine to the southwest, indicates that a large ice-collapsed depression, 30 km long and 8 km to 16 km wide, developed within the Saginaw lobe just behind its margin. For a short period of time it contained intermittent glacial lakes one of which drained through the Kesler Lakes sluiceway. A large outwash plain, the Union City-Mendon sluiceway, heads at the Tekonsha Moraine in southcentral Calhoun County and extends southwest through northeastern Branch County to the Sturgis Moraine. Several abandoned narrow chutes, up to 1.6 km long and 60 m to 300 m wide, are incised in the outwash plain in the vicinity of Union City. Channel geometry indicates that flow exceeded 850 cms (30,000 cfs) during bankfull discharge and came from the overflow of a lake dammed by ice blocks in the ancient St. Joseph River floodplain.

  7. Hydrodynamic performance and cavitation of an open propeller in a simulated ice-blocked flow

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Bose, N.; Yamaguchi, H. )

    1994-08-01

    Experiments were done on a 200-mm-dia open propeller behind a simulated ice blockage in a cavitation tunnel. The propeller performance in uniform flow and blocked flow is contrasted over a range of advance coefficients and at different cavitation numbers. Mean thrust and torque coefficients are presented. The types of cavitation, and its intermittent nature over a cycle of operation, are reported. The experiments indicate the likelihood of cavitation at full scale for blocked conditions and illustrate the effects of cavitation on mean values of thrust and torque.

  8. Flow Patterns During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding is a relatively new technique for welding that uses a cylindrical pin or nib inserted along the weld seam. The nib (usually threaded) and the shoulder in which it is mounted are rapidly rotated and advanced along the seam. Extreme deformation takes place leaving a fine equiaxed structure in the weld region., The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is investigated using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a zone of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the rotational zone that both rotates and advances and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the rotational zone. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off in its wake of the nib, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side.

  9. Development of Three-Dimensional Flow Code Package to Predict Performance and Stability of Aircraft with Leading Edge Ice Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strash, D. J.; Summa, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported herein, a simplified, uncoupled, zonal procedure is utilized to assess the capability of numerically simulating icing effects on a Boeing 727-200 aircraft. The computational approach combines potential flow plus boundary layer simulations by VSAERO for the un-iced aircraft forces and moments with Navier-Stokes simulations by NPARC for the incremental forces and moments due to iced components. These are compared with wind tunnel force and moment data, supplied by the Boeing Company, examining longitudinal flight characteristics. Grid refinement improved the local flow features over previously reported work with no appreciable difference in the incremental ice effect. The computed lift curve slope with and without empennage ice matches the experimental value to within 1%, and the zero lift angle agrees to within 0.2 of a degree. The computed slope of the un-iced and iced aircraft longitudinal stability curve is within about 2% of the test data. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a zonal method for the icing analysis of complete aircraft or isolated components within the linear angle of attack range. In fact, this zonal technique has allowed for the viscous analysis of a complete aircraft with ice which is currently not otherwise considered tractable.

  10. Relating Segregation Patterns and Symmetries in Chaotic Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisar, Stephen; Meier, Steven; Lueptow, Richard; Ottino, Julio

    2006-11-01

    Segregation patterns formed by time-periodic flow of polydisperse granular material (varying in particle size) in quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) tumblers capture the symmetries of Poincar'e sections, stroboscopic maps of the underlying flow, derived from a continuum model. The similarities are striking despite the fact that the model contains no information about particle properties. We study this phenomenon experimentally by using mixtures of bidisperse granular material in which the concentration of small particles is varied in quasi-2D tumblers with square and pentagonal cross-sections. Experimental segregation patterns can be connected to the dynamics of the underlying flow by an analysis of periodic points. Patterns vary with small particle concentration based on the location of both elliptic points that characterize islands of regular flow and hyperbolic points that characterize regions of chaotic flow seen in Poincar'e sections. The calculation of the eigenvectors and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic points shows that lobes of segregated small particles stretch from hyperbolic points toward corners of the tumbler, demonstrating the connection between regions of chaotic flow and the shape of the segregation patterns. Furthermore, unstable manifolds map the shape of lobes of segregated particles. Funded by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and NSF.

  11. Geodetic observations of ice flow velocities over the southern part of subglacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica, and their glaciological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Jens; Dietrich, Reinhard; Fritsche, Mathias; Wendt, Anja; Yuskevich, Alexander; Kokhanov, Andrey; Senatorov, Anton; Lukin, Valery; Shibuya, Kazuo; Doi, Koichiro

    2006-09-01

    In the austral summer seasons 2001/02 and 2002/03, Global Positioning System (GPS) data were collected in the vicinity of Vostok Station to determine ice flow velocities over Lake Vostok. Ten GPS sites are located within a radius of 30km around Vostok Station on floating ice as well as on grounded ice to the east and to the west of the lake. Additionally, a local deformation network around the ice core drilling site 5G-1 was installed. The derived ice flow velocity for Vostok Station is 2.00ma-1 +/- 0.01ma-1. Along the flowline of Vostok Station an extension rate of about 10-5a-1 (equivalent to 1cm km-1 a-1) was determined. This significant velocity gradient results in a new estimate of 28700 years for the transit time of an ice particle along the Vostok flowline from the bedrock ridge in the southwest of the lake to the eastern shoreline. With these lower velocities compared to earlier studies and, hence, larger transit times the basal accretion rate is estimated to be 4mma-1 along a portion of the Vostok flowline. An assessment of the local accretion rate at Vostok Station using the observed geodetic quantities yields an accretion rate in the same order of magnitude. Furthermore, the comparison of our geodetic observations with results inferred from ice-penetrating radar data indicates that the ice flow may not have changed significantly for several thousand years.

  12. The North Polar Layered Deposits on Mars: The Internal Layering of Gemina Lingula and Implications for Ice Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Holt, John W.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Choudhary, Prateek

    2010-05-01

    horizons in the lower part. The upper horizons also generally achieve a better fit in the western part of GL while the fit for the lower horizons has a less distinct geographical variation. These differences could indicate a time gap in the deposition of the layers and may be explained by the existence of an angular unconformity previously identified within GL (Holt and Safaeinili, 2009). It is possible that the lower layers experienced a significantly different history than the upper, and/or that the geometry of the upper layers is primarily the result of draping the unconformity surface which is an elongated dome. Only taking into account individual layer geometry, our comparison between modelled and observed internal layering indicates that it is possible that ice flow has influenced the shape of NPLD. However, if this is the case GL must have extended farther to the southeast, or alternatively the accumulation pattern must have been significantly different to what is assumed in the model. Fishbaugh and Hvidberg. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, 2006. Greve et al. Planetary and Space Science, 52, p. 775-787, 2004. Greve and Mahajan. Icarus, 174, p. 475-485, 2005. Hindmarsh et al. Annals of Glaciology, 50, 130140, 2009. Holt and Safaeinili. LPSC XXXX, # 1721, 2009. Phillips et al. Science, 320, 1182, 2008. Putzig et al. Icarus, 204, p. 443-457, 2009. Seu et al. Journal of Geophysical Research, 112, 2007. Winebrenner et al. Icarus, 195, p. 90-105, 2008.

  13. Morphometry and pattern of a large sample of Canadian eskers: new insights into ice sheet meltwater drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrar, Robert; Stokes, Chris; Evans, David

    2013-04-01

    Meltwater drainage systems beneath ice sheets are a poorly understood, yet fundamentally important environment for understanding glacier dynamics, which are strongly influenced by the nature and quantity of meltwater entering the subglacial system. Contemporary sub-ice sheet meltwater drainage systems are notoriously difficult to access and monitor, but it is possible to utilise the exposed beds of past ice sheets to further our understanding of subglacial drainage. In particular, eskers record deposition in glacial drainage channels and are widespread on the exposed beds of former ice sheets, although they have rarely been studied in detail at the ice sheet scale. This paper presents the results of a remote sensing investigation of a large sample (>20,000) of eskers mapped from Landsat imagery of Canada and formed under the North American Ice Sheet Complex. Within a GIS framework, we investigate their spatial arrangement and morphometry, including length, fragmentation, sinuosity, spacing, frequency and tributaries. Results indicate that the channels in which eskers formed were often very long (hundreds of km) and often very straight (mean sinuosity approximates 1). In some locations, the lateral distance between neighbouring eskers is remarkably consistent and results indicate a preferred spacing of around 12 km. In other locations, typically over soft sediments, esker patterns are more chaotic, as predicted by theory. Significantly, comparison to an existing ice margin chronology reveals that the meltwater drainage system of the ice sheet became more organised and efficient during deglaciation: the number of eskers at the ice margin increased as deglaciation progressed and eskers became more closely spaced. The data presented in this paper provide an alternative perspective on the problems surrounding ice sheet meltwater drainage and are particularly suitable for: (i), assessment of the factors that control esker location and formation; (ii), rigorous testing of

  14. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  15. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  16. Condition of the Ross Ice Shelf derived from AVHRR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casassa, Gino

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite imagery is combined with the Ross Ice Shelf Geophysical and Glaciological Survey (RIGGS) data to study recent changes on the Ross Ice Shelf. Flow stripes that appear on the AVHRR imagery agree with significant changes in ice flow that have occurred over the past 1,100 years on the ice shelf sector fed by East Antarctica. A large looping pattern of flow stripes that disagrees with RIGGS flow lines appears west of Crary Ice Rise, on the eastern part of the ice shelf. This looped pattern is interpreted as relict flow stripes related to past activity of a major ice stream of West Antarctica, which occurred about 800 years ago.

  17. Condition of the Ross Ice Shelf derived from AVHRR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casassa, Gino

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite imagery is combined with the Ross Ice Shelf Geophysical and Glaciological Survey (RIGGS) data to study recent changes on the Ross Ice Shelf. Flow stripes that appear on the AVHRR imagery agree with significant changes in ice flow that have occurred over the past 1,100 years on the ice shelf sector fed by East Antarctica. A large looping pattern of flow stripes that disagrees with RIGGS flow lines appears west of Crary Ice Rise, on the eastern part of the ice shelf. This looped pattern is interpreted as relict flow stripes related to past activity of a major ice stream of West Antarctica, which occurred about 800 years ago.

  18. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of the temporal variability and the spatial distribution of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial to better quantify atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions, in particular sea-ice mass and energy budgets. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study, we combine diurnal brightness temperature differences (dTB(37 GHz)) and ratios (TB(19 GHz)/TB(37 GHz)) to detect and classify snowmelt processes. We distinguish temporary snowmelt from continuous snowmelt to characterize dominant melt patterns for different Antarctic sea-ice regions from 1988/1989 to 2014/2015. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 38.9 ± 6.0% of all detected melt events are diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, characteristic of temporary melt (Type A). Less than 2% reveal immediate continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, i.e., strong melt over a period of several days (Type B). In 11.7 ± 4.0%, Type A and B take place consecutively (Type C), and for 47.8 ± 6.8% no surface melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous snowmelt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 17 days after the onset of temporary melt. Comparisons with Snow Buoy data suggest that also the onset of continuous snowmelt does not translate into changes in snow depth for a longer period but might rather affect the internal stratigraphy and density structure of the snowpack. Considering the entire data set, the timing of snowmelt processes does not show significant temporal trends.

  19. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  20. Hierarchical multiscale patterned flexible PDMS elastomeric film and its ice-retarding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Bandyopadhyay, Diya; Karim, Alamgir

    2013-03-01

    Hierarchical structures in nature inspired development of artificial micro-nano structures in recent years, because these structures exhibit unique properties like tunable adhesion and wetting. We demonstrate a simple yet versatile method to fabricate micro-nano surface based on combination of PDMS nano-imprinting and UVO lithography. Nanoscale patterned PDMS is fabricated by imprinting digital recording media discs (CD/DVD) pattern. The micro pattern was then built by selective densification of patterned PDMS by exposing to UVO through a bigger mask like TEM grid or wire mesh. The nano imprinted pattern remains unaffected during the UVO treatment. We observed that tunable hierarchical structures with height up to 900 nm can be created by simply controlling UVO exposure time. This method provides potential applications in various fields such as superhydrophocity, icephobicity, microfludics and solar cell. We demonstrate that these hierarchical surface exhibits improved icephobicity comparing to flat hydrophobic surface. Icephobocity experiments were carried out in a controlled humidity and temperature chamber. Patterned PDMS film coatings were cooled to -10 oC at a relative humidity of 65%. Temporal formation of ice was observed under optical microscopy.

  1. Australia-East Antarctica geological linkages and ice-sheet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Betts, Peter; Young, Duncan; Richter, Tom; Greenbaum, Jamin; Roberts, Jason; Siegert, Martin; Blankenship, Don

    2013-04-01

    For much of Antarctica, geophysical data have been too spatially sparse to reliably image geology and tectonic structures beneath the ice sheet. Robust supercontinental reconstructions to provide context to interpretations have also been lacking. Here we interpret new airborne gravity and magnetics data to define geology and tectonic structures within the Wilkes Land/Terre Adelie sector from 90°E to 150°E, penetrating up to 1000 km into the East Antarctic continent. We co-interpret East Antarctic and Australian geophysical data in a robust and independent Gondwana-fit reconstruction. Geological features are reliably interpreted in context, and show that the major tectonic provinces of Australia, and their bounding fault zones continue into Antarctica. This allows their geometries to be defined. Features imaged include,the boundary between Indo-antarctic crust and Australo-antarctic crust, the Perth Basin, The Albany-Fraser-Musgrave Orogen, the Gawler-Mawson Craton and the Ross Delamerian Orogen. The data also reveals East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) catchments, and current flow, is controlled by large-scale faults and sedimentary basins. We hypothesise that the tectonic inheritance of Gondwana breakup provided strong boundary conditions for the initiation and development of the EAIS at 34 Ma. These conditions have remained in place since, to the extent that they exert major influence on the present flow of ice.

  2. Subaqueous ice-contact fans: Depositional systems characterised by highly aggradational supercritical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Joerg; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Subaqueous ice-contact fans are deposited by high-energy plane-wall jets from subglacial conduits into standing water bodies. Highly aggradational conditions during flow expansion and deceleration allow for the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows, which are commonly considered rare in the depositional record. We present field examples from gravelly and sandy subaqueous ice-contact fan successions, which indicate that deposition by supercritical flows might be considered as a characteristic feature of these depositional systems. The studied successions were deposited in deep ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. The gravel-rich subaqueous fan deposits are dominated by large scour-fills (up to 25 m wide and 3 m) deep and deposits of turbulent hyperconcentrated flows, which are partly attributed to supercritical flow conditions (Winsemann et al., 2009). Scours (up to 4.5 m wide and 0.9 m deep) infilled by gravelly backsets are observed above laterally extensive erosional surfaces and are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps. Laterally discontinuous beds of low-angle cross-stratified gravel are interpreted as antidune deposits. Downflow and up-section the gravel-rich deposits pass into sand-rich successions, which include deposits of chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes and humpback dunes (Lang and Winsemann, 2013). Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes are characterised by scour-fills (up to 4 m wide and 1.2 m deep) comprising backsets or gently dipping sigmoidal foresets. Stationary antidune deposits consist of laterally extensive sinusoidal waveforms with long wavelengths (1-12 m) and low amplitudes (0.1-0.5 m), which formed under quasi-steady flows at the lower limit of the supercritical flow stage and high rates of sedimentation. Humpback dunes are characterised by divergent sigmoidal foresets and are interpreted as

  3. Radar-based observatiions of variable thickness debris cover on martian ice masses: evidence of debris transfer by flowing ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souness, Colin; Brough, Stephen; Woodward, John; Hubbard, Bryn; Davis, Joel; Grindrod, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The mid-latitudes of Mars host a wide range of ice-based landforms, many of which display surface morphologies indicative of viscous flow of that ice. Despite being shrouded beneath a layer of rocky debris, these viscous flow features (VFFs) are thought to have similarities with terrestrial glaciers. Until recently most studies that focussed on the origin, structure and role of these martian VFFs were restricted to observations made from satellite imagery. Little data have been available to gain a clearer picture of VFF internal structure, which has impeded our collective ability to infer many particulars of VFF growth and flow, including the extent to which these ice flows have interacted with, and potentially helped shape, the martian landscape. However, the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) system mounted on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) can, in some cases, provide a valuable insight into what lies beneath the surface of these ice masses. We present a SHARAD-based study of glacial systems on Mars which reveals pronounced heterogeneity in the thickness of their observed superficial debris covers. The surface debris layers in question appear to thicken in a down-slope direction. Radar data indicates that in the lower reaches of each studied glacial catchment, ice surface debris cover exceeds 10 m in thickness. The observed flow-parallel a-symmetry in debris thickness atop these martian glaciers is similar to that recorded on many terrestrial glaciers, indicating that cumulative down-flow debris mass transfer such as occurs within glacierised catchments on Earth may also currently operate, or have operated, on Mars. This suggests that glaciers on Mars have played a substantial role in redistributing lithic material from mountainous catchments to lower-lying areas, potentially throughout the glacial regions of Mars' mid-latitudes, thus making an important processual contribution to the evolution of Mars' contemporary landscape.

  4. Comparison of observed and simulated spatial patterns of ice microphysical processes in tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems: Ice Microphysics in Midlevel Inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Hannah C.; Houze, Robert A.

    2016-07-25

    To equitably compare the spatial pattern of ice microphysical processes produced by three microphysical parameterizations with each other, observations, and theory, simulations of tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were forced to develop the same mesoscale circulations as observations by assimilating radial velocity data from a Doppler radar. The same general layering of microphysical processes was found in observations and simulations with deposition anywhere above the 0°C level, aggregation at and above the 0°C level, melting at and below the 0°C level, and riming near the 0°C level. Thus, this study is consistent with the layered ice microphysical pattern portrayed in previous conceptual models and indicated by dual-polarization radar data. Spatial variability of riming in the simulations suggests that riming in the midlevel inflow is related to convective-scale vertical velocity perturbations. Finally, this study sheds light on limitations of current generally available bulk microphysical parameterizations. In each parameterization, the layers in which aggregation and riming took place were generally too thick and the frequency of riming was generally too high compared to the observations and theory. Additionally, none of the parameterizations produced similar details in every microphysical spatial pattern. Discrepancies in the patterns of microphysical processes between parameterizations likely factor into creating substantial differences in model reflectivity patterns. It is concluded that improved parameterizations of ice-phase microphysics will be essential to obtain reliable, consistent model simulations of tropical oceanic MCSs.

  5. Pattern Dynamics in Taylor Vortex Flow with Double Hourglass Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Richard; Olsen, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    In previous investigations ootnotetextWiener et al., Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997) & Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999) we have demonstrated experimentally that Taylor vortex flow in an hourglass geometry undergoes a period-doubling cascade to chaotic pattern dynamics that can be controlled by proportional feedback with small perturbations. The hourglass geometry creates a spatial ramp in the Reynolds number. This results in a region of supercritical vortex flow between regions of subcritical structureless flow that provide the pattern with soft boundaries that allow for persistent dynamics. For a range of reduced Reynolds numbers, the Taylor vortex pattern exhibits persistent dynamics consisting of drifting and stretching vortices punctuated with phase slips. Each phase slip corresponds to the generation of a new vortex pair. We are currently investigating the phase dynamics of Tayor vortex flow with a double hourglass geometry which consists of two regions of supercritical flow in which phase slips occur, separated by a narrow region of subcritical flow. Initial results indicate that at some reduced Reynolds numbers there is synchronization between the vortex dynamics in the two regions, both in the temporal occurrence of the phase slips as well as the drift directions of the vortices.

  6. Ice Flow Dynamics and Outlet Zone Morphology of Subglacial Lake Ellsworth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, N.; Smith, A.; Woodward, J.; Siegert, M. J.; Hindmarsh, R. C.; Corr, H.; King, E. C.; Vaughan, D.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Jay-Allemand, M.

    2009-12-01

    Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) is located beneath 2.95-3.28 km of ice at the base of a deep subglacial trench ~30 km from the central ice divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Seismic reflection surveys indicate a maximum water column thickness of 155 m. Radio-echo sounding (RES) data have been used to map the lake, the morphology of the subglacial catchment and the structure and thickness of the overlying ice sheet. Direct access, measurement and sampling of the lake waters and underlying sediments will be undertaken during the 2012-13 Antarctic field season by the Lake Ellsworth Consortium. Internal ice sheet layers throughout the SLE catchment have been picked and transformed into 3D surfaces as input for radar layer modelling. SLE is bounded on either side by steep, ~2 km high, mountainous subglacial topography. Over the lake, anomalies between modelled and observed internal layers are recognised near the steeper bedrock wall. We have sought to understand these in terms of perturbations to the velocity field from higher order mechanical effects as well as being caused by melt anomalies. A closely-spaced grid of RES lines (area coverage 7.5 x 7.5 km, line spacing ~500 m or less) has been used to map the outlet area of the lake in detail, with the aim of identifying possible drainage routes. The downstream margin of the lake is characterised by a pronounced topographic ridge, trending obliquely to ice flow, which rises ~200 m above the elevation of the water surface. Beyond the ridge a 5 km by 0.75 km linear depression has been mapped. A narrow, low-lying breach in the ridge that connects to this depression may provide a subglacial hydrological outlet from SLE. Potential mechanisms for the formation of these features include: i) subaerial or subglacial processes pre-dating ice sheet development; ii) water discharge from SLE. Such models are not necessarily mutually exclusive. The origins of the subglacial geomorphology and its possible influence on the routing

  7. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  8. Deposition patterns and dispersion in reactive channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Hawkins, C.; Jamtveit, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flow of natural fluids is often associated with dispersion of dissolved chemical species and their surface deposition either by precipitation kinetics or aggregation. For most industrial or practical flows, this wall deposition has a detrimental effect that hiders transport by clogging or alters the fluid container; therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of transport in reactive flows and the range of deposition patterns developed. This talk has two main aims. Firstly, it is to present a combined theoretical and numerical approach to explore the diverse yet generic wall morphologies that develop in channel flows either due to precipitation kinetics or aggregation of spherical particles. These deposition patterns range from dendrites to needles and fan-like structures growing against the mean flow direction, and depend strongly on flow perturbations and dispersion properties. The second goal is to revisit classical Taylor's theory of dispersion in turbulent pipe flows and to show that, in fully developed turbulence, it predicts a nontrivial connection between longitudinal dispersion and the turbulent energy spectrum that we can also test and observe in numerical simulations.

  9. Interannual Arctic sea ice variability and associated winter weather patterns: A regional perspective for 1979-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hans W.; Alley, Richard B.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2016-12-01

    Using Arctic sea ice concentration derived from passive microwave satellite observations in autumn and early winter over the 1979-2014 period, the Arctic region was objectively classified into several smaller regions based on the interannual sea ice variability through self-organizing map analyses. The trend in regional sea ice extent (RSIE) in each region was removed using an adaptive, nonlinear, and nonstationary method called Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition, which captures well the accelerating decline of Arctic RSIEs in recent decades. Although the linear trend in RSIE is negative in all regions in both seasons, there are marked differences in RSIE trends and variability between regions, with the largest negative trends found during autumn in the Beaufort Sea, the Barents-Kara Seas, and the Laptev-East Siberian Seas. Winter weather patterns associated with the nonlinearly detrended RSIEs show distinct features for different regions and tend to be better correlated with the autumn than early winter RSIE anomalies. Sea ice losses in the Beaufort Sea and the Barents-Kara Seas are both associated with a cooling of Eurasia, but in the former case the circulation anomaly is reminiscent of a Rossby wave train, whereas in the latter case the pattern projects onto the negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation. These results highlight the nonuniform changes in Arctic sea ice and suggest that regional sea ice variations may play a crucial role for the winter weather patterns.

  10. Signature of recent ice flow acceleration in the radar attenuation and temperature structure of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Dustin; Seroussi, Helene; Chu, Winnie; Young, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Englacial temperature structure exerts significant control on the rheology and flow of glaciers and ice sheets. It is however logistically prohibitive to directly measure at the glacier-catchment scale. As a result, numerical ice sheet models often make broad assumptions about englacial temperatures based on contemporary ice surface velocities. However, this assumption might break down in regions - like the Amundsen Sea Embayment - that have experienced recent acceleration since temperature and rheology do not respond instantaneously to changes in ice flow regime. To address this challenge, we present a new technique for estimating englacial attenuation rates using bed echoes from radar sounding data. We apply this technique to an airborne survey of Thwaites Glacier and compare the results to temperature and attenuation structures modeled using the numerical Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) for three surface velocity scenarios. These include contemporary surface velocities, surface velocities from the early 1970s, and ice-sheet balance velocities. We find that the observed attenuation structure is much closer to those modeled with pre-acceleration surface velocities. This suggests that ice sheet models initialized with contemporary surface velocities are likely overestimating the temperature and underestimating the rheology of the fast-flowing trunk and grounding zone of Thwaites Glacier.

  11. Optimal numerical solvers for transient simulations of ice flow using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM versions 4.2.5 and 4.11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, Feras; Larour, Eric; Morlighem, Mathieu; Seroussi, Helene; Borstad, Christopher P.; Rignot, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Identifying fast and robust numerical solvers is a critical issue that needs to be addressed in order to improve projections of polar ice sheets evolving in a changing climate. This work evaluates the impact of using advanced numerical solvers for transient ice-flow simulations conducted with the JPL-UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We identify optimal numerical solvers by testing a broad suite of readily available solvers, ranging from direct sparse solvers to preconditioned iterative methods, on the commonly used Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for Higher-Order ice sheet Models benchmark tests. Three types of analyses are considered: mass transport, horizontal stress balance, and incompressibility. The results of the fastest solvers for each analysis type are ranked based on their scalability across mesh size and basal boundary conditions. We find that the fastest iterative solvers are ˜ 1.5-100 times faster than the default direct solver used in ISSM, with speed-ups improving rapidly with increased mesh resolution. We provide a set of recommendations for users in search of efficient solvers to use for transient ice-flow simulations, enabling higher-resolution meshes and faster turnaround time. The end result will be improved transient simulations for short-term, highly resolved forward projections (10-100 year time scale) and also improved long-term paleo-reconstructions using higher-order representations of stresses in the ice. This analysis will also enable a new generation of comprehensive uncertainty quantification assessments of forward sea-level rise projections, which rely heavily on ensemble or sampling approaches that are inherently expensive.

  12. Modelling ice layer formation using a preferential flow formulation in the physics based multi-layer SNOWPACK model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, Nander; Würzer, Sebastian; Fierz, Charles; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For physics based snow cover models, simulating the formation of dense ice layers inside the snowpack has been a long time challenge. In spite of their small vertical extend, the presence of ice lenses inside the snowpack can have a profound impact on vapor, heat and liquid water flow. These effects may ultimately influence processes on larger scales when, for example, looking at hydrological processes or wet snow avalanche formation. Also microwave emission signals from the snowpack are strongly influenced by the presence of ice layers. Recent laboratory experiments and modelling techniques of liquid water flow in snow have advanced the understanding of liquid water flow in snow, in particular the formation of preferential flow paths. We present a modelling approach in the one-dimensional, multi-layer snow cover model SNOWPACK for preferential flow that is based on a dual-domain approach (i.e., separation into a matrix flow and a preferential flow domain) and solving Richards equation for both. In recently published laboratory experiments, water ponding inside the snowpack has been identified to initiate preferential flow. Those studies also quantified the part of the snowpack involved in preferential flow as a function of grain size. By combining these concepts with an empirical function to determine refreezing of preferential flow water inside the snowpack, we are able to simulate preferential water flow in the model. We found that preferential flow paths arriving at a layer transition in the snowpack may lead to ponding conditions. Subsequent refreezing then may form dense ice layers (>700 kg/m3). We compare the simulations to 14 years of biweekly snow profiles made at the Weissfluhjoch study plot at 2540m altitude in the Eastern Swiss Alps. We show that we are able to reproduce several ice lenses that were observed in the field, whereas some profiles remain challenging to simulate.

  13. Lost Jim Lava Flow, Seward Peninsula, Alaska as an analog for lava-ice interactions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, E.; Hamilton, C.; Herrick, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    On Mars, volcanism within Elysium Planitia may have occurred as recently as ~10 million years ago, which associated lava flows being emplaced with ice-bearing permafrost. On Earth, there are few active volcanic regions that are cold enough to support permafrost, but the Seward Peninsula in Alaska is a prime location to study recent volcano-ice interactions. In the early 2000s, J.E. Beget and J.S. Kargel explored two areas in Alaska that exhibit features characteristic of explosive volcanism that may be the result of lava-ice interaction. These locations include the Lost Jim Lava Flow (65°29'N, 163°17'W) and several large maars (66°23'N, 164°29'W). The work presented here focuses on the Lost Jim Lava Flow, emanating from Lost Jim Cone and flowing West and North. The flow was erupted 1000-2000 years ago, covers ~225 km2, and ranges 3-30 m in thickness. Previous fieldwork identified pits along the margins of the flow that were interpreted to be collapse features (i.e., thermokarst) that formed as ground-ice beneath the lava melted due to heat transfer from the overlaying lava flow. This investigation utilizes stereo photogrammetry to generate high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) of these flow features to assess if these pits are indeed the products of thermokarstification, or if they are lava-rise pits formed by lava flow inflation. The DTMs were generated from ALOS PRISM data and DigitalGlobe Worldview 1 and 2 panchromatic satellite images taken as stereo-pairs or -triplets. With these new models the extent and morphology of the flow and pits will be categorized across the entire flow. These results are also compared to young lava flows on Mars, which may have experienced lava-ice interactions. Understanding the expression of such interactions on Earth may aid in the identification and interpretation of analogous eruptions on Mars.

  14. Observations on traffic flow patterns and traffic engineering practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Lixin

    2002-07-01

    Border Gateway Protocol allows ASs to apply diverse routing policies for selecting routes and propagating reachability information to other ASs. This enables network operators to configure routing policies so as to control traffic flows between ASs. However, BGP is not designed for the inter-AS traffic engineering. This makes it difficult to implement effective routing policies to address network performance and utilization problems. Network operators usually tweak routing policies to influence the inter-domain traffic among the available links. This can lead to undesirable traffic flow patterns across the Internet and degrade the Internet traffic performance. In this paper, we show several observations on Internet traffic flow patterns and derive routing policies that give rise to the traffic flow patterns. Our results show that an AS can reach as much as 20% of the prefixes via a peer link even though there is a path via a customer link. In addition, an AS can reach as much as 80% of the prefixes via a provider link even though there is a path via a peer link. Second, we analyze the cause of the prevalence of these traffic patterns. Our analysis shows that an AS typically does not receive the potential route from its customers or peers. Third, we find that alternate routes have with lower propagation delay than the chosen routes for some prefixes. This shows that some traffic engineering practices might adversely affect Internet performance.

  15. Flow-driven instabilities during pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, A.; Steinbock, O.; Zykov, V.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2015-06-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a well known model system for the study of biological pattern formation. In the natural environment, aggregating populations of starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells may experience fluid flows that can profoundly change the underlying wave generation process. Here we study the effect of advection on the pattern formation in a colony of homogeneously distributed Dictyostelium discoideum cells described by the standard Martiel-Goldbeter model. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. The evolution of small perturbations in cAMP concentrations is studied analytically in the linear regime and by corresponding numerical simulations. We show that flow can significantly influence the dynamics of the system and lead to a flow-driven instability that initiate downstream traveling cAMP waves. We also show that boundary conditions have a significant effect on the observed patterns and can lead to a new kind of instability.

  16. Five-Hole Flow Angle Probe Calibration for the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonsalez, Jose C.; Arrington, E. Allen

    1999-01-01

    A spring 1997 test section calibration program is scheduled for the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel following the installation of new water injecting spray bars. A set of new five-hole flow angle pressure probes was fabricated to properly calibrate the test section for total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle. The probes have nine pressure ports: five total pressure ports on a hemispherical head and four static pressure ports located 14.7 diameters downstream of the head. The probes were calibrated in the NASA Glenn 3.5-in.-diameter free-jet calibration facility. After completing calibration data acquisition for two probes, two data prediction models were evaluated. Prediction errors from a linear discrete model proved to be no worse than those from a full third-order multiple regression model. The linear discrete model only required calibration data acquisition according to an abridged test matrix, thus saving considerable time and financial resources over the multiple regression model that required calibration data acquisition according to a more extensive test matrix. Uncertainties in calibration coefficients and predicted values of flow angle, total pressure, static pressure. Mach number. and velocity were examined. These uncertainties consider the instrumentation that will be available in the Icing Research Tunnel for future test section calibration testing.

  17. Turbulent patterns in wall-bounded flows: A Turing instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneville, Paul

    2012-06-01

    In their way to/from turbulence, plane wall-bounded flows display an interesting transitional regime where laminar and turbulent oblique bands alternate, the origin of which is still mysterious. In line with Barkley's recent work about the pipe flow transition involving reaction-diffusion concepts, we consider plane Couette flow in the same perspective and transform Waleffe's classical four-variable model of self-sustaining process into a reaction-diffusion model. We show that, upon fulfillment of a condition on the relative diffusivities of its variables, the featureless turbulent regime becomes unstable against patterning as the result of a Turing instability. A reduced two-variable model helps us to delineate the appropriate region of parameter space. An intrinsic status is therefore given to the pattern's wavelength for the first time. Virtues and limitations of the model are discussed, calling for a microscopic support of the phenomenological approach.

  18. Lineations on the ``White'' Accumulation Areas of the Residual Northern Ice Cap of Mars: Their Relation to the ``Accublation'' and Ice Flow Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David A.; Winebrenner, Dale P.; Stern, Harry

    2002-09-01

    Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images of the whiter areas of the residual North Polar Cap (P. C. Thomas et al. 2000, Nature404, 161-164) show a gentle hummocky pitted surface that has been popularly called "cottage cheese" terrain. The pits are 1 or 2 m deep and tens of meters across. They are typically joined in roughly linear strings or long depressions and these features are referred to here as "lineations." The lineations tend to have one or occasionally two preferred directions. We have examined the MOC imagery for the North Cap and using high-resolution images that have good wide-angle context images were able to determine the lineation angles for 31 sites scattered over most of the ice cap. We propose a process that will produce linear features in the white areas, then relate the orientation of the lineations over much of the North Cap to these processes and the inferred ice flow direction. There is first-order agreement between the measured sign of the lineation angles and those predicted assuming ice flow. Higher accumulations and velocities are predicted in the catchment for ice that flows into Chasma Boreale. This comes from the indications that katabatic winds are concentrated in this catchment.

  19. Concerning the co-occurrence of subglacial lakes and flow bifurcations of water and ice in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Active subglacial lakes beneath the ice streams and outlet glaciers of Antarctica are frequently found in regions of the ice sheet that are potential bifurcation points - i.e. locations where a small change in surface elevation (<5 m) would make the difference between subglacial water following main ice flow and diverting to an outflow location ultimately 100's of km away. In these regions the hydropotential basins that enable the water to pond result from a combination of bedrock topography and dynamic ice topography. Consequently the stability of such lakes over long timescales is subject to many factors, but ultimately favors locations where deceleration is occurring downstream but there is still a sufficient supply of water from upstream. Here we map and model the hydraulic connections in these dynamic regions, simulating the filling and draining of several key subglacial lakes. We then compare the model output against repeat track surface altimetry and other geophysical observations. Our initial results suggest the formation and drainage of subglacial lakes comprise part of two separate but related feedback loops: 1. In these regions thickening of ice downstream will tend to form hydropotential barriers that impound large quantities of subglacial water over time. Lakes formed upstream of these barriers will reduce lubrication to points downstream through impoundment and channelization of water. This will lead to further slowing and thickening. 2. The additional water stored upstream of a slowing ice stream is can then be accessed by an accelerating ice stream can provide an additional source of water for neighboring ice streams, especially those undergoing acceleration and thinning downstream. Consequently subglacial lake dynamics contribute significantly to the ice flow variability for much of the continent. Furthermore, the inferred ice flow history for locations such as the Siple Coast, is consistent with lake clusters and the associated water storage at

  20. Subcutaneous blood flow in early male pattern baldness

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Peters, K.; Hansted, B.

    1989-05-01

    The subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe washout method in the scalp of 14 patients with early male pattern baldness. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal haired men matched for age. The SBF in the scalp of the normal individuals was about 10 times higher than previously reported SBF values in other anatomical regions. In patients with early male pattern baldness, SBF was 2.6 times lower than the values found in the normal individuals (13.7 +/- 9.6 vs 35.7 +/- 10.5 ml/100 g/min-1). This difference was statistically significant (p much less than 0.001). A reduced nutritive blood flow to the hair follicles might be a significant event in the pathogenesis of early male pattern baldness.

  1. Sea ice in the Baltic and Barents Seas in Relation to Large-Scale Atmospheric Circulation Patterns and Oceanic Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Kekonen, T.; Jevrejeva, S.; Isaksson, E.; Pohjola, V. A.; Mulvaney, R.

    2001-12-01

    The past record of sea ice conditions in the Baltic and Barents Seas has been the studied extensively using historical records, and extends back to 1715 and 1864 respectively. We have collected and chemically analysed an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, that also spans this period at close to annual resolution. Using singular spectrum analysis we have been able to identify several periodicities in the sea ice extent series that are also seen in the indices of large scale atmospheric circulation patterns such as the North Atlantic Oscillation. We are able to track the changes in amplitude of the various periodicities over time. Methansulfonic acid (MSA) is a tracer of marine biological productivity, which depends to a large degree on the sea ice cover. The ice core data shows that a significant change in MSA occurred in 1920, with the earlier period having higher concentrations than the later period. There is also a change in the phase of the MSA variations relative to those in sea ice extent around Svalbard. The 1920's marked the maximum extent of glaciers in Svalbard, and the largest rise in Svalbard air temperature occurred in 1917, there was also a dramatic reduction in ice coverage in the sea to the west of Svalbard. In the Baltic record we also see a change in character of the ice coverage, that also corresponds to a change in the North Atlantic Oscillation index. The re-organization of sea ice cover in the Barents Sea is closely associated with a change in the position of the Icelandic low pressure cell which affects the winter storm tracks across the Atlantic, leading to a change in the Baltic Sea ice conditions.

  2. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  3. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  4. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  5. Possible recent and ancient glacial ice flow in the south polar region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    Martian polar science began almost as soon as small telescopes were trained on the planet. The seasonal expansion and contraction of the polar caps and their high albedoes led most astronomers to think that water ice is the dominant constituent. In 1911 Lowell perceived a bluish band around the retreating edge of the polar caps, and interpreted it as water from melting polar ice and seasonal snow. An alternative idea in his time was that the polar caps consist of frozen carbonic acid. Lowell rejected the carbonic acid hypothesis on account of his blue band. He also pointed out that carbonic acid would sublimate rather than melt at confining pressures near and below one bar, hence, carbonic acid could not account for the blue band. In comparing Lowell's theories with today's knowledge, it is recognized that (1) sublimation is mainly responsible for the growth and contraction of Mars' polar caps, (2) carbon dioxide is a major component of the southern polar cap, and (3) Lowell's blue band was probably seasonal dust and/or clouds. Geomorphic evidence that glacial ice and glacial melt waters once flowed over broad areas of the southern polar region. Two aspects of the south polar region suggest possible glacial processes during two distinct eras in Mars' history.

  6. Continuous flow analysis method for determination of soluble iron and aluminium in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Spolaor, A; Vallelonga, P; Gabrieli, J; Roman, M; Barbante, C

    2013-01-01

    Iron and aluminium are the two most abundant metals on the Earth's crust, but they display quite different biogeochemical properties. While iron is essential to many biological processes, aluminium has not been found to have any biological function at all. In environmental studies, iron has been studied in detail for its limiting role in the bioproductivity of high nutrient, low carbon oceanic zones, while aluminium is routinely used as a reference of crustal contributions to atmospheric deposition archives including peat bogs, lacustrine and marine sediments and ice sheets and glaciers. We report here the development of a flow injection analysis technique, which has been optimised for the simultaneous determination of soluble iron and aluminium in polar ice cores. Iron was determined by its catalytic role in the reduction of N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamene (DPD) to a semiquinonic form (DPDQ) and subsequent absorption spectroscopy at 514 nm. Aluminium was determined by spectroscopic analysis of an aluminium-lumogallion complex that exhibits fluorescence at 560 nm. These techniques have been applied to a section of Greenland ice dated to 1729-1733 AD and indicate that volcanism is a source of highly soluble aluminium and iron.

  7. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  8. Using pattern matching to increase performance in hotspot fixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falch, Bradley J.; Baek, Seung-Hee; Tsai, John; Ji, Mingchao; Zhu, Jun

    2017-03-01

    As feature sizes and pitches continue to decrease, more complex correction algorithms are needed to solve increasingly difficult geometric configurations. Usage of these more complex algorithms results in unacceptably long time-to-mask when applied to an entire design. In many cases, the more complex algorithms are only required in a small percentage of areas of the entire design, and these areas are not always known prior to tapeout. Hotspot fixing (HSF) flows are increasingly used to fix these hotspot areas to minimize errors and decrease time-to-mask. These flows involve "recorrecting" a design, using the previous correction output as the input to the HSF flow. This input file contains a hierarchy that was optimized for the original correction. Hotspot areas are frequently smaller than the original correction areas and frequently repeat in unique cell outputs of the original correction, so the optimal hierarchy for a HSF fix flow may be very different from the original correction. A new hierarchy, optimized for HSF, is difficult to form from the corrected output. This paper describes the usage of pattern-matching to regain hierarchical compression for identical hotspot areas that are not repeating cells in the original correction. Using this pattern-matching HSF flow, turnaround time for the hotspot fixing can be more than 50X faster than re-using the original correction's hierarchy for complex HSF methods. These significant gains can be achieved in spite of the additional complexity it can add to the flow. In the case where simpler/faster HSF correction methods are used, significant turnaround time gains can still be made by using this pattern matching technique. Hotspot fixing methodologies are increasingly deployed during tapeouts as a means to optimize the tradeoffs between complex, highly accurate correction methods and faster methods that are sufficient for most pattern areas.1 However, pattern database hierarchies may not be optimum for these hotspot

  9. Fundamental Study of Direct Contact Cold Energy Release by Flowing Hot Air through Ice Particles Packed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Sigeo; Inaba, Hideo

    This paper has dealt with the direct contact heat exchange characteristics between ice particles (average ice particle diameter : 3.10mm) packed in the rectangular cold energy storage vessel and flowing hot air as a heat transfer medium. The hot air bubbles ascended in the fluidized ice particles layer, and they were cooled down directly by melting ice particles. The temperature efficiency increased as Reynolds number Re increased because the hot air flowing in the layer became active. The dehumidity efficiency increased with an increase in modified Stefan number and Re, since the heat capacity of inlet air and heat transfer coefficient increased. Finally, some empirical correlations for temperature efficiency, dehumidity efficiency and the completion time of cold energy release were derived in terms of various nondimensional parameters.

  10. Flow Patterns in the Dog Descending Aorta under a Steady Flow Condition Simulating Mid-Systole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Shunsuke; Goldsmith, Harry Leonardo; Karino, Takeshi

    Hemodynamic factors are suspected to be involved in the localized pathogenesis and development of atherosclerotic lesions in the human thoracico-abdominal aorta. Hence, we studied the detailed flow patterns and the distributions of fluid velocity and wall shear stress there under the condition of a steady flow using five transparent aortic trees prepared from dogs as models of the human descending aorta and by means of flow visualization and high-speed cinemicrographic techniques. It was found that in all the cases the flow in the descending aorta was not fully developed to the extent to provide a parabolic velocity profile. Flow was disturbed at each junction, and most complex secondary and adverse flows formed at the branching site of the left renal artery adjacent to the lateral and posterior walls of the descending aorta. Furthermore, there was considerable interaction between the secondary and adverse flows formed at the branching sites of the four major arteries that stemmed off the descending aorta.

  11. Long-term change of a small ice cap in Greenland: a dynamic perspective from numerical flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieli, A.; Adamson, K.; Lane, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Small ice caps at the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet are often close to the limit of existence and therefore respond far more sensitively to climate change than the land-margin of the neighboring ice sheet. However, their past evolution and dynamic behavior is poorly understood and their use as climate indicators therefore remains limited. We here aim to provide a long-term reconstruction of Lyngmarksbreen, a small (32km2) ice cap on Disko Island in West Greenland, from the pre-little ice age (LIA, starting at about 1200 AD) to present. We use a 2-dim. time-dependent numerical flow model (SIA) in combination with geomorphological mapping, exposure dating and historical observations to simulate its long-term evolution. We specifically focus on retreat since the LIA, which is well constrained by geomorphological length records of several small outlet glaciers and data from local and regional climate stations (Qeqertassuaq and Ilulisat). We also explore aspects related to flow dynamics and find that the dynamic state of this ice cap is far from being balanced and is highly sensitive to the surface elevation mass balance feedback resulting in an asynchronous response of the different outlets. This sensitivity can partly be explained by low surface slopes and a very limited elevation extent of the ice cap. Our investigations further suggest that redistribution of snow through wind-drift is strongly affecting the surface mass balance and hence the evolution of the ice cap. Over the last century the ice cap almost continuously retreated and today almost no accumulation area remains. As a consequence, this ice cap will likely vanish within the next few decades.

  12. Consider an Ice Stream.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, R.

    2002-12-01

    positions in past millennia conform to radically different flow patterns while on the scale of hours an ice stream's motion is halted completely, then released to move at surge-like speeds, in tempo with the tides. Explaining these complexities constantly reminds us that the rigorous physics applied to ice so effectively by Nye still work.

  13. Ice Formation via Deposition Mode Nucleation Onto Dust Particulates: The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Abbatt, J. P.; Cotton, R.; Demott, P.; Jones, H.; Möhler, O.; Stetzer, O.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory studies are described whereby the heterogeneous ice nucleating ability of various dust samples were studied, for particles suspended in a newly built thermal gradient continuous flow diffusion chamber (TG-CFDC). Ice formation is observed using an optical particle counter (OPC) and the relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions of the flow system are validated by observing homogenous freezing of H2SO4 aerosols. At the Fourth International Ice Nucleation Workshop (ICIS 07) in Karslruhe, Germany this system was used to investigate ice nucleation primarily in the vapor deposition mode, for Arizona Test Dust (ATD), Israeli Desert Dust (ID), Canary Island Dust (CID), Saharan Dust (SD), Graphite Spark Soot, Snomax® (dead bacteria) and live bacteria. The aerosol size was in the submicron range with an approximate cut off of 700 nm and a mode of 350 nm. Temperatures for nucleation were varied from 265 - 230 K. The dust aerosols were generally found to be more efficient than soot. At warmer temperatures (263 K) the bacteria were found to be active in the deposition mode which was not the case for dusts. Among the various dust types at 248 K, the CID was more efficient than ATD at nucleating ice when efficiency is based on lowest onset RH conditions for ice formation in our chamber. We also present preliminary results for the effect of total surface area versus size of aerosols on ice nucleation using ATD as a surrogate for naturally occurring mineral dust.

  14. SIMPLE MODEL OF ICE SEGREGATION USING AN ANALYTIC FUNCTION TO MODEL HEAT AND SOIL-WATER FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Guymon, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a simple two-dimensional model of coupled heat and soil-water flow in freezing or thawing soil. The model also estimates ice-segregation (frost-heave) evolution. Ice segregation in soil results from water drawn into a freezing zone by hydraulic gradients created by the freezing of soil-water. Thus, with a favorable balance between the rate of heat extraction and the rate of water transport to a freezing zone, segregated ice lenses may form.

  15. The steady-state flow pattern past gravitating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormel, C. W.

    2013-02-01

    Gravitating bodies significantly alter the flow pattern (density and velocity) of the gas that attempts to stream past. Still, small protoplanets in the Mars-super-Earth range can only bind limited amounts of nebular gas; until the so-called critical core mass has been reached (˜1-10 M⊕) this gas is in near hydrostatic equilibrium with the nebula. Here we aim for a general description of the flow pattern surrounding these low-mass, embedded planets. Using various simplifying assumptions (subsonic, 2D, inviscid flow, etc.), we reduce the problem to a partial differential equation that we solve numerically as well as approximate analytically. It is found that the boundary between the atmosphere and the nebula gas strongly depends on the value of the disc headwind (deviation from Keplerian rotation). With increasing headwind the atmosphere decreases in size and also becomes more asymmetrical. Using the derived flow pattern for the gas, trajectories of small solid particles, which experience both gas drag and gravitational forces, are integrated numerically. Accretion rates for small particles (dust) are found to be low, as they closely follow the streamlines, which curl away from the planet. However, pebble-size particles achieve large accretion rates, in agreement with previous numerical and analytical works.

  16. Diurnal patterns of the bi-directional reflectance of fresh-water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshkevich, George A.; Deering, Donald W.; Eck, Thomas F.; Ahmad, Suraiya P.

    1990-01-01

    To improve the interpretation of surface cryospheric albedo from satellite sensor data, diurnal measurements of the spectral bidirectional reflectance of a commonly found fresh water ice type were made, from which hemispherical reflectance can be derived. The purpose of this study is to document its clear-sky, bidirectional reflectance characteristics in the visible (650-670 nm) and near-infrared (810-840 nm) region, assess the diurnal nature of the reflectance, and quantify the surface anisotropy. Bidirectional reflectances of the refrozen slush ice measured show a spectral dependence and change significantly with solar zenith angle. Considerable variation occurs at each view angle and among view angles throughout the day. Although diurnal reflectance patterns were similar in both bands, magnitudes varied greatly, being highest in the visible and lowest in the near-infrared region. With the exception of peak saturated (specular) values in the forward scatter direction, bidirectional reflectance was generally highest in the morning when the surface and the illumination were most diffuse in character.

  17. Rimming flows and pattern formation inside rapidly rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezhaev, Denis; Dyakova, Veronika; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of fluid and granular medium in a rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. In a rapidly rotating cylinder liquid and granular medium coat the cylindrical wall under centrifugal force. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory fluid flow which is responsible for the series of novel effects of pattern formation, namely, axial segregation of heavy particles and pattern formation in the form of sand regular hills extended along the axis of rotation. At least two types of axial segregation are found: a) patterns of spatial period of the same order of magnitude as fluid layer thickness which induced by steady flows generated by inertial waves; b) fine patterns which manifests Gortler - Taylor vortices developing as a consequence of centrifugal instability of viscous boundary layer near the cylindrical wall. Under gravity, intensive fluid shear flow induces partial fluidization of annular layer of granular medium. The oscillatory motion is followed by onset of regular ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The work is supported by Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-11-00476).

  18. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of spontaneous pattern formation during dendritic ice crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirmizi, Shakeel H.; Gill, William N.

    1989-06-01

    The dynamics of spontaneous pattern formation are studied experimentally by observing and recording the evolution of ice crystal patterns which grow freely in a supercooled melt. The sequence of evolution to dendrites is recorded in real time using cine-micrography. In the range of subcoolings from 0.06 to 0.29°C, all the patterns evolved as follows: Smooth disk → Perturbed disk → Disk dendrite → Partially developed dendrite → Fully developed dendrite. The initial smooth disk, the main branch and the side branches all developed perturbations beyond a critical size which depends on the subcooling. The combined effect of the destabilizing thermal gradients ahead of the growing crystal and the stabilizing Gibbs-Thompson capillarity effect dictates the critical size of the unstable structures in terms of the mean curvature of the interface. Detailed analysis of the evolving patterns was done using digital image analysis on the PRIME computer to determine both the manner in which the dendritic growth process replicates itself and the role which the shape and the movement of the interface play in the pattern formation process. Total arc length ST, total area A and the complexity ratio ξ = ST⧸√ A of evolving patterns were computed as a function of time and undercooling for each crystal image. These results permitted us to make some comparisons with theoretical models on pattern evolution. Three distinct phases of evolution were identified: the initial phase when the crystal structure is smooth and free of any perturbations and the complexity ratio is almost a constant, an intermediate phase when the crystal structure develops perturbations which grow quickly in number and in size and the complexity ratio increases rapidly and a final phase when the pattern approaches that of a fully developed dendrite which, on a global scale grows in a shape-perserving manner and has a slowly increasing complexity ratio which seems to approach an asymptote. Two factors were

  19. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the injected fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms—cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)—responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge—from pore-filling to post-bridging—are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions.

  20. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Benzhong; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid–fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate’s affinity to the invading fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms—cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)—responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge—from pore filling to postbridging—are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions. PMID:27559089

  1. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, Ruben; Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the injected fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms-cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)-responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge-from pore-filling to post-bridging-are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions.

  2. The Moulin Explorer: A Novel Instrument to Study Greenland Ice Sheet Melt-Water Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, A.; Wang, H.; Elliott, A.; O'Hern, S.; Martin, S.; Lutz, C.; Steffen, K.; McGrath, D.; Phillips, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recent data shows that the Greenland ice sheet has been melting at an accelerated rate over the past decade. This melt water flows from the surface of the glacier to the bedrock below by draining into tubular crevasses known as moulins. Some believe these pathways eventually converge to nearby lakes and possibly the ocean. The Moulin Explorer Probe has been developed to traverse autonomously through these moulins. It uses in-situ pressure, temperature, and three-axis accelerometer sensors to log data. At the end of its journey, the probe will surface and send GPS coordinates using an Iridium satellite tracker so it may be retrieved via helicopter or boat. The information gathered when retrieved can be used to map the pathways and water flow rate through the moulins. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory- California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support was provided by the NASA Earth Science, Cryosphere program

  3. Pattern formation and mixing in three-dimensional film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heining, C.; Pollak, T.; Aksel, N.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of inertia on gravity-driven free surface flow over different three-dimensional periodic corrugations is considered analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the case of high bottom amplitudes, compared to the film thickness, the results predict complex free surface structures especially in cases where the topography is not fully flooded by the liquid film. The investigation of the flow field shows a rich variety of pattern formation phenomena depending on the interplay between the geometry of the topography and the inertia of the film. Finally, we show how the complex topographical structure enhances the laminar mixing within the film.

  4. Computational analysis for dry-ice sublimation assisted CO2 jet impingement flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Songmi; Lee, Jaeseon

    2015-11-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the novel gas-solid two-phase jet impingement are investigated computationally. When the high pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) flow passes through a nozzle or orifice, it experiences the sudden expansion and the rapid temperature drop occurred by Joule-Thomson effect. This temperature drop causes the lower bulk jet fluid temperature than the CO2 sublimation line, so dry-ice becomes formed. By using CO2 gas-solid mixture as a working fluid of jet impingement, it is expected the heat transfer enhancement can be achieved due to the low bulk temperature and the additional phase change latent heat. In this study, 2D CFD model is created to predict the cooling effect of gas-solid CO2 jet. The gas-solid CO2 flow is considered by Euler-Lagrangian approach of mixed phase and the additional heat transfer module is embedded to account for the sublimation phenomena of the solid state CO2. The jet flow and heat transfer performance of gas-solid CO2 jet is investigated by the variance of flow parameter like Reynolds number, solid phase concentration and jet geometries.

  5. Flow behavior characteristics of ice cream mix made with buffalo milk and various stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Kuldip S; Sidhu, Jiwan S; Mudahar, Gurmail S; Singh, A K

    2002-01-01

    Ice cream made with buffalo milk, using optimum levels of various stabilizers of plant origin, was evaluated for its flow behavior characteristics, with the objective of producing an acceptable quality product. The minimum variation in the viscosity of mix was observed at three rates of shear (348.88, 523.33 and 1046.66 S(-1)) for all ice cream mixes. The flow behavior index (n) of all the mixes having optimum levels of various stabilizers was observed to be less than 1; indicating their pseudoplastic nature. Consistency coefficient (m) of sodium alginate was found to be 1.19; highest among all the stabilizers, followed by gelatin (1.17), karaya (1.08), guar gum (0.75), acacia gum (0.70), ghatti gum (0.36), and the control (0.29). The consistency coefficient (m) signifies the apparent viscosity of the pseudoplastic fluid. The viscosity of the mixes having various stabilizers (optimum levels) was found to be in descending order: Sodium alginate, gelatin, karaya, guar gum, acacia, ghatti and control.

  6. Gene flow on ice: the role of sea ice and whaling in shaping Holarctic genetic diversity and population differentiation in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus)

    PubMed Central

    Elizabeth Alter, S; Rosenbaum, Howard C; Postma, Lianne D; Whitridge, Peter; Gaines, Cork; Weber, Diana; Egan, Mary G; Lindsay, Melissa; Amato, George; Dueck, Larry; Brownell, Robert L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads-Peter; Laidre, Kristin L; Caccone, Gisella; Hancock, Brittany L

    2012-01-01

    Sea ice is believed to be a major factor shaping gene flow for polar marine organisms, but it remains unclear to what extent it represents a true barrier to dispersal for arctic cetaceans. Bowhead whales are highly adapted to polar sea ice and were targeted by commercial whalers throughout Arctic and subarctic seas for at least four centuries, resulting in severe reductions in most areas. Both changing ice conditions and reductions due to whaling may have affected geographic distribution and genetic diversity throughout their range, but little is known about range-wide genetic structure or whether it differed in the past. This study represents the first examination of genetic diversity and differentiation across all five putative stocks, including Baffin Bay-Davis Strait, Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin, Bering-Beaufort-Chukchi, Okhotsk, and Spitsbergen. We also utilized ancient specimens from Prince Regent Inlet (PRI) in the Canadian Arctic and compared them with modern stocks. Results from analysis of molecular variance and demographic simulations are consistent with recent and high gene flow between Atlantic and Pacific stocks in the recent past. Significant genetic differences between ancient and modern populations suggest PRI harbored unique maternal lineages in the past that have been recently lost, possibly due to loss of habitat during the Little Ice Age and/or whaling. Unexpectedly, samples from this location show a closer genetic relationship with modern Pacific stocks than Atlantic, supporting high gene flow between the central Canadian Arctic and Beaufort Sea over the past millennium despite extremely heavy ice cover over much of this period. PMID:23170222

  7. Gene flow on ice: the role of sea ice and whaling in shaping Holarctic genetic diversity and population differentiation in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus).

    PubMed

    Elizabeth Alter, S; Rosenbaum, Howard C; Postma, Lianne D; Whitridge, Peter; Gaines, Cork; Weber, Diana; Egan, Mary G; Lindsay, Melissa; Amato, George; Dueck, Larry; Brownell, Robert L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads-Peter; Laidre, Kristin L; Caccone, Gisella; Hancock, Brittany L

    2012-11-01

    Sea ice is believed to be a major factor shaping gene flow for polar marine organisms, but it remains unclear to what extent it represents a true barrier to dispersal for arctic cetaceans. Bowhead whales are highly adapted to polar sea ice and were targeted by commercial whalers throughout Arctic and subarctic seas for at least four centuries, resulting in severe reductions in most areas. Both changing ice conditions and reductions due to whaling may have affected geographic distribution and genetic diversity throughout their range, but little is known about range-wide genetic structure or whether it differed in the past. This study represents the first examination of genetic diversity and differentiation across all five putative stocks, including Baffin Bay-Davis Strait, Hudson Bay-Foxe Basin, Bering-Beaufort-Chukchi, Okhotsk, and Spitsbergen. We also utilized ancient specimens from Prince Regent Inlet (PRI) in the Canadian Arctic and compared them with modern stocks. Results from analysis of molecular variance and demographic simulations are consistent with recent and high gene flow between Atlantic and Pacific stocks in the recent past. Significant genetic differences between ancient and modern populations suggest PRI harbored unique maternal lineages in the past that have been recently lost, possibly due to loss of habitat during the Little Ice Age and/or whaling. Unexpectedly, samples from this location show a closer genetic relationship with modern Pacific stocks than Atlantic, supporting high gene flow between the central Canadian Arctic and Beaufort Sea over the past millennium despite extremely heavy ice cover over much of this period.

  8. Evoluton of polygonal fracture patterns in lava flows.

    PubMed

    Aydin, A; Degraff, J M

    1988-01-29

    Cooling-induced fractures, also known as columnar joints, divide basaltic lava flows into prismatic columns with polygonal cross sections. The regularity and symmetry of the fracture patterns have long fascinated naturalists. In view of the recent selection of two candidate nuclear waste sites in areas where polygonally fractured volcanic rocks are located, a better understanding of the fracture patterns is required. Field data indicate that the tetragonal networks at flow surfaces evolve systematically to hexagonal networks as the joints grow inward during solidification of lava. This evolution occurs by the gradual change of most orthogonal intersections to nonorthogonal intersections of about 120 degrees. The surface features and intersection geometries of columnar joints show that joint segments at any given level form sequentially yet harmoniously.

  9. Long-term evolution of a small ice cap in Greenland: a dynamic perspective from numerical flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieli, Andreas; Lane, Timothy; Adamson, Kathryn

    2017-04-01

    Small ice caps at the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet are often close to the limit of existence and are therefore expected to respond more sensitively to climate change than the land-margin of the neighboring ice sheet. However, their past evolution and dynamic behavior is poorly understood and their use as climate indicators therefore remains so far limited. We here aim to provide a long-term dynamic reconstruction of Lyngmarksbraeen, a small (32km2) ice cap on Disko Island in West Greenland, with a particular focus on the little ice age (LIA, since 1200AD). We use a 2-dim. time-dependent numerical flow model (SIA) and a PDD-mass balance model in combination with historical observations, geomorphological mapping and exposure dating to simulate its long-term evolution and dynamic behaviour. We specifically focus on retreat since the LIA, which is well constrained by geomorphological evidence and historical maps and length records of several small outlet glaciers and data from local and regional climate stations (Qeqertarssuaq and Ilulisat). We also explore aspects related to flow dynamics and find that the dynamic state of this ice cap is, at any time, far from being balanced and is highly sensitive to the surface elevation mass balance feedback and results in an asynchronous response of the different outlets and hysteresis-type behaviour. The modelling is able to reproduce the observed LIA-extent and the almost continuous retreat over the last hundred years well. It further indicates that the ice cap was already dynamically inert since the 1960s. Today, the ice cap has lost almost its entire accumulation area and even without any further warming in the future, the ice cap is expected to vanish within a couple of decades.

  10. Divergent patterns of recent sea ice cover across the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas of the Pacific Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Karen E.; Moore, G. W. K.; Cooper, Lee W.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past three decades of the observed satellite record, there have been significant changes in sea ice cover across the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas of the Pacific Arctic Region (PAR). Satellite data reveal that patterns in sea ice cover have been spatially heterogeneous, with significant declines in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, yet more complex multi-year variability in the Bering Sea south of St. Lawrence Island. These patterns in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas have intensified since 2000, indicating a regime shift in sea ice cover across the northern portion of the PAR. In particular, satellite data over 1979-2012 reveal localized decreases in sea ice presence of up to -1.64 days/year (Canada Basin) and -1.24 days/year (Beaufort Sea), which accelerated to up to -6.57 days/year (Canada Basin) and -12.84 days/year (Beaufort Sea) over the 2000-2012 time period. In contrast, sea ice in the Bering Sea shows more complex multi-year variability with localized increases in sea ice presence of up to +8.41 days/year since 2000. The observed increases in sea ice cover since 2000 in the southern Bering Sea shelf region are observed in wintertime, whereas sea ice losses in the Canada Basin and Beaufort Sea have occurred during summer. We further compare sea ice variability across the region with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) wind and air temperature fields to determine the extent to which this recent variability is driven by thermal vs. wind-driven processes. Results suggest that for these localized areas that are experiencing the most rapid shifts in sea ice cover, those in the Beaufort Sea are primarily wind driven, those offshore in the Canada Basin are primarily thermally driven, and those in the Bering Sea are influenced by elements of both. Sea ice variability (and its drivers) across the PAR provides critical insight into the forcing effects of recent shifts in climate and its likely

  11. Effect of Some Factors on Critical Condition of Ice Formation for Flowing Supercooled Organic Water Solution in Cooled Circular Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Miyahara, Satoshi; Takeya, Kengo

    Supercooling characteristics of three kinds of organic water solutions (D-Sorbitol, Glycerol, Glucose) in a forced flow were investigated experimentally. The critical condition of ice nucleation in a cooled circular tube was examined for concentration of water solution and cooling temperature under various Reynolds numbers. It was found that the flow velocity and cooling temperature conditions in a laminar flow region. However, in a turbulent flow region, the critical degree of supercooling was influenced by the flow velocity and cooling temperature. As a result, non-dimensional correlation equations for the critical condition of ice formation were derived in the laminar and turbulent flow region as a function of some non-dimensional parameters. While the ice making efficiency of D-Sorbitol water solution was measured under various Reynolds numbers and cooling temperature conditions on the stable supercooling condition. The ice making efficiency of supercooled organic water solution was influenced by the degree of the supercooling based on the mixed organic water solution temperature at the outlet of the inner tube.

  12. Mantle Flow Pattern and Dynamic Topography beneath the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Kirby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The complex tectonic history of the eastern US over the past billion years includes episodes of subduction and rifting associated with two complete cycles of supercontinent assembly and breakup. Both the previous global tomography models (S40RTS, SAVANI, TX2011, GyPSuM, SMEAN) and the analysis of the shear-wave splitting from the broadband seismic stations find a distinct coast-to-inland differentiation pattern in the lithosphere and upper mantle. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) includes a dense linear seismic array from the Atlantic coast of Virginia to the western boarder of Ohio, crossing several different tectonic zones. To derive the regional mantle flow pattern along with its surface expression such as dynamic topography and aid the interpretation of the seismic observations, we are building a new geodynamic model based on ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) that uses buoyancy derived from seismic tomography along with realistic lithosphere and sub-lithosphere structure. At present, we use S40RTS and SAVANI tomography models together with the temperature-dependent viscosity to compute the mantle flow and dynamic topography. Beneath the eastern US, the upper mantle flow in our model is primarily parallel to the trend of the Appalachian belt, which is broadly consistent with the direction of the local shear-wave splitting. The dynamic topography results exhibit a coast-to-inland magnitude differentiation along the MAGIC seismic deployment. The numerical tests also show that both the magnitude and pattern of the dynamic topography are quite sensitive to the density perturbation and rigidity of the lithosphere/sub-lithosphere. Our future work involves using other tomography and viscosity models to obtain the mantle flow pattern as well as the resulting dynamic topography and geoid.

  13. Microscopic Current Flow Patterns in Nanoscale Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Na; Bushong, Neil; Hatcher, Ryan; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2006-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale conductors has been studied extensively mainly using the stationary scattering approach. However, the dynamical nature of transport, and in particular, the flow patterns of the microscopic current through a nanoscale junction, have remained poorly understood. We apply a novel time-dependent transport approach [1], which combines closed and finite geometries with time-dependent density functional theory,to study current flow patterns in nanoscale quantum point contacts [2]. The results of both atomistic and jellium calculations show that surface charges form dynamically at the junction-electrode interfaces in both abrupt and adiabatic junctions. The curr ent exhibits some characteristics of a classical hydrodynamic liquid but also displays unique patterns arising from the interaction with the surface charges. We also investigate the effect of the flow velocity, charge density, and lattice structures on the electron dynamics. If time permits we also discuss the effects of the viscosity of the electron liquid [3]. Work supported by DOE (DE-FG02-05ER46204). [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] N. Bushong, N. Sai and, M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. (in press). [3] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale, and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005 ).

  14. Animating streamlines with repeated asymmetric patterns for steady flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuo; Liu, Zhanping; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Animation provides intuitive cueing for revealing essential spatial-temporal features of data in scientific visualization. This paper explores the design of Repeated Asymmetric Patterns (RAPs) in animating evenly-spaced color-mapped streamlines for dense accurate visualization of complex steady flows. We present a smooth cyclic variable-speed RAP animation model that performs velocity (magnitude) integral luminance transition on streamlines. This model is extended with inter-streamline synchronization in luminance varying along the tangential direction to emulate orthogonal advancing waves from a geometry-based flow representation, and then with evenly-spaced hue differing in the orthogonal direction to construct tangential flow streaks. To weave these two mutually dual sets of patterns, we propose an energy-decreasing strategy that adopts an iterative yet efficient procedure for determining the luminance phase and hue of each streamline in HSL color space. We also employ adaptive luminance interleaving in the direction perpendicular to the flow to increase the contrast between streamlines.

  15. Greenland coastal air temperatures linked to Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea ice conditions during autumn through regional blocking patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Thomas J.; Hanna, Edward; Hall, Richard J.; Miller, Jeffrey; Ribergaard, Mads H.; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2017-03-01

    Variations in sea ice freeze onset and regional sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea are linked to autumn surface air temperatures (SATs) around coastal Greenland through 500 hPa blocking patterns, 1979-2014. We find strong, statistically significant correlations between Baffin Bay freeze onset and SSTs and SATs across the western and southernmost coastal areas, while weaker and fewer significant correlations are found between eastern SATs, SSTs, and freeze periods observed in the neighboring Greenland Sea. Autumn Greenland Blocking Index values and the incidence of meridional circulation patterns have increased over the modern sea ice monitoring era. Increased anticyclonic blocking patterns promote poleward transport of warm air from lower latitudes and local warm air advection onshore from ocean-atmosphere sensible heat exchange through ice-free or thin ice-covered seas bordering the coastal stations. Temperature composites by years of extreme late freeze conditions, occurring since 2006 in Baffin Bay, reveal positive monthly SAT departures that often exceed 1 standard deviation from the 1981-2010 climate normal over coastal areas that exhibit a similar spatial pattern as the peak correlations.

  16. Ice stream reorganization and ice sheet mass balance following the reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougamont, Marion; Christoffersen, Poul; Price, Stephen; Carter, Sasha

    2015-04-01

    Kamb Ice Stream tributaries. As a consequence, ice in the tributaries reaches the Whillans Ice Stream catchment, maintaining active flow in its main trunk for the next century. At the same time, the relict Siple Ice Stream reactivates, which significantly decreases the mass balance for this region. Because the modelled state of the bed is the coldest for the trunk of Kamb Ice Stream, this region reactivates last (during the second century of the experiment). Our modelled patterns of ice stream flow variability are similar to those in the past, as inferred from observations (e.g., Catania et al., J.Glac., 2012). We discuss the mechanisms for migrating ice flow regimes and the implication for the future mass balance of the Siple Coast region.

  17. Interferometric Estimation of theThree-Dimensional Ice-Flow Velocity Vector Using Ascending and Descending Passes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Kwok, R.; Fahnestock, M.

    1996-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry provides an importatn new tool for determining ice-flow velocity. Interferometric measurements made from a single track direction are sensitive only to a single component of the three-dimensional velocity vector. Observations from along thre different track directions would allow the full velocity vector to be determined. A north/south-looking SAR could provide these observations over large portions of the globe but not over large areas of the polar ice sheets. We develop and demonstrate a technique that allows the full three-component velocity vector to be determined from data acquired along two track directions (ascending and descending) under a surface-parallel flow assumption.

  18. Performance and applicability of a 2.5-D ice-flow model in the vicinity of a dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Parrenin, Frédéric; Todd, Joe; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Ritz, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional ice flow modelling requires a large number of computing resources and observation data, such that 2-D simulations are often preferable. However, when there is significant lateral divergence, this must be accounted for (2.5-D models), and a flow tube is considered (volume between two horizontal flowlines). In the absence of velocity observations, this flow tube can be derived assuming that the flowlines follow the steepest slope of the surface, under a few flow assumptions. This method typically consists of scanning a digital elevation model (DEM) with a moving window and computing the curvature at the centre of this window. The ability of the 2.5-D models to account properly for a 3-D state of strain and stress has not clearly been established, nor their sensitivity to the size of the scanning window and to the geometry of the ice surface, for example in the cases of sharp ridges. Here, we study the applicability of a 2.5-D ice flow model around a dome, typical of the East Antarctic plateau conditions. A twin experiment is carried out, comparing 3-D and 2.5-D computed velocities, on three dome geometries, for several scanning windows and thermal conditions. The chosen scanning window used to evaluate the ice surface curvature should be comparable to the typical radius of this curvature. For isothermal ice, the error made by the 2.5-D model is in the range 0-10 % for weakly diverging flows, but is 2 or 3 times higher for highly diverging flows and could lead to a non-physical ice surface at the dome. For non-isothermal ice, assuming a linear temperature profile, the presence of a sharp ridge makes the 2.5-D velocity field unrealistic. In such cases, the basal ice is warmer and more easily laterally strained than the upper one, the walls of the flow tube are not vertical, and the assumptions of the 2.5-D model are no longer valid.

  19. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  20. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  1. Pockmark Current Flow Patterns in Belfast Bay, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandel, C. L.; Lippmann, T. C.; Foster, D. L.; Irish, J. D.; Brothers, L.

    2012-12-01

    Pockmarks are large, circular or elongate depressions in the seafloor that are globally distributed in a wide range of geologic settings including shallow, estuarine environments like Belfast Bay, Maine. The primary mechanism of pockmark formation in Belfast Bay is attributed to episodic methane venting of shallow, natural gas in the area. Recent models suggest pockmarks may be further maintained by the reduction or prevention of fine-grained sediment deposition due to inner-pockmark upwelling events induced by near-bed current flow and flow separation over the depressions. Fluid dynamics around these features may be similar to flow around dimples or cavities. In 2011, we tested this hypothesis by deploying two ADCP moorings at the rim and center of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine over a two day period. The sampled pockmarks consist of a circular, shallow (33 m) pockmark and a more elongated, deeper (42 m) pockmark, each with a length-to-depth ratio of 2.8. Time-varying current profiles indicate a complex rotational structure with depth, often exceeding 180°. Multiple upwelling and downwelling events extend throughout the water column with vertical velocities reaching up to 0.02 m/s. The shallow pockmark shows greater temporal and spatial variability in rotational structure that may be attributed to the converging tidal flows entering Belfast Bay. Current flow patterns in the deep pockmark are more directionally consistent with the tide and exhibit greater spatial alignment in the upper water column between the rim and center of the pockmark. Both pockmarks exhibit a counter-clockwise rotational pattern on the rising tide as current flow rotates nearly 100° from surface and into the pockmark. As the tide ebbs, a sub-division of flow is observed with a southerly-directed flow in the upper two-thirds of the water column and a northeasterly-directed flow within 10 m of the bottom. This circulation pattern resembles open cavity (L/D < 6) flow explained by

  2. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The morphology of river networks at the Earth's surface has been addressed in numerous studies. Numerical simulations of fluvial erosion processes and concepts of optimization have provided a rather comprehensive understanding about the scale invariance of river networks. Less is known about the structure of preferential flow patterns in the subsurface because these are only accessible by indirect measurements in most cases. As preferential flow patterns are crucial for all transport processes in the subsurface, unraveling their structure is a major challenge in subsurface hydrology. Transferring the idea of optimization from surface flow to subsurface flow it was recently suggested that preferential subsurface flow patterns should also have a dendritic, scale-invariant structure similar to that of river networks. In this study we analyzed the mean discharges of serval thousand springs with respect to scale invariance. For this purpose we reanalyzed a data set comprising about 17,000 springs from Spain already published in the literature and three new data sets from the Eastern Alps in Austria. We found that the probability density f(Q) of the discharge distribution can be described by a power law with an exponential cutoff, f(Q) ≈ Q-τe- QQc. The scaling exponent τ was found to be about 1.6, which is slightly larger than the exponent τ = 1.5 of river networks. In contrast to rivers, the distributions of the spring discharges are characterized by a significant cutoff at large discharges. This cutoff strongly depends on the lithology of the aquifers, while the scaling exponent τ ˜ 1.6 seems to be universal. The highest cutoff was found for limestones being one of the primary host rocks for karstic aquifers. We found Qc ˜ 6000 l/s for the limestones in the data set from Spain, suggesting a scale-invariant subsurface flow pattern up to catchment sizes of several thousand square kilometers. At the other edge, we found a cutoff at catchment sizes in the order of

  3. Groundwater flow with energy transport and water ice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to freezing in peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Voss, Clifford I.; Siegel, Donald I.

    2007-04-01

    In northern peatlands, subsurface ice formation is an important process that can control heat transport, groundwater flow, and biological activity. Temperature was measured over one and a half years in a vertical profile in the Red Lake Bog, Minnesota. To successfully simulate the transport of heat within the peat profile, the U.S. Geological Survey's SUTRA computer code was modified. The modified code simulates fully saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes proportional heat capacity and thermal conductivity of water and ice, decreasing matrix permeability due to ice formation, and latent heat. The model is verified by correctly simulating the Lunardini analytical solution for ice formation in a porous medium with a mixed ice-water zone. The modified SUTRA model correctly simulates the temperature and ice distributions in the peat bog. Two possible benchmark problems for groundwater and energy transport with ice formation and melting are proposed that may be used by other researchers for code comparison.

  4. Investigating the Uptake Mechanisms of Hydrogen Peroxide to Single and Polycrystalline Ice with a Novel Flow Tube System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Angela; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Air-ice chemical interactions are important for describing the distribution and subsequent chemical fate of trace atmospheric gases within ice and snow and determining the oxidative capacities of these environments. The nature of this interaction is governed by a compound's physicochemical properties as well as ice microstructure. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reservoir of HOx radicals in the atmosphere and an important chromophore in snow and ice, is a trace gas that demonstrates complex uptake behaviour to frozen aqueous media by the reversible, fast adsorption to the air-ice interface, aggregation, and lateral interactions, and a slower process, ostensibly via uptake into the bulk. However, the exact mechanism and kinetics for the slow uptake of H2O2 and the size of this reservoir is unknown. It is important to describe and quantify this loss term, over environmentally-relevant timescales, accommodation of H2O2 into the bulk may be the dominant process which controls the composition and chemistry of the snow and overlying atmosphere. We hypothesize that the slow uptake of H2O2 occurs by diffusion into the grain boundaries of ice. To provide mechanistic insight to the macroscopic phenomenon of atmospheric gas uptake to ice, and discern various mechanisms including adsorption to air-ice interface and accommodation into the bulk through uptake into grain boundaries, we design, machine, and validate a novel flow reactor system featuring a Drilled Ice Flow Tube (DIFT). Our flow reactor system is uniquely suited to testing these uptake mechanisms: by controlling the degree of grain boundaries present in the DIFT (ie. monocrystalline or polycrystalline), we can directly observe the effect of the ice microstructure on the adsorptive and bulk uptake of trace atmospheric gases over long timescales (eg. on the order of hours). Here, we describe method development of the DIFT and demonstrate using polarised microscopy imagery that our experimental set-up allows for the direct

  5. Arctic Marine Biogeochemistry in a Global Ice-Ocean Ecosystem Model: A Look at Seasonal Features and Spatial Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, C.; Jin, M.; Elliott, S.; Jeffery, N.; Steiner, N.; Carpenter, L.; Chance, R.

    2015-12-01

    The LANL-UAF ice-ocean ecosystem model was developed to investigate how sea ice influences biogeochemical cycling in the arctic marine environment and predict how it will do so in the future. Sea ice is an integral component of arctic biogeochemical cycles. Rapidly changing sea ice conditions, such as thinning, increasing open water area and freshening impact C, N, and S cycles in multiple interacting ways. Here we discuss model results for chlorophyll, primary productivity, nutrients, and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in the Arctic Ocean. We compare our results to observations and simulations from other Arctic biogeochemical models. Participation in several recent intercomparison studies provide context for interpretation of our own model results. Key seasonal features and spatial patterns of biogeochemical phenomena studied include pan-Arctic primary production, subsurface chlorophyll maxima, under-ice phytoplankton blooms, and relatively high seawater DMS concentrations following the retreating ice edge. Not surprisingly, in most all cases, the model's success depends on how well the physical processes (e.g., vertical mixing, melt-water stratification) realistically distribute available nutrients. Further explanations for model-model and model-observation agreement/disagreement will be presented. While the model predicted high ice primary productivity recently recorded in the Bering Sea, the model shows no indication of extremely high seawater DMS recently observed at sea ice stations north of Svalbard. Preliminary model results from a high resolution version of our model, as part of the Regional Arctic System Model - Marine Biogeochemistry (i.e., RASM-mBGC) project, will also be presented.

  6. Flow pattern changes improve roller cone bit performance

    SciTech Connect

    Huffstutler, A.D.

    1996-05-06

    Improving the flow pattern through and around roller cone bits has increased penetration rate and footage while dropping the cost per foot drilled. These changes to the flow area around the bit help clean the bit and borehole more efficiently. By eliminating the protruding nozzle bosses, increasing nozzle bore size, narrowing the width of the bit arm segments, and providing a convex spherical dome, flow trajectories have been improved. These altered flow trajectories have eliminated hydraulic dead spots commonly found around current roller cone rock bit configurations. Nozzles are directed significantly more inward, toward the well bore bottom and away from the edge of the borehole. The flow impacts the bottom of the hole where it is needed most. Further performance enhancement features include an angled ramp on the shirt-tail portion of the arm to aid in lifting the cuttings upward, away from the cones and the bearing seals. Changing contours of the bit arms in the nozzle and bearing areas also improves cleaning and prevents cuttings from packing off in the bearing seal area.

  7. Development of radial optic flow pattern sensitivity at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh Raj; Falkenberg, Helle K

    2015-05-01

    The development of sensitivity to radial optic flow discrimination was investigated by measuring motion coherence thresholds (MCTs) in school-aged children at two speeds. A total of 119 child observers aged 6-16years and 24 young adult observers (23.66+/-2.74years) participated. In a 2AFC task observers identified the direction of motion of a 5° radial (expanding vs. contracting) optic flow pattern containing 100 dots with 75% Michelson contrast moving at 1.6°/s and 5.5°/s and. The direction of each dot was drawn from a Gaussian distribution whose standard deviation was either low (similar directions) or high (different directions). Adult observers also identified the direction of motion for translational (rightward vs. leftward) and rotational (clockwise vs. anticlockwise) patterns. Motion coherence thresholds to radial optic flow improved gradually with age (linear regression, p<0.05), with different rates of development at the two speeds. Even at 16years MCTs were higher than that for adults (independent t-tests, p<0.05). Both children and adults had higher sensitivity at 5.5°/s compared to 1.6°/s (paired t-tests, p<0.05). Sensitivity to radial optic flow is still immature at 16years of age, indicating late maturation of higher cortical areas. Differences in sensitivity and rate of development of radial optic flow at the different speeds, suggest that different motion processing mechanisms are involved in processing slow and fast speeds.

  8. Regular patterns in the information flow of local dephasing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    Consider local dephasing processes of a qubit that interacts with a structured reservoir of frequency modes or a thermal bath, with Ohmic-like spectral density (SD). It is known that non-Markovian evolution appears uniquely above a temperature-dependent critical value of the Ohmicity parameter and non-Markovianity can be induced by properly engineering the external environment. In the same scenario, we find regular patterns in the flow of quantum information: Alternate directions appear in correspondence with periodic intervals of the Ohmicity parameter α0. The information flows back into the system over long times at zero temperature for 2 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , where n =0 ,1 ,2 ,..., and at nonvanishing temperatures for 3 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . Under special conditions, backflow of information appears also for nonvanishing, even natural values of the Ohmicity parameter, at zero temperature, and for odd natural values at nonvanishing temperatures. Otherwise, the long-time information flows into the environment. In the transition from vanishing to arbitrary nonvanishing temperature, the long-time backflow of information is stable for 3 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , while it is reversed for 2 +4 n <α0<3 +4 n and 4 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . The patterns in the information flow are not altered if the low-frequency Ohmic-like profiles of the SDs are perturbed with additional factors that consist in arbitrary powers of logarithmic forms. Consequently, the flow of information can be controlled, directed, and reversed over long times by engineering a wide variety of reservoirs that includes and continuously departs from the Ohmic-like structure at low frequencies. Non-Markovianity and recoherence appear according to the same rules along with the backflow of information.

  9. Pattern centric OPC flow: a special RET flow with fast turn-around-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tom; Wu, Joanne; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Gary; Wang, Benny; Su, Bo; Cheng, Guojie

    2008-03-01

    Low K1 photolithography process increases the complexity of RET applications in IC designs. As technology node shrinks, pattern density is much denser along with much smaller geometry dimensions. Model-based OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) and post-OPC verification require more complex models and through process window compensated approaches, which significantly increase computational burden. Both lithographical challenges and computational complexity associated with 45nm process and below create a need for advanced capabilities on commercial OPC tools. To answer those challenges, hardware-accelerated OPC solution made a debut to solve runtime bottleneck issues, but they came in with very expensive price tags. As today, there are no explorations on the linkage between design styles and layout pattern OPC reusability. This paper introduces a new OPC flow with pattern-centric approach to leverage OPC knowledge of repeated design cells and patterns to achieve fast full chip OPC convergence, shorter cycle time, better OPC quality, and eventually lead to high manufacturing yields. In this paper, the main concepts of pattern-based OPC flow are demonstrated in 65nm customer memory designs. Pattern-based OPC is a natural extension of Anchor's pattern-centric approaches in DFM (Design for Manufacturing) domain.

  10. Stochastic Modeling of Buoyancy driven Gas Flow Pattern: Can Continuum Models describe Channelized Gas Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Samani, S.

    2010-12-01

    The injection of gases into the subsurface has become an important research topic in groundwater remediation technology, e.g. air sparging, and in CCS-technology, e.g. CO2-sequestration into saline aquifers. In both cases risk assessment is based on 2-phase flow modeling assuming that the stochastic gas flow patterns can be described by the continuum approach. As Cinar et al. (2009) have stated: “The fundamental understanding of drainage, as it applies to CO2 sequestration process, is limited primarily by the lack of well characterized experiments that allow a detailed classification of the microscopic flow regimes”. In case of air sparging the two important flow regimes are capillary fingering and viscous fingering. Using pore scale network modeling Ewing and Berkowitz (1998) were able to describe the transition from capillary fingering (= incoherent channelized flow) to viscous fingering (= coherent channelized flow). In order to investigate the stability of buoyancy-driven gas flow and the transition between coherent channelized flow and incoherent channelized flow we conducted high-resolution optical bench scale experiments. Our main results, which are in strong contradiction to the commonly used continuum models (CM) are: (1) Capillary trapping can already occur during injection and at the front of the plume (Lazik and Geistlinger, 2008) (2) Gas clusters or bubbles can be mobile (incoherent gas flow) and immobile (capillary trapping), and (3) Incoherent gas flow can not be described by a generalized Darcy law (Geistlinger et al., 2006, 2009). Glass et al. (2000) conducted CO2-gas injection experiments. Based on their experimental results they also questioned the validity of CM to describe coherent and incoherent gas flow and the validity of homogeneous stability analysis to predict channel width, channel number and channel velocity in heterogeneous porous media. Despite these findings there is an ongoing controversial discussion in the literature about

  11. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-07

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of topographic feedback on a coupled mass balance and ice-flow model for Vestfonna ice-cap, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Martina; Möller, Marco; Zwinger, Thomas; Moore, John

    2016-04-01

    Using a coupled simulation set-up between a by statistical climate data forced and to ice-cap resolution downscaled mass balance model and an ice-dynamic model, we study coupling effects for the Vestfonna ice cap, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard, by analysing the impacts of different imposed coupling intervals on mass-balance and sea-level rise (SLR) projections. Based on a method to estimate errors introduced by different coupling schemes, we find that neglecting the topographic feedback in the coupling leads to underestimations of 10-20% in SLR projections on century time-scales in our model compared to full coupling (i.e., exchange of properties using smallest occurring time-step). Using the same method it also is shown that parametrising mass-balance adjustment for changes in topography using lapse rates is a - in computational terms - cost-effective reasonably accurate alternative applied to an ice-cap like Vestfonna. We test the forcing imposed by different emission pathways (RCP 2.4, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.5). For most of them, over the time-period explored (2000-2100), fast-flowing outlet glaciers decrease in impacting SLR due to their deceleration and reduced mass flux as they thin and retreat from the coast, hence detaching from the ocean and thereby losing their major mass drainage mechanism, i.e., calving.

  13. A flow band model of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica: Response to CO sub 2 -induced climatic warming

    SciTech Connect

    Lingle, C.S.; Brown, T.J. ); Schilling, D.H. ); Fastook, J.L. ); Paterson, W.S.B. )

    1991-04-10

    A time-dependent model is applied to the Ross Ice Shelf flow band discharging ice stream B, West Antarctica. The model includes the effects of temperature, depth-dependent density, and backpressure from the coasts of the Ross embayment and Crary Ice Rise. Data from the Ross Ice Shelf Geophysical and Glaciological Survey and the Siple Coast Project are used as input data. Accuracy and stability are verified by reproducing the flow band for 10,000 model years with equilibrium distributions of accumulation, surface temperature, and basal balance. Sensitivity is tested by forcing the model with increasing accumulation rates, surface temperatures, and basal melt rates, respectively, while other factors are held constant. The response of the ice shelf to three climatic scenarios that may result from increasing carbon dioxide and trace greenhouse gases is simulated. The results range from slight thickening with moderately increased backpressure in the grounding zone to rapid thinning accompanied by rapidly decreasing backpressure during 175- to 600-year simulations, depending primarily upon whether increasing surface temperatures and accumulaton rates are accompanied by increased rates of basal melting. The central ice shelf, about 400 km upglacier from the calving front, thins by 22% in 600 years when basal melting is increased linearly to a maximum of 0.5 m/yr after 150 years, then held steady. The ice shelf thins by 40% in 175 years at the same location when basal melting is increasedlinearly to 2.0 m/yr after 150 years, then held steady. The present calculated equilibrium rate of basal melting, averaged over the bottom surface of the flow band is 0.17 m/yr.

  14. Transport of nonaparticles flowing past a patterned substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Koplik, Joel

    2011-11-01

    We consider the defection of suspended particle trajectories due to flow past a patterned surface using complimentary Langevin numerical simulations and theoretical analyses based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The intended application is to vector particle separation in a nanofluidic channel. The simulations of flow past an alternating periodic striped pattern of attractive and repelling regions generally show that particles are deflected away from the imposed flow direction, to a degree that depends on the particle's size and the details of the substrate interaction. Both van der Waals and Coulomb interactions are studied, and in the latter case we explore the effects of the spatial distribution of bounding surface charge. Theoretically, both exactly in two dimensions and within the Fick-Jacobs approximation in three, we show that the effect of a periodic potential on the particle motion is always to impede the mean transport velocity in the orthogonal direction and deflect the trajectory, or equivalently reduce the effective diffusivity. Upper and lower bounds are found for the deflection angle, and explicit estimates are obtained in the limit of a weakly varying interaction. Supported by the NSF.

  15. Fluid flow patterns in porous media with partially ordered microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsaeidi, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Natural granular porous media found in geosciences applications are disordered at the pore scale, which contributes to the interesting behavior that they exhibit including hydrodynamic dispersion, capillary pressure and wetting behavior, and various types of fingering. Many standard equations and models that have been developed for transport in porous media are based on the assumption of uniform disorder, randomly distributed parameters, and isotropic behavior. However, factors that cause partial ordering (e.g., settling of oblong grains, alignment of elongated particles, or packing structures near a boundary) can lead to anomalous flow behavior relative to the base case, when in turn requires different ways to understand and describe transport. In this work we examine the packing structure and fluid flow patterns in packings of equilateral cylindrical particles that are packed in a tube. The detailed packing structures are obtained experimentally from microCT experiments, and the flow patterns are simulated by numerical solution of the Stokes equations using the finite element method. This research is of interest in chemical engineering because this type of packing is used in catalytic reactors. However, the structures are also interesting from both a fundamental perspective and as prototypes for partially ordered natural materials because the packings undergo a transition from fully disordered internally to highly structured at the wall, and therefore provide insight into differences caused by the ordering.

  16. Comparison of observed and simulated spatial patterns of ice microphysical processes in tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Hannah C.; Houze, Robert A.

    2016-07-01

    To equitably compare the spatial pattern of ice microphysical processes produced by three microphysical parameterizations with each other, observations, and theory, simulations of tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were forced to develop the same mesoscale circulations as observations by assimilating radial velocity data from a Doppler radar. The same general layering of microphysical processes was found in observations and simulations with deposition anywhere above the 0°C level, aggregation at and above the 0°C level, melting at and below the 0°C level, and riming near the 0°C level. Thus, this study is consistent with the layered ice microphysical pattern portrayed in previous conceptual models and indicated by dual-polarization radar data. Spatial variability of riming in the simulations suggests that riming in the midlevel inflow is related to convective-scale vertical velocity perturbations. Finally, this study sheds light on limitations of current generally available bulk microphysical parameterizations. In each parameterization, the layers in which aggregation and riming took place were generally too thick and the frequency of riming was generally too high compared to the observations and theory. Additionally, none of the parameterizations produced similar details in every microphysical spatial pattern. Discrepancies in the patterns of microphysical processes between parameterizations likely factor into creating substantial differences in model reflectivity patterns. It is concluded that improved parameterizations of ice-phase microphysics will be essential to obtain reliable, consistent model simulations of tropical oceanic MCSs.

  17. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion.

    PubMed

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-08-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation in respiratory rate (from 12 +/- 3 to 21 +/- 5 breaths, min(-1)) and tidal volume (1022 +/- 142 to 1992 +/- 253 ml). Though end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased from 4.9 +/- 0.13 to 3.9 +/- 0.21 kPa, CBFV was insignificantly reduced by 7 +/- 4% during immersion with a brief nadir of 21 +/- 4%. Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold-water immersion could benefit from education in cold-shock response and the possibility of reducing the ventilatory response voluntarily.

  18. Fresh shallow valleys in the Martian midlatitudes as features formed by meltwater flow beneath ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, Daniel E. J.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant numbers of valleys have been identified in the Martian midlatitudes (30-60°N/S), spatially associated with extant or recent ice accumulations. Many of these valleys date to the Amazonian, but their formation during these cold, dry epochs is problematic. In this study, we look in detail at the form, distribution, and quantitative geomorphology of two suites of these valleys and their associated landforms in order to better constrain the processes of their formation. Since the valleys themselves are so young and thus well preserved, uniquely, we can constrain valley widths and courses and link these to the topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter and High-Resolution Stereo Camera data. We show that the valleys are both qualitatively and quantitatively very similar, despite their being >5000 km apart in different hemispheres and around 7 km apart in elevation. Buffered crater counting indicates that the ages of these networks are statistically identical, probably forming during the Late Amazonian, ~100 Ma. In both localities, at least tens of valleys cross local drainage divides, apparently flowing uphill. We interpret these uphill reaches to be characteristic of flow occurring beneath a now absent, relatively thin (order 101-102 m), regionally extensive ice cover. Ridges and mounds occasionally found at the foot of these valley systems are analogous to eskers and aufeis-like refreezing features. On the basis of their interaction with these aufeis-like mounds, we suggest that this suite of landforms may have formed in a single, short episode (perhaps order of days), probably forced by global climate change.

  19. Seafloor geomorphology and glacimarine sedimentation associated with fast-flowing ice sheet outlet glaciers in Disko Bay, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streuff, Katharina; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Hogan, Kelly; Jennings, Anne; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Noormets, Riko; Nielsen, Tove; Kuijpers, Antoon; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm

    2017-08-01

    Fast-flowing outlet glaciers currently drain the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), delivering ice, meltwater and debris to the fjords around Greenland. Although such glaciers strongly affect the ice sheet's mass balance, their glacimarine processes and associated products are still poorly understood. This study provides a detailed analysis of lithological and geophysical data from Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait in central West Greenland. Disko Bay is strongly influenced by Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland's fastest-flowing glacier, which currently drains ∼7% of the ice sheet. Streamlined glacial landforms record the former flow of an expanded Jakobshavn Isbræ and adjacent GIS outlets through Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait towards the continental shelf. Thirteen vibrocores contain a complex set of lithofacies including diamict, stratified mud, interbedded mud and sand, and bioturbated mud deposited by (1) suspension settling from meltwater plumes and the water column, (2) sediment gravity flows, and (3) iceberg rafting and ploughing. The importance of meltwater-related processes to glacimarine sedimentation in West Greenland fjords and bays is emphasised by the abundance of mud preserved in the cores. Radiocarbon dates constrain the position of the ice margin during deglaciation, and suggest that Jakobshavn Isbræ had retreated into central Disko Bay before 10.6 cal ka BP and to beyond Isfjeldsbanken by 7.6-7.1 cal ka BP. Sediment accumulation rates were up to 1.7 cm a-1 for ice-proximal glacimarine mud, and ∼0.007-0.05 cm a-1 for overlying distal sediments. In addition to elucidating the deglacial retreat history of Jakobshavn Isbræ, our findings show that the glacimarine sedimentary processes in West Greenland are similar to those in East Greenland, and that variability in such processes is more a function of time and glacier proximity than of geographic location and associated climatic regime.

  20. Two-phase flow patterns in adiabatic and diabatic corrugated plate gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, A.-E.; Kabelac, S.; de Vries, B.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations for two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop can be improved considerably, when they are adapted to specific flow patterns. As plate heat exchangers find increasing application as evaporators and condensers, there is a need for flow pattern maps for corrugated plate gaps. This contribution presents experimental results on flow pattern investigations for such a plate heat exchanger background, using an adiabatic visualisation setup as well as a diabatic setup. Three characteristic flow patterns were observed in the considered range of two-phase flow: bubbly flow, film flow and slug flow. The occurrence of these flow patterns is a function of mass flux, void fraction, fluid properties and plate geometry. Two different plate geometries having a corrugation angle of 27° and 63°, respectively and two different fluids (water/air and R365mfc liquid/vapor) have been analysed. A flow pattern map using the momentum flux is presented.

  1. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Zhang, Yiran; Wojcik, Ewelina; Sharma, Vivek

    Understanding and controlling the drainage kinetics of thin films is an important problem that underlies the stability, lifetime and rheology of foams and emulsions. We follow the drainage kinetics of vertical foam films using imaging and color science. Interference between light reflected from two surfactant-laden surfaces that are 100 nm - 10 micron apart leads to thickness-dependent iridescent colors in the visible region. Below 50 nm the thin films appear as black. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders (i.e. marginal regeneration) and within thinning films. Finally, we elucidate how buoyancy, capillarity, convection and gravity-driven instabilities and flows, are affected by the choice and concentration of constituents. We find fascinating examples of two-dimensional hydrodynamics and unexplained, if not unprecedented, drainage kinetics.

  2. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Shah, Krupa; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling the drainage kinetics of thin films is an important problem that underlies the stability, lifetime and rheology of foams and emulsions. We follow the drainage kinetics of vertical foam films using imaging and color science. Interference between light reflected from two surfactant-laden surfaces that are 100 nm - 10 micron apart leads to thickness-dependent iridescent colors in the visible region. Below 50 nm the thin films appear as black. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders (i.e. marginal regeneration) and within thinning films. Finally, we elucidate how buoyancy, capillarity, convection and gravity-driven instabilities and flows, are affected by the choice and concentration of constituents. We find fascinating examples of two-dimensional hydrodynamics and unexplained, if not unprecedented, drainage kinetics.

  3. Pattern formation during mixing and segregation of flowing granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Shattuck, Mark

    1996-02-01

    Powder mixing plays an important role in a number of industries ranging from pharmaceuticals and food to ceramics and mining. Avalanches provide a mechanism for the stretching and folding needed to mix granular solids. However, unlike fluids, when particles dissimilar in size, density, or shape flow, they can spontaneously demix or segregate. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we track the transport of granular solids in a slowly rotating tube both with and without segregation effects. Compared with experiments in a 2-dimensional rotating disk partially filled with colored particles, the mixing kinematics and the granular pattern formation in a tube are changed by an axial flow instability. From simple physical principles we argue how size and density segregation mechanisms can be made to cancel, allowing good mixing of dissimilar particles, and we show experiments verifying this. Further experiments isolate the axial transport in the slowly rotating tube. Axial transport can appear faster with segregation than without.

  4. Simulation of Flow Patterns Within the Human Respiratory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quatember, Bernhard; Mayr, Martin; Recheis, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    A nonlinear simulation model of the respiratory system is presented here. It describes the flow patterns as well as the specific gas mixing and distribution processes that occur in the tracheobronchial tree. The model is based on the commonly used morphometric scheme of E. Weibel. It consists of a "pressure-flow submodel" and a "gas mixing submodel. The former is a lumped parameter model consisting of 24 lumped components. The second type, the "gas mixing submodel," enables the simulation of the mixing processes in the trachea and in the larger bronchi (up to the 10th generation). Several simulation studies that are based on it have been carried out; they deal with both the physiological conditions and the specific pathological changes that occur in the small airways during the early stages of chronic obstructive bronchitis.

  5. Flow-induced polymer translocation through narrow and patterned channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-08-21

    We consider linear and branched polymers driven through narrow and patterned channels by imposing a Poiseuille flow on the ambient solvent. We establish, by means of scaling arguments, that the translocation probability of dendrimers through the pore is independent of the number of monomers and that it takes place above a viscosity-dependent critical external current. When the channel walls are smooth, the translocation times of linear and branched polymers with the same monomer number are very similar. However, for walls that are decorated with attractive patches, dramatic differences show up: whereas a dendrimer successively docks at the patches and "walks" from one to the next, being carried away by the solvent flow, linear chains spread themselves along the channel wall without achieving translocation within simulation times. Our findings are relevant for, e.g., drug delivery through dendritic carrier molecules in capillary arterioles.

  6. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Foams find use in many applications in daily life, industry and biology. Examples include beverages, firefighting foam, cosmetics, foams for oil recovery and foams formed by pollutants. Foams are collection of bubbles separated by thin liquid films that are stabilized against drainage by the presence of surfactant molecules. Drainage kinetics and stability of the foam are strongly influenced by surfactant type, addition of particles, proteins and polymers. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We experimentally study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders and within thinning films, and study how buoyancy, capillarity and gravity driven instabilities and flows, are affected by variation in bulk and interfacial physicochemical properties dependent on the choice of constituents.

  7. Gene flow pattern among Aedes aegypti populations in Mexico.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Mercado-Curiel, Ricardo F; Diaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Pérez Ramirez, Gerardo; Black, William C

    2013-03-01

    Patterns of gene flow vary greatly among Aedes aegypti populations throughout Mexico. The populations are panmictic along the Pacific coast, isolated by distance in northeast Mexico, and exhibit moderate gene flow across the Yucatan peninsula. Nine Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, were taken to examine the local patterns of gene flow. Genetic variation was examined in a 387-bp region of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 4 mitochondrial gene (ND4) using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and 3 haplotypes were detected. Cluster analysis on the linearized FST genetic distances failed to group collections in geographic proximity. Regression analysis of linear or road distances on linearized F(ST) indicated that proximal collections were as diverse as distant collections across an approximately 800-km range. The geographical distribution of the Mexican mosquito haplotype frequencies was determined for the ND4 sequences from 524 individuals from Oaxaca (this study) and 2,043 individuals from our previous studies. Herein, we report on yet another pattern dominated by genetic drift among 9 Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compare it to those reported in other regions of Mexico. Molecular analysis of variance showed that there was as much genetic variation among collections 4 km apart as there was among all collections. The numbers of haplotypes and the amount of genetic diversity among the collections from Oaxaca were much lower than detected in previous studies in other regions of Mexico and may reflect the effects of control efforts or adaptations to the altitudinal limits (1,500 m) of the species in Mexico. The geographical distribution of mosquito haplotypes in Mexico is also reported. Furthermore, based on the distribution of the mosquito haplotypes in America, we suggest that mosquito dispersion is very efficient, most likely due to commercial transportation.

  8. Snow and Ice Melt Flow Features on Devon Island, Nunavut, Arctic Canada as Possible Analogs for Recent Slope Flow Features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Cockell, Charles S.; Marinova, Margarita M.; McKay, Christopher P.; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Based on morphologic and contextual analogs from Devon Island, Arctic Canada, the recent martian slope flow features reported by Malin and Edgett are reinterpreted as being due not necessarily to groundwater seepage but possibly to snow or ice melt. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Snow and Ice Melt Flow Features on Devon Island, Nunavut, Arctic Canada as Possible Analogs for Recent Slope Flow Features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Cockell, Charles S.; Marinova, Margarita M.; McKay, Christopher P.; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Based on morphologic and contextual analogs from Devon Island, Arctic Canada, the recent martian slope flow features reported by Malin and Edgett are reinterpreted as being due not necessarily to groundwater seepage but possibly to snow or ice melt. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Pattern formation in granular and granular-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Nhat-Hang P.

    Particles and suspensions of particles in fluids are regularly used in many engineering disciplines such as catalysis and reaction engineering, environmental engineering, pharmaceutical engineering, etc. A few issues that are commonly encountered include ensuring homogeneity in pharmaceutical suspensions, predicting particle transport in atmospheric and effluent streams, and manufacturing uniform composite materials. Yet the fundamental study of particle motions in granular media or in highly concentrated granular suspensions has received little attention. Relevant issues of research interest include development of adaptive models that permit wide ranges of particle concentrations, improvement of analyses that allow physical interpretation of particle motions in any medium, of scales ranging from particle size to system size, and accurate validation of theoretical with experimental data. Given the above shortcomings, this dissertation will focus on investigating basic transport behavior of particles in fluids and developing predictive models for granular media and granular suspensions. Emphasis will be given to combining experiments with computations through examples of pattern forming phenomena in a granular medium and a dense granular-fluid system. The background motivation and the objectives of this dissertation are stated in the opening chapter 1. The next three chapters address these objectives in detail. First, chapter 2 presents experimental evidence, descriptions, and characteristics of novel patterns in a dense granular suspension. This is followed by chapter 3 in which a mean-field continuum model is derived to further elucidate the reported patterning phenomena. Chapter 4 uncovers several novel granular patterns experimentally and is concluded with a coarse-grained phenomenological model for granular surface flows. Lastly, chapter 5 closes the dissertation with conclusions and possible future directions. This work provides additional understanding and

  11. Multiple convection patterns and thermohaline flow in an idealized OGCM

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmstorf, S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper investigates how multiple steady states arise in an ocean general circulation model, caused by the fact that many different convection patterns can be stable under the same surface boundary conditions. Two alternative boundary conditions are used in the experiments: classical mixed boundary conditions and a diffusive atmospheric heat balance combined with fixed salt fluxes. In both cases, transitions between different quasi-steady convection patterns can be triggered by briefly adding fresh water at convection sites. Either a large-scale freshwater anomaly is used to completely erase the previous convection pattern or a {open_quotes}surgical{close_quotes} anomaly is added to single grid points to turn off convection there. Under classical mixed-boundary conditions, different convection sites can lead to different overturning rates of deep water. The dynamics of the convection-driven flow is analyzed in some detail. With an energy balance atmosphere, in contrast, the overturning rate is very robust, apparently regulated by a negative thermal feedback. In spite of this, different convection patterns are associated with very different climatic states, since the heat transport of the deep circulation depends strongly on where convection takes place. It is suggested that considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic could be caused by changes in high-latitude convection.

  12. Impact of ice-shelf sediment content on the dynamics of plumes under melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.

    2015-12-01

    When a floating ice shelf melts into an underlying warm salty ocean, the resulting fresh meltwater can rise in a buoyant Ice-Shelf-Water plume under the ice. In certain settings, ice flowing across the grounding line carries a basal layer of debris rich ice, entrained via basal freezing around till in the upstream ice sheet. Melting of this debris-laden ice from floating ice shelves provides a flux of dense sediment to the ocean, in addition to the release of fresh buoyant meltwater. This presentation considers the impact of the resulting suspended sediment on the dynamics of ice shelf water plumes, and identifies two key flow regimes depending on the sediment concentration frozen into the basal ice layer. For large sediment concentration, melting of the debris-laden ice shelf generates dense convectively unstable waters that drive convective overturning into the underlying ocean. For lower sediment concentration, the sediment initially remains suspended in a buoyant meltwater plume rising along the underside of the ice shelf, before slowly depositing into the underlying ocean. A theoretical plume model is used to evaluate the significance of the negatively buoyant sediment on circulation strength and the feedbacks on melting rate, along with the expected depositional patterns under the ice shelf.

  13. Flow Patterns at the Interface Between Free Flow and Sediment Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Alessandro; Zanello, Francesca; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Roman, Federico; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Bedload transport phenomena in rivers and reservoirs are driven by the flow pattern that develops at the interface between free flow and sediment bed. This is a very difficult area to investigate, due to heterogeneous flow which is often restricted to small length scales and hard to resolve with measuring instruments. Yet its interpretation is of prime interest for the understanding of the mass and momentum exchange between the free flow and the sediment. When dealing with the sediment transport triggering mechanism, most studies focus on the flow that develops above the bed, while the characteristics of the flow inside the bed are usually extrapolated from above or simply neglected. This approach yields an incomplete picture of what happens at the interface. Motivated by this, we propose a study where a free-surface flow tops a permeable bed composed of layers of equally-sized spherical beads. The physics of this configuration, originally analyzed with an experimental setup at the University of Aberdeen, was only partially understood, due to the difficulties in measuring velocity and pressure inside the pores. With a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) we resolve the velocity and pressure fields in both the free flow and inside the porous bed. The no-slip boundary along the beads' surface is imposed using immersed boundaries, which also allows to compute the force exerted by the flow. We observe the development of momentum exchange between free flow and the porous bed, which activates turbulence penetrations that affect the pores closer to the surface of the permeable bed, and has two important consequences. First, the streamwise velocity in these pores is lower than that in the lower layers, a fact that challenges the usual assumption of a monotonically decreasing velocity profile within the bed. Secondly, the turbulence penetration generates an extra fluctuating component in the sphere lift forces whose role for the initiation of their movement is still not clear.

  14. Ice Flow in the Humboldt, Petermann, and Ryder Glaciers, North Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Kwok, R.; Gogineni, P.; Allen, C.

    1998-01-01

    Radar Interferometry, ice-penetrating radar profiles, and an elevation model are used to determine the catchment area, rates of ice discharge, and approximate states of balance for three large outlet glaciers in northeast Greenland.

  15. Ice Flow in the Humboldt, Petermann, and Ryder Glaciers, North Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Kwok, R.; Gogineni, P.; Allen, C.

    1998-01-01

    Radar Interferometry, ice-penetrating radar profiles, and an elevation model are used to determine the catchment area, rates of ice discharge, and approximate states of balance for three large outlet glaciers in northeast Greenland.

  16. Breakup of Pack Ice, Antarctic Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Breakup of Pack Ice along the periphery of the Antarctic Ice Shelf (53.5S, 3.0E) produced this mosaic of ice floes off the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strong offshore winds, probably associated with strong katabatic downdrafts from the interior of the continent, are seen peeling off the edges of the ice shelf into long filamets of sea ice, icebergs, bergy bits and growlers to flow northward into the South Atlantic Ocean. 53.5S, 3.0E

  17. A new method for high-resolution methane measurements on polar ice cores using continuous flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, Simon; Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Buiron, Daphné; Blunier, Thomas; Fischer, Hubertus; Stocker, Thomas F

    2009-07-15

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Rapid variations of the CH4 concentration, as frequently registered, for example, during the last ice age, have been used as reliable time markers for the definition of a common time scale of polar ice cores. In addition, these variations indicate changes in the sources of methane primarily associated with the presence of wetlands. In order to determine the exact time evolution of such fast concentration changes, CH4 measurements of the highest resolution in the ice core archive are required. Here, we present a new, semicontinuous and field-deployable CH4 detection method, which was incorporated in a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. In CFA, samples cut along the axis of an ice core are melted at a melt speed of typically 3.5 cm/min. The air from bubbles in the ice core is extracted continuously from the meltwater and forwarded to a gas chromatograph (GC) for high-resolution CH4 measurements. The GC performs a measurement every 3.5 min, hence, a depth resolution of 15 cm is achieved atthe chosen melt rate. An even higher resolution is not necessary due to the low pass filtering of air in ice cores caused by the slow bubble enclosure process and the diffusion of air in firn. Reproducibility of the new method is 3%, thus, for a typical CH4 concentration of 500 ppb during an ice age, this corresponds to an absolute precision of 15 ppb, comparable to traditional analyses on discrete samples. Results of CFA-CH4 measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome (Antarctica) illustrate the much higher temporal resolution of our method compared with established melt-refreeze CH4 measurements and demonstrate the feasibility of the new method.

  18. The Devdorak ice-rock avalanche and consequent debris flow from the slope of Mt. Kazbek (Caucasus, Georgia) in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomorets, Sergey; Savernyuk, Elena; Petrakov, Dmitry; Dokukin, Mikhail; Gotsiridze, George; Gavardashvili, Givi; Drobyshev, Valery; Tutubalina, Olga; Zaporozhchenko, Eduard; Kamenev, Nikolay; Kamenev, Vladimir; Kääb, Andreas; Kargel, Jeffrey; Huggel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We have studied catastrophic glacial events of 2014 in the Kazbek-Dzhimaray massif, Caucasus Mts., Georgia. The first event is a so called "Kazbek blockage" of the Georgian Military Road, on 17 May 2014, which formed as a result of an ice-rock avalanche onto the Devdorak Glacier, and is similar to blockages which occurred in the same location in the 18th-19th century. The second event is a consequent debris flow on 20 August 2014. In May, June 2014 and September 2015 we conducted three field investigations of the disaster zone, which includes Devdorak Glacier, Amilishka and Kabakhi river valleys, the Terek River valley near the Kabakhi River mouth, and a temporary lake.We analyzed field research data, interpreted SPOT 6, Landsat-8 OLI, Terra ASTER, and Pleiades satellite imagery, as well as post-disaster helicopter imagery. To assess dynamic features of the ice-rock flow on 17 May 2014, we measured valley crossections with Bushnell laser ranger. In 2015 we have marked a 180-m baseline for ground stereosurvey and made a stereopair of the Devdorak glacier terminus from a distance of 700 m. The 17 May 2014 ice-rock avalanche initiated at 4500 m. a.s.l. It collapsed onto the tongue of the Devdorak Glacier which reaches down to 2300 m a.s.l. Downstream of the tongue, the avalanche transformed into an ice-rock "avalanche flow" which blocked the Terek River valley. The traffic on Military Georgian Road (part of E117 highway) which connects Russia with Georgia was stopped. 7 people were killed in their vehicles. The total length of the ice-rock avalanche and the subsequent flow was over 10 km. A temporary lake formed in the Terek river valley, reaching 300 m in length, and over 10 m in depth. For several hours, the lake was threatening another debris flow downstream the Terek river valley. According to field estimates at the Devdorak glacier tongue and in Amilishka, Kabakhi and Terek river valleys, the volume of the transported ice-rock avalanche mass, which deposited in

  19. Decoding complex flow-field patterns in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Christophel, Thomas B; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-05-01

    There has been a long history of research on visual working memory. Whereas early studies have focused on the role of lateral prefrontal cortex in the storage of sensory information, this has been challenged by research in humans that has directly assessed the encoding of perceptual contents, pointing towards a role of visual and parietal regions during storage. In a previous study we used pattern classification to investigate the storage of complex visual color patterns across delay periods. This revealed coding of such contents in early visual and parietal brain regions. Here we aim to investigate whether the involvement of visual and parietal cortex is also observable for other types of complex, visuo-spatial pattern stimuli. Specifically, we used a combination of fMRI and multivariate classification to investigate the retention of complex flow-field stimuli defined by the spatial patterning of motion trajectories of random dots. Subjects were trained to memorize the precise spatial layout of these stimuli and to retain this information during an extended delay. We used a multivariate decoding approach to identify brain regions where spatial patterns of activity encoded the memorized stimuli. Content-specific memory signals were observable in motion sensitive visual area MT+ and in posterior parietal cortex that might encode spatial information in a modality independent manner. Interestingly, we also found information about the memorized visual stimulus in somatosensory cortex, suggesting a potential crossmodal contribution to memory. Our findings thus indicate that working memory storage of visual percepts might be distributed across unimodal, multimodal and even crossmodal brain regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SALE3D. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1992-01-14

    SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.

  1. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  2. Regional characteristics of extreme drought patterns in stream flow records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrollahi, N.; Ahmadi, M.; Alaeipour, A.

    2010-12-01

    Global warming has shown dramatic effects on natural systems in some parts of the world. Middle East is one of the locations that is affected by the severe changes in the climate conditions. In this study, the regional characteristics of severe seasonal droughts have been studied by analyzing the extreme value properties of the annual maximum series of river stream flows in the last 30 years. The study region is Karun River located in south western Iran. Karun River is Iran's most effluent, and the only navigable river which is 720 km long. It rises in the Zard Kuh Mountains and continues toward the Persian Gulf. There are a number of dams on the Karun River, with the purpose of generating hydroelectric power and flood control. The area is divided into 10 catchments with daily stream flow records. To investigate the drought periods, the threshold level is defined by percentiles from the flow duration curve. Two different regionalization tools are compared, L-moment diagrams and empirical orthogonal functions. The L-moment and EOF diagrams provided virtually the same conclusions with regard to clustering of catchments, and large scale trends were found in the data which confirms a regional pattern.

  3. Flow pattern analysis of the Baylor total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wernicke, J T; Orime, Y; Takatani, S; Tasai, K; Damm, G; Naito, K; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Glueck, J

    1994-12-01

    To obtain an optimal design of the left blood chamber of the total artificial heart (TAH), flow visualization studies were performed. Information on velocities in critical areas of the left chamber was gathered using sectional pulsed laser light. The flow patterns on the entire pumping duration were photographed frame by frame. The inflow port, the opposite of the inflow and outflow of the pump (bottom area), and the diaphragm/housing junction were the focal areas. The pump conditions, such as chamber pressure, preload and afterload pressure, pumping rate and roller screw, and displacement were recorded. Major stagnations and a low washout effect were observed in the bottom region. The closing of the inflow valve was irregular. In order to solve this problem, the inflow valve angle was changed 20 degrees. A comparison study showed a better valve closing characteristic, and no stagnation areas were observed with this new valve angle. Various velocity profiles confirmed the results. The valve closing characteristics is described in relationship to back flow.

  4. Microscopic pattern of ice crystal growth in the presence of thermal hysteresis proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Coger, R.; Rubinsky, B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Fletcher, G. )

    1994-08-01

    This study examines the effect of thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) from the winter flounder (Psuedopleuronectes americanus) on the ice-water interface morphology during freezing of aqueous solutions. Experiments were performed using a directional solidification stage, and the development of the two-phase interface was observed through a microscope and recorded by a video system. Unusual ice crystal morphologies were observed, including faceted ice crystal growth along the (1100) crystal plane; spicular or needlelike growth in the (1010) direction; and growth parallel to the c-axis, (0001), consisting of incorporated liquid inclusions bounded by hexagonal prism faces. The observed crystallographic structures can be explained as an effect of the interaction between the THPs and the primary prism faces of ice crystals. This results in an increase in the Gibbs free energy of these planes, followed by ice growth into the supercooled liquid adjacent to these faces.

  5. Cosmogenic exposure age constraints on deglaciation and flow behaviour of a marine-based ice stream in western Scotland, 21-16 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, David; Benetti, Sara; Dove, Dayton; Ballantyne, Colin K.; Fabel, Derek; Clark, Chris D.; Gheorghiu, Delia M.; Newall, Jennifer; Xu, Sheng

    2017-07-01

    Understanding how marine-based ice streams operated during episodes of deglaciation requires geochronological data that constrain both timing of deglaciation and changes in their flow behaviour, such as that from unconstrained ice streaming to topographically restricted flow. We present seventeen new 10Be exposure ages from glacial boulders and bedrock at sites in western Scotland within the area drained by the Hebrides Ice Stream, a marine-based ice stream that drained a large proportion of the former British-Irish Ice Sheet. Exposure ages from Tiree constrain deglaciation of a topographic high within the central zone of the ice stream, from which convergent flowsets were produced during ice streaming. These ages thus constrain thinning of the Hebrides Ice Stream, which, on the basis of supporting information, we infer to represent cessation of ice streaming at 20.6 ± 1.2 ka, 3-4 ka earlier than previously inferred. A period of more topographically restricted flow produced flow indicators superimposed on those relating to full ice stream conditions, and exposure ages from up-stream of these constrain deglaciation to 17.5 ± 1.0 ka. Complete deglaciation of the marine sector of the Hebrides Ice Stream occurred by 17-16 ka at which time the ice margin was located near the present coastline. Exposure ages from the southernmost Outer Hebrides (Mingulay and Barra) indicate deglaciation at 18.9 ± 1.0 and 17.1 ± 1.0 ka respectively, demonstrating that an independent ice cap persisted on the southern Outer Hebrides for 3-4 ka after initial ice stream deglaciation. This suggests that deglaciation of the Hebr