Science.gov

Sample records for ice making system

  1. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  2. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  3. Dynamic-Type Ice Thermal Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Akiyoshi

    This paper deals with reviews for research and development of a dynamic-type ice thermal storage system. This system has three main features. First, the ice thermal storage tank and the ice generator are separate. Second, ice is transported to the tank from the ice generator by water or air. Third, the ice making and melting processes are operated at the same time. Outlet water temperature from the dynamic-type ice thermal storage tank remains low for a longer time. In this paper, dynamic-Type ice thermal storage systems are divided into three parts: the ice making part, the ice transport part, and the cold energy release part. Each part is reviewed separately.

  4. 21 CFR 1250.86 - Water for making ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water for making ice. 1250.86 Section 1250.86 Food... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.86 Water for making ice. Only potable water shall be piped into a freezer for making ice for drinking and culinary purposes....

  5. 21 CFR 1250.86 - Water for making ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water for making ice. 1250.86 Section 1250.86 Food... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.86 Water for making ice. Only potable water shall be piped into a freezer for making ice for drinking and culinary purposes....

  6. 21 CFR 1250.86 - Water for making ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water for making ice. 1250.86 Section 1250.86 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.86 Water for making ice. Only potable...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.86 - Water for making ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water for making ice. 1250.86 Section 1250.86 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.86 Water for making ice. Only potable...

  8. 21 CFR 1250.86 - Water for making ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water for making ice. 1250.86 Section 1250.86 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.86 Water for making ice. Only potable...

  9. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-01-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  10. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-03-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  11. A Terminal Area Icing Remote Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Serke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have developed an icing remote sensing technology that has demonstrated skill at detecting and classifying icing hazards in a vertical column above an instrumented ground station. This technology is now being extended to provide volumetric coverage surrounding an airport. With volumetric airport terminal area coverage, the resulting icing hazard information will be usable by aircrews, traffic control, and airline dispatch to make strategic and tactical decisions regarding routing when conditions are conducive to airframe icing. Building on the existing vertical pointing system, the new method for providing volumetric coverage will utilize cloud radar, microwave radiometry, and NEXRAD radar. This terminal area icing remote sensing system will use the data streams from these instruments to provide icing hazard classification along the defined approach paths into an airport. Strategies for comparison to in-situ instruments on aircraft and weather balloons for a planned NASA field test are discussed, as are possible future applications into the NextGen airspace system.

  12. The existence of memory effect on hydrogen ordering in ice: The effect makes ice attractive

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C

    2011-01-01

    The existence of ferroelectric ice XI with ordered hydrogen in space becomes of interest in astronomy and physical chemistry because of the strong electrostatic force. However, the influence was believed to be limited because it forms in a narrow temperature range. From neutron diffraction experiments, we found that small hydrogen-ordered domains exist at significantly higher temperature and the domains induce the growth of 'bulk' ice XI. The small ordered domain is named 'memory' of hydrogen ordered ice because it is the residual structure of ice XI. Since the memory exists up to at least 111 K, most of ices in the solar system are hydrogen ordered and may have ferroelectricity. The small hydrogen-ordered domains govern the cosmochemical properties of ice and evolution of icy grains in the universe.

  13. Experimental investigation of static ice refrigeration air conditioning system driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Li, M.; Luo, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Yu, Q. F.; Hassanien, R. H. E.

    2016-08-01

    The static ice refrigeration air conditioning system (SIRACS) driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system (DPES) was proposed and the test experiment have been investigated in this paper. Results revealed that system energy utilization efficiency is low because energy losses were high in ice making process of ice slide maker. So the immersed evaporator and co-integrated exchanger were suggested in system structure optimization analysis and the system COP was improved nearly 40%. At the same time, we have researched that ice thickness and ice super-cooled temperature changed along with time and the relationship between system COP and ice thickness was obtained.

  14. ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larour, Eric; Schiermeier, John E.; Seroussi, Helene; Morlinghem, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    In order to have the capability to use satellite data from its own missions to inform future sea-level rise projections, JPL needed a full-fledged ice-sheet/iceshelf flow model, capable of modeling the mass balance of Antarctica and Greenland into the near future. ISSM was developed with such a goal in mind, as a massively parallelized, multi-purpose finite-element framework dedicated to ice-sheet modeling. ISSM features unstructured meshes (Tria in 2D, and Penta in 3D) along with corresponding finite elements for both types of meshes. Each finite element can carry out diagnostic, prognostic, transient, thermal 3D, surface, and bed slope simulations. Anisotropic meshing enables adaptation of meshes to a certain metric, and the 2D Shelfy-Stream, 3D Blatter/Pattyn, and 3D Full-Stokes formulations capture the bulk of the ice-flow physics. These elements can be coupled together, based on the Arlequin method, so that on a large scale model such as Antarctica, each type of finite element is used in the most efficient manner. For each finite element referenced above, ISSM implements an adjoint. This adjoint can be used to carry out model inversions of unknown model parameters, typically ice rheology and basal drag at the ice/bedrock interface, using a metric such as the observed InSAR surface velocity. This data assimilation capability is crucial to allow spinning up of ice flow models using available satellite data. ISSM relies on the PETSc library for its vectors, matrices, and solvers. This allows ISSM to run efficiently on any parallel platform, whether shared or distrib- ISSM: Ice Sheet System Model NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California uted. It can run on the largest clusters, and is fully scalable. This allows ISSM to tackle models the size of continents. ISSM is embedded into MATLAB and Python, both open scientific platforms. This improves its outreach within the science community. It is entirely written in C/C++, which gives it flexibility in its

  15. Airborne Tomographic Swath Ice Sounding Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Freeman, Anthony; Jezek, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets modulate global sea level by storing water deposited as snow on the surface, and discharging water back into the ocean through melting. Their physical state can be characterized in terms of their mass balance and dynamics. To estimate the current ice mass balance, and to predict future changes in the motion of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, it is necessary to know the ice sheet thickness and the physical conditions of the ice sheet surface and bed. This information is required at fine resolution and over extensive portions of the ice sheets. A tomographic algorithm has been developed to take raw data collected by a multiple-channel synthetic aperture sounding radar system over a polar ice sheet and convert those data into two-dimensional (2D) ice thickness measurements. Prior to this work, conventional processing techniques only provided one-dimensional ice thickness measurements along profiles.

  16. Microwave System for Detecting Ice on Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Philip J.; Glynn, Dennis P., Jr.; Joseph, John C.

    2004-01-01

    A microwave-based system has been developed as a means of detecting ice on aircraft surfaces, with enough sensitivity to provide a warning before the ice accretes to a dangerous thickness. The system can measure the thickness of ice from a few mils (1 mil = 0.0254 mm) to about 1/4 in. (.6 mm) and can distinguish among (1) ice, (2) water (or deicing fluid), and (3) a mixture of ice and water (or deicing fluid). Sensors have been ruggedized to withstand the rain erosion environment.

  17. Sea Ice Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbø, S.; Storvold, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping of sea ice extent and sea ice features is an important task in climate research. Since the arctic coastal and oceanic areas have a high probability of cloud coverage, aerial platforms are superior to satellite measurements for high-resolution optical measurements. However, routine observations of sea ice conditions present a variety of problems using conventional piloted aircrafts. Specially, the availability of suitable aircrafts for lease does not cover the demand in major parts of the arctic. With the recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS), there is a high possibility of establishing routine, cost effective aerial observations of sea ice conditions in the near future. Unmanned aerial systems can carry a wide variety of sensors useful for characterizing sea-ice features. For instance, the CryoWing UAS, a system initially designed for measurements of the cryosphere, can be equipped with digital cameras, surface thermometers and laser altimeters for measuring freeboard of ice flows. In this work we will present results from recent CryoWing sea ice flights on Svalbard, Norway. The emphasis will be on data processing for stitching together images acquired with the non-stabilized camera payload, to form high-resolution mosaics covering large spatial areas. These data are being employed to map ice conditions; including ice and lead features and melt ponds. These high-resolution mosaics are also well suited for sea-ice mechanics, classification studies and for validation of satellite sea-ice products.

  18. Energy Efficiency of an Integral Anti-Ice System Based on Fluoroplastic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslov, E. A.; Danilaev, M. P.; Mikhailov, S. A.; Pol‧skii, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the efficiency of an integral electrothermal anti-ice system based on fluoroplastic films are presented. It is shown that the use of this system makes it possible to decrease the energy expended for the de-icing by 30% as compared to the existing electrothermal anti-ice systems and that an integral electrothermal anti-ice system can be used in small and midget aircrafts including unmanned ones.

  19. Development and Performance Evaluation of an Ozone-Contained Ice Making Machine Employing Pressurized Air Tight Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Hirofuji, Yushi; Koyama, Shigeru

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it reacts to oxygen. Recently, ozone-contained ice is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ozone-contained ice seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to the effects of cooling and sterilization of ozone-contained ice. In the present study, we have developed an ozone-contained ice making machine employing pressurized air tight containers with commercially available size. And the performance evaluation of the system is also carried out. Furthermore, we investigated the sterilization effect of ozone-contained ice on conservation of fish. It was seen that ozone-contained ice is effective for sterilization of surface of fish.

  20. Ice Storage System for School Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Ross D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project at the Manatee Education Center in Naples, Florida, which won an ASHRAE award. Project involved the implementation of ice-storage technology in 19 schools. Compares the performance of ice-storage systems with traditional chiller designs in two other schools. Tables illustrate costs for the campuses. Addresses the maintenance…

  1. Marginal Ice Zone Processes Observed from Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen extreme changes in the Arctic. Marginal ice zones (MIZ), or areas where the "ice-albedo feedback" driven by solar warming is highest and ice melt is extensive, may provide insights into the extent of these changes. Furthermore, MIZ play a central role in setting the air-sea CO2 balance making them a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Incomplete understanding of how the sea-ice modulates gas fluxes renders it difficult to estimate the carbon budget in MIZ. Here, we investigate the turbulent mechanisms driving mixing and gas exchange in leads, polynyas and in the presence of ice floes using both field and laboratory measurements. Measurements from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the marginal ice zone were made during 2 experiments: 1) North of Oliktok Point AK in the Beaufort Sea were made during the Marginal Ice Zone Ocean and Ice Observations and Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX) in July-August 2013 and 2) Fram Strait and Greenland Sea northwest of Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Norway during the Air-Sea-Ice Physics and Biogeochemistry Experiment (ASIPBEX) April - May 2015. We developed a number of new payloads that include: i) hyperspectral imaging spectrometers to measure VNIR (400-1000 nm) and NIR (900-1700 nm) spectral radiance; ii) net longwave and net shortwave radiation for ice-ocean albedo studies; iii) air-sea-ice turbulent fluxes as well as wave height, ice freeboard, and surface roughness with a LIDAR; and iv) drone-deployed micro-drifters (DDµD) deployed from the UAS that telemeter temperature, pressure, and RH as it descends through the atmosphere and temperature and salinity of the upper meter of the ocean once it lands on the ocean's surface. Visible and IR imagery of melting ice floes clearly defines the scale of the ice floes. The IR imagery show distinct cooling of the skin sea surface temperature (SST) as well as an intricate circulation and mixing pattern that depends on the surface current, wind speed, and near

  2. A Systems-Level Perspective on Engine Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan David; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Talk covers: (1) Problem of Engine Power Loss;(2) Modeling Engine Icing Effects; (3) Simulation of Engine Rollback; (4) Icing/Engine Control System Interaction; (5) Detection of Ice Accretion; (6) Potential Mitigation Strategies.

  3. Ice sheet systems and sea level change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern views of ice sheets provided by satellites, airborne surveys, in situ data and paleoclimate records while transformative of glaciology have not fundamentally changed concerns about ice sheet stability and collapse that emerged in the 1970's. Motivated by the desire to learn more about ice sheets using new technologies, we stumbled on an unexplored field of science and witnessed surprising changes before realizing that most were coming too fast, soon and large. Ice sheets are integrant part of the Earth system; they interact vigorously with the atmosphere and the oceans, yet most of this interaction is not part of current global climate models. Since we have never witnessed the collapse of a marine ice sheet, observations and exploration remain critical sentinels. At present, these observations suggest that Antarctica and Greenland have been launched into a path of multi-meter sea level rise caused by rapid climate warming. While the current loss of ice sheet mass to the ocean remains a trickle, every mm of sea level change will take centuries of climate reversal to get back, several major marine-terminating sectors have been pushed out of equilibrium, and ice shelves are irremediably being lost. As glaciers retreat from their salty, warm, oceanic margins, they will melt away and retreat slower, but concerns remain about sea level change from vastly marine-based sectors: 2-m sea level equivalent in Greenland and 23-m in Antarctica. Significant changes affect 2/4 marine-based sectors in Greenland - Jakobshavn Isb. and the northeast stream - with Petermann Gl. not far behind. Major changes have affected the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica since the 1980s. Smaller yet significant changes affect the marine-based Wilkes Land sector of East Antarctica, a reminder that not all marine-based ice is in West Antarctica. Major advances in reducing uncertainties in sea level projections will require massive, interdisciplinary efforts that are not currently in place

  4. Laboratory performance of a dynamic ice storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1991-06-01

    The performance of a commercial 30-ton dynamic ice storage system was measured in a dedicated laboratory test facility and the results analyzed. The ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions to characterize the ice generating performance as a function of condensing conditions, ice build time, and defrost time. The overall efficiency of ice production was determined and the effect of refrigeration system component performance on the overall system efficiency was evaluated. The ability of the charged system -- a tank of ice slush -- to meet a simulated cooling load over was also evaluated. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Supporting decision making and action selection under time pressure and uncertainty: the case of in-flight icing.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B; Schroeder, B

    2001-01-01

    Operators in high-risk domains such as aviation often need to make decisions under time pressure and uncertainty. One way to support them in this task is through the introduction of decision support systems (DSSs). The present study examined the effectiveness of two different DSS implementations: status and command displays. Twenty-seven pilots (9 pilots each in a baseline, status, and command group) flew 20 simulated approaches involving icing encounters. Accuracy of the decision aid (a smart icing system), familiarity with the icing condition, timing of icing onset, and autopilot usage were varied within subjects. Accurate information from either decision aid led to improved handling of the icing encounter. However, when inaccurate information was presented, performance dropped below that of the baseline condition. The cost of inaccurate information was particularly high for command displays and in the case of unfamiliar icing conditions. Our findings suggest that unless perfect reliability of a decision aid can be assumed, status displays may be preferable to command displays in high-risk domains (e.g., space flight, medicine, and process control), as the former yield more robust performance benefits and appear less vulnerable to automation biases.

  6. 14 CFR 125.181 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 125.181... Requirements § 125.181 Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to ice accumulation in the engine air induction system must be provided for each airplane....

  7. 14 CFR 125.181 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 125.181... Requirements § 125.181 Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to ice accumulation in the engine air induction system must be provided for each airplane....

  8. 14 CFR 125.181 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 125.181... Requirements § 125.181 Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to ice accumulation in the engine air induction system must be provided for each airplane....

  9. 14 CFR 125.181 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 125.181... Requirements § 125.181 Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to ice accumulation in the engine air induction system must be provided for each airplane....

  10. Wind-electric ice making for villages in the developing world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, H.; Drouilhet, S.; Flowers, L.; Bergey, M.; Brandemuehl, M.

    1994-07-01

    For many villages in the developing world, renewable energy sources are the most economical means of providing power. There is a significant need for ice to preserve fish and produce for shipment to market. Since fishing villages are near coastlines with fairly reliable wind resources, wind-powered ice machines would capitalize on a good match between ice demand and energy supply. To date little work has been done on the use of wind turbines for ice making applications. This paper presents the results of wind-electric ice making research project conducted by the University of Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Bergey Windpower Co. Several potential problems related to intermittent and variable frequency operation were determined prior to testing. Initial tests were conducted using a dynamometer to evaluate the significance of these potential problems under simulated conditions and to define basic performance expectations for ice makers in the 1.2 tons/day size range. Field testing will be completed soon to determine long-term performance of one ice maker.

  11. Electronic diver (under ice) detection system

    SciTech Connect

    McKindra, C.D.; Dunton, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes field tests successfully conducted in the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic of the Electronic Diver (Under Ice) Detection System (EDDS). The initial impetus for this research and development was the plan by the U.S. Coast Guard to expand the use of divers in the Arctic and other cold environments. One of the possible tasks that these divers would perform was to survey the areal extent of an oil spill under land fast ice. This specific development was initiated out of concern for diver safety and effectiveness while conducting various missions. The EDDS was successfully tested in the Canadian Arctic as a part of the Dome/Canadian Marine Drilling, Ltd., experimental oil spill in April, 1980. A description of the system, its possible uses, and limitations are characterized. The EDDS is an important step forward for diver under ice safety and could be used on a submersible for similar purposes. The system was tested in an oily environment and was affected by neither diver tank air bubbles nor the oil. However, the air bubbles did adversely affect a pinger type system designed to perform similar functions. Although the system performed as planned, further work is needed to optimize its performance and size.

  12. Improving Arctic sea ice edge forecasts by assimilating high horizontal resolution sea ice concentration data into the US Navy's ice forecast systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posey, P. G.; Metzger, E. J.; Wallcraft, A. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Allard, R. A.; Smedstad, O. M.; Phelps, M. W.; Fetterer, F.; Stewart, J. S.; Meier, W. N.; Helfrich, S. R.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the improvement in ice edge error within the US Navy's operational sea ice forecast systems gained by assimilating high horizontal resolution satellite-derived ice concentration products. Since the late 1980's, the ice forecast systems have assimilated near real-time sea ice concentration derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI and then SSMIS). The resolution of the satellite-derived product was approximately the same as the previous operational ice forecast system (25 km). As the sea ice forecast model resolution increased over time, the need for higher horizontal resolution observational data grew. In 2013, a new Navy sea ice forecast system (Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System - ACNFS) went into operations with a horizontal resolution of ~ 3.5 km at the North Pole. A method of blending ice concentration observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR2) along with a sea ice mask produced by the National Ice Center (NIC) has been developed, resulting in an ice concentration product with very high spatial resolution. In this study, ACNFS was initialized with this newly developed high resolution blended ice concentration product. The daily ice edge locations from model hindcast simulations were compared against independent observed ice edge locations. ACNFS initialized using the high resolution blended ice concentration data product decreased predicted ice edge location error compared to the operational system that only assimilated SSMIS data. A second evaluation assimilating the new blended sea ice concentration product into the pre-operational Navy Global Ocean Forecast System 3.1 also showed a substantial improvement in ice edge location over a system using the SSMIS sea ice concentration product alone. This paper describes the technique used to create the blended sea ice concentration product and the significant improvements in ice edge forecasting in both of the

  13. In-ice acoustic positioning system for the Enceladus Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ruth; EnEx Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    The IceMole, a combination of melting and drilling probe, which is able to move and steer through ice and take samples while doing so, can be used to install instruments in ice. In addition to the inertial navigation system, the ice-craft will be equipped with an acoustic positioning system, composed of receivers in the probe itself and several emitters (pinger) on the glacier surface. It will determine the position of the IceMole by measuring the signal propagation time and trilateration, which requires a solid knowledge of the propagation of acoustic signals in ice. A method to determine these properties during the operation of the IceMole will be developed. Here we will give an overview over the goals of the project and the design of the IceMole. We will present the status of the development of the acoustic positioning system and show the results of simulations on the positioning accuracy.

  14. Sea ice in the paleoclimate system: the challenge of reconstructing sea ice from proxies - an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vernal, Anne; Gersonde, Rainer; Goosse, Hugues; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-11-01

    Sea ice is an important component of the Earth system with complex dynamics imperfectly documented from direct observations, which are primarily limited to the last 40 years. Whereas large amplitude variations of sea ice have been recorded, especially in the Arctic, with a strikingly fast decrease in recent years partly attributed to the impact of anthropogenic climate changes, little is known about the natural variability of the sea ice cover at multi-decadal to multi-millennial time scales. Hence, there is a need to establish longer sea ice time series to document the full range of sea ice variations under natural forcings. To do this, several approaches based on biogenic or geochemical proxies have been developed from marine, ice core and coastal records. The status of the sea ice proxies has been discussed by the Sea Ice Proxy (SIP) working group endorsed by PAGES during a first workshop held at GEOTOP in Montréal. The present volume contains a set of papers addressing various sea ice proxies and their application to large scale sea ice reconstruction. Here we summarize the contents of the volume, including a table of various proxies available in marine sediments and ice cores, with their possibilities and limitations.

  15. Advanced ice protection systems test in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H.; Shin, Jaiwan; Mesander, Geert A.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of eight different deicing systems based on variations of three different technologies were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in June and July 1990. The systems used pneumatic, eddy current repulsive, and electroexpulsive means to shed ice. The tests were conducted on a 1.83 m span, 0.53 m chord NACA 0012 airfoil operated at a 4 degree angle of attack. The models were tested at two temperatures: a glaze condition at minus 3.9 C and a rime condition at minus 17.2 C. The systems were tested through a range of icing spray times and cycling rates. Characterization of the deicers was accomplished by monitoring power consumption, ice shed particle size, and residual ice. High speed video motion analysis was performed to quantify ice particle size.

  16. Advanced ice protection systems test in the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H.; Shin, Jaiwon; Mesander, Geert A.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of eight different deicing systems based on variations of three different technologies were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in June and July 1990. The systems used pneumatic, eddy current repulsive, and electro-expulsive means to shed ice. The tests were conducted on a 1.83 m span, 0.53 m chord NACA 0012 airfoil operated at a 4 degree angle of attack. The models were tested at two temperatures: a glaze condition at minus 3.9 C and a rime condition at minus 17.2 C. The systems were tested through a range of icing spray times and cycling rates. Characterization of the deicers was accomplished by monitoring power consumption, ice shed particle size, and residual ice. High speed video motion analysis was performed to quantify ice particle size.

  17. Ice Sheet System Model as Educational Entertainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the importance of polar ice sheets and their role in the evolution of Sea Level Rise (SLR), as well as Climate Change, is of paramount importance for policy makers as well as the public and schools at large. For example, polar ice sheets and glaciers currently account for 1/3 of the SLR signal, a ratio that will increase in the near to long-term future, which has tremendous societal ramifications. Consequently, it is important to increase awareness about our changing planet. In our increasingly digital society, mobile and web applications are burgeoning venues for such outreach. The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) is a software that was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/CalTech/NASA, in collaboration with University of California Irvine (UCI), with the goal of better understanding the evolution of polar ice sheets. It is a state-of-the-art framework, which relies on higher-end cluster-computing to address some of the aforementioned challenges. In addition, it is a flexible framework that can be deployed on any hardware; in particular, on mobile platforms such as Android or iOS smart phones. Here, we look at how the ISSM development team managed to port their model to these platforms, what the implications are for improving how scientists disseminate their results, and how a broader audience may familiarize themselves with running complex climate models in simplified scenarios which are highly educational and entertaining in content. We also look at the future plans toward a web portal fully integrated with mobile technologies to deliver the best content to the public, and to provide educational plans/lessons that can be used in grades K-12 as well as collegiate under-graduate and graduate programs.

  18. Validation Ice Crystal Icing Engine Test in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is an existing altitude simulation jet engine test facility located at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. It was modified in 2012 with the integration of an ice crystal cloud generation system. This paper documents the inaugural ice crystal cloud test in PSL--the first ever full scale, high altitude ice crystal cloud turbofan engine test to be conducted in a ground based facility. The test article was a Lycoming ALF502-R5 high bypass turbofan engine, serial number LF01. The objectives of the test were to validate the PSL ice crystal cloud calibration and engine testing methodologies by demonstrating the capability to calibrate and duplicate known flight test events that occurred on the same LF01 engine and to generate engine data to support fundamental and computational research to investigate and better understand the physics of ice crystal icing in a turbofan engine environment while duplicating known revenue service events and conducting test points while varying facility and engine parameters. During PSL calibration testing it was discovered than heated probes installed through tunnel sidewalls experienced ice buildup aft of their location due to ice crystals impinging upon them, melting and running back. Filtered city water was used in the cloud generation nozzle system to provide ice crystal nucleation sites. This resulted in mineralization forming on flow path hardware that led to a chronic degradation of performance during the month long test. Lacking internal flow path cameras, the response of thermocouples along the flow path was interpreted as ice building up. Using this interpretation, a strong correlation between total water content (TWC) and a weaker correlation between median volumetric diameter (MVD) of the ice crystal cloud and the rate of ice buildup along the instrumented flow path was identified. For this test article the engine anti-ice system was required to be turned on before ice crystal

  19. Validation Ice Crystal Icing Engine Test in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is an existing altitude simulation jet engine test facility located at NASA Glenn Research Center in Clevleand, OH. It was modified in 2012 with the integration of an ice crystal cloud generation system. This paper documents the inaugural ice crystal cloud test in PSLthe first ever full scale, high altitude ice crystal cloud turbofan engine test to be conducted in a ground based facility. The test article was a Lycoming ALF502-R5 high bypass turbofan engine, serial number LF01. The objectives of the test were to validate the PSL ice crystal cloud calibration and engine testing methodologies by demonstrating the capability to calibrate and duplicate known flight test events that occurred on the same LF01 engine and to generate engine data to support fundamental and computational research to investigate and better understand the physics of ice crystal icing in a turbofan engine environment while duplicating known revenue service events and conducting test points while varying facility and engine parameters. During PSL calibration testing it was discovered than heated probes installed through tunnel sidewalls experienced ice buildup aft of their location due to ice crystals impinging upon them, melting and running back. Filtered city water was used in the cloud generation nozzle system to provide ice crystal nucleation sites. This resulted in mineralization forming on flow path hardware that led to a chronic degradation of performance during the month long test. Lacking internal flow path cameras, the response of thermocouples along the flow path was interpreted as ice building up. Using this interpretation, a strong correlation between total water content (TWC) and a weaker correlation between median volumetric diameter (MVD) of the ice crystal cloud and the rate of ice buildup along the instrumented flow path was identified. For this test article the engine anti-ice system was required to be turned on before ice crystal icing

  20. FLYSAFE, nowcasting of in flight icing supporting aircrew decision making process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, A.; Le Bot, C.

    2009-09-01

    FLYSAFE is an Integrated Project of the 6th framework of the European Commission with the aim to improve flight safety through the development of a Next Generation Integrated Surveillance System (NGISS). The NGISS provides information to the flight crew on the three major external hazards for aviation: weather, air traffic and terrain. The NGISS has the capability of displaying data about all three hazards on a single display screen, facilitating rapid pilot appreciation of the situation by the flight crew. Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) were developed to provide the NGISS and the flight crew with weather related information on in-flight icing, thunderstorms, wake-vortex and clear-air turbulence. These products are generated on the ground from observations and model forecasts. WIMS supply relevant information on three different scales: global, regional and local (over airport Terminal Manoeuvring Area). Within the flysafe program, around 120 hours of flight trials were performed during February 2008 and August 2008. Two aircraft were involved each with separate objectives : - to assess FLYSAFE's innovative solutions for the data-link, on-board data fusion, data-display, and data-updates during flight; - to evaluate the new weather information management systems (in flight icing and thunderstorms) using in-situ measurements recorded on board the test aircraft. In this presentation we will focus on the in-flight icing nowcasting system developed at Météo France in the framework of FLYSAFE: the local ICE WIMS. The local ICE WIMS is based on data fusion. The most relevant information for icing detection is extracted from the numerical weather prediction model, the infra-red and visible satellite imagery and the ground weather radar reflectivities. After a presentation of the local ICE WIMS, we detail the evaluation of the local ICE WIMS performed using the winter and summer flight trial data.

  1. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  2. ICE stereocamera system - photogrammetric setup for retrieval and analysis of small scale sea ice topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, Dmitry; Pedersen, Christina; Karlsen, Tor Ivan; Aas, Harald; Granskog, Mats; Renner, Angelika; Spreen, Gunnar; Gerland, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    A new thin-ice Arctic paradigm requires reconsideration of the set of parameterizations of mass and energy exchange within the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere system used in modern CGCMs. Such a reassessment would require a comprehensive collection of measurements made specifically on first-year pack ice with a focus on summer melt season when the difference from typical conditions for the earlier multi-year Arctic sea ice cover becomes most pronounced. Previous in situ studies have demonstrated a crucial importance of smaller (i.e. less than 10 m) scale surface topography features for the seasonal evolution of pack ice. During 2011-2012 NPI developed a helicopter borne ICE stereocamera system intended for mapping the sea ice surface topography and aerial photography. The hardware component of the system comprises two Canon 5D Mark II cameras, combined GPS/INS unit by "Novatel" and a laser altimeter mounted in a single enclosure outside the helicopter. The unit is controlled by a PXI chassis mounted inside the helicopter cabin. The ICE stereocamera system was deployed for the first time during the 2012 summer field season. The hardware setup has proven to be highly reliable and was used in about 30 helicopter flights over Arctic sea-ice during July-September. Being highly automated it required a minimal human supervision during in-flight operation. The deployment of the camera system was mostly done in combination with the EM-bird, which measures sea-ice thickness, and this combination provides an integrated view of sea ice cover along the flight track. During the flight the cameras shot sequentially with a time interval of 1 second each to ensure sufficient overlap between subsequent images. Some 35000 images of sea ice/water surface captured per camera sums into 6 Tb of data collected during its first field season. The reconstruction of the digital elevation model of sea ice surface will be done using SOCET SET commercial software. Refraction at water/air interface can

  3. New Icing Cloud Simulation System at the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.; Oldenburg, John R.; Sheldon, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A new spray bar system was designed, fabricated, and installed in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). This system is key to the IRT's ability to do aircraft in-flight icing cloud simulation. The performance goals and requirements levied on the design of the new spray bar system included increased size of the uniform icing cloud in the IRT test section, faster system response time, and increased coverage of icing conditions as defined in Appendix C of the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR), Part 25 and Part 29. Through significant changes to the mechanical and electrical designs of the previous-generation spray bar system, the performance goals and requirements were realized. Postinstallation aerodynamic and icing cloud calibrations were performed to quantify the changes and improvements made to the IRT test section flow quality and icing cloud characteristics. The new and improved capability to simulate aircraft encounters with in-flight icing clouds ensures that the 1RT will continue to provide a satisfactory icing ground-test simulation method to the aeronautics community.

  4. Sea Ice in the NCEP Climate Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Grumbine, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice is known to play a significant role in the global climate system. For a weather or climate forecast system (CFS), it is important that the realistic distribution of sea ice is represented. Sea ice prediction is challenging; sea ice can form or melt, it can move with wind and/or ocean current; sea ice interacts with both the air above and ocean underneath, it influences by, and has impact on the air and ocean conditions. NCEP has developed coupled CFS (version 2, CFSv2) and carried out CFS reanalysis (CFSR), which includes a coupled model with the NCEP global forecast system, a land model, an ocean model (GFDL MOM4), and a sea ice model. In this work, we present the NCEP coupled model, the CFSv2 sea ice component that includes a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model and a simple "assimilation" scheme, how sea ice has been assimilated in CFSR, the characteristics of the sea ice from CFSR and CFSv2, and the improvements of sea ice needed for future CFS (version 3) and the CFSR.

  5. Sea Ice Topography Profiling using Laser Altimetry from Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Roger Ian

    Arctic sea ice is undergoing a dramatic transition from a perennial ice pack with a high prevalence of old multiyear ice, to a predominantly seasonal ice pack comprised primarily of young first-year and second-year ice. This transition has brought about changes in the sea ice thickness and topography characteristics, which will further affect the evolution and survivability of the ice pack. The varying ice conditions have substantial implications for commercial operations, international affairs, regional and global climate, our ability to model climate dynamics, and the livelihood of Arctic inhabitants. A number of satellite and airborne missions are dedicated to monitoring sea ice, but they are limited by their spatial and temporal resolution and coverage. Given the fast rate of sea ice change and its pervasive implications, enhanced observational capabilities are needed to augment the current strategies. The CU Laser Profilometer and Imaging System (CULPIS) is designed specifically for collecting fine-resolution elevation data and imagery from small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), and has a great potential to compliment ongoing missions. This altimeter system has been integrated into four different UAS, and has been deployed during Arctic and Antarctic science campaigns. The CULPIS elevation measurement accuracy is shown to be 95±25 cm, and is limited primarily by GPS positioning error (<25 cm), aircraft attitude determination error (<20 cm), and sensor misalignment error (<20 cm). The relative error is considerably smaller over short flight distances, and the measurement precision is shown to be <10 cm over a distance of 200 m. Given its fine precision, the CULPIS is well suited for measuring sea ice topography, and observed ridge height and ridge separation distributions are found to agree with theoretical distributions to within 5%. Simulations demonstrate the inability of course-resolution measurements to accurately represent the theoretical distributions

  6. IceVal DatAssistant: An Interactive, Automated Icing Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Laurie H.; Wright, William B.

    2008-01-01

    As with any scientific endeavor, the foundation of icing research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is the data acquired during experimental testing. In the case of the GRC Icing Branch, an important part of this data consists of ice tracings taken following tests carried out in the GRC Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), as well as the associated operational and environmental conditions documented during these tests. Over the years, the large number of experimental runs completed has served to emphasize the need for a consistent strategy for managing this data. To address the situation, the Icing Branch has recently elected to implement the IceVal DatAssistant automated data management system. With the release of this system, all publicly available IRT-generated experimental ice shapes with complete and verifiable conditions have now been compiled into one electronically-searchable database. Simulation software results for the equivalent conditions, generated using the latest version of the LEWICE ice shape prediction code, are likewise included and are linked to the corresponding experimental runs. In addition to this comprehensive database, the IceVal system also includes a graphically-oriented database access utility, which provides reliable and easy access to all data contained in the database. In this paper, the issues surrounding historical icing data management practices are discussed, as well as the anticipated benefits to be achieved as a result of migrating to the new system. A detailed description of the software system features and database content is also provided; and, finally, known issues and plans for future work are presented.

  7. IceVal DatAssistant: An Interactive, Automated Icing Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Laurie H.; Wright, William B.

    2008-01-01

    As with any scientific endeavor, the foundation of icing research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is the data acquired during experimental testing. In the case of the GRC Icing Branch, an important part of this data consists of ice tracings taken following tests carried out in the GRC Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), as well as the associated operational and environmental conditions during those tests. Over the years, the large number of experimental runs completed has served to emphasize the need for a consistent strategy to manage the resulting data. To address this situation, the Icing Branch has recently elected to implement the IceVal DatAssistant automated data management system. With the release of this system, all publicly available IRT-generated experimental ice shapes with complete and verifiable conditions have now been compiled into one electronically-searchable database; and simulation software results for the equivalent conditions, generated using the latest version of the LEWICE ice shape prediction code, are likewise included and linked to the corresponding experimental runs. In addition to this comprehensive database, the IceVal system also includes a graphically-oriented database access utility, which provides reliable and easy access to all data contained in the database. In this paper, the issues surrounding historical icing data management practices are discussed, as well as the anticipated benefits to be achieved as a result of migrating to the new system. A detailed description of the software system features and database content is also provided; and, finally, known issues and plans for future work are presented.

  8. Structure of Water Ice in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Jenniskens, Peter; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the properties of solar system ices (chemical reaction rates, volatile retention and release, vaporization behavior, thermal conductivity, infrared spectral characteristics and the like) are a direct consequence of ice structure. However, the characterization of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs has typically utilized indirect measurements which yield phenomenological interpretations. When water ice is vapor-deposited at 14 K and warmed until it volatilizes in moderate vacuum, the ice undergoes a series of amorphous to amorphous and amorphous to crystalline structural transitions which we have characterized by diffraction methods. These structural transitions correlate with and underlie many phenomena observed in laboratory infrared and gas release experiments. The elucidation of the dynamic structural changes which occur in vapor-deposited water ice as a function of time, temperature and radiation history allows for the more complete interpretation of remote observations of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs.

  9. 14 CFR 25.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction system icing protection. 25.1093... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1093 Induction system icing protection. (a) Reciprocating engines. Each reciprocating engine air induction...

  10. Interferometric System for Measuring Thickness of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad; Jordan, Rolando; McDonald, Kyle; Holt, Benjamin; Huang, John; Kugo, Yasuo; Ishimaru, Akira; Jaruwatanadilok, Semsak; Akins, Torry; Gogineni, Prasad

    2006-01-01

    The cryospheric advanced sensor (CAS) is a developmental airborne (and, potentially, spaceborne) radar-based instrumentation system for measuring and mapping the thickness of sea ice. A planned future version of the system would also provide data on the thickness of snow covering sea ice. Frequent measurements of the thickness of polar ocean sea ice and its snow cover on a synoptic scale are critical to understanding global climate change and ocean circulation.

  11. Energy-Efficient Systems Eliminate Icing Danger for UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Ames Research Center engineer Leonard Haslim invented an anti-icing t echnology called an electroexpulsive separation system, which uses m echanical force to shatter potentially dangerous ice buildup on an ai rcraft surface. Temecula, California-based Ice Management Systems (no w known as IMS-ESS) licensed the technology from Ames and has discov ered a niche market for the lightweight, energy-efficient technology: unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). IMS-ESS systems now prevent damagi ng ice accumulation on military UAVs, allowing the vehicles to carry out crucial missions year round.

  12. Practical Use Study of the Direct Conveyance and Cooling System for Iced Water by the Propylene Glycol Solutio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Mitsuo; Ninomiya, Tohru; Matsubara, Kazuo; Aikawa, Keisuke; Ikoma, Kenji

    In a cold storage warehouse, by developing the thermal energy storage technique using cheap electric powerin the night, it is necessary to construct a high-efficient and energy-saving-type refrigeration system in which air conditioning is possible at 0 degrees c. We created a brine iced water (ice slurry) cooled under 0 degreesc by a closed supercooling ice making method. For a practical application, the brine iced water was directly sent to the load side, and it was utilized as the secondary refrigerant for the heat exchange. As a result, by replacing the pure water with a marketed propylene glycol solution, it was proven that the conventional closed supercooling ice making method could be similarly utilized for the ice making. However, it is necessary to control the evaporation temperature in the refrigerator, because the freezing temperature changes with the brine concentration. In the refrigerator entrance, it is necessary to heat at a constant temperature so that the inflow brine may not freeze. In case of the brine iced water, the fluidity of the brine iced water is high, and the ice particle is carried away by the flow. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent runoff of the ice particle from an intake of the thermal storage tank in case of thebrine water. This proposal system was confirmed that there was practically no problem by an operation of a 15kW refrigerator system.

  13. Investigation of Icing Characteristics of Typical Light Airplane Engine Induction Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.

    1949-01-01

    The icing characteristics of two typical light-airplane engine induction systems were investigated using the carburetors and manifolds of engines in the horsepower ranges from 65 to 85 and 165 to 185. The smaller system consisted of a float-type carburetor with an unheated manifold and the larger system consisted of a single-barrel pressure-type carburetor with an oil-jacketed manifold. Carburetor-air temperature and humidity limits of visible and serious Icing were determined for various engine power conditions. Several.methods of achieving ice-free induction systems are discussed along with estimates of surface heating requirements of the various induct ion-system components. A study was also made of the icing characteristics of a typical light-airplane air scoop with an exposed filter and a modified system that provided a normal ram inlet with the filter located in a position to Induce inertia separation of the free water from the charge air. The principle of operation of float-type carburetors is proved to make them inherently more susceptible to icing at the throttle plate than pressure-type carburetors.. The results indicated that proper jacketing and heating of all parts exposed to the fuel spray can satisfactorily reduce or eliminate icing in the float-type carburetor and the manifold. Pressure-type carburetors can be protected from serious Icing by proper location of the fuel-discharge nozzle combined with suitable application of heat to critical parts.

  14. Spectral properties of water ice and contaminants. [of importance to remote sensing of ice in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    For remote sensing studies of ices in the solar system, it is important to understand the optical properties of water ice, and mixtures of ice and particulate materials. The present paper has the objective to review the current understanding of the spectral properties of ice, and mixtures of ice and particulates. The review is to provide a basis for the understanding of the remote sensing of ice. It is found that reflectance spectra of ice-soil intimate mixtures are complex, nonlinear functions of the optical and physical properties of the components which comprise the surface.

  15. 14 CFR 33.68 - Induction system icing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.68 Induction system icing. Each engine, with all icing protection systems operating, must— (a) Operate throughout its flight...

  16. 14 CFR 121.283 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 121.283 Section 121.283 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to...

  17. 14 CFR 121.283 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 121.283 Section 121.283 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to...

  18. 14 CFR 121.283 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 121.283 Section 121.283 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to...

  19. 14 CFR 121.283 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 121.283 Section 121.283 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to...

  20. 14 CFR 125.181 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 125.181 Section 125.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Requirements § 125.181 Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of...

  1. 14 CFR 121.283 - Induction system ice prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction system ice prevention. 121.283 Section 121.283 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction system ice prevention. A means for preventing the malfunctioning of each engine due to...

  2. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  3. Icing tunnel tests of a glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system on a general aviation airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Schweikhard, W. G.; Albright, A. E.; Evanich, P.

    1981-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested. Results show that the system is very effective in preventing ice accretion (anti-ice mode) or removing ice from an airfoil. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing are a function of velocity, liquid water content in the air, ambient temperature, and droplet size. Large ice caps were removed in only a few minutes using anti-ice flow rates. It was found that the shed time is a function of the type of ice, size of the ice cap, angle of attack, and glycol flow rate. Wake survey measurements show that there is no significant drag penalty for the installation or operation of the system tested.

  4. Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

    1999-10-05

    The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

  5. Icing-Protection Requirements for Reciprocating-Engine Induction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D; Rollin, Vern G; Mulholland, Donald R

    1950-01-01

    Despite the development of relatively ice-free fuel-metering systems, the widespread use of alternate and heated-air intakes, and the use of alcohol for emergency de-icing, icing of aircraft-engine induction systems is a serious problem. Investigations have been made to study and to combat all phases of this icing problem. From these investigations, criterions for safe operation and for design of new induction systems have been established. The results were obtained from laboratory investigations of carburetor-supercharger combinations, wind-tunnel investigations of air scoops, multicylinder-engine studies, and flight investigations. Characteristics of three forms of ice, impact, throttling, and fuel evaporation were studied. The effects of several factors on the icing characteristics were also studied and included: (1) atmospheric conditions, (2) engine and air-scoop configurations, including light-airplane system, (3) type fuel used, and (4) operating variables, such as power condition, use of a manifold pressure regulator, mixture setting, carburetor heat, and water-alcohol injection. In addition, ice-detection methods were investigated and methods of preventing and removing induction-system ice were studied. Recommendations are given for design and operation with regard to induction-system design.

  6. Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity

    DOEpatents

    Weng, Kuo-Lianq; Weng, Kuo-Liang

    1998-01-01

    The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

  7. Data assimilation of surface altimetry on the North-Easter Ice Stream using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, Eric; Utke, Jean; Morlighem, Mathieu; Seroussi, Helene; Csatho, Beata; Schenk, Anton; Rignot, Eric; Khazendar, Ala

    2014-05-01

    Extensive surface altimetry data has been collected on polar ice sheets over the past decades, following missions such as Envisat and IceSat. This data record will further increase in size with the new CryoSat mission, the ongoing Operation IceBridge Mission and the soon to launch IceSat-2 mission. In order to make the best use of these dataset, ice flow models need to improve on the way they ingest surface altimetry to infer: 1) parameterizations of poorly known physical processes such as basal friction; 2) boundary conditions such as Surface Mass Balance (SMB). Ad-hoc sensitivity studies and adjoint-based inversions have so far been the way ice sheet models have attempted to resolve the impact of 1) on their results. As for boundary conditions or the lack thereof, most studies assume that they are a fixed quantity, which, though prone to large errors from the measurement itself, is not varied according to the simulated results. Here, we propose a method based on automatic differentiation to improve boundary conditions at the base and surface of the ice sheet during a short-term transient run for which surface altimetry observations are available. The method relies on minimizing a cost-function, the best fit between modeled surface evolution and surface altimetry observations, using gradients that are computed for each time step from automatic differentiation of the ISSM (Ice Sheet System Model) code. The approach relies on overloaded operators using the ADOLC (Automatic Differentiation by OverLoading in C++) package. It is applied to the 79 North Glacier, Greenland, for a short term transient spanning a couple of decades before the start of the retreat of the Zachariae Isstrom outlet glacier. Our results show adjustments required on the basal friction and the SMB of the whole basin to best fit surface altimetry observations, along with sensitivities each one of these parameters has on the overall cost function. Our approach presents a pathway towards assimilating

  8. [Design and application of hyperspectral radiation system for sea ice observation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue-Zhong; Xu, Zhan-Tang; Sun, Zhao-Hua; Cao, Wen-Xi; Lu, Gui-Xin

    2010-06-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the global climate systems. In the present article, a hyperspectral radiation system for the observation of optical properties of sea ice was designed. The system consists of three optical channels, which can operate simultaneously. Two kinds of optical detectors were designed, and the problem relevant to the water-tightness was resolved. The system can be used to measure the solar radiation beneath the sea ice by an "L" bracket. Another bracket for detecting bidirectional reflectance was designed, which can fix the optical detector at any angle ranging over 0-180 measured with an angle detector. In order to make a most suitable and automatic integrated time, the system can adjust the integrated time intelligently by itself. The system can work stably under extremely low temperature. Furthermore, the system was equipped with four thermistors and one GPS. The system was validated showing a good stability and veracity in situ in the Liaodong Bay.

  9. Methods and systems for detection of ice formation on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Wang, Wubao (Inventor); Sztul, Henry (Inventor); Budansky, Yury (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system for detecting ice formation on metal, painted metal and other material surfaces can include a transparent window having an exterior surface upon which ice can form; a light source and optics configured and arranged to illuminate the exterior surface of the window from behind the exterior surface; and a detector and optics configured and arranged to receive light backscattered by the exterior surface and any ice disposed on the exterior surface and determine the thickness of the ice layer. For example, the system can be used with aircraft by placing one or more windows in the wings of the aircraft. The system is used for a novel optical method for real-time on-board detection and warning of ice formation on surfaces of airplanes, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and other vehicles and stationary structures to improve their safety and operation.

  10. Systems Engineering Techniques for ALS Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Luis F.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Jones, Harry; Levri, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) Metric is the predominant tool for predicting the cost of ALS systems. Metric goals for the ALS Program are daunting, requiring a threefold increase in the ALS Metric by 2010. Confounding the problem, the rate new ALS technologies reach the maturity required for consideration in the ALS Metric and the rate at which new configurations are developed is slow, limiting the search space and potentially giving the perspective of a ALS technology, the ALS Metric may remain elusive. This paper is a sequel to a paper published in the proceedings of the 2003 ICES conference entitled, "Managing to the metric: an approach to optimizing life support costs." The conclusions of that paper state that the largest contributors to the ALS Metric should be targeted by ALS researchers and management for maximum metric reductions. Certainly, these areas potentially offer large potential benefits to future ALS missions; however, the ALS Metric is not the only decision-making tool available to the community. To facilitate decision-making within the ALS community a combination of metrics should be utilized, such as the Equivalent System Mass (ESM)-based ALS metric, but also those available through techniques such as life cycle costing and faithful consideration of the sensitivity of the assumed models and data. Often a lack of data is cited as the reason why these techniques are not considered for utilization. An existing database development effort within the ALS community, known as OPIS, may provide the opportunity to collect the necessary information to enable the proposed systems analyses. A review of these additional analysis techniques is provided, focusing on the data necessary to enable these. The discussion is concluded by proposing how the data may be utilized by analysts in the future.

  11. Global ice-sheet system interlocked by sea level

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, G.H.; Hughes, T.J.; Karlen, W.

    1986-01-01

    Denton and Hughes postulated that sea level linked a global ice-sheet system with both terrestrial and grounded marine components during later Quaternary ice ages. Summer temperature changes near Northern Hemisphere melting margins initiated sea-level fluctuations that controlled marine components in both polar hemispheres. It was further proposed that variations of this ice-sheet system amplified and transmitted Milankovitch summer half-year insolation changes between 45 and 75/sup 0/N into global climatic changes. New tests of this hypothesis implicate sea level as a major control of the areal extent of grounded portions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. But factors other than areal changes of the grounded Antarctic Ice Sheet may have strongly influenced Southern Hemisphere climate and terminated the last ice age simultaneously in both polar hemispheres. Atmospheric carbon dioxide linked to high-latitude oceans is the most likely candidate, but another potential influence was high-frequency climatic oscillations. It is postulated that variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide acted through an Antarctic ice shelf linked to the grounded ice sheet to produce and terminate Southern Hemisphere ice-age climate. It is further postulated that Milankovitch summer insolation combined with a warm-high frequency oscillation caused marked recession of Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet melting margins and the North Atlantic polar front about 14,000 /sup 14/C yr B.P. This permitted renewed formation of North Atlantic Deep Water, which could well have controlled atmospheric carbon dioxide. Combined melting and consequent sea-level rise from the three warming factors initiated irreversible collapse of the interlocked global ice-sheet system, which was at its largest but most vulnerable configuration.

  12. Aircraft Icing Weather Data Reporting and Dissemination System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, Ellen J.; Minsk, Brian; Lindholm, Tenny; Politovich, Marcia; Reehorst, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The long-term operational concept of this research is to develop an onboard aircraft system that assesses and reports atmospheric icing conditions automatically and in a timely manner in order to improve aviation safety and the efficiency of aircraft operations via improved real-time and forecast weather products. The idea is to use current measurement capabilities on aircraft equipped with icing sensors and in-flight data communication technologies as a reporting source. Without requiring expensive avionics upgrades, aircraft data must be processed and available for downlink. Ideally, the data from multiple aircraft can then be integrated (along with other real-time and modeled data) on the ground such that aviation-centered icing hazard metrics for volumes of airspace can be assessed. As the effect of icing on different aircraft types can vary, the information should be displayed in meaningful ways such that multiple types of users can understand the information. That is, information must be presented in a manner to allow users to understand the icing conditions with respect to individual concerns and aircraft capabilities. This research provides progress toward this operational concept by: identifying an aircraft platform capable of digitally capturing, processing, and downlinking icing data; identifying the required in situ icing data processing; investigating the requirements for routing the icing data for use by weather products; developing an icing case study in order to gain insight into major air carrier needs; developing and prototyping icing display concepts based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research's existing diagnostic and forecast experimental icing products; and conducting a usability study for the prototyped icing display concepts.

  13. Short-term sea ice forecasting: An assessment of ice concentration and ice drift forecasts using the U.S. Navy's Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, David A.; Allard, Richard A.; Metzger, E. Joseph; Posey, Pamela G.; Preller, Ruth H.; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Phelps, Michael W.; Smedstad, Ole Martin

    2015-12-01

    In this study the forecast skill of the U.S. Navy operational Arctic sea ice forecast system, the Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS), is presented for the period February 2014 to June 2015. ACNFS is designed to provide short term, 1-7 day forecasts of Arctic sea ice and ocean conditions. Many quantities are forecast by ACNFS; the most commonly used include ice concentration, ice thickness, ice velocity, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and sea surface velocities. Ice concentration forecast skill is compared to a persistent ice state and historical sea ice climatology. Skill scores are focused on areas where ice concentration changes by ±5% or more, and are therefore limited to primarily the marginal ice zone. We demonstrate that ACNFS forecasts are skilful compared to assuming a persistent ice state, especially beyond 24 h. ACNFS is also shown to be particularly skilful compared to a climatologic state for forecasts up to 102 h. Modeled ice drift velocity is compared to observed buoy data from the International Arctic Buoy Programme. A seasonal bias is shown where ACNFS is slower than IABP velocity in the summer months and faster in the winter months. In February 2015, ACNFS began to assimilate a blended ice concentration derived from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) and the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS). Preliminary results show that assimilating AMSR2 blended with IMS improves the short-term forecast skill and ice edge location compared to the independently derived National Ice Center Ice Edge product.

  14. ICE System: Interruptible control expert system. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezina, James M.

    1990-01-01

    The Interruptible Control Expert (ICE) System is based on an architecture designed to provide a strong foundation for real-time production rule expert systems. Three principles are adopted to guide the development of ICE. A practical delivery platform must be provided, no specialized hardware can be used to solve deficiencies in the software design. Knowledge of the environment and the rule-base is exploited to improve the performance of a delivered system. The third principle of ICE is to respond to the most critical event, at the expense of the more trivial tasks. Minimal time is spent on classifying the potential importance of environmental events with the majority of the time used for finding the responses. A feature of the system, derived from all three principles, is the lack of working memory. By using a priori information, a fixed amount of memory can be specified for the hardware platform. The absence of working memory removes the dangers of garbage collection during the continuous operation of the controller.

  15. An operational all-weather Great Lakes ice information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the NASA developed all-weather ice information system for the Great Lakes winter navigation program. The system utilizes an X-band side looking airborne radar (SLAR) for determining type, location, and areal distribution of the ice cover in the Great Lakes and an airborne, S band, down looking short pulse radar for obtaining ice thickness. Digitized SLAR data are relayed in real time via the NOAA-GOES satellite in geosynchronous orbit. The SLAR images along with hand drawn interpretative ice charts for various Great Lakes winter shipping areas are broadcast to facsimile recorders aboard vessles is the area via the MARAD marine VHF-FM radio network. These data assist such vessels in navigating both through and around the ice.

  16. All Systems Go for Engine Icing Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    All the pieces came together to recently produce a successful first run of a ground test investigating how ice can accumulate inside a hot jet engine. A full-size engine, spray bars to create the i...

  17. Antarctic sea ice carbon dioxide system and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransson, Agneta; Chierici, Melissa; Yager, Patricia L.; Smith, Walker O., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    In austral summer, from December 2008 to January 2009, we investigated the sea-ice carbon dioxide (CO2) system and CO2 controls in the Amundsen and Ross Seas, Antarctica. We sampled seawater, brine and sea ice for the measurements of total alkalinity (AT), total inorganic carbon (DIC), pH, inorganic nutrients, particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON), chlorophyll a, pigments, salinity and temperature. Large variability in all measured parameters was observed in time and space due to the complex sea-ice dynamics. We discuss the controls of the sea-ice CO2 system, such as brine rejection, biological processes, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation/dissolution and CO2 exchange. Most (80 to 90%) of the DIC loss was due to brine rejection, which suggests that the sea ice acted as an efficient DIC sink from 0.8 and 2.6 mol m-2 yr-1 (9.6-31 g C m-2 yr-1). The remaining change in DIC was to a large extent explained by net biological production. The AT:DIC ratio in the sea ice was higher than in the under-ice water (UIW), with ratios reaching 1.7, which indicated CaCO3 precipitation and concomitant DIC loss in the sea ice. Elevated AT:DIC ratios and carbonate concentrations were also observed in the UIW, which reflect the solid CaCO3 rejected from the ice during melt. The potential for uptake of atmospheric CO2 in the mixed layer increased by approximately 56 μatm due to the combined effect of CaCO3 precipitation during ice formation, and ice melt in summer.

  18. NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) Icing Facility Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Queito P.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) was recently upgraded to perform engine inlet ice crystal testing in an altitude environment. The system installed 10 spray bars in the inlet plenum for ice crystal generation using 222 spray nozzles. As an altitude test chamber, PSL is capable of simulation of in-flight icing events in a ground test facility. The system was designed to operate at altitudes from 4,000 ft. to 40,000 ft. at Mach numbers up to 0.8M and inlet total temperatures from -60F to +15F.

  19. Phase Relations and Properties of Salty ices VI and VII: Implications for Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, I.; Manning, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ice VI and ice VII may be important in the interiors of Europa, Ganymede, Callisto and Titan. Oceans and interior pore waters in these bodies likely contain dissolved salts. To address the role of salt on ice VI and ice VII, we investigated phase equilibria in the system H2O -NaCl at 1 molal (5.5 wt%) NaCl in an externally heated diamond-anvil cell. Phase identifications were made by optical microscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy. Experiments were conducted at 22-150°C and up to 5 GPa by allowing the cell to thermally equilibrate at a given temperature and then varying pressure isothermally while observing phase changes. The liquidus curves of ice VI and ice VII in a 5.5 wt% NaCl solution were determined. Melting was observed from 22 to 80°C (ice VI) and from 35 to 150°C (ice VII). Both melting curves are steeper than the respective NaCl-free curves, indicating that the freezing-point depression at this bulk composition increases with pressure. The intersection of the two liquidus curves indicates that VI-VII-liquid triple point is shifted toward lower T and higher P relative to pure H2O. The 5.5 wt% NaCl bulk composition crystallizes into a single solid phase of NaCl-bearing ice VI or ice VII solid solution over the investigated T range (the subscript 'ss' indicates solid solution). Large single crystals of ice VIss or ice VIIss can also be grown by slow compression of the cell from near-liquidus conditions to the solidus. Raman spectra of these crystals clearly show zoning in these crystals. The zoning persists for days at 22°C, indicating relatively slow Na+ and Cl- diffusivity. The large depression of the freezing point in a 1 molal NaCl solution has important implications for the oceans and interiors of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Salty fluids may remain stable to much greater depth than expected. This would promote extensive hydrothermal metamorphism of the silicate interiors. If not limited to ice VI and VII, this behavior may suppress

  20. Monstrous Ice Cloud System in Titan's Present South Polar Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; McLain, Jason; Achterberg, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Milam, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    During southern autumn when sunlight was still available, Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem discovered a cloud around 300 km near Titan's south pole (West, R. A. et al., AAS/DPS Abstracts, 45, #305.03, 2013); the cloud was later determined by Cassini's Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer to contain HCN ice (de Kok et al., Nature, 514, pp 65-67, 2014). This cloud has proven to be only the tip of an extensive ice cloud system contained in Titan's south polar stratosphere, as seen through the night-vision goggles of Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). As the sun sets and the gloom of southern winter approaches, evidence is beginning to accumulate from CIRS far-IR spectra that a massive system of nitrile ice clouds is developing in Titan's south polar stratosphere. Even during the depths of northern winter, nothing like the strength of this southern system was evident in corresponding north polar regions.From the long slant paths that are available from limb-viewing CIRS far-IR spectra, we have the first definitive detection of the ν6 band of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) ice in Titan’s south polar stratosphere. In addition, we also see a strong blend of nitrile ice lattice vibration features around 160 cm-1. From these data we are able to derive ice abundances. The most prominent (and still chemically unidentified) ice emission feature, the Haystack, (at 220 cm-1) is also observed. We establish the vertical distributions of the ice cloud systems associated with both the 160 cm-1 feature and the Haystack. The ultimate aim is to refine the physical and possibly the chemical relationships between the two. Transmittance thin film spectra of nitrile ice mixtures obtained in our Spectroscopy for Planetary ICes Environments (SPICE) laboratory are used to support these analyses.

  1. The International Polar Year (IPY) Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) system study: a focus on fast ice edge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. G.; Mundy, C. J.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; MacDonald, R. W.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Gosselin, M.; Hanesiak, J.; Tremblay, J.; Ferguson, S.; Stern, G.; Meakin, S.; Deming, J. W.; Leitch, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) system study supported a large multidisciplinary overwintering in the Banks Island (NT) flaw lead over the period September 2007 to August 2008 as part of the International Polar Year (IPY). The CFL system is formed when the central pack ice (which is mobile) moves away from coastal fast ice, opening a flaw lead. The CFL forms in the fall and continues as thin ice or open water throughout the winter. The flaw lead is circumpolar, with recurrent and interconnected polynyas occurring throughout the Arctic. The overarching objectives of the CFL project were to contrast the physical and biological systems of the flaw lead open water and thin ice to the adjacent landfast ice cover. The Canadian Research Icebreaker (NGCC Amundsen) completed the first-ever overwintering of a research icebreaker in the flaw lead. She supported a total of 11,000 person days distributed across 295 investigators from 28 different countries. The project obtained many first-ever measurements of a complete suite of physical, biogeochemical, contaminant and marine ecosystem variables across the open water - fast ice contrast. In this paper we present an overview of the early results from this study with a particular focus on the role of fast ice edges in modifying the physical, biological and geochemical processes that occur at the fast ice edge interface. Traditional knowledge of these ice edges illustrates a rich physical and ecological environment. Western science results show the temporal nature of fast ice edges and the associated stimulation of biological productivity make these a particularly important part of the flaw lead system.

  2. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL): Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) Facility in February 2013. Honeywell Engines supplied the test article, an obsolete, unmodified Lycoming ALF502-R5 turbofan engine serial number LF01 that experienced an un-commanded loss of thrust event while operating at certain high altitude ice crystal icing conditions. These known conditions were duplicated in the PSL for this testing.

  3. A Systems-Level Perspective on Engine Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8% of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  4. Global ice-sheet system interlocked by sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, George H.; Hughes, Terence J.; Karlén, Wibjörn

    1986-07-01

    Denton and Hughes (1983, Quaternary Research20, 125-144) postulated that sea level linked a global ice-sheet system with both terrestrial and grounded marine components during late Quaternary ice ages. Summer temperature changes near Northern Hemisphere melting margins initiated sea-level fluctuations that controlled marine components in both polar hemispheres. It was further proposed that variations of this ice-sheet system amplified and transmitted Milankovitch summer half-year insolation changes between 45 and 75°N into global climatic changes. New tests of this hypothesis implicate sea level as a major control of the areal extent of grounded portions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, thus fitting the concept of a globally interlocked ice-sheet system. But recent atmospheric modeling results ( Manabe and Broccoli, 1985, Journal of Geophysical Research90, 2167-2190) suggest that factors other than areal changes of the grounded Antarctic Ice Sheet strongly influenced Southern Hemisphere climate and terminated the last ice age simultaneously in both polar hemispheres. Atmospheric carbon dioxide linked to high-latitude oceans is the most likely candidate ( Shackleton and Pisias, 1985, Atmospheric carbon dioxide, orbital forcing, and climate. In "The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric CO 2: Natural Variations Archean to Present" (E. T. Sundquest and W. S. Broecker, Eds.), pp. 303-318. Geophysical Monograph 32, American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C.), but another potential influence was high-frequency climatic oscillations (2500 yr). It is postulated that variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide acted through an Antarctic ice shelf linked to the grounded ice sheet to produce and terminate Southern Hemisphere ice-age climate. It is further postulated that Milankovitch summer insolation combined with a warm high-frequency oscillation caused marked recession of Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet melting margins and the North Atlantic polar front about 14,000 14C yr B.P. This

  5. Great Lakes all-weather ice information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertler, R. J.; Mueller, R. A.; Jirberg, R. J.; Cooper, D. W.; Heighway, J. E.; Holmes, A. D.; Gedney, R. T.; Mark, H.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described which utilizes an X-band Side-Looking-Airborne-Radar (SLAR) for determining type, location, and aerial distribution of the ice cover in the Great Lakes and an airborne, S-band, short pulse radar for obtaining ice thickness. The SLAR system is currently mounted aboard a U.S. Coast Guard C-130B aircraft. Digitized SLAR data are relayed in real-time via the NOAA-GOES-1 satellite in geosynchronous orbit to the U.S. Coast Guard Ice Center in Cleveland, Ohio. SLAR images along with hand-drawn interpretative ice charts for various winter shipping areas in the Great Lakes are broadcast to facsimile recorders aboard Great Lakes vessels. The operational aspects of this ice information system are being demonstrated by NASA, U.S. Coast Guard, and NOAA/National Weather Service. Results from the 1974-75 winter season demonstrated the ability of this system to provide all-weather ice information to shippers in a timely manner.

  6. Ice Cloud Properties in Ice-Over-Water Cloud Systems Using TRMM VIRS and TMI Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Huang, Jianping; Lin, Bing; Yi, Yuhong; Arduini, Robert F.; Fan, Tai-Fang; Ayers, J. Kirk; Mace, Gerald G.

    2007-01-01

    A multi-layered cloud retrieval system (MCRS) is updated and used to estimate ice water path in maritime ice-over-water clouds using Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission spacecraft between January and August 1998. Lookup tables of top-of-atmosphere 0.65- m reflectance are developed for ice-over-water cloud systems using radiative transfer calculations with various combinations of ice-over-water cloud layers. The liquid and ice water paths, LWP and IWP, respectively, are determined with the MCRS using these lookup tables with a combination of microwave (MW), visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) data. LWP, determined directly from the TMI MW data, is used to define the lower-level cloud properties to select the proper lookup table. The properties of the upper-level ice clouds, such as optical depth and effective size, are then derived using the Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split-window Technique (VISST), which matches the VIRS IR, 3.9- m, and VIS data to the multilayer-cloud lookup table reflectances and a set of emittance parameterizations. Initial comparisons with surface-based radar retrievals suggest that this enhanced MCRS can significantly improve the accuracy and decrease the IWP in overlapped clouds by 42% and 13% compared to using the single-layer VISST and an earlier simplified MW-VIS-IR (MVI) differencing method, respectively, for ice-over-water cloud systems. The tropical distribution of ice-over-water clouds is the same as derived earlier from combined TMI and VIRS data, but the new values of IWP and optical depth are slightly larger than the older MVI values, and exceed those of single-layered layered clouds by 7% and 11%, respectively. The mean IWP from the MCRS is 8-14% greater than that retrieved from radar retrievals of overlapped clouds over two surface sites and the standard deviations of the differences are similar to those for single-layered clouds. Examples

  7. A Real-Time Satellite-Based Icing Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Nguyen, Louis; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Heck, Patrick W.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Bernstein, Ben C.; McDonough, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft icing is one of the most dangerous weather conditions for general aviation. Currently, model forecasts and pilot reports (PIREPS) constitute much of the database available to pilots for assessing the icing conditions in a particular area. Such data are often uncertain or sparsely available. Improvements in the temporal and areal coverage of icing diagnoses and prognoses would mark a substantial enhancement of aircraft safety in regions susceptible to heavy supercooled liquid water clouds. The use of 3.9 microns data from meteorological satellite imagers for diagnosing icing conditions has long been recognized (e.g., Ellrod and Nelson, 1996) but to date, no explicit physically based methods have been implemented. Recent advances in cloud detection and cloud property retrievals using operational satellite imagery open the door for real-time objective applications of those satellite datasets for a variety of weather phenomena. Because aircraft icing is related to cloud macro- and microphysical properties (e.g., Cober et al. 1995), it is logical that the cloud properties from satellite data would be useful for diagnosing icing conditions. This paper describes the a prototype realtime system for detecting aircraft icing from space.

  8. Ice Middleware in the New Solar Telescope's Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumko, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) is now in the process of assembling and aligning its 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST). There are many challenges controlling NST and one of them is establishing reliable and robust communications between different parts of the Telescope Control System (TCS). For our TCS we selected Ice (Internet communication engine) from ZeroC, Inc. In this paper we discuss advantages of the Ice middleware, details of implementation and problems we face implementing it.

  9. Physical State of Ices in the Outer Solar System. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of the identity and abundances of ices observed around protostars and those associated with comets clearly suggests that comets preserve the heritage of the interstellar materials that aggregated to form them. However, the ability to identify these same species on icy satellites in the outer solar system is a complex function of the composition of the original ices, their subsequent thermal histories, and their exposure to various radiation environments. Our ability to identify the ices currently present on objects in the outer solar system relies upon observational and laboratory, and theoretical efforts. To date there is ample observational evidence for crystalline water ice throughout the outer solar system. In addition, there is growing evidence that amorphous ice may be present on some bodies. More volatile ices, e.g. N2, CH4. CO, and other species, e.g. ammonia hydrate, are identified on objects lying at and beyond Uranus. Both photolysis and radiolysis play important roles in altering the original surfaces due to chemical reactions and erosion of the surface. Ultraviolet photolysis appears to dominate alteration of the upper few hundred Angstroms, although sputtering the surface can sometimes be a significantly competitative process; dominating on icy surfaces embedded in a strong planetary magnetospheric field. There is growing observational evidence that the by-products of photolysis and radiolysis, suggested on a theoretical basis, are present on icy surfaces.

  10. Sediment fluxes of an Antarctic palaeo-ice stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Kelly; Larter, Robert; Smith, James; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter

    2016-04-01

    New marine-geophysical data (multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution acoustic profiles) acquired in 2014 have been integrated with heritage multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow boomer profiles from Anvers-Hugo Trough, western Antarctic Peninsula. From these datasets we have identified seismic facies relating to ice-stream advance and flow, ice-stream retreat, and post-glacial sedimentation processes. We identify multiple subglacial seismic units forming MSGL and other streamlined landforms at a variety of size scales. This may be indicative of multiple generations of ice-flow through the confluent ice-stream system. We also calculate the sediment volumes of a series of grounding-zone wedges (GZWs) located on the outer and mid-shelf that were produced during several stillstands in the trough as the grounded ice margin retreated through the system during deglaciation around c. 15-13 ka (from published core chronologies). Based on these volumes we consider the likely rates of subglacial sediment delivery by the Anvers Trough palaeo-ice stream and compare these to inferred flux rates from other palaeo- and modern Antarctic ice streams. In addition, we map the post-glacial glacimarine sediment package in the trough. Large mapped sediment thicknesses of this unit across the trough are consistent with high post-glacial sediment accumulation rates reported from cores acquired in the Anvers-Hugo Trough system. Previous authors have attributed this to exceptionally high primary productivity in a calving-bay re-entrant settings produced as ice retreated across the shelf on this part of the Antarctic margin.

  11. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  12. 14 CFR 27.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Induction system icing protection. (a) Reciprocating engines. Each reciprocating engine air induction system... preheat supplied to the alternate air intake is not less than that provided by the engine cooling air...— (i) 100 degrees F.; or (ii) If a fluid deicing system is used, at least 40 degrees F. (b)...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Induction system icing protection. (a) Reciprocating engines. Each reciprocating engine air induction system... preheat supplied to the alternate air intake is not less than that provided by the engine cooling air...— (i) 100 degrees F.; or (ii) If a fluid deicing system is used, at least 40 degrees F. (b)...

  14. Experimental study of fluid deicing system in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the icing of horizontal control surfaces at the VFW in 1970 led them to select the NASA Icing Research Tunnel at LRC for their tests. Tests were performed for the VFW 614 aircraft. The TKS ice warning system, the Rosemont ice warning system and the liquid water content indicator were investigated and found to be appropriate for the aircraft.

  15. Ice Detector and Deicing Fluid Effectiveness Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ice detector and deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring system for an aircraft is disclosed. The ice detection portion is particularly suited for use in flight to notify the flight crew of an accumulation of ice on an aircraft lifting and control surfaces, or helicopter rotors, whereas the deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring portion is particularly suited for use on the ground to notify the flight crew of the possible loss of the effectiveness of the deicing fluid. The ice detection portion comprises a temperature sensor and a parallel arrangement of electrodes whose coefficient of coupling is indicative of the formation of the ice, as well as the thickness of the formed ice. The fluid effectiveness monitoring portion comprises a temperature sensor and an ionic-conduction cell array that measures the conductivity of the deicing fluid which is indicative of its concentration and, thus, its freezing point. By measuring the temperature and having knowledge of the freezing point of the deicing fluid, the fluid effectiveness monitoring portion predicts when the deicing fluid may lose its effectiveness because its freezing point may correspond to the temperature of the ambient.

  16. Evolution of Planetary Ice-Ocean Systems: Effects of Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary oceanography is enjoying renewed attention thanks to not only the detection of several exoplanetary ocean worlds but also due to the expanding family of ocean worlds within our own star system. Our solar system is now believed to host about nine ocean worlds including Earth, some dwarf planets and few moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Amongst them, Europa, like Earth is thought to have an ice Ih-liquid water system. However, the thickness of the Europan ice-ocean system is much larger than that of the Earth. The evolution of this system would determine the individual thicknesses of the ice shell and the ocean. In turn, these thicknesses can alter the course of evolution of the system. In a pure H2O system, the thickness of the ice shell would govern if heat loss occurs entirely by conduction or if the shell begins to convect as it attains a threshold thickness. This switch between conduction-convection regimes could determine the longevity of the subsurface ocean and hence define the astrobiological potential of the planetary body at any given time. In reality, however, the system is not pure water ice. The detected induced magnetic field infers a saline ocean layer. Salts are expected to act as an anti-freeze allowing a subsurface ocean to persist over long periods but the amount of salts would determine the extent of that effect. In our current study, we use geodynamic models to examine the effect of salinity on the evolution of ice-ocean system. An initial ocean with different salinities is allowed to evolve. The effect of salinity on thickness of the two layers at any time is examined. We also track how salinity controls the switch between conductive-convective modes. The study shows that for a given time period, larger salinities can maintain a thick vigorously convecting ocean while the smaller salinities behave similar to a pure H2O system leading to a thick convecting ice-shell. A range of salinities identified can potentially predict the current state

  17. The NASA Icing Remote Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Brinker, David J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Ryerson, Charles C.; Koenig, George G.

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) have an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. A multiple instrument approach is the current emphasis of this activity. Utilizing radar, radiometry, and lidar, a region of supercooled liquid is identified. If the liquid water content (LWC) is sufficiently high, then the region of supercooled liquid cloud is flagged as being an aviation hazard. The instruments utilized for the current effort are an X-band vertical staring radar, a radiometer that measures twelve frequencies between 22 and 59 GHz, and a lidar ceilometer. The radar data determine cloud boundaries, the radiometer determines the sub-freezing temperature heights and total liquid water content, and the ceilometer refines the lower cloud boundary. Data are post-processed with a LabVIEW program with a resultant supercooled LWC profile and aircraft hazard identification. Remotely sensed measurements gathered during the 2003-2004 Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS II) were compared to aircraft in-situ measurements. Although the comparison data set is quite small, the cases examined indicate that the remote sensing technique appears to be an acceptable approach.

  18. 14 CFR 33.68 - Induction system icing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Induction system icing. 33.68 Section 33.68 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.68 Induction system...

  19. 14 CFR 33.68 - Induction system icing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Induction system icing. 33.68 Section 33.68 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.68 Induction system...

  20. 14 CFR 33.68 - Induction system icing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Induction system icing. 33.68 Section 33.68 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.68 Induction system...

  1. 14 CFR 33.68 - Induction system icing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Induction system icing. 33.68 Section 33.68 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.68 Induction system...

  2. Quantifying signal dispersion in a hybrid ice core melting system.

    PubMed

    Breton, Daniel J; Koffman, Bess G; Kurbatov, Andrei V; Kreutz, Karl J; Hamilton, Gordon S

    2012-11-01

    We describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting and data logging system allowing simultaneous depth coregistration of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system (for microparticle and conductivity measurement) and a discrete sample analysis system (for geochemistry and microparticles), both supplied from the same melted ice core section. This hybrid melting system employs an ice parcel tracking algorithm which calculates real-time sample transport through all portions of the meltwater handling system, enabling accurate (1 mm) depth coregistration of all measurements. Signal dispersion is analyzed using residence time theory, experimental results of tracer injection tests and antiparallel melting of replicate cores to rigorously quantify the signal dispersion in our system. Our dispersion-limited resolution is 1.0 cm in ice and ~2 cm in firn. We experimentally observe the peak lead phenomenon, where signal dispersion causes the measured CFA peak associated with a given event to be depth assigned ~1 cm shallower than the true event depth. Dispersion effects on resolution and signal depth assignment are discussed in detail. Our results have implications for comparisons of chemistry and physical properties data recorded using multiple instruments and for deconvolution methods of enhancing CFA depth resolution.

  3. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  4. A Study of the Effects of Altitude on Thermal Ice Protection System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Oleskiw, Myron; Broeren, Andy P.; Orchard, Andy P.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal ice protection systems use heat energy to prevent a dangerous buildup of ice on an aircraft. As aircraft become more efficient, less heat energy is available to operate a thermal ice protections system. This requires that thermal ice protection systems be designed to more exacting standards so as to more efficiently prevent a dangerous ice buildup without adversely affecting aircraft safety. While the effects of altitude have always beeing taked into account in the design of thermal ice protection systems, a better understanding of these effects is needed so as to enable more exact design, testing, and evaluation of these systems.

  5. Radar imaging of solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcke, Leif J.

    We map the planet Mercury and Jupiter's moons Ganymede and Callisto using Earth-based radar telescopes and find that all of these have regions exhibiting high, depolarized radar backscatter and polarization inversion (m c > 1). Both characteristics suggest significant volume scattering from water ice or similar cold-trapped volatiles. Synthetic aperture radar mapping of Mercury's north and south polar regions at fine (6 km) resolution at 3.5 cm wavelength corroborates the results of previous 13 cm investigations of enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion (0.9 <= m c <= 1.3) from areas on the floors of craters at high latitudes, where Mercury's near-zero obliquity results in permanent Sun shadows. Co-registration with Mariner 10 optical images shows that this enhanced scattering cannot be caused by simple double-bounce geometries, since the bright, reflective regions do not appear on the radar-facing wall but, instead, in shadowed regions not directly aligned with the radar look direction. Thermal models require the existence of such a layer to preserve ice deposits in craters at other than high polar latitudes. The additional attenuation (factor 1.64 +/- 15%) of the 3.5 cm wavelength data from these experiments over previous 13 cm radar observations is consistent with a range of layer thickness from 0 +/- 11 to 35 +/- 15 cm, depending on the assumed scattering law exponent n. Our 3.5 cm wavelength bistatic aperture synthesis observations of the two outermost Galilean satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede and Callisto, resolve the north-south ambiguity of previous images, and confirm the disk-integrated enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion noted in prior investigations. The direct imaging technique more clearly shows that higher backscatter are as are associated with the terrain that has undergone recent resurfacing, such as the sulci and the impact crater basins. The leading hemispheres of both moons have somewhat higher (20% +/- 5%) depolarized echoes

  6. Automatic control study of the icing research tunnel refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, Arthur W.; Soeder, Ronald H.

    1991-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a subsonic, closed-return atmospheric tunnel. The tunnel includes a heat exchanger and a refrigeration plant to achieve the desired air temperature and a spray system to generate the type of icing conditions that would be encountered by aircraft. At the present time, the tunnel air temperature is controlled by manual adjustment of freon refrigerant flow control valves. An upgrade of this facility calls for these control valves to be adjusted by an automatic controller. The digital computer simulation of the IRT refrigeration plant and the automatic controller that was used in the simulation are discussed.

  7. Determination of Ice Water Path in Ice-over-Water Cloud Systems Using Combined MODIS and AMSR-E Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Yi, Yuhong; Fan, T.-F.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    To provide more accurate ice cloud properties for evaluating climate models, the updated version of multi-layered cloud retrieval system (MCRS) is used to retrieve ice water path (IWP) in ice-over-water cloud systems over global ocean using combined instrument data from the Aqua satellite. The liquid water path (LWP) of lower layer water clouds is estimated from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) measurements. With the lower layer LWP known, the properties of the upper-level ice clouds are then derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer measurements by matching simulated radiances from a two-cloud layer radiative transfer model. Comparisons with single-layer cirrus systems and surface-based radar retrievals show that the MCRS can significantly improve the accuracy and reduce the over-estimation of optical depth and ice water path retrievals for ice over-water cloud systems. During the period from December 2004 through February 2005, the mean daytime ice cloud optical depth and IWP for overlapped ice-over-water clouds over ocean from Aqua are 7.6 and 146.4 gm(sup -2), respectively, significantly less than the initial single layer retrievals of 17.3 and 322.3 gm(sup -2). The mean IWP for actual single-layer clouds was 128.2 gm(sup -2).

  8. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a... sea level engine(s) using fuel metering device tending to prevent icing has a sheltered alternate... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a... sea level engine(s) using fuel metering device tending to prevent icing has a sheltered alternate... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a... sea level engine(s) using fuel metering device tending to prevent icing has a sheltered alternate... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems...

  11. Evaluating an Ice-Storage System in a Deregulated Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staniewicz, Theodore J.; Watson, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties the electric industry's deregulation created for St. Joseph's University's (Philadelphia) development of a thermal ice-storage system as part of its HVAC design and the school's solution. A monthly equipment summary sheet with year-to-date figures is provided. (GR)

  12. Ethane Ices in the Outer Solar System: Spectroscopy and Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Raines, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    We report recent experiments on ethane ices made at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System. New near- and mid-infrared data for crystalline and amorphous ethane, including new spectra for a seldom-studied solid phase that exists at 35-55 K, are presented along with radiation-chemical experiments showing the formation of more-complex hydrocarbons,

  13. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a... sea level engine(s) using fuel metering device tending to prevent icing has a sheltered alternate... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane with sea level engines using conventional venturi carburetors has a preheater that can provide a... sea level engine(s) using fuel metering device tending to prevent icing has a sheltered alternate... power; (5) Each airplane with sea level or altitude engine(s) using fuel injection systems...

  15. The Ice Core Data Gateway: The one stop gateway to ice core data held at the Antarctic Glaciological Data Center (AGDC), the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, and the Arctic System Science's Data Coordination Center (ADCC).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R.; Scambos, T.; Eakin, M.; Anderson, D.; McNeave, C.

    2002-12-01

    The Ice Core Data Gateway archives and distributes physical and geochemical data from ice cores collected in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Typical data sets include age-depth relationships, oxygen and hydrogen isotope concentrations, major element chemistry, accumulation rates and pollen. The data are in general presented as ASCII files with a short text metadata description. The archive is designed to provide access to ice core data sets over the long term, thereby making them available for comparison with future data: a critical component of change detection studies. By facilitating broad data access, the center promotes interdisciplinary scientific research. Investigators are encouraged to contribute data sets derived from ice cores to the Ice Core Data Gateway. Data center staff will work with you to compile data set documentation prior to making the data available to users. Contributing scientists are given prominent recognition in the documentation, and while the data center answers technical questions about format, citations for usage, etc., it can refer scientific questions to contributors if requested. Contributing your data to the Ice Core Data Gateway and associated data centers directly supports to NSF Office of Polar Programs Guidelines and Award Conditions for Scientific Data (http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?opp991). This effort is being coordinated with the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Initiative and U.S. component of the International Trans Antarctic Science Expedition (ITASE), and includes data from the Arctic System Science Program's Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core.

  16. Decadal variability in coupled sea-ice-thermohaline circulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Neelin, J.D.

    1997-12-01

    An interdecadal oscillation in a coupled ocean-ice system was identified in a previous study. This paper extends that study to further examine the stability of the oscillation and the sensitivity of its frequency to various parameters and forcing fields. Three models are used: (i) an analytical box model; (ii) a two-dimensional model for the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) coupled to a thermodynamic ice model, as in the authors` previous study; and (iii) a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model (OGCM) coupled to a similar ice model. The box model is used to elucidate the essential feedbacks that give rise to this oscillation and to identify the most important parameters and processes that determine the period. The counted model becomes more stable toward low coupling, greater diffusion, and weaker THC feedback. Nonlinear effects in the sea-ice model become important in the higher ocean-ice coupling regime where the effective sea-ice damping associated with this nonlinearity stabilizes the model. The 3D OGCM is used to test this coupled ocean-ice mechanism in a more realistic model setting. This model generates an interdecadal oscillation whose characteristics and phase relations among the model variables are similar to the oscillation obtained in the 2D models. The major difference is that the oscillation frequency is considerably lower. The difference can be explained in terms of the analytical box model solution in which the period of oscillation depends on the rate of anomalous density production by melting/cooling of sea ice per SST anomaly, times the rate of warming/cooling by anomalous THC heat advection per change in density anomaly. The 3D model has a smaller THC response to high-latitude density perturbations than the 2D model, and anomalous velocities in the 3D case tend to follow the mean isotherms so anomalous heat advection is reduced. This slows the ocean-ice feedback process, leading to the longer oscillation period. 36 refs., 27 figs.

  17. Surface roughness due to residual ice in the use of low power deicing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Bond, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    Thicknesses of residual ice are presented to provide information on surface contamination and associated roughness during deicing events. Data was obtained from low power ice protection systems tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) with nine different deicing systems. Results show that roughness associated with residual ice is not characterized by uniformly distributed roughness. Results also show that deicing systems require a critical mass of ice to generate a sufficient expelling force to remove the ice.

  18. Flow of ices in the Ammonia-Water System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently deformed crystalline hydrates and partial melts of the water-rich end of the NH3-H2O system, with the aim of improving our understanding of physical processes occurring in icy moons of the outer solar system. Deformation experiments were carried out at constant strain rate. The range of experimental variables are given. Phase relationships in the NH3-H2O system indicate that water ice and ammonia dihydrate, NH3-2H2O, are the stable phases under our experiment conditions. X-ray diffraction of our samples usually revealed these as the dominant phases, but we have also observed an amorphous phase (in unpressurized samples only) and occasionally significant ammonia monohydrate, NH3-H2O. The onset of partial melting at the peritectic temperature at about 176 K appeared as a sharp transition in strength observed in samples of x(sub NH3) = 0.05 and 0.01, the effect of melt was less pronounced. For any given water ice + dihydrate alloy in the subsolidus region, we observed one rheological law over the entire temperature range from 175 K to about 140 K. Below 140 K, a shear instability similar to that occurring in pure water ice under the same conditions limited our ability to measure ductile flow. The rheological laws for the several alloys vary systematically from that of pure ice to that of dihydrate. Pure dihydrate is about 4 orders of magnitude less viscous than water ice just below the peritectic temperature, but because of a very pronounced temperature dependence in dihydrate (100 kJ/mol versus 43 kJ/mol for water ice) the viscosity of dihydrate equals or exceeds that of water ice at T less than 140 K. The large variation in viscosity of dihydrate with relatively small changes in temperature may be helpful in explaining the rich variety of tectonic and volcanic features seen on the surfaces of icy moons in the outer solar system.

  19. The Effect of Excess Snow on Sea Ice in a Global Ice-Ocean Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, B.; Bélair, S.; Lemieux, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Snow cover on sea ice acts as a thermal insulator, greatly reducing the upward heat flux from the ocean through the ice, specifically through thin ice. The treatment of snow in the CICE sea ice model does not include the effects of blowing snow, thereby leading to an unrealistically thick snow layer on the ice. We investigate the consequences of this excess snow for the upward heat fluxes throughout the year, and how this impacts forecast accuracy in a global ice-ocean prediction model (GIOPS). First results will be presented, and computationally efficient solutions will be discussed.

  20. A system of system lenses for leadership decision-making.

    PubMed

    Cady, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The sheer volume and dynamics among system agents in healthcare makes decision-making a daunting task at all levels. Being clear about what leaders mean by "healthcare system" is critical in aligning system strategy and leadership decision-making. This article presents an emerging set of lenses (ideology and beliefs, rational and irrational information processing, interpersonal social dynamics, process and value creation, and context) to help frame leadership decision-making in healthcare systems.

  1. Assimilating high horizontal resolution sea ice concentration data into the US Navy's ice forecast systems: Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS) and the Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS 3.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posey, P. G.; Metzger, E. J.; Wallcraft, A. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Allard, R. A.; Smedstad, O. M.; Phelps, M. W.; Fetterer, F.; Stewart, J. S.; Meier, W. N.; Helfrich, S. R.

    2015-04-01

    This study presents the improvement in the US Navy's operational sea ice forecast systems gained by assimilating high horizontal resolution satellite-derived ice concentration products. Since the late 1980's, the ice forecast systems have assimilated near real-time sea ice concentration derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI and then SSMIS). The resolution of the satellite-derived product was approximately the same as the previous operational ice forecast system (25 km). As the sea ice forecast model resolution increased over time, the need for higher horizontal resolution observational data grew. In 2013, a new Navy sea ice forecast system (Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System - ACNFS) went into operations with a horizontal resolution of ~3.5 km at the North Pole. A method of blending ice concentration observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR2) along with a sea ice mask produced by the National Ice Center (NIC) has been developed resulting in an ice concentration product with very high spatial resolution. In this study, ACNFS was initialized with this newly developed high resolution blended ice concentration product. The daily ice edge locations from model hindcast simulations were compared against independent observed ice edge locations. ACNFS initialized using the high resolution blended ice concentration data product decreased predicted ice edge location error compared to the operational system that only assimilated SSMIS data. A second evaluation assimilating the new blended sea ice concentration product into the pre-operational Navy Global Ocean Forecast System 3.1 also showed a substantial improvement in ice edge location over a system using the SSMIS sea ice concentration product alone. This paper describes the technique used to create the blended sea ice concentration product and the significant improvements to both of the Navy's sea ice forecasting systems.

  2. High-resolution wave forecasting system for the seasonally ice-covered Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomi, Laura; Lehtiranta, Jonni

    2016-04-01

    When forecasting surface waves in seasonally ice-covered seas, the inclusion of ice conditions in the modelling is important. The ice cover affects the propagation and also changes the fetch over which the waves grow. In wave models the ice conditions are often still given as a boundary condition and handled by excluding areas where the ice concentration exceeds a certain threshold value. The ice data used are typically based on satellite analysis or expert analysis of local Ice Services who combine data from different sources. This type of data is sufficiently accurate to evaluate the near-real time ice concentrations, but when making forecasts it is also important to account for the possible changes in ice conditions. For example in a case of a high wind situation, there can be rapid changes in the ice field, when the wind and waves may push the ice towards shores and cause fragmentation of ice field. To enhance handling of ice conditions in the Baltic Sea wave forecasts, utilisation of ice model data was studied. Ice concentration, thickness produced by FMI's operational ice model HELMI were used to provide ice data to wave model as follows: Wave model grid points where the ice concentration was more than or equal to 70% and the ice thickness more than1 cm, were excluded from calculations. Ice concentrations smaller than that were taken into account as additional grid obstructions by decreasing the wave energy passed from one grid cell to another. A challenge in evaluating wave forecast accuracy in partly ice covered areas it that there's typically no wave buoy data available, since the buoys have to be recovered well before the sea area freezes. To evaluate the accuracy of wave forecast in partially ice covered areas, significant wave heights from altimeter's ERS2, Envisat, Jason-1 and Jason-2 were extracted from Ifremer database. Results showed that the more frequent update of the ice data was found to improve the wave forecast especially during high wind

  3. Photometric Properties of Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.; Buratti, B. J.

    We present an overview of fundamental photometric properties of icy surfaces throughout the Solar System and investigate the extent to which these properties reflect the evolution of the bodies on which they reside. We review photometric models and their parameters and discuss the physical interpretability of those parameters. We focus on those fundamental photometric properties, primarily albedo and the near-opposition phase function, which are independent of any interpretation from the application of a photometric model. Finally, we offer suggestions for future work, both observational and laboratory measurements, which will enhance the scientific return from continued photometric studies of icy bodies in the Solar System.

  4. Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) Force Measurement System (FMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An Electronics Engineer at the Glenn Research Center (GRC), requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) provide technical support for an evaluation of the existing force measurement system (FMS) at the GRC's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the intent of developing conceptual designs to improve the tunnel's force measurement capability in order to better meet test customer needs. This report contains the outcome of the NESC technical review.

  5. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  6. Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Observations of Glaciers, Ice Sheets, Sea Ice and Snow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld Mayer, M. U.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) are being used increasingly in observations of the Earth, especially as such UAS become smaller, lighter and hence less expensive. In this paper, we present examples of observations of snow fields, glaciers and ice sheets and of sea ice in the Arctic that have been collected from UAS. We further examine possibilities for instrument miniaturization, using smaller UAS and smaller sensors for collecting data. The quality and type of data is compared to that of satellite observations, observations from manned aircraft and to measurements made during field experiments on the ground. For example, a small UAS can be sent out to observe a sudden event, such as a natural catastrophe, and provide high-resolution imagery, but a satellite has the advantage of providing the same type of data over much of the Earth's surface and for several years, but the data is generally of lower resolution. Data collected on the ground typically have the best control and quality, but the survey area is usually small. Here we compare micro-topographic measurements made on snow fields the Colorado Rocky Mountains with airborne and satellite data.

  7. Cryosphere Science Outreach using the Ice Sheet System Model and a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the role of Cryosphere Science within the larger context of Sea Level Rise is both a technical and educational challenge that needs to be addressed if the public at large is to trulyunderstand the implications and consequences of Climate Change. Within this context, we propose a new approach in which scientific tools are used directly inside a mobile/website platform geared towards Education/Outreach. Here, we apply this approach by using the Ice Sheet System Model, a state of the art Cryosphere model developed at NASA, and integrated within a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory, with the goal is to outreach Cryospherescience to K-12 and College level students. The approach mixes laboratory experiments, interactive classes/lessons on a website, and a simplified interface to a full-fledged instance of ISSM to validate the classes/lessons. This novel approach leverages new insights from the Outreach/Educational community and the interest of new generations in web based technologies and simulation tools, all of it delivered in a seamlessly integrated web platform. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  8. The Effect of Ice Shelf Meltwater on Antarctic Sea Ice and the Southern Ocean in an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauling, A.; Bitz, C. M.; Smith, I.; Langhorne, P.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that recent Antarctic sea ice expansion resulted from an increase in fresh water reaching the Southern Ocean. This presentation investigates this conjecture in an Earth System Model. The freshwater flux from ice sheet and ice shelf mass imbalance is largely missing in models that participated in the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). However, CMIP5 models do account for the fresh water from precipitation minus evaporation (P-E). On average in CMIP5 models P- E reaching the Southern Ocean has increased to a present value of about 2600 Gt yr-1 greater than pre-industrial times and 3-8 times larger than estimates of the mass imbalance of Antarctic ice sheets and shelves. Two sets of model experiments were conducted from 1980-2013 in CESM1-CAM5 artificially distributing fresh water either at the ocean surface according to an estimate of iceberg melt, or at the ice shelf fronts at depth. An anomalous reduction in vertical advection of heat into the surface mixed layer resulted in sea surface cooling at high southern latitudes, and an associated increase in sea ice area. A freshwater enhancement of 1780 Gt yr-1 (approximately 1.3 times either present day basal melt or iceberg calving freshwater fluxes) raised the sea ice total area by 1×106 km2. Yet, even a freshwater enhancement up to 2670 Gt yr-1 was insufficient to offset the sea ice decline due to anthropogenic forcing for any period of 20 years or longer. Further, the sea ice response was found to be insensitive to the depth of fresh water injection.

  9. EUV-VUV Photolysis of Molecular Ice Systems of Astronomical Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Cheng, B.-M.

    2006-01-01

    We wish to report laboratory simulation results obtained from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of molecular ices relevant to the cometary-type ices and icy satellites of planetary systems. Specifically, we identify the type of molecules that form in the ices and/or those that come off the ice surfaces, quantify their production yields and destruction yields, understand their production mechanisms, and ascertain their significance in astronomical environments.

  10. NASA Icing Remote Sensing System Comparisons From AIRS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Brinker, David J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. A multiple instrument approach is the current emphasis of this activity. Utilizing radar, radiometry, and lidar, a region of supercooled liquid is identified. If the liquid water content (LWC) is sufficiently high, then the region of supercooled liquid cloud is flagged as being an aviation hazard. The instruments utilized for the current effort are an X-band vertical staring radar, a radiometer that measures twelve frequencies between 22 and 59 GHz, and a lidar ceilometer. The radar data determine cloud boundaries, the radiometer determines the sub-freezing temperature heights and total liquid water content, and the ceilometer refines the lower cloud boundary. Data is post-processed with a LabVIEW program with a resultant supercooled LWC profile and aircraft hazard identification. Individual remotely sensed measurements gathered during the 2003-2004 Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS II) were compared to aircraft in-situ measurements. Comparisons between the remote sensing system s fused icing product and in-situ measurements from the research aircraft are reviewed here. While there are areas where improvement can be made, the cases examined indicate that the fused sensor remote sensing technique appears to be a valid approach.

  11. JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography.

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Hilgart, M.; Pothineni, S.; Urakhchin, A.; Devarapalli, S.; Yoder, D.; Becker, M.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Nagarajan, V.; Smith, J. L.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  12. Involving the motor system in decision making.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Reto; König, Peter; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2004-02-01

    The control of behaviour is usually understood in terms of three distinct components: sensory processing, decision making and movement control. Recently, this view has been questioned on the basis of physiological and behavioural data, blurring the distinction between these three stages. This raises the question to what extent the motor system itself can contribute to the interpretation of behavioural situations. To investigate this question we use a neural model of sensory motor integration applied to a behaving mobile robot performing a navigation task. We show that the population response of the motor system provides a substrate for the categorization of behavioural situations. This categorization allows for the assessment of the complexity of a behavioural situation and regulates whether higher-level decision making is required to resolve behavioural conflicts. Our model lends credence to an emerging reconceptualization of behavioural control where the motor system can be considered as part of a high-level perceptual system.

  13. Transport, hysteresis and avalanches in artificial spin ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the hopping dynamics of an artificial spin ice system constructed from colloids on a kagome optical trap array where each trap has two possible states. By applying an external drive from an electric field which is analogous to a biasing applied magnetic field for real spin systems, we can create polarized states that obey the spin-ice rules of two spins in and one spin out at each vertex. We demonstrate that when we sweep the external drive and measure the fraction of the system that has been polarized, we can generate a hysteresis loop analogous to the hysteretic magnetization versus external magnetic field curves for real spin systems. The disorder in our system can be readily controlled by changing the barrier that must be overcome before a colloid can hop from one side of a trap to the other. For systems with no disorder, the effective spins all flip simultaneously as the biasing field is changed, while for strong disorder the hysteresis curves show a series of discontinuous jumps or avalanches similar to Barkhausen noise.

  14. ICE Raids, Children, Media, and Making Sense of Latino Newcomers in Flyover Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Edmund T.; Reeves, Jenelle

    2012-01-01

    Extant cultural models articulated in "Flyover Country" print media responses to ICE workplace raids showed a welcome of sorts of Latino newcomers. These models suggest a place for Latino students at school and more broadly for Latino children and parents in these communities. Thus, they index an unwillingness to see Latino newcomers in…

  15. NACA Investigations of Icing-Protection Systems for Turbojet-Engine Installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonGlahn, Uwe; Callaghan, Edmund E.; Gray, Vernon H.

    1951-01-01

    Investigations have been made in flight and in wind tunnels to determine which components of turbojet installations are most critical in icing conditions, and to evaluate several methods of icing protection. From these studies, the requirements necessary for adequate icing protection and the consequent penalties on engine performance can be estimated. Because investigations have indicated that the compressor-inlet screen constitutes the greatest icing hazard and is difficult to protect, complete removal or retraction of the screen upon encountering an icing condition is recommended. In the absence of the screen, the inlet guide vanes of an axial-flow-type turbojet engine constitute the greatest danger to engine operation in an icing condition; a centrifugal-type engine, on the other hand, is relatively unsusceptible to icing once the screen has been removed. Of the three icing-protection systems investigated, surface heating, hot-gas bleedback, and inertia-separation inlets, only the first two offer an acceptable solution to the problem of engine icing protection. Surface heating, either by gas heating or electrical means, appears to be the most acceptable icing-protection method with regard to performance losses. Hot-gas bleedback, although causing undesirable thrust losses, offers an easy means of obtaining icing protection for some installations. The final choice of an icing-protection system depends, however, on the supply of heated gas and electrical power available and on the allowable performance and. weight penalties associated with each system.

  16. The pre-LGM evolution of the Uummannaq ice Stream system in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Jamieson, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Ice streams are a key component of an ice sheet system. They are fast flowing, dynamic corridors of ice that play a pivotal role in modulating ice flux from the interior of an ice sheet to its terrestrial or marine margin. The behaviour of marine-terminating ice streams in particular is critical in determining the dynamic (in)stability of ice sheets and ice/ocean interaction through time. However, despite an increase in palaeo-ice stream reconstructions and improvements in numerical modelling, in many instances we know little about the evolution of ice streams beyond the last glacial cycle. This is particularly true for topographically-guided or constrained ice stream systems that must represent the end-member state of a system that has developed over million year time scales. Recent research suggests that topographic focussing, subglacial geology, meltwater routing and calving margins are the primary controls on ice stream evolution. However, few studies have considered the combined role of geology, pre Quaternary landscapes and uplift in pre-conditioning a landscape for ice stream onset. This paper explores the factors that have controlled the evolution of the Uummannaq Ice Stream (UIS) system in West Greenland. During the last glacial cycle the UIS was a topographically-guided system, but the variables that led to ice stream onset prior to the Late Quaternary remain poorly understood. Geology, selective linear erosion and dynamic feedbacks were all important controls, but the influence of rifting, early uplift and pre-glacial topography in particular may have been pivotal controls on the evolution and location of the UIS onset zone.

  17. Ground-Based Icing Condition Remote Sensing System Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Koenig, George G.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the NASA Glenn Research Center activities to assess and down select remote sensing technologies for the purpose of developing a system capable of measuring icing condition hazards aloft. The information generated by such a remote sensing system is intended for use by the entire aviation community, including flight crews. air traffic controllers. airline dispatchers, and aviation weather forecasters. The remote sensing system must be capable of remotely measuring temperature and liquid water content (LWC), and indicating the presence of super-cooled large droplets (SLD). Technologies examined include Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Dual-Band Radar, Multi-Band Radar, Ka-Band Radar. Polarized Ka-Band Radar, and Multiple Field of View (MFOV) Lidar. The assessment of these systems took place primarily during the Mt. Washington Icing Sensors Project (MWISP) in April 1999 and the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) from November 1999 to February 2000. A discussion of the various sensing technologies is included. The result of the assessment is that no one sensing technology can satisfy all of the stated project goals. Therefore a proposed system includes radiometry and Ka-band radar. A multilevel approach is proposed to allow the future selection of the fielded system based upon required capability and available funding. The most basic level system would be the least capable and least expensive. The next level would increase capability and cost, and the highest level would be the most capable and most expensive to field. The Level 1 system would consist of a Profiling Microwave Radiometer. The Level 2 system would add a Ka-Band Radar. The Level 3 system would add polarization to the Ka-Band Radar. All levels of the system would utilize hardware that is already under development by the U.S. Government. However, to meet the needs of the aviation community, all levels of the system will require further development. In addition to the proposed system

  18. Naturalistic Decision Making For Power System Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin; Robinson, Marck; Ey, Pamela

    2009-06-23

    Abstract: Motivation -- As indicated by the Blackout of 2003, the North American interconnected electric system is vulnerable to cascading outages and widespread blackouts. Investigations of large scale outages often attribute the causes to the three T’s: Trees, Training and Tools. A systematic approach has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The approach has been developed and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine naturalistic decision making (NDM) processes, transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations are analyzed to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. Findings/Design -- The results of the study indicate that we can map the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify clearly what mental models and mental simulations are being performed at different points in the scenario. As a result of this research we expect that we can identify improved training methods and improved analytical and visualization tools for power system operators. Originality/Value -- The research applies for the first time, the concepts of Recognition Primed Decision Making, Situation Awareness Levels and Cognitive Task Analysis to training of electric power system operators. Take away message -- The NDM approach provides an ideal framework for systematic training management and mitigation to accelerate learning in team-based training scenarios with high-fidelity power grid simulators.

  19. Europa Kinetic Ice Penetrator System for Hyper Velocity Instrument Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tessa

    Landing of a payload on any celestial body has only used a soft landing system. These systems use retro rockets and atmospheric components to match velocity and then overcome local gravity in order to land on the surface. This is a proposed system for depositing instrumentation on an icy surface at hypervelocity using the properties of different projectiles and ejecta properties that would negate the need for a soft landing system. This system uses two projectiles, a cylinder with inner aerodynamic surfaces and a payload section with a conical nose and aerodynamic surfaces. The cylinder lands first, creates a region of fractured ice, and directs that fractured material into a collimated ejecta stream. The payload travels through the ejecta and lands in the fractured region. The combination of the ejecta stream and the softened target material reduces the impact acceleration to within survivable levels.

  20. Systems and Techniques for Identifying and Avoiding Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John

    1995-01-01

    In-flight icing is one of the most difficult aviation weather hazards facing general aviation. Because most aircraft in the general aviation category are not certified for flight into known icing conditions, techniques for identifying and avoiding in-flight ice are important to maintain safety while increasing the utility and dispatch capability which is part of the AGATE vision. This report summarizes a brief study effort which: (1) Reviewed current ice identification, forecasting, and avoidance techniques; (2) Assessed feasibility of improved forecasting and ice avoidance procedures; and (3) Identified key issues for the development of improved capability with regard to in-flight icing.

  1. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Roger G.

    2007-12-19

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  2. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    ScienceCinema

    Barry, Roger G.

    2016-07-12

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  3. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed method of analytically predicting the minimum fluid flow rate required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge system on a wing under a given set of flight conditions is presented. Results of the proposed method are compared with the actual results of an icing test of a real wing section in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel.

  4. The effect of sea ice on the solar energy budget in the astmosphere-sea ice-ocean system: A model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, Knut; Weeks, W. F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    1994-01-01

    A coupled one-dimensional multilayer and multistream radiative transfer model has been developed and applied to the study of radiative interactions in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system. The consistent solution of the radiative transfer equation in this coupled system automatically takes into account the refraction and reflection at the air-ice interface and allows flexibility in choice of stream numbers. The solar radiation spectrum (0.25 micron-4.0 micron) is divided into 24 spectral bands to account adequately for gaseous absorption in the atmosphere. The effects of ice property changes, including salinity and density variations, as well as of melt ponds and snow cover variations over the ice on the solar energy distribution in the entire system have been studied quantitatively. The results show that for bare ice it is the scattering, determined by air bubbles and brine pockets, in just a few centimeters of the top layer of ice that plays the most important role in the solar energy absorption and partitioning in the entire system. Ice thickness is important to the energy distribution only when the ice is thin, while the absorption in the atmosphere is not sensitive to ice thickness exceeds about 70 cm. The presence of clouds moderates all the sensitivities of the absorptive amounts in each layer to the variations in the ice properties and ice thickness. Comparisons with observational spectral albedo values for two simple ice types are also presented.

  5. The ancient heritage of water ice in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A; Alexander, Conel M O'D; Du, Fujun; Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I; Harries, Tim J

    2014-09-26

    Identifying the source of Earth's water is central to understanding the origins of life-fostering environments and to assessing the prevalence of such environments in space. Water throughout the solar system exhibits deuterium-to-hydrogen enrichments, a fossil relic of low-temperature, ion-derived chemistry within either (i) the parent molecular cloud or (ii) the solar nebula protoplanetary disk. Using a comprehensive treatment of disk ionization, we find that ion-driven deuterium pathways are inefficient, which curtails the disk's deuterated water formation and its viability as the sole source for the solar system's water. This finding implies that, if the solar system's formation was typical, abundant interstellar ices are available to all nascent planetary systems.

  6. The ancient heritage of water ice in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A; Alexander, Conel M O'D; Du, Fujun; Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I; Harries, Tim J

    2014-09-26

    Identifying the source of Earth's water is central to understanding the origins of life-fostering environments and to assessing the prevalence of such environments in space. Water throughout the solar system exhibits deuterium-to-hydrogen enrichments, a fossil relic of low-temperature, ion-derived chemistry within either (i) the parent molecular cloud or (ii) the solar nebula protoplanetary disk. Using a comprehensive treatment of disk ionization, we find that ion-driven deuterium pathways are inefficient, which curtails the disk's deuterated water formation and its viability as the sole source for the solar system's water. This finding implies that, if the solar system's formation was typical, abundant interstellar ices are available to all nascent planetary systems. PMID:25258075

  7. Information Processing in Decision-Making Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Matthijs; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Redish, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Decisions result from an interaction between multiple functional systems acting in parallel to process information in very different ways, each with strengths and weaknesses. In this review, the authors address three action-selection components of decision-making: The Pavlovian system releases an action from a limited repertoire of potential actions, such as approaching learned stimuli. Like the Pavlovian system, the habit system is computationally fast but, unlike the Pavlovian system permits arbitrary stimulus-action pairings. These associations are a “forward” mechanism; when a situation is recognized, the action is released. In contrast, the deliberative system is flexible but takes time to process. The deliberative system uses knowledge of the causal structure of the world to search into the future, planning actions to maximize expected rewards. Deliberation depends on the ability to imagine future possibilities, including novel situations, and it allows decisions to be taken without having previously experienced the options. Various anatomical structures have been identified that carry out the information processing of each of these systems: hippocampus constitutes a map of the world that can be used for searching/imagining the future; dorsal striatal neurons represent situation-action associations; and ventral striatum maintains value representations for all three systems. Each system presents vulnerabilities to pathologies that can manifest as psychiatric disorders. Understanding these systems and their relation to neuroanatomy opens up a deeper way to treat the structural problems underlying various disorders. PMID:22492194

  8. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  9. Lunar South Pole ice as heat sink for Lunar cryofuel production system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.; Stanley, M.; Modro, S.M.; Whitman, P.

    1995-03-01

    Recent Clementine bistatic radar data suggest that water ice may be present in a {open_quotes}forever shaded{close_quotes} depression or crater at the South Pole of the Moon. The ice is a feedstock for the electrolysis production of cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen rocket fuels for a transportation system on the moon and for leaving and descending on to the moon. The ice also provides a convective heat sink critical to the practical implementation of high throughput electric power generators and refrigerators that liquefy and cool the oxygen and hydrogen into cryogenic rocket fuel. This brief analysis shows that about a hundred tonnes of hardware delivered to the lunar surface can produce tens of thousands of tonnes of rocket fuel per year, on the moon. And it makes the point that if convective cooling is used instead of radiative cooling, then power and processing systems can be used that exist and have been tested already. This shortens the time by an order of magnitude to develop lunar operations. Quick deployment of a chemical cryofuel energy source is a key factor in the economics of lunar development.

  10. On-ice vibroseis and snowstreamer systems for geoscientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Olaf; Hofstede, Coen; Diez, Anja; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Lambrecht, Astrid; Mayer, Christoph; Blenkner, Rick; Hilmarsson, Sverrir

    2015-03-01

    We present implementations of vibroseis system configurations with a snowstreamer for over-ice long-distance seismic traverses (>100 km). The configurations have been evaluated in Antarctica on ice sheet and ice shelf areas in the period 2010-2014. We discuss results of two different vibroseis sources: Failing Y-1100 on skis with a peak force of 120 kN in the frequency range 10-110 Hz; IVI EnviroVibe with a nominal peak force of 66 kN in the nominal frequency range 10-300 Hz. All measurements used a well-established 60 channel 1.5 km snowstreamer for the recording. Employed forces during sweeps were limited to less than 80% of the peak force. Maximum sweep frequencies, with a typical duration of 10 s, were 100 and 250 Hz for the Failing and EnviroVibe, respectively. Three different concepts for source movement were employed: the Failing vibrator was mounted with wheels on skis and pulled by a Pistenbully snow tractor. The EnviroVibe was operated self-propelled on Mattracks on the Antarctic plateau. This lead to difficulties in soft snow. For later implementations the EnviroVibe with tracks was put on a polyethylene (PE) sled. The sled had a hole in the center to lower the vibrator baseplate directly onto the snow surface. With the latter setup, data production varied between 20 km/day for 6-fold and 40 km/day for single fold for 9 h/day of measurements. The combination of tracks with the PE-sled was especially advantageous on hard and rough surfaces because of the flexibility of each component and the relatively lose mounting. The systems presented here are suitable to obtain data of subglacial and sub-seabed sediment layers and englacial layering in comparable quality as obtained from marine geophysics and land-based explosive surveys. The large offset aperture of the streamer overcomes limitations of radar systems for imaging of steep along-track subglacial topography. With joint international scientific and logistic efforts, large-scale mapping of Antarctica

  11. Using an Earth System Model to Better Understand Ice Sheet Variability Through the Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an Earth System model with a dynamic land-ice component to explore several inconsistencies between traditional Milankovitch theory and δ18O sediment records of the Pleistocene. Our model results show that a combination of albedo feedbacks, seasonal offset of precession forcing, and orbital cycle duration differences can explain much of the 41-kyr glacial cycles that characterize the early Pleistocene. The obliquity-controlled changes in annual average high-latitude insolation produce large variations in arctic vegetation-type and sea-ice cover, which amplify the land-ice response. In contrast, the seasonal nature of the precession insolation signal dampens net ice-melt. For instance, when precession enhances ice melt in the spring, it reduces ice melt in the fall, and vice versa. The lower frequency of obliquity cycles in combination with amplified climate sensitivity due to albedo feedbacks help produce a larger ice-volume response to cycles of obliquity compared to precession, despite precession contributing more to variations in high-latitude summer insolation. In addition, we can simulate the appearance of a 100-kyr ice-volume signal by reducing basal sliding in the ice sheet model. Model experiments with enhanced basal drag have greater ice sheet elevation because the ice sheets are not able to flow as quickly, leading to increased ice thickness at the expense of ice extent. These thicker ice sheets have colder surface temperatures, receive more snowfall, and do not readily advance past the ice equilibrium line. Greater high-latitude summer insolation from the combination of high obliquity and precession/eccentricity is then necessary to cause complete ice sheet retreat. This research lends support to the regolith hypothesis, which proposes gradual erosion of high-latitude northern hemisphere regolith by multiple cycles of glaciation helped cause the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  12. Modeling the seasonal variability of a coupled Arctic ice-ocean system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Mellor, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal variability of the ice-ocean system in the Arctic Basin and the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents Seas was modeled using a three-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model developed at Princeton University. The snow-ice model uses a three-level thermodynamic scheme similar to Semtner's (1976), but is extended to include the effect of leads. It is shown that simulations using the climatological monthly forcing fields produce a realistic seasonal variability of the ice cover. The ice thickness had a considerable sensitivity to the choice of the long-wave back radiation scheme, but these effects can be reduced through dynamical factors.

  13. Naturalistic Decision Making for Power System Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin; Robinson, Marck; Ey, Pamela

    2010-02-01

    Motivation – Investigations of large-scale outages in the North American interconnected electric system often attribute the causes to three T’s: Trees, Training and Tools. To document and understand the mental processes used by expert operators when making critical decisions, a naturalistic decision making (NDM) model was developed. Transcripts of conversations were analyzed to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. Findings/Design – An item analysis indicated that the operators’ Situation Awareness Levels, mental models, and mental simulations can be mapped at different points in the training scenario. This may identify improved training methods or analytical/ visualization tools. Originality/Value – This study applies for the first time, the concepts of Recognition Primed Decision Making, Situation Awareness Levels and Cognitive Task Analysis to training of electric power system operators. Take away message – The NDM approach provides a viable framework for systematic training management to accelerate learning in simulator-based training scenarios for power system operators and teams.

  14. VAV systems -- What makes them succeed? What makes them fail?

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellin, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    When variable-air-volume (VAV) systems work right, they provide excellent temperature and humidity control and in addition deliver outside air to conditioned spaces in amounts sufficient to satisfy ASHRAE Standard 62 and meet all criteria required for acceptable indoor air quality. The final benefit is lower utility cost when compared to a comparable constant-air-volume system. However, the successful performance of VAV systems is often compromised by flawed conception, faulty design, defective installation, poor start-up, inaccurate operation, and inadequate maintenance. Field observations of underperforming VAV systems have uncovered problems due to mistakes that have been made through all the phases of system development. It is recommended that most VAV systems be designed, installed, started, and operated under a comprehensive commissioning process. Experience has shown that careful monitoring of all phases of development and operation will ensure that there are minimal problems to plague the building owner and operating personnel once the system is in use. This paper is written from the viewpoint of a former contractor who is now a professional engineer and who has designed, installed, started, and maintained VAV systems.

  15. Altitude Effects on Thermal Ice Protection System Performance; A Study of an Alternative Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Gene; Wright, Bill; Orchard, David; Oleskiw, Myron

    2015-01-01

    The quest for more energy-efficient green aircraft, dictates that all systems, including the ice protection system (IPS), be closely examined for ways to reduce energy consumption and to increase efficiency. A thermal ice protection systems must protect the aircraft from the hazardous effects of icing, and yet it needs to do so as efficiently as possible. The system can no longer be afforded the degree of over-design in power usage they once were. To achieve these more exacting designs, a better understanding of the heat and mass transport phenomena involved during an icing encounter is needed.

  16. A novel backpackable ice-penetrating radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Saito, Ryoji; Naruse, Renji

    We have developed a novel ice-penetrating radar system that can be carried on a backpack. Including batteries for a 3 hour continuous measurement, the total weight is 13 kg. In addition, it operates reliably down to -25°C, has a low power consumption of 24 W, and is semi-waterproof. The system has a built-in-one controller with a high-brightness display for reading data quickly, a receiver with 12-bit digitizing, and a 1 kV pulse transmitter in which the pulse amplitude varies by <0.2%. Optical communications between components provides low-noise data acquisition and allows synchronizing of the pulse transmission with sampling. Measurements with the system revealed the 300 m deep bed topography of a temperate valley glacier in the late ablation season.

  17. N-ICE2015: Multi-disciplinary study of the young sea ice system north of Svalbard from winter to summer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Harald; Granskog, Mats; Assmy, Philipp; Duarte, Pedro; Hudson, Stephen; Gerland, Sebastian; Spreen, Gunnar; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is shifting to a new regime with a thinner and smaller sea-ice area cover. Until now, winter sea ice extent has changed less than during summer, as the heat loss to the atmosphere during autumn and winter is large enough form an ice cover in most regions. The insulating snow cover also heavily influences the winter ice growth. Consequently, the older, thicker multi-year sea ice has been replace by a younger and thinner sea. These large changes in the sea ice cover may have dramatic consequences for ecosystems, energy fluxes and ultimately atmospheric circulation and the Northern Hemisphere climate. To study the effects of the changing Arctic the Norwegian Polar Institute, together with national and international partners, launched from January 11 to June 24, 2015 the Norwegian Young Sea ICE cruise 2015 (N-ICE2015). N-ICE2015 was a multi-disciplinary cruise aimed at simultaneously studying the effect of the Arctic Ocean changes in the sea ice, the atmosphere, in radiation, in ecosystems. as well as water chemistry. R/V Lance was frozen into the drift ice north of Svalbard at about N83 E25 and drifted passively southwards with the ice until she was broken loose. When she was loose, R/V Lance was brought back north to a similar starting position. While fast in the ice, she served as a living and working platform for 100 scientist and engineers from 11 countries. One aim of N-ICE2015 is to present a comprehensive data-set on the first year ice dominated system available for the scientific community describing the state and changes of the Arctic sea ice system from freezing to melt. Analyzing the data is progressing and some first results will be presented.

  18. Discovery of water ice nearly everywhere in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.

    1995-10-01

    During the last decade we have discovered sources of accessible water in some form nearly everywhere in the solar system. Water ice has been found on the planet Mercury; probably on the Earth`s Moon; on Mars; on near Earth objects; on comets whose orbits frequently come close to that of Earth`s orbit; probably on Ceres, the largest inner asteroid; and on comets previously and incorrectly considered to be out of practical reach. The comets also provide massive quantities of hydrocarbons, similar to oil shale. The masses of either water or hydrocarbons are measured in units of cubic kilometers. The water is key to space transportation because it can be used as a rocket propellant directly, and because thermal process alone can be used to convert it and hydrocarbons into hydrogen, the highest performing rocket propellant. This presentation outlines what is currently known about the locations of the water ice, and sketches the requirements and environments of missions to prospect for and assay the water sources.

  19. Improving Sea Ice Prediction in the NCEP Climate Forecast System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collow, T. W.; Wang, W.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Skillful prediction of Arctic sea ice is important for the wide variety of interests focused in that region. However, the current operational system used by the NOAA Climate Prediction Center does not adequately predict the seasonal climatology of sea ice extent and maintains too high sea ice coverage across the Arctic. It is thought that the primary reasoning for this lies in the initialization of sea ice thickness. Experiments are carried out using the Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) model with an improved sea ice thickness initialization from the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Analysis and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) rather than the default Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) sea ice thickness data. All other variables are initialized from CFSR. In addition, physics parameterizations are adjusted to better simulate real world conditions. Here we focus on hindcasts initialized from 2005-2014. Although the seasonal cycle of sea ice is generally better captured in runs that use PIOMAS sea ice thickness initialization, local sea ice freeze in early winter in the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea is delayed when both sea ice thickness configurations are used. In addition ice freeze in the North Atlantic is more pronounced than in the observations. This shows that simply changing initial sea ice thickness is not enough to improve forecasts for all locations. Modeled atmospheric and oceanic parameters are investigated including the radiation budget, land surface temperature advection, and sub-surface oceanic heat flow to diagnose possible reasons for the modeling deficiencies, and further modifications to the model will be discussed.

  20. Effect of biopolymers on structure and ice recrystallization in dynamically frozen ice cream model systems.

    PubMed

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2002-11-01

    Ice crystal growth and microstructure of sugarsolutions prepared with stabilizers (carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC], xanthan gum, locust bean gum [LBG], and gelatin) with or without milk solids-nonfat (MSNF) after freezing in a scraped surface heat exchanger and temperature cycling (5 cycles from -6 degrees C to -20 degrees C) were studied. Ice crystal growth was calculated from brightfield microscopic images acquired from samples before and after cycling. Freeze-substitution and low-temperature embedding (LR-Gold resin) were sample preparation techniques utilized for structure analyses by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Differential staining for carbohydrates and proteins allowed the identification of stabilizer gel-like structures in LBG, gelatin, and gelatin/MSNF solutions. In the absence of milk proteins, xanthan and LBG were the most effective at retarding recrystallization, while in their presence, only xanthan had an effect. Cryo-gelation of the LBG was observed but is not the only mechanism of stabilizer action. Thermodynamic incompatibility between biopolymers was observed to promote localized high concentrations of milk proteins located at the ice crystal interface, probably exerting a water-holding action that significantly enhanced the stabilizer effect. Qualitatively, solution heterogeneity (phase separation) was directly proportional to ice crystal growth inhibition. It is suggested that water-holding by stabilizer and proteins, and in some cases steric hindrance induced by a stabilizer gel-like network, caused a reduction in the kinetics of the ice recrystallization phenomena and promoted mechanisms of melt-regrow instead of melt-diffuse-grow recrystallization, thus resulting in the preservation of the ice crystal size and in a small span of the ice crystal size distribution.

  1. Stability of Antarctic Ice Shelves and Their Role in the Global Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, M. A.; Grosfeld, K.; Macayeal, D. R.; Saheicha, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth's radiation budget, a key determinant of global climate, depends critically on the spatial distribution of surface albedos of our planet. Climate is also driven by major oceanic transport and exchange processes. In that regard, the polar regions play a particularly decisive role. While attention has so far mainly been paid to the annual and inter-annual variability of polar sea ice covers, a number of recent dramatic changes, i.e., the disintegration of the Larsen A- and parts of Larsen B Ice Shelves as well as the major calving events of Filchner-Ronne- and Ross Ice Shelves have led to renewed interest in the role of ice shelves for the global climate system. In this regard, it is not only the disintegration of ice shelves itself that is of particular concern. Ice shelves are known to play a distinct role in the overall stability of the (West-) Antarctic Ice Sheet. Thus, ice shelf disintegration could lead to instability of (parts of) the Antarctic ice cover, with corresponding consequences for the global albedo. Furthermore, the disintegration of major ice shelves will ultimately lead to a significant change of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation with widespread implications for the world ocean and ultimately global climate. In this paper we will, firstly based on a conceptual model, elucidate the possible impact chain leading from initial regional climate warming, over surface processes on the ice shelves and an increase in calving events to their possible disintegration. We will strive to consider possible feedback between reduced ice shelf surface area and sub-ice shelf exchange processes and their role for global climate and AABW formation. The more qualitative conjectures will be compared with first results from coupled ice shelf-ocean models under varying climate conditions.

  2. Measurement of lake ice thickness with a short-pulse radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of lake ice thickness were made during March 1975 at the Straits of Mackinac by using a short-pulse radar system aboard an all-terrain vehicle. These measurements were compared with ice thicknesses determined with an auger. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses in the range 29 to 60 cm. The maximum difference between radar and auger measurements was less than 9.8 percent. The magnitude of the error was less than + or - 3.5 cm. The NASA operating short-pulse radar system used in monitoring lake ice thickness from an aircraft is also described.

  3. Analysis and testing of the Diamond One wing anti-icing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Diamond One wing leading edge is protected against ice accretions by a bleed air anti-icing system. Three cross-sections selected for computer modeling considered the thermal mechanisms of convection, conduction, evaporation and sensible heating of impinged and runback water. With an instrumented aircraft, the model was refined using dry air and above freezing cloud flight test data. The refined model was exercised for wing surface temperature predictions for six critical icing conditions and found safe for natural icing flight testing. Measured natural icing test data was then inserted into the model to compare predicted vs. measured temperatures. Correlation was achieved and the system was accepted by FAA as safe for flight into known icing conditions.

  4. New Spray Bar System Installed in NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) is the world's largest refrigerated wind tunnel dedicated to the study of aircraft icing. In the IRT, natural icing conditions are duplicated to test the effects of in-flight icing on actual aircraft components and on scale models of airplanes and helicopters. The IRT's ability to reproduce a natural icing cloud was significantly improved with the recent installation of a new spray bar system. It is the spray bar system that transforms the low-speed wind tunnel into an icing wind tunnel by producing microscopic droplets of water and injecting them into the wind tunnel air stream in order to accurately simulate cloud moisture.

  5. A simple video-based timing system for on-ice team testing in ice hockey: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Larson, David P; Noonan, Benjamin C

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a newly developed on-ice timing system for team evaluation in the sport of ice hockey. We hypothesized that this new, simple, inexpensive, timing system would prove to be highly accurate and reliable. Six adult subjects (age 30.4 ± 6.2 years) performed on ice tests of acceleration and conditioning. The performance times of the subjects were recorded using a handheld stopwatch, photocell, and high-speed (240 frames per second) video. These results were then compared to allow for accuracy calculations of the stopwatch and video as compared with filtered photocell timing that was used as the "gold standard." Accuracy was evaluated using maximal differences, typical error/coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the timing methods. The reliability of the video method was evaluated using the same variables in a test-retest analysis both within and between evaluators. The video timing method proved to be both highly accurate (ICC: 0.96-0.99 and CV: 0.1-0.6% as compared with the photocell method) and reliable (ICC and CV within and between evaluators: 0.99 and 0.08%, respectively). This video-based timing method provides a very rapid means of collecting a high volume of very accurate and reliable on-ice measures of skating speed and conditioning, and can easily be adapted to other testing surfaces and parameters.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Extraterrestrial Ices and PAHs: Making an Astrobiological Silk Purse out of an Interstellar Sow s Ear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, D.

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Today, the composition of dust in the ISM is reasonably well constrained to cold, micron-sized particles of various refractory materials. Shrouded within the protective confines of cold, opaque molecular clouds--the birthplace of stars and planets--these particles accrete mantles of mixed molecular ices whose major components are also well constrained. Finally, amidst the molecular inventory of these ice mantles are likely to be found polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whose telltale infrared signature is now recognized throughout the Universe. However, of what significance is this scenario to the origin of life in our solar system--or any other? The major components of the icy materials observed in interstellar clouds and in our own solar system are uniformly quite simple. In addition, despite the fact that PAHs likely represent the single largest molecular reservoir of organic carbon in evolving planetary systems, they are not what would be considered "biogenic" molecules. Although interesting from a chemical and astrophysical standpoint, in the absence of a mechanism by which these materials can be transformed into more biochemically significant structures, they are of little Astrobiological significance. In this talk, we will begin with a brief review of the nature and abundance of the "raw" population of PAHs and PAH-related materials in the ISM. From there, we will move on to explore our laboratory simulations of the photochemical evolution of realistic mixed molecular ices under conditions which simulate those encountered in the ISM and in evolving planetary systems. Particular attention will be paid to the surprisingly complex array of organic species that are produced in these ices from such a deceptively simple inventory of starting materials

  7. Tracking and responding to a changing Arctic sea-ice cover: How ice users can help the scientific community design better observing systems (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, Hajo

    2010-05-01

    The Arctic sea-ice cover is undergoing a major transformation, with substantial reductions in summer ice extent reflecting changes in ice thickness, age, and circulation. These changes are impacting Arctic ecosystems and a range of human activities. Anticipating and responding to such impacts, exacerbated by increasing economic activity in parts of the Arctic, requires a foundation of environmental observations and model predictions. Recent increases in industrial activities such as shipping and resource development in parts of the Arctic have further highlighted the need for an integrated observing system. In the case of a changing sea-ice cover, how would one best design and optimize such a system? One of the challenges is to meet the information needs of the scientific community in furthering fundamental understanding of the Arctic system, as well as those of key stakeholders and society, helping them to prepare for and respond to Arctic change. This presentation focuses on how the concept of sea-ice system services, i.e., the uses and benefits (or harm) derived from sea ice, may help guide the implementation of an effective observing system. Principal service categories are (1) sea ice as climate regulator, marine hazard, and coastal buffer; (2) transportation and use of ice as a platform; (3) cultural services obtained from the "icescape"; and (4) support of food webs and biological diversity by sea ice. An analysis of the different ice services provided to different user groups can help prioritize different types of observations and determine optimal measurement strategies. Moreover, the focus on different uses of the ice cover may also help synthesize fundamental and applied research to help Arctic communities adapt in a changing environment. Alaska has experienced some of the most substantial changes in sea-ice conditions throughout the Arctic over the past three decades and is used to illustrate the concepts discussed above. Specifically, we have examined

  8. Phase transition of an ice-proton system into a Bernal-Fowler state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkin, Ivan A.; Petrenko, Victor F.

    2000-11-01

    We present a microscopic model of an ice-proton system. A mean-field approximation was used to study the disorder-partial order transition in the proton subsystem of ice. This analysis revealed that ice rules arise as a result of the second-order phase transition. From the theoretical point of view, above the phase-transition temperature the protons should be distributed over all possible positions without any restrictions. However, in real ice under zero pressure the disordering of the proton lattice apparently leads to ice melting. We also derived the Landau-Ginzburg equation suitable for the model under consideration and showed that the theories based on ice rules must be modified when one is working in the region of the critical temperature.

  9. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  10. Real-Time Observations of Optical Properties of Arctic Sea Ice with an Autonomous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gerland, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Granskog, M. A.; Hudson, S. R.; Perovich, D. K.; Karlsen, T. I.; Fossan, K.

    2012-12-01

    The recent drastic changes in the Arctic sea ice cover have altered the interaction of solar radiation and sea ice. To improve our understanding of this interaction, a Spectral Radiation Buoy (SRB) for measuring sea ice optical properties was developed, based on a system used during the last International Polar Year at the drift of "Tara" across the Arctic Ocean. A first version of the SRB was deployed on drifting ice in the high Arctic in April 2012. It includes three Satlantic spectral radiometers (two in air, one under ice), covering the wavelength range from 347 nm to 804 nm with 3.3 nm spectral resolution, a bio-shutter to protect the under-ice radiometer, a data logger to handle and store collected data, and an Iridium satellite modem to transfer data in real-time. The under-ice radiometer is mounted on an adjustable under-ice arm, and the other instruments are mounted on a triangular frame frozen into the ice. The SRB measures simultaneously, autonomously and continuously the spectral fluxes of incident and reflected solar radiation, as well as under-ice irradiance, water temperature and water pressure every hour. So far, between mid April and early August 2012, the system has drifted about 600 km, from the starting position near the North Pole towards the Fram Strait. The data collected during this deployment, so far, already demonstrate that this system is suitable for autonomous and long-term observations over and under sea ice in harsh conditions. Along with the SRB, commercially available Ice Mass Balance buoys (IMB) were deployed on the same ice floe. In the vicinity of the site, manned baseline measurements of snow and sea ice physical properties have been carried out during the SRB deployment. The combined datasets allow description of the evolution of the ice floe during seasonal melt. With snow melt, the spectral surface albedo decreased and the transmittance through the snow and ice increased after mid-April, especially when melt ponds started to

  11. Impact of sea-ice processes on the carbonate system and ocean acidification at the ice-water interface of the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransson, Agneta; Chierici, Melissa; Miller, Lisa A.; Carnat, Gauthier; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Thomas, Helmuth; Pineault, Simon; Papakyriakou, Tim N.

    2013-12-01

    From sea-ice formation in November 2007 to onset of ice melt in May 2008, we studied the carbonate system in first-year Arctic sea ice, focusing on the impact of calcium-carbonate (CaCO3) saturation states of aragonite (ΩAr) and calcite (ΩCa) at the ice-water interface (UIW). Based on total inorganic carbon (CT) and total alkalinity (AT), and derived pH, CO2, carbonate ion ([CO32-]) concentrations and Ω, we investigated the major drivers such as brine rejection, CaCO3 precipitation, bacterial respiration, primary production and CO2-gas flux in sea ice, brine, frost flowers and UIW. We estimated large variability in sea-ice CT at the top, mid, and bottom ice. Changes due to CaCO3 and CO2-gas flux had large impact on CT in the whole ice core from March to May, bacterial respiration was important at the bottom ice during all months, and primary production in May. It was evident that the sea-ice processes had large impact on UIW, resulting in a five times larger seasonal amplitude of the carbonate system, relative to the upper 20 m. During ice formation, [CO2] increased by 30 µmol kg-1, [CO32-] decreased by 50 µmol kg-1, and the ΩAr decreased by 0.8 in the UIW due to CO2-enriched brine from solid CaCO3. Conversely, during ice melt, [CO32-] increased by 90 µmol kg-1 in the UIW, and Ω increased by 1.4 between March and May, likely due to CaCO3 dissolution and primary production. We estimated that increased ice melt would lead to enhanced oceanic uptake of inorganic carbon to the surface layer.

  12. Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the ice-rule obeying and ice-rule breaking vertices in an artificial spin ice system created using magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors with nanostructured pinning arrays. We show that this system can be doped by changing the external field to move the number of vortices away from commensurability and create sites that contain two or zero vortices. For a square ice, the doping leads to the formation of a grain boundary of vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In commensurate systems where the ice rules are obeyed, we can introduce random disorder at the individual pinning sites to create regions where vortices may not be able to flip from one side of the trap to another. For weak disorder, all of the vertices still obey the ice rules, while at intermediate levels of disorder we find grain boundaries of vertices which do not obey the ice rules. For strong disorder it is possible to create isolated paired vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In summary, we have shown that an artificial square ice can be created using vortices in a type-II superconductor interacting with a periodic array of pinning sites where each site has a double well potential. By defining the direction of the effective spin according to the side of the double well occupied by the vortex, we find that this system obeys the ice rules for square ice. We add disorder to the system in the form of randomness of the height of the potential barrier at the center of the well, and obtain vertex configurations using a rotating drive protocol which is similar to the shaking ac magnetic field used in nanomagnetic systems. For weak disorder the entire system still obeys the square ice rules. For intermediate disorder, ice-rule breaking vertices appear and form grain boundaries, while for strong disorder there are both gain boundaries and isolated paired defects. In a system with uniform potential barrier heights, we introduce disorder by moving away from commensurability and creating

  13. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    Sea ice covers vast areas of the polar oceans, with ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 7 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September to approximately 15 x 10(exp 6) sq km in March and ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km in February to approximately 18 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September. These ice covers have major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the polar regions, and so as changes occur in them there are potential widespread consequences. Satellite data reveal considerable interannual variability in both polar sea ice covers, and many studies suggest possible connections between the ice and various oscillations within the climate system, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Antarctic Oscillation, or Southern Annular Mode. Nonetheless, statistically significant long-term trends are also apparent, including overall trends of decreased ice coverage in the Arctic and increased ice coverage in the Antarctic from late 1978 through the end of 2003, with the Antarctic ice increases following marked decreases in the Antarctic ice during the 1970s. For a detailed picture of the seasonally varying ice cover at the start of the 21st century, this chapter includes ice concentration maps for each month of 2001 for both the Arctic and the Antarctic, as well as an overview of what the satellite record has revealed about the two polar ice covers from the 1970s through 2003.

  14. Automatic digital photo-book making system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wiley; Teo, Patrick; Muzzolini, Russ

    2010-02-01

    The diversity of photo products has grown more than ever before. A group of photos are not only printed individually, but also can be arranged in specific order to tell a story, such as in a photo book, a calendar or a poster collage. Similar to making a traditional scrapbook, digital photo book tools allow the user to choose a book style/theme, layouts of pages, backgrounds and the way the pictures are arranged. This process is often time consuming to users, given the number of images and the choices of layout/background combinations. In this paper, we developed a system to automatically generate photo books with only a few initial selections required. The system utilizes time stamps, color indices, orientations and other image properties to best fit pictures into a final photo book. The common way of telling a story is to lay the pictures out in chronological order. If the pictures are proximate in time, they will coincide with each other and are often logically related. The pictures are naturally clustered along a time line. Breaks between clusters can be used as a guide to separate pages or spreads, thus, pictures that are logically related can stay close on the same page or spread. When people are making a photo book, it is helpful to start with chronologically grouped images, but time alone wont be enough to complete the process. Each page is limited by the number of layouts available. Many aesthetic rules also apply, such as, emphasis of preferred pictures, consistency of local image density throughout the whole book, matching a background to the content of the images, and the variety of adjacent page layouts. We developed an algorithm to group images onto pages under the constraints of aesthetic rules. We also apply content analysis based on the color and blurriness of each picture, to match backgrounds and to adjust page layouts. Some of our aesthetic rules are fixed and given by designers. Other aesthetic rules are statistic models trained by using

  15. Ice Chemistry on Outer Solar System Bodies: Electron Radiolysis of N2-, CH4-, and CO-Containing Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi; Nuevo, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Radiation processing of the surface ices of outer Solar System bodies may be an important process for the production of complex chemical species. The refractory materials resulting from radiation processing of known ices are thought to impart to them a red or brown color, as perceived in the visible spectral region. In this work, we analyzed the refractory materials produced from the 1.2-keV electron bombardment of low-temperature N2-, CH4-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1), which simulates the radiation from the secondary electrons produced by cosmic ray bombardment of the surface ices of Pluto. Despite starting with extremely simple ices dominated by N2, electron irradiation processing results in the production of refractory material with complex oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. These refractory materials were studied at room temperature using multiple analytical techniques including Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Infrared spectra of the refractory material suggest the presence of alcohols, carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, amines, and nitriles. XANES spectra of the material indicate the presence of carboxyl groups, amides, urea, and nitriles, and are thus consistent with the IR data. Atomic abundance ratios for the bulk composition of these residues from XANES analysis show that the organic residues are extremely N-rich, having ratios of N/C ∼ 0.9 and O/C ∼ 0.2. Finally, GC-MS data reveal that the residues contain urea as well as numerous carboxylic acids, some of which are of interest for prebiotic and biological chemistries.

  16. Effectiveness of Thermal-Pneumatic Airfoil-Ice-Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowan, William H., Jr.; Mulholland, Donald R.

    1951-01-01

    Icing and drag investigations were conducted in the NACA Lewis icing research tunnel employing a combination thermal-pneumatic de-icer mounted on a 42-inch-chord NACA 0018 airfoil. The de-icer consisted of a 3-inch-wide electrically heated strip symmetrically located about the leading edge with inflatable tubes on the upper and lower airfoil surfaces aft of the heated area. The entire de-icer extended to approximately 25 percent of chord. A maximum power density of 9.25 watts per square inch was required for marginal ice protection on the airfoil leading edge at an air temperature of 00 F and an airspeed of 300 miles per hour. Drag measurements indicated, that without icing, the de-icer installation increased the section drag to approximately 140 percent of that of the bare airfoil; with the tubes inflated, this value increased to a maximum of approximately 620 percent. A 2-minute tube-inflation cycle prevented excessive ice formation on the inflatable area although small scattered residual Ice formations remained after inflation and were removed intermittently during later cycles. Effects of the time lag of heater temperatures after initial application of power and the insulating effect of ice formations on heater temperatures were also determined.

  17. An Ice Core Melter System for Continuous Major and Trace Chemical Analyses of a New Mt. Logan Summit Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Handley, M. J.; Sneed, S. D.; Mayewski, P. A.; Kreutz, K. J.; Fisher, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The ice core melter system at the University of Maine Climate Change Institute has been recently modified and updated to allow high-resolution (<1-2 cm ice/sample), continuous and coregistered sampling of ice cores, most notably the 2001 Mt. Logan summit ice core (187 m to bedrock), for analyses of 34 trace elements (Sr, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Pb, Bi, U, As, Al, S, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, REE suite) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), 8 major ions (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, MSA) by ion chromatography (IC), stable water isotopes (δ 18O, δ D, d) and volcanic tephra. The UMaine continuous melter (UMCoM) system is housed in a dedicated clean room with HEPA filtered air. Standard clean room procedures are employed during melting. A Wagenbach-style continuous melter system has been modified to include a pure Nickel melthead that can be easily dismantled for thorough cleaning. The system allows melting of both ice and firn without wicking of the meltwater into unmelted core. Contrary to ice core melter systems in which the meltwater is directly channeled to online instruments for continuous flow analyses, the UMCoM system collects discrete samples for each chemical analysis under ultraclean conditions. Meltwater from the pristine innermost section of the ice core is split between one fraction collector that accumulates ICP-MS samples in acid pre-cleaned polypropylene vials under a class-100 HEPA clean bench, and a second fraction collector that accumulates IC samples. A third fraction collector accumulates isotope and tephra samples from the potentially contaminated outer portion of the core. This method is advantageous because an archive of each sample remains for subsequent analyses (including trace element isotope ratios), and ICP-MS analytes are scanned for longer intervals and in replicate. Method detection limits, calculated from de-ionized water blanks passed through the entire UMCoM system, are below 10% of average Mt

  18. A seamless approach to understanding and predicting Arctic sea ice in Met Office modelling systems.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Helene T; Ridley, Jeff K; Keen, Ann B; West, Alex E; Peterson, K Andrew; Rae, Jamie G L; Milton, Sean F; Bacon, Sheldon

    2015-07-13

    Recent CMIP5 models predict large losses of summer Arctic sea ice, with only mitigation scenarios showing sustainable summer ice. Sea ice is inherently part of the climate system, and heat fluxes affecting sea ice can be small residuals of much larger air-sea fluxes. We discuss analysis of energy budgets in the Met Office climate models which point to the importance of early summer processes (such as clouds and meltponds) in determining both the seasonal cycle and the trend in ice decline. We give examples from Met Office modelling systems to illustrate how the seamless use of models for forecasting on time scales from short range to decadal might help to unlock the drivers of high latitude biases in climate models.

  19. Use of the X-Band Radar to Support the Detection of In-Flight Icing Hazards by the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serke, David J.; Politovich, Marcia K.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Gaydos, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The Alliance Icing Research Study-II (AIRS-II) field program was conducted near Montreal, Canada during the winter of 2003. The NASA Icing Remote Detection System (NIRSS) was deployed to detect in-flight icing hazards and consisted of a vertically pointing multichannel radiometer, a ceilometer and an x-band cloud radar. The radiometer was used to derive atmospheric temperature soundings and integrated liquid water, while the ceilometer and radar were used only to define cloud boundaries. The purpose of this study is to show that the radar reflectivity profiles from AIRS-II case studies could be used to provide a qualitative icing hazard.

  20. Laboratory Studies of Extraterrestrial Ices and PAHs: Making an Astrobiological Silk Purse Out of An Interstellar Sow's Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Today, the composition of dust in the ISM is reasonably well constrained to cold, micron-sized particles of various refractory materials. Shrouded within the protective confines of cold, opaque molecular clouds--the birthplace of stars and planets--these particles secrete mantles of mixed molecular lees whose major components are also well constrained. Finally, amidst the molecular inventory of these ice mantles are likely to be found polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whose telltale infrared signature I is now recognized throughout the Universe. However, of what significance is this scenario to the origin of life in our solar system--or any other? The major components of the icy materials observed in interstellar clouds and in our own solar system are uniformly quite simple. In addition, despite the fact that PAHs likely represent the single largest molecular reservoir of organic carbon in evolving planetary systems, they are not what would be considered "biogenic" molecules. Although interesting from a chemical and astrophysical standpoint, in the absence of a mechanism by which these materials can be transformed into more biochemically significant structures, they are of little Astrobiological significance. In this talk, we will begin with a brief review of the nature and abundance of the "raw" population of PAHs and PAH-related materials in the ISM. From there, we will move on to explore our laboratory simulations of the photochemical evolution of realistic mixed molecular ices under conditions which simulate those encountered in the ISM and in evolving planetary systems. Particular attention will be paid to the surprisingly complex array of organic species that are produced in these ices from such a deceptively simple inventory of starting materials

  1. Dynamics of coupled ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone: Study of the mesoscale processes and of constitutive equations for sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at the modelling of mesoscale processed such as up/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A 2-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model (f-plane) through interfacial stresses. The constitutive equations of the sea ice are formulated on the basis of the Reiner-Rivlin theory. The internal ice stresses are important only at high ice concentrations (90-100%), otherwise the ice motion is essentially free drift, where the air-ice stress is balanced by the ice-water stress. The model was tested by studying the upwelling dynamics. Winds parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwilling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater that air-ocean momentum flux, and thus the Ekman transport is bigger under the ice than in the open water. The upwelling simulation was extended to include temporally varying forcing, which was chosen to vary sinusoidally with a 4 day period. This forcing resembles successive cyclone passings. In the model with a thin oceanic upper layer, ice bands were formed.

  2. Semi-automated Digital Imaging and Processing System for Measuring Lake Ice Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Preetpal

    Canada is home to thousands of freshwater lakes and rivers. Apart from being sources of infinite natural beauty, rivers and lakes are an important source of water, food and transportation. The northern hemisphere of Canada experiences extreme cold temperatures in the winter resulting in a freeze up of regional lakes and rivers. Frozen lakes and rivers tend to offer unique opportunities in terms of wildlife harvesting and winter transportation. Ice roads built on frozen rivers and lakes are vital supply lines for industrial operations in the remote north. Monitoring the ice freeze-up and break-up dates annually can help predict regional climatic changes. Lake ice impacts a variety of physical, ecological and economic processes. The construction and maintenance of a winter road can cost millions of dollars annually. A good understanding of ice mechanics is required to build and deem an ice road safe. A crucial factor in calculating load bearing capacity of ice sheets is the thickness of ice. Construction costs are mainly attributed to producing and maintaining a specific thickness and density of ice that can support different loads. Climate change is leading to warmer temperatures causing the ice to thin faster. At a certain point, a winter road may not be thick enough to support travel and transportation. There is considerable interest in monitoring winter road conditions given the high construction and maintenance costs involved. Remote sensing technologies such as Synthetic Aperture Radar have been successfully utilized to study the extent of ice covers and record freeze-up and break-up dates of ice on lakes and rivers across the north. Ice road builders often used Ultrasound equipment to measure ice thickness. However, an automated monitoring system, based on machine vision and image processing technology, which can measure ice thickness on lakes has not been thought of. Machine vision and image processing techniques have successfully been used in manufacturing

  3. Investigation of Aerodynamic and Icing Characteristics of a Flush Alternate Inlet Induction System Air Scoop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James P.

    1953-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the NACA Lewis icing research tunnel to determine the aerodynamic and icing characteristics of a full-scale induction-system air-scoop assembly incorporating a flush alternate inlet. The flush inlet was located immediately downstream of the offset ram inlet and included a 180 deg reversal and a 90 deg elbow in the ducting between inlet and carburetor top deck. The model also had a preheat-air inlet. The investigation was made over a range of mass-air- flow ratios of 0 to 0.8, angles of attack of 0 and 4 deg airspeeds of 150 to 270 miles per hour, air temperatures of 0 and 25 F various liquid-water contents, and droplet sizes. The ram inlet gave good pressure recovery in both clear air and icing but rapid blockage of the top-deck screen occurred during icing. The flush alternate inlet had poor pressure recovery in both clear air and icing. The greatest decreases in the alternate-inlet pressure recovery were obtained at icing conditions of low air temperature and high liquid-water content. No serious screen icing was observed with the alternate inlet. Pressure and temperature distributions on the carburetor top deck were determined using the preheat-air supply with the preheat- and alternate-inlet doors in various positions. No screen icing occurred when the preheat-air system was operated in combination with alternate-inlet air flow.

  4. SONARC: A Sea Ice Monitoring and Forecasting System to Support Safe Operations and Navigation in Arctic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, S. R.; Babiker, M.; Sandven, S.; Muckenhuber, S.; Korosov, A.; Bobylev, L.; Vesman, A.; Mushta, A.; Demchev, D.; Volkov, V.; Smirnov, K.; Hamre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice monitoring and forecasting systems are important tools for minimizing accident risk and environmental impacts of Arctic maritime operations. Satellite data such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), combined with atmosphere-ice-ocean forecasting models, navigation models and automatic identification system (AIS) transponder data from ships are essential components of such systems. Here we present first results from the SONARC project (project term: 2015-2017), an international multidisciplinary effort to develop novel and complementary ice monitoring and forecasting systems for vessels and offshore platforms in the Arctic. Automated classification methods (Zakhvatkina et al., 2012) are applied to Sentinel-1 dual-polarization SAR images from the Barents and Kara Sea region to identify ice types (e.g. multi-year ice, level first-year ice, deformed first-year ice, new/young ice, open water) and ridges. Short-term (1-3 days) ice drift forecasts are computed from SAR images using feature tracking and pattern tracking methods (Berg & Eriksson, 2014). Ice classification and drift forecast products are combined with ship positions based on AIS data from a selected period of 3-4 weeks to determine optimal vessel speed and routing in ice. Results illustrate the potential of high-resolution SAR data for near-real-time monitoring and forecasting of Arctic ice conditions. Over the next 3 years, SONARC findings will contribute new knowledge about sea ice in the Arctic while promoting safe and cost-effective shipping, domain awareness, resource management, and environmental protection.

  5. Thermal design and de-icing system for the Antarctic Telescope ICE-T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Kärcher, Hans J.; Kühn, Jürgen; Divarano, Igor

    2010-07-01

    ICE-T, the International Concordia Explorer Telescope, is under final design by an international consortium led by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam AIP, Germany, and is intended to be placed at the French-Italian Concordia Station on Dome C in Antarctica. Experience with smaller telescopes at Concordia has shown that under the weather conditions at this site - with mean outside temperatures of -60° to -80° C and temperature changes of 20° in short time intervals - the ice-accumulation on the optical components during observation is a major problem. Also, energy consumption at this site should be minimized because fuel transport to the site is very costly. The paper describes the thermal concept for the telescope where the waste energy of the instrument electronics is used for heating the front surfaces of the Schmidt optics. All other parts of the telescope are protected by an insulated smooth cladding against the harsh outside environment. The effectiveness of the thermal concept is verified by CFD (Computer Fluid Dynamics) calculations.

  6. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  7. Results of a low power ice protection system test and a new method of imaging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Bond, Thomas H.; Mesander, Geert A.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a BF Goodrich De-Icing System's Pneumatic Impulse Ice Protection (PIIP) system in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Characterization studies were done on shed ice particle size by changing the input pressure and cycling time of the PIIP de-icer. The shed ice particle size was quantified using a newly developed image software package. The tests were conducted on a 1.83 m (6 ft) span, 0.53 m (221 in) chord NACA 0012 airfoil operated at a 4 degree angle of attack. The IRT test conditions were a -6.7 C (20 F) glaze ice, and a -20 C (-4 F) rime ice. The ice shedding events were recorded with a high speed video system. A detailed description of the image processing package and the results generated from this analytical tool are presented.

  8. Decision Technology Systems: A Vehicle to Consolidate Decision Making Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgionne, Guisseppi A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of management decision making and the support needed to manage successfully highlights a Decision Technology System (DTS) that integrates other information systems. Topics discussed include computer information systems (CISs); knowledge gateways; the decision-making process; decision support systems (DSS); expert systems; and facility…

  9. A study of carburetor/induction system icing in general aviation accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obermayer, R. W.; Roe, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the frequency and severity of carburetor/induction icing in general-aviation accidents was performed. The available literature and accident data from the National Transportation Safety Board were collected. A computer analysis of the accident data was performed. Between 65 and 90 accidents each year involve carburetor/induction system icing as a probable cause/factor. Under conditions conducive to carburetor/induction icing, between 50 and 70 percent of engine malfunction/failure accidents (exclusive of those due to fuel exhaustion) are due to carburetor/induction system icing. Since the evidence of such icing may not remain long after an accident, it is probable that the frequency of occurrence of such accidents is underestimated; therefore, some extrapolation of the data was conducted. The problem of carburetor/induction system icing is particularly acute for pilots with less than 1000 hours of total flying time. The severity of such accidents is about the same as any accident resulting from a forced landing or precautionary landing. About 144 persons, on the average, are exposed to death and injury each year in accidents involving carburetor/induction icing as a probable cause/factor.

  10. A dynamical-systems approach for computing ice-affected streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamical-systems approach was developed and evaluated for computing ice-affected streamflow. The approach provides for dynamic simulation and parameter estimation of site-specific equations relating ice effects to routinely measured environmental variables. Comparison indicates that results from the dynamical-systems approach ranked higher than results from 11 analytical methods previously investigated on the basis of accuracy and feasibility criteria. Additional research will likely lead to further improvements in the approach.

  11. Decision Making and Systems Thinking: Educational Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtseven, M. Kudret; Buchanan, Walter W.

    2016-01-01

    Decision making in most universities is taught within the conventional OR/MS (Operations Research/Management Science) paradigm. This paradigm is known to be "hard" since it is consisted of mathematical tools, and normally suitable for solving structured problems. In complex situations the conventional OR/MS paradigm proves to be…

  12. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8% of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  13. The IceCube data acquisition system: Signal capture, digitization,and timestamping

    SciTech Connect

    The IceCube Collaboration; Matis, Howard

    2009-03-02

    IceCube is a km-scale neutrino observatory under construction at the South Pole with sensors both in the deep ice (InIce) and on the surface (IceTop). The sensors, called Digital Optical Modules (DOMs), detect, digitize and timestamp the signals from optical Cherenkov-radiation photons. The DOM Main Board (MB) data acquisition subsystem is connected to the central DAQ in the IceCube Laboratory (ICL) by a single twisted copper wire-pair and transmits packetized data on demand. Time calibration ismaintained throughout the array by regular transmission to the DOMs of precisely timed analog signals, synchronized to a central GPS-disciplined clock. The design goals and consequent features, functional capabilities, and initial performance of the DOM MB, and the operation of a combined array of DOMs as a system, are described here. Experience with the first InIce strings and the IceTop stations indicates that the system design and performance goals have been achieved.

  14. Analyses and tests for design of an electro-impulse de-icing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.; Schrag, R. L.; Bernhart, W. D.; Friedberg, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    De-icing of aircraft by using the electro-magnetic impulse phenomenon was proposed and demonstrated in several European countries. However, it is not available as a developed system due to lack of research on the basic physical mechanisms and necessary design parameters. The de-icing is accomplished by rapidly discharging high voltage capacitors into a wire coil rigidly supported just inside the aircraft skin. Induced eddy currents in the skin create a repulsive force resulting in a hammer-like force which cracks, de-bonds, and expels ice on the skin surface. The promised advantages are very low energy, high reliability of de-icing, and low maintenance. Three years of Electo-Impulse De-icing (EIDI) research is summarized and the analytical studies and results of testing done in the laboratory, in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel, and in flight are presented. If properly designed, EIDI was demonstrated to be an effective and practical ice protection system for small aircraft, turbojet engine inlets, elements of transport aircraft, and shows promise for use on helicopter rotor blades. Included are practical techniques of fabrication of impulse coils and their mountings. The use of EIDI with nonmetallic surface materials is also described.

  15. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8 percent of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  16. Bulk heat transfer coefficient in the ice-upper ocean system in the ice melt season derived from concentration-temperature relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Ohshima, Kay I.

    2008-06-01

    The bulk heat transfer coefficient in the ice-upper ocean system (Kb) in the ice melt season is estimated by a new method at 18 areas that cover much of the Antarctic seasonal ice zone. The method is based on a model in which ice melting is caused only by heat input through open water and is treated in a bulk fashion in the ice-upper ocean system. Kb is estimated by fitting a convergent curve derived from the model to an observed ice concentration-temperature plot (CT-plot). Estimated Kb is 1.15 ± 0.72 × 10-4 m s-1 on average. If Kb can be expressed by the product of the heat transfer coefficient (ch) and the friction velocity (uτ), ch is 0.0113 ± 0.0055. This value is about two times larger than that estimated at the ice bottom. The relationship between Kb and the geostrophic wind speed (Uw), which is roughly proportional to uτ, shows a significant positive correlation, as expected. Further, Kb seems more likely to be proportional to the square or cube of Uw rather than a linear relationship. Since Kb estimated from our method is associated with ice melting in a bulk fashion in the ice-upper ocean system, this relationship likely indicates both the mixing process of heat in the upper ocean (proportional to uτ3) and the local heat transfer process at the ice-ocean interface (proportional to uτ).

  17. 14 CFR 25.1093 - Induction system icing protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... protection at its critical condition, without adverse effect, in an atmosphere that is at a temperature... that, in air free of visible moisture at a temperature of 30 F., each airplane with altitude engines... probability of ice formation has a preheater that can provide a heat rise of 100 °F. with the engine at...

  18. Studies of Ice Nucleating Aerosol Particles in Arctic Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this research is to improve the understanding of ice nucleating aerosol particles (IN) and the role they play in ice formation in Arctic clouds. IN are important for global climate issues in a variety of ways. The primary effect is their role in determining the phase (liquid or solid) of cloud particles. The microscale impact is on cloud particle size, growth rate, shape, fall speed, concentration, radiative properties, and scavenging of gases and aerosols. On a larger scale, ice formation affects the development of precipitation (rate, amount, type, and distribution), latent heat release (rate and altitude), ambient humidity, the persistence of clouds, and cloud albedo. The overall goals of our FIRE 3 research are to characterize the concentrations and variability of Arctic IN during the winter-spring transition, to compare IN measurements with ice concentrations in Arctic clouds, and to examine selected IN samples for particle morphology and chemical there are distinguishable chemical signatures. The results can be combined with other measurements of aerosols, gaseous species, and cloud characteristics in order to understand the processes that determine the phase and concentration of cloud particles.

  19. Balance Mass Flux and Velocity Across the Equilibrium Line in Ice Drainage Systems of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Giovinetto, Mario B.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Estimates of balance mass flux and the depth-averaged ice velocity through the cross-section aligned with the equilibrium line are produced for each of six drainage systems in Greenland. (The equilibrium line, which lies at approximately 1200 m elevation on the ice sheet, is the boundary between the area of net snow accumulation at higher elevations and the areas of net melting at lower elevations around the ice sheet.) Ice drainage divides and six major drainage systems are delineated using surface topography from ERS (European Remote Sensing) radar altimeter data. The net accumulation rate in the accumulation zone bounded by the equilibrium line is 399 Gt/yr and net ablation rate in the remaining area is 231 Gt/yr. (1 GigaTon of ice is 1090 kM(exp 3). The mean balance mass flux and depth-averaged ice velocity at the cross-section aligned with the modeled equilibrium line are 0.1011 Gt kM(exp -2)/yr and 0.111 km/yr, respectively, with little variation in these values from system to system. The ratio of the ice mass above the equilibrium line to the rate of mass output implies an effective exchange time of approximately 6000 years for total mass exchange. The range of exchange times, from a low of 3 ka in the SE drainage system to 14 ka in the NE, suggests a rank as to which regions of the ice sheet may respond more rapidly to climate fluctuations.

  20. Passenger comfort technology for system decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Decisions requiring passenger comfort technology were shown to depend on: the relationship between comfort and other factors (e.g., cost, urgency, alternate modes) in traveler acceptance of the systems, serving a selected market require technology to quantify effects of comfort versus offsetting factors in system acceptance. Public predict the maximum percentage of travelers who willingly accept the overall comfort of any trip ride. One or the other of these technology requirements apply to decisions on system design, operation and maintenance.

  1. Making hybrids of two-hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Dagher, M C; Filhol-Cochet, O

    1997-05-01

    Two-hybrid systems are powerful tools to find new partners for a protein of interest. However, exchange of material between two-hybrid users has been handicapped by the various versions of two-hybrid systems available and by the widely accepted idea that they are not compatible. In the present paper we show that, contrary to the dogma, the most often used two-hybrid systems may be combined by either transformation or mating assays. The protocol to be followed in each case is provided. This will greatly increase the prospects of the growing network of interacting proteins, by reconciling the "two-hybrid systems" and the "interaction trap".

  2. Quantum criticality and fractional charge excitations in itinerant ice-rule systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udagawa, Masafumi; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2013-03-01

    ``Ice rule'' is a configurational constraint on Ising-type variables defined on tetrahedron-based lattices, such as a pyrochlore lattice, so that two out of the four sites on a tetrahedron are in the opposite state to the other two. This concept plays an important role in many systems, such as water ice Ih, magnetite Fe3O4, and spin ice materials Ho(Dy)2Ti2O7. Under the ice-rule constraint, the ground state is disordered and retains macroscopic degeneracy. Nevertheless, the ice-rule configuration is not completely random but has a peculiar spatial structure with quasi-long-range correlation. It is interesting to ask how itinerant electrons change their properties by coupling to this anomalous spatial structure. To answer this problem, we adopt an extended Falicov-Kimball model as a minimal model, in which itinerant electrons interact with localized charge degrees of freedom under the ice rule. We exactly solve this model on a loop-less variant of the tetrahedron-based lattices, a tetrahedron Husimi cactus and clarify the ground-state phase diagram. The exact solution reveals a quantum critical point separating two insulating phases, where a novel non-Fermi-liquid behavior emerges. We also discuss the nature of fractional excitations breaking the ice-rule manifold.

  3. A finite element study of the EIDI system. [Electro-Impulse De-Icing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatkhate, A. A.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a method for modeling the structural dynamics of an Electro-Impulse De-Icing System, using finite element analyses procedures. A guideline for building a representative finite element model is discussed. Modeling was done initially using four noded cubic elements, four noded isoparametric plate elements and eight noded isoparametric shell elements. Due to the size of the problem and due to the underestimation of shear stress results when compared to previous analytical work an approximate model was created to predict possible areas of shedding of ice. There appears to be good agreement with the test data provided by The Boeing Commercial Airplane Company. Thus these initial results of this method were found to be encouraging. Additional analytical work and comparison with experiment is needed in order to completely evaluate this approach.

  4. A comparison of ice VII formed in the H2O, NaCl-H2O, and CH3OH-H2O systems: Implications for H2O-rich planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Scott, Henry P.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2013-02-01

    High-pressure H2O polymorphs, namely ice VI, ice VII, and ice X, are hypothesized to make up a considerable portion of the interiors of large icy satellites and select extra-solar planets. The incorporation of foreign ions or molecules into these high-pressure phases is possible through ocean-ice interaction, rock-ice interaction at depth, or processes that occurred during accretion. Recent research concerning the effects charged ions have on ice VII has shown that these ions notably affect the structure of ice VII (Frank et al., 2006; Klotz et al., 2009). This study was designed to determine the effects of a molecular impurity on ice VII and compare those effects to both pure H2O ice and ice with an ionic impurity. Ice samples were formed in this study via compression in a diamond anvil cell from either H2O, a 1.60 mol% NaCl aqueous solution, a 1.60 mol% CH3OH aqueous solution, or a 5.00 mol% CH3OH aqueous solution and were compressed up to 71 GPa at room temperature. Ice formed from pure H2O had no impurities whereas ices formed in the NaCl-H2O and CH3OH-H2O systems contained the impurities Na+ and Cl- and CH3OH, respectively. Pressure-volume relations were observed in situ by using synchrotron based X-ray diffraction and were used to determine the equations of state for ices formed in the H2O, NaCl-H2O and CH3OH-H2O systems. The data illustrate that ice VII formed from a NaCl-bearing aqueous solution exhibited a depressed volume when compared to that of H2O-only ice VII at any given pressure, whereas ice VII formed from CH3OH-bearing aqueous solutions showed an opposite trend, with an increase in volume relative to that of pure ice VII. The ices within planetary bodies will most likely have both ionic and molecular impurities and the trends outlined in this study can be used to improve density profiles of H2O-rich planetary bodies.

  5. Influence of Sea Ice on Arctic Marine Sulfur Biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, Clara; Jin, Meibing

    2013-06-30

    Global climate models (GCMs) have not effectively considered how responses of arctic marine ecosystems to a warming climate will influence the global climate system. A key response of arctic marine ecosystems that may substantially influence energy exchange in the Arctic is a change in dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions, because DMS emissions influence cloud albedo. This response is closely tied to sea ice through its impacts on marine ecosystem carbon and sulfur cycling, and the ice-albedo feedback implicated in accelerated arctic warming. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions from coupled climate simulations, important model components of the climate system, such as feedbacks between arctic marine biogeochemistry and climate, need to be reasonably and realistically modeled. This research first involved model development to improve the representation of marine sulfur biogeochemistry simulations to understand/diagnose the control of sea-ice-related processes on the variability of DMS dynamics. This study will help build GCM predictions that quantify the relative current and possible future influences of arctic marine ecosystems on the global climate system. Our overall research objective was to improve arctic marine biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, now CESM). Working closely with the Climate Ocean Sea Ice Model (COSIM) team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), we added 1 sea-ice algae and arctic DMS production and related biogeochemistry to the global Parallel Ocean Program model (POP) coupled to the LANL sea ice model (CICE). Both CICE and POP are core components of CESM. Our specific research objectives were: 1) Develop a state-of-the-art ice-ocean DMS model for application in climate models, using observations to constrain the most crucial parameters; 2) Improve the global marine sulfur model used in CESM by including DMS biogeochemistry in the Arctic; and 3) Assess how sea ice influences DMS dynamics in the arctic marine

  6. JBluIce-EPICS: a fast and flexible open-source beamline control system for macromolecular crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S.; Hilgart, M.; Makarov, O.; Pothineni, S. B.; Yoder, D.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Venugopalan, N.; Becker, M.; Clift, M.; Smith, J. L.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper overviews recent advances in the JBluIce-EPICS open-source control system designed at the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Cancer Institute at the Advanced Photon Source (GM/CA@APS). We discuss some technical highlights of this system distinguishing it from the competition, such as reduction of software layers to only two, possibility to operate JBluIce in parallel with other beamline controls, plugin-enabled architecture where the plugins can be written in any programming language, and utilization of the whole power of the Java integrated development environment in the Graphical User Interface. Then, we demonstrate how these highlights help to make JBluIce fast, easily adaptable to new beamline developments, and intuitive for users. In particular, we discuss several recent additions to the system including a bridge between crystal rastering and data collection, automatic detection of raster polygons from optical crystal centering, background data processing, and a pathway to a fully automated pipeline from crystal screening to solving crystal structure.

  7. Experimental investigation on performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Liu, Xu; Wu, Shuangmao

    2009-11-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is conducted in this paper. The experimental system of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe is set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure and the condensation pressure of refrigeration system, the refrigeration capacity and the COP (coefficient of performance) of the system, the IPF (ice packing factor) and the cool storage capacity in the cool storage tank during charging period, and the cool discharge rate and the cool discharge capacity in the cool storage tank, the outlet water temperature in the cool storage tank and the outlet air temperature in room unit during discharging period are investigated. The experimental results show that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe can stably work during charging and discharging period. This indicates that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is well adapted to cool storage air-conditioning systems in building. (author)

  8. New wave systems in the "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Murawski, Jens; Pohlmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Near "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean offers new possibilities for maritime activities. Retreat of the sea ice projected in the climate change scenarios in the coming decades will open new ship routes, which potentially can be much more efficient compared to the present days. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown what kind of wave systems will develop under new ice conditions. We investigate the near future of the Arctic wave climate using new projections of wind and ice conditions from the CMIP5 set of experiments. We use the output (wind and ice data) of an Earth system model (EC-Earth) to force a high-resolution Arctic setup of the wave model WAM. The grid of the WAM was rotated ensuring a free propagation of waves over the North Pole. Model results from the historical (spanning the years 1850-2010) and future projections (for the period of 2010-2100) of Earth's climate will be presented. We investigate the changes in the wave systems of the Arctic Ocean under future sea ice conditions. We show that the region will develop new patterns in wave regimes including the generation of the Arctic swell and the new surfing zones along the coastal line.

  9. Young Solar System in the Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version

    This artist's diagram compares the Epsilon Eridani system to our own solar system. The two systems are structured similarly, and both host asteroids (brown), comets (blue) and planets (white dots).

    Epsilon Eridani is our closest known planetary system, located about 10 light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. Its central star is a younger, fainter version of our sun, and is about 800 million years old about the same age of our solar system when life first took root on Earth.

    Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that the system hosts two asteroid belts, in addition to previously identified candidate planets and an outer comet ring.

    Epsilon Eridani's inner asteroid belt is located at about the same position as ours, approximately three astronomical units from its star (an astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and the sun.). The system's second, denser belt lies at about the same place where Uranus orbits in our solar system, or 20 astronomical units from the star.

    In the same way that Jupiter lies just outside our asteroid belt, shepherding its rocky debris into a ring, Epsilon Eridani is thought to have planets orbiting near the rims of its two belts. The first of these planets was identified in 2000 via the radial velocity technique. Called Epsilon Eridani b, it orbits at an average distance of 3.4 astronomical units placing it just outside the system's inner asteroid belt.

    The second planet orbiting near the rim of the outer asteroid belt at 20 astronomical units was inferred when Spitzer discovered the belt.

    A third planet might orbit in Epsilon Eridani at the inner edge of its outermost comet ring, which lies between 35 and 90 astronomical units. This planet was first hinted at in 1998 due to observed lumpiness in the comet ring.

    The outer comet ring around Epsilon Eridani is denser than our

  10. Ice & Fire: Missions to the most difficult solar system destinations… on a budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehle, Robert L.; Brewster, Stephen C.; Carraway, John B.; Chatterjee, Alok K.; Clark, Karla B.; Doyle, Richard J.; Henry, Paul K.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Jorgensen, Edward J.; Kemski, Richard P.; Ludwinski, Jan M.; Maddock, Robert W.; Mondt, Jack F.; Randolph, James E.; Terrile, Richard J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1999-11-01

    Three radii from the surface of the Sun… more natural radiation around Jupiter than would be encountered immediately following a nuclear war… to the farthest planet and beyond… these challenges are faced by the three "Ice & Fire" missions: Solar Probe, Europa Orbiter, and PlutoKuiper Express. These three missions will be beneficiaries of the X2000 and related advanced technology development programs. Technology developments now in progress make these missions achievable at costs recently thought adequate only for missions of relatively short durations to "nearby" destinations. The next mission to Europa after Galileo will determine whether a global subsurface liquid water ocean is currently present, and will identify locations where the ocean, if it exists, may be most accessible to future missions. Pluto-Kuiper Express will complete the reconnaissance of the known planets in our Solar System with geological, compositional, and atmospheric mapping of Pluto and Charon while Pluto remains relatively near the Sun during its 248 year orbit. An extended mission to a Kuiper Disk object may be possible, depending on remaining sciencecraft resources. Using a unique combination of Sun shield/high gain antenna and quadrature encounter geometry, Solar Probe will deeply penetrate our nearest star's atmosphere to make local measurements of the birth of solar wind, and to remotely image features as small as 60 kilometers across on the Sun's surface. Avionics technology, leading to integration of functions among a set of multichip modules with standard interfaces, will enable lower production costs, lower power and mass, and the ability to package with modest shielding to enable survival in orbit around Europa inside Jupiter's intense radiation belts. The same avionics and software can be utilized on the other Ice & Fire missions. Each mission is characterized by a long cruise to its destination, facilitated by planetary flybys. The flight systems will represent a unique

  11. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS.

  12. Permafrost and Subsurface Ice in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The properties and behavior of planetary permafrost are discussed with reference to the ability of such surfaces to sustain loads characteristics of spacecraft landing and planetary bases. In most occurrences, water ice is in close proximity to, or in contact with, finely divided silicate mineral matter. When ice contacts silicate mineral surfaces, a liquid-like, transition zone is created. Its thickness ranges from several hundred Angstron units at temperatures near 0 degrees C to about three Angstrom units at -150 degrees C. When soluble substances are present, the resulting brine enlarges the interfacial zone. When clays are involved, although the interfacial zone may be small, its extent is large. The unfrozen, interfacial water may amount to 100% or more weight at a temperature of -5 degrees C. The presence of this interfacial unfrozen water acts to confer plasticity to permafrost, enabling it to exhibit creep at all imposed levels of stress. Nucleation processes and load-bearing capacity are examined.

  13. What makes closed ecological systems sustainable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitelson, I.; Degermendzhy, A.; Rodicheva, E.

    A closed ecosystem has some properties that an open systems lacks. Let us consider the ones that increase the sustainability of an ecosystem. The common feature of biological and physicochemical life support systems is that basically they are both catalytic. There are two fundamental properties distinguishing biological systems: 1) they are auto-catalytic: their catalysts - enzymes of protein nature - are continuously reproduced when the system functions; 2) the program of every process performed by enzymes and the program of their reproduction are inherent in the biological system itself - in the totality of genomes of the species involved in the functioning of the ecosystem. Actually, one cell with the genome capable of the phenotypic realization is enough for the self- restoration of the function performed by the cells of this species in the ecosystem. The multi-cellular organisms with stem cells are constantly ready to repair themselves by intensifying the continuous process of regeneration. We (Gitelson) have made a quantitative investigation of this process by studying the regeneration and reparation of erythrocytes in mammals. The continuous microalgal culture of Chlorella vulgaris was taken to investigate quantitatively the similar functional process of self-restoration in unicellular algae (Rodicheva). Based on the data obtained, we proposed a mathematical model of the restoration process in the cell population that has suffered an acute radiation damage. Besides these general biological mechanisms responsible for their sustainability, closed systems also possess specific features enhancing their stability. They are as follows: 1. Nutrients cannot leave the system. 2. The metabolic pathways of the material cycling are closed. 3. The rates of interlink metabolism are in conformity with each other due to their mutual limitation. We present the data obtained in the Bios-3 experiments that prove the efficiency of this mechanism as a factor of the

  14. Crystallization of amorphous water ice in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Electron diffraction studies of vapor-deposited water ice have characterized the dynamical structural changes during crystallization that affect volatile retention in cometary materials. Crystallization is found to occur by nucleation of small domains, while leaving a significant part of the amorphous material in a slightly more relaxed amorphous state that coexists metastably with cubic crystalline ice. The onset of the amorphous relaxation is prior to crystallization and coincides with the glass transition. Above the glass transition temperature, the crystallization kinetics are consistent with the amorphous solid becoming a "strong" viscous liquid. The amorphous component can effectively retain volatiles during crystallization if the volatile concentration is approximately 10% or less. For higher initial impurity concentrations, a significant amount of impurities is released during crystallization, probably because the impurities are trapped on the surfaces of micropores. A model for crystallization over long timescales is described that can be applied to a wide range of impure water ices under typical astrophysical conditions if the fragility factor D, which describes the viscosity behavior, can be estimated.

  15. An Instructional System for Consumer Decision-Making: Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchman, J. Richard; DiSario, Martha R.

    An instructional system is presented for building the competencies of adult basic education students in making consumer decisions, and offers a guide to teachers who wish to design their own decision-making problems for students. The first four chapters provide a brief introduction, discuss the rational consumer decision-making process and the…

  16. Rapid Access Ice Drill: A New Tool for Exploration of the Deep Antarctic Ice Sheets and Subglacial Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodge, J. W.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) will penetrate the Antarctic ice sheets in order to core through deep ice, the glacial bed, and into bedrock below. This new technology will provide a critical first look at the interface between major ice caps and their subglacial geology. Currently in construction, RAID is a mobile drilling system capable of making several long boreholes in a single field season in Antarctica. RAID is interdisciplinary and will allow access to polar paleoclimate records in ice >1 Ma, direct observation at the base of the ice sheets, and recovery of rock cores from the ice-covered East Antarctic craton. RAID uses a diamond rock-coring system as in mineral exploration. Threaded drill-pipe with hardened metal bits will cut through ice using reverse circulation of Estisol for pressure-compensation, maintenance of temperature, and removal of ice cuttings. Near the bottom of the ice sheet, a wireline bottom-hole assembly will enable diamond coring of ice, the glacial bed, and bedrock below. Once complete, boreholes will be kept open with fluid, capped, and made available for future down-hole measurement of thermal gradient, heat flow, ice chronology, and ice deformation. RAID will also sample for extremophile microorganisms. RAID is designed to penetrate up to 3,300 meters of ice and take sample cores in less than 200 hours. This rapid performance will allow completion of a borehole in about 10 days before moving to the next drilling site. RAID is unique because it can provide fast borehole access through thick ice; take short ice cores for paleoclimate study; sample the glacial bed to determine ice-flow conditions; take cores of subglacial bedrock for age dating and crustal history; and create boreholes for use as an observatory in the ice sheets. Together, the rapid drilling capability and mobility of the drilling system, along with ice-penetrating imaging methods, will provide a unique 3D picture of the interior Antarctic ice sheets.

  17. A coupled dynamic-thermodynamic model of an ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamics are incorporated into a coupled ice-ocean model in order to investigate wind-driven ice-ocean processes in the marginal zone. Upswelling at the ice edge which is generated by the difference in the ice-air and air-water surface stresses is found to give rise to a strong entrainment by drawing the pycnocline closer to the surface. Entrainment is shown to be negligible outside the areas affected by the ice edge upswelling. If cooling at the top is included in the model, the heat and salt exchanges are further enhanced in the upswelling areas. It is noted that new ice formation occurs in the region not affected by ice edge upswelling, and it is suggested that the high-salinity mixed layer regions (with a scale of a few Rossby radii of deformation) will overturn due to cooling, possibly contributing to the formation of deep water.

  18. Design and deployment of a stationary ice-penetrating radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, G. E.; Mingo, L.; Saint-Jacques, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-penetrating radar (IPR) is a popular tool in glaciology, used most commonly for mapping ice depth. Dielectric contrasts between englacial materials, including ice, water, and impurities, allow the detection of internal stratigraphy and some characterization of englacial properties. Here we describe the design and the 2014-2015 deployments of an autonomous stationary ice-penetrating radar system that was tested on a large outlet glacier of the Icefield Ranges of southwest Yukon, Canada. The radar system was deployed within a kilometer of an ice-marginal lake that is dammed by the Kaskawulsh Glacier and drains annually in a subglacial jökulhlaup. It was programmed to perform a series of soundings every few hours and was left unattended over the course of 6 weeks in 2014 and 7 weeks in 2015, while the lake level was monitored with a pressure transducer and time-lapse imagery. The 2014 dataset is characterized by a marked decrease in englacial reflector strength and coherence during the drainage of the ice-dammed lake. We interpret these data as a significant change in englacial saturation associated with the flood. The 2015 dataset post-dates the flood and provides an opportunity to examine more subtle changes in englacial and subglacial properties. Radar mapping in the vicinity of the deployment locations provides context for the time-dependent measurements, also showing significant differences before and after lake drainage.

  19. Thermodynamics of the formaldehyde-water and formaldehyde-ice systems for atmospheric applications.

    PubMed

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Domine, Florent

    2011-01-27

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a species involved in numerous key atmospheric chemistry processes that can significantly impact the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Since gaseous HCHO is soluble in water, the water droplets of clouds and the ice crystals of snow exchange HCHO with the gas phase and the partitioning of HCHO between the air, water, and ice phases must be known to understand its chemistry. This study proposes thermodynamic formulations for the partitioning of HCHO between the gas phase and the ice and liquid water phases. A reanalysis of existing data on the vapor-liquid equilibrium has shown the inadequacy of the Henry's law formulation, and we instead propose the following equation to predict the mole fraction of HCHO in liquid water at equilibrium, X(HCHO,liq), as a function of the partial pressure P(HCHO) (Pa) and temperature T (K): X(HCHO,liq) = 1.700 × 10(-15) e((8014/T))(P(HCHO))(1.105). Given the paucity of data on the gas-ice equilibrium, the solubility of HCHO and the diffusion coefficient (D(HCHO)) in ice were measured by exposing large single ice crystals to low P(HCHO). Our recommended value for D(HCHO) over the temperature range 243-266 K is D(HCHO) = 6 × 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1). The solubility of HCHO in ice follows the relationship X(HCHO,ice) = 9.898 × 10(-13) e((4072/T))(P(HCHO))(0.803). Extrapolation of these data yields the P(HCHO) versus 1/T phase diagram for the H(2)O-HCHO system. The comparison of our results to existing data on the partitioning of HCHO between the snow and the atmosphere in the high arctic highlights the interplay between thermodynamic equilibrium and kinetics processes in natural systems. PMID:21171657

  20. Thermodynamics of the formaldehyde-water and formaldehyde-ice systems for atmospheric applications.

    PubMed

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Domine, Florent

    2011-01-27

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a species involved in numerous key atmospheric chemistry processes that can significantly impact the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Since gaseous HCHO is soluble in water, the water droplets of clouds and the ice crystals of snow exchange HCHO with the gas phase and the partitioning of HCHO between the air, water, and ice phases must be known to understand its chemistry. This study proposes thermodynamic formulations for the partitioning of HCHO between the gas phase and the ice and liquid water phases. A reanalysis of existing data on the vapor-liquid equilibrium has shown the inadequacy of the Henry's law formulation, and we instead propose the following equation to predict the mole fraction of HCHO in liquid water at equilibrium, X(HCHO,liq), as a function of the partial pressure P(HCHO) (Pa) and temperature T (K): X(HCHO,liq) = 1.700 × 10(-15) e((8014/T))(P(HCHO))(1.105). Given the paucity of data on the gas-ice equilibrium, the solubility of HCHO and the diffusion coefficient (D(HCHO)) in ice were measured by exposing large single ice crystals to low P(HCHO). Our recommended value for D(HCHO) over the temperature range 243-266 K is D(HCHO) = 6 × 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1). The solubility of HCHO in ice follows the relationship X(HCHO,ice) = 9.898 × 10(-13) e((4072/T))(P(HCHO))(0.803). Extrapolation of these data yields the P(HCHO) versus 1/T phase diagram for the H(2)O-HCHO system. The comparison of our results to existing data on the partitioning of HCHO between the snow and the atmosphere in the high arctic highlights the interplay between thermodynamic equilibrium and kinetics processes in natural systems.

  1. Tightly integrated single- and multi-crystal data collection strategy calculation and parallelized data processing in JBluIce beamline control system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Ogata, Craig M.; Hilgart, Mark C.; Stepanov, Sergey; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Becker, Michael; Winter, Graeme; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Smith, Janet L.; et al

    2014-11-18

    The calculation of single- and multi-crystal data collection strategies and a data processing pipeline have been tightly integrated into the macromolecular crystallographic data acquisition and beamline control software JBluIce. Both tasks employ wrapper scripts around existing crystallographic software. JBluIce executes scripts through a distributed resource management system to make efficient use of all available computing resources through parallel processing. The JBluIce single-crystal data collection strategy feature uses a choice of strategy programs to help users rank sample crystals and collect data. The strategy results can be conveniently exported to a data collection run. The JBluIce multi-crystal strategy feature calculates amore » collection strategy to optimize coverage of reciprocal space in cases where incomplete data are available from previous samples. The JBluIce data processing runs simultaneously with data collection using a choice of data reduction wrappers for integration and scaling of newly collected data, with an option for merging with pre-existing data. Data are processed separately if collected from multiple sites on a crystal or from multiple crystals, then scaled and merged. Results from all strategy and processing calculations are displayed in relevant tabs of JBluIce.« less

  2. Tightly integrated single- and multi-crystal data collection strategy calculation and parallelized data processing in JBluIce beamline control system.

    PubMed

    Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Ogata, Craig M; Hilgart, Mark C; Stepanov, Sergey; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Becker, Michael; Winter, Graeme; Sauter, Nicholas K; Smith, Janet L; Fischetti, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    The calculation of single- and multi-crystal data collection strategies and a data processing pipeline have been tightly integrated into the macromolecular crystallographic data acquisition and beamline control software JBluIce. Both tasks employ wrapper scripts around existing crystallographic software. JBluIce executes scripts through a distributed resource management system to make efficient use of all available computing resources through parallel processing. The JBluIce single-crystal data collection strategy feature uses a choice of strategy programs to help users rank sample crystals and collect data. The strategy results can be conveniently exported to a data collection run. The JBluIce multi-crystal strategy feature calculates a collection strategy to optimize coverage of reciprocal space in cases where incomplete data are available from previous samples. The JBluIce data processing runs simultaneously with data collection using a choice of data reduction wrappers for integration and scaling of newly collected data, with an option for merging with pre-existing data. Data are processed separately if collected from multiple sites on a crystal or from multiple crystals, then scaled and merged. Results from all strategy and processing calculations are displayed in relevant tabs of JBluIce.

  3. Tightly integrated single- and multi-crystal data collection strategy calculation and parallelized data processing in JBluIce beamline control system.

    PubMed

    Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Ogata, Craig M; Hilgart, Mark C; Stepanov, Sergey; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Becker, Michael; Winter, Graeme; Sauter, Nicholas K; Smith, Janet L; Fischetti, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    The calculation of single- and multi-crystal data collection strategies and a data processing pipeline have been tightly integrated into the macromolecular crystallographic data acquisition and beamline control software JBluIce. Both tasks employ wrapper scripts around existing crystallographic software. JBluIce executes scripts through a distributed resource management system to make efficient use of all available computing resources through parallel processing. The JBluIce single-crystal data collection strategy feature uses a choice of strategy programs to help users rank sample crystals and collect data. The strategy results can be conveniently exported to a data collection run. The JBluIce multi-crystal strategy feature calculates a collection strategy to optimize coverage of reciprocal space in cases where incomplete data are available from previous samples. The JBluIce data processing runs simultaneously with data collection using a choice of data reduction wrappers for integration and scaling of newly collected data, with an option for merging with pre-existing data. Data are processed separately if collected from multiple sites on a crystal or from multiple crystals, then scaled and merged. Results from all strategy and processing calculations are displayed in relevant tabs of JBluIce. PMID:25484844

  4. Tightly integrated single- and multi-crystal data collection strategy calculation and parallelized data processing in JBluIce beamline control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Ogata, Craig M.; Hilgart, Mark C.; Stepanov, Sergey; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Becker, Michael; Winter, Graeme; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2014-11-18

    The calculation of single- and multi-crystal data collection strategies and a data processing pipeline have been tightly integrated into the macromolecular crystallographic data acquisition and beamline control software JBluIce. Both tasks employ wrapper scripts around existing crystallographic software. JBluIce executes scripts through a distributed resource management system to make efficient use of all available computing resources through parallel processing. The JBluIce single-crystal data collection strategy feature uses a choice of strategy programs to help users rank sample crystals and collect data. The strategy results can be conveniently exported to a data collection run. The JBluIce multi-crystal strategy feature calculates a collection strategy to optimize coverage of reciprocal space in cases where incomplete data are available from previous samples. The JBluIce data processing runs simultaneously with data collection using a choice of data reduction wrappers for integration and scaling of newly collected data, with an option for merging with pre-existing data. Data are processed separately if collected from multiple sites on a crystal or from multiple crystals, then scaled and merged. Results from all strategy and processing calculations are displayed in relevant tabs of JBluIce.

  5. Tightly integrated single- and multi-crystal data collection strategy calculation and parallelized data processing in JBluIce beamline control system

    PubMed Central

    Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Ogata, Craig M.; Hilgart, Mark C.; Stepanov, Sergey; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Becker, Michael; Winter, Graeme; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of single- and multi-crystal data collection strategies and a data processing pipeline have been tightly integrated into the macromolecular crystallographic data acquisition and beamline control software JBluIce. Both tasks employ wrapper scripts around existing crystallographic software. JBluIce executes scripts through a distributed resource management system to make efficient use of all available computing resources through parallel processing. The JBluIce single-crystal data collection strategy feature uses a choice of strategy programs to help users rank sample crystals and collect data. The strategy results can be conveniently exported to a data collection run. The JBluIce multi-crystal strategy feature calculates a collection strategy to optimize coverage of reciprocal space in cases where incomplete data are available from previous samples. The JBluIce data processing runs simultaneously with data collection using a choice of data reduction wrappers for integration and scaling of newly collected data, with an option for merging with pre-existing data. Data are processed separately if collected from multiple sites on a crystal or from multiple crystals, then scaled and merged. Results from all strategy and processing calculations are displayed in relevant tabs of JBluIce. PMID:25484844

  6. An overview of laboratory studies on the energetic processes in water-rich ices containing organic impurities at outer Solar System temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    Solid water-rich ice is an important constituent in our Solar System. Planets such as Earth and Mars, Moons such as Europa and Enceladus, Comets, rings of Saturn, and KBOs are covered with solid water ices. Thus, understanding the intricate physics and chemistry of these ices is a non-trivial and non-negligible task that needs both laboratory and in-situ observational work to make advances in this field. Over the past several years, we have been systematically studying VUV-radiation processing of organic impurities embedded in water-ices in the temperature range between 20 K and 180 K. Since PAHs are abundant extraterrestrial species and their optical strong absorption occurs in the UV-VIS-NIR region (0.2 -- 0.9 μ m) where water-ice is transparent, we have focused on water rich ices containing PAHs. During these in-situ studies we discovered several counter-intuitive phenomena (see for example: Gudipati {&} Allamandola, 2006, Astrophys. J. 638, 286 {&} J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 9020 and references therein): \\begin{itemize} PAHs embedded in cryogenic water-ice are easily and efficiently ionized (>80{%}, i.e., near quantitative ion yields) to the cation form by VUV photons. In water ice, PAH ionization energy is lowered by up to 2 eV compared to the gas-phase, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. PAH cations are stabilized in water ice to temperatures as high as 120 K. Sequential photoionization leading to the formation and stabilization of doubly positively charged organic (PAH) species in water ice has also been found. Electrons are stored in these energy processed water-ices doped with organic impurities. These findings have a range of applications to understanding the geology, chemistry, and physics of icy bodies in the outer Solar System such as coloration, energy budget, outbursts and atmospheres. These and other applications to outer Solar System will be discussed. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by grants from NASA's Exobiology

  7. Gas lift systems make ideal offshore workers

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    With a low initial installation cost and small footprint, gas lift systems are well suited for offshore installations where compressed gas is usually already available. These systems are used on multiple and slimhole completions and handle sandy conditions well. They are also used to kick off wells that will flow naturally once the heavier completion fluids leave the production string. Gas lift itself is a mature workaday technology. Measurement and control of gas flow is an area of intense development in gas lift technology. One new control method involves production of multiple completions through a single wellbore. Typically, gas lift valves are opened and closed through tubing pressure. But downhole measurement technology does not yet yield information good enough for stable gas lift control of multiple completions. Gas lift is proving to be a useful AL technique in conjunction with electric submersible pumps (ESP). Located above the ESP pump, the gas lift can reduce the head and allow greater flow. This is helpful when small casing restricts the size of the downhole ESP pump. Wells can usually be produced by the gas lift alone in case of ESP failure, or by replacing the ESP where schedules, high repair costs or low prices rule out repair.

  8. An Investigation of a Thermal Ice-Prevention System for a Twin-Engine Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alun R

    1946-01-01

    Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. The thermal system investigated was based upon the transfer of heat from the engine exhaust gas to air, which is then caused to flow along the inner surface of any portion of the airplane for which protection is desired.

  9. Making the health care delivery system accountable.

    PubMed

    Wilen, S B; Stone, B M

    1998-01-01

    Accountability has become the fact of life for the health care provider and the delivery system. Until recently, accountability has been viewed primarily through the judicial process as issues of fraud and liability, or by managed care entities through evaluation of the financial bottom line. It is this second consideration and its ramifications that will be explored in this article. Appropriate measurement tools are needed to evaluate services, delivery, performance, customer satisfaction, and outcomes assessment. Measurement tools will be considered in light of the industry's unique considerations and realities. All participants, including insurers, employers, management, and health care providers and recipients, bear responsibilities which necessitate assessment and analysis. However, until the basic question, "Who is the customer?" is resolved, accountability issues remain complex and obscured. Accountability costs and impacts must be evaluated over time. They go way beyond bottom line cost containment and reduction. Accountability will be accomplished when the health care industry implements quality and measurement concepts that yield the highest levels of validity and appropriateness for health care delivery.

  10. Cirrus, contrails, and ice supersaturated regions in high pressure systems at northern mid latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, F.; Treffeisen, R.; Engelbart, D.; Krüger, K.; Schrems, O.

    2008-03-01

    During the European heat wave summer 2003 with predominant high pressure conditions we performed a detailed study of upper tropospheric humidity and ice particles which yielded striking results concerning the occurrence of ice supersaturated regions (ISSR), cirrus, and contrails. Our study is based on lidar observations and meteorological data obtained at Lindenberg/Germany (52.2° N, 14.1° E) as well as the analysis of the European centre for medium range weather forecast (ECMWF). Cirrus clouds were detected in 55% of the lidar profiles and a large fraction of them were subvisible (optical depth <0.03). Thin ice clouds were particularly ubiquitous in high pressure systems. The radiosonde data showed that the upper troposphere was very often supersaturated with respect to ice. Relating the radiosonde profiles to concurrent lidar observations reveals that the ISSRs almost always contained ice particles. Persistent contrails observed with a camera were frequently embedded in these thin or subvisible cirrus clouds. The ECMWF cloud parametrisation reproduces the observed cirrus clouds consistently and a close correlation between the ice water path in the model and the measured optical depth of cirrus is demonstrated.

  11. The sea level response to ice sheet freshwater forcing in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of a realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing on sea-level change in the fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) showing not only the effect on the ocean density and dynamics, but also the gravitational response to mass redistribution between ice sheets and the ocean. We compare the ‘standard’ model simulation (NO-FW) to a simulation with a more realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing (FW) for two different forcing scenario’s (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5) for 1850–2100. The effect on the global mean thermosteric sea-level change is small compared to the total thermosteric change, but on a regional scale the ocean steric/dynamic change shows larger differences in the Southern Ocean, the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (locally over 0.1 m). The gravitational fingerprints of the net sea-level contributions of the ice sheets are computed separately, showing a regional pattern with a magnitude that is similar to the difference between the NO-FW and FW simulations of the ocean steric/dynamic pattern. Our results demonstrate the importance of ice sheet mass loss for regional sea-level projections in light of the projected increasing contribution of ice sheets to future sea-level rise.

  12. Measurements of the isotopic composition of ice and vapor above a tropical convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, A.; Hanisco, T. F.; Sayres, D. S.; St Clair, J.; Smith, J. B.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present observations of the isotopic composition of condensed and vapor water in the lower tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above a large summertime tropical convective system obtained by the Hoxotope and ICOS isotope instruments flown on the NASA WB-57 during TC4. A simple ice isotopic physics model is used in conjunction with our observational data to determine the origin of the condensed phase encountered above the cloud top. Regions of ice that are characteristic of both convective lofting, where the ice is isotopically heavier than the surroundings, and in situ condensation, where the ice shows little difference in isotopic composition with respect to the vapor, are encountered above the convective cell with convective lofting being the dominant mechanism by which water is transported to this altitude. While ice lofting is an important component of water transport models in the TTL, the isotopic composition of ice has been a relatively unconstrained parameter. Observations of condensed isotopes coupled with the vertical profile of vapor in the summertime TTL suggests that there is a seasonal variation in convective timescales that needs to be accounted for in convectively-influenced trajectory models describing the transport of water in the TTL.

  13. Analysis of ice crystals occuring in the upper high levels of tropical mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delplanque, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    In 2010 several test flights were performed in tropical marine meso-scale convective systems at flight levels between 10.5 and 10.8 km. Ice crystals were observed with a high speed CDD camera (image pixel resolution: 15 μ m, time resolution 0.007 s) hereafter called the Airbus nephelometer. In-cloud observations were not restricted to the stratiform regions of the MCS but also convective cores were intensely sampled. High number concentrations of ice crystals (N > 1000 L-1) and IWC of more than 4 g.m-3 could be observed. The main objective of our study is the retrieval of the ice water mass from ice particle number distribution and crystal habits, both observed by the Airbus nephelometer. The shape of ice particles was supposed to correspond to the form of oblate spheroids. A statistical study of the aspect ratio of crystal images was performed comparing two different geometrical approaches for the aspect ratio of their semi axis. One uses the ratio of minimum to maximum length, the other is based on the aspect ratio which best fits the crystal image. Different regions of the MCS present different mean aspect ratios measured at small scale (200 m). Variations of the aspect ratio seem to be associated with different nucleation and growth histories for the crystals. For regions with 'young' ice crystals, an anti-correlation between the aspect ratio and ice number concentration was observed. This observation is compared with the results obtained from simple diffusional growth modeling. To better quantify the characteristics of high concentrations of small ice crystal MCS regions, we propose to use the size distribution of the mean aspect ratio (from 100 μ m to 1 mm), to distinguish quite different behaviors for 'young' and 'mature' convective regions.

  14. The CONCEPTS Global Ice-Ocean Prediction System: Establishing an Environmental Prediction Capability in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Pierre; Smith, Gregory; Testut, Charles-Emmanuel; Surcel Colan, Dorina; Roy, Francois; Reszka, Mateusz; Dupont, Frederic; Lemieux, Jean-Francois; Beaudoin, Christiane; He, Zhongjie; Belanger, Jean-Marc; Deacu, Daniel; Lu, Yimin; Buehner, Mark; Davidson, Fraser; Ritchie, Harold; Lu, Youyu; Drevillon, Marie; Tranchant, Benoit; Garric, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Here we describe a new system implemented recently at the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) entitled the Global Ice Ocean Prediction System (GIOPS). GIOPS provides ice and ocean analyses and 10 day forecasts daily at 00GMT on a global 1/4° resolution grid. GIOPS includes a full multivariate ocean data assimilation system that combines satellite observations of sea level anomaly and sea surface temperature (SST) together with in situ observations of temperature and salinity. In situ observations are obtained from a variety of sources including: the Argo network of autonomous profiling floats, moorings, ships of opportunity, marine mammals and research cruises. Ocean analyses are blended with sea ice analyses produced by the Global Ice Analysis System.. GIOPS has been developed as part of the Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems (CONCEPTS) tri-departmental initiative between Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and National Defense. The development of GIOPS was made through a partnership with Mercator-Océan, a French operational oceanography group. Mercator-Océan provided the ocean data assimilation code and assistance with the system implementation. GIOPS has undergone a rigorous evaluation of the analysis, trial and forecast fields demonstrating its capacity to provide high-quality products in a robust and reliable framework. In particular, SST and ice concentration forecasts demonstrate a clear benefit with respect to persistence. These results support the use of GIOPS products within other CMC operational systems, and more generally, as part of a Government of Canada marine core service. Impact of a two-way coupling between the GEM atmospheric model and NEMO-CICE ocean-ice model will also be presented.

  15. HAIC/HIWC field campaign - investigating ice microphysics in high ice water content regions of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter; Lilie, Lyle; Dezitter, Fabien; Grandin, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Despite existing research programs focusing on tropical convection, high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) - potentially encountered by commercial aircraft and related to reported in-service events - remain poorly documented either because investigation of such high IWC regions was not of highest priority or because utilized instrumentation was not capable of providing accurate cloud microphysical measurements. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The French Falcon 20 research aircraft had been equipped among others with a state-of-the-art in situ microphysics package including the IKP (isokinetic evaporator probe which provides a reference measurement of IWC and TWC), the CDP (cloud droplet spectrometer probe measuring particles in the range 2-50 µm), the 2D-S (2D-Stereo, 10-1280 µm) and PIP (precipitation imaging probe, 100-6400 µm) optical array probes. Microphysical data collection has been performed mainly at -40°C and -30°C levels, whereas little data could be sampled at -50°C and at -15C/-10°C. The study presented here focuses on ice crystal size properties, thereby analyzing in detail the 2D image data from 2D-S and PIP optical array imaging probes. 2D images recorded with 2D-S and PIP were processed in order to extract a large variety of geometrical parameters, such as maximum diameter (Dmax), 2D surface equivalent diameter (Deq), and the corresponding number particle size distribution (PSD). Using the PSD information from both probes, a composite size distribution was then built, with sizes ranging from few tens of µm to roughly 10 mm. Finally, mass-size relationships for ice crystals in tropical convection were established in terms of power laws in order to compute median mass diameters MMDmax and

  16. Systems for measuring thickness of temperate and polar ice from the ground or from the air.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, R.D.; Wright, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Equipment has been designed and tested for ground-based and airborne sounding of temperate glaciers. Echoes have been obtained from ice depths of 550m using the airborne system and about 1000m using the ground-based system. -from Authors

  17. Improving Climate Literacy Using The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM): A Prototype Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory For Use In K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Perez, G.; Petrie, K.; Nguyen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Statistics indicate that most Americans learn what they will know about science within the confines of our public K-12 education system and the media. Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aim to remedy science illiteracy and provide guidelines to exceed the Common Core State Standards that most U.S. state governments have adopted, by integrating disciplinary cores with crosscutting ideas and real life practices. In this vein, we present a prototype ';Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory' (I-Lab), geared to K-12 students, educators and interested members of the general public. I-Lab will allow users to perform experiments using a state-of-the-art dynamical ice sheet model and provide detailed downloadable lesson plans, which incorporate this model and are consistent with NGSS Physical Science criteria for different grade bands (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12). The ultimate goal of this website is to improve public climate science literacy, especially in regards to the crucial role of the polar ice sheets in Earth's climate and sea level. The model used will be the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), an ice flow model developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine, that simulates the near-term evolution of polar ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica) and includes high spatial resolution capabilities and data assimilation to produce realistic simulations of ice sheet dynamics at the continental scale. Open sourced since 2011, ISSM is used in cutting edge cryosphere research around the globe. Thru I-Lab, students will be able to access ISSM using a simple, online graphical interface that can be launched from a web browser on a computer, tablet or smart phone. The interface will allow users to select different climate conditions and watch how the polar ice sheets evolve in time under those conditions. Lesson contents will include links to background material and activities that teach observation recording, concept articulation, hypothesis formulation and testing, and

  18. Glacial ice cores: A model system for developing extraterrestrial decontamination protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, Brent C.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Foreman, Christine M.; Denson, Jackie; Priscu, John C.

    2005-04-01

    Evidence gathered from spacecraft orbiting Mars has shown that water ice exists at both poles and may form a large subsurface reservoir at lower latitudes. The recent exploration of the martian surface by unmanned landers and surface rovers, and the planned missions to eventually return samples to Earth have raised concerns regarding both forward and back contamination. Methods to search for life in these icy environments and adequate protocols to prevent contamination can be tested with earthly analogues. Studies of ice cores on Earth have established past climate changes and geological events, both globally and regionally, but only recently have these results been correlated with the biological materials (i.e., plant fragments, seeds, pollen grains, fungal spores, and microorganisms) that are entrapped and preserved within the ice. The inclusion of biology into ice coring research brings with it a whole new approach towards decontamination. Our investigations on ice from the Vostok core (Antarctica) have shown that the outer portion of the cores have up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitude higher bacterial density and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the inner portion of the cores, respectively, as a result of drilling and handling. The extreme gradients that exist between the outer and inner portion of these samples make contamination a very relevant aspect of geomicrobiological investigations with ice cores, particularly when the actual numbers of ambient bacterial cells are low. To address this issue and the inherent concern it raises for the integrity of future investigations with ice core materials from terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments, we employed a procedure to monitor the decontamination process in which ice core surfaces are painted with a solution containing a tracer microorganism, plasmid DNA, and fluorescent dye before sampling. Using this approach, a simple and direct method is proposed to verify the authenticity of geomicrobiological

  19. Ice Protection of Turbojet Engines by Inertia Separation of Water II : Single-offset-duct System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, Uwe

    1948-01-01

    Investigation of a single-offset-duct system designed to prevent entrance of water into a turbojet engine was conducted on a half-scale nacelle model. An investigation was made to determine ram-pressure recovery and radial velocity profiles at the compressor section and icing characteristics of such a duct system. At a design inlet velocity of 0.77, the maximum ram-pressure recovery attained with effective water-separating inlet was 77 percent, which is considerably less than attainable with a direct-ram inlet. Continuous heating of the accessory-housing surface would be required for inlets that have a small ice storage space.

  20. Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE`s Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration and Deployment Projects (LSDDPs) in which developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE`s projects and to others in the D and D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased cost of operation. As buildings are demolished as part of the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project`s (FEMP`s) D and D Plan, many of the activities are performed in hot weather and usually require use of various types and layers of personal protective equipment (PPE). While PPE is designed to protect the worker from contamination, it also significantly compromises the body`s ability to cool itself, leading to potentially serious heat stress situations. This report describes a comparative demonstration between the methodology currently used for heat stress management (i.e., limited stay times and cool-down rooms) and an alternative personal ice cooling suit technology. The baseline methodology for heat stress management is limited stay times when working in hot conditions. The FEMP`s Safety Performance Requirements outline the procedures and stay times to be followed and consider the temperature of the working environment, work load, and the type and amount of PPE required for the job. While these common criteria for determining stay times, other sites may have different requirements. This demonstration investigates the feasibility of using the personal ice cooling suite as a tool for managing heat stress in workers at the FEMP. This report provides a comparative analysis of

  1. An Investigation of the Icing and Heated-air De-icing Characteristics of the R-2600-13 Induction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gilbert E.

    1946-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was made on a Holley 1685-HB carburetor mounted on an R-2600-13 supercharger assembly to determine the icing characteristics and the heated-air de-icing requirements of this portion of the B-25D airplane induction system. Icing has been found to be most prevalent at relatively small throttle openings and, consequently, all runs were made at simulated 60-percent normal rated power condition. Icing characteristics were determined during a series of 15-minute runs over a range of inlet-air conditions. For the de-icing investigation severe impact ice was allowed to form in the induction system and the time required for the recovery of 95 percent of the maximum possible air flow at the original throttle setting was then determined for a range of wet-bulb temperatures. Results of these runs showed that ice on the walls of the carburetor adapter and on the rim of the impeller-shroud portion of the supercharger diffuser plate did not affect engine operation at 60-percent normal rated power. Ice that adversely affected the air flow and the fuel-air ratio was formed only on the central web of the carburetor and then only when the inlet air was saturated or contained free moisture in excess of saturation. No serious ice formations were observed at inlet-air temperatures above 66 0 F or with an inlet-air enthalpy greater than 34 Btu per pound. The maximum temperature at. which any trace of icing could be detected was 1110 F with a relative humidity of approximately 28 percent, The air-flow recovery time for emergency de-icing was 0.3 minute for.an enthalpy of 35 Btu per pound or wet-bulb temperature of 68 0 F. Further increase in enthalpy and wet-bulb temperature above these values resulted in very slight improvement in recovery time. The fuel-air ratio restored by a 5-Minute application of heated air was approximately 7 percent less than the initial value for cold-air conditions.

  2. All-weather ice information system for Alaskan arctic coastal shipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.; Jirberg, R. J.; Schertler, R. J.; Mueller, R. A.; Chase, T. L.; Kramarchuk, I.; Nagy, L. A.; Hanlon, R. A.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    A near real-time ice information system designed to aid arctic coast shipping along the Alaskan North Slope is described. The system utilizes a X-band Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) mounted aboard a U.S. Coast Guard HC-130B aircraft. Radar mapping procedures showing the type, areal distribution and concentration of ice cover were developed. In order to guide vessel operational movements, near real-time SLAR image data were transmitted directly from the SLAR aircraft to Barrow, Alaska and the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Glacier. In addition, SLAR image data were transmitted in real time to Cleveland, Ohio via the NOAA-GOES Satellite. Radar images developed in Cleveland were subsequently facsimile transmitted to the U.S. Navy's Fleet Weather Facility in Suitland, Maryland for use in ice forecasting and also as a demonstration back to Barrow via the Communications Technology Satellite.

  3. Photochemistry of Ozone-Water Ices Relevant to Outer Solar System Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Markus, C.; Hodyss, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone has been observed in icy surfaces throughout the solar system by various platforms including the Hubble Space telescope and the Galileo spacecraft. Here we present experiments conducted on ozone-water ices designed to expand our understanding of their stability and their photochemical properties on these surfaces. Ozone-water ice mixtures were deposited as thin films in a vacuum chamber under conditions relevant to satellites in the outer solar system. They were then exposed to a range of ultraviolet (UV) light sources and characterized by infrared and UV spectroscopy. The samples were found to be stable up to 160 K at low concentrations. In all ozone-water ice mixtures studied, hydrogen peroxide formed as a result of UV irradiation while ozone was destroyed. Photochemical changes were observed at all wavelengths studied up to the 254 nm line from a mercury resonance lamp. This result is significant given the increase in the solar flux towards such longer UV wavelengths.

  4. An Intercomparison of Predicted Sea Ice Concentration from Global Ocean Forecast System & Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemond, K.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research is to provide an evaluation of improvements in marginal ice zone (MIZ) and pack ice estimations from the Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS) model compared to the current operational model, the Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS). This will be determined by an intercomparison between the subjectively estimated operational ice concentration data from the National Ice Center (NIC) MIZ analysis and the ice concentration estimates from GOFS and ACNFS. This will help ascertain which nowcast from the models compares best to the NIC operational data stream needed for vessel support. It will also provide a quantitative assessment of GOFS and ACNFS performance and be used in the Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL) report from the NIC to NRL. The intercomparison results are based on statistical evaluations through a series of map overlays from both models ACNFS, GOFS with the NIC's MIZ data. All data was transformed to a common grid and difference maps were generated to determine which model had the greatest difference compared to the MIZ ice concentrations. This was provided daily for both the freeze-up and meltout seasons. Results indicated the GOFS model surpassed the ACNFS model, however both models were comparable. These results will help US Navy and NWS Anchorage ice forecasters understand model biases and know which model guidance is likely to provide the best estimate of future ice conditions.The objective of this research is to provide an evaluation of improvements in marginal ice zone (MIZ) and pack ice estimations from the Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS) model compared to the current operational model, the Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS). This will be determined by an intercomparison between the subjectively estimated operational ice concentration data from the National Ice Center (NIC) MIZ analysis and the ice concentration estimates from GOFS and ACNFS. This will help ascertain which nowcast from the models

  5. Mapping sea ice using reflected GNSS signals in a bistatic radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Clara; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Mannucci, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be used as a kind of bistatic radar, with receivers opportunistically recording ground-reflected signals transmitted by the GNSS satellites themselves. This technique, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), has primarily been explored using receivers flown on aircraft or balloons, or in modeling studies. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land and ocean surface. Here, we examine the ability of reflected GNSS signals to estimate sea ice extent and sea ice age, as well as comment on the possibility of using GNSS-R to detect leads and polynyas within the ice. In particular, we quantify how the peak power of Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) generated within the GNSS receiver responds as the satellite flies over the Polar Regions. To compute the effective peak power of each DDM, we first normalize the peak power of the DDM by the noise floor. We also correct for antenna gain, range, and incidence angle. Once these corrections are made, the effective peak power across DDMs may be used as a proxy for changes in surface permittivity and surface roughness. We compare our calculations of reflected power to existing sea ice remote sensing products such as data from the SSMI/S as well as Landsat imagery. Our analysis shows that GNSS reflections are extremely sensitive to the sea ice edge, with increases in reflected power of more than 10 dB relative to reflected power over the open ocean. As the sea ice ages, it thickens and roughens, and reflected power decreases, though it does not decrease below the power over the open ocean. Given the observed sensitivity of GNSS reflections to small features over land and the sensitivity to the sea ice edge, we hypothesize that reflection data could help map the temporal evolution of leads and polynyas.

  6. 76 FR 7238 - Pipeline Safety: Dangers of Abnormal Snow and Ice Build-Up on Gas Distribution Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... distribution system facilities appear to have been related to either the stress of snow and ice or the... distribution system facilities that appear to have been related to either the stress of snow and ice or... greatest risk. Damage may result from the stresses imposed by the additional loading of the snow or...

  7. Replicating the Ice-Volume Signal of the Early Pleistocene with a Complex Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Milankovitch theory proposes high-latitude summer insolation intensity paces the ice ages by controlling perennial snow cover amounts (Milankovitch, 1941). According to theory, the ~21 kyr cycle of precession should dominate the ice-volume records since it has the greatest influence on high-latitude summer insolation. Modeling experiments frequently support Milankovitch theory by attributing the majority of Northern Hemisphere high-latitude summer snowmelt to changes in the cycle of precession (e.g. Jackson and Broccoli, 2003). However, ice-volume proxy records, especially those of the Early Pleistocene (2.6-0.8 Ma), display variability with a period of ~41 kyr (Raymo and Lisiecki, 2005), indicative of insolation forcing from obliquity, which has a much smaller influence on summer insolation intensity than precession. Several hypotheses attempt to explain the discrepancies between Milkankovitch theory and the proxy records by invoking phenomena such as insolation gradients (Raymo and Nisancioglu, 2003), hemispheric offset (Raymo et al., 2006; Lee and Poulsen, 2009), and integrated summer energy (Huybers, 2006); however, all of these hypotheses contain caveats (Ruddiman, 2006) and have yet to be supported by modeling studies that use a complex GCM. To explore potential solutions to this '41 kyr problem,' we use an Earth system model composed of the GENESIS GCM and Land Surface model, the BIOME4 vegetation model, and the Pennsylvania State ice-sheet model. Using an asynchronous coupling technique, we run four idealized transient combinations of obliquity and precession, representing the orbital extremes of the Pleistocene (Berger and Loutre, 1991). Each experiment is run through several complete orbital cycles with a dynamic ice domain spanning North America and Greenland, and fixed preindustrial greenhouse-gas concentrations. For all orbital configurations, model results produce greater ice-volume spectral power at the frequency of obliquity despite significantly

  8. Sensitivity of the Regional Arctic System Model surface climate to ice-ocean state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Maslowski, W.; Osinski, R.; Cassano, J. J.; Craig, A.; Duvivier, A.; Fisel, B. J.; Gutowski, W. J.; Higgins, M.; Hughes, M. R.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Nijssen, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) is a high-resolution Earth System model extending across the Arctic Ocean, its marginal seas, the Arctic drainage basin, and including the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) Arctic domain. RASM uses the flux coupler (CPL7) within the Community Earth System Model framework to couple regional configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE), and Variable Infiltration Capacity land hydrology model (VIC). Work is also underway to incorporate the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM) as well as glacier, ice cap and dynamic vegetation models. As part of RASM development, coupled simulations are being prepared for the CORDEX Arctic domain, which is unique among CORDEX regions by being centered over the ocean. Up to this point, there has been uncertainty over how much initial and surface conditions in the ice-ocean boundary layer influence the surface climate of the Arctic in RASM, relative to regional atmospheric model constraints, such as spectral nudging and boundary conditions. We present results that suggest there is a significant dependency on the initial sea ice conditions on decadal timescales within RASM. This has important implications for (i) how results from different regional artic models may be combined and compared in CORDEX and (ii) appropriate methods for ensemble generation in regional polar models. We will also present results illustrating the influence of sub-hourly sea ice deformation on decadal climate in RASM, highlighting an important reason why fully coupled and high-resolution regional models are essential for regional Arctic downscaling.

  9. Strategic Decision Making and Group Decision Support Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Michael Robert

    1986-01-01

    Institutional strategic decisions require the participation of every individual with a significant stake in the solution, and group decision support systems are being developed to respond to the political and consensual problems of collective decision-making. (MSE)

  10. Defining Mesoscale Convective Systems by Their 85-GHz Ice-Scattering Signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Zipser, Edward J.

    1996-06-01

    Mesoseale Convective systems are composed of numerous deep convective cells with varying amounts of large, convectively produced ice particles aloft. The magnitude of the 85-GHz brightness temperature depression resulting from scattering by large ice is believed to be related to the convective intensity and to the magnitude of the convective fluxes through a deep layer. The 85-GHz ice-scattering signature can be used to map the distribution of organized mesoscale regions of convectively produced large ice particles. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the usefulness of the 85-GHz ice-scattering signature for describing the frequency, convective intensity, and geographic distribution of mesoscale convective systems.Objective criteria were developed to identify mesoscale convective systems from raw data from January, April, July, and October 1993. To minimize the effects of background contamination and to ensure that bounded areas contained convective elements, a "mesoscale convective system" was defined as an area bounded by 250 K of at least 2000 km2 of 85 GHz, with a minimum brightness temperature 225 K. Mesoscale convective systems extracted from the raw data were sorted and plotted by their areas and by their minimum brightness temperatures. Four area and brightness temperature classes were used to account for a spectrum of organized convection ranging from small to very large and from less organized to highly organized. The populations of mesoscale convective systems by this study's definition were consistent with infrared-based climatologies and large-scale seasonal dynamics. Land/water differences were high-lighted by the plots of minimum brightness temperature. Most of the intense mesoscale convective systems were located on or near land and seemed to occur most frequently in particular areas in North America, South America, Africa, and India.

  11. Experimental study of the NaCl-H 2O system up to 28 GPa: Implications for ice-rich planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Runge, Claire E.; Scott, Henry P.; Maglio, Steven J.; Olson, Jessica; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Shen, Guoyin

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have hypothesized that high-pressure H 2O polymorphs, specifically Ice VI and Ice VII, make up a significant portion of the interiors of select outer planets and their moons; most notably the Galilean satellites, Saturn's Titan and possibly Neptune's moon Triton as well as potential H 2O-rich extra-solar bodies. Several of these bodies have been conjectured to contain subsurface salty H 2O waters; therefore, any potential ice phases in the interior of these satellites could have interacted extensively with the salty oceans. Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation have been used previously to study the bonding structure and unit cell parameters of pure Ice VII. However, no data exist on the effect of salts on the unit cell parameters and volume of solid H 2O at high pressure. To obtain pertinent data for use in planetary physics, it is important to understand the effect of impurities on H 2O at high pressure. The NaCl-H 2O system was chosen as a first order approximation of H 2O-rich planetary bodies. The unit cell parameters and OH stretching frequencies of Ice VII formed from 5 and 10 wt.% NaCl-H 2O solutions were studied in detail up to 27 GPa at 298 K by using a diamond anvil cell, synchrotron X-ray radiation and Raman spectroscopy. The data indicate that, over the range in pressure and temperature of this study, the maximum solubility of solutes in Ice VII was not pressure dependent. Our data suggest that the maximum concentration of NaCl that can be incorporated into Ice VII at 298 K is 7.5 ± 2.5 wt.% (or 2.4 ± 0.8 mol% NaCl). Ice VII formed from a 5 wt.% NaCl-H 2O solution has a density that is up to 5% greater at any given pressure relative to the density of Ice VII formed from pure H 2O. Additionally, the bulk modulus, 26.2 ± 1.4 GPa, was found to be approximately 10-20% greater relative to Ice VII formed from pure H 2O. Relative OH stretching frequency shifts from Ice VII formed from the NaCl-H 2O solutions were compared to Ice VII

  12. NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Lab: 2012 Inaugural Ice Crystal Cloud Calibration Procedure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith F.; Rosine, Bryan M.

    2014-01-01

    The inaugural calibration of the ice crystal and supercooled liquid water clouds generated in NASA Glenn's engine altitude test facility, the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) is reported herein. This calibration was in support of the inaugural engine ice crystal validation test. During the Fall of 2012 calibration effort, cloud uniformity was documented via an icing grid, laser sheet and cloud tomography. Water content was measured via multi-wire and robust probes, and particle sizes were measured with a Cloud Droplet Probe and Cloud Imaging Probe. The environmental conditions ranged from 5,000 to 35,000 ft, Mach 0.15 to 0.55, temperature from +50 to -35 F and relative humidities from less than 1 percent to 75 percent in the plenum.

  13. Comparison of two droplet sizing systems in an icing wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, J. R.; Ide, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Analyzer and the combined measurements from the Particle Measuring Systems Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the icing cloud. Clouds with a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A comparison of the volume median diameter from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and only the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe indicated agreement up to 18 microns. A combined volume median diameter was calculated from the droplet distribution of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement up to 30 microns with the agreement deteriorating rapidly above 30 microns. Droplet distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented.

  14. Comparison of two droplet sizing systems in an icing wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Analyzer and the combined measurements from the Particle Measuring Systems Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the icing cloud. Clouds with a range of volume median diameterss from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A comparison of the volume median diameter from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and only the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe indicated agreement up to 18 microns. A combined volume median diameter was calculated from the droplet distribution of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement up to 30 microns with the agreement deteriorating rapidly above 30 microns. Droplet distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented.

  15. The LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica, LARISSA a Model for Antarctic Integrated System Science (AISS) Investigations using Marine Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Huber, B. A.; Vernet, M.; Leventer, A.; Scambos, T. A.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Smith, C. R.; de Batist, M. A.; Yoon, H.; Larissa

    2010-12-01

    The LARISSA program is the first interdisciplinary project funded in the AISS program of the NSF Office of Polar Programs and was officially launched in the closing days of the IPY. This program brings together investigators, students, and media to address the rapid and fundamental changes taking place in the region of the Larsen Ice Shelf and surrounding areas. Scientific foci include: glaciologic and oceanographic interactions, the response of pelagic and benthic ecosystems to ice shelf decay, sedimentary record of ice shelf break disintegration, the geologic evolution of ice shelf systems over the last 100,000 years, paleoclimate/environmental records from marine sediment and ice cores, and the crustal response to ice mass loss at decade to millennial time scales. The first major field season took place this past austral summer aboard the NB Palmer (cruise NBP10-01) which deployed with a multi-layered logistical infrastructure that included: two Bell 220 aircraft, a multifunctional deep water ROV, video guided sediment corer, jumbo piston core, and an array of oceanographic and biological sensors and instruments. In tandem with this ship based operation Twin Otter aircraft supported an ice core team upon the crest of the Bruce Plateau with logistic support provided by the BAS at Rothera Station. Although unusually heavy sea ice prevented much of the original work from being completed in the Larsen Embayment the interdisciplinary approach proved useful. Further the logistical model of ship based aircraft to support interdisciplinary work proved viable, again despite an unusually severe summer meterologic pattern across the northern Antarctic Peninsula. As the program moves forward other vessels will come into play and the model can be applied to interdisciplinary objectives in other regions of Antarctica which are remote and lack land based infrastructure to support coastal field programs in glaciology, geology, or meteorology. This work could then be completed

  16. Extraction and characterization of gelatin from two edible Sudanese insects and its applications in ice cream making.

    PubMed

    Mariod, Abdalbasit Adam; Fadul, Hadia

    2015-07-01

    Three methods were used for extraction of gelatin from two insects, melon bug (Coridius viduatus) and sorghum bug (Agonoscelis versicoloratus versicoloratus). Extraction of insect gelatin using hot water gave higher yield reached up to 3.0%, followed by mild acid extraction which gave 1.5% and distilled water extraction which gave only 1.0%, respectively. The obtained gelatins were characterized by FTIR and the spectra of insect's gelatin seem to be similar when compared with commercial gelatin. Amide II bands of gelatins from melon and sorghum bug appeared around at 1542-1537 cm(-1). Slight differences in the amino acid composition of gelatin extracted from the two insects were observed. Ice cream was made by using 0.5% insect's gelatin and compared with that made using 0.5% commercial gelatin as stabilizing agent. The properties of the obtained ice cream produced using insects gelatin were significantly different when compared with that made using commercial gelatin.

  17. Creating future fit between ice and society: The institutionalization of a refuge in the Arctic to preserve sea ice system services in a changing North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovecraft, A. L.; Meek, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice system can be holistically characterized as a social-ecological system that provides not only vital geophysical and biological services to climate and oceans but also provisioning services to people and industry. These services are under threat from the three major interconnected global forces of increasing traffic for shipping, security, and tourism; contaminant accumulation primarily from distant, but also related to some local marine activities, industrial production; and climatic changes, especially the warming at the poles which is diminishing the earth’s cryosphere. As the Arctic becomes more open due to sea ice loss the current strategies to preserve individual species or sea ice system functions may become obsolete in the next several decades. Concurrent to this will be the rise of traffic in areas currently not passable and an increase in exploitation of natural resources (biological and mineral) further north. This expansion of human activity does not have a suite of institutions in place that comprehensively address a future open Arctic Ocean and the coasts of the circumpolar north. Consequently, as the amount of space that can preserve a diversity of sea ice system services shrinks and the use of that space becomes crowded with interests, governments across scales need to be able to plan to balance the increase in use with preservation of services valuable both in terms of regulating and supporting planetary processes and the cultural and provisioning services more immediately tied to human flourishing. In short, it is a race between stressors and human capacity to manage them through rules minimizing their direct impact on the ice or preventing them from entering an eventual “ice shed” boundaries of a minimum summer sea ice cover. This poster explores the potential for the creation of a system of governance that would provide a refuge based on the projected summer sea ice to remain in the Arctic even as the climate shifts in

  18. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakov, P.; Counillon, F.; Bertino, L.; Lisæter, K. A.; Oke, P. R.; Korablev, A.

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ - a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003-2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and the sea-ice variability in the Arctic. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates - a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in-situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  19. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakov, P.; Counillon, F.; Bertino, L.; Lisæter, K. A.; Oke, P. R.; Korablev, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ - a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003-2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation and the sea ice. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates - a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  20. Development of a one-dimensional electro-thermophysical model of the snow sea-ice system: Arctic climate processes and microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanesiak, John Michael

    Snow covered sea ice plays a crucial role in the earth's climate. This includes polar biology, local, regional and world weather and ocean circulations as well as indigenous people's way of life. Recent research has indicated significant climate change in the polar regions, especially the Canadian arctic. Polar climate processes are also among the most poorly misrepresented within global circulation models (GCMs). The goal of this thesis is to improve our understanding and capability to simulate arctic climate processes in a predictive sense. An electro-thermophysical relationship exists between the thermophysical characteristics (climate variables and processes) and electrical properties (dielectrics) that control microwave remote sensing of snow-covered first- year sea ice (FYI). This work explicitly links microwave dielectrics and a thermodynamic model of snow and sea ice by addressing four key issues. These includes: (1)ensure the existing one-dimensional sea ice models treat the surface energy balance (SEB) and snow/ice thermodynamics in the appropriate time scales we see occurring in field experiments, (2)ensure the snow/ice thermodynamics are not compromised by differences in environmental and spatial representation within components of the SEB, (3)ensure the snow layer is properly handled in the modeling environment, and (4)how we can make use of satellite microwave remote sensing data within the model environment. Results suggest that diurnal processes are critical and need to be accounted for in modeling snow-covered FYI, similar to time scales acting in microwave remote sensing signatures. Output from the coupled snow sea-ice model provides the required input to microwave dielectric models of snow and sea ice to predict microwave penetration depths within the snow and sea ice (an Electro-Thermophysical model of the Snow Sea Ice System (ETSSIS)). Results suggest ETSSIS can accurately simulate microwave penetration depths in the cold dry snow season and

  1. In situ cryogenic transmission electron microscopy for characterizing the evolution of solidifying water ice in colloidal systems.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kaiping; Liu, Yin; Dillon, Shen J

    2014-04-01

    The details of ice interface dynamics in complex systems are critical to a variety of natural and commercial processes. A platform for low temperature environmental transmission electron microscopy is developed and applied to characterization of ice crystallization in colloidal solutions. The platform is utilized for studying the phase evolution in ice during crystallization and the dynamic interactions of Au nanoparticles at the crystallization front. The results indicate that models developed to treat ice-particle interactions at the micron scale extend well to the nanoscale.

  2. On the state of water ice on saturn's moon Titan and implications to icy bodies in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2009-10-22

    The crystalline state of water ice in the Solar System depends on the temperature history of the ice and the influence of energetic particles to which it has been exposed. We measured the infrared absorption spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice in the 10-50 K and 10-140 K temperature ranges, respectively, and conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline water ice via ionizing radiation irradiation at doses of up to 160 +/- 30 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted only partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. The experiments showed that a fraction of the 1.65 microm band, which is characteristic for crystalline water ice, survived the irradiation, to a degree that strongly depends on the temperature. Quantitative kinetic fits of the temporal evolution of the 1.65 mum band clearly demonstrate that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. Our experiments show the amorphization at 40 K was incomplete, in contradiction to Mastrapa and Brown's conclusion (Icarus 2006, 183, 207.). At 50 K, the recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most icy objects in the Solar System, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites (including Titan), and Kuiper Belt Objects, are equal to or above 50 K; this explains why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline. PMID:19827849

  3. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  4. The Europa Imaging System (EIS): Investigating Europa's geology, ice shell, and current activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, Elizabeth; Thomas, Nicolas; Fletcher, Leigh; Hayes, Alexander; Ernst, Carolyn; Collins, Geoffrey; Hansen, Candice; Kirk, Randolph L.; Nimmo, Francis; McEwen, Alfred; Hurford, Terry; Barr Mlinar, Amy; Quick, Lynnae; Patterson, Wes; Soderblom, Jason

    2016-07-01

    NASA's Europa Mission, planned for launch in 2022, will perform more than 40 flybys of Europa with altitudes at closest approach as low as 25 km. The instrument payload includes the Europa Imaging System (EIS), a camera suite designed to transform our understanding of Europa through global decameter-scale coverage, topographic and color mapping, and unprecedented sub- meter-scale imaging. EIS combines narrow-angle and wide-angle cameras to address these science goals: • Constrain the formation processes of surface features by characterizing endogenic geologic structures, surface units, global cross-cutting relationships, and relationships to Europa's subsurface structure and potential near-surface water. • Search for evidence of recent or current activity, including potential plumes. • Characterize the ice shell by constraining its thickness and correlating surface features with subsurface structures detected by ice penetrating radar. • Characterize scientifically compelling landing sites and hazards by determining the nature of the surface at scales relevant to a potential lander. EIS Narrow-angle Camera (NAC): The NAC, with a 2.3°° x 1.2°° field of view (FOV) and a 10-μμrad instantaneous FOV (IFOV), achieves 0.5-m pixel scale over a 2-km-wide swath from 50-km altitude. A 2-axis gimbal enables independent targeting, allowing very high-resolution stereo imaging to generate digital topographic models (DTMs) with 4-m spatial scale and 0.5-m vertical precision over the 2-km swath from 50-km altitude. The gimbal also makes near-global (>95%) mapping of Europa possible at ≤50-m pixel scale, as well as regional stereo imaging. The NAC will also perform high-phase-angle observations to search for potential plumes. EIS Wide-angle Camera (WAC): The WAC has a 48°° x 24°° FOV, with a 218-μμrad IFOV, and is designed to acquire pushbroom stereo swaths along flyby ground-tracks. From an altitude of 50 km, the WAC achieves 11-m pixel scale over a 44-km

  5. Altitude Effects on Thermal Ice Protection System Performance; a Study of an Alternative Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Orchard, David; Wright, William B.; Oleskiw, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Research has been conducted to better understand the phenomena involved during operation of an aircraft's thermal ice protection system under running wet icing conditions. In such situations, supercooled water striking a thermally ice-protected surface does not fully evaporate but runs aft to a location where it freezes. The effects of altitude, in terms of air pressure and density, on the processes involved were of particular interest. Initial study results showed that the altitude effects on heat energy transfer were accurately modeled using existing methods, but water mass transport was not. Based upon those results, a new method to account for altitude effects on thermal ice protection system operation was proposed. The method employs a two-step process where heat energy and mass transport are sequentially matched, linked by matched surface temperatures. While not providing exact matching of heat and mass transport to reference conditions, the method produces a better simulation than other methods. Moreover, it does not rely on the application of empirical correction factors, but instead relies on the straightforward application of the primary physics involved. This report describes the method, shows results of testing the method, and discusses its limitations.

  6. Thermoeconomic optimal sizing for ice storage system in partial storage control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Joo, Y.J.; Choi, B.Y.; Kwon, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes optimal sizing of ice storage and chiller system through parametric simulation for a commercial office building with peak cooling load of 600 tons. As an optimality criterion, the minimization of the annualized capital cost and fuel exergy costs on the basis of thermoeconomic analysis was chosen. This paper considers encapsulated ice storage system in chiller-downstream arrangement with chiller-priority control and storage-priority control strategies. Minimal required chiller sizes of the system for each control strategy are determined with storage fraction from 40% to 60%. The design condition, which has minimum cost, lies on the curve of the set of required chiller size and storage fraction. The optimal sizing is defined in this paper as the choice of size of chiller and storage tank, which leads to minimization of the annualized cost per exergy unit of product for the system.

  7. Use of a new high-speed digital data acquisition system in airborne ice-sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, David L.; Bradley, Jerry A.; Hodge, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital data acquisition and signal averaging system for borehole, surface, and airborne radio-frequency geophysical measurements was designed and built by the US Geological Survey. The system permits signal averaging at rates high enough to achieve significant signal-to-noise enhancement in profiling, even in airborne applications. The first field use of the system took place in Greenland in 1987 for recording data on a 150 by 150-km grid centered on the summit of the Greenland ice sheet. About 6000-line km were flown and recorded using the new system. The data can be used to aid in siting a proposed scientific corehole through the ice sheet.

  8. How do the physical properties of ice influence the habitability of outer solar system satellites? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    [11] might enhance downwards transportation rates. A less obvious issue is the extent to which the silicate portion of the satellites can be heated. This is because 1) hot silicates prolong the life of an overlying ocean and 2) hydrothermal circulation is a source of reactants. Europa [12] and Enceladus [13] may both possess hot, partially-molten silicate interiors. However, at least for Enceladus the temperatures inferred by [13] cannot be explained by conventional tidal heating [7]. One possibility is that the conventional Maxwell viscoelastic rheological model does not adequately describe dissipation in real geological materials [14], and that more complicated descriptions are required. [1] Gaidos EJ, Science 284, 1631-33, 1999. [2] Hand KP et al., Astrobiology 7, 1006-22, 2007. [3] Zolotov MY Shock EL, JGR 109, E06003, 2004. [4] Schulze-Makuch D, Irwin LN Astrobiology 2, 105-21, 2002. [5] Barr AC, McKinnon WB, JGR 112, E02012, 2007. [6] Ross RG, Kargel JS, in Solar System Ices, 33-62, 1998. [7] Roberts JH, Nimmo F, Icarus 194, 675-89, 2008. [8] Deschamps F, Sotin C, JGR 106, 5107-21, 2001. [9] Barr AC et al., LPSC 33, 1545, 2002. [10] Postberg F et al., Nature 459, 1098-1101, 2009. [11] Nimmo F, Gaidos E, JGR 107, 5021, 2002. [12] Greenberg R et al., Rev. Geophys. 40, 1004, 2002. [13] Matson DL et al., Icarus 187, 569-73, 2007. [14] McCarthy C et al., LPSC 39, 2512, 2008.

  9. Modeling of oil spills in ice conditions in the Gulf of finland on the basis of an operative forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanovoy, V. V.; Eremina, T. R.; Isaev, A. V.; Neelov, I. A.; Vankevich, R. E.; Ryabchenko, V. A.

    2012-11-01

    A brief description of the GULFOOS operative forecasting oceanographic system of the Gulf of Finland and the OilMARS operative forecasting oil spill model is presented. Special attention is focused on oil spill simulation in ice conditions. All the assumptions and parameterizations used are described. Modeling results of training simulations for the ice conditions of January 2011 are presented.

  10. Development of a direct contact ice storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, R.

    1989-03-01

    The program described involves the design, construction, and performance testing of a Direct Freeze Thermal Energy Storage System. Task 1 (Design) has been completed; and Task 2 (construction) is in progress, with equipment procurements presently underway. Once constructed, the system will undergo extensive laboratory performance testing and analysis, followed by an assessment of the system`s cost effectiveness. This study will advance the understanding and development of the direct freeze concept, which offers inherent benefits for thermal energy storage.

  11. On the use of the point-mass modeling technique for assessing ice-mass variations in alpine glacier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimond, Stefan; Baur, Oliver; Krauss, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Most scientific studies dealing with gravity-based ice-mass balance estimations focus on the Earth's continental glacier systems, namely the Greenland and the Antarctica ice sheets. Alpine glacier regions such as the Alps, Himalaya or Patagonia, on the other hand, seem to be less considered. According to the most recent assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), however, glacier shrinkage is one of the most dominant contributors to global sea level rise. In this context we investigate the capability of the point-mass modeling technique to assess ice-mass variations in small-scale alpine regions from space-borne gravimetric data. Two different approaches of this method can be distinguished: point-mass modeling with (i) predefined and fixed positions and (ii) with unknown locations of the surface mass changes. Approach (i) yields a linear functional model in which only the magnitudes of the point-masses are considered unknown. A highly non-linear optimization problem needs to be solved for approach (ii), since both the magnitudes and the coordinates of the point-masses are introduced as unknown parameters. In addition to that, owing to the effect of downward continuation, this problem is categorized as ill-posed and needs to be remedied by introducing regularization. The L-curve criterion or the generalized cross-validation method are typically used for selecting a suitable regularization factor. We conducted a series of close-loop simulation tests for various alpine glacier systems to compare the two approaches. In order to solve the global optimization problems in (i) and (ii), we make use of genetic algorithms.

  12. Making intelligent systems team players: Overview for designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a guide and companion to the NASA Technical Memorandum 104738, 'Making Intelligent Systems Team Players,' Volumes 1 and 2. The first two volumes of this Technical Memorandum provide comprehensive guidance to designers of intelligent systems for real-time fault management of space systems, with the objective of achieving more effective human interaction. This report provides an analysis of the material discussed in the Technical Memorandum. It clarifies what it means for an intelligent system to be a team player, and how such systems are designed. It identifies significant intelligent system design problems and their impacts on reliability and usability. Where common design practice is not effective in solving these problems, we make recommendations for these situations. In this report, we summarize the main points in the Technical Memorandum and identify where to look for further information.

  13. Reconstruction of the Greenland ice sheet dynamics in a fully coupled Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Oleg; Volodin, Evgeny; Huybrechts, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are undoubtedly effective tools for studying climate dynamics. Incorporation of evolving ice sheets to ESMs is a challenging task because response times of the climate system and of ice sheets differ by several orders of magnitude. Besides, AO GCMs operate on spatial and temporal resolutions substantially differing from those of ice sheet models (ICMs). Therefore elaboration of an effective coupling methodology of an AO GCM and an ICM is the key problem of an ESM construction and utilization. Several downscaling strategies of varying complexity exist now of data exchange between modeled climate system and ice sheets. Application of a particular strategy depends on the research objectives. In our view, the optimum approach for model studying of significant environmental changes (e.g. glacial/interglacial transitions) when ice sheets undergo substantial evolution of geometry and volume would be an asynchronous coupling. The latter allows simulation in the interactive way of growth and decay of ice sheets in the changing climatic conditions. In the focus of the presentation, is the overview of coupling aspects of an AO GCM INMCM32 elaborated in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (Moscow, Russia) to the Greenland ice sheet model (GrISM, Vrije Uninersiteit Brussel, Belgium). To provide interactive coupling of INMCM32 (spatial resolution 5°×4°, 21 vertical layers and temporal resolution 6 min. in the atmospheric block) and GrISM (spatial resolution 20×20 km, 51 vertical layers and 1 yr temporal resolution), we employ a special energy- and water balance model (EWBM-G), which serves as a buffer providing effective data exchange between INMCM32 and GrISM. EWBM-G operates in a rectangle domain including Greenland. Transfer of daily meanings of simulated climatic variables (air surface temperature and specific humidity) is provided on the lateral boundarias of the domain and inside the domain (sea level air pressure, wind speed and total

  14. Experimental and analytical investigation of a freezing point depressant fluid ice protection system. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. Stainless steel mesh, laser drilled titanium, and composite panels were tested on two general aviation wing sections. Two different glycol-water solutions were evaluated. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing were obtained as a function of angle of attack, liquid water content, volume median drop diameter, temperature, and velocity. Ice accretions formed after five minutes of icing were shed in three minutes or less using a glycol fluid flow equal to the anti-ice flow rate. Two methods of predicting anti-ice flow rates are presented and compared with a large experimental data base of anti-ice flow rates over a wide range of icing conditions. The first method presented in the ADS-4 document typically predicts flow rates lower than the experimental flow rates. The second method, originally published in 1983, typically predicts flow rates up to 25 percent higher than the experimental flow rates. This method proved to be more consistent between wing-panel configurations. Significant correlation coefficients between the predicted flow rates and the experimental flow rates ranged from .867 to .947.

  15. The Fate of De-icing Salts in Stormwater Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestero, T. P.; Roseen, R. M.; Houle, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    The traditional paradigm behind the design of stormwater management systems is to minimize the water quantity and water quality impacts resulting from land modification. The intent is to yield post-development hydrology similar to pre-development hydrology. The water quality aspect has been primarily focused on sediment removal, however, rarely are stormwater management systems designed for removal of de-icing salt. Chloride toxicity effects upon aquatic organisms resulting from snowmelt runoff are pronounced, routine, and problematic in northern climates. The capacity of current management strategies to treat chloride is in question. This paper explores the fate of de-icing salt through 13 different stormwater management systems. The systems include swales, retention pond, infiltration systems, bioretention systems, wetlands, manufactured devices, and porous asphalt. All systems exist at a field site and are delivered the same runoff (quantity and quality). The devices were designed and installed in accordance with existing drainage manual recommendations. None were designed for salt removal. As expected, devices with minimal water storage do not remove salt. Devices that do have significant amounts of storage do not remove salt, however the effluent concentrations are not as high as the influent concentrations: the peak influent salt concentration is attenuated similar to how the peak inflow discharge is attenuated by storage routing. The porous asphalt has displayed some remarkable characteristics. This surface has remained permeable throughout the winter, even though in addition to the de-icing chemicals, sand is applied. It appears that very little de-icing salt is needed on the surface, which has enormous economic and environmental implications.

  16. Ice-Free Arctic Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The current warming trends in the Arctic may shove the Arctic system into a seasonally ice-free state not seen for more than one million years, according to a new report. The melting is accelerating, and researchers were unable to identify any natural processes that might slow the deicing of the Arctic. "What really makes the Arctic different from…

  17. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Raines, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2045 FYg), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System.

  18. Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R.; Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F.

    2011-01-15

    A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

  19. Ice recrystallization in a model system and in frozen muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Martino, M N; Zaritzky, N E

    1989-04-01

    Recrystallization produces modifications on ice crystal sizes during storage and transport of frozen foods, reducing the advantages obtained by quick freezing and inducing physicochemical changes which alter their quality and shorten their shelf life. This process involves the growth of the larger crystals at the expense of the smaller ones, being the interfacial energy, the driving force of the phenomenon. In the present work recrystallization was analyzed using direct microscopic observation of ice crystals in a model solution (0.28 N NaCl) and indirect observation of frozen muscle tissue. The model solution allowed visualization of the interface behavior; from the analysis of the ice crystal frequency distributions, relationships between shape and size of the grains were established. A kinetic model based on the average system curvature was proposed obtaining a satisfactory fitness of the experimental data. Values of the kinetic constants determined at different temperatures allowed the estimation of the process activation energy. In muscle tissues isothermal freeze-substitution was used to observe the holes left by the ice in frozen semitendinous beef muscle stored at -5, -10, -15, and -20 degrees C during long periods of time. A different evolution of the mean ice crystal diameter was observed with respect to the model system. In meat samples, at long storage times, a limit diameter value was reached; this situation has been proved to be independent of temperature and initial size (freezing rate); a theoretical expression based on tissue characteristic parameters was proposed for its evaluation. Activation energy for recrystallization in muscle tissue was also determined, being comparable to values for protein denaturation and quality losses.

  20. Development and Implementation of a Model-Driven Envelope Protection System for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Martos, Borja; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  1. Detection of the Impact of Ice Crystal Accretion in an Aircraft Engine Compression System During Dynamic Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation community. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. Here a detection algorithm is developed which has the capability to detect the impact of ice accretion in the Low Pressure Compressor of an aircraft engine during steady flight as well as during changes in altitude. Unfortunately, the algorithm as implemented was not able to distinguish throttle changes from ice accretion and thus more work remains to be done.

  2. The IceCube data acquisition system for galactic core collapse supernova searches

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Volker; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory was designed to detect highly energetic neutrinos. The detector was built as a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes monitoring one cubic kilometer of clear Antarctic ice. Due to low photomultiplier dark noise rates in the cold and radio-pure ice, IceCube is also able to detect bursts of O(10MeV) neutrinos expected to be emitted from core collapse supernovae. The detector will provide the world’s highest statistical precision for the lightcurves of galactic supernovae by observing an induced collective rise in all photomultiplier rates [1]. This paper presents the supernova data acquisition system, the search algorithms for galactic supernovae, as well as the recently implemented HitSpooling DAQ extension. HitSpooling will overcome the current limitation of transmitting photomultiplier rates in intervals of 1.6384 ms by storing all recorded time-stamped hits for supernova candidate triggers. From the corresponding event-based information, the average neutrino energy can be estimated and the background induced by detector noise and atmospheric muons can be reduced.

  3. Saturn's system ices: a comparative spectral study by Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Clark, Roger N.; Cuzzi, Jeff N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Coradini, Angioletta; Cerroni, Priscilla; Tosi, Federico; Ciarniello, Mauro; Nicholson, Phil D.; McCord, Thomas B.; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has observed the entire population of Saturnian icy objects, allowing a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division). The results we present are derived from the entire dataset available after about 5 years of the Cassini mission, which consists of more than 2000 full-disk observations of the moons as well as several radial mosaics of the ring system. The spectra of Saturn's satellites are characterized by a step red slope in the 0.35-0.55 µm range, which is highly diagnostic of the presence of organic contaminants and darkening agents on icy surfaces; in the 0.55-0.95 µm range the spectra become more flat and featureless. In the IR range the water ice bands at 1.5-2.0-3.0 µm bands are evident everywhere, while the CO2 ice band at 4.26 µm is seen only on the three external satellites Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Some specific spectrophotometric indicators are chosen to retrieve the macroscopic properties of the ices: I/F continuum levels, 0.35-0.55 and 0.55-0.95 µm spectral slopes, H2O-CO2 ice band depths and band positions. By using these indicators the Saturn's satellites are grouped in distinct classes, noticeably between the almost pure water ice and blue surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic- and carbon dioxide-rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Hyperion and the leading hemisphere of Iapetus have the reddest VIS slopes of the group. Janus' visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive VIS spectral slope, while Epimetheus is more neutral and similar to Iapetus' bright terrains (trailing hemisphere), Mimas and Tethys. The two F ring's shepherd moons, Prometheus and Pandora, have similarities with Atlas, while Calypso and Telesto

  4. Advanced Optical Diagnostics for Ice Crystal Cloud Measurements in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.; Fagan, Amy; Van Zante, Judith F.; Kirkegaard, Jonathan P.; Rohler, David P.; Maniyedath, Arjun; Izen, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    A light extinction tomography technique has been developed to monitor ice water clouds upstream of a direct connected engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The system consists of 60 laser diodes with sheet generating optics and 120 detectors mounted around a 36-inch diameter ring. The sources are pulsed sequentially while the detectors acquire line-of-sight extinction data for each laser pulse. Using computed tomography algorithms, the extinction data are analyzed to produce a plot of the relative water content in the measurement plane. To target the low-spatial-frequency nature of ice water clouds, unique tomography algorithms were developed using filtered back-projection methods and direct inversion methods that use Gaussian basis functions. With the availability of a priori knowledge of the mean droplet size and the total water content at some point in the measurement plane, the tomography system can provide near real-time in-situ quantitative full-field total water content data at a measurement plane approximately 5 feet upstream of the engine inlet. Results from ice crystal clouds in the PSL are presented. In addition to the optical tomography technique, laser sheet imaging has also been applied in the PSL to provide planar ice cloud uniformity and relative water content data during facility calibration before the tomography system was available and also as validation data for the tomography system. A comparison between the laser sheet system and light extinction tomography resulting data are also presented. Very good agreement of imaged intensity and water content is demonstrated for both techniques. Also, comparative studies between the two techniques show excellent agreement in calculation of bulk total water content averaged over the center of the pipe.

  5. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  7. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  8. Monitoring and decision making by people in man machine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannsen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of human monitoring and decision making behavior as well as its modeling are described. Classic and optimal control theoretical, monitoring models are surveyed. The relationship between attention allocation and eye movements is discussed. As an example of applications, the evaluation of predictor displays by means of the optimal control model is explained. Fault detection involving continuous signals and decision making behavior of a human operator engaged in fault diagnosis during different operation and maintenance situations are illustrated. Computer aided decision making is considered as a queueing problem. It is shown to what extent computer aids can be based on the state of human activity as measured by psychophysiological quantities. Finally, management information systems for different application areas are mentioned. The possibilities of mathematical modeling of human behavior in complex man machine systems are also critically assessed.

  9. A safety-based decision making architecture for autonomous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musto, Joseph C.; Lauderbaugh, L. K.

    1991-01-01

    Engineering systems designed specifically for space applications often exhibit a high level of autonomy in the control and decision-making architecture. As the level of autonomy increases, more emphasis must be placed on assimilating the safety functions normally executed at the hardware level or by human supervisors into the control architecture of the system. The development of a decision-making structure which utilizes information on system safety is detailed. A quantitative measure of system safety, called the safety self-information, is defined. This measure is analogous to the reliability self-information defined by McInroy and Saridis, but includes weighting of task constraints to provide a measure of both reliability and cost. An example is presented in which the safety self-information is used as a decision criterion in a mobile robot controller. The safety self-information is shown to be consistent with the entropy-based Theory of Intelligent Machines defined by Saridis.

  10. Earth Observing System (EOS) Snow and Ice Products for Observation and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D.; Kaminski, M.; Cavalieri, D.; Dickinson, R.; Marquis, M.; Riggs, G.; Robinson, D.; VanWoert, M.; Wolfe, R.

    2005-01-01

    Snow and ice are the key components of the Earth's cryosphere, and their influence on the Earth's energy balance is very significant due at least in part to the large areal extent and high albedo characterizing these features. Large changes in the cryosphere have been measured over the last century and especially over the past decade, and remote sensing plays a pivotal role in documenting these changes. Many of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) products derived from instruments on the Terra, Aqua, and Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) satellites are useful for measuring changes in features that are associated with climate change. The utility of the products is continually enhanced as the length of the time series increases. To gain a more coherent view of the cryosphere and its historical and recent changes, the EOS products may be employed together, in conjunction with other sources of data, and in models. To further this goal, the first EOS Snow and Ice Products Workshop was convened. The specific goals of the workshop were to provide current and prospective users of EOS snow and ice products up-to-date information on the products, their validation status and future enhancements, to help users utilize the data products through hands-on demonstrations, and to facilitate the integration of EOS products into models. Oral and poster sessions representing a wide variety of snow and ice topics were held; three panels were also convened to discuss workshop themes. Panel discussions focused on data fusion and assimilation of the products into models. Approximately 110 people attended, representing a wide array of interests and organizations in the cryospheric community.

  11. Decision Making Methods in Space Economics and Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews various methods of decision making and the impact that they have on space economics and systems engineering. Some of the methods discussed are: Present Value and Internal Rate of Return (IRR); Cost-Benefit Analysis; Real Options; Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; Cost-Utility Analysis; Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT); and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

  12. Parental Decision Making in an Education Voucher System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, R. Gary

    Parental decisionmaking is the keystone of any voucher model. This paper examines the parental decisionmaking process as it has unfolded in the educational voucher experiment in the Alum Rock school system near San Jose, California. The author assumed at the outset that parents cannot make intelligent choices between schooling alternatives if they…

  13. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  14. Stochastic ice stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  15. A high-resolution ocean and sea-ice modelling system for the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, F.; Higginson, S.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Lu, Y.; Roy, F.; Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J.-F.; Garric, G.; Davidson, F.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the CONCEPTS (Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems) initiative, The Government of Canada is developing a high resolution (1/12°) ice-ocean regional model covering the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. The objective is to provide Canada with short-term ice-ocean predictions and hazard warnings in ice infested regions. To evaluate the modelling component (as opposed to the analysis - or data-assimilation - component), a series of hindcasts for the period 2003-2009 is carried out, forced at the surface by the Canadian Global Re-Forecasts. These hindcasts test how the model represent upper ocean characteristics and ice cover. Each hindcast implements a new aspect of the modelling or the ice-ocean coupling. Notably, the coupling to the multi-category ice model CICE is tested. The hindcast solutions are then assessed using a validation package under development, including in-situ and satellite ice and ocean observations. The conclusions are: (1) the model reproduces reasonably well the time mean, variance and skewness of sea surface height. (2) The model biases in temperature and salinity show that while the mean properties follow expectations, the Pacific Water signature in the Beaufort Sea is weaker than observed. (3) However, the modelled freshwater content of the Arctic agrees well with observational estimates. (4) The distribution and volume of the sea ice is shown to be improved in the latest hindcast thanks to modifications to the drag coefficients and to some degree as well to the ice thickness distribution available in CICE. (5) On the other hand, the model overestimates the ice drift and ice thickness in the Beaufort Gyre.

  16. A high-resolution ocean and sea-ice modelling system for the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, F.; Higginson, S.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Lu, Y.; Roy, F.; Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J.-F.; Garric, G.; Davidson, F.

    2015-05-01

    As part of the CONCEPTS (Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems) initiative, a high-resolution (1/12°) ice-ocean regional model is developed covering the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. The long-term objective is to provide Canada with short-term ice-ocean predictions and hazard warnings in ice-infested regions. To evaluate the modelling component (as opposed to the analysis - or data-assimilation - component, which is not covered in this contribution), a series of hindcasts for the period 2003-2009 is carried out, forced at the surface by the Canadian GDPS reforecasts (Smith et al., 2014). These hindcasts test how the model represents upper ocean characteristics and ice cover. Each hindcast implements a new aspect of the modelling or the ice-ocean coupling. Notably, the coupling to the multi-category ice model CICE is tested. The hindcast solutions are then assessed using a verification package under development, including in situ and satellite ice and ocean observations. The conclusions are as follows: (1) the model reproduces reasonably well the time mean, variance and skewness of sea surface height; (2) the model biases in temperature and salinity show that while the mean properties follow expectations, the Pacific Water signature in the Beaufort Sea is weaker than observed; (3) the modelled freshwater content of the Arctic agrees well with observational estimates; (4) the distribution and volume of the sea ice are shown to be improved in the latest hindcast due to modifications to the drag coefficients and to some degree to the ice thickness distribution available in CICE; (5) nonetheless, the model still overestimates the ice drift and ice thickness in the Beaufort Gyre.

  17. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Atsuki Urata, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems. Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic-period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  18. Remote Pulsed Laser Raman Spectroscopy System for Detecting Qater, Ice, and Hydrous Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nuraul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra; Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani; Sandford, Steve

    2006-01-01

    For exploration of planetary surfaces, detection of water and ice is of great interest in supporting existence of life on other planets. Therefore, a remote Raman spectroscopy system was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with University of Hawaii for detecting ice-water and hydrous minerals on planetary surfaces. In this study, a 532 nm pulsed laser is utilized as an excitation source to allow detection in high background radiation conditions. The Raman scattered signal is collected by a 4-inch telescope positioned in front of a spectrograph. The Raman spectrum is analyzed using a spectrograph equipped with a holographic super notch filter to eliminate Rayleigh scattering, and a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks onto the detector for higher spectral range. To view the spectrum, the spectrograph is coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), which allows detection of very weak Stokes line. The ICCD is operated in gated mode to further suppress effects from background radiation and long-lived fluorescence. The sample is placed at 5.6 m from the telescope, and the laser is mounted on the telescope in a coaxial geometry to achieve maximum performance. The system was calibrated using the spectral lines of a Neon lamp source. To evaluate the system, Raman standard samples such as calcite, naphthalene, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol were analyzed. The Raman evaluation technique was used to analyze water, ice and other hydrous minerals and results from these species are presented.

  19. Remote pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy system for detecting water, ice, and hydrous minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Sandford, Steve P.

    2006-08-01

    For exploration of planetary surfaces, detection of water and ice is of great interest in supporting existence of life on other planets. Therefore, a remote Raman spectroscopy system was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the University of Hawaii for detecting ice-water and hydrous minerals on planetary surfaces. In this study, a 532 nm pulsed laser is utilized as an excitation source to allow detection in high background radiation conditions. The Raman scattered signal is collected by a 4-inch telescope positioned in front of a spectrograph. The Raman spectrum is analyzed using a spectrograph equipped with a holographic super notch filter to eliminate Rayleigh scattering, and a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks onto the detector for higher spectral range. To view the spectrum, the spectrograph is coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), which allows detection of very weak Stokes line. The ICCD is operated in gated mode to further suppress effects from background radiation and long-lived fluorescence. The sample is placed at 5.6 m from the telescope, and the laser is mounted on the telescope in a coaxial geometry to achieve maximum performance. The system was calibrated using the spectral lines of a Neon lamp source. To evaluate the system, Raman standard samples such as calcite, naphthalene, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol were analyzed. The Raman evaluation technique was used to analyze water, ice and other hydrous minerals and results from these species are presented.

  20. Artic ice and drilling structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sodhl, D.S.

    1985-04-01

    The sea ice in the southern Beaufort Sea is examined and subdivided into three zones: the fast ice zone, the seasonal pack-ice zone, an the polar pack ice zone. Each zone requires its own type of system. Existing floating drilling systems include ice-strengthened drill ships, conical drilling systems, and floating ice platforms in deep-water land-fast ice. The development of hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic presents great challenges to engineers, since the structures are required to operate safely under various conditions. Significant progress has yet to be made in understanding the behavior of ice.

  1. Autumn-time response of the ocean-atmospheric system to interannual changes in Arctic sea-ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Benestad, R. E.; Melsom, A.; Balmaseda, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    Sea-ice has a memory of several months and influences the atmosphere by modifying exchange of heat, moisture and momentum at the ocean-atmosphere interface, and by changing the albedo in summer. Thus, being a slowly evolving component of the Earth's climate, sea-ice could be very important for seasonal weather forecasting, especially in the polar regions. Arctic sea-ice extent reaches a minimum in September and sea-ice variability is highest during this period. Here we use a set of simulations from a state-of-the-art coupled ocean-atmosphere model to study the response of the northern hemispheric mid- to high-latitude ocean-atmospheric system to interannual changes in Arctic sea-ice extent during boreal Autumn-early winter. The model set-up consists of 5-member 5-month long simulations, with atmospheric and ocean initial conditions from 1 October 2007. Sea-ice in the model is prescribed, and is derived from observed SST for the years 2000 to 2007. We focus especially on 2007 when Arctic sea-ice extent reached a record lowest and show that there might be improved prediction skill associated with the low sea-ice conditions. Further, implications for seasonal weather predictability over western Europe and the Arctic region will be assessed.

  2. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Chu, Y. Y.; Greenstein, J. S.; Walden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made of interaction between a human pilot and automated on-board decision making systems. Research was initiated on the topic of pilot problem solving in automated and semi-automated flight management systems and attempts were made to develop a model of human decision making in a multi-task situation. A study was made of allocation of responsibility between human and computer, and discussed were various pilot performance parameters with varying degrees of automation. Optimal allocation of responsibility between human and computer was considered and some theoretical results found in the literature were presented. The pilot as a problem solver was discussed. Finally the design of displays, controls, procedures, and computer aids for problem solving tasks in automated and semi-automated systems was considered.

  3. On Convection in Ice I Shells of Outer Solar System Bodies--Application to Callisto and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.

    2005-03-01

    Convection in Callisto's floating ice I shell is possible for reasonable grain sizes. Diffusion creep is the key. Not only possible, but probably required throughout much of Solar System history. For Titan, it depends on grain size and composition.

  4. Tracer gauge: an automated dye dilution gauging system for ice-affected streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Fleming, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    In-stream flow protection programs require accurate, real-time streamflow data to aid in the protection of aquatic ecosystems during winter base flow periods. In cold regions, however, winter streamflow often can only be estimated because in-channel ice causes variable backwater conditions and alters the stage-discharge relation. In this study, an automated dye dilution gauging system, a tracer gauge, was developed for measuring discharge in ice-affected streams. Rhodamine WT is injected into the stream at a constant rate, and downstream concentrations are measured with a submersible fluorometer. Data loggers control system operations, monitor key variables, and perform discharge calculations. Comparison of discharge from the tracer gauge and from a Cipoletti weir during periods of extensive ice cover indicated that the root-mean-square error of the tracer gauge was 0.029 m3 s−1, or 6.3% of average discharge for the study period. The tracer gauge system can provide much more accurate data than is currently available for streams that are strongly ice affected and, thus, could substantially improve management of in-stream flow protection programs during winter in cold regions. Care must be taken, however, to test for the validity of key assumptions, including complete mixing and conservative behavior of dye, no changes in storage, and no gains or losses of water to or from the stream along the study reach. These assumptions may be tested by measuring flow-weighted dye concentrations across the stream, performing dye mass balance analyses, and evaluating breakthrough curve behavior.

  5. Leveraging Cloud Technology to Provide a Responsive, Reliable and Scalable Backend for the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory Using the Ice Sheet System Model and Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, G. L.; Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Cheng, D. L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory(VISL) is a Cryosphere outreach effort byscientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory(JPL) in Pasadena, CA, Earth and SpaceResearch(ESR) in Seattle, WA, and the University of California at Irvine (UCI), with the goal of providing interactive lessons for K-12 and college level students,while conforming to STEM guidelines. At the core of VISL is the Ice Sheet System Model(ISSM), an open-source project developed jointlyat JPL and UCI whose main purpose is to model the evolution of the polar ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. By using ISSM, VISL students have access tostate-of-the-art modeling software that is being used to conduct scientificresearch by users all over the world. However, providing this functionality isby no means simple. The modeling of ice sheets in response to sea and atmospheric temperatures, among many other possible parameters, requiressignificant computational resources. Furthermore, this service needs to beresponsive and capable of handling burst requests produced by classrooms ofstudents. Cloud computing providers represent a burgeoning industry. With majorinvestments by tech giants like Amazon, Google and Microsoft, it has never beeneasier or more affordable to deploy computational elements on-demand. This isexactly what VISL needs and ISSM is capable of. Moreover, this is a promisingalternative to investing in expensive and rapidly devaluing hardware.

  6. Regional Earth System Prediction for Policy Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtugudde, R. G.; Cbfs Team

    2010-12-01

    While the IPCC will continue to lead Earth System projections for global issues such as greenhouse gas levels and global temperature increase, high-resolution regional Earth System predictions will be crucial for producing effective decision-making tools for day-to-day, sustainable Earth System management and adaptive management of resources. Regional Earth System predictions and projections at the order of a few meters resolution from days to decades must be validated and provide uncertainties and skill scores to be usable. While the task is daunting, it would be criminally negligent of the global human not to embark on this task immediately. The observational needs for the integrated natural-human system for the regional Earth System are distinct from the global needs even though there are many overlaps. The process understanding of the Earth System at the micro-scale can be translated into predictive understanding and skillful predictions for sustainable management and adaptation by merging these observations with Earth System models to go from global scale predictions and projections to regional environmental manifestations and mechanistic depiction of human interactions with the Earth System and exploitation of its resources. Regional Earth System monitoring and predictions thus will continuously take the pulse of the planet to prescribe appropriate actions for participatory decision-making for sustainable and adaptive management of the Earth System and to avoid catastrophic domains of potential outcomes. An example of a regional Earth System prediction system over the Chesapeake Bay with detailed interactions with users is discussed. Routine forecasts of atmospheric and hydrodynamic forecasts are used to produce linked prediction products for water quality, hypoxia, sea nettles, harmful algal blooms, striped bass, pathogens, etc.

  7. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Ways in which computers can aid the decision making of an human operator of an aerospace system are investigated. The approach taken is to aid rather than replace the human operator, because operational experience has shown that humans can enhance the effectiveness of systems. As systems become more automated, the role of the operator has shifted to that of a manager and problem solver. This shift has created the research area of how to aid the human in this role. Published research in four areas is described. A discussion is presented of the DC-8 flight simulator at Georgia Tech.

  8. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER ICE AND CHROMOPHORES ACROSS SATURN'S SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Hedman, M. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Flamini, E.

    2013-04-01

    Over the past eight years, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini orbiter has returned hyperspectral images in the 0.35-5.1 {mu}m range of the icy satellites and rings of Saturn. These very different objects show significant variations in surface composition, roughness, and regolith grain size as a result of their evolutionary histories, endogenic processes, and interactions with exogenic particles. The distributions of surface water ice and chromophores, i.e., organic and non-icy materials, across the Saturnian system, are traced using specific spectral indicators (spectral slopes and absorption band depths) obtained from rings mosaics and disk-integrated satellites observations by VIMS. Moving from the inner C ring to Iapetus, we found a marking uniformity in the distribution of abundance of water ice. On the other hand, the distribution of chromophores is much more concentrated in the rings particles and on the outermost satellites (Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus). A reduction of red material is observed on the satellites' surfaces orbiting within the E ring environment likely due to fine particles from Enceladus' plumes. Once the exogenous dark material covering the Iapetus' leading hemisphere is removed, the texture of the water ice-rich surfaces, inferred through the 2 {mu}m band depth, appears remarkably uniform across the entire system.

  9. Asthenospheric ice-load effects in a global dynamical-system model of the Pleistocene climate

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.; Verbitsky, M.Ya.

    1992-10-01

    In a previous dynamical model the late Cenozoic climate variations were simulated, taking into account free and forced variations of atmospheric carbon dioxide acting in concert with changes in global ice mass and the deep ocean thermal state, all under the influence of the known earth-orbital radiative changes. This model is now extended by adding another relevant variable, bedrock/asthenosphere depression, including its associated ice-calving effects. Within the context of this extended model we (1) demonstrate the main results of previous bedrock/ice sheet models in what we believe is the simplest possible manner, (2) show how these previous models can exhibit the mid-Pleistocene transition with the inclusion of CO{sub 2} effects, (3) discuss the limitations of these previous bedrock models, and (4) illustrate the possibility of removing some of these limitations and accounting for further aspects of the paleoclimate record by using the full dynamical system that includes forced and free effects of CO{sub 2}, as well as effects of bedrock depression and Milankovitch forcing. As one example of a new possibility, with bedrock effects included in the full system we can obtain a solution characterized by irregularly spaced, intermittent episodes in which the behavior is dominated either by near-40 kyr period oscillations or by near-100 kyr periods (such as prevailed over the Pleistocene). 27 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Decentralised water systems: emotional influences on resource decision making.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Aditi

    2012-09-01

    The study of emotion has gathered momentum in the field of environmental science, specifically in the context of community resource decision-making. Of particular interest in this review is the potential influence of emotion, risk and threat perception on individuals' decisions to acceptance and adopt decentralised water systems, such as rainwater tanks and greywater systems. The role of message framing is also considered in detail, as well as the influences that different types of framing can have on decision making. These factors are considered as possible predictors for analysing community acceptance of decentralised water in urban environments. Concepts believed to be influenced by emotion, such as trust and framing, are also discussed as potentially meaningful contributors to an overall model of community acceptance of decentralised water. Recommendations are made for how emotion-based concepts, such as risk and threat, can be targeted to facilitate widespread adoption of decentralised systems and how researchers can explore different types of emotions that influence decision making in distinct ways. This review is an important theoretical step in advancing the psycho-social understanding of acceptance and adoption of on-site water sources. Avenues for future research are recommended, including the need for greater theoretical development to encourage future social science research on decentralised systems.

  11. Greenland Ice Sheet glacier motion and ice loss: New understanding of ice sheet behavior through remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Scambos, T.; Joughin, I.

    2015-12-01

    Ice loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet makes up roughly a third of current sea level rise, also generating substantial local and regional freshwater fluxes. Containing more than 6 meters of sea level rise equivalent in ice, Greenland has the potential to contribute much more to rising ocean levels and freshening water in the future. Understanding the dynamics of the ice sheet, particularly the behavior of fast flowing coastal outlet glaciers, is critical to improving predictions of future ice sheet change and associated impacts. Combining velocity, glacier ice front, sea ice, and ice sheet surface melt data, we made several important advances in characterizing and understanding seasonal glacier behavior and the processes driving change: 1) seasonal velocity patterns fall into at least 3 distinct patterns, 2) these seasonal velocity patterns likely indicate differences in glacier responsiveness to ocean versus subglacial hydrologic processes, and 3) in some regions seasonal versus multi-year velocity changes appear most strongly influenced by different environmental factors. Further progress was previously hampered by limits in measurement resolution across space and time. To address this challenge, we are creating a new - and continuously growing - ice velocity dataset from Landsat 8 imagery. This data stream supports comprehensive global measurements of ice flow, providing a leap in our understanding of ice sheet motion across space and time. We offer a high-level discussion of our research findings and an introduction to the new Landsat 8-enabled data stream. Our results and measurement capabilities deliver critical new knowledge about ice sheet behavior and interaction with ocean and climate factors. These advances, in turn, have important implications for other elements of Earth system research, including climate, oceanography, and biology.

  12. Expert systems. Assisting formulary decision making in the ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Nash, D; Windt, P E; Peterson, A M

    1994-11-01

    In this article, the author reviews the application of a computer-assisted decision support system to their formulary decision-making process. Basic information is presented describing expert systems, which are a type of computer-assisted decision support system, and their advantages and disadvantages. A specific example of an expert system, 'RXPERT', is described. 'RXPERT' is a prototype expert system that models the decision-making process for an ambulatory (nonhospital) formulary. This formulary is the underpinning of the prescription drug benefit programme for the nearly 1 million residents of Saskatchewan, Canada. In the current formulary decision process, each drug product is evaluated by 2 separate committees, with the third and final decision resting with the Ministry of Health. The first committee, the Drug Quality Assessment Committee (DQAC), comprises members with expertise in medicine, pharmacology, clinical pharmacy, pharmaceutics, statistics, and regulatory processes. The DQAC evaluates information from the drug manufacturer and other independent sources, and makes an initial assessment with respect to clinical aspects of alternative therapies and generic interchangeability. The committee then makes its recommendation to the Saskatchewan Formulary Committee (SFC). The SFC reviews the recommendation of the DQAC and considers the administrative and economic implications of accepting the product for the patient, the programme, and healthcare professionals' practice. The SFC either reaffirms the recommendation of the DQAC or modifies it based on further review, and forwards its recommendation to the Ministry of Health. Finally, the Ministry of Health reviews the evaluation and determines the drug's formulary status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10155275

  13. ICE CHEMISTRY ON OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM BODIES: ELECTRON RADIOLYSIS OF N{sub 2}-, CH{sub 4}-, AND CO-CONTAINING ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi; Nuevo, Michel

    2015-10-20

    Radiation processing of the surface ices of outer Solar System bodies may be an important process for the production of complex chemical species. The refractory materials resulting from radiation processing of known ices are thought to impart to them a red or brown color, as perceived in the visible spectral region. In this work, we analyzed the refractory materials produced from the 1.2-keV electron bombardment of low-temperature N{sub 2}-, CH{sub 4}-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1), which simulates the radiation from the secondary electrons produced by cosmic ray bombardment of the surface ices of Pluto. Despite starting with extremely simple ices dominated by N{sub 2}, electron irradiation processing results in the production of refractory material with complex oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. These refractory materials were studied at room temperature using multiple analytical techniques including Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Infrared spectra of the refractory material suggest the presence of alcohols, carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, amines, and nitriles. XANES spectra of the material indicate the presence of carboxyl groups, amides, urea, and nitriles, and are thus consistent with the IR data. Atomic abundance ratios for the bulk composition of these residues from XANES analysis show that the organic residues are extremely N-rich, having ratios of N/C ∼ 0.9 and O/C ∼ 0.2. Finally, GC-MS data reveal that the residues contain urea as well as numerous carboxylic acids, some of which are of interest for prebiotic and biological chemistries.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigation of the anomalous behavior of ice during freezing of aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dushyant B; Elliott, James A; Gatlin, Larry A; Kumar, Satyendra; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y

    2009-05-01

    Simple aqueous systems, i.e., phosphate-glycine buffers and pure water, were studied at subambient temperatures by X-ray difractometry using a high-intensity synchrotron radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Complex X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, with two or more poorly resolved peaks in place of each of the four diagnostic peaks of hexagonal ice, 100, 002, 101, and 102, referred as "splitting", were observed in the majority of cases. The splitting of up to 0.05 A (d-spacing) was detected for 100, 002, and 101 peaks, whereas 102 peak was less affected. Deformation of the lattice of hexagonal ice, probably due to local stress created on the ice/ice or ice/container interface during water-to-ice transformation, is proposed as a possible mechanism for the observed splitting of XRD peaks. Using molecular modeling, it was estimated that the observed shifts in the peak positions are equivalent to applying a hydrostatic pressure of 2-3 kbars. The splitting can be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water-to-ice transformation on the destabilization of proteins and other biological systems. PMID:19358549

  15. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing of Aqueous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Dushyant B.; Elliott, James A.; Gatlin, Larry A.; Kumar, Satyendra; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y.

    2009-06-01

    Simple aqueous systems, i.e., phosphate-glycine buffers and pure water, were studied at subambient temperatures by X-ray difractometry using a high-intensity synchrotron radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Complex X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, with two or more poorly resolved peaks in place of each of the four diagnostic peaks of hexagonal ice, 100, 002, 101, and 102, referred as 'splitting', were observed in the majority of cases. The splitting of up to 0.05 {angstrom} (d-spacing) was detected for 100, 002, and 101 peaks, whereas 102 peak was less affected. Deformation of the lattice of hexagonal ice, probably due to local stress created on the ice/ice or ice/container interface during water-to-ice transformation, is proposed as a possible mechanism for the observed splitting of XRD peaks. Using molecular modeling, it was estimated that the observed shifts in the peak positions are equivalent to applying a hydrostatic pressure of 2-3 kbars. The splitting can be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water-to-ice transformation on the destabilization of proteins and other biological systems.

  16. Making intelligent systems team players: Additional case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Rhoads, Ron W.

    1993-01-01

    Observations from a case study of intelligent systems are reported as part of a multi-year interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. A series of studies were conducted to investigate issues in designing intelligent fault management systems in aerospace applications for effective human-computer interaction. The results of the initial study are documented in two NASA technical memoranda: TM 104738 Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Case Studies and Design Issues, Volumes 1 and 2; and TM 104751, Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Overview for Designers. The objective of this additional study was to broaden the investigation of human-computer interaction design issues beyond the focus on monitoring and fault detection in the initial study. The results of this second study are documented which is intended as a supplement to the original design guidance documents. These results should be of interest to designers of intelligent systems for use in real-time operations, and to researchers in the areas of human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence.

  17. Facts and fiction of learning systems. [decision making intelligent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saridis, G. N.

    1975-01-01

    The methodology that will provide the updated precision for the hardware control and the advanced decision making and planning in the software control is called learning systems and intelligent control. It was developed theoretically as an alternative for the nonsystematic heuristic approaches of artificial intelligence experiments and the inflexible formulation of modern optimal control methods. Its basic concepts are discussed and some feasibility studies of some practical applications are presented.

  18. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, William H

    2011-01-18

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  19. Examination of Icing Induced Loss of Control and Its Mitigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Colantonio, Renato O.

    2010-01-01

    Factors external to the aircraft are often a significant causal factor in loss of control (LOC) accidents. In today s aviation world, very few accidents stem from a single cause and typically have a number of causal factors that culminate in a LOC accident. Very often the "trigger" that initiates an accident sequence is an external environment factor. In a recent NASA statistical analysis of LOC accidents, aircraft icing was shown to be the most common external environmental LOC causal factor for scheduled operations. When investigating LOC accident or incidents aircraft icing causal factors can be categorized into groups of 1) in-flight encounter with super-cooled liquid water clouds, 2) take-off with ice contamination, or 3) in-flight encounter with high concentrations of ice crystals. As with other flight hazards, icing induced LOC accidents can be prevented through avoidance, detection, and recovery mitigations. For icing hazards, avoidance can take the form of avoiding flight into icing conditions or avoiding the hazard of icing by making the aircraft tolerant to icing conditions. Icing detection mitigations can take the form of detecting icing conditions or detecting early performance degradation caused by icing. Recovery from icing induced LOC requires flight crew or automated systems capable of accounting for reduced aircraft performance and degraded control authority during the recovery maneuvers. In this report we review the icing induced LOC accident mitigations defined in a recent LOC study and for each mitigation describe a research topic required to enable or strengthen the mitigation. Many of these research topics are already included in ongoing or planned NASA icing research activities or are being addressed by members of the icing research community. These research activities are described and the status of the ongoing or planned research to address the technology needs is discussed

  20. Laboratory Investigation of Ice Formation and Elimination in the Induction System of a Large Twin-engine Cargo Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colis, William D

    1947-01-01

    The icing characteristics, the de-icing rate with hot air, and the effect of impact ice on fuel metering and mixture distribution have been determined in a laboratory investigation of that part of the engine induction system consisting of a three-barrel injection-type carburetor and a supercharger housing with spinner-type fuel injection from an 18-cylinder radial engine used on a large twin-engine cargo airplane. The induction system remained ice-free at carburetor-air temperatures above 36 F regardless of the moisture content of the air. Between carburetor-air temperatures of 32 F and 36 F with humidity ratios in excess of saturation, serious throttling ice formed in the carburetor because of expansion cooling of the air; at carburetor-air temperatures below 32 F with humidity ratios in excess of saturation, serious impact-ice formations occurred, Spinner-type fuel injection at the entrance to the supercharger and heating of the supercharger-inlet elbow and the guide vanes by the warn oil in the rear engine housing are design features that proved effective in eliminating fuel-evaporation icing and minimized the formation of throttling ice below the carburetor. Air-flow recovery time with fixed throttle was rapidly reduced as the inlet -air wet -bulb temperature was increased to 55 F; further temperature increase produced negligible improvement in recovery time. Larger ice formations and lower icing temperatures increased the time required to restore proper air flow at a given wet-bulb temperature. Impact-ice formations on the entrance screen and the top of the carburetor reduced the over-all fuel-air ratio and increased the spread between the over-all ratio and the fuel-air ratio of the individual cylinders. The normal spread of fuel-air ratio was increased from 0.020 to 0.028 when the left quarter of the entrance screen was blocked in a manner simulating the blocking resulting from ice formations released from upstream duct walls during hot-air de-icing.

  1. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  2. Physical Chemical Controls of Methane and other Hydrocarbon gases in Outer Solar System Water-Ice Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus appear to have liquid water under its thin icy surface that has venting water and complex hydrocarbons. Jupiter's moon Europa is locked under a very thick layer of surface ice. Because Saturn's moon Titan contains abundant hydrocarbon gasses and liquids and both Saturn and Jupiter contain abundant hydrocarbon gases, it is likely that Europa also may have significant quantities of hydrocarbon gases in their water-ice systems. Both of these moons have the potential for life. We have begun to explore the impact that gas hydrate, which is a crystalline material composed of water and gas molecules, has on the availability of liquid water on a planet's surface: what conditions need to be present to initiate hydrate formation from a primordial selection of gases, salts, and water, how isolated hydrate systems evolve under the condition of mass transfer from ex-hydrate stability conditions to pro-hydrate stability conditions, the timespan of conditions that hydrate formation can host liquid solutions in an otherwise cooling regime; and the impact that additional chemistry, such as primitive chemosynthesis, may have on the sequestered hydrocarbon gases in hydrate. The analog for gas hydrate on these moons is the Permafrost hydrate system of Earth. Gas hydrate and water ice are stable in a compound cryosphere with ice extending downward from cold surface conditions to about the 273 K isotherm. Hydrate, depending on the mixture of gases in it, is stable from some depth below the surface to some isotherm that could be considerably in excess of 273 K. Salinity may strongly affect stability conditions. In order to estimate the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone and its effect on 'planetary' heat flow, we model heat production as a function of mass flow. Variables are gravity, ice thickness, temperature of the surrounding medium (space, ice, and water), the thickness of the "ocean", the and the thermophysical properties of the gas being

  3. Commercial aviation icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koegeboehn, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    A short range and long range icing research program was proposed. A survey was made to various industry and goverment agencies to obtain their views of needs for commercial aviation ice protection. Through these responsed, other additional data, and Douglas Aircraft icing expertise; an assessment of the state-of-the-art of aircraft icing data and ice protection systems was made. The information was then used to formulate the icing research programs.

  4. A Procedure for the Design of Air-Heated Ice-Prevention Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, C. B.

    1954-01-01

    A procedure proposed for use in the design of air-heated systems for the continuous prevention of ice formation on airplane components is set forth. Required heat-transfer and air-pressure-loss equations are presented, and methods of selecting appropriate meteorological conditions for flight over specified geographical areas and for the calculation of water-drop-impingement characteristics are suggested. In order to facilitate the design, a simple electrical analogue was devised which solves the complex heat-transfer relationships existing in the thermal-system analysis. The analogue is described and an illustration of its application to design is given.

  5. Amazonian-aged fluvial system and associated ice-related features in Terra Cimmeria, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, Solmaz; Hauber, Ernst; Kleinhans, Maarten; Le Deit, Laetitia; Platz, Thomas; Fawdon, Peter; Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate throughout the Amazonian is widely believed to have been cold and hyper-arid, very similar to the current conditions. However, ubiquitous evidence of aqueous and glacial activity has been recently reported, including channels that can be tens to hundreds of kilometres long, alluvial and fluvial deposits, ice-rich mantles, and glacial and periglacial landforms. Here we study a ∼340 km-long fluvial system located in the Terra Cimmeria region, in the southern mid-latitudes of Mars. The fluvial system is composed of an upstream catchment system with narrow glaciofluvial valleys and remnants of ice-rich deposits. We observe depositional features including fan-shaped deposits, and erosional features such as scour marks and streamlined islands. At the downstream section of this fluvial system is an outflow channel named Kārūn Valles, which displays a unique braided alluvial fan and terminates on the floor of the Ariadnes Colles basin. Our observations point to surface runoff of ice/snow melt as the water source for this fluvial activity. According to our crater size-frequency distribution analysis the entire fluvial system formed during early to middle Amazonian, between ∼ 1.8-0.2+0.2 Ga to 510-40+40 Ma. Hydraulic modelling indicates that the Kārūn Valles and consequently the alluvial fan formation took place in geologically short-term event(s). We conclude that liquid water was present in Terra Cimmeria during the early to middle Amazonian, and that Mars during that time may have undergone several episodic glacial-related events.

  6. Economic Decision Making: Application of the Theory of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitt, Robert

    In this chapter the complex systems are discussed in the context of economic and business policy and decision making. It will be showed and motivated that social systems are typically chaotic, non-linear and/or non-equilibrium and therefore complex systems. It is discussed that the rapid change in global consumer behaviour is underway, that further increases the complexity in business and management. For policy making under complexity, following principles are offered: openness and international competition, tolerance and variety of ideas, self-reliability and low dependence on external help. The chapter contains four applications that build on the theoretical motivation of complexity in social systems. The first application demonstrates that small economies have good prospects to gain from the global processes underway, if they can demonstrate production flexibility, reliable business ethics and good risk management. The second application elaborates on and discusses the opportunities and challenges in decision making under complexity from macro and micro economic perspective. In this environment, the challenges for corporate management are being also permanently changed: the balance between short term noise and long term chaos whose attractor includes customers, shareholders and employees must be found. The emergence of chaos in economic relationships is demonstrated by a simple system of differential equations that relate the stakeholders described above. The chapter concludes with two financial applications: about debt and risk management. The non-equilibrium economic establishment leads to additional problems by using excessive borrowing; unexpected downturns in economy can more easily kill companies. Finally, the demand for quantitative improvements in risk management is postulated. Development of the financial markets has triggered non-linearity to spike in prices of various production articles such as agricultural and other commodities that has added market

  7. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme and the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.

  8. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme andmore » the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.« less

  9. Autonomous perception and decision making in cyber-physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumik

    2011-07-01

    The cyber-physical system (CPS) is a relatively new interdisciplinary technology area that includes the general class of embedded and hybrid systems. CPSs require integration of computation and physical processes that involves the aspects of physical quantities such as time, energy and space during information processing and control. The physical space is the source of information and the cyber space makes use of the generated information to make decisions. This dissertation proposes an overall architecture of autonomous perception-based decision & control of complex cyber-physical systems. Perception involves the recently developed framework of Symbolic Dynamic Filtering for abstraction of physical world in the cyber space. For example, under this framework, sensor observations from a physical entity are discretized temporally and spatially to generate blocks of symbols, also called words that form a language. A grammar of a language is the set of rules that determine the relationships among words to build sentences. Subsequently, a physical system is conjectured to be a linguistic source that is capable of generating a specific language. The proposed technology is validated on various (experimental and simulated) case studies that include health monitoring of aircraft gas turbine engines, detection and estimation of fatigue damage in polycrystalline alloys, and parameter identification. Control of complex cyber-physical systems involve distributed sensing, computation, control as well as complexity analysis. A novel statistical mechanics-inspired complexity analysis approach is proposed in this dissertation. In such a scenario of networked physical systems, the distribution of physical entities determines the underlying network topology and the interaction among the entities forms the abstract cyber space. It is envisioned that the general contributions, made in this dissertation, will be useful for potential application areas such as smart power grids and

  10. Mapping Ice with Airborne Lasers

    NASA Video Gallery

    Determining whether polar ice quantities are growing or shrinking requires accurate and detailed measurements, year over year. To help make those measurements, IceBridge mission aircraft fire 3,000...

  11. Melt ponds and marginal ice zone from new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Tikhonov, Vasiliy; Komarova, Nataliia; Raev, Mikhail; Sharkov, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. A new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval in polar regions from satellite microwave radiometry data is discussed. Beside estimating sea ice concentration, the algorithm makes it possible to indicate ice areas with melting snow and melt ponds. Melt ponds are an important element of the Arctic climate system. Covering up to 50% of the surface of drifting ice in summer, they are characterized by low albedo values and absorb several times more incident shortwave radiation than the rest of the snow and ice cover. The change of melt ponds area in summer period 1987-2015 is investigated. The marginal ice zone (MIZ) is defined as the area where open ocean processes, including specifically ocean waves, alter significantly the dynamical properties of the sea ice cover. Ocean wave fields comprise short waves generated locally and swell propagating from the large ocean basins. Depending on factors like wind direction and ocean currents, it may consist of anything from isolated, small and large ice floes drifting over a

  12. Development of Simulator Based on Stochastic Switched ARX Model for Refrigeration System with Ice Thermal Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioya, Tsubasa; Fujimoto, Yasutaka

    In this paper, we introduce a simulator for ice thermal storage systems. Basically, the refrigeration system is modeled as a linear discrete-time system. For system identifications, the least square method is used. However, it is difficult to identify the switching time of the electromagnetic valve of brine pipes attached at showcases accurately by this method. In order to overcome this difficulty, a simulator based on the stochastic switched ARX model is developed. The data obtained from the simulator are compared with actual data. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed simulator.

  13. Technology for Ice Rinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Ron Urban's International Ice Shows set up portable ice rinks for touring troupes performing on temporary rinks at amusement parks, sports arenas, dinner theaters, shopping malls and civic centers. Key to enhanced rink portability, fast freezing and maintaining ice consistency is a mat of flexible tubing called ICEMAT, an offshoot of a solar heating system developed by Calmac, Mfg. under contract with Marshall.

  14. An acoustic telemetry system for a sahllow-eater under-ice Arctic environment

    SciTech Connect

    DePinto, V.; Kosalos, J.G.; Lanter, S.

    1983-05-01

    A new underwater acoustic telemetry system has been developed for long-range medium-rate, full duplex digital data transmission in a shallow water, under-ice Arctic environment. Prior to design of the system, acoustic properties of three ice-covered transmission channels were evaluated in experiments in the Canadian Arctic, near Resolute Bay. The three channels, each ranging to 4500 m in length, were characterized by their water depth profiles: In the first, one end of the channel was 100 m deep, while the other end was 10 m deep; in the second, one end was 100 m deep, while the other end was 200 m deep; in the third, the water depth was constant at 100 m. Results of the Arctic experiment are presented here, along with a discussion of the design concepts used to optimize the telemetry system for low error rates in a severe multipath environment. Acoustic telemetry can be used to advantage whenever digital data must be transmitted under water. The present system was developed under contract with the Canadian Government, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, for a remotely piloted vehicle being developed by the Bedford Institute of Oceanography for evaluation and use by the Canadian Hydrographic Service. The telemetry system will be used to transmit control signals and data, both to and from the vehicle.

  15. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  16. Ice Types in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    the MISR cameras, whereas younger, smoother ice types are predominantly forward scattering. The MISR map at right was generated using a statistical classification routine (called ISODATA) and analyzed using ice charts from the National Ice Center. Five classes of sea ice were found based upon the classification of MISR angular data. These are described, based on interpretation of the SAR image, by the image key. Very smooth ice areas that are predominantly forward scattering are colored red. Frost flowers are largely smooth to the MISR visible band sensor and are mapped as forward scattering. Areas mapped as blue are predominantly backward scattering, and the other three classes have statistically distinct angular signatures and fall within the middle of the forward/backward scattering continuum. Some areas that may be first year or younger ice between the multi year ice floes are not discernible to SAR, illustrating how MISR potentially can make a unique contribution to sea ice mapping.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. This data product was generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 6663. The MISR image has been cropped to include an area that is 200 kilometers wide, and utilizes data from blocks 30 to 33 within World Reference System-2 path 71.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Geospatial decision support systems for societal decision making

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernknopf, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    While science provides reliable information to describe and understand the earth and its natural processes, it can contribute more. There are many important societal issues in which scientific information can play a critical role. Science can add greatly to policy and management decisions to minimize loss of life and property from natural and man-made disasters, to manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources, and in general, to enhance and protect our quality of life. However, the link between science and decision-making is often complicated and imperfect. Technical language and methods surround scientific research and the dissemination of its results. Scientific investigations often are conducted under different conditions, with different spatial boundaries, and in different timeframes than those needed to support specific policy and societal decisions. Uncertainty is not uniformly reported in scientific investigations. If society does not know that data exist, what the data mean, where to use the data, or how to include uncertainty when a decision has to be made, then science gets left out -or misused- in a decision making process. This paper is about using Geospatial Decision Support Systems (GDSS) for quantitative policy analysis. Integrated natural -social science methods and tools in a Geographic Information System that respond to decision-making needs can be used to close the gap between science and society. The GDSS has been developed so that nonscientists can pose "what if" scenarios to evaluate hypothetical outcomes of policy and management choices. In this approach decision makers can evaluate the financial and geographic distribution of potential policy options and their societal implications. Actions, based on scientific information, can be taken to mitigate hazards, protect our air and water quality, preserve the planet's biodiversity, promote balanced land use planning, and judiciously exploit natural resources. Applications using the

  18. On the Role of Arctic Sea Ice Deformations: An Evaluation of the Regional Arctic System Model Results with Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Robert; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Roberts, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The atmosphere - sea ice - ocean fluxes and their contribution to rapid changes in the Arctic system are not well understood and generally are not resolved by global climate models (GCMs). While many significant model refinements have been made in the recent past, including the representation of sea ice rheology, surface albedo and ice-albedo feedback, other processes such as sea ice deformations, still require further studies and model advancements. Of particular potential interest here are linear kinematic features (LKFs), which control winter air-sea heat exchange and affect buoyancy forces in the ocean. Their importance in Arctic climate change, especially under an increasing first-year ice cover, is yet to be determined and their simulation requires representation of processes currently at sub-grid scale of most GCMs. To address some of the GCM limitations and to better understand the role of LKFs in air-sea exchange we use the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), which allows high spatio-temporal resolution and regional focus on the Arctic. RASM is a fully coupled regional climate model, developed to study dynamic and thermodynamic processes and their coupling across the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interface. It consists of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), the Community Ice Model (CICE) and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land hydrology model. The sea ice component has been upgraded to the Los Alamos Community Ice Model version 5.1 (CICE5.1), which allows either Elastic-Viscous-Plastic (EVP) or a new anisotropic (EPA) rheology. RASM's domain is pan-Arctic, with the ocean and sea ice components configured at an eddy-permitting horizontal resolution of 1/12-degree as well as 1/48-degree, for limited simulations. The atmosphere and land model components are configured at 50-km grids. All the components are coupled at a 20-minute time step. Results from multiple RASM simulations are analyzed and

  19. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  20. Retrievals of Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties of Deep Convective Systems using Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, J.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Wang, J.; Homeyer, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents innovative algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and newly derived empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements in Wang et al. (2015) during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). With composite gridded NEXRAD radar reflectivity, four-dimensional (space-time) ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs are retrieved, which is not possible from either in situ sampling at a single altitude or from vertical pointing radar measurements. For this study, aircraft in situ measurements provide the best-estimated ice cloud microphysical properties for validating the radar retrievals. Two statistical comparisons between retrieved and aircraft in situ measured ice microphysical properties are conducted from six selected cases during MC3E. For the temporal-averaged method, the averaged ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm) from aircraft in situ measurements are 0.50 g m-3 and 1.51 mm, while the retrievals from radar reflectivity have negative biases of 0.12 g m-3 (24%) and 0.02 mm (1.3%) with correlations of 0.71 and 0.48, respectively. For the spatial-averaged method, the IWC retrievals are closer to the aircraft results (0.51 vs. 0.47 g m-3) with a positive bias of 8.5%, whereas the Dm retrievals are larger than the aircraft results (1.65 mm vs. 1.51 mm) with a positive bias of 9.3%. The retrieved IWCs decrease from ~0.6 g m-3 at 5 km to ~0.15 g m-3 at 13 km, and Dm values decrease from ~2 mm to ~0.7 mm at the same levels. In general, the aircraft in situ measured IWC and Dm values at each level are within one standard derivation of retrieved properties. Good agreements between microphysical properties measured from aircraft and retrieved from radar reflectivity measurements indicate the reasonable accuracy of our retrievals.

  1. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  2. EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Markus, T.; Gasiewski, A.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Sturm, M.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A coordinated Arctic sea ice validation field campaign using the NASA Wallops P-3B aircraft was successfully completed in March 2003. This campaign was part of the program for validating the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) sea ice products. The AMSR-E, designed and built by the Japanese National Space Development Agency for NASA, was launched May 4,2002 on the EOS Aqua spacecraft. The AMSR-E sea ice products include sea ice concentration, sea ice temperature, and snow depth on sea ice. The primary instrument on the P-3B aircraft was the NOAA ETL Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) covering the same frequencies and polarizations as the AMSR-E. This paper describes the objectives of each of the seven flights, the Arctic regions overflown, and the coordination among satellite, aircraft, and surface-based measurements. Two of the seven aircraft flights were coordinated with scientists making surface measurements of snow and ice properties including sea ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice at a study area near Barrow, AK and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The remaining flights covered portions of the Bering Sea ice edge, the Chukchi Sea, and Norton Sound. Comparisons among the satellite and aircraft PSR data sets are presented.

  3. Bench Scale Test of Absorption Slurry-ice Maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasao, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    Slurry ice system is desirable as cold heat source for air conditioning, because it requires less conveyance power or less pipe size. On the other hand, recently absorption refrigerator is reevaluated because it can utilize various types of waste heat and it does not use fluorocarbon refrigerant. But it had been regarded to be difficult to make ice by absorption refrigerator because the refrigerant is water. However making slurry ice is possible, of cource, if the slurry ice generated by partial freezing of water is continuously taken away from the evaporator. This method was certified experimentally with a bench scale model. For ice making continuously, ice had not to be frozen stiff at water surface or inside wall of the evaporator. Then refrigerant water in the evaporator was raised swirl flow. And inside wall of the evaporator was finished by water repellent coating, and heated from outside wall. This slurry ice was adaptable to hydraulic transportation, because ice was needle crystal with about 5 mm length and ice temperature was 0°C.

  4. Investigating the Uptake Mechanisms of Hydrogen Peroxide to Single and Polycrystalline Ice with a Novel Flow Tube System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Angela; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Air-ice chemical interactions are important for describing the distribution and subsequent chemical fate of trace atmospheric gases within ice and snow and determining the oxidative capacities of these environments. The nature of this interaction is governed by a compound's physicochemical properties as well as ice microstructure. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reservoir of HOx radicals in the atmosphere and an important chromophore in snow and ice, is a trace gas that demonstrates complex uptake behaviour to frozen aqueous media by the reversible, fast adsorption to the air-ice interface, aggregation, and lateral interactions, and a slower process, ostensibly via uptake into the bulk. However, the exact mechanism and kinetics for the slow uptake of H2O2 and the size of this reservoir is unknown. It is important to describe and quantify this loss term, over environmentally-relevant timescales, accommodation of H2O2 into the bulk may be the dominant process which controls the composition and chemistry of the snow and overlying atmosphere. We hypothesize that the slow uptake of H2O2 occurs by diffusion into the grain boundaries of ice. To provide mechanistic insight to the macroscopic phenomenon of atmospheric gas uptake to ice, and discern various mechanisms including adsorption to air-ice interface and accommodation into the bulk through uptake into grain boundaries, we design, machine, and validate a novel flow reactor system featuring a Drilled Ice Flow Tube (DIFT). Our flow reactor system is uniquely suited to testing these uptake mechanisms: by controlling the degree of grain boundaries present in the DIFT (ie. monocrystalline or polycrystalline), we can directly observe the effect of the ice microstructure on the adsorptive and bulk uptake of trace atmospheric gases over long timescales (eg. on the order of hours). Here, we describe method development of the DIFT and demonstrate using polarised microscopy imagery that our experimental set-up allows for the direct

  5. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, R. L.; Raines, L.

    2009-09-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2005 FY9), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System. This work was funded by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics, Planetary Atmospheres, and Outer Planets programs. LR was supported by a summer research internship at the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  6. Long-term ice sheet-climate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaíno, Miren; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Gröger, Matthias; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Schurgers, Guy; Winguth, Arne M. E.

    2008-11-01

    Several multi-century and multi-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate change scenarios in order to study the long-term evolution of sea level and the impact of ice sheet changes on the climate system. The core of the ESM is a coupled coarse-resolution Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Ocean biogeochemistry, land vegetation and ice sheets are included as components of the ESM. The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) decays in all simulations, while the Antarctic ice sheet contributes negatively to sea level rise, due to enhanced storage of water caused by larger snowfall rates. Freshwater flux increases from Greenland are one order of magnitude smaller than total freshwater flux increases into the North Atlantic basin (the sum of the contribution from changes in precipitation, evaporation, run-off and Greenland meltwater) and do not play an important role in changes in the strength of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (NAMOC). The regional climate change associated with weakening/collapse of the NAMOC drastically reduces the decay rate of the GrIS. The dynamical changes due to GrIS topography modification driven by mass balance changes act first as a negative feedback for the decay of the ice sheet, but accelerate the decay at a later stage. The increase of surface temperature due to reduced topographic heights causes a strong acceleration of the decay of the ice sheet in the long term. Other feedbacks between ice sheet and atmosphere are not important for the mass balance of the GrIS until it is reduced to 3/4 of the original size. From then, the reduction in the albedo of Greenland strongly accelerates the decay of the ice sheet.

  7. Using Multimodal Input for Autonomous Decision Making for Unmanned Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, James H.; Cross, Charles; Rothhaar, Paul; Tran, Loc; Motter, Mark; Qualls, Garry; Trujillo, Anna; Allen, B. Danette

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous decision making in the presence of uncertainly is a deeply studied problem space particularly in the area of autonomous systems operations for land, air, sea, and space vehicles. Various techniques ranging from single algorithm solutions to complex ensemble classifier systems have been utilized in a research context in solving mission critical flight decisions. Realized systems on actual autonomous hardware, however, is a difficult systems integration problem, constituting a majority of applied robotics development timelines. The ability to reliably and repeatedly classify objects during a vehicles mission execution is vital for the vehicle to mitigate both static and dynamic environmental concerns such that the mission may be completed successfully and have the vehicle operate and return safely. In this paper, the Autonomy Incubator proposes and discusses an ensemble learning and recognition system planned for our autonomous framework, AEON, in selected domains, which fuse decision criteria, using prior experience on both the individual classifier layer and the ensemble layer to mitigate environmental uncertainty during operation.

  8. A combined road weather forecast system to prevent road ice formation in the Adige Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Piazza, Andrea; Antonacci, Gianluca; Todeschini, Ilaria; Apolloni, Roberto; Pretto, Ilaria

    2016-04-01

    Road ice is a dangerous meteorological hazard to a nation's transportation system and economy. By reducing the pavement friction with vehicle tyres, ice formation on pavements increases accident risk and delays travelling times thus posing a serious threat to road users' safety and the running of economic activities. Keeping roads clear and open is therefore essential, especially in mountainous areas where ice is likely to form during the winter period. Winter road maintenance helps to restore road efficiency and security, and its benefits are up to 8 times the costs sustained for anti-icing strategies [1]. However, the optimization of maintenance costs and the reduction of the environmental damage from over-salting demand further improvements. These can be achieved by reliable road weather forecasts, and in particular by the prediction of road surface temperatures (RSTs). RST is one of the most important parameters in determining road surface conditions. It is well known from literature that ice forms on pavements in high-humidity conditions when RSTs are below 0°C. We have therefore implemented an automatic forecast system to predict critical RSTs on a test route along the Adige Valley complex terrain, in the Italian Alps. The system considers two physical models, each computing heat and energy fluxes between the road and the atmosphere. One is Reuter's radiative cooling model, which predicts RSTs at sunrise as a function of surface temperatures at sunset and the time passed since then [2]. One is METRo (Model of the Environment and Temperature of Roads), a road weather forecast software which also considers heat conduction through road material [3]. We have applied the forecast system to a network of road weather stations (road weather information system, RWIS) installed on the test route [4]. Road and atmospheric observations from RWIS have been used as initial conditions for both METRo and Reuter's model. In METRo observations have also been coupled to

  9. Transport and transformation of de-icing urea from airport runways in a constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Thorén, A K; Legrand, C; Herrmann, J

    2003-01-01

    Urea, NH2-CO-NH2, is used as a de-icing agent at Kalmar Airport, southeast Sweden. During 1998-2001, urea contributed on average 30% of the yearly nitrogen (N) transport of 41,000 kg via Törnebybäcken stream to the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. In order to reduce stream transport of N from airport, agricultural and other diffuse sources, a wetland was constructed in 1996. Annual wetland retention of total-N varied in the range of 2,500-8,100 kg (6-36% of influent) during 1998-2001, according to mass balances calculated from monthly sampling. During airport de-icing, January-March 2001,660 kg urea-N out of 2,600 kg applied urea-N reached the wetland according to daily sampling. This indicated that 75% of the urea was transformed before entering the wetland. Urea was found to be only a minor part (8%) of total-N in the wetland influent. Calculations of cumulative urea-N loads at the wetland inlet and outlet respectively, showed a significant urea transformation during February 2001 with approximately 40% of the incoming urea-N being transformed in the wetland system. These results show that significant amounts of urea can be transformed in a wetland system at air temperatures around 0 degree C. PMID:14621175

  10. On the Formation of Astrobiologically Important Molecules in Outer Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2012-05-01

    The prime directive of our research project is to comprehend the chemical evolution of the Solar System and how life began and developed on Earth. This will be achieved by understanding the formation of carbon-, hydrogen-, oxygen-, and nitrogen-bearing (CHON) molecules in ices of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and on comets by reproducing the space environment in laboratory experiments. A study of these KBOs is important because they resemble natural ‘time capsules’ at a frozen stage before life developed on Earth. We follow the methodology that a comparison of the molecules formed in the experiments with the current composition of KBOs provides an exceptional potential to reconstruct the composition of icy, outer Solar System bodies at the time of their formation billions of years ago. Here, we present resent results of laboratory experiments simulating the interaction of ionizing radiation with low temperatures ices and mixtures relevant to the chemistry of KBOs and comets. Special attention is given to the reaction mechanisms on the synthesis of astrobiologically important molecules; amino acids, sugars, amines, carboxylic acids, and dipeptides

  11. Constraints on ice volume changes of the WAIS and Ross Ice Shelf since the LGM based on cosmogenic exposure ages in the Darwin-Hatherton glacial system of the Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Storey, Bryan; Hood, David; Joy, Kurt; Shulmeister, James

    2010-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of the spatial and temporal scale of ice volume change of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) and Ross Ice Shelf since the last glacial maximum (LGM) ~20 ka is essential to accurately predict ice sheet response to current and future climate change. Although global sea level rose by approximately 120 metres since the LGM, the contribution of polar ice sheets is uncertain and the timing of any such contribution is controversial. Mackintosh et al (2007) suggest that sectors of the EAIS, similar to those studied at Framnes Mountains where the ice sheet slowly calves at coastal margins, have made marginal contributions to global sea-level rise between 13 and 7 ka. In contrast, Stone et al (2003) document continuing WAIS decay during the mid-late Holocene, raising the question of what was the response of the WAIS since LGM and into the Holocene. Terrestrial evidence is restricted to sparse coastal oasis and ice free mountains which archive limits of former ice advances. Mountain ranges flanking the Darwin-Hatherton glaciers exhibit well-defined moraines, weathering signatures, boulder rich plateaus and glacial tills, which preserve the evidence of advance and retreat of the ice sheet during previous glacial cycles. Previous studies suggest a WAIS at the LGM in this location to be at least 1,000 meters thicker than today. As part of the New Zealand Latitudinal Gradient Project along the Transantarctic, we collected samples for cosmogenic exposure dating at a) Lake Wellman area bordering the Hatherton Glacier, (b) Roadend Nunatak at the confluence of the Darwin and Hatherton glaciers and (c) Diamond Hill which is positioned at the intersection of the Ross Ice Shelf and Darwin Glacier outlet. While the technique of exposure dating is very successful in mid-latitude alpine glacier systems, it is more challenging in polar ice-sheet regions due to the prevalence of cold-based ice over-riding events and absence of outwash processes which removes

  12. Radiolysis of Amino Acids in Outer Solar-System Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids have been found in cometary dust particles and in the organic component of meteorites. These molecules, important for pre-biotic chemistry and for active biological systems, might be formed in cold planetary or interstellar environments and then delivered to H20-rich surfaces in the outer solar system. Many models for the availability of organic species on Earth and elsewhere depend on the ability of these molecules to survive in radiation-rich space environments. This poster presents results of O.8-MeV proton radiolysis of ice films at lS-140K. using infrared spectroscopy, the destruction rates of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine have been determined for both pure films and those containing amino acids diluted in H2o. our results are discussed in terms of the survivability of these molecules in the icy surfaces present in the outer solar system and the possibility of their detection by instruments on board the New Horizons spacecraft

  13. Present-day and future Antarctic ice sheet climate and surface mass balance in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Vizcaino, Miren; Fyke, Jeremy; van Kampenhout, Leo; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-02-01

    We present climate and surface mass balance (SMB) of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) as simulated by the global, coupled ocean-atmosphere-land Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a horizontal resolution of ˜1° in the past, present and future (1850-2100). CESM correctly simulates present-day Antarctic sea ice extent, large-scale atmospheric circulation and near-surface climate, but fails to simulate the recent expansion of Antarctic sea ice. The present-day Antarctic ice sheet SMB equals 2280 ± 131 {Gt year^{-1}} , which concurs with existing independent estimates of AIS SMB. When forced by two CMIP5 climate change scenarios (high mitigation scenario RCP2.6 and high-emission scenario RCP8.5), CESM projects an increase of Antarctic ice sheet SMB of about 70 {Gt year^{-1}} per degree warming. This increase is driven by enhanced snowfall, which is partially counteracted by more surface melt and runoff along the ice sheet's edges. This intensifying hydrological cycle is predominantly driven by atmospheric warming, which increases (1) the moisture-carrying capacity of the atmosphere, (2) oceanic source region evaporation, and (3) summer AIS cloud liquid water content.

  14. Present-day and future Antarctic ice sheet climate and surface mass balance in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Vizcaino, Miren; Fyke, Jeremy; van Kampenhout, Leo; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-09-01

    We present climate and surface mass balance (SMB) of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) as simulated by the global, coupled ocean-atmosphere-land Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a horizontal resolution of {˜ }1° in the past, present and future (1850-2100). CESM correctly simulates present-day Antarctic sea ice extent, large-scale atmospheric circulation and near-surface climate, but fails to simulate the recent expansion of Antarctic sea ice. The present-day Antarctic ice sheet SMB equals 2280 ± 131 {Gt year^{-1}}, which concurs with existing independent estimates of AIS SMB. When forced by two CMIP5 climate change scenarios (high mitigation scenario RCP2.6 and high-emission scenario RCP8.5), CESM projects an increase of Antarctic ice sheet SMB of about 70 {Gt year^{-1}} per degree warming. This increase is driven by enhanced snowfall, which is partially counteracted by more surface melt and runoff along the ice sheet's edges. This intensifying hydrological cycle is predominantly driven by atmospheric warming, which increases (1) the moisture-carrying capacity of the atmosphere, (2) oceanic source region evaporation, and (3) summer AIS cloud liquid water content.

  15. Numerical modeling and simulation of hot air jet anti-icing system employing channels for enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kamran Zaki

    Aircraft icing is a serious concern for the aviation community since it is one of the major causes of fatal aircraft accidents. Aircrafts use different anti-icing systems and one such system is the hot-air anti-icing system, which utilizes hot-air from the engine compressor bleed to heat critical aircraft surfaces and prevent ice formation. Numerous experimental and numerical studies have been performed to increase the efficiency of the hot-air jet based anti-icing systems. Most of the investigations have focused on either orifice design or the impingement region of target surface geometry. Since the impingement surface heat transfer drops off sharply past the stagnation region, investigators have studied the use of multiple jets to enhance surface heat transfer over a larger area. However, use of multiple jets is a further strain on engine resources. One way to conserve engine resources is to use single jet in conjunction with various geometric and physical mechanisms to enhance heat transfer. The current study focuses on enhancing heat transfer using a single jet and a channel. The study investigates the effect of channel's height, inlet location and Reynolds number on heat transfer characteristics in terms of average Nusselt number distribution along the impingement surface. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to simulate the different cases. Results indicate that the heat transfer depends strongly on height and width of channel, jet-to-target spacing, inlet angle and jet Reynolds number.

  16. ABIOTIC FORMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS (RCOOH) IN INTERSTELLAR AND SOLAR SYSTEM MODEL ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2010-12-10

    The present laboratory study simulated the abiotic formation of carboxylic acids (RCOOH) in interstellar and solar system model ices of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})-hydrocarbon mix C{sub n} H{sub 2n+2} (n = 1-6). The pristine model ices were irradiated at 10 K under contamination-free, ultrahigh vacuum conditions with energetic electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic-ray particles. The chemical processing of the ices was monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer during the irradiation phase and subsequent warm-up phases on line and in situ in order to extract qualitative (carriers) and quantitative (rate constants and yields) information on the newly synthesized species. Carboxylic acids were identified to be the main carrier, together with carbon monoxide (CO) and a trace of formyl (HCO) and hydroxycarbonyl (HOCO) radicals at 10 K. The upper limit of acid column density at 10 K was estimated as much as (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 17} molecules cm{sup -2} at doses of 17 {+-} 2 eV molecule{sup -1}, or the yield of 39% {+-} 4% from the initial column density of carbon dioxide. The temporal column density profiles of the products were then numerically fit using two independent kinetic schemes of reaction mechanisms. Finally, we transfer this laboratory simulation to star-forming regions of the interstellar medium, wherein cosmic-ray-induced processing of icy grains at temperatures as low as 10 K could contribute to the current level of chemical complexity as evidenced in astronomical observations and in extracts of carbonaceous meteorites.

  17. On the formation of ozone in oxygen-rich solar system ices via ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Courtney P; Bennett, Chris J; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2011-05-28

    The irradiation of pure molecular oxygen (O(2)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) ices with 5 keV H(+) and He(+) ions was investigated experimentally to simulate the chemical processing of oxygen rich planetary and interstellar surfaces by exposure to galactic cosmic ray (GCR), solar wind, and magnetospheric particles. Deposited at 12 K under ultra-high vacuum conditions (UHV), the irradiated condensates were monitored on-line and in situ in the solid-state by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), revealing the formation of ozone (O(3)) in irradiated oxygen ice; and ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and cyclic carbon trioxide (c-CO(3)) in irradiated carbon dioxide. In addition to these irradiation products, evolution of gas-phase molecular hydrogen (H(2)), atomic helium (He) and molecular oxygen (O(2)) were identified in the subliming oxygen and carbon dioxide condensates by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Temporal abundances of the oxygen and carbon dioxide precursors and the observed molecular products were compiled over the irradiation period to develop reaction schemes unfolding in the ices. These reactions were observed to be dependent on the generation of atomic oxygen (O) by the homolytic dissociation of molecular oxygen induced by electronic, S(e), and nuclear, S(n), interaction with the impinging ions. In addition, the destruction of the ozone and carbon trioxide products back to the molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide precursors was promoted over an extended period of ion bombardment. Finally, destruction and formation yields were calculated and compared between irradiation sources (including 5 keV electrons) which showed a surprising correlation between the molecular yields (∼10(-3)-10(-4) molecules eV(-1)) created by H(+) and He(+) impacts. However, energy transfer by isoenergetic, fast electrons typically generated ten times more product molecules per electron volt (∼10(-2)-10(-3) molecules eV(-1)) than exposure to the ions. Implications of these

  18. Ikaite crystal distribution in Arctic winter sea ice and implications for CO2 system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysgaard, S.; Søgaard, D. H.; Cooper, M.; Pućko, M.; Lennert, K.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Wang, F.; Geilfus, N. X.; Glud, R. N.; Ehn, J.; McGinnnis, D. F.; Attard, K.; Sievers, J.; Deming, J. W.; Barber, D.

    2012-12-01

    The precipitation of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) in polar sea ice is critical to the efficiency of the sea ice-driven carbon pump and potentially important to the global carbon cycle, yet the spatial and temporal occurrence of ikaite within the ice is poorly known. We report unique observations of ikaite in unmelted ice and vertical profiles of ikaite abundance and concentration in sea ice for the crucial season of winter. Ice was examined from two locations: a 1 m thick land-fast ice site and a 0.3 m thick polynya site, both in the Young Sound area (74° N, 20° W) of NE Greenland. Ikaite crystals, ranging in size from a few µm to 700 µm were observed to concentrate in the interstices between the ice platelets in both granular and columnar sea ice. In vertical sea-ice profiles from both locations, ikaite concentration determined from image analysis, decreased with depth from surfaceice values of 700-900 µmol kg-1 ice (~ 25 × 106 crystals kg-1) to bottom-layer values of 100-200 µmol kg-1 ice (1-7 × 106 kg-1), all of which are much higher (4-10 times) than those reported in the few previous studies. Direct measurements of total alkalinity (TA) in surface layers fell within the same range as ikaite concentration whereas TA concentrations in bottom layers were twice as high. This depth-related discrepancy suggests interior ice processes where ikaite crystals form in surface sea ice layers and partly dissolved in bottom layers. From these findings and model calculations we relate sea ice formation and melt to observed pCO2 conditions in polar surface waters, and hence, the air-sea CO2 flux.

  19. Regular network model for the sea ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Müller-Stoffels, Marc; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean and sea ice form a feedback system that plays an important role in the global climate. The complexity of highly parameterized global circulation (climate) models makes it very difficult to assess feedback processes in climate without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics is understood. We introduce a two-dimensional energy-based regular network model to investigate feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The model includes the nonlinear aspect of the ice-water phase transition, a nonlinear diffusive energy transport within a heterogeneous ice-ocean lattice, and spatiotemporal atmospheric and oceanic forcing at the surfaces. First results for a horizontally homogeneous ice-ocean layer show bistability and related hysteresis between perennial ice and perennial open water for varying atmospheric heat influx. Seasonal ice cover exists as a transient phenomenon. We also find that ocean heat fluxes are more efficient than atmospheric heat fluxes to melt Arctic sea ice.

  20. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  1. Calmac Ice Storage Test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.

    1991-08-01

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. Calmac provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The Calmac ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging was similar to that reported by the manufacturer. Both the measured average and minimum brine temperatures were in close agreement with Calmac's literature values, and the ability to fully charge the tank was relatively unaffected by charging rate and brine flow rate. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend most strongly on the discharge conditions required to serve the load. This report describes Calmac system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. Companion reports describe ISTF test procedures and ice-making efficiency test results that are common to many of the units tested. 11 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Microbial Contamination of Ice Machines Is Mediated by Activated Charcoal Filtration Systems in a City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yorioka, Katsuhiro; Oie, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Koji; Kimoto, Hiroo; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Although microbial contamination of ice machines has been reported, no previous study has addressed microbial contamination of ice produced by machines equipped with activated charcoal (AC) filters in hospitals. The aim of this study was to provide clinical data for evaluating AC filters to prevent microbial contamination of ice. We compared microbial contamination in ice samples produced by machines with (n = 20) and without an AC filter (n = 40) in Shunan City Shinnanyo Municipal Hospital. All samples from the ice machine equipped with an AC filter contained 10-116 CFUs/g of glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. No microorganisms were detected in samples from ice machines without AC filters. After the AC filter was removed from the ice machine that tested positive for Gram-negative bacteria, the ice was resampled (n = 20). Analysis found no contaminants. Ice machines equipped with AC filters pose a serious risk factor for ice contamination. New filter-use guidelines and regulations on bacterial detection limits to prevent contamination of ice in healthcare facilities are necessary.

  3. Microbial Contamination of Ice Machines Is Mediated by Activated Charcoal Filtration Systems in a City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yorioka, Katsuhiro; Oie, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Koji; Kimoto, Hiroo; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Although microbial contamination of ice machines has been reported, no previous study has addressed microbial contamination of ice produced by machines equipped with activated charcoal (AC) filters in hospitals. The aim of this study was to provide clinical data for evaluating AC filters to prevent microbial contamination of ice. We compared microbial contamination in ice samples produced by machines with (n = 20) and without an AC filter (n = 40) in Shunan City Shinnanyo Municipal Hospital. All samples from the ice machine equipped with an AC filter contained 10-116 CFUs/g of glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. No microorganisms were detected in samples from ice machines without AC filters. After the AC filter was removed from the ice machine that tested positive for Gram-negative bacteria, the ice was resampled (n = 20). Analysis found no contaminants. Ice machines equipped with AC filters pose a serious risk factor for ice contamination. New filter-use guidelines and regulations on bacterial detection limits to prevent contamination of ice in healthcare facilities are necessary. PMID:27348980

  4. MUSE - Mission to the Uranian system: Unveiling the evolution and formation of ice giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra-Bahamón, Tatiana; Bracken, Colm; Costa Sitjà, Marc; Dirkx, Dominic; Gerth, Ingo; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Labrianidis, Christos; Laneuville, Matthieu; Luntzer, Armin; MacArthur, Jane L.; Maier, Andrea; Morschhauser, Achim; Nordheim, Tom A.; Sallantin, Renaud; Tlustos, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The planet Uranus, one of the two ice giants in the Solar System, has only been visited once by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1986. Ice giants represent a fundamental class of planets, and many known exoplanets fall within this category. Therefore, a dedicated mission to an ice giant is crucial to improve the understanding of the formation, evolution and current characteristics of such planets in order to extend the knowledge of both the Solar System and exoplanetary systems. In the study at hand, the rationale, selection, and conceptual design for a mission to investigate the Uranian system, as an archetype for ice giants, is presented. A structured analysis of science questions relating to the Uranian system is performed, categorized by the themes atmosphere, interior, moons and rings, and magnetosphere. In each theme, science questions are defined, with their relative importance in the theme quantified. Additionally, top-level weights for each theme are defined, with atmosphere and interior weighted the strongest, as they are more related to both exoplanetary systems and the Uranian system, than the other two themes (which are more specific for the planet itself). Several top level mission architecture aspects have been defined, from which the most promising concepts were generated using heuristic methods. A trade-off analysis of these concepts is presented, separately, for engineering aspects, such as cost, complexity, and risk, and for science aspects. The science score for each mission is generated from the capability of each mission concept to answer the science questions. The trade-off results in terms of relative science and engineering weight are presented, and competitive mission concepts are analyzed based on the preferred mission type. A mission design point for a typical flagship science mission is selected from the trade space. It consists of a Uranus orbiter with a dry mass of 2073 kg including 402 kg of payload and a Uranus entry probe, which is to

  5. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history. PMID:25380218

  6. The NASA aircraft icing research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available to industry icing technology to support the needs and requirements for all-weather aircraft designs. Research is being done for both fixed wing and rotary wing applications. The NASA program emphasizes technology development in two areas, advanced ice protection concepts and icing simulation. Reviewed here are the computer code development/validation, icing wind tunnel testing, and icing flight testing efforts.

  7. Systemic Data-Based Decision Making: A Systems Approach for Using Data in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Tamara M.

    2009-01-01

    No Child Left Behind has increased data collection and reporting, the development of data systems, and interest in using data for decision-making in schools and classrooms. Ends-driven decision making has become common educational practice, where the ends justify the means at all costs, and short-term results trump longer-term outcomes and the…

  8. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  9. EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Validation Program: Arctic2003 Aircraft Campaign Flight Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Markus,T.

    2003-01-01

    In March 2003 a coordinated Arctic sea ice validation field campaign using the NASA Wallops P-3B aircraft was successfully completed. This campaign was part of the program for validating the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) sea ice products. The AMSR-E, designed and built by the Japanese National Space Development Agency for NASA, was launched May 4, 2002 on the EOS Aqua spacecraft. The AMSR-E sea ice products to be validated include sea ice concentration, sea ice temperature, and snow depth on sea ice. This flight report describes the suite of instruments flown on the P-3, the objectives of each of the seven flights, the Arctic regions overflown, and the coordination among satellite, aircraft, and surface-based measurements. Two of the seven aircraft flights were coordinated with scientists making surface measurements of snow and ice properties including sea ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice at a study area near Barrow, AK and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. Two additional flights were dedicated to making heat and moisture flux measurements over the St. Lawrence Island polynya to support ongoing air-sea-ice processes studies of Arctic coastal polynyas. The remaining flights covered portions of the Bering Sea ice edge, the Chukchi Sea, and Norton Sound.

  10. Implications of Contingency Planning Support for Weather and Icing Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A human-centered systems analysis was applied to the adverse aircraft weather encounter problem in order to identify desirable functions of weather and icing information. The importance of contingency planning was identified as emerging from a system safety design methodology as well as from results of other aviation decision-making studies. The relationship between contingency planning support and information on regions clear of adverse weather was investigated in a scenario- based analysis. A rapid prototype example of the key elements in the depiction of icing conditions was developed in a case study, and the implications for the components of the icing information system were articulated.

  11. Ice Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  12. Putting DSM on ice

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.; Ebeling, J.

    1994-02-01

    Electric utilities' demand-side management (DSM) activities owe their political correctness to the theory that deferring new generating capacity and conserving energy is environmentally friendly and saves the consumer money. When prompted by perceived DSM-mandating integrated resource planning (IRP) legislation, utilities jumped into DSM alone headfirst, spending more than $1.8 billion in 1991 on DSM alone. However, mixed results are causing everyone from utilities to regulators to rethink their positions. Even long-time DSM proponents are beginning to review their aggressive DSM-influenced load forecasts. Because there is a demonstrated shortage of solid evidence that many of these programs really produce the promised savings, many experts now contend that a large portion of existing DSM programs will not survive real economic scrutiny. Increased competition will place even more pressure on DSM programs that are not cost-effective. This article describes a proven DSM technology, combustion turbine inlet air cooling with thermal (ice) energy storage. This process makes it possible to shift peak loads to off-peak periods without compromising customer service or system reliability. Ice is produced during off-peak hours and stored in tanks as a water/ice mixture. During on-peak hours, water from the storage tanks is pumped to the combustion turbine coils to cool the inlet air. The lower air temperature results in increased mass flow through the turbine, producing higher turbine capacity.

  13. Ice pack heat sink subsystem, phase 2. [astronaut life support cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the design, development, fabrication, and test at one gravity of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions; the investigation of thermal storage material with the objective of uncovering materials with heats of fusion and/or solution in the range of 300 Btu/lb (700 kilojoules/kilogram); and the planned procedure for implementing an ice pack heat sink subsystem flight experiment. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  14. Subaqueous ice-contact fans: Depositional systems characterised by highly aggradational supercritical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Joerg; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Subaqueous ice-contact fans are deposited by high-energy plane-wall jets from subglacial conduits into standing water bodies. Highly aggradational conditions during flow expansion and deceleration allow for the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows, which are commonly considered rare in the depositional record. We present field examples from gravelly and sandy subaqueous ice-contact fan successions, which indicate that deposition by supercritical flows might be considered as a characteristic feature of these depositional systems. The studied successions were deposited in deep ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. The gravel-rich subaqueous fan deposits are dominated by large scour-fills (up to 25 m wide and 3 m) deep and deposits of turbulent hyperconcentrated flows, which are partly attributed to supercritical flow conditions (Winsemann et al., 2009). Scours (up to 4.5 m wide and 0.9 m deep) infilled by gravelly backsets are observed above laterally extensive erosional surfaces and are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps. Laterally discontinuous beds of low-angle cross-stratified gravel are interpreted as antidune deposits. Downflow and up-section the gravel-rich deposits pass into sand-rich successions, which include deposits of chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes and humpback dunes (Lang and Winsemann, 2013). Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes are characterised by scour-fills (up to 4 m wide and 1.2 m deep) comprising backsets or gently dipping sigmoidal foresets. Stationary antidune deposits consist of laterally extensive sinusoidal waveforms with long wavelengths (1-12 m) and low amplitudes (0.1-0.5 m), which formed under quasi-steady flows at the lower limit of the supercritical flow stage and high rates of sedimentation. Humpback dunes are characterised by divergent sigmoidal foresets and are interpreted as

  15. Digging up ice-rocks: clues to our origin frozen in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Emery, Joshua P.; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-10-01

    As of 2016, almost 2000 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs have been discovered, and this is only a small fraction of the estimated total population. These ice-rocks are the relics of the formation of the Solar System and keep deep in their frozen interior the code to decipher the first stages of its formation. However, after more than 20 years of studies from ground- and space-based telescopes, we are not able, as yet, to unravel the conditions in the outer nebula into a clear picture of the chemical, dynamical, and thermal history of the outer Solar System.The big picture of this region shows the trans-Neptunian belt as a population of icy objects, covered by a mixture of water ice, silicates and complex organics, with varied sizes (9 to 2400 km) and albedos (4 to 96%). In some particular cases the presence of volatiles (CO, N2) or other ices (CH3OH) has also been detected. Two space-based observatories have made exceptional contributions to our understanding of the physical nature of TNOs: Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Telescope. Spitzer, detected for the first time thermal radiation from TNOs, and together with Herschel provided constraints on the sizes, albedos, and thermal properties of over 100 of them. Moreover, IRAC/Spitzer data combined with existing observations at wavelengths < 2.5μm, and with the thermal properties addressed by Herschel and Spitzer, have proven to be a treasure trove that provides unprecedented insights into the surface composition of TNOs.In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST, to be launched in 2018) will succeed the Hubble Space Telescope as NASA's premier space-based telescope for planetary science. This telescope will offer much more detailed characterization of TNO's composition via NIRCam photometry, or NIRSpec spectroscopy, from 1 – 5 μm.Here we show the results of the study of TNOs' surface composition by means of the analysis of 0.4 to 5 μm albedos. We will also show how IRAC data

  16. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  17. Glacier Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) and the GLIMS Information Management System at NSIDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. E.; Scharfen, G. R.; Barry, R. G.; Khalsa, S. S.; Raup, B.; Swick, R.; Troisi, V. J.; Wang, I.

    2001-12-01

    GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space) is an international project to survey a majority of the world's glaciers with the accuracy and precision needed to assess recent changes and determine trends in glacial environments. This will be accomplished by: comprehensive periodic satellite measurements, coordinated distribution of screened image data, analysis of images at worldwide Regional Centers, validation of analyses, and a publicly accessible database. The primary data source will be from the ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer) instrument aboard the EOS Terra spacecraft, and Landsat ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus), currently in operation. Approximately 700 ASTER images have been acquired with GLIMS gain settings as of mid-2001. GLIMS is a collaborative effort with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Aeronautics Space Adminstration (NASA), other U.S. Federal Agencies and a group of internationally distributed glaciologists at Regional Centers of expertise. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) is developing the information management system for GLIMS. We will ingest and maintain GLIMS-analyzed glacier data from Regional Centers and provide access to the data via the World Wide Web. The GLIMS database will include measurements (over time) of glacier length, area, boundaries, topography, surface velocity vectors, and snowline elevation, derived primarily from remote sensing data. The GLIMS information management system at NSIDC will provide an easy to use and widely accessible service for the glaciological community and other users needing information about the world's glaciers. The structure of the international GLIMS consortium, status of database development, sample imagery and derived analyses and user search and order interfaces will be demonstrated. More information on GLIMS is available at: http://www.glims.org/.

  18. Space Launch System Complex Decision-Making Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Flores, Tim; Hundley, Jason; Monk, Timothy; Feldman,Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The Space Shuttle program has ended and elements of the Constellation Program have either been cancelled or transitioned to new NASA exploration endeavors. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has worked diligently to select an optimum configuration for the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy lift vehicle that will provide the foundation for future beyond low earth orbit (LEO) large-scale missions for the next several decades. From Fall 2010 until Spring 2011, an SLS decision-making framework was formulated, tested, fully documented, and applied to multiple SLS vehicle concepts at NASA from previous exploration architecture studies. This was a multistep process that involved performing figure of merit (FOM)-based assessments, creating Pass/Fail gates based on draft threshold requirements, performing a margin-based assessment with supporting statistical analyses, and performing sensitivity analysis on each. This paper focuses on the various steps and methods of this process (rather than specific data) that allowed for competing concepts to be compared across a variety of launch vehicle metrics in support of the successful completion of the SLS Mission Concept Review (MCR) milestone.

  19. Climate effects on volcanism: influence on magmatic systems of loading and unloading from ice mass variations, with examples from Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Pinel, Virginie; Lund, Björn; Albino, Fabien; Pagli, Carolina; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2010-05-28

    Pressure influences both magma production and the failure of magma chambers. Changes in pressure interact with the local tectonic settings and can affect magmatic activity. Present-day reduction in ice load on subglacial volcanoes due to global warming is modifying pressure conditions in magmatic systems. The large pulse in volcanic production at the end of the last glaciation in Iceland suggests a link between unloading and volcanism, and models of that process can help to evaluate future scenarios. A viscoelastic model of glacio-isostatic adjustment that considers melt generation demonstrates how surface unloading may lead to a pulse in magmatic activity. Iceland's ice caps have been thinning since 1890 and glacial rebound at rates exceeding 20 mm yr(-1) is ongoing. Modelling predicts a significant amount of 'additional' magma generation under Iceland due to ice retreat. The unloading also influences stress conditions in shallow magma chambers, modifying their failure conditions in a manner that depends critically on ice retreat, the shape and depth of magma chambers as well as the compressibility of the magma. An annual cycle of land elevation in Iceland, due to seasonal variation of ice mass, indicates an annual modulation of failure conditions in subglacial magma chambers.

  20. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  1. Numerical modeling of anti-icing systems and comparison to test results on a NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis IRT on an electro-thermally heated NACA 0012 airfoil. Quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and those predicted by a computer simulation code were made to assess the validity of a recently developed anti-icing model. An infrared camera was utilized to scan the instantaneous temperature contours of the skin surface. Despite some experimental difficulties, good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experimental results were generally obtained for the surface temperature and the possibility for the runback to freeze. Some recommendations were given for an efficient operation of a thermal anti-icing system.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Anti-icing Systems and Comparison to Test Results on a NACA 0012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis IRT on an electro-thermally heated NACA 0012 airfoil. Quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and those predicted by a computer simulation code were made to assess the validity of a recently developed anti-icing model. An infrared camera was utilized to scan the instantaneous temperature contours of the skin surface. Despite some experimental difficulties, good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experiment results were generally obtained for the surface temperature and the possibility for each runback to freeze. Some recommendations were given for an efficient operation of a thermal anti-icing system.

  3. Organic solids produced from simple C/H/O/N ices by charged particles - Applications to the outer solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.N.; Thompson, W.R.; Chyba, C.F.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of charged particle irradiation by cold plasma discharge on surfaces of H2O:CH4 clathrate with a 200:1 ratio and on ices composed of H2O and C2H6 or C2H2 are examined. The molecules studies are found in Comet Halley and are plausible constituents in icy outer solar system objects. The IR transmission spectra of four ice-tholin residues obtained in the laboratory are compared with spectra produced by irradiation of gases and ices containing simple hydrocarbons. The similarities between CH4 clathrate residue and Halley organic grains, and the surface transport or atmospheric replenishment activity on Triton and Pluto are discussed. 56 refs.

  4. An assessment of the rapid evolution of ice-marginal and proglacial systems due to ongoing climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Ice-marginal and proglacial systems are rapidly evolving due to ongoing climate change, which is primarily manifest in deglaciation and thawing permafrost. Evolution of ice-marginal and proglacial systems can be recognised specifically in geomorphological and hydrological processes, landforms and sediments. These changes will have important and immediate consequences for landscape stability and for water and sediment fluxes, and hence for biogeochemical cycles, ecology and human activity. This presentation will discuss three hot topics; (i) the general response of alpine catchments to deglaciation and permafrost thawing, (ii) the impact of proglacial lakes on ice margins and on proglacial systems, (iii) the role of sudden onset glacier floods, or 'jökulhlaups', in ice-marginal and proglacial systems. In all three topics an emphasis will be made on the state of conceptual knowledge, outstanding requirement for quantitative measurement and analysis, and opportunities offered by emerging technology. The presentation will finish with a look forwards to suggest ways of integrating ideas and approaches, resources and methods across research disciplines.

  5. Aircraft Landing Gear, Ice and Rain Control Systems (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame):9067.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with operation, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of aircraft landing gear, ice and rain control systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe…

  6. 76 FR 1629 - Public Land Order No. 7757; Withdrawal of National Forest System Land for the Big Ice Cave; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... States mining laws for a period of 20 years on behalf of the United States Forest Service to protect the Big Ice Cave, its subterranean water supply, and Federal improvements. The land has been and will remain open to such forms of disposition as may by law be made of National Forest System land and...

  7. Modeling South Pacific Ice-Ocean Interactions in the Global Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, David M.; Jenkins, Adrian; Jacobs, Stanley S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to improve the modeling of interactions between large Antarctic ice shelves and adjacent regions of the Southern Ocean. Our larger goal is to gain a better understanding of the extent to which the ocean controls ice shelf attrition, thereby influencing the size and dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Melting and freezing under ice shelves also impacts seawater properties, regional upwelling and sinking and the larger-scale ocean circulation. Modifying an isopycnal coordinate general circulation model for use in sub-ice shelf cavities, we found that the abrupt change in water column thickness at an ice shelf front does not form a strong barrier to buoyancy-driven circulation across the front. Outflow along the ice shelf base, driven by melting of the thickest ice, is balanced by deep inflow. Substantial effort was focused on the Filchner-Ronne cavity, where other models have been applied and time-series records are available from instruments suspended beneath the ice. A model comparison indicated that observed changes in the production of High Salinity Shelf Water could have a major impact on circulation within the cavity. This water propagates into the cavity with an asymmetric seasonal signal that has similar phasing and shape in the model and observations, and can be related to winter production at the sea surface. Even remote parts of the sub-ice shelf cavity are impacted by external forcing on sub-annual time scales. This shows that cavity circulations and products, and therefore cavity shape, will respond to interannual variability in sea ice production and longer-term climate change. The isopycnal model gives generally lower net melt rates than have been obtained from other models and oceanographic data, perhaps due to its boundary layer formulation, or the lack of tidal forcing. Work continues on a manuscript describing the Ross cavity results.

  8. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  9. Cryogenic Property Measurements on Icy Compositions with Application to Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Barmatz, M.; Mitchell, K.

    2007-08-01

    grains). Post-synthesis microstructural characterization will be performed using Cryogenic Optical Microscopy integrating a cross-polarizer to analyze thin sections, and a Cryogenic Scanning Electron Microscope. Mechanical property measurements on solid specimens will be performed between 80 and 270 K with a cryogenically cooled Instron measurement system. Compression measurements will be conducted as a function of temperature, strain-rate, microstructural length scale and orientation. The time dependent viscous response will be measured by performing creep measurements over the same range of temperatures. Using low-frequency cyclic loading, the dissipation factor will be measured at frequencies approaching satellite orbital frequencies. We will report preliminary mechanical property measurements of Antarctic glacial specimens at cryogenic temperatures. Fluids. In order to improve our understanding of effusive cryovolcanism, the rheological properties of liquid and mixed (slurry) materials will be measured between 80 and 300 K using a cryogenically cooled Brookfield rotational rheometer. We will report preliminary measurements of the temperature dependence of the viscous response for several compositions in the Methanol-Water System. Also, we will describe an experiment designed to measure methane wetting on water ice. These experiments will be carried out in order to explore the effects of the presence of methane lakes on Titan's surface. We are developing the capability to investigate more complex materials relevant to surface processes on Titan, including methane-ethane phase studies, hydrocarbons such as acetylene and benzene, as well as tholins and clathrates, which should exhibit a range of rheological and mechanical properties from fast-moving fluids to glacial creep. Acknowledgements: Most of the research described in this presentation was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National

  10. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  11. A System of Conservative Regridding for Ice-Atmosphere Coupling in a General Circulation Model (GCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R.; Nowicki, S.; Kelley, M.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    The method of elevation classes, in which the ice surface model is run at multiple elevations within each grid cell, has proven to be a useful way for a low-resolution atmosphere inside a general circulation model (GCM) to produce high-resolution downscaled surface mass balance fields for use in one-way studies coupling atmospheres and ice flow models. Past uses of elevation classes have failed to conserve mass and energy because the transformation used to regrid to the atmosphere was inconsistent with the transformation used to downscale to the ice model. This would cause problems for two-way coupling. A strategy that resolves this conservation issue has been designed and is presented here. The approach identifies three grids between which data must be regridded and five transformations between those grids required by a typical coupled atmosphere-ice flow model. This paper develops a theoretical framework for the problem and shows how each of these transformations may be achieved in a consistent, conservative manner. These transformations are implemented in Glint2, a library used to couple atmosphere models with ice models. Source code and documentation are available for download. Confounding real-world issues are discussed, including the use of projections for ice modeling, how to handle dynamically changing ice geometry, and modifications required for finite element ice models.

  12. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  13. Proceedings of the Airframe Icing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Ron O. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history of working with its partners towards the understanding of ice accretion formation and its associated degradation of aerodynamic performance. The June 9, 2009, Airframe Icing Workshop held at GRC provided an opportunity to examine the current NASA airframe icing research program and to dialogue on remaining and emerging airframe icing issues and research with the external community. Some of the airframe icing gaps identified included, but are not limited to, ice accretion simulation enhancements, three-dimensional benchmark icing database development, three-dimensional iced aerodynamics modeling, and technology development for a smart icing system.

  14. Experimental study of performance degradation of a rotating system in the NASA Lewis RC icing tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Helicopter Icing Consortium (HIC) conducted one of the first U.S. tests of a heavily instrumented model in the controlled environment of a refrigerated tunnel. In the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA LeRC, ice was accreted on the main rotor blade of the BMTR-1 Sikorsky model helicopter under a variety of environmental conditions, such that liquid water content (LWC) and volume mean droplet diameter (VMD) ranges reflected the Federal Aviation Agency and Department of Defence icing condition envelopes. This report gives the correlated results of the data provided by NASA LeRC. The method of statistical analysis is discussed. Lift, thrust, and torque coefficients are presented as a function of icing time, as correlated with changes in ambient temperature, LWC, and VMD. The physical significance of these forces is discussed.

  15. Climate Data Records (CDRs) for Ice Motion and Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschudi, M. A.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J. A.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Climate Data Records (CDRs) for remotely-sensed Arctic sea ice motion and sea ice age are under development by our group at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The ice motion product, archived at NSIDC, has a considerable history of use, while sea ice age is a relatively new product. Our technique to estimate sea ice motion utilizes images from SSM/I, as well as SMMR and the series of AVHRR sensors to estimate the daily motion of ice parcels. This method is augmented by incorporating ice motion observations from the network of drifting buoys deployed as part of the International Arctic Buoy Program. Our technique to calculate ice age relies on following the actual age of the ice for each ice parcel, categorizing the parcel as first-year ice, second-year, ice, etc. based on how many summer melt seasons the ice parcel survives. Both of these research-grade products have been interpolated onto 25x25 km grid points spanning the entire Arctic Ocean using the Equal-Area Scalable Earth (EASE) grid. Datasets generated from this program have shown that the Arctic ice cover has experienced a significant (> 70%) decline in multiyear ice over the last 20 years, leaving a younger ice cover in 2011. By comparing ice age derived by the Lagrangian tracking method to ice thickness estimated by Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data, it is observed that ice age is linearly related to ice thickness, up to an age of 10 years. Therefore, the shift in dominance of multiyear ice to first-year ice relates to a significant thinning of the ice. This thinning is estimated to correspond to a 40% reduction in ice volume in the last 20 years. An ancillary dataset (APP-X) produced by the University of Wisconsin, Madison has been combined with the ice motion product to monitor the properties of the sea ice parcels tracked by the ice motion product. This dataset includes ice surface and 2-meter air temperature, albedo, downwelling shortwave

  16. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  17. Ice fog and light snow measurements using a high resolution camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, measurements collected by the ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe employed during FRAM (Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling) project for the Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada are analysed to study small ice crystal impact on aviation operations. Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow form during cold weather conditions and they affect aviation operations through visibility and deposition over the surfaces. In addition, these events influence the local heat budget through radiative cooling. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models and this can only be done using accurate measurements from ground-based instrumentation. Imaging of ice particles' properties can complement other in-situ measurements being collected routinely. The newly developed ICI probe, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, is presented here. The ICI probe samples ice particles through a vertical inlet, where a laser beam and photodetector detect ice crystals contained in the flow. The detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution between 10 to 1000 micron size range. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing for measurements are triggered by the photodetector. The results suggested that the majority of ice particles during the two-month long campaign were small with sizes between 300 μm and 800 μm. During ice fog events, the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm. In this presentation, challenges and issues related to small ice crystals are described and their importance for aviation operations and climate change are discussed.

  18. Distinct Seasonal Velocity Patterns Based on Ice-Sheet-Wide Analysis of Greenland Outlet Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, T. A.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Usher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet increased significantly over the last several decades and current mass losses of 260-380 Gt ice/yr contribute 0.7-1.1 mm/yr to global sea-level rise. Greenland mass loss includes ice discharge via marine-terminating outlet glaciers and surface meltwater runoff, the former now making up a third to a half of total ice loss. The magnitude of ice discharge depends in part on ice-flow speed, which has broadly increased since 2000 but varies locally, regionally, and from year to year. Research on a limited set of Greenland glaciers also shows that speeds vary seasonally. However, for much of the west, northwest, and southeast coasts where ice loss is increasing most rapidly, there are few or no records of seasonal velocity variation. Ice velocity is influenced by several key components of the ice-sheet-ocean-climate system: subglacial environment, surface melt and runoff, and ice-ocean interaction at the ice-front (terminus). Thus, knowledge of seasonal velocity patterns is important for predicting annual ice discharge, understanding the effects of increased surface melt on total mass loss, and establishing how ice-flow responds to other climatic changes. We developed 5-year records of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 glaciers around the ice-sheet margin. Among glaciers with significant speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position, with seasonal summer speedup sustained through fall. The other two patterns appear to be meltwater controlled and indicate regional differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. These differences in dominant velocity control mechanisms reveal likely spatiotemporal variations in the dynamic response of the ice sheet to climate change.

  19. Exploring Ice-Covered Waters with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, A.; Forrest, A.; Laval, B.

    2009-12-01

    Reductions in lake- and sea-ice extent and ice-shelf collapse in both the Arctic and Antarctic are exposing underlying waters to significant increases in light and heat penetration, altering water mass properties and current dynamics. These physical changes likely drive rapid biological evolution and succession in associated marine ecosystems, influencing the biogeochemical transformation of matter and energy in previously ice-covered waters. However the unaltered, or pristine state of waters covered by thick (>3m) or moving ice is poorly understood, as these environments are largely inaccessible to investigation from the surface. Advancement of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology now allows these vehicles to be utilized as platforms for polar oceanographic research, permitting exploration of previously uncharted ice-covered waters. UBC-Gavia, a 2.5 m long AUV operated out of the University of British Columbia, has been involved in several under-ice (both lake and sea) missions making it one of the few such vehicles to be successfully deployed under-ice. Results of three under-ice case studies are presented in this work: Pavilion Lake, Canada - an ice-covered temperate lake; Lake Thingvallavatn, Iceland - a subarctic lake experiencing spring ice break-up; and Joliffe Bay, Lincoln Sea, Canadian High Arctic - a near shore multi- and first-year sea ice environment. The focus of each of these case studies was to examine physical processes in the water column under ice (e.g. radiatively driven convection) using a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) profiler mounted on the front of the vehicle. In addition, various engineering lessons were acquired in order to adapt the vehicle for deployment, operation and recovery in ice-covered waters. The next phase of research will also be presented; a planned deployment of UBC-Gavia near the McMurdo Ice Shelf in Antarctica, to map under ice structure, ice thickness and convective processes in the water column. These

  20. NASA's rotorcraft icing research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.; Miller, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available icing technology to support the needs and requirements of industry for all weather aircraft designs. While a majority of the technology being developed is viewed to be generic (i.e., appropriate to all vehicle classes), vehicle specific emphasis is being placed on the helicopter due to its unique icing problems. In particular, some of the considerations for rotorcraft icing are indicated. The NASA icing research program emphasizes technology development in two key areas: ice protection concepts and icing simulation (analytical and experimental). The NASA research efforts related to rotorcraft icing in these two technology areas will be reviewed.

  1. Applying the revenge system to the criminal justice system and jury decision-making.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Murray, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    McCullough et al. propose an evolved cognitive revenge system which imposes retaliatory costs on aggressors. They distinguish between this and other forms of punishment (e.g., those administered by judges) which are not underpinned by a specifically designed evolutionary mechanism. Here we outline mechanisms and circumstances through which the revenge system might nonetheless infiltrate decision-making within the criminal justice system.

  2. A snow and ice melt seasonal prediction modelling system for Alpine reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Kristian; Oesterle, Felix; Hanzer, Florian; Schöber, Johannes; Huttenlau, Matthias; Strasser, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    The timing and the volume of snow and ice melt in Alpine catchments are crucial for management operations of reservoirs and hydropower generation. Moreover, a sustainable reservoir operation through reservoir storage and flow control as part of flood risk management is important for downstream communities. Forecast systems typically provide predictions for a few days in advance. Reservoir operators would benefit if lead times could be extended in order to optimise the reservoir management. Current seasonal prediction products such as the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) enable seasonal forecasts up to nine months in advance, with of course decreasing accuracy as lead-time increases. We present a coupled seasonal prediction modelling system that runs at monthly time steps for a small catchment in the Austrian Alps (Gepatschalm). Meteorological forecasts are obtained from the CFSv2 model. Subsequently, these data are downscaled to the Alpine Water balance And Runoff Estimation model AWARE running at monthly time step. Initial conditions are obtained using the physically based, hydro-climatological snow model AMUNDSEN that predicts hourly fields of snow water equivalent and snowmelt at a regular grid with 50 m spacing. Reservoir inflow is calculated taking into account various runs of the CFSv2 model. These simulations are compared with observed inflow volumes for the melting and accumulation period 2015.

  3. Kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula

    Spin ice in magnetic pyrochlore oxides is a peculiar magnetic state. Like ordinary water ice, these materials are in apparent violation with the third law of thermodynamics, which dictates that the entropy of a system in thermal equilibrium vanishes as its temperature approaches absolute zero. In ice, a "zero-point" entropy is retained down to low temperatures thanks to a high number of low-energy positions of hydrogen ions associated with the Bernal-Fowler ice-rules. Spins in pyrochlore oxides Ho2Ti 2O7 and Dy2Ti2O7 exhibit a similar degeneracy of ground states and thus also have a sizable zero-point entropy. A recent discovery of excitations carrying magnetic charges in pyrochlore spin ice adds another interesting dimension to these magnets. This thesis is devoted to a theoretical study of a two-dimensional version of spin ice whose spins reside on kagome, a lattice of corner-sharing triangles. It covers two aspects of this frustrated classical spin system: the dynamics of artificial spin ice in a network of magnetic nanowires and the thermodynamics of crystalline spin ice. Magnetization dynamics in artificial spin ice is mediated by the emission, propagation and absorption of domain walls in magnetic nanowires. The dynamics shows signs of self-organized behavior such as avalanches. The theoretical model compares favorably to recent experiments. The thermodynamics of the microscopic version of spin ice on kagome is examined through analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The results show that, in addition to the high-temperature paramagnetic phase and the low-temperature phase with magnetic order, spin ice on kagome may have an intermediate phase with fluctuating spins and ordered magnetic charges. This work is concluded with a calculation of the entropy of kagome spin ice at zero temperature when one of the sublattices is pinned by an applied magnetic field and the system breaks up into independent spin chains, a case of dimensional reduction.

  4. In vitro toxicities of experimental jet fuel system ice-inhibiting agents.

    PubMed

    Geiss, K T; Frazier, J M

    2001-07-01

    One research emphasis within the Department of Defense has been to seek the replacement of operational compounds with alternatives that pose less potential risk to human and ecological systems. Alternatives to glycol ethers, such as diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (M-DE), were investigated for use as jet fuel system ice-inhibiting agents (FSIIs). This group of chemicals includes three derivatives of 1,3-dioxolane-4-methanol (M-1, M-2, and M-3) and a 1,3-dioxane (M-27). In addition, M-DE was evaluated as a reference compound. Our approach was to implement an in vitro test battery based on primary rat hepatocyte cultures to perform initial toxicity evaluations. Hepatocytes were exposed to experimental chemicals (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM dosages) for periods up to 24 h. Samples were assayed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, MTT dye reduction activity, glutathione level, and rate of protein synthesis as indicators of toxicity. Of the compounds tested, M-1, especially at the 10-mM dose, appeared to be more potent than the other chemicals, as measured by these toxicity assays. M-DE, the current FSII, elicited little response in the toxicity assays. Although some variations in toxicity were observed at the 10-mM dose, the in vitro toxicities of the chemicals tested (except for M-1) were not considerably greater than that of M-DE.

  5. Effects of cold therapy in the treatment of mandibular angle fractures: hilotherm system vs ice bag.

    PubMed

    Barca, Ida; Colangeli, Walter; Cristofaro, Maria Giulia; Giudice, Amerigo; Giofrè, Elio; Varano, Anna; Giudice, Mario

    2016-06-18

    La crioterapia dopo interventi di chirurgia maxillo-facciale è una metodica comunemente utilizzata sia a fini analgesici che di riduzione dell’edema e dell’ecchimosi dei tessuti molli. Hilotherapy è costituito da un’unità mobile elettrica refrigerante dotata di un termostato digitale regolabile e da un circuito chiuso di acqua distillata refrigerata che scorre all’interno di collettori e di maschere in gomma specificatamente conformate per i distretti anatomici del massiccio facciale. Abbiamo selezionato 40 pz affetti da frattura unifocale di angolo mandibolare e suddivisi in 2 gruppi, crioterapia con ice-bag (gruppo A) e Hiloterapy System (Gruppo B); entrambi sottoposti a medesimo trattamento farmacologico di base (antibiotico-antiedemigeno-antidolorifico). L’analisi dei dati ha dimostrato come l’utilizzo dell’Hiloterapy System nel post-operatorio per 48 ore a temperatura modulata ha garantito un più rapido decremento dell’edema dei tessuti molli e un miglior controllo del dolore, con conseguente minor richiesta di farmaci anti-infiammatori ed anti-dolorifici, rispetto al gruppo A.

  6. How Activity Systems Evolve: Making / Saving Salmon in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yew-Jin; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the history of a state-sponsored salmon enhancement project in British Columbia and to explicate the development of the former using cultural historical activity theory. We make thematic the notion of inner contradictions, which express themselves outwardly as a function of both quantitative and…

  7. neXtSIM: a new Lagrangian sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampal, Pierre; Bouillon, Sylvain; Ólason, Einar; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover has changed drastically over the last decades. Associated with these changes is a shift in dynamical regime seen by an increase of extreme fracturing events and an acceleration of sea ice drift. The highly non-linear dynamical response of sea ice to external forcing makes modelling these changes and the future evolution of Arctic sea ice a challenge for current models. It is, however, increasingly important that this challenge be better met, both because of the important role of sea ice in the climate system and because of the steady increase of industrial operations in the Arctic. In this paper we present a new dynamical/thermodynamical sea ice model called neXtSIM that is designed to address this challenge. neXtSIM is a continuous and fully Lagrangian model, whose momentum equation is discretised with the finite-element method. In this model, sea ice physics are driven by the combination of two core components: a model for sea ice dynamics built on a mechanical framework using an elasto-brittle rheology, and a model for sea ice thermodynamics providing damage healing for the mechanical framework. The evaluation of the model performance for the Arctic is presented for the period September 2007 to October 2008 and shows that observed multi-scale statistical properties of sea ice drift and deformation are well captured as well as the seasonal cycles of ice volume, area, and extent. These results show that neXtSIM is an appropriate tool for simulating sea ice over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  8. How and when to terminate the Pleistocene ice ages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kawamura, K.; Takahashi, K.; Raymo, M. E.; Okuno, J.; Blatter, H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change with wax and wane of large Northern Hemisphere ice sheet occurred in the past 800 thousand years characterized by 100 thousand year cycle with a large amplitude of sawtooth pattern, following a transition from a period of 40 thousand years cycle with small amplitude of ice sheet change at about 1 million years ago. Although the importance of insolation as the ultimate driver is now appreciated, the mechanism what determines timing and strength of terminations are far from clearly understood. Here we show, using comprehensive climate and ice-sheet models, that insolation and internal feedbacks between the climate, the ice sheets and the lithosphere-asthenosphere system explain the 100,000-year periodicity. The responses of equilibrium states of ice sheets to summer insolation show hysteresis, with the shape and position of the hysteresis loop playing a key part in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that after inception of the ice sheet, its mass balance remains mostly positive through several precession cycles, whose amplitudes decrease towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to make the mass balance negative. Therefore, once a large ice sheet is established, a moderate increase in insolation is sufficient to trigger a negative mass balance, leading to an almost complete retreat of the ice sheet within several thousand years. We discuss further the mechanism which determine the timing of ice age terminations by examining the role of astronomical forcing and change of atmospheric carbon dioxide contents through sensitivity experiments and comparison of several ice age cycles with different settings of astronomical forcings.

  9. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  10. Academic Airframe Icing Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Mike; Rothmayer, Alric; Thompson, David

    2009-01-01

    2-D ice accretion and aerodynamics reasonably well understood for engineering applications To significantly improve our current capabilities we need to understand 3-D: a) Important ice accretion physics and modeling not well understood in 3-D; and b) Aerodynamics unsteady and 3-D especially near stall. Larger systems issues important and require multidisciplinary team approach

  11. Models of governance in multihospital systems. Implications for hospital and system-level decision-making.

    PubMed

    Morlock, L L; Alexander, J A

    1986-12-01

    This study utilizes data from a national survey of 159 multihospital systems in order to describe the types of governance structures currently being utilized, and to compare the policy making process for various types of decisions in systems with different approaches to governance. Survey results indicate that multihospital systems most often use one of three governance models. Forty-one percent of the systems (including 33% of system hospitals) use a parent holding company model in which there is a system-wide corporate governing board and separate governing boards for each member hospital. Twenty-two percent of systems in the sample (but 47% of all system hospitals) utilize what we have termed a modified parent holding company model in which there is one system-wide governing board, but advisory boards are substituted for governing boards at the local hospital level. Twenty-three percent of the sampled systems (including 11% of system hospitals) use a corporate model in which there is one system-wide governing board but no other governing or advisory boards at either the divisional, regional or local hospital levels. A comparison of systems using these three governance approaches found significant variation in terms of system size, ownership and the geographic proximity of member hospitals. In order to examine the relationship between alternative approaches to governance and patterns of decision-making, the three model types were compared with respect to the percentages of systems reporting that local boards, corporate management and/or system-wide corporate boards have responsibility for decision-making in a number of specific issue areas. Study results indicate that, regardless of model type, corporate boards are most likely to have responsibility for decisions regarding the transfer, pledging and sale of assets; the formation of new companies; purchase of assets greater than $100,000; changes in hospital bylaws; and the appointment of local board members. In

  12. Piloted Simulation to Evaluate the Utility of a Real Time Envelope Protection System for Mitigating In-Flight Icing Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranaudo, Richard J.; Martos, Borja; Norton, Bill W.; Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The utility of the Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system for mitigating a potentially hazardous icing condition was evaluated by 29 pilots using the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). ICEPro provides real time envelope protection cues and alerting messages on pilot displays. The pilots participating in this test were divided into two groups; a control group using baseline displays without ICEPro, and an experimental group using ICEPro driven display cueing. Each group flew identical precision approach and missed approach procedures with a simulated failure case icing condition. Pilot performance, workload, and survey questionnaires were collected for both groups of pilots. Results showed that real time assessment cues were effective in reducing the number of potentially hazardous upset events and in lessening exposure to loss of control following an incipient upset condition. Pilot workload with the added ICEPro displays was not measurably affected, but pilot opinion surveys showed that real time cueing greatly improved their situation awareness of a hazardous aircraft state.

  13. Two-way coupled ice sheet-earth system simulations: Consequences of raising CO2 concentration for Greenland and the interacting climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodehacke, Christian; Vizcaino, Miren; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The observed distinct warming in the Arctic and the northward flow of tropical water masses seem to trigger enhanced melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which adds more fresh water into the ambient ocean. A continuation of the observed accelerated melting during the last decade would stabilize the water column in the adjacent deep water formation sides. With our fully coupled ice sheet-earth system model we approach the questions if this weakens the formation of deep water masses and reduces the thermohaline driven meridional overturning circulation (MOC). We have performed idealized future projections to investigate the response of the interaction under raising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration with our two-way coupled ice sheet-earth system model system. We will present the building blocks of our fully coupled system, which includes a physical based calculation of the ice sheet's surface mass balance and ice sheet-ocean interaction; The ESM instead is subject to orographic changes and receives fresh water fluxes, for example. Since the behavior of an ice sheet in the near future is controlled by both the external forcing and by its initial conditions, we have performed Latin Hyper Cube (LHC) simulations with the ice sheet model over more than one glacial-interglacial cycle utilizing standard techniques to obtain a reasonable initial state. According to several quantities the best performing LHC member is exposed afterwards to boundary conditions determined from energy balance calculations again obtained from simulated forcing fields. Finally the fully coupled system is brought into a quasi-equilibrium under pre-industrial conditions before idealized scenarios have been started. In contrast to commonly used strategies, our coupled ice sheet inherits the memory of a glacial cycle simulations obtain exclusively from ESM fields. Furthermore we use a mass conserving scheme, do neither apply flux corrections nor utilize anomaly coupling. Under different CO2

  14. Energy conservation in ice skating rinks

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, B.K.; McAvoy, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    An economic and energy analysis of ice rinks was made to examine the areas in which energy could be profitably conserved. The areas where new equipment could make a major reduction in energy use are: the use of waste heat for space heating, the installation of a low emissivity false ceiling to reduce radiant heat, the use of a load cycling controller to reduce refrigeration costs, and the installation of more efficient lighting systems. Changes in rink operating procedure that could cut energy use are: higher refrigerant temperatures, thinner ice, the use of colder resurfacing water, turning the compressors and pumps off at night, and reducing ventilation.

  15. Making adaptable systems work for mission operations: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Barbara E.; Levesque, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is based on a highly adaptable multimission ground data system (MGDS) for mission operations. The goal for MGDS is to support current flight project science and engineering personnel and to meet the demands of future missions while reducing associated operations and software development costs. MGDS has become a powerful and flexible mission operations system by using a network of heterogeneous workstations, emerging open system standards, and selecting an adaptable tools-based architecture. Challenges in developing adaptable systems for mission operations and the benefits of this approach are described.

  16. Aircraft icing research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Shaw, R. J.; Olsen, W. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Research activity is described for: ice protection systems, icing instrumentation, experimental methods, analytical modeling for the above, and in flight research. The renewed interest in aircraft icing has come about because of the new need for All-Weather Helicopters and General Aviation aircraft. Because of increased fuel costs, tomorrow's Commercial Transport aircraft will also require new types of ice protection systems and better estimates of the aeropenalties caused by ice on unprotected surfaces. The physics of aircraft icing is very similar to the icing that occurs on ground structures and structures at sea; all involve droplets that freeze on the surfaces because of the cold air. Therefore all icing research groups will benefit greatly by sharing their research information.

  17. Transmission line icing measurement on photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Ma, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijin; Du, Hao; Luo, Hong; Mao, Xianyin; Tang, Min; Liu, Yawen

    2015-12-01

    Icing thickness parameter is the basic data for power sector to make decision for icing accident prevention. In this paper, a transmission line icing measurement method is proposed. It used the photogrammetry method to realize icing parameters measurement through the integration of high resolution camera, laser range finder and inertial measurement unit. Compared with traditional icing measurement method, this method is flexible and is the effective supplement of the fixed icing detection terminal. And its high accuracy measurement guarantees the reliability of the icing thickness parameters.

  18. Freezing and melting behavior of an octyl β-D-glucoside-water binary system--inhibitory effect of octyl β-D-glucoside on ice crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Asakura, Kouichi; Osanai, Shuichi

    2012-12-21

    Phase transition behavior of lyotropic liquid crystals of an octyl β-D-glucoside (OG)-water binary system during ice freezing and melting was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarizing optical microscopy (POM). Not the thermotropic, but the lyotropic phase transition due to the change of OG concentration during ice freezing and melting was observed. The concentration-temperature phase diagram of the binary system was constructed. Melting temperature of ice, T(m), lyotropic phase transition temperature, T(tr), and glass transition temperatures of unfrozen phases in the absence and presence of ice, T(g) and T(g)', were shown in the phase diagram. The phase diagram indicated that the OG aqueous system was concentrated to ca. 90-92 wt% by ice freezing and exhibited glass transition at T(g)'. An observation of the concentration-gradient specimen by the cryo-POM showed the evidence of the inhibitory effects of OG on nucleation and growth of ice crystals in the extremely high OG concentration system in which the lamellar liquid crystalline phase was formed. This study provided the importance of the influence of concentration change by ice freezing on the behaviour of the sugar-based surfactant-water system under low temperature conditions.

  19. The ISS Increments 3 and 4 Test Report: For the Active Rack Isolation System ISS Characterization Experiment (ARIS-ICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quraishi, Naveed; Allen, Jim; Bushnell, Glenn; Fialho, Ian

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of ARIS-ICE is to improve, optimize then operationally test and document the performance of the ARIS system on the International Space Station. The ICE program required testing across a full 3 increments (2 through 4). This paper represents the operational report summarizing our accomplishments through the third and fourth increment of testing. The main objectives and results of the increment two testing are discussed in The Increment two Operational Report. This report can be obtained from the ISS Payloads Office or from (http://iss-www.isc.nasa.gov/sslissapt/payofc/OZ3/ARIS.html). In summary these were to ensure the smooth and successful activation of the system and correct operational issues related to long term testing. Then the follow on increment 3 & 4 testing encompassed the majority of the on orbit performance assessments and improvements made to the ARIS system. The intent here is to report these preliminary results of the increment 3 & 4 ARIS-ICE testing as well as the ARIS system improvements made for our users and customers.

  20. Application of new GPS aircraft control/display system to topographic mapping of the Greenland ice cap

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Swift, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    NASA has completed an accurate baseline map of the elevation of the Greenland ice sheet using a scanning airborne lidar in combination with differential kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) techniques. The present plan is to reoccupy these survey lines which are spread over the major regions of the ice sheet beginning in 1997. The results are expected to provide a quantitative answer on how the ice sheet is responding to regional climatic changes. Navigation to within +-100 m of the desired track over lengths of up to 1,000 km are a requirement for the success of the program. To meet this navigational requirement, NASA developed the GPS Flight Management System (GFMS). GFMS is a PC based system that uses the real-time position update from a single GPS receiver located on the aircraft to calculate a cross-track error and generates aircraft steering commands which are converted into analog Instrument Landing System (OM) signals using an RF generator. TU GFMS also updates a cockpit display. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Evaluating Land-Atmosphere-Ocean-Sea Ice Interface Processes in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, M.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) have problems simulating climate in the Arctic region. For instance, there continues to be a wide spread in the simulations of the interannual variability and long-term trends of sea ice in the 20th century in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. Thus, there is also a wide spread in the trends in sea ice decline projected for the 21st century in the CMIP5 models. Recently, the Regional Arctic System Model version 1.0 (RASM1.0) has been developed to provide improved high-resolution simulations of the Arctic atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-land system. A major baseline for the performance of RASM is its comparison with reanalysis (that provides the lateral boundary condition to drive RASM) and with the coarser-resolution ESMs. In this presentation, we will provide such a baseline with respect to the land-atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interface processes by comparing RASM with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and three reanalysis products. First, 2-m air temperature, surface radiative and turbulent fluxes, and precipitation are compared to global datasets to assess the representation of these quantities in the models and reanalyses regionally. It is found that these quantities are generally better represented over land than over the oceans and sea ice. Then, we will further compare RASM, CESM, and reanalysis products with surface observations made at land flux towers, during northern high-latitude ship cruises over the oceans, and during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment over sea ice. In these comparisons, we will focus on both the annual and diurnal cycles. For instance, the snow versus snow-free period over land will be emphasized, because the land-atmosphere coupling mechanism differs between the two periods. The impact of radiative fluxes on the diurnal temperature errors will also be emphasized. Furthermore, our newly-developed snow depth and snow water equivalent data over several 2deg X 2

  2. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by whch scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  3. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special but not exclusive look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  4. Over Ice

    NASA Video Gallery

    All about NASA's IceBridge P-3B plane and its IceBridge retrofit. Upgraded with 21st century "special modifications", the aircraft is less a cold war relic and more like the Space Agency's Millenni...

  5. The evolution of a Pluto-like system during the migration of the ice giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Pryscilla; Giuliatti Winter, Silvia M.; Gomes, Rodney S.

    2015-01-01

    The planetary migration of the Solar System giant planets in the framework of the Nice model (Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F. [2005]. Nature 435,459-461; Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R. [2005]. Nature 435, 462-465; Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A. [2005]. Nature 435, 466-469) creates a dynamical mechanism which can be used to explain the distribution of objects currently observed in the Kuiper belt (e.g., Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Vanlaerhoven, C., Gomes, R., Tsiganis, K. [2008]. Icarus 196, 258-273). Through this mechanism the planetesimals within the disk, heliocentric distance ranging from beyond Neptune's orbit to approximately 34 AU, are delivered to the belt after a temporary eccentric phase of Uranus and Neptune's orbits. We reproduced the mechanism proposed by Levison et al. to implant bodies into the Kuiper belt. The capture of Pluto into the external 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune is associated with this gravitational scattering model. We verified the existence of several close encounters between the ice giants and the planetesimals during their outward radial migration, then we believe that the analysis of the dynamical history of the plutonian satellites during this kind of migration is important, and would provide some constrains about their place of formation - within the primordial planetesimal disk or in situ. We performed N-body simulations and recorded the trajectories of the planetesimals during close approaches with Uranus and Neptune. Close encounters with Neptune are the most common, reaching approximately 1200 in total. A Pluto similarly sized body assumed the hyperbolic trajectories of the former primordial planetesimal with respect to those giant planets. We assumed the current mutual orbital configuration and sizes for Pluto's satellites, then we found that the rate of destruction of systems similar to that of Pluto with closest approaches to Uranus or Neptune

  6. The effectiveness of ice- and Freon-based personal cooling systems during work in fully encapsulating suits in the heat.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Glenn, S P; Hudnall, J; Rice, C; Clark, S

    1991-03-01

    The use of cooling garments in conjunction with fully encapsulating suits offers the potential for reducing the heat strain for workers at hazardous waste sites and chemical emergencies. This study examined the use of ice- and Freon-based cooling garments during exercise in the heat while wearing a U.S. Coast Guard chemical response suit (CRS), a fully encapsulating, Teflon-coated, Nomex suit. Responses of nine healthy men (mean age 28.8 yr) were measured during moderate exercise at 30% of their maximal oxygen consumption in an environmental chamber maintained at 33.9 degrees C (93 degrees F) and 82% relative humidity. The four randomly assigned experimental conditions were (1) the CONTROL, consisting of a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) worn in conjunction with shorts, shirt, helmet, and shoes; (2) the CRS, consisting of the Coast Guard CRS worn with shorts, shirt, SCBA, helmet, gloves, and boots; (3) the ICE, which was identical to the CRS ensemble, with the addition of an ice and water cooling system; and (4) the FREON, which was also identical to the CRS ensemble, with the addition of a Freon-based cooling system. To the author's knowledge, this paper is the first to quantify and compare a Freon-based system with a circulating ice water system. The subjects performed repeated rest/work intervals for 45 min, followed by a 10-min recovery period. Measured physiological responses, including heart rate, skin, rectal, and axillary temperatures, were recorded at 1-min intervals during the tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The effectiveness of ice- and Freon-based personal cooling systems during work in fully encapsulating suits in the heat.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Glenn, S P; Hudnall, J; Rice, C; Clark, S

    1991-03-01

    The use of cooling garments in conjunction with fully encapsulating suits offers the potential for reducing the heat strain for workers at hazardous waste sites and chemical emergencies. This study examined the use of ice- and Freon-based cooling garments during exercise in the heat while wearing a U.S. Coast Guard chemical response suit (CRS), a fully encapsulating, Teflon-coated, Nomex suit. Responses of nine healthy men (mean age 28.8 yr) were measured during moderate exercise at 30% of their maximal oxygen consumption in an environmental chamber maintained at 33.9 degrees C (93 degrees F) and 82% relative humidity. The four randomly assigned experimental conditions were (1) the CONTROL, consisting of a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) worn in conjunction with shorts, shirt, helmet, and shoes; (2) the CRS, consisting of the Coast Guard CRS worn with shorts, shirt, SCBA, helmet, gloves, and boots; (3) the ICE, which was identical to the CRS ensemble, with the addition of an ice and water cooling system; and (4) the FREON, which was also identical to the CRS ensemble, with the addition of a Freon-based cooling system. To the author's knowledge, this paper is the first to quantify and compare a Freon-based system with a circulating ice water system. The subjects performed repeated rest/work intervals for 45 min, followed by a 10-min recovery period. Measured physiological responses, including heart rate, skin, rectal, and axillary temperatures, were recorded at 1-min intervals during the tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2028917

  8. Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS): Making the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jardins, Susan; Davis, Harry, Jr.

    An electronic performance support system (EPSS) is a computerized system designed to increase productivity by supporting the performance of the worker on demand at the time of need. This way, workers are allowed to perform with a minimum of intervention from others. Popular examples of performance support tools, or partially implemented EPSSs,…

  9. Southern Hemisphere Sea Ice and the Atmospheric Boundary Layer in a High-Resolution Simulation of the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez, A.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the horizontal resolution of the sea ice and ocean components in a global climate model has been shown to affect the extent of sea ice and the strength of atmosphere/ocean fluxes. Since existing high-resolution (0.1°) coupled simulations include a dynamical ocean, it is difficult to pinpoint how these results are influenced by the resolution of the sea ice. This project takes a closer look at the impact of sea ice resolution on ocean/atmosphere interactions in the Southern Hemisphere using the Community Earth System Model (CESM1-CAM5) in a slab ocean configuration. In this set-up, sea ice and mixed layer ocean models on a 0.1° grid (high resolution) or 1° grid (standard resolution) are coupled with atmosphere and land models run at the same 0.5° resolution. The high resolution model can produce fine scale, open water areas within the ice pack that facilitate air/sea flux exchanges and reduce the stability of the lower atmosphere in the model. Correlations between sea ice concentration and boundary layer variables will be described at different spatial scales to understand the effects of resolving small scale features. Finally, a kernel feedback analysis will be shown on a 0.1°, double CO2 run to look at the impact of sea ice resolution on the regional lapse rate feedback.

  10. Modeling and Detection of Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The accretion of ice particles in the core of commercial aircraft engines has been an ongoing aviation safety challenge. While no accidents have resulted from this phenomenon to date, numerous engine power loss events ranging from uneventful recoveries to forced landings have been recorded. As a first step to enabling mitigation strategies during ice accretion, a detection scheme must be developed that is capable of being implemented on board modern engines. In this paper, a simple detection scheme is developed and tested using a realistic engine simulation with approximate ice accretion models based on data from a compressor design tool. These accretion models are implemented as modified Low Pressure Compressor maps and have the capability to shift engine performance based on a specified level of ice blockage. Based on results from this model, it is possible to detect the accretion of ice in the engine core by observing shifts in the typical sensed engine outputs. Results are presented in which, for a 0.1 percent false positive rate, a true positive detection rate of 98 percent is achieved.

  11. Impact of the ice phase on a mesoscale convective system: Implication of cloud parameterization and cloud radiative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.N.S.; Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.; Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.

    1991-08-01

    This study attempts to provide further understanding of the effect of the ice phase on cloud ensemble features which are useful for improving GCM cumulus parameterization. In addition, cloud model results are used to diagnose the radiative properties of anvils in order to assess cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate for the future work. The heat, moisture and mass budget analyses of a simulated squall line system indicate that, at least for this type of system, the inclusion of the ice phase in the microphysics does not considerably change the net cloud heating and drying effects and the feedback on the large-scale motion. Nonetheless, its impact on the radiative properties of clouds significantly influences not only the squall line system itself, but also the larger-scale circulation due to the favorable stratification for long-lasting anvil clouds. The water budget suggests a simple methodology to parameterize the microphysical effect without considering it as a model physics module. Further application of the water budget might also be used to parameterize the cloud transport of condensates in the anvil cloud region, which allows the GCM columns to interact with each other. The findings of this study suggest that the ice phase could be ignored in the cloud parameterization in order to save significant amounts of computational resources and to simplify the model physics. More scientific effort should, however, be focused on the effect of the ice phase to further explore cloud feedback on the large-scale climate through the radiative process. The cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate will be addressed in a companion study by coupling the radiative transfer model with the cloud model. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Ion Irradiation of Ethane and Water Mixture Ice at 15 K: Implications for the Solar System and the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Fulvio, D.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2016-06-01

    Solid water has been observed on the surface of many different astronomical objects and is the dominant ice present in the universe, from the solar system (detected on the surface of some asteroids, planets and their satellites, trans-Neptunian objects [TNOs], comets, etc.) to dense cold interstellar clouds (where interstellar dust grains are covered with water-rich ices). Ethane has been detected across the solar system, from the atmosphere of the giant planets and the surface of Saturn’s satellite Titan to various comets and TNOs. To date, there were no experiments focused on icy mixtures of C2H6 and H2O exposed to ion irradiation simulating cosmic rays, a case study for many astronomical environments in which C2H6 has been detected. In this work, the radiolysis of a C2H6:H2O (2:3) ice mixture bombarded by a 40 MeV58Ni11+ ion beam is studied. The chemical evolution of the molecular species existing in the sample is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The analysis of ethane, water, and molecular products in solid phase was performed. Induced chemical reactions in C2H6:H2O ice produce 13 daughter molecular species. Their formation and dissociation cross sections are determined. Furthermore, atomic carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen budgets are determined and used to verify the stoichiometry of the most abundantly formed molecular species. The results are discussed in the view of solar system and interstellar medium chemistry. The study presented here should be regarded as a first step in laboratory works dedicated to simulate the effect of cosmic radiation on multicomponent mixtures involving C2H6 and H2O.

  13. 33 CFR 96.220 - What makes up a safety management system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What makes up a safety management system? 96.220 Section 96.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.220 What makes up a safety management system? (a)...

  14. 33 CFR 96.220 - What makes up a safety management system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What makes up a safety management system? 96.220 Section 96.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.220 What makes up a safety management system? (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 96.220 - What makes up a safety management system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What makes up a safety management system? 96.220 Section 96.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.220 What makes up a safety management system? (a)...

  16. 33 CFR 96.220 - What makes up a safety management system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What makes up a safety management system? 96.220 Section 96.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.220 What makes up a safety management system? (a)...

  17. 33 CFR 96.220 - What makes up a safety management system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What makes up a safety management system? 96.220 Section 96.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.220 What makes up a safety management system? (a)...

  18. Ice Water Path Retrieval Using Microwave and Submillimetre Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brath, Manfred; Grützun, Verena; Mendrok, Jana; Fox, Stuart; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2016-04-01

    There is an ongoing need for data on ice clouds. The ice water path as an essential climate variable is a fundamental parameter to describe ice clouds. Combined passive microwave and submillimetre wave measurements are capable to sample the size distribution of the ice particles and are sensitive to relevant particle sizes. This makes combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements useful for estimates of ice water path. Furthermore, instead of being sensitive for the upper ice column as for example for passive visible and passive infrared measurements, combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements can sample the full ice column. We developed a retrieval algorithm for ice water path based on a neural network approach using combined microwave and submillimetre wave measurements, from about 20 channels in the range between 89 GHz and 664 GHz of the electromagnetic sprectra. We trained a neural network by using 1D radiative transfer simulations which were conducted using the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). The radiative transfer simulations were fed by atmospheric profiles from a numerical weather prediction model. We will present an analysis of the retrieval. Additionally, we will present results of retrieved IWP from combined ISMAR (International SubMillimetre Airborne Radiometer) and MARSS (Microwave Airborne Radiometer Scanning System) measurements on board of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft during March 2015 over the North Atlantic.

  19. Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, William

    2012-06-19

    Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more by 2100. Although some sea-level contributions are fairly well constrained by models, others are highly uncertain. Recent studies suggest a potential large contribution ({approx}0.5 m/century) from the marine-based West Antarctic Ice Sheet, linked to changes in Southern Ocean wind stress. To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet/ocean models that do not yet exist (but are well under way). CESM is uniquely positioned to provide integrated, physics based sea-level predictions.

  20. Adaptive network models of collective decision making in swarming systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huepe, Cristián; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    We consider a class of adaptive network models where links can only be created or deleted between nodes in different states. These models provide an approximate description of a set of systems where nodes represent agents moving in physical or abstract space, the state of each node represents the agent's heading direction, and links indicate mutual awareness. We show analytically that the adaptive network description captures a phase transition to collective motion in some swarming systems, such as the Vicsek model, and that the properties of this transition are determined by the number of states (discrete heading directions) that can be accessed by each agent.

  1. Adaptive network models of collective decision making in swarming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Huepe, Cristián; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    We consider a class of adaptive network models where links can only be created or deleted between nodes in different states. These models provide an approximate description of a set of systems where nodes represent agents moving in physical or abstract space, the state of each node represents the agent's heading direction, and links indicate mutual awareness. We show analytically that the adaptive network description captures a phase transition to collective motion in some swarming systems, such as the Vicsek model, and that the properties of this transition are determined by the number of states (discrete heading directions) that can be accessed by each agent.

  2. Adaptive network models of collective decision making in swarming systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huepe, Cristián; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    We consider a class of adaptive network models where links can only be created or deleted between nodes in different states. These models provide an approximate description of a set of systems where nodes represent agents moving in physical or abstract space, the state of each node represents the agent's heading direction, and links indicate mutual awareness. We show analytically that the adaptive network description captures a phase transition to collective motion in some swarming systems, such as the Vicsek model, and that the properties of this transition are determined by the number of states (discrete heading directions) that can be accessed by each agent. PMID:27627342

  3. Making recombinant proteins in animals--different systems, different applications.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Michael K; Lacroix, Dan; Pothier, François; Sirard, Marc-André

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors represent a powerful tool to address the growing need for therapeutic recombinant proteins. The ability of transgenic animals to produce complex, biologically active recombinant proteins in an efficient and economic manner has stimulated a great deal of interest in this area. As a result, genetically modified animals of several species, expressing foreign proteins in various tissues, are currently being developed. However, the generation of transgenic animals is a cumbersome process and remains problematic in the application of this technology. The advantages and disadvantages of different transgenic systems in relation to other bioreactor systems are discussed.

  4. The volume- and surface-binding energies of ice systems containing CO, CO2, and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory-measured, temperature-dependent sticking efficiencies are presently used to derive the surface-binding energies of CO and CO2 on H2O-rich ices, with a view to determining the condensation and vaporization properties of these systems as well as to the measured energies' implications for both cometary behavior and the evolution of interstellar ices. The molecular volume and the surface binding energies are not found to be necessarily related on the basis of simple nearest-neighbor scaling in surface and bulk sites; this may be due to the physical constraints associated with matrix structure-associated physical constraints, which sometimes dominate the volume-binding energies.

  5. Geographic Information Systems: Empowering Kinds to Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Michael W., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Describes ArcView, a Geographic Information System (GIS) that enables K-12 classrooms to access electronic maps and information databases for specific communities. Presents actual applications of ArcView at an elementary school and a high school. Finds that students are using GIS technology to collect, analyze, and apply local data to real…

  6. Making Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Sustainable in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dascombe, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Spatial technologies, particularly Geographic Information Systems (GIS), have become invaluable and persuasive tools in society today. These technologies have also made their way into classrooms around the world and Australian teachers are leaders in implementing GIS technology into their classrooms. There is still a way to go in order to make…

  7. Insideout: Making Environmental Control Systems a Part of Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Z.

    1980-01-01

    A growing awareness of environmental problems and energy scarcity has led architects and engineers to reevaluate their approaches to building design. Three approaches to combining environmental control systems with design in the Department of Architecture at the University of Oregon are discussed. (MLW)

  8. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Hammer, J. M.; Morris, N. M.; Brown, E. N.; Yoon, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of advanced software engineering methods (e.g., from artificial intelligence) to aid aircraft crews in procedure selection and execution is investigated. Human problem solving in dynamic environments as effected by the human's level of knowledge of system operations is examined. Progress on the development of full scale simulation facilities is also discussed.

  9. Method of making a partial interlaminar separation composite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An interlaminar separation system for composites is disclosed a thin layer of a perforated foil film is interposed between adjacent laminae of a composite formed from prepreg tapes. Laminae adherence takes place through the perforations and a composite structure with improved physical property characteristics is produced.

  10. ON THE FORMATION OF OZONE IN SOLAR SYSTEM OXYGEN ICES EXPOSED TO HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Courtney; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2012-02-01

    Mimicking the bombardment of icy surfaces with heavy ions from solar system radiation fields, solid-phase molecular oxygen ({sup 32}O{sub 2}) and its isotope labeled analogue ({sup 36}O{sub 2}) were irradiated with monoenergetic carbon (C{sup +}), nitrogen (N{sup +}), and oxygen (O{sup +}) ions in laboratory experiments simulating the interaction of ions from the solar wind and those abundant in planetary magnetospheres. Online Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of the irradiated oxygen ices (12 K) showed that the yields of molecular ozone monomer (O{sub 3} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} molecules eV{sup -1} in {sup 32}O{sub 2}) were independent of the mass of the implanted C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and O{sup +} ions ({Phi}{sub max} = 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}). The production of oxygen atoms in the solid was observed in the mid-IR stabilized via the [O{sub 3}...O] van der Waals complex. We expand on this inference by comparing the ozone yields induced by light particles (e{sup -}, H{sup +}, and He{sup +}) to the heavy ions (C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and O{sup +}) to provide compelling evidence that the abundance of radiolytic products in an oxygen-bearing solid is primarily dependent on electronic stopping regimes, which supersedes the contribution of nuclear stopping processes irrespective of the mass of the particle irradiation in the kinetic energy regime of solar wind and magnetospheric particles.

  11. Geoengineering by cloud seeding: influence on sea ice and climate system

    SciTech Connect

    Rasch, Philip J.; Latham, John; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2009-12-18

    GCM computations using a fully coupled ocean atmosphere model indicate that increasing cloud reflectivity by seeding maritime boundary layer clouds with particles made from seawater may compensate for some of the effects on climate of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. The chosen seeding strategy (one of many possible scenarios) can restore global averages of temperature, precipitation and sea ice to present day values, but not simultaneously. The response varies nonlinearly with extent of the seeding, and geoengineering generates local changes to important climatic features. The global tradeoffs of restoring ice cover and cooling the planet must be assessed alongside the local changes to climate features.

  12. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  13. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  14. Flow and fracture of ice and ice mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    Frozen volatiles make up an important volume fraction of the low density moons of the outer solar system. Understanding the tectonic history of the surfaces of these moons, as well as the evolution of their interiors, requires knowledge of the mechanical strength of these icy materials under the appropriate planetary conditions (temperature, hydrostatic pressure, strain rate). Ongoing lab research is being conducted to measure mechanical properties of several different ices under conditions that faithfully reproduce condition both at the moons' surfaces (generally low temperature, to about 100 K, and low pressures) and in the deep interiors (warmer temperatures, pressures to thousands of atmospheres). Recent progress is reported in two different phases of the work: rheology of ices in the NH3-H2O system at temperatures and strain rates lower than ever before explored, with application to the ammonia-rich moons of Saturn and Uranus; and the water ice I yields II phase transformation, which not only applies directly to process deep in the interiors of Ganymede and Callisto, but holds implications for deep terrestrial earthquakes as well.

  15. Risk Intelligence: Making Profit from Uncertainty in Data Processing System

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiangke; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    In extreme scale data processing systems, fault tolerance is an essential and indispensable part. Proactive fault tolerance scheme (such as the speculative execution in MapReduce framework) is introduced to dramatically improve the response time of job executions when the failure becomes a norm rather than an exception. Efficient proactive fault tolerance schemes require precise knowledge on the task executions, which has been an open challenge for decades. To well address the issue, in this paper we design and implement RiskI, a profile-based prediction algorithm in conjunction with a riskaware task assignment algorithm, to accelerate task executions, taking the uncertainty nature of tasks into account. Our design demonstrates that the nature uncertainty brings not only great challenges, but also new opportunities. With a careful design, we can benefit from such uncertainties. We implement the idea in Hadoop 0.21.0 systems and the experimental results show that, compared with the traditional LATE algorithm, the response time can be improved by 46% with the same system throughput. PMID:24883392

  16. Risk intelligence: making profit from uncertainty in data processing system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Si; Liao, Xiangke; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    In extreme scale data processing systems, fault tolerance is an essential and indispensable part. Proactive fault tolerance scheme (such as the speculative execution in MapReduce framework) is introduced to dramatically improve the response time of job executions when the failure becomes a norm rather than an exception. Efficient proactive fault tolerance schemes require precise knowledge on the task executions, which has been an open challenge for decades. To well address the issue, in this paper we design and implement RiskI, a profile-based prediction algorithm in conjunction with a riskaware task assignment algorithm, to accelerate task executions, taking the uncertainty nature of tasks into account. Our design demonstrates that the nature uncertainty brings not only great challenges, but also new opportunities. With a careful design, we can benefit from such uncertainties. We implement the idea in Hadoop 0.21.0 systems and the experimental results show that, compared with the traditional LATE algorithm, the response time can be improved by 46% with the same system throughput. PMID:24883392

  17. Managing IceBridge Airborne Mission Data at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, M.; Kaminski, M. L.; Deems, J. S.; Scambos, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    Operation IceBridge (OIB) is a NASA airborne geophysical survey mission conducting laser altimetry, ice-penetrating radar profiling, gravimetry and other geophysical measurements to monitor and characterize the Earth's cryosphere. The IceBridge mission will operate from 2009 until after the launch of ICESat-II (currently planned for 2015), and provides continuity of measurements between that mission and its predecessor. Data collection sites include the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets and the sea ice pack regions of both poles. These regions include some of the most rapidly changing areas of the cryosphere. IceBridge is also collecting data in East Antarctica via the University of Texas ICECAP program and in Alaska via the University of Alaska, Fairbanks glacier mapping program. The NSIDC Distributed Active Archive Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder provides data archive and distribution support for the IceBridge mission. Our IceBridge work is based on two guiding principles: ensuring preservation of the data, and maximizing usage of the data. This broadens our work beyond the typical scope of a data archive. In addition to the necessary data management, discovery, distribution, and outreach functions, we are also developing tools that will enable broader use of the data, and integrating diverse data types to enable new science research. Researchers require expeditious access to data collected from the IceBridge missions; our archive approach balances that need with our long-term preservation goal. We have adopted a "fast-track" approach to publish data quickly after collection and make it available via FTP download. Subsequently, data sets are archived in the NASA EOSDIS ECS system, which enables data discovery and distribution with the appropriate backup, documentation, and metadata to assure its availability for future research purposes. NSIDC is designing an IceBridge data portal to allow interactive data search, exploration, and subsetting via

  18. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of satellite altimetry as valuable tool for taking quantitative sea ice monitoring beyond the traditional surface extent measurements and into estimates of sea ice thickness and volume, parameters that arc fundamental to improved understanding of polar dynamics and climate modeling. Several studies have now demonstrated the use of both microwave (ERS, Envisat/RA-2) and laser (ICESat/GLAS) satellite altimeters for determining sea ice thickness. The complexity of polar environments, however, continues to make sea ice thickness determination a complicated remote sensing task and validation studies remain essential for successful monitoring of sea ice hy satellites. One such validation effort, the Arctic Aircraft Altimeter (AAA) campaign of2006. included underflights of Envisat and ICESat north of the Canadian Archipelago using NASA's P-3 aircraft. This campaign compared Envisat and ICESat sea ice elevation measurements with high-resolution airborne elevation measurements, revealing the impact of refrozen leads on radar altimetry and ice drift on laser altimetry. Continuing this research and validation effort, the Canada Basin Sea Ice Thickness (CBSIT) experiment was completed in April 2009. CBSIT was conducted by NOAA. and NASA as part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, a gap-filling mission intended to supplement sea and land ice monitoring until the launch of NASA's ICESat-2 mission. CBIST was flown on the NASA P-3, which was equipped with a scanning laser altimeter, a Ku-band snow radar, and un updated nadir looking photo-imaging system. The CB5IT campaign consisted of two flights: an under flight of Envisat along a 1000 km track similar to that flown in 2006, and a flight through the Nares Strait up to the Lincoln Sea that included an overflight of the Danish GreenArc Ice Camp off the coast of northern Greenland. We present an examination of data collected during this campaign, comparing airborne laser altimeter measurements

  19. Making sense of scoring systems in community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    The site of care decision is one of the most important in the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Several scoring systems have been developed to predict mortality risk in CAP, and these have been applied to guide physicians about whether patients should be admitted to the hospital or to the intensive care unit (ICU). However, these tools were initially developed to predict mortality risk, and studies have demonstrated that the risk for death does not always equate with need for hospitalization or ICU care. The most widely studied scoring systems are the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and the CURB-65 (a modification of the British Thoracic Society rule). Each has advantages and limitations, with the more-complex PSI developed to identify low-mortality risk patients, and the CURB-65, which is simpler, being developed to easily identify more severely ill individuals. No scoring system can replace clinical judgement about the admission decision, and prospective studies have shown that physicians still admit at least 30-60% of low mortality risk patients when using the PSI to guide this decision. Limitations of these prognostic tools include their variable utility in the elderly, and their failure to include certain comorbidities (COPD, immune suppression) and social factors, in their calculations. The need for ICU care is also not well-defined by measuring the PSI or CURB-65, and other tools such as those developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society (IDSA/ATS) guideline committee and the SMART-COP rule may have greater utility for this purpose. In the future, measurements of serum biomarkers, such as procalcitonin, may augment the information provided by prognostic scoring tools for patients with CAP.

  20. Dual or unitary system? Two alternative models of decision making.

    PubMed

    Rustichini, Aldo

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, a lively debate in neuroeconomics has focused on what appears to be a fundamental question: Is the brain a unitary or a dual system? We are still far from a consensus view. The accumulating evidence supports both sides of the debate. A reason for the difficulty in reaching a convincing solution is that we do not yet have a clear theoretical model for either position. Here I review the basic elements and potential building blocks for such theories, using sources in large measure from classical decision theory and game theory.

  1. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, John M.; Wan, C. Yoon; Vasandani, Vijay

    1987-01-01

    The current research is focused on detection of human error and protection from its consequences. A program for monitoring pilot error by comparing pilot actions to a script was described. It dealt primarily with routine errors (slips) that occurred during checklist activity. The model to which operator actions were compared was a script. Current research is an extension along these two dimensions. The ORS fault detection aid uses a sophisticated device model rather than a script. The newer initiative, the model-based and constraint-based warning system, uses an even more sophisticated device model and is to prevent all types of error, not just slips or bad decision.

  2. Does one national prospective payment system market basket make sense?

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    For the first 4 years of Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS), one national market basket of cost weights and price proxies has been used to update payment rates. Previous evidence for a single rate is reviewed, and more recent data are presented that show definite regional differences in input price inflation, resulting in systematic gains or losses for some regions. However, as long as the Health Care Financing Administration continues to periodically update its hospital wage index, the net impact on hospitals is minor. Nevertheless, large differences in PPS-excluded hospital cost shares indicate the need for two sets of cost weights. PMID:10313084

  3. Making intelligent systems team players. A guide to developing intelligent monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Land, Sherry A.; Malin, Jane T.; Thronesberry, Carroll; Schreckenghost, Debra L.

    1995-01-01

    This reference guide for developers of intelligent monitoring systems is based on lessons learned by developers of the DEcision Support SYstem (DESSY), an expert system that monitors Space Shuttle telemetry data in real time. DESSY makes inferences about commands, state transitions, and simple failures. It performs failure detection rather than in-depth failure diagnostics. A listing of rules from DESSY and cue cards from DESSY subsystems are included to give the development community a better understanding of the selected model system. The G-2 programming tool used in developing DESSY provides an object-oriented, rule-based environment, but many of the principles in use here can be applied to any type of monitoring intelligent system. The step-by-step instructions and examples given for each stage of development are in G-2, but can be used with other development tools. This guide first defines the authors' concept of real-time monitoring systems, then tells prospective developers how to determine system requirements, how to build the system through a combined design/development process, and how to solve problems involved in working with real-time data. It explains the relationships among operational prototyping, software evolution, and the user interface. It also explains methods of testing, verification, and validation. It includes suggestions for preparing reference documentation and training users.

  4. Investigating the Biases in the Antarctic Sea Ice - Ocean System of Climate Models using Process-oriented Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, O.; Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.; Holland, P.; Uotila, P.; Zunz, V.

    2015-12-01

    Most analyses of Antarctic sea ice in simulations of the CMIP5 archive have so far been oriented towards the quantification of the disagreement between model results and sea ice observations only. Since the decomposition of those biases into distinct physical components is necessary to understand their origins, we propose here an ocean-sea ice-atmosphere integrated and process-oriented approach. Not only the biases in variables essential to the sea ice seasonal evolution are estimated regionally with regard to observations, but their contributions to the sea ice concentration budget are estimated. Following a previously developed method, the sea ice concentration balance over the autumn-winter seasons is decomposed into four terms, including the sea ice concentration change during the period of interest, advection, divergence and a residual accounting for the net contribution of thermodynamics and ice deformation. Concurrently, correlations between trends in ocean temperature at depth and trends in ice concentration are calculated directly from various model output fields (including CMIP5 models) to disentangle the role of ice-ocean interactions. Results show that the geographical patterns of all mean sea ice concentration budget terms over 1992-2005 are in qualitative agreement with the observed ones. Sea ice thermodynamic growth is maintained by horizontal divergence near the continent and in the central ice pack, whereas melting close to the ice edge is led by sea ice advection. However, significant errors in all budget terms are observed due to ice velocities that tend to be overestimated all around Antarctica in several models, leading to a relatively weak divergence in the inner ice pack and to an excessive advection in the marginal ice zone. Biases in ice drift speed and direction are ultimately related to biases in winds in all models. This method paves the way for a systematic assessment of forthcoming CMIP6 sea ice model outputs in the Southern Hemisphere.

  5. Changes in ice dynamics, elevation and mass discharge of Dinsmoor-Bombardier-Edgeworth glacier system, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehaus, Thorsten; Marinsek, Sebastián; Helm, Veit; Skvarca, Pedro; Braun, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest changing regions on Earth. The disintegration of the Larsen-A Ice Shelf in 1995 caused tributary glaciers to adjust by speeding up, surface lowering, and overall increased ice-mass discharge. In this study, we investigate the temporal variation of these changes at the Dinsmoor-Bombardier-Edgeworth glacier system by analyzing dense time series from various spaceborne and airborne Earth observation missions. Precollapse ice shelf conditions and subsequent adjustments through 2014 were covered. Our results show a response of the glacier system some months after the breakup, reaching maximum surface velocities at the glacier front of up to 8.8 m/d in 1999 and a subsequent decrease to ∼1.5 m/d in 2014. Using a dense time series of interferometrically derived TanDEM-X digital elevation models and photogrammetric data, an exponential function was fitted for the decrease in surface elevation. Elevation changes in areas below 1000 m a.s.l. amounted to at least 130 ± 15 m between 1995 and 2014, with change rates of ∼3.15 m/a between 2003 and 2008. Current change rates (2010-2014) are in the range of 1.7 m/a. Mass imbalances were computed with different scenarios of boundary conditions. The most plausible results amount to - 40.7 ± 3.9 Gt. The contribution to sea level rise was estimated to be 18.8 ± 1.8 Gt, corresponding to a 0.052 ± 0.005 mm sea level equivalent, for the period 1995-2014. Our analysis and scenario considerations revealed that major uncertainties still exist due to insufficiently accurate ice-thickness information. The second largest uncertainty in the computations was the glacier surface mass balance, which is still poorly known. Our time series analysis facilitates an improved comparison with GRACE data and as input to modeling of glacio-isostatic uplift in this region. The study contributed to a better understanding of how glacier systems adjust to ice shelf disintegration.

  6. Characterizing the Siple Coast Ice Stream System using Satellite Images, Improved Topography, and Integrated Aerogeophysical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scambos, Ted

    2003-01-01

    A technique for improving elevation maps of the polar ice sheets has been developed using AVHRR images. The technique is based on 'photoclinometry' or 'shape from shading', a technique used in the past for mapping planetary surfaces where little elevation information was available. The fundamental idea behind photoclinometry is using the brightness of imaged areas to infer their surface slope in the sun-illuminated direction. Our version of the method relies on a calibration of the images based on an existing lower-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), and then using the images to improve the input DEM resolution to the scale of the image data. Most current DEMs covering the ice sheets are based on Radar altimetry data, and have an inherent resolution of 10 to 25 km at best - although the grid scale of the DEM is often finer. These DEMs are highly accurate (to less than 1 meter); but they report the mean elevation of a broad area, thus erasing smaller features of glaciological interest. AVHRR image data, when accurately geolocated and calibrated, provides surface slope measurements (based on the pixel brightness under known lighting conditions) every approximately 1.1 km. The limitations of the technique are noisiness in the image data, small variations in the albedo of the snow surface, and the integration technique used to create an elevation field from the image-derived slopes. Our study applied the technique to several ice sheet areas having some elevation data; Greenland, the Amery Ice Shelf, the Institute Ice Stream, and the Siple Coast. For the latter, the input data set was laser-altimetry data collected under NSF's SOAR Facility (Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research) over the onset area of the Siple Coast. Over the course of the grant, the technique was greatly improved and modified, significantly improving accuracy and reducing noise from the images. Several publications resulted from the work, and a follow-on proposal to NASA has been

  7. The physics of ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Chris

    2003-05-01

    Almost everybody likes ice cream, so it can provide an excellent vehicle for discussing and demonstrating a variety of physical phenomena, such as Newton's law of cooling, Boyle's law and the relationship between microstructure and macroscopic properties (e.g. Young's modulus). Furthermore, a demonstration of freezing point depression can be used to make ice cream in the classroom!

  8. American juvenile justice system: history in the making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Aaron; Segal, Roland; Boden, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The original theory behind separating juvenile offenders from adult offenders was to provide care and direction for youngsters instead of isolation and punishment. This idea took hold in the 19th century and became mainstream by the early 20th century. In the 1950s and 1960s, public concern grew because of a perceived lack of effectiveness and lack of rights. The Supreme Court made a series of rulings solidifying juvenile rights including the right to receive notice of charges, the right to have an attorney and the right to have charges proven beyond a reasonable doubt. In the 1980s, the public view was that the juvenile court system was too lenient and that juvenile crimes were on the rise. In the 1990s, many states passed punitive laws, including mandatory sentencing and blanket transfers to adult courts for certain crimes. As a result, the pendulum is now swinging back toward the middle from rehabilitation toward punishment. PMID:23843574

  9. Match-making for posaconazole through systems thinking.

    PubMed

    Fügi, Matthias A; Kaiser, Marcel; Tanner, Marcel; Schneiter, Roger; Mäser, Pascal; Guan, Xue Li

    2015-02-01

    Currently available drugs for Chagas' disease are limited by toxicity and low efficacy in the chronic stage. Posaconazole, the most advanced new anti-chagasic drug candidate, did not fully confirm its initial potential in a Phase II clinical trial for chronic Chagas' disease. Given that posaconazole is highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro, and was very well tolerated in clinical trials, it should not be abandoned. Rather, a combination therapy may provide a highly promising outlook. Systems-scale approaches facilitate the hunt for a combination partner for posaconazole, which acts by blocking sterol biosynthesis. Mounting evidence suggests the functional interactions between sterols and sphingolipids in vivo. Here, we propose combining sterol and sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors to advance drug development in Chagas' disease. PMID:25486978

  10. Coated armor system and process for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Henry S.; Lillo, Thomas M.; McHugh, Kevin M.

    2010-11-23

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  11. American juvenile justice system: history in the making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Aaron; Segal, Roland; Boden, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The original theory behind separating juvenile offenders from adult offenders was to provide care and direction for youngsters instead of isolation and punishment. This idea took hold in the 19th century and became mainstream by the early 20th century. In the 1950s and 1960s, public concern grew because of a perceived lack of effectiveness and lack of rights. The Supreme Court made a series of rulings solidifying juvenile rights including the right to receive notice of charges, the right to have an attorney and the right to have charges proven beyond a reasonable doubt. In the 1980s, the public view was that the juvenile court system was too lenient and that juvenile crimes were on the rise. In the 1990s, many states passed punitive laws, including mandatory sentencing and blanket transfers to adult courts for certain crimes. As a result, the pendulum is now swinging back toward the middle from rehabilitation toward punishment.

  12. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  13. Arctic Sea Ice Model Sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, K. J.; Bochev, P.; Paskaleva, B.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000.

  14. The CBT Advisor: An Expert System Program for Making Decisions about CBT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg

    1985-01-01

    Discusses structure, credibility, and use of the Computer Based Training (CBT) Advisor, an expert system designed to help managers make judgements about course selection, system selection, cost/benefits, development effort, and probable success of CBT projects. (MBR)

  15. The flow history of Siple Dome and Ice Streams C and D, West Antarctica: Inferences from geophysical measurements and ice flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nereson, Nadine Ann

    1998-09-01

    Siple Dome (81.65sp° S. 148.81sp° W) is an ice ridge between Ice Streams C and D on the Siple Coast of West Antarctica. Its location near the coast and between two ice streams makes it a favorable place for the study of paleo-climate and paleo-ice-stream activity. The analyses presented in this dissertation are based on geophysical measurements made at Siple Dome in 1994 and 1996 as part of a collaborative project among the University of Washington, St. Olaf College, and the University of Colorado. The measurements were made to characterize the geometry of the dome, investigate its stability, infer possible changes in the ice stream configuration, and support an ice core paleo-climate project at the Siple Dome summit. In this dissertation, geophysical measurements are used with quasi-time-dependent ice flow models and inverse methods to infer the history of ice flow at Siple Dome and place limits on the past activity of adjacent ice streams C and D. Information about past ice flow is inferred primarily from the shapes of internal layers detected across Siple Dome from radio-echo sounding measurements. The continuity of the internal layers and the shape of a warp feature in the layer pattern at the divide suggest that Siple dome has not been over-run by ice streams over the past 10sp4 years and that the divide position has been slowly migrating northward toward Ice Stream D for the past few thousand years. Gradual thinning of the boundary between Siple Dome and a relict piece of Ice Stream C prior to its stagnation may be responsible for the divide migration. The pattern of ice thickness change across the south flank of Siple Dome, calculated from measurements of ice flow and an inferred accumulation pattern, is interpreted as a response to recent ({<}500 a) stagnation of a piece of Ice Stream C adjacent to Siple Dome. The topography of surface lineations on the Ice Stream D-side of Siple Dome indicates recent ({<}500 a) stagnation of another relict ice stream

  16. Patterns, Probabilities, and People: Making Sense of Quantitative Change in Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle Hoda; Wilensky, Uri J.

    2015-01-01

    The learning sciences community has made significant progress in understanding how people think and learn about complex systems. But less is known about how people make sense of the quantitative patterns and mathematical formalisms often used to study these systems. In this article, we make a case for attending to and supporting connections…

  17. Ice chemistry on outer solar system bodies: Carboxylic acids, nitriles, and urea detected in refractory residues produced from the UV photolysis of N{sub 2}:CH{sub 4}:CO-containing ices

    SciTech Connect

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi; Nuevo, Michel; White, Douglas W.

    2014-06-20

    Radiation processing of the surface ices of outer solar system bodies may result in the production of new chemical species even at low temperatures. Many of the smaller, more volatile molecules that are likely produced by the photolysis of these ices have been well characterized by laboratory experiments. However, the more complex refractory material formed in these experiments remains largely uncharacterized. In this work, we present a series of laboratory experiments in which low-temperature (15-20 K) N{sub 2}:CH{sub 4}:CO ices in relative proportions 100:1:1 are subjected to UV irradiation, and the resulting materials are studied with a variety of analytical techniques including infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Despite the simplicity of the reactants, these experiments result in the production of a highly complex mixture of molecules from relatively low-mass volatiles (tens of daltons) to high-mass refractory materials (hundreds of daltons). These products include various carboxylic acids, nitriles, and urea, which are also expected to be present on the surface of outer solar system bodies, including Pluto and other transneptunian objects. If these compounds occur in sufficient concentrations in the ices of outer solar system bodies, their characteristic bands may be detectable in the near-infrared spectra of these objects.

  18. Ice Chemistry on Outer Solar System Bodies: Carboxylic Acids, Nitriles, and Urea Detected in Refractory Residues Produced from the UV Photolysis of N2:CH4:CO-Containing Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi; Nuevo, Michel; White, Douglas W.

    2014-06-01

    Radiation processing of the surface ices of outer solar system bodies may result in the production of new chemical species even at low temperatures. Many of the smaller, more volatile molecules that are likely produced by the photolysis of these ices have been well characterized by laboratory experiments. However, the more complex refractory material formed in these experiments remains largely uncharacterized. In this work, we present a series of laboratory experiments in which low-temperature (15-20 K) N2:CH4:CO ices in relative proportions 100:1:1 are subjected to UV irradiation, and the resulting materials are studied with a variety of analytical techniques including infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Despite the simplicity of the reactants, these experiments result in the production of a highly complex mixture of molecules from relatively low-mass volatiles (tens of daltons) to high-mass refractory materials (hundreds of daltons). These products include various carboxylic acids, nitriles, and urea, which are also expected to be present on the surface of outer solar system bodies, including Pluto and other transneptunian objects. If these compounds occur in sufficient concentrations in the ices of outer solar system bodies, their characteristic bands may be detectable in the near-infrared spectra of these objects.

  19. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  20. Antarctic krill under sea ice: elevated abundance in a narrow band just south of ice edge.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Andrew S; Fernandes, Paul G; Brandon, Mark A; Armstrong, Frederick; Millard, Nicholas W; McPhail, Steven D; Stevenson, Peter; Pebody, Miles; Perrett, James; Squires, Mark; Bone, Douglas G; Griffiths, Gwyn

    2002-03-01

    We surveyed Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) under sea ice using the autonomous underwater vehicle Autosub-2. Krill were concentrated within a band under ice between 1 and 13 kilometers south of the ice edge. Within this band, krill densities were fivefold greater than that of open water. The under-ice environment has long been considered an important habitat for krill, but sampling difficulties have previously prevented direct observations under ice over the scale necessary for robust krill density estimation. Autosub-2 enabled us to make continuous high-resolution measurements of krill density under ice reaching 27 kilometers beyond the ice edge.

  1. Airframe Icing Research Gaps: NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark

    2009-01-01

    qCurrent Airframe Icing Technology Gaps: Development of a full 3D ice accretion simulation model. Development of an improved simulation model for SLD conditions. CFD modeling of stall behavior for ice-contaminated wings/tails. Computational methods for simulation of stability and control parameters. Analysis of thermal ice protection system performance. Quantification of 3D ice shape geometric characteristics Development of accurate ground-based simulation of SLD conditions. Development of scaling methods for SLD conditions. Development of advanced diagnostic techniques for assessment of tunnel cloud conditions. Identification of critical ice shapes for aerodynamic performance degradation. Aerodynamic scaling issues associated with testing scale model ice shape geometries. Development of altitude scaling methods for thermal ice protections systems. Development of accurate parameter identification methods. Measurement of stability and control parameters for an ice-contaminated swept wing aircraft. Creation of control law modifications to prevent loss of control during icing encounters. 3D ice shape geometries. Collection efficiency data for ice shape geometries. SLD ice shape data, in-flight and ground-based, for simulation verification. Aerodynamic performance data for 3D geometries and various icing conditions. Stability and control parameter data for iced aircraft configurations. Thermal ice protection system data for simulation validation.

  2. Analytical ice shape predictions for flight in natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Brian M.; Riley, James T.

    1988-01-01

    LEWICE is an analytical ice prediction code that has been evaluated against icing tunnel data, but on a more limited basis against flight data. Ice shapes predicted by LEWICE is compared with experimental ice shapes accreted on the NASA Lewis Icing Research Aircraft. The flight data selected for comparison includes liquid water content recorded using a hot wire device and droplet distribution data from a laser spectrometer; the ice shape is recorded using stereo photography. The main findings are as follows: (1) An equivalent sand grain roughness correlation different from that used for LEWICE tunnel comparisons must be employed to obtain satisfactory results for flight; (2) Using this correlation and making no other changes in the code, the comparisons to ice shapes accreted in flight are in general as good as the comparisons to ice shapes accreted in the tunnel (as in the case of tunnel ice shapes, agreement is least reliable for large glaze ice shapes at high angles of attack); (3) In some cases comparisons can be somewhat improved by utilizing the code so as to take account of the variation of parameters such as liquid water content, which may vary significantly in flight.

  3. Decision Support Systems and the Conflict Model of Decision Making: A Stimulus for New Computer-Assisted Careers Guidance Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, R. Malcolm

    Decision Support Systems (DSSs) are computer-based decision aids to use when making decisions which are partially amenable to rational decision-making procedures but contain elements where intuitive judgment is an essential component. In such situations, DSSs are used to improve the quality of decision-making. The DSS approach is based on Simon's…

  4. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  5. Arctic continental shelf morphology related to sea-ice zonation, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Toimil, L.; Barnes, P.

    1978-01-01

    Landsat-1 and NOAA satellite imagery for the winter 1972-1973, and a variety of ice and sea-floor data were used to study sea-ice zonation and dynamics and their relation to bottom morphology and geology on the Beaufort Sea continental shelf of arctic Alaska. In early winter the location of the boundary between undeformed fast ice and westward-drifting pack ice of the Pacific Gyre is controlled by major coastal promontories. Pronounced linear pressure- and shear-ridges, as well as hummock fields, form along this boundary and are stabilized by grounding, generally between the 10- and 20-m isobaths. Slippage along this boundary occurs intermittently at or seaward of the grounded ridges, forming new grounded ridges in a widening zone, the stamukhi zone, which by late winter extends out to the 40-m isobath. Between intermittent events along the stamukhi zone, pack-ice drift and slippage is continuous along the shelf edge, at average rates of 3-10 km/day. Whether slippage occurs along the stamukhi zone or along the shelf edge, it is restricted to a zone several hundred meters wide, and ice seaward of the slip face moves at uniform rates without discernible drag effects. A causal relationship is seen between the spatial distribution of major ice-ridge systems and offshore shoals downdrift of major coastal promontories. The shoals appear to have migrated shoreward under the influence of ice up to 400 m in the last 25 years. The sea floor seaward of these shoals within the stamukhi zone shows high ice-gouge density, large incision depths, and a high degree of disruption of internal sedimentary structures. The concentration of large ice ridges and our sea floor data in the stamukhi zone indicate that much of the available marine energy is expended here, while the inner shelf and coast, where the relatively undeformed fast ice grows, are sheltered. There is evidence that anomalies in the overall arctic shelf profile are related to sea-ice zonation, ice dynamics, and bottom

  6. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  7. Stripping with dry ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  8. Absorption Coefficients of the Methane-Nitrogen Binary Ice System: Implications for Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapa, Silvia; Grundy, W.; Tegler, S.; Bergonio, J.; Boehnhardt, H.; Barrera, L.

    2013-10-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic measurements of Pluto display methane (CH4) ice absorption bands shifted toward shorter wavelengths compared to the central wavelengths of pure CH4 obtained in the laboratory. This shift, described by Schmitt and Quirico (1992), occurs when CH4 is dissolved at low concentrations in a matrix of solid N2, and the magnitude of the shift varies from one CH4 band to another. This is the main argument behind the modeling analysis of Pluto’s spectra available in literature, employing pure CH4 and CH4 diluted at low concentrations in N2. However, the nitrogen-methane binary phase diagram generated from X-ray diffraction studies by Prokhvatilov & Yantsevich (1983) indicates that at temperatures relevant to the surfaces of icy dwarf planets, like Pluto, two phases contribute to the absorptions: methane ice saturated with nitrogen and nitrogen ice saturated with methane. No optical constants are available so far for the latter component, limiting this way the knowledge of the methane-nitrogen mixing ratio across and into the surface of Pluto and other dwarf planets. New infrared absorption coefficient spectra of CH4-I diluted in β-N2 and β-N2 diluted in CH4-I were measured at temperatures between 40 and 90 K, in the wavelength range 0.8-2.5 μm at different mixing ratios. The spectra were derived from transmission measurements of crystals grown from the liquid phase in closed cells. In particular, a systematic study of the changes in CH4:N2 mixtures spectral behavior with mixing ratio is presented for the first time, in order to understand whether the peak frequencies of the CH4-ice bands correlate with the amount of N2-ice. We report a linear trend of the blueshifts of the CH4-ice bands vs CH4 abundance. This trend varies from band to band, while it is fairly constant with temperature. These data are applied to interpret unpublished high dispersion H and K bands spectra of Pluto acquired with the NACO instrument at the ESO VLT on 27 June 2008

  9. Scrambled Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This complex area on the side of Europa which faces away from Jupiter shows several types of features which are formed by disruptions of Europa's icy crust. North is to the top of the image, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The prominent wide, dark bands are up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide and over 50 kilometers (30 miles) long. They are believed to have formed when Europa's icy crust fractured, separated and filled in with darker, 'dirtier' ice or slush from below. A relatively rare type of feature on Europa is the 15-kilometer-diameter (9.3-mile) impact crater in the lower left corner. The small number of impact craters on Europa's surface is an indication of its relatively young age. A region of chaotic terrain south of this impact crater contains crustal plates which have broken apart and rafted into new positions. Some of these 'ice rafts' are nearly 1 kilometer (about half a mile) across. Other regions of chaotic terrain are visible and indicate heating and disruption of Europa's icy crust from below. The youngest features in this scene are the long, narrow cracks in the ice which cut across all other features. One of these cracks is about 30 kilometers (18 miles) to the right of the impact crater and extends for hundreds of miles from the top to the bottom of the image.

    The image, centered near 23 degrees south latitude and 179 degrees longitude, covers an area about 240 by 215 kilometers (150 by 130 miles) across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 460 meters (500 yards) across. The image was taken as Galileo flew by Europa on March 29, 1998. The image was taken by the onboard solid state imaging system camera from an altitude of 23,000 kilometers (14,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  10. Building Confidence in the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM) with LIVVkit, the Land Ice Validation and Verification Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J. H.; Bennett, A. R.; Evans, K. J.; Worley, P.; Price, S. F.; Hoffman, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Using an ice flow model to make inferences of real world systems requires a high level of confidence in the model. Verification and validation (V&V) is a set of techniques that are used to quantify confidence and build credibility. We are developing LIVVkit (Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit), a comprehensive V&V toolkit for ice sheet models, to help scientists make robust inferences of real world systems with their models. LIVVkit is written in python, due to its wide usage throughout the scientific community and should be easily accessible to a large number of users. The toolkit provides resources for data assimilation, verification testing, validation testing, and performance evaluations. A website is created automatically which presents the testing results in a comprehensive and user-friendly way. LIVVkit allows scientists and developers to implement reusable validation tests of model applications and build confidence in their ice flow model. Currently, we are working with scientific users and developers of the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM) for the development of LIVVkit, but LIVVkit is designed to be extensible to other ice flow models.

  11. Image content engine (ICE): a system for fast image database searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brase, James M.; Poland, Douglas N.; Paglieroni, David W.; Weinert, George F.; Grant, Charles W.; Lopez, Aseneth S.; Nikolaev, Sergei

    2005-05-01

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  12. Image Content Engine (ICE): A System for Fast Image Database Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J M; Paglieroni, D W; Weinert, G F; Grant, C W; Lopez, A S; Nikolaev, S

    2005-03-22

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  13. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Development of lysozyme-combined antibacterial system to reduce sulfur dioxide and to stabilize Italian Riesling ice wine during aging process

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Han, Shun-yu; Zhang, Bo; Li, Min; Sheng, Wen-jun

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of SO2 reduction and stabilizing ice wine, a new antibacterial technique was developed and verified in order to reduce the content of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and simultaneously maintain protein stability during ice wine aging process. Hazardous bacterial strain (lactic acid bacteria, LAB) and protein stability of Italian Riesling ice wine were evaluated in terms of different amounts of lysozyme, SO2, polyphenols, and wine pH by single-factor experiments. Subsequently, a quadratic rotation-orthogonal composite design with four variables was conducted to establish the multiple linear regression model that demonstrated the influence of different treatments on synthesis score between LAB inhibition and protein stability of ice wine. The results showed that, synthesis score can be influenced by lysozyme and SO2 concentrations on an extremely significant level (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the lysozyme-combined antibacterial system, which is specially designed for ice wine aging, was optimized step by step by response surface methodology and ridge analysis. As a result, the optimal proportion should be control in ice wine as follows: 179.31 mg L−1 lysozyme, 177.14 mg L−1 SO2, 0.60 g L−1 polyphenols, and 4.01 ice wine pH. Based on this system, the normalized synthesis score between LAB inhibition and protein stability can reach the highest point 0.920. Finally, by the experiments of verification and comparison, it was indicated that lysozyme-combined antibacterial system, which was a practical and prospective method to reduce SO2 concentration and effectively prevent contamination from hazardous LAB, can be used to stabilize ice wine during aging process. PMID:26405531

  15. Ice Roughness in Short Duration SLD Icing Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Reed, Dana; Vargas, Mario; Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Ice accretion codes depend on models of roughness parameters to account for the enhanced heat transfer during the ice accretion process. While mitigating supercooled large droplet (SLD or Appendix O) icing is a significant concern for manufacturers seeking future vehicle certification due to the pending regulation, historical ice roughness studies have been performed using Appendix C icing clouds which exhibit mean volumetric diameters (MVD) much smaller than SLD clouds. Further, the historical studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness using multiple images of roughness elements. In this study, the ice roughness developed on a 21-in. NACA 0012 at 0deg angle of attack exposed to short duration SLD icing events was measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The MVD's used in the study ranged from 100 micrometer to 200 micrometers, in a 67 m/s flow, with liquid water contents of either 0.6 gm/cubic meters or 0.75 gm/cubic meters. The ice surfaces were measured using a Romer Absolute Arm laser scanning system. The roughness associated with each surface point cloud was measured using the two-dimensional self-organizing map approach developed by McClain and Kreeger (2013) resulting in statistical descriptions of the ice roughness.